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Sample records for agents including ionizing

  1. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for... Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. (a) Agents....

  2. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  3. Partially ionized plasmas, including the Third Symposium on Uranium Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, M.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals of both electrically and fission generated plasmas are discussed. Research in gaseous fuel reactors using uranium hexafluoride is described and other partially ionized plasma applications are discussed.

  4. Ionization of Atoms by Slow Heavy Particles, Including Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Roberts, B M; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2016-01-15

    Atoms and molecules can become ionized during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is a promising possible explanation for the anomalous 9σ annual modulation in the DAMA dark matter direct detection experiment [R. Bernabei et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 73, 2648 (2013)]. We demonstrate the applicability of the Born approximation for such an interaction by showing its equivalence to the semiclassical adiabatic treatment of atomic ionization by slow-moving WIMPs. Conventional wisdom has it that the ionization probability for such a process should be exponentially small. We show, however, that due to nonanalytic, cusplike behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus this suppression is removed, leading to an effective atomic structure enhancement. We also show that electron relativistic effects actually give the dominant contribution to such a process, enhancing the differential cross section by up to 1000 times.

  5. Ionization of Atoms by Slow Heavy Particles, Including Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Flambaum, V. V.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2016-01-01

    Atoms and molecules can become ionized during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is a promising possible explanation for the anomalous 9 σ annual modulation in the DAMA dark matter direct detection experiment [R. Bernabei et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 73, 2648 (2013)]. We demonstrate the applicability of the Born approximation for such an interaction by showing its equivalence to the semiclassical adiabatic treatment of atomic ionization by slow-moving WIMPs. Conventional wisdom has it that the ionization probability for such a process should be exponentially small. We show, however, that due to nonanalytic, cusplike behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus this suppression is removed, leading to an effective atomic structure enhancement. We also show that electron relativistic effects actually give the dominant contribution to such a process, enhancing the differential cross section by up to 1000 times.

  6. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of...

  7. Direct gas-phase detection of nerve and blister warfare agents utilizing active capillary plasma ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J-C; Schaer, M; P Siegenthaler, P; Zenobi, R

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasensitive direct gas-phase detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) is demonstrated utilizing active capillary plasma ionization and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Four G- agents, two V-agents and various blistering agents [including sulfur mustard (HD)] were detected directly in the gas phase with limits of detection in the low parts per trillion (ng m(-3)) range. The direct detection of HD was shown for dry carrier gas conditions, but signals vanished when humidity was present, indicating a possible direct detection of HD after sufficient gas phase pretreatment. The method provided sufficient sensitivity to monitor directly the investigated volatile CWAs way below their corresponding minimal effect dose, and in most cases even below the eight hours worker exposure concentration. In general, the ionization is very soft, with little to no in-source fragmentation. Especially for the G-agents, some dimer formation occurred at higher concentrations. This adds complexity, but also further selectivity, to the corresponding mass spectra. Our results show that the active capillary plasma ionization is a robust, sensitive, "plug and play" ambient ionization source suited (but not exclusively) to the very sensitive detection of CWAs. It has the potential to be used with portable MS instrumentation. PMID:26307710

  8. Application of Ni-63 photo and corona discharge ionization for the analysis of chemical warfare agents and toxic wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stach, J.; Adler, J.; Brodacki, M.; Doring, H.-R.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decade, advances in instrumental design and refinements in the understanding of ion molecule reactions at atmospheric pressure enabled the application of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) as a simple inexpensive and sensitive analytical method for the detection of organic trace compounds. Positive and negative gas-phase ions for ion mobility spectrometry have been produced by a variety of methods, including photo-ionization, laser multi photon ionization, surface ionization, corona discharge ionization. The most common ion source used in ion mobility spectrometry is a radioactive Ni-63 foil which is favored due to simplicity, stability, convenience, and high selectivity. If reactant ions like (H2O(n)H)(+) or (H2O(n)O2)(-) dominate in the reaction region, nearly all kinds of compounds with a given proton or electron affinity; are ionized. However, the radioactivity of the Ni-63 foil is one disadvantage of this ion source that stimulates the development and application of other ionization techniques. In this paper, we report analyses of old chemical warfare agents and toxic wastes using Bruker RAID ion mobility spectrometers. Due to the modular construction of the measuring cell, the spectrometers can be equipped with different ion sources. The combined use of Ni-63, photo- and corona discharge ionization allows the identification of different classes of chemical compounds and yields in most cases comparable results.

  9. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of agents... to: (i) Establish performance criteria for Poolers. (ii) Monitor and evaluate the financial...

  10. Direct quantification of chemical warfare agents and related compounds at low ppt levels: comparing active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization and secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-01

    A novel active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization (DBDI) technique for mass spectrometry is applied to the direct detection of 13 chemical warfare related compounds, including sarin, and compared to secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. The investigated compounds include an intact chemical warfare agent and structurally related molecules, hydrolysis products and/or precursors of highly toxic nerve agents (G-series, V-series, and "new" nerve agents), and blistering and incapacitating warfare agents. Well-defined analyte gas phase concentrations were generated by a pressure-assisted nanospray with consecutive thermal evaporation and dilution. Identification was achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The most abundant fragment ion intensity of each compound was used for quantification. For DBDI and SESI, absolute gas phase detection limits in the low ppt range (in MS/MS mode) were achieved for all compounds investigated. Although the sensitivity of both methods was comparable, the active capillary DBDI sensitivity was found to be dependent on the applied AC voltage, thus enabling direct tuning of the sensitivity and the in-source fragmentation, which may become a key feature in terms of field applicability. Our findings underline the applicability of DBDI and SESI for the direct, sensitive detection and quantification of several CWA types and their degradation products. Furthermore, they suggest the use of DBDI in combination with hand-held instruments for CWAs on-site monitoring.

  11. An X-Ray Analysis Database of Photoionization Cross Sections Including Variable Ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ping; Cohen, David H.; MacFarlane, Joseph J.; Cassinelli, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of research efforts in the following areas are discussed: review of the major theoretical and experimental data of subshell photoionization cross sections and ionization edges of atomic ions to assess the accuracy of the data, and to compile the most reliable of these data in our own database; detailed atomic physics calculations to complement the database for all ions of 17 cosmically abundant elements; reconciling the data from various sources and our own calculations; and fitting cross sections with functional approximations and incorporating these functions into a compact computer code.Also, efforts included adapting an ionization equilibrium code, tabulating results, and incorporating them into the overall program and testing the code (both ionization equilibrium and opacity codes) with existing observational data. The background and scientific applications of this work are discussed. Atomic physics cross section models and calculations are described. Calculation results are compared with available experimental data and other theoretical data. The functional approximations used for fitting cross sections are outlined and applications of the database are discussed.

  12. A generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations including ionization, dissociation and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, H.; De Jager, C.; Cuntz, M.; Lobel, A.; Achmad, L.

    1993-01-01

    For purposes of computing shocks in stellars atmospheres and winds we have developed a generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations including ionization, dissociation, radiation and related phenomena such as excitation, rotation and vibration of molecules. The new equations are given in analytical form. They are valid as long as the internal energy E, the total pressure P, and the first adiabatic coefficient gamma(sub 1) can be evaluated. However, we have not treated shock structures. In the case of non-LTE we have to employ an approximation for gamma(sub 1) because in that case no definition exists. Our new version of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations can easily be used for many purposes including ab-initio modeling. In our derivation we introduce a parameter gamma(sub H), which is definded as the ratio of the enthalpy H (sometimes called heat function w) to the internal energy E (sometimes called U). Using this parameter we solve the equations for changing mu and (d(natural log P)/d(natural log rho))(sub ad) identically equal to gamma(sub 1) on both sides of the shock. Both gamma(sub H) and gamma(sub 1), and also mu are functions of pressure P and temperature T. We present: (1) the derivation, (2) examples of gamma(sub 1) (P,T) and gamma(sub H) (P,T) which include/exclude ionization and radiation, and (3) as an example the differences in post-shock parameters as function of the pre-shock temperature for the case with ionization and without radiation.

  13. Ionization potential of {sup 9}Be calculated including nuclear motion and relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Stanke, Monika; Kedziera, Dariusz; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2007-05-15

    Variational calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions have been performed for the ground states of {sup 9}Be and {sup 9}Be{sup +} including the nuclear motion [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. An approach based on the analytical energy gradient calculated with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters was employed, leading to energies of the two systems noticeably improved over those found in the recent paper of Pachucki and Komasa [Phys. Rev. A 73, 052502 (2006)]. The non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic corrections ({alpha}=e{sup 2}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c). With those corrections and the {alpha}{sup 3} and {alpha}{sup 4} corrections taken from Pachucki and Komasa, a new value of the ionization potential (IP) of {sup 9}Be was determined. It agrees very well with the most recent experimental IP.

  14. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  15. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  16. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  17. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  18. Cooperative biological effects between ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Manti, Lorenzo; D'Arco, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), at environmentally and therapeutically relevant doses or as a result of diagnostics or accidents, causes cyto- and genotoxic damage. However, exposure to IR alone is a rare event as it occurs in spatial and temporal combination with several physico-chemical agents. Some of these are of known noxiousness, as is the case with chemical compounds at high dose, hence additive/synergistic effects can be expected or have been demonstrated. Conversely, the cellular toxicity of other agents, such as non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), is only presumed and their short- and long-term cooperation on IR-induced damage remains undetermined. In this review, we shall examine evidence in support of the interplay between spatially and/or temporally related environmentally relevant stressors. In vitro or animal-based studies as well as epidemiological surveys have generally examined the combined action of no more than a couple of known or potentially DNA-damaging agents. Moreover, most existing research mainly focused on short-term effects of combined exposures. Hence, it is important that quantitative research addresses the issue of the possible cooperation between chronic exposure to environmental trace contaminants and exposure to EMFs, examining not only the modulation of damage acutely induced by IR but also long-term genome stability.

  19. Secondary ionization of chemical warfare agent simulants: atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Wes E; Clowers, Brian H; Haigh, Paul E; Hill, Herbert H

    2003-11-15

    For the first time, the use of a traditional ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (radioactive nickel ((63)Ni) beta emission ionization) and three alternative ionization sources (electrospray ionization (ESI), secondary electrospray ionization (SESI), and electrical discharge (corona) ionization (CI)) were employed with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility orthogonal reflector time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM(tof)MS) to detect chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants from both aqueous- and gas-phase samples. For liquid-phase samples, ESI was used as the sample introduction and ionization method. For the secondary ionization (SESI, CI, and traditional (63)Ni ionization) of vapor-phase samples, two modes of sample volatilization (heated capillary and thermal desorption chamber) were investigated. Simulant reference materials, which closely mimic the characteristic chemical structures of CWA as defined and described by Schedule 1, 2, or 3 of the Chemical Warfare Convention treaty verification, were used in this study. A mixture of four G/V-type nerve simulants (dimethyl methylphosphonate, pinacolyl methylphosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and 2-(butylamino)ethanethiol) and one S-type vesicant simulant (2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide) were found in each case (sample ionization and introduction methods) to be clearly resolved using the IM(tof)MS method. In many cases, reduced mobility constants (K(o)) were determined for the first time. Ion mobility drift times, flight times, relative signal intensities, and fragmentation product signatures for each of the CWA simulants are reported for each of the methods investigated. PMID:14615983

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in prominences from numerical simulations including partial ionization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, E.; Díaz, A.; de Vicente, A.; Collados, M.; Luna, M.

    2014-05-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at a prominence-corona transition region in a non-linear regime. Our aim is to understand how the presence of neutral atoms in the prominence plasma influences the instability growth rate, as well as the evolution of velocity, magnetic field vector, and thermodynamic parameters of turbulent drops. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the instability initiated by a multi-mode perturbation at the corona-prominence interface using a single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approach including a generalized Ohm's law. The initial equilibrium configuration is purely hydrostatic and contains a homogeneous horizontal magnetic field forming an angle with the direction in which the plasma is perturbed. We analyze simulations with two different orientations of the magnetic field. For each field orientation we compare two simulations, one for the pure MHD case, and one including the ambipolar diffusion in Ohm's law (AD case). Other than that, both simulations for each field orientation are identical. The numerical results in the initial stage of the instability are compared with the analytical linear calculations. We find that the configuration is always unstable in the AD case. The growth rate of the small-scale modes in the non-linear regime is up to 50% larger in the AD case than in the purely MHD case and the average velocities of flows are a few percentage points higher. Significant drift momenta are found at the interface between the coronal and the prominence material at all stages of the instability, produced by the faster downward motion of the neutral component with respect to the ionized component. The differences in temperature of the bubbles between the ideal and non-ideal case are also significant, reaching 30%. There is an asymmetry between large rising bubbles and small-scale down flowing fingers, favoring the detection of upward velocities in observations.

  1. Simulating the 21 cm signal from reionization including non-linear ionizations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Sultan; Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionization and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionization and the resulting 21 cm power spectrum, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into our semi-numerical code, SIMFAST21, that evolves reionization on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parametrize the ionization rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion scales superlinearly with halo mass ({R_ion}∝ M_h^{1.41}), in contrast to previous assumptions. Implementing these scalings into SIMFAST21, we tune our one free parameter, the escape fraction fesc, to simultaneously reproduce recent observations of the Thomson optical depth, ionizing emissivity and volume-averaged neutral fraction by the end of reionization. This yields f_esc=4^{+7}_{-2} per cent averaged over our 0.375 h-1 Mpc cells, independent of halo mass or redshift, increasing to 6 per cent if we also constrain to match the observed z = 7 star formation rate function. Introducing superlinear Rion increases the duration of reionization and boosts small-scale 21 cm power by two to three times at intermediate phases of reionization, while inhomogeneous recombinations reduce ionized bubble sizes and suppress large-scale 21 cm power by two to three times. Gas clumping on sub-cell scales has a minimal effect on the 21 cm power. Superlinear Rion also significantly increases the median halo mass scale for ionizing photon output to ˜ 1010 M⊙, making the majority of reionizing sources more accessible to next-generation facilities. These results highlight the importance of accurately treating ionizing sources and recombinations for modelling reionization and its 21 cm power spectrum.

  2. Neutral desorption extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for fast screening sunscreen agents in cream cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinglei; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Jinghua; Hu, Zhong; Hu, Bin; Ding, Liying; Jia, Li; Chen, Huanwen

    2011-09-15

    High throughput analysis of sunscreen agents present in cream cosmetic has been demonstrated, typically 2 samples per minute, using neutral desorption extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ND-EESI-MS) without sample pretreatment. For the targeted compounds such as 4-Aminobenzoic acid and oxybenzone, ND-EESI-MS method provided linear signal responses in the range of 1-100 ppb. Limits of detection (LOD) of the method were estimated at sub-ppb levels for the analytes tested. Reasonable relative standard deviation (RSD=8.4-16.0%) was obtained as a result of 10 independent measurements for commercial cosmetics samples spiked with each individual sunscreen agents at 1-10 ppb. Acceptable recoveries were achieved in the range of 87-116% for direct analysis of commercial cream cosmetic samples. The experimental data demonstrate that ND-EESI-MS is a useful tool for high throughput screening of sunscreen agents in highly viscous cream cosmetic products, with the capability to obtain quantitative information of the analytes.

  3. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  4. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  5. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-01

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 μg/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 μg/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring. PMID:23339735

  6. Ion mobility spectrometric analysis of vaporous chemical warfare agents by the instrument with corona discharge ionization ammonia dopant ambient temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takafumi; Kishi, Shintaro; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Tachikawa, Masumi; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Nakagawa, Takao; Kitagawa, Nobuyoshi; Tokita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-03-20

    The ion mobility behavior of nineteen chemical warfare agents (7 nerve gases, 5 blister agents, 2 lachrymators, 2 blood agents, 3 choking agents) and related compounds including simulants (8 agents) and organic solvents (39) was comparably investigated by the ion mobility spectrometry instrument utilizing weak electric field linear drift tube with corona discharge ionization, ammonia doping, purified inner air drift flow circulation operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Three alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates, tabun, and four organophosphorus simulants gave the intense characteristic positive monomer-derived ion peaks and small dimer-derived ion peaks, and the later ion peaks were increased with the vapor concentrations. VX, RVX and tabun gave both characteristic positive monomer-derived ions and degradation product ions. Nitrogen mustards gave the intense characteristic positive ion peaks, and in addition distinctive negative ion peak appeared from HN3. Mustard gas, lewisite 1, o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile and 2-mercaptoethanol gave the characteristic negative ion peaks. Methylphosphonyl difluoride, 2-chloroacetophenone and 1,4-thioxane gave the characteristic ion peaks both in the positive and negative ion mode. 2-Chloroethylethylsulfide and allylisothiocyanate gave weak ion peaks. The marker ion peaks derived from two blood agents and three choking agents were very close to the reactant ion peak in negative ion mode and the respective reduced ion mobility was fluctuated. The reduced ion mobility of the CWA monomer-derived peaks were positively correlated with molecular masses among structurally similar agents such as G-type nerve gases and organophosphorus simulants; V-type nerve gases and nitrogen mustards. The slope values of the calibration plots of the peak heights of the characteristic marker ions versus the vapor concentrations are related to the detection sensitivity, and within chemical warfare agents examined the slope values for sarin, soman

  7. Ion mobility spectrometric analysis of vaporous chemical warfare agents by the instrument with corona discharge ionization ammonia dopant ambient temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takafumi; Kishi, Shintaro; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Tachikawa, Masumi; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Nakagawa, Takao; Kitagawa, Nobuyoshi; Tokita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-03-20

    The ion mobility behavior of nineteen chemical warfare agents (7 nerve gases, 5 blister agents, 2 lachrymators, 2 blood agents, 3 choking agents) and related compounds including simulants (8 agents) and organic solvents (39) was comparably investigated by the ion mobility spectrometry instrument utilizing weak electric field linear drift tube with corona discharge ionization, ammonia doping, purified inner air drift flow circulation operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Three alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates, tabun, and four organophosphorus simulants gave the intense characteristic positive monomer-derived ion peaks and small dimer-derived ion peaks, and the later ion peaks were increased with the vapor concentrations. VX, RVX and tabun gave both characteristic positive monomer-derived ions and degradation product ions. Nitrogen mustards gave the intense characteristic positive ion peaks, and in addition distinctive negative ion peak appeared from HN3. Mustard gas, lewisite 1, o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile and 2-mercaptoethanol gave the characteristic negative ion peaks. Methylphosphonyl difluoride, 2-chloroacetophenone and 1,4-thioxane gave the characteristic ion peaks both in the positive and negative ion mode. 2-Chloroethylethylsulfide and allylisothiocyanate gave weak ion peaks. The marker ion peaks derived from two blood agents and three choking agents were very close to the reactant ion peak in negative ion mode and the respective reduced ion mobility was fluctuated. The reduced ion mobility of the CWA monomer-derived peaks were positively correlated with molecular masses among structurally similar agents such as G-type nerve gases and organophosphorus simulants; V-type nerve gases and nitrogen mustards. The slope values of the calibration plots of the peak heights of the characteristic marker ions versus the vapor concentrations are related to the detection sensitivity, and within chemical warfare agents examined the slope values for sarin, soman

  8. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  9. Specificity enhancement by electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry--a valuable tool for differentiation and identification of 'V'-type chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Weissberg, Avi; Tzanani, Nitzan; Dagan, Shai

    2013-12-01

    The use of chemical warfare agents has become an issue of emerging concern. One of the challenges in analytical monitoring of the extremely toxic 'V'-type chemical weapons [O-alkyl S-(2-dialkylamino)ethyl alkylphosphonothiolates] is to distinguish and identify compounds of similar structure. MS analysis of these compounds reveals mostly fragment/product ions representing the amine-containing residue. Hence, isomers or derivatives with the same amine residue exhibit similar mass spectral patterns in both classical EI/MS and electrospray ionization-MS, leading to unavoidable ambiguity in the identification of the phosphonate moiety. A set of five 'V'-type agents, including O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX), O-isobutyl S-(2-diethylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothiolate (RVX) and O-ethyl S-(2-diethylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VM) were studied by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/MS, utilizing a QTRAP mass detector. MS/MS enhanced product ion scans and multistage MS(3) experiments were carried out. Based on the results, possible fragmentation pathways were proposed, and a method for the differentiation and identification of structural isomers and derivatives of 'V'-type chemical warfare agents was obtained. MS/MS enhanced product ion scans at various collision energies provided information-rich spectra, although many of the product ions obtained were at low abundance. Employing MS(3) experiments enhanced the selectivity for those low abundance product ions and provided spectra indicative of the different phosphonate groups. Study of the fragmentation pathways, revealing some less expected structures, was carried out and allowed the formulation of mechanistic rules and the determination of sets of ions typical of specific groups, for example, methylphosphonothiolates versus ethylphosphonothiolates. The new group-specific ions elucidated in this work are also useful for screening unknown 'V'-type agents and related

  10. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  11. Isolation and characterization of BHK cells sensitive to ionizing radiation and alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.; Horng, M.F.; Weber, M.C.; Glazier, K.G.

    1984-07-01

    A host-cell viral suicide enrichment procedure was used to isolate BHK strains sensitive to ionizing radiation. Of six strains surviving infection with irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV), three were found to be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than the parental BHK cells. Strains V1 and V2 were studied in more detail and found to exhibit hypersensitivity to ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), methyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, but not to uv radiation. Susceptibility to mutation in response to EMS was also compared in BHK and strains V1 and V2. The frequency of induction of ouabain-resistant cells was 140% of the parental strain in the case of strain V1 and 58% of the parental strain in the case of strain V2.

  12. Rapid identification of emerging infectious agents using PCR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Rangarajan; Hall, Thomas A; Massire, Christian; Li, Feng; Blyn, Lawrence B; Eshoo, Mark W; Hofstadler, Steven A; Ecker, David J

    2007-04-01

    Newly emergent infectious diseases are a global public health problem. The population dense regions of Southeast Asia are the epicenter of many emerging diseases, as evidenced by the outbreak of Nipah, SARS, avian influenza (H5N1), Dengue, and enterovirus 71 in this region in the past decade. Rapid identification, epidemiologic surveillance, and mitigation of transmission are major challenges in ensuring public health safety. Here we describe a powerful new approach for infectious disease surveillance that is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify nucleic acid targets from large groupings of organisms, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for accurate mass measurements of the PCR products, and base composition signature analysis to identify organisms in a sample. This approach is capable of automated analysis of more than 1,500 PCR reactions a day. It is applicable to the surveillance of bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal pathogens and will facilitate rapid characterization of known and emerging pathogens. PMID:17470915

  13. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a)...

  14. [Effect of antineoplastic agents and ionizing radiation on a human testicular cancer heterograft].

    PubMed

    Osieka, R; Bamberg, M; Pfeiffer, R; Glatte, P; Scherer, E; Schmidt, C G

    1985-01-01

    Chemotherapy has afforded a high percentage of definitive cures in advanced testicular cancer. Nevertheless some patients with large tumor burden still succumb to chemorefractory disease. Therefore preclinical and clinical evaluation of new drugs and agents not primarily used against this type of disease are still mandatory. For preclinical drug screening purposes heterotransplantation of specific human tumors yields a model with high validity for tumor markers and drug response. Heterotransplantation of a human embryonal testicular cancer was used for simultaneous testing of established agents such as cisplatin, melphalan, bleomycin, vinblastine, etoposide and adriamycin and some newer derivatives such as PHM or mafosfamide. Furthermore agents such as procarbazine, dacarbazine and methyl-CCNU that cross the blood-brain-barrier displayed some interesting activity. The results hint at a unique chemosensitivity pattern of the xenograft line, with some accordance between clinical response to vinblastine and bleomycin and good response of the xenografts to bleomycin but not to vinblastine. Radiotherapy was also effective against this tumor line, but there was not much difference in response when the schedule of fractionation was changed. It is concluded that a combined modality approach might salvage patients with residual, chemorefractory disease.

  15. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  16. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  17. Effect of ionizing energy on extracts of Quillaja saponaria to be used as an antimicrobial agent on irradiated edible coating for fresh strawberries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zúñiga, G. E.; Junqueira-Gonçalves, M. P.; Pizarro, M.; Contreras, R.; Tapia, A.; Silva, S.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating antimicrobial compounds into edible films or coatings provides a novel way to improve the safety and shelf life of ready-to-eat foods. Diverse studies with Quillaja saponaria Mol. (popularly named quillay) extracts have demonstrated their potential as antifungal agents against phytopathogenic fungi. Crosslinking induced by ionizing radiation is an effective method for the improvement of both barrier and mechanical properties of the edible films and coatings based on milk proteins. However there are few reports about the effects of γ-radiation on plant extracts. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 35 kGy) on extracts prepared from in vitro plants of Q. saponaria to be used as antimicrobial agent in irradiated edible coating based on calcium caseinate and whey protein isolated, and also to establish the concentration of Q. saponaria extract to be added as an antifungal agent in the coating. Gamma irradiation since 15 kGy affects negatively the antimicrobial activity and metabolites composition of extract of Q. saponaria by reducing compounds of phenolic nature. Otherwise no effect on saponins profile was observed even at higher doses. It was possible to conclude that the antifungal activity of Q. saponaria extract is mainly related to phenolic compounds content. In addition, our work also shows that to obtain an efficient antifungal protection is necessary to add a minimum concentration of 6% of the extract after the coating irradiation.

  18. Rural-urban migration including formal and informal workers in the urban sector: an agent-based numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Nilton; Oliveira, Tharnier; Silveira, Jaylson

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this work is to study rural-urban migration in the early stages of industrialization. We use an agent-based model and take into account the existence of informal and formal workers on the urban sector and possible migration movements, dependent on the agents' social and private utilities. Our agents are place on vertices of a square lattice, such that each vertex has only one agent. Rural, urban informal and urban formal workers are represented by different states of a three-state Ising model. At every step, a fraction a of the agents may change sectors or migrate. The total utility of a given agent is then calculated and compared to a random utility, in order to check if this agent turns into an actual migrant or changes sector. The dynamics is carried out until an equilibrium state is reached and equilibrium variables are then calculated and compared to available data. We find that a generalized Harris-Todaro condition is satisfied [1] on these equilibrium regimes, i.e, the ratio between expected wages between any pair of sectors reach a constant value. [4pt] [1] J. J. Silveira, A. L. Esp'indola and T. J. Penna, Physica A, 364, 445 (2006).

  19. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  20. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  1. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  2. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  3. Characterisation of "caramel-type" thermal decomposition products of selected monosaccharides including fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose and ribose by advanced electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Golon, Agnieszka; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2013-07-01

    The chemical analysis of caramel, formed upon heating of carbohydrates, remains a significant challenge due to the complexity of the resulting product mixture. Identification of the products formed upon heating of monosaccharides including fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose and ribose is essential to understand the composition and properties of carbohydrate-rich processed foods. In this work, we report on the use of combined mass spectrometry techniques, including high performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)). The composition of the obtained caramel was examined by high resolution mass spectrometry along with van Krevelen and Kendrick analysis. We found that caramel is composed of oligomers with up to six carbohydrate units formed through unselective glycosidic bond formation, their dehydrated products by losing up to eight water molecules, hydrated products and disproportionation products. An accurate mass measurement and subsequent fragment ion studies of all caramel samples (around 40 compounds) can thus be identified. Glycosidic bond and ring cleavages of sugar moieties were the major observable fragmentation pathways during this experiment. The innovative analytical strategies for the complex mixture analysis used provide a comprehensive account of the chemical composition of caramel, one of the most popular dietary materials over the world.

  4. Simultaneous determination of four anti-dandruff agents including octopirox in shampoo products by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, L

    2001-06-01

    A method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the simultaneous identification and quantitative determination of four anti-dandruff agents such as salicylic acid, ketoconazole, climbazole, octopirox in commercial anti-dandruff shampoo products. A symmetry C18 column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) was used at temperature of 35 degrees C, mobile phase with flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1) was acetonitrile: water (containing 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.0, adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) = 60 : 40 (V/V) and UV detection at 224 nm and 305 nm. Samples were extracted with mobile phase by stirring and ultrasonic method. The average recoveries of four anti-dandruff agents were 98.0-104.1%. The relative standard deviations for samples were 0.11-0.90%. The method is simple, rapid and reproducible. PMID:18498472

  5. [The approbation of technique of mass spectrometry with matrix-activated laser desorption/ionization for identification of plague agent].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, M V; Ostiak, A S; Balakhonov, S V

    2014-08-01

    The study of sampling of strains of Y. pestis of main and altaic subspecies was implemented. The modern technique of identification of microorganisms was applied using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The evaluation of biological safety of method of sampling preparation was implemented. To supplement the identification base "BioTyper" the spectrum of typical strains of Y. pestis were obtained. The enhanced identification base was used to evaluate possibilities of application of MALDI-TOF technology for identification and taxonomic differentiation of Y. pestis from other representatives of genus of Yersinia. In the process of study a complete concordance of results of mass spectrometry identification and classic cultural method was observed. On the basis of mass spectrometry characteristic of analyzed sampling the differentiation between strains of Y. pestis of subspecies pestis and strains of subspecies altaica was implemented. The study results testify the effectiveness of application of mass spectrometry analysis for reliable interspecies and intraspecific differentiation of plague agent. The simplicity and velocity of sampling preparation and implementation of analysis and low cost of active storage allow considering the MALDI-TOF technology of mass spectrometry identification as highly perspective method for laboratory diagnostic of plague agent.

  6. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  7. Development of a gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system for on-site detection of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takahiro; Kakegawa, Ken; Aida, Mari; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Seto, Yasuo; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-06-01

    A gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system was developed to realize a mobile on-site analytical device for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In this system, the plasma source was directly connected to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. The plasma can be generated with ambient air, which is drawn into the discharge region by negative pressure in the mass spectrometer. High-power density pulsed plasma of 100 kW could be generated by using a microhollow cathode and a laboratory-built high-intensity pulsed power supply (pulse width: 10-20 μs; repetition frequency: 50 Hz). CWAs were desorbed and protonated in the enclosed space adjacent to the plasma source. Protonated sample molecules were introduced to the mass spectrometer by airflow through the discharge region. To evaluate the analytical performance of this device, helium and air plasma were directly irradiated to CWAs in the gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system and the protonated molecules were analyzed by using an ion-trap mass spectrometer. A blister agent (nitrogen mustard 3) and nerve gases [cyclohexylsarin (GF), tabun (GA), and O-ethyl S-2-N,N-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX)] in solution in n-hexane were applied to the Teflon rod and used as test samples, after solvent evaporation. As a result, protonated molecules of CWAs were successfully observed as the characteristic ion peaks at m/z 204, 181, 163, and 268, respectively. In air plasma, the limits of detection were estimated to be 22, 20, 4.8, and 1.0 pmol, respectively, which were lower than those obtained with helium plasma. To achieve quantitative analysis, calibration curves were made by using CWA stimulant dipinacolyl methylphosphonate as an internal standard; straight correlation lines (R(2) = 0.9998) of the peak intensity ratios (target per internal standard) were obtained. Remarkably, GA and GF gave protonated dimer ions, and the ratios of the protonated dimer ions to the protonated

  8. Development of a gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system for on-site detection of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takahiro; Kakegawa, Ken; Aida, Mari; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Seto, Yasuo; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-06-01

    A gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system was developed to realize a mobile on-site analytical device for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In this system, the plasma source was directly connected to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. The plasma can be generated with ambient air, which is drawn into the discharge region by negative pressure in the mass spectrometer. High-power density pulsed plasma of 100 kW could be generated by using a microhollow cathode and a laboratory-built high-intensity pulsed power supply (pulse width: 10-20 μs; repetition frequency: 50 Hz). CWAs were desorbed and protonated in the enclosed space adjacent to the plasma source. Protonated sample molecules were introduced to the mass spectrometer by airflow through the discharge region. To evaluate the analytical performance of this device, helium and air plasma were directly irradiated to CWAs in the gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system and the protonated molecules were analyzed by using an ion-trap mass spectrometer. A blister agent (nitrogen mustard 3) and nerve gases [cyclohexylsarin (GF), tabun (GA), and O-ethyl S-2-N,N-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX)] in solution in n-hexane were applied to the Teflon rod and used as test samples, after solvent evaporation. As a result, protonated molecules of CWAs were successfully observed as the characteristic ion peaks at m/z 204, 181, 163, and 268, respectively. In air plasma, the limits of detection were estimated to be 22, 20, 4.8, and 1.0 pmol, respectively, which were lower than those obtained with helium plasma. To achieve quantitative analysis, calibration curves were made by using CWA stimulant dipinacolyl methylphosphonate as an internal standard; straight correlation lines (R(2) = 0.9998) of the peak intensity ratios (target per internal standard) were obtained. Remarkably, GA and GF gave protonated dimer ions, and the ratios of the protonated dimer ions to the protonated

  9. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents. PMID:19241065

  10. [Impact of biologically important anions on reactive oxygen species formation in water under the effect of non-ionizing physical agents].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Ivanov, V E; Karp, O É; Chernikov, A V; Belosludtsev, K N; Bobylev, A G; Astashev, M E; Gapeev, A B; Bruskov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The influence of biologically relevant anions (succinate, acetate, citrate, chloride, bicarbonate, hydroorthophosphate, dihydroorthophosphate, nitrite, nitrate) on the formation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals in water was studied under the effect of non-ionizing radiation: heat, laser light with a wavelength of 632.8 nm, corresponding to the maximum absorption of molecular oxygen, and electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequencies. It has been established that various anions may both inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase it. Bicarbonate and sulfate anions included in the biological fluids' and medicinal mineral waters have significant, but opposite effects on reactive oxygen species production. Different molecular mechanisms of reactive oxygen species formation are considered under the action of the investigated physical factors involving these anions, which may influence the biological processes by signal-regulatory manner and provide a healing effect in physical therapy.

  11. The alkaline single cell electrophoresis assay with eight mouse organs: results with 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Matsusaka, N; Madarame, H; Miyamae, Y; Ishida, K; Satoh, M; Sekihashi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-04-13

    The genotoxicity of 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers selected from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) groups 1, 2A, and 2B was evaluated in eight mouse organs with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) (comet) assay. Groups of four mice were treated once intraperitoneally at the dose at which micronucleus tests had been conducted, and the stomach, colon, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, brain, and bone marrow were sampled 3, 8, and/or 24 h later. All chemicals were positive in the SCGE assay in at least one organ. Of the 22 mono-functional alkylating agents, over 50% were positive in all organs except the brain and bone marrow. The two subsets of mono-functional alkylating agents differed in their bone marrow genotoxicity: only 1 of the 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines was positive in bone marrow as opposed to 8 of the 13 other alkylating agents, reflecting the fact that dialkyl N-nitrosoamines are poor micronucleus inducers in hematopoietic cells. The two groups of mono-functional alkylating agents also differ in hepatic carcinogenicity in spite of the fact that they are similar in hepatic genotoxicity. While dialkyl N-nitrosoamines produce tumors primarily in mouse liver, only one (styrene-7,8-oxide) out of 10 of the other type of mono-functional alkylating agents is a mouse hepatic carcinogen. Taking into consideration our previous results showing high concordance between hepatic genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for aromatic amines and azo compounds, a possible explanation for the discrepancy might be that chemicals that require metabolic activation show high concordance between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the liver. A high percent of the 10 DNA crosslinkers were positive in the SCGE assay in the gastrointestinal mucosa, but less than 50% were positive in the liver and lung. In this study, we allowed 10 min alkali-unwinding to obtain low and stable control values

  12. High-performance liquid chromatography of selenium compounds utilizing perfluorinated carboxylic acid ion-pairing agents and inductively coupled plasma and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Kotrebai, M; Tyson, J F; Block, E; Uden, P C

    2000-01-01

    Increasing speciation demands in clinical chemistry, toxicology and nutrition have made the determination of the total elements in a sample inadequate; the amount of an element and the chemical forms in which it is present need to be known. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used after high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation, as was electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The effect of variation of the number of carbon atoms in perfluorinated carboxylic acids used as ion-pairing agents for the separation of selenium compounds was examined. Trifluoroacetic acid (0.1%), pentafluoropropanoic acid (0.1%) or heptafluorobutanoic acid (0.1%; HFBA) were alternatively used as additives to methanol-water (1:99, v/v) solutions as mobile phases. Reversed-phase HPLC-ICP-MS with 0.1% HFBA in the mobile phase allowed more than 20 selenium compounds to be separated in 70 min in an isocratic elution mode; the separation of natural selenium-enriched sample extracts was examined and explained. The pH of the 0.1% HFBA solution was modified with hydrochloric acid or ammonia and the pH of the sample extracts before injection was modified in order to overcome unwanted double peak formation in the chromatograms of sample extracts. Oxidations of standard gamma-glutamyl-Se-methylselenocysteine and Se-methylselenocysteine were carried out using 30% H2O2 solution and identifications of selenium-containing oxidation products were made using HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS. The principal organic oxidation product in both cases was methaneseleninic acid (MeSeO2H).

  13. Clinical evaluation of a frozen commercially prepared microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents, including the new triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Huynh, H; Hollis, R J

    2002-05-01

    A commercially prepared frozen broth microdilution panel (Trek Diagnostic Systems, Westlake, Ohio) was compared with a reference microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of two quality control (QC) strains and 99 clinical isolates of Candida spp. The antifungal agents tested included amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole. Microdilution testing was performed according to NCCLS recommendations. MIC endpoints were read visually after 48 h of incubation and were assessed independently for each microdilution panel. The MICs for the QC strains were within published limits for both the reference and Trek microdilution panels. Discrepancies among MIC endpoints of no more than 2 dilutions were used to calculate the percent agreement. Acceptable levels of agreement between the Trek and reference panels were observed for all antifungal agents tested against the 99 clinical isolates. The overall agreement for each antifungal agent ranged from 96% for ravuconazole to 100% for amphotericin B. The Trek microdilution panel appears to be a viable alternative to frozen microdilution panels prepared in-house. PMID:11980944

  14. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  15. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  16. Fragmentation study of iridoid glycosides including epimers by liquid chromatography-diode array detection/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and its application in metabolic fingerprint analysis of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Hua; Wen, Jun; Fan, Guorong; Chai, Yifeng; Wu, Yutian

    2010-09-15

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS) method was applied to the characterization of ten iridoid glycosides in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, a traditional Chinese medicine. During the process of structural elucidation, two groups of isomers including two epimers were structurally characterized and differentiated according to their distinctive fragmentation patterns which were closely related to their isomeric differentiations. Subsequently, the major compounds were purified by multi-dimensional chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC and the structure identification was confirmed with NMR techniques. The major fragmentation pathways of iridoid glycosides in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis obtained through the MS data were schemed systematically, which provided the best sensitivity and specificity for characterization of the iridoid glycosides especially the isomers so far. Based on the fragmentation patterns of iridoid glycosides concluded, seven major iridoid glycosides were characterized in rat plasma after intravenous administration of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis. PMID:20740525

  17. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  18. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates.

  19. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  20. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  1. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxypyrrole) Modified Emitter Electrode for Substitution of Homogeneous Redox Buffer Agent Hydroquinone in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Peintler-Krivan, Emese; Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2010-01-01

    The electrolysis inherent to the operation of the electrospray ionization (ESI) source used with mass spectrometry (MS) is a well-known attendant effect of generating unipolar spray droplets and may affect the analysis of the analyte of interest. Undesirable electrolysis of an analyte may be prevented by limiting the emitter electrode current and/or the mass transport characteristics of the system. However, these ways to avoid analyte electrolysis may not be applcable in all ESI-MS experiments. For example, in the case of specific nanospray systems (e.g. the wire-in-a-capillary bulk-loaded or chip-based tip-loaded nanospray configurations), the solution flow rate is fixed in the 50-500 nL/min range and the electrode surface to volume ratio is large presenting a very effcient analyte to electrode mass transport configuration. In these situations, control over the interfacial potential of the working electrode via homogeneous or traditional heterogeneous (sacrificial metal) redox buffering is a possible way to prevent analyte electrolysis. However, byproducts of these redox buffering approaches can appear in the mass spectra and/or they can chemically alter the analyte. For example, the main reason for using hydroquinone as a homogeneous redox buffer, in addition to its relatively low oxidation potential, is that neither the original compound nor its oxidation product benzoquinone can be detected directly by ESI-MS. However, benzoquinone can alter analytes with thiol functional groups by reacting with those groups via a 1,4-Michael addition.

  2. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  3. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  4. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  5. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  6. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  7. Identification of chemical warfare agents from vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hisayuki; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagoya, Tomoki; Ikeda, Toru; Kurimata, Naoko; Unoke, Shohei; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    A field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Hapsite ER system) was evaluated for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the vapor phase. The system consisted of Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler (trapping time: 3s(-1)min), a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary gas chromatography column capable of raising temperatures up to 200°C, a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump for data acquisition, and a personal computer for data analysis. Sample vapors containing as little as 22μg sarin (GB), 100μg soman (GD), 210μg tabun (GA), 55μg cyclohexylsarin (GF), 4.8μg sulfur mustard, 390μg nitrogen mustard 1, 140μg of nitrogen mustard 2, 130μg nitrogen mustard 3, 120μg of 2-chloroacetophenone and 990μg of chloropicrin per cubic meter could be confirmed after Tri-Bed micro-concentration (for 1min) and automated AMDIS search within 12min. Using manual deconvolution by background subtraction of neighboring regions on the extracted ion chromatograms, the above-mentioned CWAs could be confirmed at lower concentration levels. The memory effects were also examined and we found that blister agents showed significantly more carry-over than nerve agents. Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the detection of GB and GD, raising the concentration limits for confirmation in the presence of gasoline by both AMDIS search and manual deconvolution; however, GA and GF were not subject to interference by gasoline. Lewisite 1, and o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile could also be confirmed by gas chromatography, but it was hard to quantify them. Vapors of phosgene, chlorine, and cyanogen chloride could be confirmed by direct mass spectrometric detection at concentration levels higher than 2, 140, and 10mg/m(3) respectively, by bypassing the micro-concentration trap and gas chromatographic separation. PMID:26118803

  8. Identification of chemical warfare agents from vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hisayuki; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagoya, Tomoki; Ikeda, Toru; Kurimata, Naoko; Unoke, Shohei; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    A field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Hapsite ER system) was evaluated for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the vapor phase. The system consisted of Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler (trapping time: 3s(-1)min), a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary gas chromatography column capable of raising temperatures up to 200°C, a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump for data acquisition, and a personal computer for data analysis. Sample vapors containing as little as 22μg sarin (GB), 100μg soman (GD), 210μg tabun (GA), 55μg cyclohexylsarin (GF), 4.8μg sulfur mustard, 390μg nitrogen mustard 1, 140μg of nitrogen mustard 2, 130μg nitrogen mustard 3, 120μg of 2-chloroacetophenone and 990μg of chloropicrin per cubic meter could be confirmed after Tri-Bed micro-concentration (for 1min) and automated AMDIS search within 12min. Using manual deconvolution by background subtraction of neighboring regions on the extracted ion chromatograms, the above-mentioned CWAs could be confirmed at lower concentration levels. The memory effects were also examined and we found that blister agents showed significantly more carry-over than nerve agents. Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the detection of GB and GD, raising the concentration limits for confirmation in the presence of gasoline by both AMDIS search and manual deconvolution; however, GA and GF were not subject to interference by gasoline. Lewisite 1, and o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile could also be confirmed by gas chromatography, but it was hard to quantify them. Vapors of phosgene, chlorine, and cyanogen chloride could be confirmed by direct mass spectrometric detection at concentration levels higher than 2, 140, and 10mg/m(3) respectively, by bypassing the micro-concentration trap and gas chromatographic separation.

  9. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  10. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for detection and identification of albumin phosphylation by organophosphorus pesticides and G- and V-type nerve agents.

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Breyer, Felicitas; Thumfart, Jörg Oliver; Höchstetter, Hans; Thiermann, Horst

    2010-11-01

    Toxic organophosphorus compounds (OPC), e.g., pesticides and nerve agents (NA), are known to phosphylate distinct endogenous proteins in vivo and in vitro. OPC adducts of butyrylcholinesterase and albumin are considered to be valuable biomarkers for retrospective verification of OPC exposure. Therefore, we have detected and identified novel adducts of human serum albumin (HSA) by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Pure albumin and plasma were incubated with numerous pesticides and NA of the V- and G-type in different molar ratios. Samples were prepared either by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel enzymatic cleavage using endoproteinase Glu-C (Glu-C) or by combining highly albumin-selective affinity extraction with ultrafiltration followed by reduction, carbamidomethylation, and enzymatic cleavage (Glu-C) prior to MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Characteristic mass shifts for phosphylation revealed tyrosine adducts at Y(411) (Y(401)KFQNALLVRY(411)TKKVPQVSTPTLVE(425)), Y(148) and Y(150) (I(142)ARRHPY(148)FY(150)APE(153), single and double labeled), and Y(161) (L(154)LFFAKRY(161)KAAFTE(167)) produced by original NA (tabun, sarin, soman, cyclosarin, VX, Chinese VX, and Russian VX) as well as by chlorpyrifos-oxon, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), paraoxon-ethyl (POE), and profenofos. MALDI-MS/MS of the single-labeled I(142)-E(153) peptide demonstrated that Y(150) was phosphylated with preference to Y(148). Aged albumin adducts were not detected. The procedure described was reproducible and feasible for detection of adducts at the most reactive Y(411)-residue (S/N ≥ 3) when at least 1% of total albumin was labeled. This was achieved by incubating plasma with molar HSA/OPC ratios ranging from approximately 1:0.03 (all G-type NA, DFP, and POE) to 1:3 (V-type NA, profenofos). Relative signal intensity of the Y(411) adduct correlated well with the spotted relative

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for detection and identification of albumin phosphylation by organophosphorus pesticides and G- and V-type nerve agents.

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Breyer, Felicitas; Thumfart, Jörg Oliver; Höchstetter, Hans; Thiermann, Horst

    2010-11-01

    Toxic organophosphorus compounds (OPC), e.g., pesticides and nerve agents (NA), are known to phosphylate distinct endogenous proteins in vivo and in vitro. OPC adducts of butyrylcholinesterase and albumin are considered to be valuable biomarkers for retrospective verification of OPC exposure. Therefore, we have detected and identified novel adducts of human serum albumin (HSA) by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Pure albumin and plasma were incubated with numerous pesticides and NA of the V- and G-type in different molar ratios. Samples were prepared either by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel enzymatic cleavage using endoproteinase Glu-C (Glu-C) or by combining highly albumin-selective affinity extraction with ultrafiltration followed by reduction, carbamidomethylation, and enzymatic cleavage (Glu-C) prior to MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Characteristic mass shifts for phosphylation revealed tyrosine adducts at Y(411) (Y(401)KFQNALLVRY(411)TKKVPQVSTPTLVE(425)), Y(148) and Y(150) (I(142)ARRHPY(148)FY(150)APE(153), single and double labeled), and Y(161) (L(154)LFFAKRY(161)KAAFTE(167)) produced by original NA (tabun, sarin, soman, cyclosarin, VX, Chinese VX, and Russian VX) as well as by chlorpyrifos-oxon, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), paraoxon-ethyl (POE), and profenofos. MALDI-MS/MS of the single-labeled I(142)-E(153) peptide demonstrated that Y(150) was phosphylated with preference to Y(148). Aged albumin adducts were not detected. The procedure described was reproducible and feasible for detection of adducts at the most reactive Y(411)-residue (S/N ≥ 3) when at least 1% of total albumin was labeled. This was achieved by incubating plasma with molar HSA/OPC ratios ranging from approximately 1:0.03 (all G-type NA, DFP, and POE) to 1:3 (V-type NA, profenofos). Relative signal intensity of the Y(411) adduct correlated well with the spotted relative

  13. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  14. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  15. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  16. Radioprotection and contrast agent use in pediatrics: what, how, and when.

    PubMed

    Lancharro Zapata, Á M; Rodríguez, C Marín

    2016-05-01

    It is essential to minimize exposure to ionizing radiation in children for various reasons. The risk of developing a tumor from exposure to a given dose of radiation is greater in childhood. Various strategies can be used to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation. It is fundamental to avoid unnecessary tests and tests that are not indicated, to choose an alternative test that does not use ionizing radiation, and/or to take a series of measures that minimize the dose of radiation that the patient receives, such as avoiding having to repeat tests, using the appropriate projections, using shields, adjusting the protocol (mAs, Kv, or pitch) to the patient's body volume, etc… When contrast agents are necessary, intracavitary ultrasound agents can be used, although the use of ultrasound agents is also being extended to include intravenous administration. In fluoroscopy, contrast agents with low osmolarity must be used, as in CT where we must adjust the dose and speed of injection to the patient's weight and to the caliber of the peripheral line, respectively. In MRI, only three types of contrast agents have been approved for pediatric use. It is sometimes necessary to use double doses or organ-specific contrast agents in certain clinical situations; the safety of contrast agents for these indications has not been proven, so they must be used off label.

  17. Dissociative ionization of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Winifred

    2004-09-01

    Dissociative ionization (DI) by electron impact plays a role in many different applications, including low-temperature plasma processing, the study of space and astrophysical plasmas, and the study of biological damages by high-energy radiation. In the present study, our goal is to understand the health hazard to humans from exposure to radiation during an extended space flight. DI by secondary electrons can damage the DNA, either directly by causing a DNA lesion, or indirectly by producing radicals and cations that attack the DNA. The theoretical model employed makes use of the fact that electronic motion is much faster than nuclear motion, allowing DI to be treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in a dissociative state of the molecular ion with the same geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the ion relaxes from the initial geometry and undergoes unimolecular dissociation. Thus the DI cross section is given by the product of the ionization cross section and the dissociation probability. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For unimolecular dissociation, we use the multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method to determine the minimum energy pathways to possible product channels. This model has been applied to study the DI of H_2O, NH_3, and CH_4, and the results are in good agreement with experiment. The DI from the low-lying channels of benzene has also been studied and the dissociation products are compared with photoionization measurements. The DI of the DNA bases guanine and cytosine are then discussed. Of the four DNA bases, guanine has the largest ionization cross section and cytosine has the smallest. The guanine radical cation is considered to be one of the precursors to the primary, direct-type lesions formed in DNA when it is irradiated. Comparison of DI products of guanine and cytosine will be made to understand the differences in

  18. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  19. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    The Helmholtz-free-energy model for nonideal mixtures of hydrogen atoms and molecules by Saumon and Chabrier (1991) is extended to describe dissociation and ionization in similar mixtures in chemical equilibrium. A free-energy model is given that describes partial ionization in the pressure and temperature ionization region. The plasma-phase transition predicted by the model is described for hydrogen mixtures including such components as H2, H, H(+), and e(-). The plasma-phase transition has a critical point at Tc = 15,300 K and Pc = 0.614 Mbar, and thermodynamic instability is noted in the pressure-ionization regime. The pressure dissociation and ionization of fluid hydrogen are described well with the model yielding information on the nature of the plasma-phase transition. The model is shown to be valuable for studying dissociation and ionization in astrophysical objects and in high-pressure studies where pressure and temperature effects are significant.

  20. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  1. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Glish, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above.

  2. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  3. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  4. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  5. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  6. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  7. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  8. High-efficiency electron ionizer for a mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved electron ionizer for use in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The improved electron ionizer includes a repeller plate that ejects sample atoms or molecules, an ionizer chamber, a cathode that emits an electron beam into the ionizer chamber, an exit opening for excess electrons to escape, at least one shim plate to collimate said electron beam, extraction apertures, and a plurality of lens elements for focusing the extracted ions onto entrance apertures.

  9. Field ionizing elements and applications thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A field ionizing element formed of a membrane that houses electrodes therein that are located closer to one another than the mean free path of the gas being ionized. The membrane includes a supporting portion, and a non supporting portion where the ions are formed. The membrane may be used as the front end for a number of different applications including a mass spectrometer, a thruster, an ion mobility element, or an electrochemical device such as a fuel cell.

  10. Electron ionization of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Simon J.; Price, Stephen D.

    2007-11-01

    Relative partial ionization cross sections and precursor specific relative partial ionization cross sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of C2H2 have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion-ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H2+, C2+, C+/C22+, CH +/C2H22+, CH2+, C2+, and C2H + relative to the formation of C2H2+, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30-200eV. While excellent agreement is found between our data and one set of previously published absolute partial ionization cross sections, some discrepancies exist between the results presented here and two other recent determinations of these absolute partial ionization cross sections. We attribute these differences to the loss of some translationally energetic fragment ions in these earlier studies. Our relative precursor-specific partial ionization cross sections enable us, for the first time, to quantify the contribution to the yield of each fragment ion from single, double, and triple ionization. Analysis shows that at 50eV double ionization contributes 2% to the total ion yield, increasing to over 10% at an ionizing energy of 100eV. From our ion-ion coincidence data, we have derived branching ratios for charge separating dissociations of the acetylene dication. Comparison of our data to recent ab initio/RRKM calculations suggest that close to the double ionization potential C2H22+ dissociates predominantly on the ground triplet potential energy surface (Σg-3) with a much smaller contribution from dissociation via the lowest singlet potential energy surface (Δg1). Measurements of the kinetic energy released in the fragmentation reactions of C2H22+ have been used to obtain precursor state energies for the formation of product ion pairs, and are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with theory.

  11. Melatonin protection from chronic, low-level ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Russel J; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Ma, Shuran; Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2011-12-15

    In the current survey, we summarize the published literature which supports the use of melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, as a protective agent against chronic, low-level ionizing radiation. Under in vitro conditions, melatonin uniformly was found to protect cellular DNA and plasmid super coiled DNA from ionizing radiation damage due to Cs(137) or X-radiation exposure. Likewise, in an in vivo/in vitro study in which humans were given melatonin orally and then their blood lymphocytes were collected and exposed to Cs(137) ionizing radiation, nuclear DNA from the cells of those individuals who consumed melatonin (and had elevated blood levels) was less damaged than that from control individuals. In in vivo studies as well, melatonin given to animals prevented DNA and lipid damage (including limiting membrane rigidity) and reduced the percentage of animals that died when they had been exposed to Cs(137) or Co(60) radiation. Melatonin's ability to protect macromolecules from the damage inflicted by ionizing radiation likely stems from its high efficacy as a direct free radical scavenger and possibly also due to its ability to stimulate antioxidative enzymes. Melatonin is readily absorbed when taken orally or via any other route. Melatonin's ease of self administration and its virtual absence of toxicity or side effects, even when consumed over very long periods of time, are essential when large populations are exposed to lingering radioactive contamination such as occurs as a result of an inadvertent nuclear accident, an intentional nuclear explosion or the detonation of a radiological dispersion device, i.e., a "dirty" bomb. PMID:22185900

  12. Fundamentals of ambient metastable-induced chemical ionization mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glenn A.

    Molecular ionization is owed much of its development from the early implementation of electron ionization (EI). Although dramatically increasing the library of compounds discovered, an inherent problem with EI was the low abundance of molecular ions detected due to high fragmentation leading to the difficult task of the correct chemical identification after mass spectrometry (MS). These problems stimulated the research into new ionization methods which sought to "soften" the ionization process. In the late 1980s the advancements of ionization techniques was thought to have reached its pinnacle with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Both ionization techniques allowed for "soft" ionization of large molecular weight and/or labile compounds for intact characterization by MS. Albeit pervasive, neither ESI nor MALDI can be viewed as "magic bullet" ionization techniques. Both techniques require sample preparation which often included native sample destruction, and operation of these techniques took place in sealed enclosures and often, reduced pressure conditions. New open-air ionization techniques termed "ambient MS" enable direct analysis of samples of various physical states, sizes and shapes. One particular technique named Direct Analysis In Real Time (DART) has been steadily growing as one of the ambient tools of choice to ionize small molecular weight (< 1000 Da) molecules with a wide range of polarities. Although there is a large list of reported applications using DART as an ionization source, there have not been many studies investigating the fundamental properties of DART desorption and ionization mechanisms. The work presented in this thesis is aimed to provide in depth findings on the physicochemical phenomena during open-air DART desorption and ionization MS and current application developments. A review of recent ambient plasma-based desorption/ionization techniques for analytical MS is presented in

  13. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  14. Ionization of NO at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1991-01-01

    Space vehicles flying through the atmosphere at high speed are known to excite a complex set of chemical reactions in the atmospheric gases, ranging from simple vibrational excitation to dissociation, atom exchange, electronic excitation, ionization, and charge exchange. Simple arguments are developed for the temperature dependence of the reactions leading to ionization of NO, including the effect of vibrational electronic thermal nonequilibrium. NO ionization is the most important source of electrons at intermediate temperatures and at higher temperatures provides the trigger electrons that ionize atoms. Based on these arguments, recommendations are made for formulae which fit observed experimental results, and which include a dependence on both a heavy particle temperature and different vibration electron temperatures. In addition, these expressions will presumably provide the most reliable extrapolation of experimental results to much higher temperatures.

  15. Diffuse, Warm Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, L. M.

    2002-05-01

    Over the past decade, new high-sensitivity observations have significantly advanced our knowledge of the diffuse, ionized gas in spiral galaxies. This component of the interstellar medium, often referred to as Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) or Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG), plays an important role in the complex stellar-interstellar matter and energy cycle. In examining the distribution and physical properties of this gas, we learn not only about the conditions of the medium but also about processes providing heating and ionization in the halos of spiral galaxies. For the Milky Way, three new Hα surveys are available providing large sky coverage, arc-minute spatial resolution, and the ability to kinematically resolve this prominent optical emission line. These new, global views show that the Warm Ionized Medium of the Galaxy is ubiquitous as previously suspected, is rich with filamentary structure down to current resolution limits, and can be traced into the halo at large distances from the Galactic plane. Observations of additional optical emission lines are beginning to probe the physical conditions of the WIM. Early results suggest variations in the temperature and ionization state of the gas which are not adequately explained by Lyman continuum stellar photoionization alone. In parallel with this intensive work in the Milky Way have been numerous studies about the diffuse, ionized gas in other spiral galaxies. Here, deep, face-on spiral investigations provide some of the best maps of the global DIG distribution in a galaxy and begin to allow a probe of the local link between star formation and the powering of ionized gas. In addition, ionized gas has been traced out to impressive distances (z > 3 kpc) in edge-on spirals, revealing out large-scale changes in the physical conditions and kinematics of galactic halos.

  16. Ionizing Radiation and Its Risks

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Marvin

    1982-01-01

    Penetrating ionizing radiation fairly uniformly puts all exposed molecules and cells at approximately equal risk for deleterious consequences. Thus, the original deposition of radiation energy (that is, the dose) is unaltered by metabolic characteristics of cells and tissue, unlike the situation for chemical agents. Intensely ionizing radiations, such as neutrons and alpha particles, are up to ten times more damaging than sparsely ionizing sources such as x-rays or gamma rays for equivalent doses. Furthermore, repair in cells and tissues can ameliorate the consequences of radiation doses delivered at lower rates by up to a factor of ten compared with comparable doses acutely delivered, especially for somatic (carcinogenic) and genetic effects from x- and gamma-irradiation exposure. Studies on irradiated laboratory animals or on people following occupational, medical or accidental exposures point to an average lifetime fatal cancer risk of about 1 × 10-4 per rem of dose (100 per 106 person-rem). Leukemia and lung, breast and thyroid cancer seem more likely than other types of cancer to be produced by radiation. Radiation exposures from natural sources (cosmic rays and terrestrial radioactivity) of about 0.1 rem per year yield a lifetime cancer risk about 0.1 percent of the normally occurring 20 percent risk of cancer death. An increase of about 1 percent per rem in fatal cancer risk, or 200 rem to double the “background” risk rate, is compared with an estimate of about 100 rem to double the genetic risk. Newer data suggest that the risks for low-level radiation are lower than risks estimated from data from high exposures and that the present 5 rem per year limit for workers is adequate. PMID:6761969

  17. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  18. Dynamics of Tumor Hypoxia in Response to Patupilone and Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Katrin; Rohrer Bley, Carla; Zimmermann, Martina; Vuong, Van; Hug, Daniel; Soltermann, Alex; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Pruschy, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is one of the most important parameters that determines treatment sensitivity and is mainly due to insufficient tumor angiogenesis. However, the local oxygen concentration in a tumor can also be shifted in response to different treatment modalities such as cytotoxic agents or ionizing radiation. Thus, combined treatment modalities including microtubule stabilizing agents could create an additional challenge for an effective treatment response due to treatment-induced shifts in tumor oxygenation. Tumor hypoxia was probed over a prolonged observation period in response to treatment with different cytotoxic agents, using a non-invasive bioluminescent ODD-Luc reporter system, in which part of the oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of HIF-1α is fused to luciferase. As demonstrated in vitro, this system not only detects hypoxia at an ambient oxygen concentration of 1% O2, but also discriminates low oxygen concentrations in the range from 0.2 to 1% O2. Treatment of A549 lung adenocarcinoma-derived tumor xenografts with the microtubule stabilizing agent patupilone resulted in a prolonged increase in tumor hypoxia, which could be used as marker for its antitumoral treatment response, while irradiation did not induce detectable changes in tumor hypoxia. Furthermore, despite patupilone-induced hypoxia, the potency of ionizing radiation (IR) was not reduced as part of a concomitant or adjuvant combined treatment modality. PMID:23251549

  19. Ionizing radiation and cancer prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Hoel, D G

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation long has been recognized as a cause of cancer. Among environmental cancer risks, radiation is unique in the variety of organs and tissues that it can affect. Numerous epidemiological studies with good dosimetry provide the basis for cancer risk estimation, including quantitative information derived from observed dose-response relationships. The amount of cancer attributable to ionizing radiation is difficult to estimate, but numbers such as 1 to 3% have been suggested. Some radiation-induced cancers attributable to naturally occurring exposures, such as cosmic and terrestrial radiation, are not preventable. The major natural radiation exposure, radon, can often be reduced, especially in the home, but not entirely eliminated. Medical use of radiation constitutes the other main category of exposure; because of the importance of its benefits to one's health, the appropriate prevention strategy is to simply work to minimize exposures. PMID:8741791

  20. Ionization cooling and muon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Muon colliders potential to provide a probe for fundamental particle physics is very interesting. To obtain the needed collider luminosity, the phase space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The Ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. The authors note that, the ionization losses results not only in damping, but also heating. They discuss methods used including moments methods, Focker Plank Equation, and Multi Particle Codes. In addition they show how a simple analysis permits us to estimate the most part of the optimal system parameters, such as optimal damping rates, length of the system and energy.

  1. Systems and methods for cylindrical hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages

    DOEpatents

    Diamant, Kevin David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel Joseph

    2014-05-13

    Systems and methods may be provided for cylindrical Hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages. The systems and methods may include a cylindrical channel having a center axial direction, a gas inlet for directing ionizable gas to an ionization section of the cylindrical channel, an ionization device that ionizes at least a portion of the ionizable gas within the ionization section to generate ionized gas, and an acceleration device distinct from the ionization device. The acceleration device may provide an axial electric field for an acceleration section of the cylindrical channel to accelerate the ionized gas through the acceleration section, where the axial electric field has an axial direction in relation to the center axial direction. The ionization section and the acceleration section of the cylindrical channel may be substantially non-overlapping.

  2. Ionization in Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and Extrasolar Planets. V. Alfvén Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Diver, D. A.; Rimmer, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (>=10-7) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10-6-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H2, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  3. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. V. ALFVÉN IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Rimmer, P. B.; Diver, D. A.

    2013-10-10

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (≥10{sup –7}) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10{sup –6}-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H{sub 2}, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  4. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  5. Martian Meteor Ionization Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Pesnell, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Small interplanetary grains bombard Mars, like all the solar system planets, and, like all the planets with atmospheres, meteoric ion and atom layers form in the upper atmosphere. We have developed a comprehensive one-dimensional model of the Martian meteoric ionization layer including a full chemical scheme. A persistent layer of magnesium ions should exist around an altitude of 70 km. Unlike the terrestrial case, where the metallic ions are formed via charge-exchange with the ambient ions, Mg(+) in the Martian atmosphere is produced by photoionization. Nevertheless, the predicted metal layer peak densities for Earth and Mars are similar. Diffusion solutions, such as those presented here, should be a good approximation of the metallic ions in regions where the magnetic field is negligible and may provide a significant contribution to the nightside ionosphere. The low ultraviolet absorption of the Martian atmosphere may make Mars an excellent laboratory in which to study meteoric ablation. Resonance lines not seen in the spectra of terrestrial meteors may be visible to a surface observatory in the Martian highlands.

  6. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  7. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  8. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  9. Multiple ionization of argon by helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, C. C.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We apply the continuum distorted-wave eikonal initial state and the independent electron model to describe the multiple ionization of Ar by He2+ and He+ in the energy range 0.1-10 Mev amu-1. Auger-like post collisional processes are included, which enhance the high energy multiple ionization cross sections via ionization of the inner shells. All Ar electrons (K, L and M-shells) have been included in these calculations. The results agree well with the experimental data at high energies, where the post-collisional ionization is the main contribution. At intermediate impact energies the description is also good though it tends to overestimate the triple and quadruple ionization data at intermediate energies. We analyze this by comparing the present results for He+2 in Ar, with previous ones for He+2 in Ne and Kr. It was found that the theoretical description improves from Ne to Ar and Kr, with the latter being nicely described even at intermediate energies. The present formalism is also tested for Ar inner shell and total ionization cross sections. In all the cases the results above 0.1 MeV amu-1 are quite reasonable, as compared with the experimental data available and with the ECPSSR values.

  10. Multiple ionization of argon by helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, C. C.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We apply the continuum distorted-wave eikonal initial state and the independent electron model to describe the multiple ionization of Ar by He2+ and He+ in the energy range 0.1–10 Mev amu–1. Auger-like post collisional processes are included, which enhance the high energy multiple ionization cross sections via ionization of the inner shells. All Ar electrons (K, L and M-shells) have been included in these calculations. The results agree well with the experimental data at high energies, where the post-collisional ionization is the main contribution. At intermediate impact energies the description is also good though it tends to overestimate the triple and quadruple ionization data at intermediate energies. We analyze this by comparing the present results for He+2 in Ar, with previous ones for He+2 in Ne and Kr. It was found that the theoretical description improves from Ne to Ar and Kr, with the latter being nicely described even at intermediate energies. The present formalism is also tested for Ar inner shell and total ionization cross sections. In all the cases the results above 0.1 MeV amu–1 are quite reasonable, as compared with the experimental data available and with the ECPSSR values.

  11. Polynucleotide kinase as a potential target for enhancing cytotoxicity by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, N. K.; Karimi-Busheri, F.; Rasouli-Nia, A.; Mani, R.; Dianov, G.; Glover, J. N. M.; Weinfeld, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of many antineoplastic agents is due to their capacity to damage DNA and there is evidence indicating that DNA repair contributes to the cellular resistance to such agents. DNA strand breaks constitute a significant proportion of the lesions generated by a broad range of genotoxic agents, either directly, or during the course of DNA repair. Strand breaks that are caused by many agents including ionizing radiation, topoisomerase I inhibitors, and DNA repair glycosylases such as NEIL1 and NEIL2, often contain 5’-hydroxyl and/or 3’-phosphate termini. These ends must be converted to 5’-phosphate and 3’-hydroxyl termini in order to allow DNA polymerases and ligases to catalyze repair synthesis and strand rejoining. A key enzyme involved in this end-processing is polynucleotide kinase (PNK), which possesses two enzyme activities, a DNA 5’-kinase activity and a 3’-phosphatase activity. PNK participates in the single-strand break repair pathway and the non-homologous end joining pathway for double-strand break repair. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of PNK renders cells more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. Structural analysis of PNK revealed the protein is composed of three domains, the kinase domain at the C-terminus, the phosphatase domain in the centre and a forkhead associated (FHA) domain at the N-terminus. The FHA domain plays a critical role in the binding of PNK to other DNA repair proteins. Thus each PNK domain may be a suitable target for small molecule inhibition to effectively reduce resistance to ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors. PMID:18473721

  12. Diagnosing transient ionization in dynamic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Giunta, A.; Madjarska, M. S.; Summers, H.; O'Mullane, M.; Singh, A.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide a diagnostic line ratio that will enable the observer to determine whether a plasma is in a state of transient ionization. Methods: We use the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) to calculate line contribution functions for two lines, Si iv 1394 Å and O iv 1401 Å, formed in the solar transition region. The generalized collisional-radiative theory is used. It includes all radiative and electron collisional processes, except for photon-induced processes. State-resolved direct ionization and recombination to and from the next ionization stage are also taken into account. Results: For dynamic bursts with a decay time of a few seconds, the Si iv 1394 Å line can be enhanced by a factor of 2-4 in the first fraction of a second with the peak in the line contribution function occurring initially at a higher electron temperature due to transient ionization compared to ionization equilibrium conditions. On the other hand, the O iv 1401 Å does not show such any enhancement. Thus the ratio of these two lines, which can be observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, can be used as a diagnostic of transient ionization. Conclusions: We show that simultaneous high-cadence observations of two lines formed in the solar transition region may be used as a direct diagnostic of whether the observed plasma is in transient ionization. The ratio of these two lines can change by a factor of four in a few seconds owing to transient ionization alone.

  13. Cellular responses to ionizing and ultraviolet radiation in ataxia telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Loberg, L.I.; McGrath, S.J.; Dixon, K.

    1995-11-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic disease characterized by a wide variety of symptoms including a marked increase of cancer incidence and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR). Hypersensitivity is expressed as decreased cell survival, increased induction of chromosomal damage, radioresistant DNA synthesis and absence of G1 arrest following exposure of cells to IR. The defect in AT may lie in the regulation of DNA replication and control of the cell cycle. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis confirms the alterations of cell cycle control in AT cells following exposure to 1Gy ionizing radiation. Replication activity in the in vitro system parallels in vivo DNA synthesis in that: (a) extracts from normal cells exposed to 1Gy IR show a dramatic decrease in replication activity, and (b) extracts from AT cells exposed 1Gy IR do not show such a decrease in replication activity. The inability of AT cells to inhibit DNA replication following exposure to IR is a response which is seen after exposure to other types of DNA damaging agents. AT and normal cells were treated with 254nm UV radiation. Following exposure to 10J UV radiation, normal cells show dramatic DNA replication arrest while AT cells do not demonstrate DNA replication arrest. It appears that failure to halt DNA synthesis is a global feature of AT cells exposed to radiation. Phosphorylation changes of the essential replication protein, single strand binding protein (hSSB), have been investigated after both UV and ionizing radiation exposure. Previous work in the lab has shown, via immunoblotting techniques, that hSSB is hyperphosphorylated in HeLa cells following exposure to 10J UV radiation. In AT cells, hyperphosphorylation of hSSB also occurs following 10J UV radiation, but not 1Gy Ir. Further research is being conducted to examine the apparent uncoupling of DNA synthesis control and hyperphosphorylation of hSSB in UV-exposed AT cells.

  14. Hand and shoe monitor using air ionization probes

    DOEpatents

    Fergus, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    A hand and shoe radiation monitor is provided which includes a probe support body defining a plurality of cells, within each cell there being an ionization probe. The support body provides structural strength for protecting the ionization probes from force applied to the support body during a radiation monitoring event. There is also provided a fast response time amplifier circuit for the output from the ionization probes.

  15. Determination of the ionization potentials of security-relevant substances with single photon ionization mass spectrometry using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schramm, E; Mühlberger, F; Mitschke, S; Reichardt, G; Schulte-Ladbeck, R; Pütz, M; Zimmermann, R

    2008-02-01

    Several ionization potentials (IPs) of security relevant substances were determined with single photon ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) using monochromatized synchrotron radiation from the "Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung" (BESSY). In detail, the IPs of nine explosives and related compounds, seven narcotics and narcotics precursors, and one chemical warfare agent (CWA) precursor were determined, whereas six IPs already known from the literature were verified correctly. From seven other substances, including one CWA precursor, the IP could not be determined as the molecule ion peak could not be detected. For these substances the appearance energy (AE) of a main fragment was determined. The analyzed security-relevant substances showed IPs significantly below the IPs of common matrix compounds such as nitrogen and oxygen. Therefore, it is possible to find photon energies in between, whereby the molecules of interest can be detected with SPI in very low concentrations due to the shielding of the matrix. All determined IPs except the one of the explosive EGDN were below 10.5 eV. Hence, laser-generated 118 nm photons can be applied for detecting almost all security-relevant substances by, e.g., SPI-TOFMS. PMID:18284801

  16. Agent oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1994-01-01

    The goal of our research is a methodology for creating robust software in distributed and dynamic environments. The approach taken is to endow software objects with explicit information about one another, to have them interact through a commitment mechanism, and to equip them with a speech-acty communication language. System-level applications include software interoperation and compositionality. A government application of specific interest is an infrastructure for coordination among multiple planners. Daily activity applications include personal software assistants, such as programmable email, scheduling, and new group agents. Research topics include definition of mental state of agents, design of agent languages as well as interpreters for those languages, and mechanisms for coordination within agent societies such as artificial social laws and conventions.

  17. Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 107 Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database (Web, free access)   This is a database primarily of total ionization cross sections of molecules by electron impact. The database also includes cross sections for a small number of atoms and energy distributions of ejected electrons for H, He, and H2. The cross sections were calculated using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, which combines the Mott cross section with the high-incident energy behavior of the Bethe cross section. Selected experimental data are included.

  18. Analysis of Wheat Prolamins, the Causative Agents of Celiac Sprue, Using Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Mejías, Jaime H.; Lu, Xiaoqiao; Osorio, Claudia; Ullman, Jeffrey L.; von Wettstein, Diter; Rustgi, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Wheat prolamins, commonly known as “gluten”, are a complex mixture of 71–78 proteins, which constitute ~80% of the proteins in the wheat grains and supply 50% of the global dietary protein demand. Prolamins are also responsible for numerous gluten-induced disorders and determine the unique visco-elastic properties of the wheat dough. These properties necessitate the reliable determination of the prolamin composition in wheat grains and their derived products. Therefore, this study examined the impact of HPLC conditions, including column type, column temperature, flow rate, and the gradient of polar and non-polar solvents in the mobile phase, to improve the analytical resolution of prolamins. The following conditions were found optimal for analyses: column temperature 60 °C, flow rate 1.0 mL/min and an elution gradient of 20%–60% of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid + acetonitrile in 60 min. For further improvement of resolution, gliadin and glutenin extracts were analyzed using MALDI-TOF-MS in combination with HPLC fractionation. Two semi-quantitative methods, densitometry of stained polyacrylamide gels and HPLC, were used to determine relative prolamin quantities and the correspondence between the methods was established. The combinatorial gluten analyses approach developed during the present study was used to analyze prolamin profiles of wheat transformants expressing DEMETER silencing artificial microRNA, and the results are discussed. PMID:24739977

  19. What Protein Charging (and Supercharging) Reveal about the Mechanism of Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Lakshmanan, Rajeswari

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the charging mechanism of electrospray ionization is central to overcoming shortcomings such as ion suppression or limited dynamic range and explaining phenomena such as supercharging. Towards that end, we explore what accumulated observations reveal about the mechanism of electrospray. We introduce the idea of an intermediate region for electrospray ionization (and other ionization methods) to account for the facts that solution charge state distributions (CSDs) do not correlate to those observed by ESI– MS (the latter bear more charge) and that gas phase reactions can reduce, but not increase the extent of charging. This region incorporates properties, e.g., basicities, intermediate between solution and gas phase. Assuming that droplet species polarize within the high electric field leads to equations describing ion emission resembling those from the equilibrium partitioning model. The equations predict many trends successfully, including CSD shifts to higher m/z for concentrated analytes and shifts to lower m/z for sprays employing smaller emitter opening diameters. From this view, a single mechanism can be formulated to explain how reagents that promote analyte charging (“supercharging”) such as m–NBA, sulfolane, and 3–nitrobenzonitrile increase analyte charge from “denaturing” and “native” solvent systems. It is suggested that additives’ Brønsted basicities are inversely correlated to their ability to shift CSDs to lower m/z in positive ESI, as are Brønsted acidities for negative ESI. Because supercharging agents reduce an analyte's solution ionization, excess spray charge is bestowed on evaporating ions carryingfewer opposing charges. Brønsted basicity (or acidity) determines how much ESI charge is lost to the agent (unavailable to evaporating analyte). PMID:25135609

  20. What Protein Charging (and Supercharging) Reveal about the Mechanism of Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Lakshmanan, Rajeswari; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the charging mechanism of electrospray ionization is central to overcoming shortcomings such as ion suppression or limited dynamic range, and explaining phenomena such as supercharging. Towards that end, we explore what accumulated observations reveal about the mechanism of electrospray. We introduce the idea of an intermediate region for electrospray ionization (and other ionization methods) to account for the facts that solution charge state distributions (CSDs) do not correlate with those observed by ESI-MS (the latter bear more charge) and that gas phase reactions can reduce, but not increase, the extent of charging. This region incorporates properties (e.g., basicities) intermediate between solution and gas phase. Assuming that droplet species polarize within the high electric field leads to equations describing ion emission resembling those from the equilibrium partitioning model. The equations predict many trends successfully, including CSD shifts to higher m/z for concentrated analytes and shifts to lower m/z for sprays employing smaller emitter opening diameters. From this view, a single mechanism can be formulated to explain how reagents that promote analyte charging ("supercharging") such as m-NBA, sulfolane, and 3-nitrobenzonitrile increase analyte charge from "denaturing" and "native" solvent systems. It is suggested that additives' Brønsted basicities are inversely correlated to their ability to shift CSDs to lower m/z in positive ESI, as are Brønsted acidities for negative ESI. Because supercharging agents reduce an analyte's solution ionization, excess spray charge is bestowed on evaporating ions carrying fewer opposing charges. Brønsted basicity (or acidity) determines how much ESI charge is lost to the agent (unavailable to evaporating analyte).

  1. Screening of nerve agent degradation products by MALDI-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Shu, You-Ren; Su, An-Kai; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for the rapid screening of degradation products derived from nerve agents by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. Five standard products were selected as model compounds, including isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA), pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PMPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isobutyl methylphosphonic acid (i-BuMPA), and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CHMPA), which are degradation products of Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), VX, Russian VX (RVX), and GF, respectively. For comparison, CHCA (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and DCCA (7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) were used as the MALDI-matrix when the third harmonic generation (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser and a hydrogen Raman laser (multifrequency laser) were used, respectively. The method permitted the five nerve agent degradation products to be screened rapidly and successfully, suggesting that it has the potential for use as a routine monitoring tool. PMID:16808484

  2. Screening of nerve agent degradation products by MALDI-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Shu, You-Ren; Su, An-Kai; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for the rapid screening of degradation products derived from nerve agents by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. Five standard products were selected as model compounds, including isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA), pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PMPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isobutyl methylphosphonic acid (i-BuMPA), and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CHMPA), which are degradation products of Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), VX, Russian VX (RVX), and GF, respectively. For comparison, CHCA (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and DCCA (7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) were used as the MALDI-matrix when the third harmonic generation (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser and a hydrogen Raman laser (multifrequency laser) were used, respectively. The method permitted the five nerve agent degradation products to be screened rapidly and successfully, suggesting that it has the potential for use as a routine monitoring tool.

  3. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  4. An overview of ionization gauges with carbon nanotube cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Detian; Wang, Yongjun; Cheng, Yongjun; Feng, Yan; Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Huzhong; Sun, Jian; Dong, Changkun

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as ideal electron emitters have been widely used in a variety of electronic devices, including the x-ray tube, vacuum microwave tubes, flat panel displays, electron microscopes, ionization gauges, etc. In this paper, we summarize the current status of research on a variety of ionization gauges with CNT cathodes and discuss the advantages as well as the existing problems of the novel ionization gauge. The CNT emitter-based ionization gauges have proved highly effective at ultra high and extra high vacuum measurements. This review also provides some suggestions to improve gauge performance in future work.

  5. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  6. Ionization of EPA Contaminants in Direct and Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization and Atmospheric Pressure Laser Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  7. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI. PMID:25828352

  8. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  9. Tevatron ionization profile monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, A.; Bowie, K.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Kwarciany, R.; Lundberg, C.; Slimmer, D.; Valerio, L.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Ionization Profile monitors have been used in almost all machines at Fermilab. However, the Tevatron presents some particular challenges with its two counter-rotating, small beams, and stringent vacuum requirements. In order to obtain adequate beam size accuracy with the small signals available, custom made electronics from particle physics experiments was employed. This provides a fast (single bunch) and dead-timeless charge integration with a sensitivity in the femto-Coulomb range, bringing the system close to the single ionization electron detection threshold. The detector itself is based on a previous Main Injector prototype, albeit with many modifications and improvements. The first detector was installed at the end of 2005, and the second detector during the spring shutdown. The ultimate goal is to continuously monitor beam size oscillations at injection, as well as the beam size evolution during ramp and squeeze. Initial results are very encouraging.

  10. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  11. Hysteresis of ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dinklage, A.; Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H.; Wilke, C.

    2008-06-15

    A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

  12. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  13. Ionizing radiation and orthopaedic prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2005-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) materials have been used successfully as one half of the bearing couple (against metallic alloys or ceramics) in total hip and total knee joint replacements for four decades. This review describes the impact of ionizing radiation (used for sterilization and for microstructural modification via crosslinking) on the performance of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. Gamma radiation sterilization in air leads to oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components that occurs during shelf-aging and also during in vivo use. Efforts to mitigate oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components include gamma radiation sterilization in inert barrier-packaging and processing treatments to reduce free radicals. Ionizing radiation (both gamma and electron-beam) has recently been used to form highly crosslinked UHMWPEs that have better adhesive and abrasive wear resistance than non-crosslinked UHMWPE, thereby potentially improving the long-term performance of total joint replacements. Along with increased wear resistance, however, there are deleterious changes to ductility and fracture resistance of UHMWPE, and an increased risk of fracture of these components remains a clinical concern.

  14. Multi-Agent Information Classification Using Dynamic Acquaintance Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Peng, Shengquan; Raje, Rajeev; Palakal, Mathew; Mostafa, Javed

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of automated information services focuses on information classification and collaborative agents, i.e. intelligent computer programs. Highlights include multi-agent systems; distributed artificial intelligence; thesauri; document representation and classification; agent modeling; acquaintances, or remote agents discovered through…

  15. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  16. Functional imaging of the lungs with gas agents.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stanley J; Nagle, Scott K; Couch, Marcus J; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas--and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multidetector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multispectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultrashort echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis in both adults and children.

  17. Engineered Ionizable Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Cymes, Gisela D; Grosman, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    One of the great challenges of mechanistic ion-channel biology is to obtain structural information from well-defined functional states. In the case of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, the open-channel conformation is particularly elusive owing to its transient nature and brief mean lifetime. In this Chapter, we show how the analysis of single-channel currents recorded from mutants engineered to contain single ionizable side chains in the transmembrane region can provide specific information about the open-channel conformation without any interference from the closed or desensitized conformations. The method takes advantage of the fact that the alternate binding and unbinding of protons to and from an ionizable side chain causes the charge of the protein to fluctuate by 1 unit. We show that, in mutant muscle acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (AChRs), this fluctuating charge affects the rate of ion conduction in such a way that individual proton-transfer events can be identified in a most straightforward manner. From the extent to which the single-channel current amplitude is reduced every time a proton binds, we can learn about the proximity of the engineered side chain to the lumen of the pore. And from the kinetics of proton binding and unbinding, we can calculate the side-chain's affinity for protons (pK a), and hence, we can learn about the electrostatic properties of the microenvironment around the introduced ionizable group. The application of this method to systematically mutated AChRs allowed us to identify unambiguously the stripes of the M1, M2 and M3 transmembrane α-helices that face the pore's lumen in the open-channel conformation in the context of a native membrane. PMID:26381938

  18. Multiple ionization and coupling effects in L-subshell ionization of heavy atoms by oxygen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pajek, M.; Banas, D.; Semaniak, J.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Chojnacki, S.; Czyzewski, T.; Fijal, I.; Jaskola, M.; Glombik, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Trautmann, D.; Lapicki, G.; Mukoyama, T.

    2003-08-01

    The multiple-ionization and coupling effects in L-shell ionization of atoms by heavy-ion impact have been studied by measuring the L x-ray production cross sections in solid targets of Au, Bi, Th, and U bombarded by oxygen ions in the energy range 6.4-70 MeV. The measured L x-ray spectra were analyzed using the recently proposed method accounting for the multiple-ionization effects, such as x-ray line shifting and broadening, which enables one to obtain the ionization probabilities for outer shells. The L-subshell ionization cross sections have been obtained from measured x-ray production cross sections for resolved L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{gamma}{sub 1}, and L{gamma}{sub 2,3} transitions using the L-shell fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields being substantially modified by the multiple ionization in the M and N shells. In particular, the effect of closing of strong L{sub 1}-L{sub 3}M{sub 4,5} Coster-Kronig transitions in multiple-ionized atoms was evidenced and discussed. The experimental ionization cross sections for the L{sub 1}, L{sub 2}, and L{sub 3} subshells have been compared with the predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and the ECPSSR theory that includes the corrections for the binding-polarization effect within the perturbed stationary states approximation, the projecticle energy loss, and Coulomb deflection effects as well as the relativistic description of inner-shell electrons. These approaches were further modified to include the L-subshell couplings within the ''coupled-subshell model'' (CSM). Both approaches, when modified for the coupling effects, are in better agreement with the data. Particularly, the predictions of the SCA-CSM calculations reproduce the experimental L-subshell ionization cross section reasonably well. Remaining discrepancies are discussed qualitatively, in terms of further modifications of the L-shell decay rates caused by a change of electronic wave functions in multiple-ionized atoms.

  19. Light, Including Ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Bowen, Michael P.; Correa, Genevieve; Ono, Yoko; Goodarzi, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is intricately linked to the functional status of the cutaneous immune system. In susceptible individuals, UV radiation can ignite pathogenic inflammatory pathways leading to allergy or autoimmunity. In others, this same UV radiation can be used as a phototherapy to suppress pathogenic cutaneous immune responses. These vastly different properties are a direct result of UV light’s ability to ionize molecules in the skin and thereby chemically alter them. Sometimes these UV-induced chemical reactions are essential, the formation of pre-vitamin D3 from 7-dehydrocholesterol, for example. In other instances they can be potentially detrimental. UV radiation can ionize a cell’s DNA causing adjacent pyrimidine bases to chemically bond to each other. To prevent malignant transformation, a cell may respond to this UV-induced DNA damage by undergoing apoptosis. Although this pathway prevents skin cancer it also has the potential of inducing or exacerbating autoreactive immune responses by exposing the cell’s nuclear antigens. Ultaviolet-induced chemical reactions can activate the immune system by a variety of other mechanisms as well. In response to UV irradiation keratinocytes secrete cytokines and chemokines, which activate and recruit leukocytes to the skin. In some individuals UV-induced chemical reactions can synthesize novel antigens resulting in a photoallergy. Alternatively, photosensitizing molecules can damage cells by initiating sunburn-like phototoxic reactions. Herein we review all types of UV-induced skin reactions, especially those involving the immune system. PMID:20018479

  20. Technology assessment for the determination of chemical agent vapors in demilitarization facilities: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Wise, M.B.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of analytical methods for the determination of chemical agents GB, VX, and HD was made. HD, or mustard, is bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, and is classified as a blishtering agent. GB, or Sarin, is isopropyl methyl phosphonofluoridate. VX is O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)methylphosphonothioate. Both GB and VX are nerve agents. Included were methods capable of providing for monitoring requirements at the time weighted average (TWA) and allowable stack concentration (ASC) levels in near real time. A review of the currently used automatic continuous air monitoring system (ACAMS) was made as well as a review of the recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (APIMS). This report recommends a strategy for research and development for near term and medium term improvement of the overall monitoring program. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Ionization of polarized hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are discussed for the production of polarized H/sup -/ ions from polarized atoms produced in ground state atomic beam sources. Present day sources use ionizers of two basic types - electron ionizers for H/sup +/ Vector production followed by double charge exchange in a vapor, or direct H/sup -/ Vector production by charge exchange of H/sup 0/ with Cs/sup 0/. Both methods have ionization efficiencies of less than 0.5%. Ionization efficiencies in excess of 10% may be obtained in the future by the use of a plasma ionizer plus charge exchange in Cs or Sr vapor, or ionization by resonant charge exchange with a self-extracted D/sup -/ beam from a ring magnetron or HCD source. 36 references, 4 figures.

  2. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  3. Laser plasma formation assisted by ultraviolet pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Yalin, Azer P. Dumitrache, Ciprian; Wilvert, Nick; Joshi, Sachin; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2014-10-15

    We present experimental and modeling studies of air pre-ionization using ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses and its effect on laser breakdown of an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) pulse. Experimental studies are conducted with a 266 nm beam (fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG) for UV pre-ionization and an overlapped 1064 nm NIR beam (fundamental of Nd:YAG), both having pulse duration of ∼10 ns. Results show that the UV beam produces a pre-ionized volume which assists in breakdown of the NIR beam, leading to reduction in NIR breakdown threshold by factor of >2. Numerical modeling is performed to examine the ionization and breakdown of both beams. The modeled breakdown threshold of the NIR, including assist by pre-ionization, is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Spontaneous-Desorption Ionizer for a TOF-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J. Albert

    2006-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) like the one mentioned in the immediately preceding article has been retrofitted with an ionizer based on a surface spontaneous-desorption process. This ionizer includes an electron multiplier in the form of a microchannel plate (MCP). Relative to an ionizer based on a hot-filament electron source, this ionizer offers advantages of less power consumption and greater mechanical ruggedness. The current density and stability characteristics of the electron emission of this ionizer are similar to those of a filament-based ionizer. In tests of various versions of this ionizer in the TOF-MS, electron currents up to 100 nA were registered. Currents of microamperes or more - great enough to satisfy requirements in most TOFMS applications - could be obtained by use of MCPs different from those used in the tests, albeit at the cost of greater bulk. One drawback of this ionizer is that the gain of the MCP decreases as a function of the charge extracted thus far; the total charge that can be extracted over the operational lifetime is about 1 coulomb. An MCP in the ion-detector portion of the TOF-MS is subject to the same limitation.

  5. KGB agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    A short story is reported in which the activity of Communist Party of the USSR and secret KGB agents, which were payed by the State, in view of controlling of the conscience of population. The story reffers to the Physics Department of the Moscow University, Planing Institute of the Gosplan of Moldavian S.S.R. and Chishinau Technical University (actually: Technical University of Moldova), where the author has worked during Soviet times. Almost every 6-th citizen in the USSR was engaged in this activity, while actually the former communists rule in the Republic of Moldova.

  6. Ionization Cooling Using a Parametric Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Derbenev; R.P. Johnson

    2005-05-16

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is presently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. A new idea to combine ionization cooling with parametric resonances has been developed that will lead to beams with much smaller sizes so that high luminosity in a muon collider can be achieved with fewer muons. In the linear channel described here, a half integer resonance is induced such that the normal elliptical motion of particles in x-x' phase space becomes hyperbolic, with particles moving to smaller x and larger x' as they pass down the channel. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points of the channel then cool the angular divergence of the beam by the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. We discuss the theory of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling, including the sensitivity to aberrations and the need to start with a beam that has already been cooled adequately.

  7. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  8. Non-traditional applications of laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, Casey R.

    Seven studies were carried out using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) to develop enhanced methodologies for a variety of analyte systems by investigating analyte chemistries, ionization processes, and elimination of spectral interferences. Applications of LDI and matrix assisted laser/desorption/ionization (MALDI) have been previously limited by poorly understood ionization phenomena, and spectral interferences from matrices. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization MS is well suited to the analysis of proteins. However, the proteins associated with bacteriophages often form complexes which are too massive for detection with a standard MALDI mass spectrometer. As such, methodologies for pretreatment of these samples are discussed in detail in the first chapter. Pretreatment of bacteriophage samples with reducing agents disrupted disulfide linkages and allowed enhanced detection of bacteriophage proteins. The second chapter focuses on the use of MALDI MS for lipid compounds whose molecular mass is significantly less than the proteins for which MALDI is most often applied. The use of MALDI MS for lipid analysis presented unique challenges such as matrix interference and differential ionization efficiencies. It was observed that optimization of the matrix system, and addition of cationization reagents mitigated these challenges and resulted in an enhanced methodology for MALDI MS of lipids. One of the challenges commonly encountered in efforts to expand MALDI MS applications is as previously mentioned interferences introduced by organic matrix molecules. The third chapter focuses on the development of a novel inorganic matrix replacement system called metal oxide laser ionization mass spectrometry (MOLI MS). In contrast to other matrix replacements, considerable effort was devoted to elucidating the ionization mechanism. It was shown that chemisorption of analytes to the metal oxide surface produced acidic adsorbed species which then

  9. Multiphoton ionization of Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Eladio; Martinez, Denhi; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization and dissociation of Uracil using a Reflectron time of flight spectrometer was performed along with radiation from the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Uracil is one of the four nitrogen bases that belong to RNA. The last years special interest has been concentrated on the study of the effects under UV radiation in nucleic acids1 and also in the role that this molecule could have played in the origin and development of life on our planet.2 The MPI mass spectra show that the presence and intensity of the resulting ions strongly depend on the density power. The identification of the ions in the mass spectra is presented. The results are compared with those obtained in other laboratories under different experimental conditions and some of them show partial agreement.3 The present work was supported by CONACYT-Mexico Grant 165410 and DGAPA UNAM Grant IN101215 and IN102613.

  10. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-11-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  11. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  12. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  13. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  14. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  15. Calculating Relative Ionization Probabilities of Plutonium for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Support Nuclear Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensegrav, Craig; Smith, Craig; Isselhardt, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing work seeks to apply the technology of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of debris from nuclear detonations. As part of this effort, modeling and simulation methods are being applied to analyze and predict the potential for ionization by laser excitation of isotopes of both uranium and plutonium. Early work focused on the ionization potential of isotopes of uranium, and the present effort has expanded and extended the previous work by identifying and integrating new data for plutonium isotopes. In addition to extending the effort to this important new element, we have implemented more accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of the laser beams to improve the accuracy of model predictions compared with experiment results as well as an ability to readily incorporate new experimental data as they become available. The model is used to estimate ionization cross sections and to compare relative excitation on two isotopes as a function of wavelength. This allows the study of sensitivity of these measurements to fluctuations in laser wavelength, irradiance, and bandwidth. We also report on initial efforts to include predictions of americium ionization probabilities into our modeling package. I would like to thank my co-authors, Gamani Karunasiri and Fabio Alves. My success is a product of their support and guidance.

  16. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  17. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  18. Towards universal ambient ionization: direct elemental analysis of solid substrates using microwave plasma ionization.

    PubMed

    Evans-Nguyen, K M; Gerling, J; Brown, H; Miranda, M; Windom, A; Speer, J

    2016-06-21

    A microwave plasma was used for direct ambient ionization mass spectrometry of solid substrates, rapidly yielding atomic spectra without sample digestion or pre-treatment. Further, molecular spectra for the organic components of the substrate were obtained simultaneously, in an ambient ionization format. Initial characterization of the microwave plasma coupling to an ion trap mass spectrometer was carried out using solution standards and a microwave plasma torch (MPT) configuration. The configuration of the microwave plasma was then optimized for ambient ionization. The atomic and organic composition for samples applicable to nuclear and conventional forensic screening, including explosive/radionuclide mixtures and inorganic/organic gunshot residue component mixtures were successfully determined. The technologies employed are readily fieldable; the feasibility of a multimode ion source that could be coupled with a portable ion trap mass spectrometer for rapid, on-site, elemental, isotopic, and molecular screening of samples is demonstrated. PMID:26979768

  19. Towards universal ambient ionization: direct elemental analysis of solid substrates using microwave plasma ionization.

    PubMed

    Evans-Nguyen, K M; Gerling, J; Brown, H; Miranda, M; Windom, A; Speer, J

    2016-06-21

    A microwave plasma was used for direct ambient ionization mass spectrometry of solid substrates, rapidly yielding atomic spectra without sample digestion or pre-treatment. Further, molecular spectra for the organic components of the substrate were obtained simultaneously, in an ambient ionization format. Initial characterization of the microwave plasma coupling to an ion trap mass spectrometer was carried out using solution standards and a microwave plasma torch (MPT) configuration. The configuration of the microwave plasma was then optimized for ambient ionization. The atomic and organic composition for samples applicable to nuclear and conventional forensic screening, including explosive/radionuclide mixtures and inorganic/organic gunshot residue component mixtures were successfully determined. The technologies employed are readily fieldable; the feasibility of a multimode ion source that could be coupled with a portable ion trap mass spectrometer for rapid, on-site, elemental, isotopic, and molecular screening of samples is demonstrated.

  20. Filling agents.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ioannis P

    2005-06-01

    Injectable fillers have become an important component of minimally invasive facial rejuvenation modalities. Their ease of use, effectiveness, low morbidity, and fast results with minimal downtime are factors that have made them popular among patients. Soft tissue augmentation has evolved to a unique combination of medicine and art. A wide selection of available agents and new products, each one with unique properties, may be used alone or in combination. The physician acquires the tools to rebalance facial characteristics not only by filling wrinkles but also by having the ability to shape the face and restore bony contours and lines. Careful selection of candidates, realistic expectations, and an understanding of the limitations of fillers are crucial for a successful result.

  1. Electron-impact ionization and dissociative ionization of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Winifred

    2006-05-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced damages to human health. It is recognized that secondary electrons play a role in the damage process, particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. The damage can be direct, by creating a DNA lesion, or indirect, by producing radicals that attack the DNA. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. This investigation focuses on ionization and dissociative ionization (DI) of DNA fragments by electron-impact. For ionization we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model [W.M. Huo, Phys. Rev. A64, 042719-1 (2001)]. For DI it is assumed that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion, allowing DI to be treated as a two-step process and the DI cross section given by the product of the ionization cross section and dissociation probability. The ionization study covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. The result implies that certain properties of the DNA, like the total ionization cross section, are localized properties and an additivity principle may apply. This allows us to obtain properties of a larger molecular system built up from the results of smaller subsystem fragments. The DI of guanine and cytosine has been studied. For guanine, a proton is produced from the channel where the ionized electron originates from a molecular orbital with significant charge density along the N(1)-H bond. The interaction of the proton with cytosine was also studied.

  2. Gelled Anti-icing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O. F.; Sperber, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Pectin added to antifreeze/water mixture. Formulations include water with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as deicer and pectin as gel former. Without gelling agent, deicer runs off vertical surfaces. Without pectin solution will completely evaporate in far less time. Agents developed have wide potential for ice prevention on runways, highways, bridges and sidewalks.

  3. Mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy of 4-aminobenzonitrile cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L. C. L.; Lin, J. L.; Tzeng, W. B.

    2000-11-01

    Mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) and two-color resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) methods were used to investigate the ionic properties of 4-aminobenzonitrile (4-ABN). The adiabatic ionization energy of this molecule was determined to be 66 493±4 cm -1 by the MATI spectroscopy and 66 494±7 cm -1 by the two-color R2PI spectroscopy. The active vibrations of the 4-ABN cation include the in-plane ring deformation, CC stretching, C-CN stretching, and CH bending motions. The present experimental results are well supported by our ab initio and density functional theory calculations.

  4. A numerical scheme for ionizing shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, Necdet . E-mail: naslan@yeditepe.edu.tr; Mond, Michael

    2005-12-10

    A two-dimensional (2D) visual computer code to solve the steady state (SS) or transient shock problems including partially ionizing plasma is presented. Since the flows considered are hypersonic and the resulting temperatures are high, the plasma is partially ionized. Hence the plasma constituents are electrons, ions and neutral atoms. It is assumed that all the above species are in thermal equilibrium, namely, that they all have the same temperature. The ionization degree is calculated from Saha equation as a function of electron density and pressure by means of a nonlinear Newton type root finding algorithms. The code utilizes a wave model and numerical fluctuation distribution (FD) scheme that runs on structured or unstructured triangular meshes. This scheme is based on evaluating the mesh averaged fluctuations arising from a number of waves and distributing them to the nodes of these meshes in an upwind manner. The physical properties (directions, strengths, etc.) of these wave patterns are obtained by a new wave model: ION-A developed from the eigen-system of the flux Jacobian matrices. Since the equation of state (EOS) which is used to close up the conservation laws includes electronic effects, it is a nonlinear function and it must be inverted by iterations to determine the ionization degree as a function of density and temperature. For the time advancement, the scheme utilizes a multi-stage Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm with time steps carefully evaluated from the maximum possible propagation speed in the solution domain. The code runs interactively with the user and allows to create different meshes to use different initial and boundary conditions and to see changes of desired physical quantities in the form of color and vector graphics. The details of the visual properties of the code has been published before (see [N. Aslan, A visual fluctuation splitting scheme for magneto-hydrodynamics with a new sonic fix and Euler limit, J. Comput. Phys. 197 (2004) 1

  5. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  6. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  7. Perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations in Hall effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kentaro; Sekerak, Michael J.; Boyd, Iain D.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2014-12-01

    A perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations, which cause low frequency oscillations of the discharge plasma, in Hall effect thrusters is presented including the electron energy equation in addition to heavy-species transport. Excitation and stabilization of such oscillations, often called the breathing mode, are discussed in terms of the growth rate obtained from the linear perturbation equations of the discharge plasma. The instability induced from the ionization occurs only when the perturbation in the electron energy is included while the neutral atom flow contributes to the damping of the oscillation. Effects of the electron energy loss mechanisms such as wall heat loss, inelastic collisions, and convective heat flux are discussed. It is shown that the ionization oscillations can be damped when the electron transport is reduced and the electron temperature increases so that the energy loss to the wall stabilizes the ionization instability.

  8. WHAM observations of ionized gas in the inner Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin; Barger, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) observations of ionized gas in the southern Milky Way. We include spectroscopic maps of H-Alpha, [S II], and [N II]. The data includes the Scutum-Centaurus Arm, for which we measure an exponential scale height about 20% less than that in the Perseus Arm in the outer Galaxy. The H-alpha scale height suggests a lower electron scale height in both arms than is measured locally from pulsar dispersion. The [N II] and [S II] data provide information about the temperature and ionization state of the gas: gas in the warm ionized medium is generally warmer (≈8000 K) and in lower ionization states than gas in classical H II regions. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  9. Perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Kentaro Sekerak, Michael J.; Boyd, Iain D.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2014-12-15

    A perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations, which cause low frequency oscillations of the discharge plasma, in Hall effect thrusters is presented including the electron energy equation in addition to heavy-species transport. Excitation and stabilization of such oscillations, often called the breathing mode, are discussed in terms of the growth rate obtained from the linear perturbation equations of the discharge plasma. The instability induced from the ionization occurs only when the perturbation in the electron energy is included while the neutral atom flow contributes to the damping of the oscillation. Effects of the electron energy loss mechanisms such as wall heat loss, inelastic collisions, and convective heat flux are discussed. It is shown that the ionization oscillations can be damped when the electron transport is reduced and the electron temperature increases so that the energy loss to the wall stabilizes the ionization instability.

  10. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  11. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  12. Compendium of Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Boutte, Alvin J.; Chen, Dakai; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Casey, Megan C.; Campola, Michael J.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Obryan, Martha V.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Batchlor, David A.; Oldham, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear, and hybrid devices.

  13. Iron ionization and recombination rates and ionization equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, M.; Raymond, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years important progress has been made on the knowledge of ionization and recombination rates of iron, an astrophysically abundant heavy element and a major impurity in laboratory fusion devices. We make a critical review of the existing data on ionization and dielectronic recombination and present new computations of radiative recombination rate coefficients of Fe(+14) through Fe(+25) using the photoionization cross sections of Clark et al. (1986). We provide analytical fits to the recommended data (direct ionization and excitation-autoionization cross sections; radiative and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients). Finally we determine the iron ionic fractions at ionization equilibrium and compare them with previous computations as well as with observational data.

  14. Detecting agents.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews a recent set of behavioural studies that examine the scope and nature of the representational system underlying theory-of-mind development. Studies with typically developing infants, adults and children with autism all converge on the claim that there is a specialized input system that uses not only morphological cues, but also behavioural cues to categorize novel objects as agents. Evidence is reviewed in which 12- to 15-month-old infants treat certain non-human objects as if they have perceptual/attentional abilities, communicative abilities and goal-directed behaviour. They will follow the attentional orientation of an amorphously shaped novel object if it interacts contingently with them or with another person. They also seem to use a novel object's environmentally directed behaviour to determine its perceptual/attentional orientation and object-oriented goals. Results from adults and children with autism are strikingly similar, despite adults' contradictory beliefs about the objects in question and the failure of children with autism to ultimately develop more advanced theory-of-mind reasoning. The implications for a general theory-of-mind development are discussed. PMID:12689380

  15. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  16. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  17. Ionizing radiation promotes protozoan reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    This experiment was performed to determine whether ionizing radiation is essential for maximum growth rate in a ciliated protozoan. When extraneous ionizing radiation was reduced to 0.15 mrad/day, the reproduction rate of Tetrahymena pyriformis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) than it was at near ambient levels, 0.5 or 1.8 mrad/day. Significantly higher growth rates (P less than 0.01) were obtained when chronic radiation was increased. The data suggest that ionizing radiation is essential for optimum reproduction rate in this organism.

  18. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  19. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  20. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  1. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.; Lam, S.H.

    1982-02-01

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. To combine the analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. It is capable of solving for both unsteady and steady thermionic converter behavior including possible laser ionization enhancement or atomic recombination lasing. A proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed. (WHK)

  2. The Extended Ionized Halos and Bridge of the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnarao, Dhanesh; Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Madsen, Gregory J.; Hill, Alex S.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has revealed ubiquitous ionized emission throughout the gas complexes formed by the dynamic history of the Magellanic Clouds. We present an overview of the immediate environment around the galaxies themselves, including ionized halos of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC & LMC) as well as the bridge of material between them. Using WHAM, Barger et al. (2013) found Hα emission extending throughout and beyond H I in the Bridge. We add these new maps of the SMC and LMC to provide the first complete view of the diffuse ionized gas near the interacting system. At R ~ 30,000, WHAM can cleanly separate diffuse emission at Magellanic velocities from the Milky Way and terrestrial sources to the limit of atmospheric line confusion (~ 10s of mR). We find that ionized gas extends at least 5° beyond the traditional boundary of the SMC when compared to recent deep-imaging surveys (e.g., MCELS; Smith et al. 2005). The diffuse ionized emission extent is similar to the neutral gas extent as traced by 21 cm emission. We compare the kinematic signatures between the neutral and ionized components throughout the region. Comprehensive multi-wavelength surveys are also underway to examine how physical parameters and ionization processes vary in these extended systems. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  3. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  4. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report.

  5. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  6. Progress in particle identification by ionization sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehraus, I.

    1983-11-01

    The present generation of large scale d E/d x detector was conceived in the mid-seventies. In fixed target physics applications (EPI, ISIS) the achieved particle identification efficiency allows for π/K separation in the relativistic rise region. In the family of compact colliding beam detectors (e.g. AFS, ARGUS, CLEO, JADE, TPC, UA1), only the LBL TPC performance was so far sufficient for operation beyond the minimum of ionization. New central detectors foreseen for experiments in near future (LEP) should be more performing and will require resolutions which are at the limits imposed by systematic higher order effects. Influence of various design parameters on the optimization of the d E/d x sampling performance is discussed, supported by recent result from measurements of full-scale detector segments and including tests using ionized tracks generated by pulsed UV lasers. Merits of longitudinal drift and fine sampling are compared to results obtained by classical charge integration.

  7. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation.

  8. Non-equilibrium Helium Ionization in an MHD Simulation of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11-18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  9. Ionization of impurities in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźmicz, Wiesław

    1986-12-01

    A model for calculation of the percentage of ionized dopant atoms as a function of the doping concentration and temperature is proposed. The results are compared with experiment. Analytical approximations that facilitate practical applications of the model are given.

  10. Measuring Air-Ionizer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonborg, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Test apparatus checks ion content of airstream from commercial air ionizer. Apparatus ensures ion output is sufficient to neutralize static charges in electronic assembly areas and concentrations of positive and negative ions are balanced.

  11. Alfvén ionization in exoplanetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Diver, D. A.; Rimmer, P. B.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest such objects harbour an atmospheric, localized plasma. For lowmass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized gas as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma? We propose Alfvén ionization as a simple mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficiently large degrees of ionization (≥ 10^-7) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization to occur and justify it's applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs and M-dwarfs for both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization ranging from 10^-6-1 can be obtained. Observable consequences include continuum Bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g. He, Mg, H2 or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population as a consequence of the Penning Effect. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models.

  12. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  13. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  14. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-08-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  15. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  16. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  17. Diffuse ionizing radiation within HH jets

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C. E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx

    2013-12-20

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of a time-dependent ejection velocity precessing jet. The parameters used in our models correspond to a high excitation Herbig-Haro object, such as HH 80/81. We have included the transfer of ionizing radiation produced within the shocked regions of the jet. The radiative transfer is computed with a ray-tracing scheme from all the cells with an emissivity above a certain threshold. We show the development of a radiative precursor, and compare the morphology with a model without the diffuse radiation. Our simulations show that the morphology of the Hα emission is affected considerably if the diffuse ionizing radiation is accounted for. The predicted Hα position-velocity diagram (i.e., spatially resolved emission line profiles) from a model with the transfer of ionizing radiation has a relatively strong component at zero velocity, corresponding to the radiative precursor. Qualitatively similar 'zero velocity components' are observed in HH 80/81 and in the jet from Sanduleak's star in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  18. Sparsely ionizing diagnostic and natural background radiations are likely preventing cancer and other genomic-instability-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bobby R; Di Palma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Routine diagnostic X-rays (e.g., chest X-rays, mammograms, computed tomography scans) and routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures using sparsely ionizing radiation forms (e.g., beta and gamma radiations) stimulate the removal of precancerous neo-plastically transformed and other genomically unstable cells from the body (medical radiation hormesis). The indicated radiation hormesis arises because radiation doses above an individual-specific stochastic threshold activate a system of cooperative protective processes that include high-fidelity DNA repair/apoptosis (presumed p53 related), an auxiliary apoptosis process (PAM process) that is presumed p53-independent, and stimulated immunity. These forms of induced protection are called adapted protection because they are associated with the radiation adaptive response. Diagnostic X-ray sources, other sources of sparsely ionizing radiation used in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures, as well as radioisotope-labeled immunoglobulins could be used in conjunction with apoptosis-sensitizing agents (e.g., the natural phenolic compound resveratrol) in curing existing cancer via low-dose fractionated or low-dose, low-dose-rate therapy (therapeutic radiation hormesis). Evidence is provided to support the existence of both therapeutic (curing existing cancer) and medical (cancer prevention) radiation hormesis. Evidence is also provided demonstrating that exposure to environmental sparsely ionizing radiations, such as gamma rays, protect from cancer occurrence and the occurrence of other diseases via inducing adapted protection (environmental radiation hormesis). PMID:18648608

  19. Ionization processes in fluorescent lamps: evaluation of the Hg chemi-ionization rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Sheverev, Valery A; Lister, Graeme G; Stepaniuk, Vadim

    2005-05-01

    Chemi-ionization by two mercury atoms to produce mercury atomic and molecular ions has been considered an important process in fluorescent lamps (FLs) for a quarter of a century. Despite the absence of reliable data, these processes have been included in a number of numerical models to help explain some of the experimental observations. These models have shown that the most important process is the Penning ionization of two Hg metastable atoms Hg(6(3)P2)+Hg(6(3)P2) --> Hg(+)+Hg(6(1)S0)+e. Although there is no experimental measurement of this cross section, modelers have typically used values implied from measurements of other chemi-ionization cross sections, or values obtained by fitting parameters to numerical models to obtain agreement with experiment. Recent theoretical investigations have indicated that the cross sections for the important processes may not be as large as previously thought. The aim of the present paper is to critically review the historical development of studies of chemi-ionization in fluorescent lamps and to present new experimental evidence which is consistent with the theoretical calculations and contradicts the conclusions from previously published experiments.

  20. Ionization processes in fluorescent lamps: Evaluation of the Hg chemi-ionization rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Sheverev, Valery A.; Stepaniuk, Vadim; Lister, Graeme G.

    2005-05-01

    Chemi-ionization by two mercury atoms to produce mercury atomic and molecular ions has been considered an important process in fluorescent lamps (FLs) for a quarter of a century. Despite the absence of reliable data, these processes have been included in a number of numerical models to help explain some of the experimental observations. These models have shown that the most important process is the Penning ionization of two Hg metastable atoms Hg(6 {sup 3}P{sub 2})+Hg(6 {sup 3}P{sub 2}){yields}Hg{sup +}+Hg(6 {sup 1}S{sub 0})+e. Although there is no experimental measurement of this cross section, modelers have typically used values implied from measurements of other chemi-ionization cross sections, or values obtained by fitting parameters to numerical models to obtain agreement with experiment. Recent theoretical investigations have indicated that the cross sections for the important processes may not be as large as previously thought. The aim of the present paper is to critically review the historical development of studies of chemi-ionization in fluorescent lamps and to present new experimental evidence which is consistent with the theoretical calculations and contradicts the conclusions from previously published experiments.

  1. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  2. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references.

  3. Web Search Agents: "One-Stop Shopping" for Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Explains Web search agents as tools that apply intelligent agent software technology for the purpose of automating, improving, and speeding up online search operations. Topics include intelligent desktop agents; search agent marketplace; comparing Web search agents; subjective evaluations; and use by researchers. (LRW)

  4. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  5. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Scarrow, R.C.; White, D.L.

    1985-11-12

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided. 4 tabs.

  6. Using Intelligent Agents To Assist Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knode, Steve; Knode, Jon-David W.

    This paper begins with background on intelligent agents (software programs built to perform certain specific tasks for the user). A taxonomy that categorizes intelligent agents by the degree of intelligence embedded in the software is presented. Applications of today's intelligent agents are discussed, including specific examples of the following:…

  7. Preparing Change Agents for Change Agent Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, James R.

    Seventy-seven Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking agricultural change agents from developing Central and South American countries responded to a questionnaire which sought perceptions of the roles in which the change agents felt they were involved and the roles for which they felt they were being trained. The agents were participating in training…

  8. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  9. Antibacterial agents in the cinema.

    PubMed

    García Sánchez, J E; García Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2006-12-01

    Numerous procedures used as antibacterial therapy are present in many films and include strategies ranging from different antimicrobial drugs to surgery and supporting measures. Films also explore the correct use and misuse of antimicrobial agents. Side effects and other aspects related to antibacterial therapy have also been reflected in some films. This article refers to the presence of antibacterial agents in different popular movies. There are movies in which antibacterial agents form part of the central plot, while in others it is merely an important part of the plot. In still others, its presence is isolated, and in these it plays an ambient or anecdotal role.

  10. THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Andrew; Venkatesan, Aparna; Shull, J. Michael E-mail: avenkatesan@usfca.edu

    2013-06-10

    The escape of ionizing radiation from galaxies plays a critical role in the evolution of gas in galaxies, and the heating and ionization history of the intergalactic medium. We present semi-analytic calculations of the escape fraction of ionizing radiation for both hydrogen and helium from galaxies ranging from primordial systems to disk-type galaxies that are not heavily dust-obscured. We consider variations in the galaxy density profile, source type, location, and spectrum, and gas overdensity/distribution factors. For sufficiently hard first-light sources, the helium ionization fronts closely track or advance beyond that of hydrogen. Key new results in this work include calculations of the escape fractions for He I and He II ionizing radiation, and the impact of partial ionization from X-rays from early active galactic nuclei or stellar clusters on the escape fractions from galaxy halos. When factoring in frequency-dependent effects, we find that X-rays play an important role in boosting the escape fractions for both hydrogen and helium, but especially for He II. We briefly discuss the implications of these results for recent observations of the He II reionization epoch at low redshifts, as well as the UV data and emission-line signatures from early galaxies anticipated from future satellite missions.

  11. Anode Sheath and Double Layer Solutions with Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett S.; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2014-10-01

    When an electrode in a plasma is biased more positive than the plasma potential it attracts electrons and repels ions forming a region of negative space charge (electron sheath). Ballistic electrons moving towards this anode gain energy equal to the difference in electrostatic potential energy, Δϕ = ϕ (x) -ϕplasma , with a maximum of ϕanode -ϕplasma . When ϕanode is large enough, electrons can gain enough energy to ionize neutral atoms through electron impact ionization. This leads to a layer of increased ion density near the anode, which can exceed the local electron density at large enough anode biases forming a double layer. We model the sheath potential profile using Poisson's equation with a fluid model for the electron density in the case without ionization and formulate an integral equation for the case with ionization where the ion density depends on an integral from ϕ (x) to ϕanode. An analytic form of the sheath electric field is obtained for the case without ionization and we demonstrate that it asymptotically agrees with the Child-Langmuir solution. We numerically obtain double layer solutions when including ionization and show that the potential profile expands beyond that of the Child-Langmuir solution. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94SL85000.

  12. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  13. Listening to Include

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  14. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  15. Metal ion complexation by ionizable crown ethers. Final report, January 1, 1988--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    During the report period a variety of new lipophilic ionizable crown ethers with pendent proton-ionizable groups has been synthesized. The ligands possess one or more ionizable group (carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid monoethyl ester, para-nitrophenol, phosphonic acid) attached to crown ether, monoazacrown ether or diazacrown ether frameworks. These novel chelating agents have either pendent or inward-facing proton-ionizable groups. Such lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ethers are designed for use in multiphase metal ion separations (solvent extraction, liquid membrane transport). In addition a series of proton-ionizable crown ethers without lipophilic groups was prepared to study how structural variations within the ligand influence metal ion complexation in homogeneous media as assessed by NMR spectroscopy or titration calorimetry. A third class of new metal ion-complexing agents is a series of lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids. Competitive solvent extractions of alkali metal and alkaline earth cations and of the mixed species have been conducted to reveal the influence of ring size, nature and attachment site of the lipophilic group, sidearm length, and proton-ionizable group identity and location upon the selectivity and efficiency of metal ion complexation. In addition to such studies of structural variation within the lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ether, the effect of changing the organic solvent and variation of the stripping conditions have been assessed. The influence of structural variations within lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids upon competitive solvent extraction of alkaline earth cations has been probed. Also a new chromogenic, di-ionizable crown ether with extremely high selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} has been discovered.

  16. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  17. Strongly magnetized antihydrogen and its field ionization.

    PubMed

    Vrinceanu, D; Granger, B E; Parrott, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Cederbaum, L; Mody, A; Tan, J; Gabrielse, G

    2004-04-01

    Internal orbits of experimentally analyzed antihydrogen (H) atoms depend as much on an external magnetic field as on the Coulomb force. A circular "guiding center atom" model is used to understand their field ionization. This useful model, assumed in the theory of three-body H recombination so far, ignores the important coupling between internal and center-of-mass motion. A conserved pseudomomentum, effective potential, saddle point analysis, and numerical simulation show where the simple model is valid and classify the features of the general case, including "giant dipole states."

  18. Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

    1993-01-01

    An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

  19. Electroencephalographic responses to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    GARCIA, J; BUCHWALD, N A; BACH-Y-RITA, G; FEDER, B H; KOELLING, R A

    1963-04-19

    Electroencephalographic recordings made from chronically implanted cortical electrodes indicate that ionizing radiation has an immediate effect upon brain wave patterns. X-rays delivered at the rate of 0.2 roentgen per second produce an arousal effect resembling that which occurs as a result of stimulation through peripheral receptor systems.

  20. Ionization Cooling for Muon Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Prebys, E.

    2014-09-18

    Possible application for muon experiments such as mu2e is discussed of the initial part of the ionization cooling channel originally developed for muon collider. It is shown that with the FNAL Booster as the proton driver the mu2e sensitivity can be increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the presently considered experiment.

  1. Ionization Potentials for Isoelectronic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agmon, Noam

    1988-01-01

    Presents a quantitative treatment of ionization potentials of isoelectronic atoms. By looking at the single-electron view of calculating the total energy of an atom, trends in the screening and effective quantum number parameters are examined. Approaches the question of determining electron affinities. (CW)

  2. Hydrodynamic Instability of Ionization Fronts in HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Akira; Kane, Jave; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Takabe, Hideaki

    2003-10-01

    The complex dynamics of an ionization front which is a surface of radiatively driven molecular cloud is a common feature of HII regions. We carried out two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations with a realistic initial density profile for a neutral gas region, and with perturbations at the ionization front considering detailed physics so far. The energy deposition and release due to the absorption of strong UV radiation from O-stars the recombination effects in the ionized region are included. The radiation loss from shocked molecular gas is also included. We introduce magnetic field's effect into the equation of state to prevent too high density because of radiative collapse in the molecular gas^a. The results are compared with recent detailed observational data of the Eagle Nebula by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array (BIMA)^b,c. We also discuss the growth of the perturbations at the ionization front and the appropriateness of hydrodynamic instabilities on the ionized front. a. Ryutov, D, & Remington, B., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2002) 44, B407, b. Hester, J. J, et al., AJ (1996) 111, 2349, c. Pound, M. W., et al., ApJ (1998) 493, L113

  3. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  4. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  5. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Kuca, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Biological warfare agents are a group of pathogens and toxins of biological origin that can be potentially misused for military or criminal purposes. The present review attempts to summarize necessary knowledge about biological warfare agents. The historical aspects, examples of applications of these agents such as anthrax letters, biological weapons impact, a summary of biological warfare agents and epidemiology of infections are described. The last section tries to estimate future trends in research on biological warfare agents.

  6. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  7. Electron ionization dynamics of N2 and O2 molecules: Velocity-map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, James N.; Lee, Jason W. L.; Vallance, Claire

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a crossed-beam velocity-map imaging study into the electron ionization dynamics of jet-cooled N2 and O2 molecules at electron collision energies from 35 to 100 eV. The use of velocity-map imaging detection provides insight into the detailed ionization dynamics through the dimension of the product ion kinetic energy associated with impulsive dissociation. In particular, "mesoscopic" cross sections corresponding to ionization from manifolds of energetically close states converging to the same dissociation asymptote are reported for a number of single-ionization channels. In addition, a range of double-ionization cross sections have been characterized, including those yielding X2 2 + dications. These are found to be in excellent agreement with other cross sections determined in coincidence measurements. This agreement supports a meaningful and accurate determination of the single-ionization channels.

  8. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Ionizing Radiation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Grynberg, Priscila; Bitar, Mainá; Pires, Simone da Fonseca; Hilário, Heron Oliveira; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, enduring up to 1.5 kGy of gamma rays. Ionizing radiation can damage the DNA molecule both directly, resulting in double-strand breaks, and indirectly, as a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. After a dose of 500 Gy of gamma rays, the parasite genome is fragmented, but the chromosomal bands are restored within 48 hours. Under such conditions, cell growth arrests for up to 120 hours and the parasites resume normal growth after this period. To better understand the parasite response to ionizing radiation, we analyzed the proteome of irradiated (4, 24, and 96 hours after irradiation) and non-irradiated T. cruzi using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. A total of 543 spots were found to be differentially expressed, from which 215 were identified. These identified protein spots represent different isoforms of only 53 proteins. We observed a tendency for overexpression of proteins with molecular weights below predicted, indicating that these may be processed, yielding shorter polypeptides. The presence of shorter protein isoforms after irradiation suggests the occurrence of post-translational modifications and/or processing in response to gamma radiation stress. Our results also indicate that active translation is essential for the recovery of parasites from ionizing radiation damage. This study therefore reveals the peculiar response of T. cruzi to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism can change its protein expression to survive such a harmful stress. PMID:24842666

  10. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented. PMID:23811423

  11. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented.

  12. Using metal complex ion-molecule reactions in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer to detect chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Graichen, Adam M; Vachet, Richard W

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n](y+) complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n](2+) complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  13. Magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Linton, Mark G.

    2013-06-15

    Magnetic reconnection in partially ionized plasmas is a ubiquitous phenomenon spanning the range from laboratory to intergalactic scales, yet it remains poorly understood and relatively little studied. Here, we present results from a self-consistent multi-fluid simulation of magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma with a particular focus on the parameter regime of the solar chromosphere. The numerical model includes collisional transport, interaction and reactions between the species, and optically thin radiative losses. This model improves upon our previous work in Leake et al.[“Multi-fluid simulations of chromospheric magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma,” Astrophys. J. 760, 109 (2012)] by considering realistic chromospheric transport coefficients, and by solving a generalized Ohm's law that accounts for finite ion-inertia and electron-neutral drag. We find that during the two dimensional reconnection of a Harris current sheet with an initial width larger than the neutral-ion collisional coupling scale, the current sheet thins until its width becomes less than this coupling scale, and the neutral and ion fluids decouple upstream from the reconnection site. During this process of decoupling, we observe reconnection faster than the single-fluid Sweet-Parker prediction, with recombination and plasma outflow both playing a role in determining the reconnection rate. As the current sheet thins further and elongates, it becomes unstable to the secondary tearing instability, and plasmoids are seen. The reconnection rate, outflows, and plasmoids observed in this simulation provide evidence that magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere could be responsible for jet-like transient phenomena such as spicules and chromospheric jets.

  14. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  15. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?

    Abstract
    High doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  16. Electron impact ionization and attachment cross sections for H2S. [in comet and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure, by electron impact, appearance potentials and the cross sections for ionization, dissociative ionization, and electron attachment for H2S. Results are presented, and discussed individually, for both positive and negative ions. A schematic diagram of the experimental setup is included.

  17. DESI-MS/MS of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Paul A.

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used to headspace ­sample chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products from glass vials and glass vials containing spiked media, including Dacron swabs, office carpet, paper and fabric. The interface of the Z-spray source was modified to permit safe introduction of the SPME fibers for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (DESI-MS) analysis. A "dip and shoot" method was also developed for the rapid sampling and DESI-MS analysis of chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products in liquid samples. Sampling was performed by simply dipping fused silica, stainless steel or SPME tips into the organic or aqueous samples. Replicate analyses were completed within several minutes under ambient conditions with no sample pre-treatment, resulting in a significant increase in sample throughput. The developed sample handling and analysis method was applied to the determination of chemical warfare agent content in samples containing unknown chemical and/or biological warfare agents. Ottawa sand was spiked with sulfur mustard, extracted with water and autoclaved to ensure sterility. Sulfur mustard was completely hydrolysed during the extraction/autoclave step and thiodiglycol was identified by DESI-MS, with analyses generally being completed within 1 min using the "dip and shoot" method.

  18. Mass spectrometry for the detection of bioterrorism agents: from environmental to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Armengaud, Jean; Fenaille, François; Ezan, Eric

    2016-03-01

    In the current context of international conflicts and localized terrorist actions, there is unfortunately a permanent threat of attacks with unconventional warfare agents. Among these, biological agents such as toxins, microorganisms, and viruses deserve particular attention owing to their ease of production and dissemination. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for the detection and quantification of biological agents have a decisive role to play for countermeasures in a scenario of biological attacks. The application of MS to every field of both organic and macromolecular species has in recent years been revolutionized by the development of soft ionization techniques (MALDI and ESI), and by the continuous development of MS technologies (high resolution, accurate mass HR/AM instruments, novel analyzers, hybrid configurations). New possibilities have emerged for exquisite specific and sensitive detection of biological warfare agents. MS-based strategies for clinical application can now address a wide range of analytical questions mainly including issues related to the complexity of biological samples and their available volume. Multiplexed toxin detection, discovery of new markers through omics approaches, and identification of untargeted microbiological or of novel molecular targets are examples of applications. In this paper, we will present these technological advances along with the novel perspectives offered by omics approaches to clinical detection and follow-up. PMID:26956386

  19. Ionization and expansion of barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently envelope 3D model is used here to study the motion of the barium clouds released in the ionosphere, including the ionization stage. The ionization and the expansion of the barium clouds and the interaction between the clouds and the background ions are investigated using three simulations: a cloud without a directional velocity, a cloud with an initial velocity of 5 km/s across the B field, and a cloud with initial velocity components of 2 km/s both along and across the B field.

  20. Heater-induced ionization inferred from spectrometric airglow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Miceli, R. J.; Varney, R. H.; Schlatter, N.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Spectrographic airglow measurements were made during an ionospheric modification experiment at HAARP on March 12, 2013. Artificial airglow enhancements at 427.8, 557.7, 630.0, 777.4, and 844.6 nm were observed. On the basis of these emissions and using a methodology based on the method of Backus and Gilbert [1968, 1970], we estimate the suprathermal electron population and the subsequent equilibrium electron density profile, including contributions from electron impact ionization. We find that the airglow is consistent with significant induced ionization in view of the spatial intermittency of the airglow.

  1. Direct Observations of the Evolution of Polar Cap Ionization Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, B.; Lockwood, M. M.; Hu, H.; Moen, J. I.; Ruohoniemi, J.; Thomas, E. G.; Zhang, S.; Yang, H.; Liu, R.; McWilliams, K. A.; Baker, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Patches of ionization are common in the polar ionosphere where their motion and associated density gradients give variable disturbances to High Frequency (HF) radio communications, over-the-horizon radar location errors, and disruption and errors to satellite navigation and communication. Their formation and evolution are poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report direct observations of the full evolution of patches during a geomagnetic storm, including formation, polar cap entry, transpolar evolution, polar cap exit, and sunward return flow. Our observations show that modulation of nightside reconnection in the substorm cycle of the magnetosphere helps form the gaps between patches where steady convection would give a 'tongue' of ionization (TOI).

  2. Ionization coefficient approach to modeling breakdown in nonuniform geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Nicolaysen, Scott D.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the work on breakdown modeling in nonuniform geometries by the ionization coefficient approach. Included are: (1) fits to primary and secondary ionization coefficients used in the modeling; (2) analytical test cases for sphere-to-sphere, wire-to-wire, corner, coaxial, and rod-to-plane geometries; a compilation of experimental data with source references; comparisons between code results, test case results, and experimental data. A simple criterion is proposed to differentiate between corona and spark. The effect of a dielectric surface on avalanche growth is examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The presence of a clean dry surface does not appear to enhance growth.

  3. Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

  4. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  5. Ionization of Rydberg atoms colliding with a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sjakste, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    2006-04-15

    We report on a theoretical study of the ionization process of Xe* Rydberg atoms colliding with a metal surface, in the presence of an external electric field. The evolution of the Xe* outer electron is studied by a wave packet propagation approach, allowing to include all dynamical aspects of the collision, in particular nonadiabatic inter-Rydberg transitions. We investigate how the different Xe* Stark states formed in the external field couple together and ionize on the surface and how the different polarizations of the electronic cloud in the Xe* states are reflected in their ionization properties. We show that the presence of the external electric field can significantly perturb the dynamics of the ionization process. Our results account for recent results from Dunning et al. [Nucl. Inst. Meth. B 203, 69 (2003)]. In particular, it is explained how the external electric field present in the experimental procedure of Dunning et al. leads to the apparent absence of a polarization effect in the ionization process.

  6. Natural products as antimitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Natural products still play an important role in the medicinal chemistry, especially in some therapeutic areas. As example more than 60% of currently-used anticancer agents are derives from natural sources including plants, marine organisms or micro-organism. Thus natural products (NP) are an high-impact source of new "lead compounds" or new potential therapeutic agents despite the large development of biotechnology and combinatorial chemistry in the drug discovery and development. Many examples of anticancer drugs as paclitaxel, combretastatin, bryostatin and discodermolide have shown the importance of NP in the anticancer chemotherapy through many years. Many organisms have been studied as sources of drugs namely plants, micro-organisms and marine organisms and the obtained NP can be considered a group of "privileged chemical structures" evolved in nature to interact with other organisms. For this reason NP are a good starting points for pharmaceutical research and also for library design. Tubulin and microtubules are one of the most studied targets for the search of anticancer compounds. Microtubule targeting agents (MTA) also named antimitotic agents are compounds that are able to perturb mitosis but are also able to arrest cell growing during interphase. The anticancer drugs, taxanes and vinca alkaloids have established tubulin as important target in cancer therapy. More recently the vascular disrupting agents (VDA) combretastatin analogues were studied for their antimitotics properties. This review will consider the anti mitotic NP and their potential impact in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  7. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on selected optical materials: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1992-07-30

    This report gives an overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on optical materials that may be used in spacecraft sensors. It introduces the relevant phenomena and indicates were more detailed information can be found. The topics covered include radiation induced absorption in ultraviolet transmitting materials, ordinary optical glasses, cerium stabilized optical glasses, and infrared transmitting materials; bleaching and annealing, and radioluminesence.

  9. Very small ionization pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A very small ionization pressure gauge has been developed to operate in the pressure range 10/sup -6/ Torr to 100..mu... A metal construction and external cooling fins result in a very rugged device with exceptionally small outgassing properties. The gauge also incorporates a replaceable filament-grid assembly on a single plug which allows the simple replacement of both the filament and the grid when needed.

  10. Green-function approach to the theory of tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, I. I.; Zhao, L. B.

    2015-05-01

    We solve the problem of tunneling ionization of a multielectron atom in a static electric field by using the Green's function for the Stark-Coulomb problem. This allows us to incorporate the outgoing-wave boundary conditions at infinity. The interaction of the active electron with the atomic residue is described either by a model potential or by the l -dependent pseudopotential which prevents virtual transitions to orbitals occupied by inner electrons. The method works well in the broad range of electric fields including the region above the classical ionization threshold (the barrier-suppression region). Calculations of ionization of Ar demonstrate a noticeable difference between the model potential approach and the pseudopotential approach, but both sets of results agree with experimental data.

  11. Calculating electron beam properties in an ionized benzene channel

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.R.

    1986-08-01

    We have derived formulas for the equilibrium-beam radius and other properties of an electron beam propagating in an ionized benzene channel. These formulas have been determined for two special cases. The first was for Gaussian spatial profiles for both the electron and laser beams. We obtained an analytical result for the equilibrium-beam radius, even though we included both KrF laser-induced and collisional sources of ionization of different sizes. The second case we considered was for laser and electron beams with flat radial profiles. These calculations were performed to determine if a laser-guided electron beam could reduce the focal size of an electron accelerator. We also developed a personal-computer spreadsheet program that receives 10 inputs and calculates 26 dependent quantities relating to the beam and ionization properties.

  12. Examination of nonequilibrium effects in an ionized nitrogen flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, John A.; Candler, Graham V.

    1993-01-01

    A thermo-chemical nonequilibrium ionized nitrogen flow in a shock tube is examined. A one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code has been developed to study the flowfield incorporating a novel treatment of the electron energy equation. In the present approach, the electron pressure is included in the electron energy flux. In contrast, previous work has removed this term from the flux to facilitate the flux splitting. The code uses a five-species gas model for ionized nitrogen characterized by translational-rotational, vibrational, and electron-electronic temperatures. The results give good agreement with experimental data except for an inadequacy in the electronic source terms. A small difference is observed between the new and old splittings which increases with higher levels of ionization.

  13. Role of centennial geomagnetic changes in local atmospheric ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I. G.; Korte, M.; Kovaltsov, G. A.

    2008-03-01

    Many studies of solar-terrestrial relation are based on globally (or hemispherically) averaged quantities, including the average cosmic ray flux. However, regional effects of cosmic ray induced ionization due to geomagnetic changes may be comparable to or even dominate over the solar signal at mid-latitudes on centennial-to-millennial time scales. We show that local changes of the tropospheric ionization due to fast migration of the geomagnetic axis are crucial on centennial time scale, and the use of global averages may smear an important effect. We conclude that changes of the regional tropospheric ionization at mid-latitudes are defined by both geomagnetic changes and solar activity, and none of the two processes can be neglected. This substantiates a necessity for a careful analysis of the regional, not global, indices at mid-latitudes and offers a new possibility to disentangle direct (solar radiation) and indirect (via cosmic rays) effects in the solar-terrestrial relations.

  14. Associative ionization reactions involving excited atoms in nitrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, N. A.

    2009-05-15

    A model of kinetic processes in gas-discharge plasmas of pure nitrogen and its mixtures with nitrogen oxide and oxygen is presented. A distinctive feature of the model is that it includes associative ionization reactions involving N({sup 2}P) electronically excited atoms. Taking into account these processes allows one to explain both the anomalously slow decay of gas-discharge nitrogen plasma and the increase in the electron density in the region of the so-called pink afterglow in nitrogen. The possibility of substantially accelerating secondary ionization by adding NO molecules to a partially dissociated nitrogen is demonstrated. It is shown that such acceleration is caused by the associative ionization reaction N({sup 2}P) + O({sup 3}P) {yields} e + NO{sup +}. The calculated results agree well with available experimental data.

  15. Chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S; Chauhan, S; D'Cruz, R; Faruqi, S; Singh, K K; Varma, S; Singh, M; Karthik, V

    2008-09-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA's) are defined as any chemical substance whose toxic properties are utilised to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy in warfare and associated military operations. Chemical agents have been used in war since times immemorial, but their use reached a peak during World War I. During World War II only the Germans used them in the infamous gas chambers. Since then these have been intermittently used both in war and acts of terrorisms. Many countries have stockpiles of these agents. There has been a legislative effort worldwide to ban the use of CWA's under the chemical weapons convention which came into force in 1997. However the manufacture of these agents cannot be completely prohibited as some of them have potential industrial uses. Moreover despite the remedial measures taken so far and worldwide condemnation, the ease of manufacturing these agents and effectiveness during combat or small scale terrorist operations still make them a powerful weapon to reckon with. These agents are classified according to mechanism of toxicity in humans into blister agents, nerve agents, asphyxiants, choking agents and incapacitating/behavior altering agents. Some of these agents can be as devastating as a nuclear bomb. In addition to immediate injuries caused by chemical agents, some of them are associated with long term morbidities and psychological problems. In this review we will discuss briefly about the historical background, properties, manufacture techniques and industrial uses, mechanism of toxicity, clinical features of exposure and pharmacological management of casualties caused by chemical agents. PMID:21783898

  16. Low-density ionization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    As part of a continuing study of the physics of matter under extreme conditions, I give some results on matter at extremely low density. In particular I compare a quantum mechanical calculation of the pressure for atomic hydrogen with the corresponding pressure given by Thomas-Fermi theory. (This calculation differs from the ``confined atom`` approximation in a physically significant way.) Since Thomas-Fermi theory in some sense, represents the case of infinite nuclear charge, these cases should represent extremes. Comparison is also made with Saha theory, which considers ionization from a chemical point of view, but is weak on excited-state effects. In this theory, the pressure undergoes rapid variation as electron ionization levels are passed. This effect is in contrast to the smooth behavior of the Thomas-Fermi fixed temperature, complete ionization occurs in the low density limit, I study the case where the temperature goes appropriately to zero with the density. Although considerable modification is required, Saha theory is closer to the actual results for this case than is Thomas-Fermi theory.

  17. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  18. Nanotip Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Lee, Jae Kyoo; Kim, Samuel C; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    A method called nanotip ambient ionization mass spectrometry (NAIMS) is described, which applies high voltage between a tungsten nanotip and a metal plate to generate a plasma in which ionized analytes on the surface of the metal plate are directed to the inlet and analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The dependence of signal intensity is investigated as a function of the tip-to-plate distance, the tip size, the voltage applied at the tip, and the current. These parameters are separately optimized to achieve sensitivity or high spatial resolution. A partially observable Markov decision process is used to achieve a stabilized plasma as well as high ionization efficiency. As a proof of concept, the NAIMS technique has been applied to phenanthrene and caffeine samples for which the limits of detection were determined to be 0.14 fmol for phenanthrene and 4 amol for caffeine and to a printed caffeine pattern for which a spatial resolution of 8 ± 2 μm, and the best resolution of 5 μm, was demonstrated. The limitations of NAIMS are also discussed. PMID:27087600

  19. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  20. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  1. Femtosecond growth dynamics of an underdense ionization front measured by spectral blueshifting

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.M.; Siders, C.W.; Downer, M.C.

    1993-06-01

    A comprehensive report of time-resolved spectral blue shifts of 100-femtosecond laser pulses caused by ionization of atmospheric density N{sub 2} and noble gases subjected to high (10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} - 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) light intensities is presented. Included are data for two experiments: (1) self-shifting of the ionizing laser pulses for varying peak intensities, pressures (1-5 atm.), and gas species; and (2) time-resolved blueshifts of a weak copropagating probe pulse for the same range of ionization conditions. The self-shift data reveal a universal, reproducible pattern in the shape of the blueshifted spectra: as laser intensity, gas pressure, or atomic number increase, the self-blueshifted spectra develop from a near replica of the incident pulse spectrum into a complex structure consisting of two spectral peaks. The time-resolved data reveal different temporal dependence for each of these two features. A quantitative model for a simplified cylindrical focal geometry is presented which explains the presence of the two spectral features in terms of two distinct ionization mechanisms: collisionless tunneling ionization, which dominates early in the ionizing pulse profile, and electron impact ionization, which dominates during the intense maximum of the ionizing pulse. Transient resonant enhancements may also contribute to ionization near the peak of the pulse.

  2. Femtosecond growth dynamics of an underdense ionization front measured by spectral blueshifting

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.M.; Siders, C.W.; Downer, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive report of time-resolved spectral blue shifts of 100-femtosecond laser pulses caused by ionization of atmospheric density N[sub 2] and noble gases subjected to high (10[sup 14] W/cm[sup 2] - 10[sup 16] W/cm[sup 2]) light intensities is presented. Included are data for two experiments: (1) self-shifting of the ionizing laser pulses for varying peak intensities, pressures (1-5 atm.), and gas species; and (2) time-resolved blueshifts of a weak copropagating probe pulse for the same range of ionization conditions. The self-shift data reveal a universal, reproducible pattern in the shape of the blueshifted spectra: as laser intensity, gas pressure, or atomic number increase, the self-blueshifted spectra develop from a near replica of the incident pulse spectrum into a complex structure consisting of two spectral peaks. The time-resolved data reveal different temporal dependence for each of these two features. A quantitative model for a simplified cylindrical focal geometry is presented which explains the presence of the two spectral features in terms of two distinct ionization mechanisms: collisionless tunneling ionization, which dominates early in the ionizing pulse profile, and electron impact ionization, which dominates during the intense maximum of the ionizing pulse. Transient resonant enhancements may also contribute to ionization near the peak of the pulse.

  3. [New agents for hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier; García Gómez, María Carmen

    2016-02-19

    An elevated proportion of high cardiovascular risk patients do not achieve the therapeutic c-LDL goals. This owes to physicians' inappropriate or insufficient use of cholesterol lowering medications or to patients' bad tolerance or therapeutic compliance. Another cause is an insufficient efficacy of current cholesterol lowering drugs including statins and ezetimibe. In addition, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 inhibitors are a new cholesterol lowering medications showing safety and high efficacy to reduce c-LDL in numerous already performed or underway clinical trials, potentially allowing an optimal control of hypercholesterolemia in most patients. Agents inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis and microsomal transfer protein are also providing a new potential to decrease cholesterol in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia and in particular in homozygote familial hypercholesterolemia. Last, cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have shown powerful effects on c-HDL and c-LDL, although their efficacy in cardiovascular prevention and safety has not been demonstrated yet. We provide in this article an overview of the main characteristics of therapeutic agents for hypercholesterolemia, which have been recently approved or in an advanced research stage.

  4. Beam cooling with ionization losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbia, C.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2006-12-01

    This novel type of Ionization Cooling is an effective method in order to enhance the (strong) interaction probability of slow (few MeV/A) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin target strongly improve the nuclear reaction rate with respect to a single-pass collision, in a steady configuration in which ionization losses of a target "foil" (typically few hundred μg/cm 2 thick) are continuously recovered by an RF-cavity. With a flat foil, betatron oscillations are "cooled", but the momentum spread diverges exponentially, since faster (slower) particles ionize less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" the beam also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge-shaped "foil". Therefore, in equilibrium conditions, multiple scattering and straggling are both balanced by phase-space compression. Classic Ionization Cooling [A.A. Kolomensky, Atomnaya Energiya 19 (1965) 534; Yu.M. Ado, V.I. Balbekov, Atomnaya Energiya 31(1) (1971) 40-44; A.N. Skrinsky, V.V. Parkhomchuk, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 12 (1981) 3; E.A. Perevendentsev, A.N. Skrinsky, in: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on High Energy Acceleration, 1983, p. 485] is designed to cool the direct beam until it has been compressed and extracted for further use. In practice, this limits its applicability to non-interacting muon beams. Instead, in this new method, applicable to strongly interacting collisions, the circulating beam is not extracted. Ionization cooling provides "in situ" storage of the beam until it is converted by a nuclear interaction with the target. Simple reactions—for instance 7Li+D→8Li+p—are more favourably produced in the "mirror" kinematical frame, namely with a heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D 2 target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with angles in a narrow angular cone (around ˜10° for the mentioned reaction) and with a relatively concentrated outgoing energy spectrum which allows an efficient collection of 8

  5. Measurements of the time constant for steady ionization in shaped-charge barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoch, Edward L.; Hallinan, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of three solar illuminated shaped-charge barium releases injected at small angles to the magnetic field were made using a calibrated color television camera. Two of the releases were from 1989. The third release, a reanalysis of an event included in Hallinan's 1988 study of three 1986 releases, was included to provide continuity between the two studies. Time constants for ionization, measured during the first 25 s of each release, were found to vary considerably. The two 1989 time constants differed substantially, and both were significantly less than any of the 1986 time constants. On the basis of this variability, we conclude that the two 1989 releases showed evidence of continuous nonsolar ionization. One release showed nonsolar ionization which could not he attributed to Alfven's critical ionization velocity process, which requires a component of velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field providing a perpendicular energy greater than the ionization potential.

  6. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  7. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  8. Mother ship and physical agents collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Budulas, Peter P.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that investigates the feasibility of developing a collaboration architecture between small physical agents and a mother ship. This incudes the distribution of planning, perception, mobility, processing and communications requirements between the mother ship and the agents. Small physical agents of the future will be virtually everywhere on the battlefield of the 21st century. A mother ship that is coupled to a team of small collaborating physical agents (conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); logistics; sentry; and communications relay) will be used to build a completely effective and mission capable intelligent system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the smaller agents. The mother ship also establishes a robust communications network between the agents and is the primary information disseminating and receiving point to the external world. Because of its global knowledge and processing power, the mother ship does the high-level control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. This high level control and interaction between the mother ship and its agents (including inter agent collaboration) will be software agent architecture based. The mother ship incorporates multi-resolution battlefield visualization and analysis technology, which aids in mission planning and sensor fusion.

  9. The EO-1 Autonomous Science Agent Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Lee, Rachel; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Hengemihle, Jerry; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Ungar, Stephen; Brakke, Thomas; Boyer, Darrell; Van Gaasbeck, Jim; Greeley, Ronald; Doggett, Thomas; Baker, Victor; Dohm, James; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent is currently flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and respond to science events occurring on the Earth. The package includes software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. Because of the deployment to a remote spacecraft, this Autonomous Science Agent has stringent constraints of autonomy, reliability, and limited computing resources. We describe these constraints and how they are reflected in our agent architecture.

  10. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  11. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Rouzée, A.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-11-01

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO2 molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  12. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  13. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  14. The Tevatron Ionization Profile Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bowie, K.; Kwarciany, R.; Lundberg, C.; Slimmer, D.; Valerio, L.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    In designing an ionization profile monitor system for the Tevatron some novel approaches were taken, in particular for the readout electronics. This was motivated by the desire to resolve the individual bunches in both beams simultaneously. For this purpose, custom made electronics originally developed for Particle Physics experiments was used to provide a fast charge integration with very low noise. The various parts of the read-out electronics have been borrowed or adapted from the KTev, CMS, MINOS and BTev experiments. The detector itself also had to be modified to provide clean signals with sufficient bandwidth. The system design will be described along with the initial results.

  15. Opinion evolution influenced by informed agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kangqi; Pedrycz, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Guiding public opinions toward a pre-set target by informed agents can be a strategy adopted in some practical applications. The informed agents are common agents who are employed or chosen to spread the pre-set opinion. In this work, we propose a social judgment based opinion (SJBO) dynamics model to explore the opinion evolution under the influence of informed agents. The SJBO model distinguishes between inner opinions and observable choices, and incorporates both the compromise between similar opinions and the repulsion between dissimilar opinions. Three choices (support, opposition, and remaining undecided) are considered in the SJBO model. Using the SJBO model, both the inner opinions and the observable choices can be tracked during the opinion evolution process. The simulation results indicate that if the exchanges of inner opinions among agents are not available, the effect of informed agents is mainly dependent on the characteristics of regular agents, including the assimilation threshold, decay threshold, and initial opinions. Increasing the assimilation threshold and decay threshold can improve the guiding effectiveness of informed agents. Moreover, if the initial opinions of regular agents are close to null, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion can be realized, indicating that, to maximize the influence of informed agents, the guidance should be started when regular agents have little knowledge about a subject under consideration. If the regular agents have had clear opinions, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion cannot be achieved. However, the introduction of informed agents can make the majority of agents choose the pre-set opinion.

  16. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  17. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Kim, K. C.; Seo, E. S.; Sina, R.; Wang, J. Z.; Wu, J.; Case, G.; Ellison, S. B.; Gould, R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) experiment is designed to measure the composition and energy spectra of Z = 1 to 28 cosmic rays over the energy range of approximately 10 GeV - 100 TeV. ATIC is comprised of an eight-layer, 18 radiation length deep Bismuth Germanate (BGO) calorimeter, downstream of a 0.75 nuclear interaction length graphite target and an approximately 1 sq m finely segmented silicon charge detector. Interleaved with the graphite layers are three scintillator strip hodoscopes for pre-triggering and tracking. ATIC flew for the first time on a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) launched from McMurdo, Antarctica in January 2001. During its 16-day flight ATIC collected more than 30 million science events, along with housekeeping, calibration, and rate data. This presentation will describe the ATIC data processing, including calibration and efficiency corrections, and show results from analysis of this dataset. The next launch is planned for December 2002.

  18. Influence of Dust Loading on Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  19. Influence of dust loading on atmospheric ionizing radiation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  20. Next Generation Remote Agent Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Muscettola, Nicola; Morris, Paul H.; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    In May 1999, as part of a unique technology validation experiment onboard the Deep Space One spacecraft, the Remote Agent became the first complete autonomous spacecraft control architecture to run as flight software onboard an active spacecraft. As one of the three components of the architecture, the Remote Agent Planner had the task of laying out the course of action to be taken, which included activities such as turning, thrusting, data gathering, and communicating. Building on the successful approach developed for the Remote Agent Planner, the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner is a completely redesigned and reimplemented version of the planner. The new system provides all the key capabilities of the original planner, while adding functionality, improving performance and providing a modular and extendible implementation. The goal of this ongoing project is to develop a system that provides both a basis for future applications and a framework for further research in the area of autonomous planning for spacecraft. In this article, we present an introductory overview of the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner. We present a new and simplified definition of the planning problem, describe the basics of the planning process, lay out the new system design and examine the functionality of the core reasoning module.

  1. Investigational Antimicrobial Agents of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  2. Electron-impact ionization of complex atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorov, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2004-05-01

    We have further developed the computer code RMATRX-ION [1] to treat electron-impact ionization of atoms and ions by a hybrid approach, in which the interaction of a ``fast'' projectile with the target is treated perturbatively while the initial bound state and the interaction between a ``slow'' ejected electron and the residual ion is described through a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Work is currently in progress to extend the general Belfast R-matrix suite of codes [2] for electron and photon collisions by implementing the possibility of treating ionization, ionization-excitation, and double-ionization by charged-particle impact. Results for ionization and simultaneous ionization-excitation of various systems (He, Ca, Rb) by electron impact will be presented. [1] K. Bartschat, Comp. Phys. Commun. 75 (1993) 219 [2] K.A. Berrington, W.B. Eissner, and P.H. Norrington, Comp. Phys. Commun. 92 (1995) 290

  3. Phytonutrients as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients present in various foods plays an important role in maintaining the normal functions of the human body. The major nutrients present in foods include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. Besides these, there are some bioactive food components known as "phytonutrients" that play an important role in human health. They have tremendous impact on the health care system and may provide medical health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of disease and various physiological disorders. Phytonutrients play a positive role by maintaining and modulating immune function to prevent specific diseases. Being natural products, they hold a great promise in clinical therapy as they possess no side effects that are usually associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. They are also comparatively cheap and thus significantly reduce health care cost. Phytonutrients are the plant nutrients with specific biological activities that support human health. Some of the important bioactive phytonutrients include polyphenols, terpenoids, resveratrol, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, carotenoids, limonoids, glucosinolates, phytoestrogens, phytosterols, anthocyanins, ω-3 fatty acids, and probiotics. They play specific pharmacological effects in human health such as anti-microbial, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anti-spasmodic, anti-cancer, anti-aging, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, neuroprotective, hypotensive, diabetes, osteoporosis, CNS stimulant, analgesic, protection from UVB-induced carcinogenesis, immuno-modulator, and carminative. This mini-review attempts to summarize the major important types of phytonutrients and their role in promoting human health and as therapeutic agents along with the current market trend and commercialization.

  4. Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin; Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer; Tichy, Milan

    2014-04-21

    The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ξ. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

  5. [Measurement of mutagenesis to study the effects of chemical agents]. Final report, August 1, 1993--July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, T.T.

    1994-12-31

    This is the final report of a study conducted at the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Inc. This study looked at mutagenesis as a measurement of the effects of chemical agents. Topics discussed in this report include: development of a new theory for the role of lipids and lipoproteins in the interactions of macromolecules; the action of caffeine in synergizing mutagenesis of agents like ionizing radiation by inhibition of cellular repair processes which was incorporated into a rapid procedure for detection of mutagenicity with high sensitivity; quantitative theoretical analysis of the mutagenesis process in cells exposed to physical and chemical mutagenic agents; theoretical analysis was developed leading to the conclusion that the visible chromosomal lesions described will also include a significant proportion of point mutations; application of this methodology for meaningful measurement of mutagenesis to study the effects of chemical agents was begun; and investigation of the cell cytoskeleton`s effect of genome exposure operating in the course of the differentiation process.

  6. Low-Pressure, Field-Ionizing Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank; Smith, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A small mass spectrometer utilizing a miniature field ionization source is now undergoing development. It is designed for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for a lightweight, low-power-consumption instrument that can analyze the masses of a wide variety of molecules and ions. The device can operate without need for a high-vacuum, carrier-gas feed radioactive ionizing source, or thermal ionizer. This mass spectrometer can operate either in the natural vacuum of outer space or on Earth at any ambient pressure below 50 torr (below about 6.7 kPa) - a partial vacuum that can easily be reached by use of a small sampling pump. This mass spectrometer also has a large dynamic range - from singly charged small gas ions to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments larger than 104 atomic mass units - with sensitivity adequate for detecting some molecules and ions at relative abundances of less than one part per billion. This instrument (see figure) includes a field ionizer integrated with a rotating-field mass spectrometer (RFMS). The field ionizer effects ionization of a type characterized as "soft" in the art because it does not fragment molecules or initiate avalanche arcing. What makes the "soft" ionization mode possible is that the distance between the ionizing electrodes is less than mean free path for ions at the maximum anticipated operating pressure, so that the ionizer always operates on the non-breakdown side of the applicable Paschen curve (a standard plot of breakdown potential on the ordinate and pressure electrode separation on the abscissa). The field ionizer in this instrument is fabricated by micromachining a submicron-thick membrane out of an electrically nonconductive substrate, coating the membrane on both sides to form electrodes, then micromachining small holes through the electrodes and membrane. Because of the submicron electrode separation, even a potential of only 1 V applied between the electrodes gives rise to an electric

  7. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  8. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  9. Two-step single-ionization mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyen, R. W. van; Doering, J. P.; Watanabe, N.; Cooper, J. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.

    2006-03-15

    In a recent publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 233202 (2004)] two different electron impact double ionization (e,3e) mechanisms were identified and the way in which two-electron momentum distributions for atoms and molecules could be obtained by triple coincidence (e,3e) measurements was discussed. The apparatus used detected the two ejected electrons both in and out of the scattering plane at an angle of 45 deg. to the momentum transfer direction in triple coincidence with the scattered electron. Ejected electrons detected out of the scattering plane were shown to be a result of two-step double ionization processes. With the same apparatus we have made double coincidence (e,2e) measurements of electron impact single ionization cross sections for ionization of magnesium 3s (valence) and 2p and 2s (inner) shell electrons at incident energies from 400 to 3000 eV in order to obtain more information about two-step ionization. The experimental results were compared with distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations carried out to second order. For the experimental conditions, two-step ionization processes involving one ionizing collision and a second elastic collision with the atomic core are the dominant contribution to the measured cross sections. Calculations are in moderate agreement with the data. The angular distributions of the ionized electrons in these two-step ionizations reflect the initial momentum distributions of the target electrons, a result that is analogous with the earlier (e,3e) measurements.

  10. Tunneling Ionization Time Resolved by Backpropagation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2016-07-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular, the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion. PMID:27447504

  11. H to Zn Ionization Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron κ-distributions: Updated Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, E.; Dudík, J.

    2013-05-01

    New data for the calculation of ionization and recombination rates have been published in the past few years, most of which are included in the CHIANTI database. We used these data to calculate collisional ionization and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian κ-distributions with an enhanced number of particles in the high-energy tail, which have been detected in the solar transition region and the solar wind. Ionization equilibria for elements H to Zn are derived. The κ-distributions significantly influence both the ionization and recombination rates and widen the ion abundance peaks. In comparison with the Maxwellian distribution, the ion abundance peaks can also be shifted to lower or higher temperatures. The updated ionization equilibrium calculations result in large changes for several ions, notably Fe VIII-Fe XIV. The results are supplied in electronic form compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  12. Influence of renormalization shielding on the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-04-15

    The renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom are investigated in dense partially ionized plasmas. The effective projectile-target interaction Hamiltonian and the semiclassical trajectory method are employed to obtain the transition amplitude as well as the ionization probability as functions of the impact parameter, the collision energy, and the renormalization parameter. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect suppresses the transition amplitude for the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas. It is also found that the renormalization effect suppresses the differential ionization cross section in the peak impact parameter region. In addition, it is found that the influence of renormalization shielding on the ionization cross section decreases with an increase of the relative collision energy. The variations of the renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization cross section are also discussed.

  13. Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage Compendium of Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Chen, Dakai; Oldham, Timothy R.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Kim, Hak S.; Campola, Michael J.; Buchner, Stephen P.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Carts, Martin A.; O'Bryan, Martha V.

    2010-01-01

    Vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices.

  14. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wan-Ting; Dai, Ming-Xiang; Xue, Fang-Zheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all of the agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all of the agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups and that agents in the same group collaborate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203080 and 61473051) and the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City (Grant No. CSTC 2011BB0081).

  15. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials.

  16. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  17. God's Beliefs versus Mother's: The Development of Nonhuman Agent Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Justin L.; Richert, Rebekah A.; Driesenga, Amanda

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments examined assumption that children attribute human properties to nonhuman agents. Two- to 8-year-olds participated in false-belief tests concerning human and various nonhuman agents, including animals and God, and in a modified perspective-taking task including nonhuman agents. Results suggested that children do not consistently…

  18. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    PubMed

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-01

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS.

  19. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course.Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations,which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

  20. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    : Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course. Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations, which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

  1. Agent Reward Shaping for Alleviating Traffic Congestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Traffic congestion problems provide a unique environment to study how multi-agent systems promote desired system level behavior. What is particularly interesting in this class of problems is that no individual action is intrinsically "bad" for the system but that combinations of actions among agents lead to undesirable outcomes, As a consequence, agents need to learn how to coordinate their actions with those of other agents, rather than learn a particular set of "good" actions. This problem is ubiquitous in various traffic problems, including selecting departure times for commuters, routes for airlines, and paths for data routers. In this paper we present a multi-agent approach to two traffic problems, where far each driver, an agent selects the most suitable action using reinforcement learning. The agent rewards are based on concepts from collectives and aim to provide the agents with rewards that are both easy to learn and that if learned, lead to good system level behavior. In the first problem, we study how agents learn the best departure times of drivers in a daily commuting environment and how following those departure times alleviates congestion. In the second problem, we study how agents learn to select desirable routes to improve traffic flow and minimize delays for. all drivers.. In both sets of experiments,. agents using collective-based rewards produced near optimal performance (93-96% of optimal) whereas agents using system rewards (63-68%) barely outperformed random action selection (62-64%) and agents using local rewards (48-72%) performed worse than random in some instances.

  2. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  3. The role of partial ionization effects in the chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-05-28

    The energy for the coronal heating must be provided from the convection zone. However, the amount and the method by which this energy is transferred into the corona depend on the properties of the lower atmosphere and the corona itself. We review: (i) how the energy could be built in the lower solar atmosphere, (ii) how this energy is transferred through the solar atmosphere, and (iii) how the energy is finally dissipated in the chromosphere and/or corona. Any mechanism of energy transport has to deal with the various physical processes in the lower atmosphere. We will focus on a physical process that seems to be highly important in the chromosphere and not deeply studied until recently: the ion-neutral interaction effects in the chromosphere. We review the relevance and the role of the partial ionization in the chromosphere and show that this process actually impacts considerably the outer solar atmosphere. We include analysis of our 2.5D radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011 Astron. Astrophys. 531, A154 (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116520)) including the partial ionization effects on the chromosphere and corona and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The photosphere, chromosphere and transition region are partially ionized and the interaction between ionized particles and neutral particles has important consequences on the magneto-thermodynamics of these layers. The partial ionization effects are treated using generalized Ohm's law, i.e. we consider the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. The interaction between the different species affects the modelled atmosphere as follows: (i) the ambipolar diffusion dissipates magnetic energy and increases the minimum temperature in the chromosphere and (ii) the upper chromosphere may get heated and expanded over a greater range of heights. These processes reveal appreciable differences between the modelled atmospheres

  4. The role of partial ionization effects in the chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-04-01

    The energy for the coronal heating must be provided from the convection zone. However, the amount and the method by which this energy is transferred into the corona depend on the properties of the lower atmosphere and the corona itself. We review: (i) how the energy could be built in the lower solar atmosphere, (ii) how this energy is transferred through the solar atmosphere, and (iii) how the energy is finally dissipated in the chromosphere and/or corona. Any mechanism of energy transport has to deal with the various physical processes in the lower atmosphere. We will focus on a physical process that seems to be highly important in the chromosphere and not deeply studied until recently: the ion-neutral interaction effects in the chromosphere. We review the relevance and the role of the partial ionization in the chromosphere and show that this process actually impacts considerably the outer solar atmosphere. We include analysis of our 2.5D radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011 Astron. Astrophys. 531, A154 (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116520)) including the partial ionization effects on the chromosphere and corona and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The photosphere, chromosphere and transition region are partially ionized and the interaction between ionized particles and neutral particles has important consequences on the magneto-thermodynamics of these layers. The partial ionization effects are treated using generalized Ohm's law, i.e. we consider the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. The interaction between the different species affects the modelled atmosphere as follows: (i) the ambipolar diffusion dissipates magnetic energy and increases the minimum temperature in the chromosphere and (ii) the upper chromosphere may get heated and expanded over a greater range of heights. These processes reveal appreciable differences between the modelled atmospheres

  5. The role of partial ionization effects in the chromosphere

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The energy for the coronal heating must be provided from the convection zone. However, the amount and the method by which this energy is transferred into the corona depend on the properties of the lower atmosphere and the corona itself. We review: (i) how the energy could be built in the lower solar atmosphere, (ii) how this energy is transferred through the solar atmosphere, and (iii) how the energy is finally dissipated in the chromosphere and/or corona. Any mechanism of energy transport has to deal with the various physical processes in the lower atmosphere. We will focus on a physical process that seems to be highly important in the chromosphere and not deeply studied until recently: the ion–neutral interaction effects in the chromosphere. We review the relevance and the role of the partial ionization in the chromosphere and show that this process actually impacts considerably the outer solar atmosphere. We include analysis of our 2.5D radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011 Astron. Astrophys. 531, A154 (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116520)) including the partial ionization effects on the chromosphere and corona and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The photosphere, chromosphere and transition region are partially ionized and the interaction between ionized particles and neutral particles has important consequences on the magneto-thermodynamics of these layers. The partial ionization effects are treated using generalized Ohm's law, i.e. we consider the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. The interaction between the different species affects the modelled atmosphere as follows: (i) the ambipolar diffusion dissipates magnetic energy and increases the minimum temperature in the chromosphere and (ii) the upper chromosphere may get heated and expanded over a greater range of heights. These processes reveal appreciable differences between the modelled

  6. The role of partial ionization effects in the chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-05-28

    The energy for the coronal heating must be provided from the convection zone. However, the amount and the method by which this energy is transferred into the corona depend on the properties of the lower atmosphere and the corona itself. We review: (i) how the energy could be built in the lower solar atmosphere, (ii) how this energy is transferred through the solar atmosphere, and (iii) how the energy is finally dissipated in the chromosphere and/or corona. Any mechanism of energy transport has to deal with the various physical processes in the lower atmosphere. We will focus on a physical process that seems to be highly important in the chromosphere and not deeply studied until recently: the ion-neutral interaction effects in the chromosphere. We review the relevance and the role of the partial ionization in the chromosphere and show that this process actually impacts considerably the outer solar atmosphere. We include analysis of our 2.5D radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011 Astron. Astrophys. 531, A154 (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116520)) including the partial ionization effects on the chromosphere and corona and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The photosphere, chromosphere and transition region are partially ionized and the interaction between ionized particles and neutral particles has important consequences on the magneto-thermodynamics of these layers. The partial ionization effects are treated using generalized Ohm's law, i.e. we consider the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. The interaction between the different species affects the modelled atmosphere as follows: (i) the ambipolar diffusion dissipates magnetic energy and increases the minimum temperature in the chromosphere and (ii) the upper chromosphere may get heated and expanded over a greater range of heights. These processes reveal appreciable differences between the modelled atmospheres

  7. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  8. IONIZED NITROGEN AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Neri, R.; Cox, P.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Kneib, J. P.; Lestrade, J. F.; Maiolino, R.; Omont, A.; Richard, J.; Riechers, D.; Thanjavur, K.; Weiss, A.

    2012-06-10

    We present secure [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} detections in two millimeter-bright, strongly lensed objects at high redshift, APM 08279+5255 (z = 3.911) and MM 18423+5938 (z = 3.930), using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Due to its ionization energy [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} is a good tracer of the ionized gas phase in the interstellar medium. The measured fluxes are S([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (4.8 {+-} 0.8) Jy km s{sup -1} and (7.4 {+-} 0.5) Jy km s{sup -1}, respectively, yielding line luminosities of L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for APM 08279+5255 and L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (2.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for MM 18423+5938. Our high-resolution map of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} and 1 mm continuum emission in MM 18423+5938 clearly resolves an Einstein ring in this source and reveals a velocity gradient in the dynamics of the ionized gas. A comparison of these maps with high-resolution EVLA CO observations enables us to perform the first spatially resolved study of the dust continuum-to-molecular gas surface brightness ({Sigma}{sub FIR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup N}{sub CO}, which can be interpreted as the star formation law) in a high-redshift object. We find a steep relation (N = 1.4 {+-} 0.2), consistent with a starbursting environment. We measure a [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR luminosity ratio in APM 08279+5255 and MM 18423+5938 of 9.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, respectively. This is in agreement with the decrease of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR ratio at high FIR luminosities observed in local galaxies.

  9. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  10. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  11. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  12. Characterization of novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laoui, Samir

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of the high contrast of pure optical imaging and the high intrinsic resolution of ultrasound without the necessity of ionizing radiation. Photoacoustic imaging (PM) is neither purely optical nor purely acoustical in nature, but a combination of the two. It is fundamentally based on light excitation and ultrasonic detection. Photoacoustic imaging has been successful without the introduction of exogenous contrast agents; however, to image deeper regions of biological tissue, a contrast agent is necessary. Several types of photoacoustic contrast agents have been made available for diagnostic purposes; however, the majority of literature has focused on gold nanoparticle systems for which the surface-plasmon resonance effect is important. The only option currently available for molecular PM contrast agents is to choose an existing near infrared absorbing fluorescent probes with the hope that they may generate a substantial photoacoustic (PA) response. However, these dyes have been designed with an optimized fluorescence emission response and are not anticipated to generate an adequate photoacoustic response. This dissertation addresses this lack of precedence in the literature for understanding the mechanism of a photoacoustic signal generation from strongly absorbing dye molecules including BODIPY, cyanine and curcumin systems. This work represents preliminary efforts in bringing novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents (MPACs) into the photoacoustic imaging arena. To this end, photoacoustic and optical Z-scan experiments, and quenching studies were employed to demonstrate correlation of photoacoustic emission enhancement with excited state absorption mechanisms. To investigate further the photoacoustic emission in a practical imaging setting, MPACs were imaged using a recently developed photoacoustic imaging tomography system which was constructed exclusively for the purpose of this study.

  13. Electrospray Ionization on Solid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    So, Pui-Kin; Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Development of electrospray ionization on solid substrates (solid-substrate ESI) avoids the clogging problem encountered in conventional capillary-based ESI, allows more convenient sampling and permits new applications. So far, solid-substrate ESI with various materials, e.g., metals, paper, wood, fibers and biological tissue, has been developed, and applications ranging from analysis of pure compounds to complex mixtures as well as in vivo study were demonstrated. Particularly, the capability of solid-substrate ESI in direct analysis of complex samples, e.g., biological fluids and foods, has significantly facilitated mass spectrometric analysis in real-life applications and led to increasingly important roles of these techniques nowadays. In this review, various solid-substrate ESI techniques and their applications are summarized and the prospects in this field are discussed. PMID:26819900

  14. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  15. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  16. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane

    SciTech Connect

    Sayres, Scott G.; Ross, Matt W.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    The ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane is examined here with laser intensities ranging between 7x10{sup 12} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} at 624 nm. The ionization potential of silane determined using both multiphoton ionization (MPI) and tunneling ionization (TI) models agrees with the vertical ionization potential of the molecule. In addition, the application of the tunneling ionization model is extended here to the fragments of silane to determine their appearance potentials. MPI values for SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +}, SiH{sup +}, Si{sup +}, as well as H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are consistent with vertical potentials, whereas the TI measurements are found to be in accord with adiabatic potentials. The tunneling appearance potentials observed for the fragments H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are lower than reported for other techniques. In fact, the appearance potential measurements for these species resulting from silane are lower than their ionization potentials. The fragmentation rate of silane is determined to be nearly 20 times larger than the ionization rate. The main precursor for producing amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, SiH{sub 3}{sup +} is the dominant fragmentation product making up roughly a third of the total ion yield, a substantial increase from other techniques.

  17. Miniature Oxidizer Ionizer for a Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank

    2006-01-01

    A proposed miniature device for ionizing the oxygen (or other oxidizing gas) in a fuel cell would consist mostly of a membrane ionizer using the same principles as those of the device described in the earlier article, Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster (NPO-21057). The oxidizing gas would be completely ionized upon passage through the holes in the membrane ionizer. The resulting positively charged atoms or molecules of oxidizing gas could then, under the influence of the fringe fields of the ionizer, move toward the fuel-cell cathode that would be part of a membrane/electrode assembly comprising the cathode, a solid-electrolyte membrane, and an anode. The electro-oxidized state of the oxidizer atoms and molecules would enhance transfer of them through the cathode, thereby reducing the partial pressure of the oxidizer gas between the ionizer and the fuel-cell cathode, thereby, in turn, causing further inflow of oxidizer gas through the holes in the membrane ionizer. Optionally the ionizer could be maintained at a positive electric potential with respect to the cathode, in which case the resulting electric field would accelerate the ions toward the cathode.

  18. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals including radium-223.

    PubMed

    Brady, Darren; Parker, Chris C; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2013-01-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides including samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate and strontium-89 have been used for decades in the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially from prostate cancer. Emerging evidence of improved survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the first-in-class α-radionuclide, radium-223 (Ra) has rekindled interest in the role of bone-seeking radionuclide therapy.We review the literature for randomized controlled trials of bone-seeking radionuclides and explore some of the issues regarding the optimal use of these agents. In particular, we discuss dose, dose rate, radiobiology, and quality of radiation and postulate on potential future directions in particular combination schedules. β-Emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides have proven ability to control pain in prostate cancer metastatic to bone with pain response rates in the order of 60% to 70% when used as single agents. Most of the published trials were underpowered to detect differences in survival; however, there is evidence of the potential for disease modification when these agents are used in combination with chemotherapy or in multiple cycles.Data from the recent phase III ALSYMPCA trial that compared Ra to placebo in symptomatic CRPC demonstrate a significant improvement in median overall survival of 3.6 months for patients with symptomatic CRPC metastatic to bone treated with 6 cycles of the α-emitting radionuclide Ra compared with placebo. The success of Ra in improving survival in CRPC will lead this agent to become part of the treatment paradigm for this disease, and with such an excellent safety profile, Ra has huge potential in combination strategies as well as for use earlier in the natural history of metastatic prostate cancer.

  19. Photo-ionization and photo-excitation of curcumin investigated by laser flash photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tingting; Kun, Li; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Rongrong; Wu, Xianzheng; Wang, ShiLong

    2013-12-01

    Curcumin (Cur) has putative antitumor properties. In the current study, we examined photophysical and photochemical properties of Cur using laser flash photolysis. The results demonstrated that Cur could be photo-ionized at 355 nm laser pulse to produce radical cation (Currad +) and solvated electron esol- in 7:3 ethanol-water mixtures. The quantum yield of Cur photo-ionization and the ratio of photo-ionization to photo-excitation were also determined. Currad + could be transferred into neutral radical of Cur (Currad ) via deprotonation with the pKa 4.13. The excited singlet of Cur (1Cur*) could be transferred into excited triplet (3Cur*), which could be quenched by oxygen to produce singlet oxygen 1O2∗. Reaction of 3Cur* with tryptophan was confirmed. The results encourage developing curcumin as a photosensitive antitumor agent.

  20. Neoplastic cell transformation by energetic heavy ions and its modification with chemical agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    One of the major deleterious late effects of ionizing radiation is related to the induction of neoplasms. In the present report recent experimental results on neoplastic cell transformation by heavy ions are presented, and possible means to circumvent the carcinogenic effect of space radiation are discussed. Biological effects observed in experiments involving the use of energetic heavy ions accelerated at the Bevalac suggest that many of the biological effects observed in earlier space flight experiments may be due to space radiation, particularly cosmic rays. It is found that the effect of radiation on cell transformation is dose-rate dependent. The frequency of neoplastic transformation for a given dose decreases with a decrease of dose rate of Co-60 gamma rays. It is found that various chemical agents give radiation protection, including DMSO.

  1. Putative neuroprotective agents in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Maes, Michael; Anderson, George; Dean, Olivia M; Moylan, Steven; Berk, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In many individuals with major neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, their disease characteristics are consistent with a neuroprogressive illness. This includes progressive structural brain changes, cognitive and functional decline, poorer treatment response and an increasing vulnerability to relapse with chronicity. The underlying molecular mechanisms of neuroprogression are thought to include neurotrophins and regulation of neurogenesis and apoptosis, neurotransmitters, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, cortisol and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and epigenetic influences. Knowledge of the involvement of each of these pathways implies that specific agents that act on some or multiple of these pathways may thus block this cascade and have neuroprotective properties. This paper reviews the potential of the most promising of these agents, including lithium and other known psychotropics, aspirin, minocycline, statins, N-acetylcysteine, leptin and melatonin. These agents are putative neuroprotective agents for schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  2. Detecting biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Song, Linan; Ahn, Soohyoun; Walt, David R

    2005-10-01

    We developed a fiber-optic, microsphere-based, high-density array composed of 18 species-specific probe microsensors to identify biological warfare agents. We simultaneously identified multiple biological warfare agents in environmental samples by looking at specific probe responses after hybridization and response patterns of the multiplexed array.

  3. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  4. Change Agent Survival Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Folwell L.

    2011-01-01

    Consulting is a rough racket. Only a tarantula hair above IRS agents, meter maids and used car sales people, the profession is a prickly burr for slings and arrows. Throw in education, focus on dysfunctional schools and call oneself a "change agent," and this bad rap all but disappears. Unfortunately, though, consulting/coaching/mentoring in…

  5. Inner-orbital ionization of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, George; Smith, Dale; Tagliamonti, Vincent; Dragan, James

    2016-05-01

    Many coincidence techniques exist to study multiple ionization of molecules by strong laser fields. However, the first ionization step is critical in many experiments, although it is more difficult to obtain information about this initial step. We studied the single electron ionization of I2, as it presents interesting opportunities in that it is heavy and does not expand significantly during the laser pulse. Moreover, there are several distinct low-lying valence orbitals from which the electron may be removed. Most importantly, the kinetic energy release of the I+ + I dissociation channel can be measured and should correspond to well-known valence levels and separated atom limits. As it turns out, we must invoke deep valence orbits, built from the 5s electrons, to explain our data. Ionization from deep orbitals may be possible, as they have a smaller critical internuclear separation for enhanced ionization. We would like to acknowledge support from the NSF under Grant No. PHY-1306845.

  6. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  7. Ferrimagnetic susceptibility contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bach-Gansmo, T

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on superparamagnetic particles have been in clinical development for more than 5 years, and the complexity of their effects is still not elucidated. The relaxivities are frequently used to give an idea of their efficacy, but these parameters can only be used if they are concentration independent. For large superparamagnetic systems, the evolution of the transverse magnetization is biexponential, after an initial loss of magnetization. Both these characteristics of large superparamagnetic systems should lead to prudence in using the relaxivities as indicators of contrast medium efficacy. Susceptibility induced artefacts have been associated with the use of superparamagnetic contrast agents since the first imaging evaluation took place. The range of concentrations where good contrast effect was achieved without inducing artefacts, as well as blurring and metal artefacts were evaluated. The influence of motion on the induction of artefacts was studied, and compared to the artefacts induced by a paramagnetic agent subject to motion. With a suitable concentration of a negative contrast agent, a signal void could be achieved in the region prone to motion, and no artefacts were induced. If the concentration was too high, a displacement of the region close to the contrast agent was observed. The artefacts occurred in a volume surrounding the contrast agent, i.e., also outside the imaging plane. In comparison a positive, paramagnetic contrast agent induced heavy artefacts in the phase encoding direction, appearing as both high intensity regions and black holes, in a mosaic pattern. Clinical trials of the oral contrast agent OMP for abdominal MR imaging showed this agent to be safe and efficacious. OMP increased the diagnostic efficacy of abdominal MR imaging in 2 of 3 cases examined, with a significant decrease in motion artefacts. Susceptibility contrast agents may also be of use in the evaluation of small lesions in the liver. Particulate material

  8. Standard Agent Framework 1

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4)more » Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.« less

  9. How do agents represent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Alex

    Representation is inherent to the concept of an agent, but its importance in complex systems has not yet been widely recognised. In this paper I introduce Peirce's theory of signs, which facilitates a definition of representation in general. In summary, representation means that for some agent, a model is used to stand in for another entity in a way that shapes the behaviour of the agent with respect to that entity. Representation in general is then related to the theories of representation that have developed within different disciplines. I compare theories of representation from metaphysics, military theory and systems theory. Additional complications arise in explaining the special case of mental representations, which is the focus of cognitive science. I consider the dominant theory of cognition — that the brain is a representational device — as well as the sceptical anti-representational response. Finally, I argue that representation distinguishes agents from non-representational objects: agents are objects capable of representation.

  10. The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, S.; Fich, M.; Taylor, R.

    1999-01-01

    A summary of research activities carried out in this eighth and final progress report. The final report includes: this summary document, copies of three published research papers, plus a draft manuscript of a fourth research paper entitled "The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the FarInfrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way; Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo around the W4 Chimney/Supershell." The main activity during the final quarterly reporting period was research on W4, including analysis of the radio and far-infrared images, generation of shell models, a literature search, and preparation of a research manuscript. There will be additional consultation with co-authors prior to submission of the paper to the Astrophysical Journal. The results will be presented at the 4th Tetons Summer Conference on "Galactic Structure, Stars, and the ISM" in May 2000. In this fourth and last paper we show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis shows there is dense interstellar material directly below the shell, evidence that that the lower W4 shell "ran into a brick wall" and stalled, whereas the upper W4 shell achieved "breakout" to form a Galactic chimney. An ionized halo is evidence of Lyman continuum leakage which ionizes the WIM (warm ionized medium). It has long been postulated that the strong winds and abundant ionizing photons from massive stars are responsible for much of the large scale structure in the interstellar medium (ISM), including the ISM in other galaxies. However standard HII region theory predicts few photons will escape the local HII region. The significance of W4 and this work is it provides a direct example of how stellar winds power a galactic chimney, which in turn leads to a low density cavity from which ionizing photons can escape to large distances to ionize the WIM.

  11. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  12. Multi-agent autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  13. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  14. Superequilibrium ionization during adiabatic expansion of a relaxing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, O. V.; Zhdanok, S. A.; Soloukhin, R. I.; Fomin, N. A.

    1980-08-01

    A superequilibrium method for the generation of a weakly ionized plasma in a molecular gas is proposed; the method involves the production of a superequilibrium electron density in a thermally excited and vibrationally frozen molecular gas during expansion in supersonic flow. Experimental results are presented for the case of nitrogen. This method has applications in molecular and laser physics, including preionization in a fast-flow gas-discharge laser, and the study of energy losses in gasdynamic lasers.

  15. a High Resolution Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.; Hecht, A. A.; Mader, D.

    2014-09-01

    An ionization chamber for measuring the energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed as a component of the the new SPIDER detector. Design criteria included energy resolutions of <1% for high energy resolution and increased charge resolution. The ionization chamber will be combined with a high resolution time-of-flight detector to achieve fragment yield measurements with mass and nuclear charge resolutions of 1 amu and Z=1. The present status of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  16. Ionization sensitization of doping in co-deposited organic semiconductor films

    SciTech Connect

    Shinmura, Yusuke Yamashina, Yohei; Kaji, Toshihiko; Hiramoto, Masahiro

    2014-11-03

    Sensitization of the dopant ionization in co-deposited films of organic semiconductors was found. The ionization rate of cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which acts as a donor dopant in single films of metal-free phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}Pc) and fullerene (C{sub 60}), was increased from 10% to 97% in a H{sub 2}Pc:C{sub 60} co-deposited film. A charge separation superlattice model that includes electron transfer from the conduction band of H{sub 2}Pc to that of C{sub 60}, which increases the rate of dopant ionization, is proposed.

  17. Selection of luting agents, part 1.

    PubMed

    Jivraj, Sajid A; Kim, Tae Hyung; Donovan, Terry E

    2006-02-01

    The clinical success of indirect restorations is dependent on multiple factors that include preparation design, mechanical forces, restorative material selection, oral hygiene, and selection of a proper luting agent. The selection of the luting agent is dependent on the specific clinical situation, the type of restoration utilized and the physical, biologic, and handling properties of the luting agent. Although it is important to choose the best luting agent for each clinical situation, far greater variations in physical properties result from improper manipulation of a given luting agent than exist between different types of cements. One study listed loss of retention as the third-leading cause of prosthetic replacement, with failure occurring after only 5.8 years in service. The primary purpose of the luting procedure is to achieve a durable bond and to have good marginal adaptation of the luting material to the restoration and tooth. Conventional cements have always relied upon retention and resistance forms in tooth preparations; Adhesive-type luting agents offer the clinician an added advantage by bonding to the tooth structure. Three main types of conventional "cements" are commonly used, zinc phosphate and the polyelectrolyte cements polycarboxylate, and glass ionomer cements. Because of its long history of successful clinical use, zinc phosphate is considered the gold standard against which all other luting agents are compared because of its long clinical history of successful use. Currently, two additional types of luting agents have gained considerable popularity. These include the resin-modified glass ionomer cements and resin cements. The resin cement category includes light-cured, dual-cured and chemically cured agents. The purpose of this article is to discuss the ideal attributes of a luting agent and make clinical recommendations for their use.

  18. A combined electron-ion spectrometer for studying complete kinematics of molecular dissociation upon shell selective ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, K.; Banerjee, S. B.; Bapat, B.

    2013-07-15

    A combined electron-ion spectrometer has been built to study dissociation kinematics of molecular ions upon various electronic decay processes ensuing from ionization of neutral molecules. The apparatus can be used with various ionization agents. Ion time-of-flight (ToF) spectra arising from various electronic decay processes are acquired by triggering the ToF measurement in coincidence with energy analyzed electrons. The design and the performance of the spectrometer in a photoionization experiment is presented in detail. Electron spectra and ion time of flight spectra resulting from valence and 2p{sub 1/2} ionization of Argon and those from valence ionization of CO are presented to demonstrate the capability of the instrument. The fragment ion spectra show remarkable differences (both kinematic and cross sectional) dependent on the energy of the ejected electron, corresponding to various electron loss and decay mechanisms in dissociative photoionization of molecules.

  19. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-07-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies.

  20. Biological warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-01-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies. PMID:21829313

  1. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, R. C., Jr.; Wilson, J. W.; Whitehead, A. H.; Goldhagen, P. E.

    1999-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement (NCRP) and the National Academy of Science (NAS) established that the uncertainty in the data and models associated with the high-altitude radiation environment could and should be reduced. In response, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) created the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project under the auspices of the High Speed Research (HSR) Program Office at the Langley Research Center. NASA's HSR Program was developed to address the potential of a second-generation supersonic transport. A critical element focussed on the environmental issues, including the threat to crew and passengers posed by atmospheric radiation. Various international investigators were solicited to contribute instruments to fly on an ER-2 aircraft at altitudes similar to those proposed for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). A list of participating investigators, their institutions, and instruments with quantities measured is presented. The flight series took place at solar minimum (radiation maximum) with northern, southern, and east/west flights. The investigators analyzed their data and presented preliminary results at the AIR Workshop in March, 1998. A review of these results are included.

  2. Dioxin, agent orange

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: dioxin, a prevalent problem; nobody wanted dioxin; agent organe and Vietnam; what we know about and may learn about agent orange and Veterans' health; agent organe and birth defects; dioxin in Missouri; 2, 4, 5-T: the U.S.' disappearing herbicide; Seveso: high-level environmental exposure; the nitro explosion; industrial exposures to dioxin; company behavior in the face of dioxin exposures; dioxin and specific cancers; animal tests of dioxin toxicity; dioxin decions; the present and the future.

  3. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND X-RAY IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko; Aikawa, Yuri

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization; here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find that photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N{sub 2}H{sup +}, indicating that it is safe to adopt existing approximations of the X-ray ionization rate in typical T Tauri star-disk systems. The recalculation of the photorates increases the abundances of neutral molecules in the outer disk, highlighting the importance of taking into account the shape of the UV spectrum in protoplanetary disks. A recalculation of the photoreaction rates also affects the gas-phase chemistry due to the adjustment of the H/H{sub 2} and C{sup +}/C ratios. The disk ionization fraction is not significantly affected by the methods adopted to calculate the photochemistry and X-ray ionization. We determine that there is a probable 'dead zone' where accretion is suppressed, present in a layer, Z/R {approx}< 0.1-0.2, in the disk midplane, within R Almost-Equal-To 200 AU.

  4. 78 FR 56234 - Multi-Agency Informational Meeting Concerning Compliance with the Select Agent Regulations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Compliance with the Select Agent Regulations; Public Webcast AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... guidance related to the select agent regulations established under the Public Health Security and... 11(Security) of the select agent regulations including information security, physical security,...

  5. Quantum mechanical calculations related to ionization and charge transfer in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauët, E.; Valiev, M.; Weare, J. H.; Liévin, J.

    2012-07-01

    Ionization and charge migration in DNA play crucial roles in mechanisms of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation, oxidizing agents and photo-irradiation. Therefore, an evaluation of the ionization properties of the DNA bases is central to the full interpretation and understanding of the elementary reactive processes that occur at the molecular level during the initial exposure and afterwards. Ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) methods have been successful in providing highly accurate evaluations of key parameters, such as ionization energies (IE) of DNA bases. Hence, in this study, we performed high-level QM calculations to characterize the molecular energy levels and potential energy surfaces, which shed light on ionization and charge migration between DNA bases. In particular, we examined the IEs of guanine, the most easily oxidized base, isolated and embedded in base clusters, and investigated the mechanism of charge migration over two and three stacked guanines. The IE of guanine in the human telomere sequence has also been evaluated. We report a simple molecular orbital analysis to explain how modifications in the base sequence are expected to change the efficiency of the sequence as a hole trap. Finally, the application of a hybrid approach combining quantum mechanics with molecular mechanics brings an interesting discussion as to how the native aqueous DNA environment affects the IE threshold of nucleobases.

  6. Differential mobility spectroscopy for chemical agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, M. Todd

    2006-05-01

    General Dynamics ATP (GDATP) and Sionex Corporation (Sionex) are carrying out a cooperative development for a handheld chemical agent detector, being called JUNO TM, which will have lower false positives, higher sensitivity, and improved interference rejection compared with presently available detectors. This enhanced performance is made possible by the use of a new principle of ion separation called Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS). The enhanced selectivity is provided by the field tunable nature of the Sionex differential mobility technology (microDMxTM) which forms the analytical heart of the JUNO system and enables fingerprinting of molecules by characterization of the ionized molecular behavior under multiple electric field conditions. This enhanced selectivity is valuable in addressing not only the traditional list of chemical warfare agents (CWA) but also the substantial list of Toxic Industrial Compounds (TICs) and Toxic Industrial Materials (TIMs) which may be released in warfare or terrorist situations. Experimental results showing the ability of the microDMx to reject interferences, detect and resolve live agents are presented. An additional breakthrough in the technology was realized by operating the device at a reduced pressure of around 0.5 atmospheres. This reduced pressure operation resulted in roughly doubling the spectrometers resolution over what has previously been reported [1]. Advances have also been made in power consumption and packaging leading to a device suitable for portable, handheld, applications. Experimental results illustrating the performance of the microDMx technology employed in JUNO are highlighted.

  7. Photo-double ionization of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael; Briggs, John

    1999-06-01

    The angular distribution of the correlated electron pair emitted in single-photon double ionization of the hydrogen molecule is analysed and calculated using a variety of approximations. Attention is directed particularly towards the differences between the molecular angular distribution and that of the corresponding `united atom', i.e. that arising from the double ionization of helium. Qualitative agreement is obtained with recent experiments on photo-double ionization of the hydrogen molecule. The major effects arising from the two-centre nuclear field of the molecule and the orientation of the axis at the moment of photon absorption are exposed in the simpler problem of photoionization of the H2+ ion.

  8. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  9. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  10. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  11. Non-equilibrium ionized blast wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a cylindrical blast wave with ionization at non-LTE conditions was calculated using equations previously developed by Wu and Fu (1970). The degree of ionization was predicted by a modified Saha equation. Temperature profiles show that the temperature at non-LTE conditions is lower than at LTE near the shock front. This corresponds to a higher degree of ionization for the non-LTE limit, which indicates that the neutral gas absorption is much more efficient at non-LTE than at the LTE limit. The decaying velocity under non-LTE is approximately 15% less than under LTE.

  12. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  13. Nonequilibrium ionization due to thermal diffusion and mass flows. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1980-01-01

    Recent calculations of diffusion coefficients are used in the continuity equation to compute ion populations of carbon in the solar transition region. Thermal diffusion causes strong departures from ionization equilibrium in the region where the temperature gradient is steepest. Mass-conserving flows are also included in our calculations. These dominate over thermal diffusion depending on the magnitude of the flows and also lead to departures from ionization equilibrium. These results have important implications for the interpretation of EUV line emission.

  14. Note: Simultaneous electrical and optical detection of expanding dense partially ionized vapour clouds.

    PubMed

    De Angeli, M; Castaldo, C; Ratynskaia, S; Grosso, G; Almaviva, S; Caneve, L; Colao, F; Maddaluno, G

    2011-10-01

    The scheme and construction of an electro-optical probe able to collect charge and detect optical emission from expanding dense partially ionized vapour clouds are reported. The instrument can be applied to phenomena such as dust impact ionization and solid target laser ablation. First, results of measurements of expanding plasma cloud formed upon ablating W target are presented. Use of the instrument in different experimental facilities, including tokamak, is discussed.

  15. Measurement of electron-impact ionization cross sections for hydrogenlike high-Z ions

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Elliott, S.R.; Scofield, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Electron-impact ionization cross sections have been measured for the hydrogenlike ions of molybdenum, dysprosium, gold, and bismuth at selected electron energies between 1.3 and 3.9 times threshold. The cross sections were obtained from x-ray measurements of the equilibrium ionization balance in an electron beam ion trap. The measured cross sections agree with recent relativistic distorted-wave calculations that include both the Moeller interaction and exchange. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Riot Control Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly ... agent from your skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will ...

  17. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  18. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  19. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  20. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  1. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, M.; Hagmann, C.; Jovanovic, I.; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T. H.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, S.; Sorensen, P.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. Detection of CENNS could offer benefits for detection of supernova and solar neutrinos in astrophysics, or for detection of antineutrinos for nuclear reactor monitoring and nuclear nonproliferation. One challenge with detecting CENNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CENNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. While a measurement of the nuclear recoil ionization yield in liquid argon in the keV energy range has been recently reported, a corresponding model for low-energy ionization yield in liquid argon does not exist. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The model consists of two distinct components: (1) simulation of the atomic collision cascade with production of ionization, and (2) the thermalization and drift of ionization electrons in an applied electric field including local recombination. As an application of our results we report updated estimates of detectable ionization in liquid argon from CENNS at a nuclear reactor.

  2. Protein-targeted gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents: design and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Caravan, Peter

    2009-07-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful medical diagnostic technique: it can penetrate deep into tissue, provide excellent soft tissue contrast with sub-millimeter resolution, and does not employ ionizing radiation. Targeted contrast agents provide an additional layer of molecular specificity to the wealth of anatomical and functional information already attainable by MRI. However, the major challenge for molecular MR imaging is sensitivity: micromolar concentrations of Gd(III) are required to cause a detectable signal change, which makes detecting proteins by MRI a challenge. Protein-targeted MRI contrast agents are bifunctional molecules comprising a protein-targeting moiety and typically one or more gadolinium chelates for detection by MRI. The ability of the contrast agent to enhance the MR image is termed relaxivity, and it depends upon many molecular factors, including protein binding itself. As in other imaging modalities, protein binding provides the pharmacokinetic effect of concentrating the agent at the region of interest. Unique to MRI, protein binding provides the pharmacodynamic effect of increasing the relaxivity of the contrast agent, thereby increasing the MR signal. In designing new agents, optimization of both the targeting function and the relaxivity is critical. In this Account, we focus on optimization of the relaxivity of targeted agents. Relaxivity depends upon speciation, chemical structure, and dynamic processes, such as water exchange kinetics and rotational tumbling rates. We describe mechanistic studies that relate these factors to the observed relaxivities and use these findings as the basis of rational design of improved agents. In addition to traditional biochemical methods to characterize ligand-protein interactions, the presence of the metal ion enables more obscure biophysical techniques, such as relaxometry and electron nuclear double resonance, to be used to elucidate the mechanism of relaxivity differences. As a case

  3. A Multi-Agent System for Intelligent Online Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riordan, Colm; Griffith, Josephine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the system architecture of an intelligent Web-based education system that includes user modeling agents, information filtering agents for automatic information gathering, and the multi-agent interaction. Discusses information management; user interaction; support for collaborative peer-peer learning; implementation; testing; and future…

  4. Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fuhua, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents" reports on the most recent advances in agent technologies for distributed learning. Chapters are devoted to the various aspects of intelligent software agents in distributed learning, including the methodological and technical issues on where and how intelligent agents…

  5. 32 CFR 552.66 - Actions required by agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... officer or counselor. Agents must complete DA Form 2056 (Commercial Insurance Solicitation Record). Blank DA Forms 2056 (not allotment forms) will be available to insurance agents on request. In the “Remarks” section of DA Form 2056, agents will include all pertinent information and a clear statement...

  6. Agent amplified communication

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.; Selman, B.; Milewski, A.

    1996-12-31

    We propose an agent-based framework for assisting and simplifying person-to-person communication for information gathering tasks. As an example, we focus on locating experts for any specified topic. In our approach, the informal person-to-person networks that exist within an organization are used to {open_quotes}referral chain{close_quotes} requests for expertise. User-agents help automate this process. The agents generate referrals by analyzing records of e-mail communication patterns. Simulation results show that the higher responsiveness of an agent-based system can be effectively traded for the higher accuracy of a completely manual approach. Furthermore, preliminary experience with a group of users on a prototype system has shown that useful automatic referrals can be found in practice. Our experience with actual users has also shown that privacy concerns are central to the successful deployment of personal agents: an advanced agent-based system will therefore need to reason about issues involving trust and authority.

  7. Direct observations of the evolution of polar cap ionization patches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-He; Zhang, Bei-Chen; Lockwood, Michael; Hu, Hong-Qiao; Moen, Jøran; Ruohoniemi, J Michael; Thomas, Evan G; Zhang, Shun-Rong; Yang, Hui-Gen; Liu, Rui-Yuan; McWilliams, Kathryn A; Baker, Joseph B H

    2013-03-29

    Patches of ionization are common in the polar ionosphere, where their motion and associated density gradients give variable disturbances to high-frequency (HF) radio communications, over-the-horizon radar location errors, and disruption and errors to satellite navigation and communication. Their formation and evolution are poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report direct observations of the full evolution of patches during a geomagnetic storm, including formation, polar cap entry, transpolar evolution, polar cap exit, and sunward return flow. Our observations show that modulation of nightside reconnection in the substorm cycle of the magnetosphere helps form the gaps between patches where steady convection would give a "tongue" of ionization (TOI). PMID:23539601

  8. Rings in above-threshold ionization: A quasiclassical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewenstein, M.; Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.; Bucksbaum, P.H. Centrum Fizyki Teoretycznej, Polska Akademia Nauk, Warszawa 02-668 Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics , Physics Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 Physics Department and Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 )

    1995-02-01

    A generalized strong-field approximation is formulated to describe atoms interacting with intense laser fields. We apply it to determine angular distributions of electrons in above-threshold ionization (ATI). The theory treats the effects of an electron rescattering from its parent ion core in a systematic perturbation series. Probability amplitudes for ionization are interpreted in terms of quasiclassical electron trajectories. We demonstrate that contributions from the direct tunneling processes in the absence of rescattering are not sufficient to describe the observed ATI spectra. We show that the high-energy portion of the spectrum, including recently discovered rings (i.e., complex features in the angular distributions of outgoing electrons) are due to rescattering processes. We compare our quasiclassical results with exact numerical solutions.

  9. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of /sup 81/Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  11. Dissociation reactions of protonated anthracycline antibiotics following electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleno, Lekha; Campagna-Slater, Valerie; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2006-09-01

    Fragmentation pathways of doxorubicin, a common cancer therapy agent, and three closely related analogs (epirubicin, daunorubicin, idarubicin) were compared using electrospray ionization with tandem mass spectrometry. This class of antibiotics with anti-tumour activity has important structural features, with a tetracyclic aromatic, polyketide portion, which is glycosylated with an amino sugar in order to exhibit its biological activity. Collision-induced dissociation spectra revealed very similar product ions for each analog, however, important differences were seen in the relative abundances and the ease at which certain fragments were formed. Fragment ions observed included those from cleavage of the glycosidic bond, loss of the side chain from the aglycone moiety, water losses and loss of a methyl radical. Following cleavage of the glycosidic bond, the charge can either reside on the aglycone portion or the sugar moiety, and each of these primary fragments undergoes several secondary dissociation pathways, depending on the collision energy. By ramping the collision voltage, we were able to correlate the changes in fragmentation behavior with small alterations in the structure of the precursor ion. The detailed study of the fragmentation behavior of doxorubicin was supported by accurate mass measurements, using an electrospray-time of flight instrument, as well as MS3 data from a quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Computational studies were also performed to help explain the role of certain functional groups in the fragmentation reactions.

  12. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage.

  13. Impact on radiogenic cancer risk of persons exhibiting abnormal sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gentner, N.E.; Morrison, D.P.; Myers, D.K.

    1988-08-01

    Human genotypes are known that confer both increased susceptibility or resistance to DNA damage and increased cancer risk after exposure to carcinogenic agents, including ionizing radiation (NAS 1980). The existence of sensitive subgroups at elevated risk, if they are of appreciable size, could have significant impact on the actual distribution of risk. The radiosensitive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) serves as a good example: the significant at risk group, A-T heterozygotes, is estimated to comprise between 0.5% and 5% of the total population, and has a twofold elevated lifetime risk of fatal neoplasia. Other genetic syndromes that manifest abnormal radiosensitivity are also known, but no estimates are available for the population frequency of all such phenotypes, or for their overall degree of increased risk. As the first part of a program addressing these questions, we have developed a rapid and inexpensive assay for screening members of the general population for abnormal radiosensitivity; such persons would be regarded as at presumptive elevated risk of radiogenic cancer. Our method utilizes lymphoblastoid cell lines and chronic as opposed to acute gamma-ray exposure to amplify the difference between normal and somewhat sensitive strains. A simple grow-back assay assesses the survival response. Information on the extent of natural variation in inherited susceptibility to radiogenic cancers could be most useful for radiation protection in the future.

  14. Proceedings of the Agent 2002 Conference on Social Agents : Ecology, Exchange, and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C., ed.; Sallach, D., ed.

    2003-04-10

    Welcome to the ''Proceedings'' of the third in a series of agent simulation conferences cosponsored by Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago. The theme of this year's conference, ''Social Agents: Ecology, Exchange and Evolution'', was selected to foster the exchange of ideas on some of the most important social processes addressed by agent simulation models, namely: (1) The translation of ecology and ecological constraints into social dynamics; (2) The role of exchange processes, including the peer dependencies they create; and (3) The dynamics by which, and the attractor states toward which, social processes evolve. As stated in the ''Call for Papers'', throughout the social sciences, the simulation of social agents has emerged as an innovative and powerful research methodology. The promise of this approach, however, is accompanied by many challenges. First, modeling complexity in agents, environments, and interactions is non-trivial, and these representations must be explored and assessed systematically. Second, strategies used to represent complexities are differentially applicable to any particular problem space. Finally, to achieve sufficient generality, the design and experimentation inherent in agent simulation must be coupled with social and behavioral theory. Agent 2002 provides a forum for reviewing the current state of agent simulation scholarship, including research designed to address such outstanding issues. This year's conference introduces an extensive range of domains, models, and issues--from pre-literacy to future projections, from ecology to oligopolistic markets, and from design to validation. Four invited speakers highlighted major themes emerging from social agent simulation.

  15. The galactic cosmic ray ionization rate.

    PubMed

    Dalgarno, A

    2006-08-15

    The chemistry that occurs in the interstellar medium in response to cosmic ray ionization is summarized, and a review of the ionization rates that have been derived from measurements of molecular abundances is presented. The successful detection of large abundances of H(3)(+) in diffuse clouds and the recognition that dissociative recombination of H(3)(+) is fast has led to an upward revision of the derived ionization rates. In dense clouds the molecular abundances are sensitive to the depletion of carbon monoxide, atomic oxygen, nitrogen, water, and metals and the presence of large molecules and grains. Measurements of the relative abundances of deuterated species provide information about the ion removal mechanisms, but uncertainties remain. The models, both of dense and diffuse clouds, that are used to interpret the observations may be seriously inadequate. Nevertheless, it appears that the ionization rates differ in dense and diffuse clouds and in the intercloud medium.

  16. On ionization and luminescence in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, E; Goercke, P; BREDT I

    1951-01-01

    An explanation based upon reaction kinetics is presented to account for the deviation of measured ionization levels obtained from reflection experiments from the values computed assuming chemical equilibrium. The heat transfer to the unburned fuel is also considered.

  17. The galactic cosmic ray ionization rate

    PubMed Central

    Dalgarno, A.

    2006-01-01

    The chemistry that occurs in the interstellar medium in response to cosmic ray ionization is summarized, and a review of the ionization rates that have been derived from measurements of molecular abundances is presented. The successful detection of large abundances of H3+ in diffuse clouds and the recognition that dissociative recombination of H3+ is fast has led to an upward revision of the derived ionization rates. In dense clouds the molecular abundances are sensitive to the depletion of carbon monoxide, atomic oxygen, nitrogen, water, and metals and the presence of large molecules and grains. Measurements of the relative abundances of deuterated species provide information about the ion removal mechanisms, but uncertainties remain. The models, both of dense and diffuse clouds, that are used to interpret the observations may be seriously inadequate. Nevertheless, it appears that the ionization rates differ in dense and diffuse clouds and in the intercloud medium. PMID:16894166

  18. Lucky drift impact ionization in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasap, Safa; Rowlands, J. A.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2004-08-01

    The review of avalanche multiplication experiments clearly confirms the existence of the impact ionization effect in this class of semiconductors. The semilogarithmic plot of the impact ionization coefficient (α) versus the reciprocal field (1/F) for holes in a-Se and electrons in a-Se and a-Si :H places the avalanche multiplication phenomena in amorphous semiconductors at much higher fields than those typically reported for crystalline semiconductors with comparable bandgaps. Furthermore, in contrast to well established concepts for crystalline semiconductors, the impact ionization coefficient in a-Se increases with increasing temperature. The McKenzie and Burt [S. McKenzie and M. G. Burt, J. Phys. C 19, 1959 (1986)] version of Ridley's lucky drift (LD) model [B. K. Ridley, J. Phys. C 16, 3373 (1988)] has been applied to impact ionization coefficient versus field data for holes and electrons in a-Se and electrons in a-Si :H. We have extracted the electron impact ionization coefficient versus field (αe vs F) data for a-Si :H from the multiplication versus F and photocurrent versus F data recently reported by M. Akiyama, M. Hanada, H. Takao, K. Sawada, and M. Ishida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.41, 2552 (2002). Provided that one accepts the basic assumption of the Ridley LD model that the momentum relaxation rate is faster than the energy relaxation rate, the model can satisfactorily account for impact ionization in amorphous semiconductors even with ionizing excitation across the bandgap, EI=Eg. If λ is the mean free path associated with momentum relaxing collisions and λE is the energy relaxation length associated with energy relaxing collisions, than the LD model requires λE>λ. The application of the LD model with energy and field independent λE to a-Se leads to ionization threshold energies EI that are quite small, less than Eg/2, and requires the possible but improbable ionization of localized states. By making λE=λE(E ,F) energy and field dependent, we were

  19. Analytical band Monte Carlo simulation of electron impact ionization in In0.53Ga0.47As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, K. Y.; Ong, D. S.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical band Monte Carlo model has been developed to study electron transport and impact ionization in In0.53Ga0.47As. Our simulations show that it is important to include the second conduction band at X7 because impact ionization becomes significant in this higher band at fields above 100kV/cm. The higher ionization rate here is found to be responsible for the strong field dependence of the ionization coefficient for electric fields above 180kV/cm. At lower fields the weak field dependence results from the large energy separation between the Γ6 and X7 valleys which confines most of the electrons to the first conduction band, where the ionization rate is lower. Although the electron impact ionization coefficient of InGaAs is comparable to that of GaAs at 300kV /cm, the average electron energy at impact ionization is 1.59eV lower than in GaAs and the average time to impact ionization is almost twice that in GaAs, indicating a slower drift of electrons in InGaAs prior to impact ionization

  20. [Laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in laser resonance ionization process of lead atom].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Shun; Li, Ying; Dai, Lin; Zheng, Rong-Er

    2008-07-01

    Isotope ratio measurements have been increasingly used in geochemistry, geochronology, cosmos chemistry and environmental science. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements are an important task in many applications such as the determination of isotope variations in geological and cosmic samples. Due to its high sensitivity, high ionization efficiency and high element selectivity, laser resonance ionization spectroscopy has nowadays become one of the key techniques, including isotope ratio measurements and trace amount analyses. Because of the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure, there is laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in the process of laser resonance ionization. The different isotope ionization efficiency can affect precise and accurate measurement of isotope ratios. In the present paper, the dependences of the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on some of the laser parameters were studied by theoretical methods. Based on the numerical simulation of the population rate equations, laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes was studied, by calculating laser resonance ionization transition "6s2 6p23 P0-6s2 6p7 s3 P1(0) --> ionization". The population rate equations was approximated considering some factors which affect the probability of laser resonance transition such as spectral lines width of laser and atom, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure. According to the approximated population rate equations, "1+1" laser resonant ionization process was employed to calculate the ionization probability of lead isotopes by means of computer simulation. The dependences of laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on the laser parameters, such as laser central wavelength, bandwidth and intensity were investigated. The calculated results show that the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes could be almost eliminated by operating at optimized wavelength and could be lessened by using wide band laser

  1. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  2. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) in Drosophila melanogaster seeking to understand the enzyme's role in cell protection against ionizing radiation are reported. Components of the investigation include molecular characterization of the gene; measuring the response of different genotypes to increasing levels of radiation; and investigation of the processes that maintain the Sod polymorphism in populations. While two alleles, S and F, are commonly found at the Sod locus in natural populations of D. melanogaster we have isolated from a natural population a null (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide a model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CAl. The radioprotective effects of SOD can be established by showing protective effects for the various genotypes that correspond to those inequalities. Because the allele variants studied are derived from natural populations, the proposed investigation avoids problems that arise when mutants obtained my mutagenesis are used. Moreover, each allele is studied in multiple genetic backgrounds, so that we correct for effects attributable to other loci by randomizing these effects.

  3. Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities.

  4. Multifluid magnetohydrodynamics of weakly ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Raymond

    show that the total electric field in the asteroid may either be of comparable strength to the electric field predicted by Sonett et al. or vanish depending on the magnetic field geometry. We include the effects of dust grains in the gas and calculate the heating rates in the plasma flow due to ion-neutral scattering and viscous dissipation. We term this newly discovered heating mechanism "electrodynamic heating", use measurements of asteroid electrical conductivities to estimate the upper limits of the possible heating rates and amount of thermal energy that can be deposited in the solid body, and compare these to the heating produced by the decay of radioactive nuclei like Al26. For the second problem we modeled molecular line emission from time-dependent multifluid MHD shock waves in star-forming regions. By incorporating realistic radiative cooling by CO and H2 into the numerical method developed by Ciolek & Roberge (2013), we present the only current models of truly time-dependent multifluid MHD shock waves in weakly-ionized plasmas. Using the physical conditions determined by our models, we present predictions of molecular emission in the form of excitation diagrams, which can be compared to observations of protostellar outflows in order to trace the physical conditions of these environments. Current work focuses on creating models for varying initial conditions and shock ages, which are and will be the subject of several in progress studies of observed molecular outflows and will provide further insight into the physics and chemistry of these flows.

  5. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  6. The ionization energy of C2.

    PubMed

    Krechkivska, O; Bacskay, G B; Welsh, B A; Nauta, K; Kable, S H; Stanton, J F; Schmidt, T W

    2016-04-14

    Resonant two-photon threshold ionization spectroscopy is employed to determine the ionization energy of C2 to 5 meV precision, about two orders of magnitude more precise than the previously accepted value. Through exploration of the ionization threshold after pumping the 0-3 band of the newly discovered 4(3)Πg ← a(3)Πu band system of C2, the ionization energy of the lowest rovibronic level of the a(3)Πu state was determined to be 11.791(5) eV. Accounting for spin-orbit and rotational effects, we calculate that the ionization energy of the forbidden origin of the a(3)Πu state is 11.790(5) eV, in excellent agreement with quantum thermochemical calculations which give 11.788(10) eV. The experimentally derived ionization energy of X(1)Σg(+) state C2 is 11.866(5) eV. PMID:27083719

  7. The ionization energy of C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechkivska, O.; Bacskay, G. B.; Welsh, B. A.; Nauta, K.; Kable, S. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Schmidt, T. W.

    2016-04-01

    Resonant two-photon threshold ionization spectroscopy is employed to determine the ionization energy of C2 to 5 meV precision, about two orders of magnitude more precise than the previously accepted value. Through exploration of the ionization threshold after pumping the 0-3 band of the newly discovered 43Πg←a3Πu band system of C2, the ionization energy of the lowest rovibronic level of the a3Πu state was determined to be 11.791(5) eV. Accounting for spin-orbit and rotational effects, we calculate that the ionization energy of the forbidden origin of the a3Πu state is 11.790(5) eV, in excellent agreement with quantum thermochemical calculations which give 11.788(10) eV. The experimentally derived ionization energy of X1Σg+ state C2 is 11.866(5) eV.

  8. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of the sodium dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, John; Weiner, John

    1984-07-01

    We report an investigation of the role of molecular multiphoton ionization in the production of Na+2 when sodium vapor is subjected to intense optical radiation. Previous authors attribute the source of much of the ion dimer signal to laser-induced associative ionization of atom sodium. In this experiment, we distinguish the molecular process from atomic collisional mechanisms by producing an intense molecular beam created through free-jet expansion of the metal vapor. The beam of nearly 50% dimers cooled to their low rotational and vibrational states allow us to obtain a simplified three-photon ionization spectrum. We find that the spectrum displays two-photon resonances corresponding to known Rydberg level transitions and that the A state, acting as virtual intermediate, plays a crucial role in the large peak-to-peak intensity variations. We employ a simple model of multiphoton ionization which uses a rate-equation approach to generate a calculated spectrum. Based on the experimental results and the success of the model in reflecting them, we conclude that much of the highly structured component of the dimer ion signal reported previously under different experimental conditions is probably due to molecular multiphoton ionization but that this structure rides on a slowly varying broad signal envelope due to laser-induced associative ionization.

  9. WARM IONIZED GAS REVEALED IN THE MAGELLANIC BRIDGE TIDAL REMNANT: CONSTRAINING THE BARYON CONTENT AND THE ESCAPING IONIZING PHOTONS AROUND DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J. E-mail: haffner@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-07-10

    The Magellanic System includes some of the nearest examples of galaxies disturbed by galaxy interactions. These interactions have redistributed much of their gas into the halos of the Milky Way (MW) and the Magellanic Clouds. We present Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper kinematically resolved observations of the warm ionized gas in the Magellanic Bridge over the velocity range of +100 to +300 km s{sup -1} in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full H{alpha} intensity map and the corresponding intensity-weighted mean velocity map of the Magellanic Bridge across (l, b) = (281 Degree-Sign .5, -30 Degree-Sign .0) to (302. Degree-Sign 5, -46. Degree-Sign 7). Using the H{alpha} emission from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-Tail and the Bridge, we estimate that the mass of the ionized material is between (0.7-1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, compared to 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} for the neutral mass over the same region. The diffuse Bridge is significantly more ionized than the SMC-Tail, with an ionization fraction of 36%-52% compared to 5%-24% for the Tail. The H{alpha} emission has a complex multiple-component structure with a velocity distribution that could trace the sources of ionization or distinct ionized structures. We find that incident radiation from the extragalactic background and the MW alone are insufficient to produced the observed ionization in the Magellanic Bridge and present a model for the escape fraction of the ionizing photons from both the SMC and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). With this model, we place an upper limit of 4.0% for the average escape fraction of ionizing photons from the LMC and an upper limit of 5.5% for the SMC. These results, combined with the findings of a half a dozen other studies for dwarf galaxies in different environments, provide compelling evidence that only a small percentage of the ionizing photons escape from dwarf galaxies in the present epoch to

  10. Sunscreening agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Latha, M S; Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B R

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents.

  11. Development of a surface ionization source for the SPIRAL 2 project.

    PubMed

    Pichard, A; Jardin, P; Saint-Laurent, M-G; Frigot, R; Bajeat, O; Delahaye, P; Dubois, M; Frånberg-Delahaye, H; Lecomte, P; Lehérissier, P; Leroy, R; Lecesne, N; Maunoury, L; Méry, A; Pacquet, J Y

    2010-02-01

    Development of new radioactive beams, and thus of new target ion sources (TISs) for isotope-separator-on-line production systems are in progress at GANIL for the SPIRAL 2 project. The efficiency and time response measurements of each step in the production process are crucial to predict and maximize the available yields, in particular, for short lived isotopes. This paper presents a method for measuring these quantities that makes use of a stable alkali chopped beam of controlled intensity. This method was applied to surface ionization source test for high efficiency. Results of recent experiments are presented that include ionization efficiency measurements for Cs, Rb, K, Na, and Li with a graphite and rhenium ionizer and dwell time of these alkalis on graphite. The results enabled to design a first surface ionization source prototype which will be installed in the SPIRAL 2 TIS.

  12. Classical description of strong-field double ionization by elliptical laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Qingbin; Huang, Cheng; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-10-01

    Sequential double ionization of argon induced by elliptically polarized laser pulses at the over-the-barrier ionization regime is investigated with a fully classical model. We provide futher detail beyond that found in our previous paper [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.053004 109, 053004 (2012)] and show that all of the experimental observations, including the evolution of the ion momentum spectra as a function of laser intensity, the intensity-dependent ratio for the parallel and antiparallel electron emissions, and the release times of both electrons for various laser pulses, are excellently reproduced by our classical model. Our results indicate that the classical treatment is very valid and accurate in describing strong-field ionization, providing a simple and intuitive way to investigate the complex electron correlations in strong-field double and multiple ionizations.

  13. Time-Resolved High-Spatial-Resolution Measurements of Underwater Laser Ionization and Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Kaganovich, D.; Helle, M. H.; Penano, J.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D.

    2013-10-01

    Laser triggering and guiding of underwater electrical discharges are being investigated and developed at NRL for applications including advanced micromachining and low-frequency laser acoustic generation. As part of this development we recently made several high-spatial-resolution, time-resolved measurements of underwater optical filamentation and laser ionization. Using 2-laser pump-probe backlit imaging techniques, we were able to achieve time resolution as short as 35 fs and spatial resolution down to 1 micron. Shadowgraph images show few-micron diameter gas bubbles forming throughout the pump beam path in ps timescales. Microbubble numbers and density increased with pulse energy and time during the pump pulse. We also obtained time-resolved spectra of ns-laser-ionized water, revealing black-body radiation lasting more than 100 ns after the ionizing pulse. Results from ongoing underwater laser ionization, filamentation, and discharge-guiding experiments will be presented. This work is supported by NRL Base Funds.

  14. Measurements of the structure of an ionizing shock wave in a hydrogen-helium mixture.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    Shock structure during ionization of a hydrogen-helium mixture has been followed using hydrogen line and continuum emission measurements. A reaction scheme is proposed which includes hydrogen dissociation and a two-step excitation-ionization mechanism for hydrogen ionization by atom-atom and atom-electron collisions. Agreement has been achieved between numerical calculations and measurements of emission intensity as a function of time for shock velocities from 13 to 20 km/sec in a 0.208 H2-0.792 He mixture. The electron temperature was found to be significantly different from the heavy particle temperature during much of the ionization process. Similar time histories for H beta and continuum emission indicate upper level populations of hydrogen in equilibrium with the electron concentration during the relaxation process.

  15. Measurements of the structure of an ionizing shock wave in a hydrogen-helium mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    Shock structure during ionization of a hydrogen-helium mixture was studied using hydrogen line and continuum emission measurements. A reaction scheme is proposed which includes hydrogen dissociation and a two-step excitation-ionization mechanism for hydrogen ionization by atom-atom and atom-electron collisions. Agreement was achieved between numerical calculations and measurements of emission intensity as a function of time for shock velocities from 13 to 20 km/sec in a 0.208 H2 - 0.792 He mixture. The electron temperature was found to be significantly different from the heavy particle temperature during much of the ionization process. Similar time histories for H beta and continuum emission indicate upper level populations of hydrogen in equilibrium with the electron concentration during the relaxation process.

  16. Two-center approach to fully differential positron-impact ionization of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bailey, J. J.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    The two-center approach to positron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen is shown to follow from the exact post form of the breakup amplitude [Kadyrov, Bray, Mukhamedzhanov, and Stelbovics, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 230405 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.230405]. In such approaches distinct ionization amplitudes arise from each center for the same ionization process. The fully differential cross section for the positron-impact breakup of atomic hydrogen is calculated including direct ionization of the target and electron capture into the positronium continuum. We show that the coherent combination of the amplitudes leads to oscillations in the differential cross sections, whereas the incoherent combination does not. The latter has also the advantage of being consistent with the unitary close-coupling formalism.

  17. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  18. Development and Applications of Liquid Sample Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Chen, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a recent advance in the field of analytical chemistry. This review surveys the development of liquid sample DESI-MS (LS-DESI-MS), a variant form of DESI-MS that focuses on fast analysis of liquid samples, and its novel analy-tical applications in bioanalysis, proteomics, and reaction kinetics. Due to the capability of directly ionizing liquid samples, liquid sample DESI (LS-DESI) has been successfully used to couple MS with various analytical techniques, such as microfluidics, microextraction, electrochemistry, and chromatography. This review also covers these hyphenated techniques. In addition, several closely related ionization methods, including transmission mode DESI, thermally assisted DESI, and continuous flow-extractive DESI, are briefly discussed. The capabilities of LS-DESI extend and/or complement the utilities of traditional DESI and electrospray ionization and will find extensive and valuable analytical application in the future.

  19. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Picosecond Infrared Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (PIR-LAESI).

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Talbot, Francis; Tata, Alessandra; Ermini, Leonardo; Franjic, Kresimir; Ventura, Manuela; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard; Post, Martin; Ifa, Demian R; Jaffray, David; Miller, R J Dwayne; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-12-15

    A picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) is capable of cutting through biological tissues in the absence of significant thermal damage. As such, PIRL is a standalone surgical scalpel with the added bonus of minimal postoperative scar tissue formation. In this work, a tandem of PIRL ablation with electrospray ionization (PIR-LAESI) mass spectrometry is demonstrated and characterized for tissue molecular imaging, with a limit of detection in the range of 100 nM for reserpine or better than 5 nM for verapamil in aqueous solution. We characterized PIRL crater size using agar films containing Rhodamine. PIR-LAESI offers a 20-30 μm vertical resolution (∼3 μm removal per pulse) and a lateral resolution of ∼100 μm. We were able to detect 25 fmol of Rhodamine in agar ablation experiments. PIR-LAESI was used to map the distribution of endogenous methoxykaempferol glucoronide in zebra plant (Aphelandra squarrosa) leaves producing a localization map that is corroborated by the literature. PIR-LAESI was further used to image the distribution inside mouse kidneys of gadoteridol, an exogenous magnetic resonance contrast agent intravenously injected. Parallel mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were performed to corroborate PIR-LAESI images of the exogenous agent. We further show that PIR-LAESI is capable of desorption ionization of proteins as well as phospholipids. This comparative study illustrates that PIR-LAESI is an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry applications. As such, a future PIRL scalpel combined with secondary ionization such as ESI and mass spectrometry has the potential to provide molecular feedback to guide PIRL surgery. PMID:26561279

  20. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Picosecond Infrared Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (PIR-LAESI).

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Talbot, Francis; Tata, Alessandra; Ermini, Leonardo; Franjic, Kresimir; Ventura, Manuela; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard; Post, Martin; Ifa, Demian R; Jaffray, David; Miller, R J Dwayne; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-12-15

    A picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) is capable of cutting through biological tissues in the absence of significant thermal damage. As such, PIRL is a standalone surgical scalpel with the added bonus of minimal postoperative scar tissue formation. In this work, a tandem of PIRL ablation with electrospray ionization (PIR-LAESI) mass spectrometry is demonstrated and characterized for tissue molecular imaging, with a limit of detection in the range of 100 nM for reserpine or better than 5 nM for verapamil in aqueous solution. We characterized PIRL crater size using agar films containing Rhodamine. PIR-LAESI offers a 20-30 μm vertical resolution (∼3 μm removal per pulse) and a lateral resolution of ∼100 μm. We were able to detect 25 fmol of Rhodamine in agar ablation experiments. PIR-LAESI was used to map the distribution of endogenous methoxykaempferol glucoronide in zebra plant (Aphelandra squarrosa) leaves producing a localization map that is corroborated by the literature. PIR-LAESI was further used to image the distribution inside mouse kidneys of gadoteridol, an exogenous magnetic resonance contrast agent intravenously injected. Parallel mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were performed to corroborate PIR-LAESI images of the exogenous agent. We further show that PIR-LAESI is capable of desorption ionization of proteins as well as phospholipids. This comparative study illustrates that PIR-LAESI is an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry applications. As such, a future PIRL scalpel combined with secondary ionization such as ESI and mass spectrometry has the potential to provide molecular feedback to guide PIRL surgery.

  1. Who's your neighbor? neighbor identification for agent-based modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; Howe, T. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation, based on the cellular automata paradigm, is an approach to modeling complex systems comprised of interacting autonomous agents. Open questions in agent-based simulation focus on scale-up issues encountered in simulating large numbers of agents. Specifically, how many agents can be included in a workable agent-based simulation? One of the basic tenets of agent-based modeling and simulation is that agents only interact and exchange locally available information with other agents located in their immediate proximity or neighborhood of the space in which the agents are situated. Generally, an agent's set of neighbors changes rapidly as a simulation proceeds through time and as the agents move through space. Depending on the topology defined for agent interactions, proximity may be defined by spatial distance for continuous space, adjacency for grid cells (as in cellular automata), or by connectivity in social networks. Identifying an agent's neighbors is a particularly time-consuming computational task and can dominate the computational effort in a simulation. Two challenges in agent simulation are (1) efficiently representing an agent's neighborhood and the neighbors in it and (2) efficiently identifying an agent's neighbors at any time in the simulation. These problems are addressed differently for different agent interaction topologies. While efficient approaches have been identified for agent neighborhood representation and neighbor identification for agents on a lattice with general neighborhood configurations, other techniques must be used when agents are able to move freely in space. Techniques for the analysis and representation of spatial data are applicable to the agent neighbor identification problem. This paper extends agent neighborhood simulation techniques from the lattice topology to continuous space, specifically R2. Algorithms based on hierarchical (quad trees) or non-hierarchical data structures (grid cells) are

  2. Atmospheric-pressure laser ionization: a novel ionization method for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Constapel, M; Schellenträger, M; Schmitz, O J; Gäb, S; Brockmann, K J; Giese, R; Benter, Th

    2005-01-01

    We report on the development of a new laser-ionization (LI) source operating at atmospheric pressure (AP) for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) applications. APLI is introduced as a powerful addition to existing AP ionization techniques, in particular atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Replacing the one-step VUV approach in APPI with step-wise two-photon ionization strongly enhances the selectivity of the ionization process. Furthermore, the photon flux during an ionization event is drastically increased over that of APPI, leading to very low detection limits. In addition, the APLI mechanism generally operates primarily directly on the analyte. This allows for very efficient ionization even of non-polar compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The APLI source was characterized with a MicroMass Q-Tof Ultima II analyzer. Both the effluent of an HPLC column containing a number of PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, anthracene, fluorene) and samples from direct syringe injection were analyzed with respect to selectivity and sensitivity of the overall system. The liquid phase was vaporized by a conventional APCI inlet (AP probe) with the corona needle removed. Ionization was performed through selective resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization schemes using a high-repetition-rate fixed-frequency excimer laser operating at 248 nm. Detection limits well within the low-fmol regime are readily obtained for various aromatic hydrocarbons that exhibit long-lived electronic states at the energy level of the first photon. Only molecular ions are generated at the low laser fluxes employed ( approximately 1 MW/cm(2)). The design and performance of the laser-ionization source are presented along with results of the analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  3. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  4. Combined effects of ionizing radiation and cycloheximide on gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1993-11-01

    Experiments were done to determine the effects of ionizing radiation exposure on expression of genes following exposure of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells to the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (including such genes as {beta}-actin, c-fos, H4-histone, c-myc, c-jun, Rb, and p53). Results revealed that when ionizing radiations (either fission-spectrum neutrons or {gamma}-rays) were administered 15 min following the cycloheximide treatment of SHE cells, the radiation exposure reduced cycloheximide-mediated gene induction for most of the induced genes studied (c-fos, H4-histone, c-jun) In addition, dose-rate differences were found when radiation exposure most significantly inhibited the cycloheximide response. Our results suggest (1) that ionizing radiation does not act as a general protein synthesis inhibitor and (2) that the presence of a labile (metastable) protein is required for the maintenance of transcription and mRNA accumulation following radiation exposure, especially for radiation administered at high dose-rates.

  5. Atmospheric fate of non-volatile and ionizable compounds.

    PubMed

    Franco, Antonio; Hauschild, Michael; Jolliet, Olivier; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    A modified version of the Multimedia Activity Model for Ionics MAMI, including two-layered atmosphere, air-water interface partitioning, intermittent rainfall and variable cloud coverage was developed to simulate the atmospheric fate of ten low volatility or ionizable organic chemicals. Probabilistic simulations describing the uncertainty of substance and environmental input properties were run to evaluate the impact of atmospheric parameters, ionization and air-water (or air-ice) interface enrichment. The rate of degradation and the concentration of OH radicals, the duration of dry and wet periods, and the parameters describing air-water partitioning (K(AW) and temperature) and ionization (pK(a) and pH) are the key parameters determining the potential for long range transport. Wet deposition is an important removal process, but its efficiency is limited, primarily by the duration of the dry period between precipitation events. Given the underlying model assumptions, the presence of clouds contributes to the higher persistence in the troposphere because of the capacity of cloud water to accumulate and transport non-volatile (e.g. 2,4-D) and surface-active chemicals (e.g. PFOA). This limits the efficiency of wet deposition from the troposphere enhancing long-range transport.

  6. Electrospray ionization with aluminum foil: A versatile mass spectrometric technique.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-03-19

    In this study, we developed a novel electrospray ionization (ESI) technique based on household aluminum foil (Al foil) and demonstated the desirable features and applications of this technique. Al foil can be readily cut and folded into desired configuration for effective ionization and for holding sample solution in bulk to allowing acquisition of durable ion signals. The present technique was demonstrated to be applicable in analysis of a wide variety of samples, ranging from pure chemical and biological compounds, e.g., organic compounds and proteins, to complex samples in liquid, semi-solid, and solid states, e.g., beverages, skincare cream, and herbal medicines. The inert, hydrophobic and impermeable surface of Al foil allows convenient and effective on-target extraction of solid samples and on-target sample clean-up, i.e., removal of salts and detergents from proteins and peptides, extending ESI device from usually only for sample loading and ionization to including sample processing. Moreover, Al foil is an excellent heat-conductor and highly heat-tolerant, permitting direct monitoring of thermal reactions, e.g., thermal denaturation of proteins. Overall, the present study showed that Al-foil ESI could be an economical and versatile method that allows a wide range of applications. PMID:24594810

  7. Future directions for LDEF ionizing radiation modeling and assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the ionizing radiation dosimetry aboard LDEF provide a unique opportunity for assessing the accuracy of current space radiation models and in identifying needed improvements for future mission applications. Details are given of the LDEF data available for radiation model evaluations. The status is given of model comparisons with LDEF data, along with future directions of planned modeling efforts and data comparison assessments. The methodology is outlined which is related to modeling being used to help insure that the LDEF ionizing radiation results can be used to address ionizing radiation issues for future missions. In general, the LDEF radiation modeling has emphasized quick-look predictions using simplified methods to make comparisons with absorbed dose measurements and induced radioactivity measurements of emissions. Modeling and LDEF data comparisons related to linear energy transfer spectra are of importance for several reasons which are outlined. The planned modeling and LDEF data comparisons for LET spectra is discussed, including components of the LET spectra due to different environment sources, contribution from different production mechanisms, and spectra in plastic detectors vs silicon.

  8. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  9. MpcAgent

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of themore » building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.« less

  10. MpcAgent

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of the building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.

  11. Effects of Ionization Feedback in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation. We model the collapse of a massive molecular cloud core forming a high-mass star in its center. We use a version of the FLASH code that has been extended by including sink particles which are a source of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The sink particles evolve according to a prestellar model which determines the stellar and accretion luminosities. Radiation transfer is done using the hybrid characteristics raytracing approach on the adaptive mesh developed by Rijkhorst et al. (2006). The radiative transfer module has been augmented to allow simulations with arbitrarily high resolution. Our highest resolution models resolve the disk scale height by at least 16 zones. Opacities for non-ionizing radiation have been added to account for the accretion heating, which is expected to be strong at the initial stage of star formation and believed to prevent fragmentation. Studies of collapsing massive cores show the formation of a gravitationally highly unstable disk. The accretion heating is not strong enough to suppress this instability. The ionizing radiation builds up an H II region around the protostar, which destroys the accretion disk close to it. We describe preliminary results, with a focus on how long the H II region remains confined by the accretion flow, and whether it can ever cut off accretion entirely. Thomas Peters acknowledges support from a Kade Fellowship for his visit to the American Museum of Natural History. He is a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Graduate School of Fundamental Physics. We also thank the DFG for support via the Emmy Noether Grant BA 3607/1 and the individual grant KL1358/5.

  12. Ionizing radiation and breast cancer in men (United States).

    PubMed

    Thomas, D B; Rosenblatt, K; Jimenez, L M; McTiernan, A; Stalsberg, H; Stemhagen, A; Thompson, W D; Curnen, M G; Satariano, W; Austin, D F

    1994-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine whether exposure of the vestigial male breast to ionizing radiation is associated with an increase in risk of breast cancer and, if so, to determine whether the apparent effects on risk in men are similar to those reported for women. A population-based case-control study of breast cancer in men was conducted in 10 geographic areas of the United States. Information on possible prior exposure to ionizing radiation, and on other potential risk factors for breast cancer, was obtained from personal interviews of 227 cases and 300 controls who were recruited from October 1983 to September 1986. Evidence from this study that ionizing radiation can cause breast cancer in men includes: a modest trend of increasing risk with frequency of chest X-rays; an increase in risk in men with three or more radiographic examinations, especially if received prior to 1963; and an increase in risk in men who received X-ray treatments to the chest and adjacent body areas. Risk was increased only from 20 to 35 years after initial exposure from either radiographic examinations or X-ray treatments, and declined after three to four decades since last exposure, suggesting a wave of increased risk of finite duration following exposure. The doses of radiation received could not be estimated precisely, but those from diagnostic procedures were likely similar to those received by prepubertal females in prior studies, and the results of those and the present investigation are compatible. The carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation may be similar in the male and prepubertal female breast.

  13. Hypersensitivity reactions to biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Alessandra; Castells, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Biologic agents (BAs) are important therapeutic tools; their use has rapidly expanded and they are used in oncology, immunology, and inflammatory diseases. Their use may be limited, however, by adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current literature on clinical presentation and pathogenic mechanisms of both acute and delayed reactions. In addition, procedures for management of BA-induced reactions, including preventive and diagnostic work-up, are provided. Lastly, this article summarizes the current knowledge of desensitization to several widely used monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Anticancer agents from marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjun; Zhou, Feng; Al-Kareef, Ammar M Q; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of anticancer active compounds found in the marine ecosystems. More than 5300 different known metabolites are from sponges and their associated microorganisms. To survive in the complicated marine environment, most of the sponge species have evolved chemical means to defend against predation. Such chemical adaptation produces many biologically active secondary metabolites including anticancer agents. This review highlights novel secondary metabolites in sponges which inhibited diverse cancer species in the recent 5 years. These natural products of marine sponges are categorized based on various chemical characteristics.

  15. Method For Detecting Biological Agents

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan W.; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Whitten, David G.

    2005-12-27

    A sensor is provided including a polymer capable of having an alterable measurable property from the group of luminescence and electrical conductivity, the polymer having an intermediate combination of a recognition element, a tethering element and a property-altering element bound thereto and capable of altering the measurable property, the intermediate combination adapted for subsequent separation from the polymer upon exposure to an agent having an affinity for binding to the recognition element whereupon the separation of the intermediate combination from the polymer results in a detectable change in the alterable measurable property, and, detecting said detectable change in the alterable measurable property.

  16. VOLTTRON: An Agent Execution Platform for the Electric Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.; Ciraci, Selim; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Tews, Cody W.

    2012-06-05

    Volttron is an agent execution platform that is engineered for use in the electric power system. Volttron provides resource guarantees for agents and the platform including memory and processor utilization; authentication and authorization services; directory services for agent and resource location; and agent mobility. Unlike most other agent platforms, Volttron does not depend on a single agent authoring language. Instead, we chose to design and implement Volttron as a platform service and framework that is decoupled from the agent execution environment. A prototype implementation of Volttron has been written in Python (using Python v2.7.2) and we have executed agents written in Python and Java and as shell scripts. The intended use of Volttron is in the power distribution system for managing distributed generation, demand-response, and plug-in electric vehicles.

  17. [Decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination].

    PubMed

    Ohmachi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    When radionuclides are accidentally ingested or inhaled, blood circulation or tissue/organ deposition of the radionuclides causes systemic or local radiation effects. In such cases, decorporation therapy is used to reduce the health risks due to their intake. Decorporation therapy includes reduction and/or inhibition of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, isotopic dilution, and the use of diuretics, adsorbents, and chelating agents. For example, penicillamine is recommended as a chelating agent for copper contamination, and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid is approved for the treatment of internal contamination with plutonium. During chelation therapy, the removal effect of the drugs should be monitored using a whole-body counter and/or bioassay. Some authorities, such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and International Atomic Energy Agency, have reported recommended decorporation agents for each radionuclide. However, few drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and many are off-label-use agents. Because many decontamination agents are drugs that have been available for a long time and have limited efficacy, the development of new, higher-efficacy drugs has been carried out mainly in the USA and France. In this article, in addition to an outline of decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination, an outline of our research on decorporation agents for actinide (uranium and plutonium) contamination and for radio-cesium contamination is also presented. PMID:25832835

  18. Intelligent Agents, Internet Information and Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, James

    1995-01-01

    Reviews intelligent software agents and their relevance to networked information, particularly concerning future patterns of information gathering in research and education. Discussion of Internet information includes differing interfaces, the need for indexing, and map-making and information overload. Additional highlights include characteristics…

  19. Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air using combined laser ionization and ambient metastable ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X. N.; Xie, Z. Q.; Gao, Y.; Hu, W.; Guo, L. B.; Jiang, L.; Lu, Y. F.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air was carried out using combined laser ionization and metastable ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-MI-TOFMS) in ambient environment for qualitative and semiquantitative (relative analyte information, not absolute information) analysis. Ambient metastable ionization using a direct analysis in realtime (DART) ion source was combined with laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-TOFMS) to study the effects of combining metastable and laser ionization. A series of metallic samples from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST 494, 495, 498, 499, and 500) and a pure carbon target were characterized using LI-TOFMS in open air. LI-MI-TOFMS was found to be superior to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Laser pulse energies between 10 and 200 mJ at the second harmonic (532 nm) of an Nd:YAG laser were applied in the experiment to obtain a high degree of ionization in plasmas. Higher laser pulse energy improves signal intensities of trace elements (such as Fe, Cr, Mn, Ni, Ca, Al, and Ag). Data were analyzed by numerically calculating relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) and limit of detections (LODs) from mass spectrometry (MS) and LIBS spectra. Different parameters, such as boiling point, ionization potential, RSC, LOD, and atomic weight, were shown to analyze the ionization and MS detection processes in open air.

  20. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  1. Modelling of robotic work cells using agent based-approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sękala, A.; Banaś, W.; Gwiazda, A.; Monica, Z.; Kost, G.; Hryniewicz, P.

    2016-08-01

    In the case of modern manufacturing systems the requirements, both according the scope and according characteristics of technical procedures are dynamically changing. This results in production system organization inability to keep up with changes in a market demand. Accordingly, there is a need for new design methods, characterized, on the one hand with a high efficiency and on the other with the adequate level of the generated organizational solutions. One of the tools that could be used for this purpose is the concept of agent systems. These systems are the tools of artificial intelligence. They allow assigning to agents the proper domains of procedures and knowledge so that they represent in a self-organizing system of an agent environment, components of a real system. The agent-based system for modelling robotic work cell should be designed taking into consideration many limitations considered with the characteristic of this production unit. It is possible to distinguish some grouped of structural components that constitute such a system. This confirms the structural complexity of a work cell as a specific production system. So it is necessary to develop agents depicting various aspects of the work cell structure. The main groups of agents that are used to model a robotic work cell should at least include next pattern representatives: machine tool agents, auxiliary equipment agents, robots agents, transport equipment agents, organizational agents as well as data and knowledge bases agents. In this way it is possible to create the holarchy of the agent-based system.

  2. Agent Persuasion Mechanism of Acquaintance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinghua, Wu; Wenguang, Lu; Hailiang, Meng

    Agent persuasion can improve negotiation efficiency in dynamic environment based on its initiative and autonomy, and etc., which is being affected much more by acquaintance. Classification of acquaintance on agent persuasion is illustrated, and the agent persuasion model of acquaintance is also illustrated. Then the concept of agent persuasion degree of acquaintance is given. Finally, relative interactive mechanism is elaborated.

  3. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, Part 3: Radiobiology and health effects of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Livingston, Gordon K; Sugarman, Stephen L; Parillo, Steven J; Glassman, Erik S

    2014-07-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure can induce profound changes in intracellular components, potentially leading to diverse health effects in exposed individuals. Any cellular component can be damaged by radiation, but some components affect cellular viability more profoundly than others. The ionization caused by radiation lasts longer than the initial inciting incident, continuing as 1 ionization incident causes another. In some cases, damage to DNA can lead to cellular death at mitosis. In other cases, activation of the genetic machinery can lead to a genetic cascade potentially leading to mutations or cell death by apoptosis. In the third of 5 articles on the management of injuries and illnesses caused by ionizing radiation, the authors provide a clinically relevant overview of the pathophysiologic process associated with potential exposure to ionizing radiation.

  4. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization.

    PubMed

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-02-12

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field.

  5. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  6. E-Learning Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Dawn G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the advantages of using intelligent agents to facilitate the location and customization of appropriate e-learning resources and to foster collaboration in e-learning environments. Design/methodology/approach: This paper proposes an e-learning environment that can be used to provide customized…

  7. Remote Agent Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benard, Doug; Dorais, Gregory A.; Gamble, Ed; Kanefsky, Bob; Kurien, James; Millar, William; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, Pandu; Rouquette, Nicolas; Rajan, Kanna; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Remote Agent (RA) is a model-based, reusable artificial intelligence (At) software system that enables goal-based spacecraft commanding and robust fault recovery. RA was flight validated during an experiment on board of DS1 between May 17th and May 21th, 1999.

  8. Can Subscription Agents Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Marcia

    1985-01-01

    With the saturation of traditional markets for their services, subscription agents have evolved from orders and invoices to serving customers by communicating with librarians and publishers and making automated and paper products available. Magazine fulfillment centers, publisher discounts, and electronic publishing will influence the subscription…

  9. Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Smart, N.G.; Wai, C.M.; Lin, Y.; Kwang, Y.H.

    1998-11-24

    Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO{sub 2} and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process. 1 fig.

  10. Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Smart, Neil G.; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Kwang, Yak Hwa

    1998-01-01

    Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO.sub.2, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO.sub.2 and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process.

  11. The effect of ionization on the populations of excited levels of C IV and C V in tokamak edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, K. D.; Coffey, I. H.; Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-02-01

    The main populating and depopulating mechanisms of the excited energy levels of ions in plasmas with densities <1023-1024 m-3 are electron collisional excitation from the ion's ground state and radiative decay, respectively, with the majority of the electron population being in the ground state of the ionization stage. Electron collisional ionization is predominately expected to take place from one ground state to that of the next higher ionization stage. However, the question arises as to whether, in some cases, ionization can also affect the excited level populations. This would apply particularly to those cases involving transient events such as impurity influxes in a laboratory plasma. An analysis of the importance of ionization in populating the excited levels of ions in plasmas typical of those found in the edge of tokamaks is undertaken for the C IV and C V ionization stages. The emphasis is on those energy levels giving rise to transitions of most use for diagnostic purposes (n ≤ 5). Carbon is chosen since it is an important contaminant of JET plasmas; it was the dominant low Z impurity before the installation of the ITER-like wall and is still present in the plasma after its installation. Direct electron collisional ionization both from and to excited levels is considered. Distorted-wave flexible atomic code calculations are performed to generate the required ionization cross sections, due to a lack of atomic data in the literature. Employing these data, ionization from excited level populations is not found to be significant in comparison with radiative decay. However, for some energy levels, ionization terminating in the excited level has an effect in the steady-state of the order of the measurement errors (±10%). During transient events, ionization to excited levels will be of more importance and must be taken into account in the calculation of excited level populations. More accurate atomic data, including possible resonance contributions to the

  12. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T.-F.; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-05-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  13. The primordial abundance of deuterium: ionization correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan; Pettini, Max

    2016-01-01

    We determine the relative ionization of deuterium and hydrogen in low metallicity damped Lyman α (DLA) and sub-DLA systems using a detailed suite of photoionization simulations. We model metal-poor DLAs as clouds of gas in pressure equilibrium with a host dark matter halo, exposed to the Haardt & Madau background radiation of galaxies and quasars at redshift z ≃ 3. Our results indicate that the deuterium ionization correction correlates with the H I column density and the ratio of successive ion stages of the most commonly observed metals. The N(N II)/N(N I) column density ratio provides the most reliable correction factor, being essentially independent of the gas geometry, H I column density, and the radiation field. We provide a series of convenient fitting formulae to calculate the deuterium ionization correction based on observable quantities. The ionization correction typically does not exceed 0.1 per cent for metal-poor DLAs, which is comfortably below the current measurement precision (2 per cent). However, the deuterium ionization correction may need to be applied when a larger sample of D/H measurements becomes available.

  14. Conceptual basis of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, M.G.

    1984-04-01

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can b defined as a state-selective detection process in which tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species. Counting of individual atoms has special meaning for detection of rare events. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. We view RIS as a specific type of multi-photon ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. 16 references.

  15. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters.

    PubMed

    Apicella, B; Li, X; Passaro, M; Spinelli, N; Wang, X

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  16. Low latitude middle atmosphere ionization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassi, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Low latitude middle atmosphere ionization was studied with data obtained from three blunt conductivity probes and one Gerdien condenser. An investigation was conducted into the effects of various ionization sources in the 40 to 65 Km altitude range. An observed enhancement of positive ion conductivity taking place during the night can be explained by an atmsopheric effect, with cosmic rays being the only source of ionization only if the ion-ion recombination coefficient (alpha sub i) is small(10 to the -7 power cu cm/s) and varies greatly with altitude. More generally accepted values of alpha sub i ( approximately equal to 3x10 to the -7 power cu cm/s) require an additional source of ionization peaking at about 65 Km, and corresponding approximately to the integrated effect of an X-ray flux measured on a rocket flown in conjunction with the ionization measurements. The reasonable assumption of an alpha sub i which does not vary with altitude in the 50-70 Km range implies an even greater value alpha sub i and a more intense and harder X-ray spectrum.

  17. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  18. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  19. Micro-Radiography of Living Biological Organisms with MEDIPIX2 Detector and Application of Various Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, Jiri; Sopko, Vit; Jakubek, Jan; Weyda, Frantisek; Benes, Jiri; Zahorovsky, Julian

    2012-08-01

    We describe a newly developed radiographic system equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector and a micro-focus FeinFocus X-ray tube tabletop. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by the X-ray tube. The digital pixel detectors of the Medipix family represent a highly efficient type of imaging devices with high spatial resolution better than 1μm, and unlimited dynamic range allowing single particle of radiation and to determine their energies. The setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in vivo observations with various contrast agents (iodine and lanthanum nitrate). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of application of iodine and lanthanum nitrate contrast agents as tracers in various insects as model organisms. The iodine contrast agent increases the absorption of X-rays and this leads to better resolution of internal structures of biological organisms, and especially the various cavities, pores, etc. Micro-radiographic imaging helps to detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  20. Performance evaluation of multi sampling ionization chamber for heavy ion beams by comparison with GEANT4 simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanke, Yuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion accelerator facilities, multi sampling ionization chambers are often used for the identification of the atomic number Z by detecting the energy deposit in it. In the study at GSI, the picture of the escape of secondary electrons, δ rays, from the ionization chamber explains the experimental data of pulse-height resolution. If this picture is correct, the pulse-height resolution should depend on the effective area of the ionization chamber. The experiment have been performed at NIRS-HIMAC. The pulse-height resolutions of two ionization chambers with different effective area were compared by using a 400-MeV/u Ni beam and their fragments. The difference in the pulse-height resolutions was observed. By comparison with the GEANT4 simulation including the δ-rays emission, the performance of the ionization chamber have been evaluated.

  1. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makito, K.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Shin, J.-H.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-01

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of ˜3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  2. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  3. Compendium of Current Total Ionizing Dose Results and Displacement Damage Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Donna J.; O'Bryan, Martha V.; Buchner, Stephen P.; Poivey, Christian; Ladbury, Ray L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Sensitivity of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices.

  4. Electron Impact Ionization of SOx, NOx and H2 SO4 - The Aerosol Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishnav, B. G.; Patel, U. R.; Joshipura, K. N.; Pandya, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports our theoretical studies on electron impact ionization of reactive molecules SOx, NOx (x = 1-3) and H2 SO4, at incident energies from threshold to 2000 eV. Motivation for this work derives from the relevance of these molecules in connection with atmospheric aerosols analysis through mass spectrometric studies and quantification of mass concentrations amongst the aerosol species. The ionization efficiency of a molecule is directly proportional to ionization cross section, which represents the efficiency on a per-molecule basis. Study of electron impact ionization cross sections of molecules, like H2 SO4, versus number of electrons in the molecule can lead to information about mass concentrations of aerosol species. We have employed in this work, the well-known spherical complex potential formalism (SCOP), which provides total elastic as well as inelastic cross sections, wherein the latter includes ionization cross sections. We have developed a method to extract ionization cross section from calculated inelastic cross section by introducing a ratio function, in a semi-empirical formalism known as CSP-ic method. For SOx and NOx targets single-centre scattering calculations are performed, while for H2 SO4, the additivity rule augmented with overlap or screening corrections, has been employed. The calculated cross sections are examined as functions of incident electron energy along with comparisons (theoretical or experimental) as available.

  5. The Origin and Optical Depth of Ionizing Photons in the Green Pea Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of radiative feedback and star formation in galaxies at high redshift is hindered by the rarity of similar systems at low redshift. However, the recently identified Green Pea (GP) galaxies are similar to high-redshift galaxies in their morphologies and star formation rates and are vital tools for probing the generation and transmission of ionizing photons. The GPs contain massive star clusters that emit copious amounts of high-energy radiation, as indicated by intense [OIII] 5007 emission and HeII 4686 emission. We focus on six GP galaxies with high ratios of [O III] 5007,4959/[O II] 3727 ~10 or more. Such high ratios indicate gas with a high ionization parameter or a low optical depth. The GP line ratios and ages point to chemically homogeneous massive stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, or shock ionization as the most likely sources of the He II emission. Models including shock ionization suggest that the GPs may have low optical depths, consistent with a scenario in which ionizing photons escape along passageways created by recent supernovae. The GPs and similar galaxies can shed new light on cosmic reionization by revealing how ionizing photons propagate from massive star clusters to the intergalactic medium.

  6. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  7. Fatal Nocardia farcinica Bacteremia Diagnosed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Amedeo; Guercini, Francesco; Cardaccia, Angela; Furbetta, Leone; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bistoni, Francesco; Mencacci, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a Gram-positive weakly acid-fast filamentous saprophytic bacterium, an uncommon cause of human infections, acquired usually through the respiratory tract, often life-threatening, and associated with different clinical presentations. Predisposing conditions for N. farcinica infections include hematologic malignancies, treatment with corticosteroids, and any other condition of immunosuppression. Clinical and microbiological diagnoses of N. farcinica infections are troublesome, and the isolation and identification of the etiologic agent are difficult and time-consuming processes. We describe a case of fatal disseminated infection in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, treated with corticosteroids, in which N. farcinica has been isolated from blood culture and identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. The patient died after 18 days of hospitalization in spite of triple antimicrobial therapy. Nocardia farcinica infection should be suspected in patients with history of malignancy, under corticosteroid therapy, suffering from subacute pulmonary infection,and who do not respond to conventional antimicrobial therapy. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry can be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of nocardiosis. PMID:23690786

  8. Rapid and Selective Screening for Sulfhydryl Analytes in Plasma and Urine using Surface-Enhanced Transmission Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Gelb, Michael H.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Nylon mesh substrates were derivatized to include VICATSH, a biotinylated reagent that contains both a photolabile linking group and a thiol specific capture agent. The enhanced mesh substrates were then used to capture sulfhydryl analytes directly from urine and plasma samples via covalent reaction between the reactive thiols of the analytes and the iodoacetaminyl unit of VICATSH. Photocleavage of the labile linker was followed by direct analysis of the mesh surface via transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI). This chemoselective capture method promoted enrichment of sulfhydryl analytes and reduced matrix interferences, thereby resulting in increased analytical performance of surface enhanced TM-DESI-MS when compared to standard DESI-MS. The present work describes the manufacture of the derivatized mesh substrates and the quality control assessments made during the manufacturing process; the optimization of the chemoselective capture method; and results of experiments pertinent to biological applications. Integration of the chemoselective capture materials with ambient ionization and tandem mass spectrometry results in a powerful combination of speed and selectivity for targeted analyte screening. PMID:20402469

  9. Free Radicals Generated by Ionizing Radiation Signal Nuclear Translocation of p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J. D.; Pennington, M. E.; Craven, M. T.; Warters, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor that regulates several pathways, which function collectively to maintain the integrity of the genome. Nuclear localization is critical for wild-type function. However, the signals that regulate subcellular localization of p53 have not been identified. Here, we examine the effect of ionizing radiation on the subcellular localization of p53 in two cell lines in which p63 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm and found that ionizing radiation caused a biphasic translocation response. p53 entered the nucleus 1-2 hours postirradiation (early response), subsequently emerged from the nucleus, and then again entered the nucleus 12-24 hours after the cells had been irradiated (delayed response). These changes in subcellular localization could be completely blocked by the free radical scavenger, WR1065. By comparison, two DNA-damaging agents that do not generate free radicals, mitomycin C and doxorubicin, caused translocation only after 12-24 h of exposure to the drugs, and this effect could not be inhibited by WR1065. Hence, although all three DNA-damaging agents induced relocalization of p53 to the nucleus, only the translocation caused by radiation was sensitive to free radical scavenging. We suggest that the free radicals generated by ionizing radiation can signal p53 translocation to the nucleus.

  10. Improved Intratumoral Oxygenation Through Vascular Normalization Increases Glioma Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, Mackenzie C.; Hamner, J. Blair; Williams, Regan F.; Rosati, Shannon F.; Sims, Thomas L.; Ng, Catherine Y.; Gaber, M. Waleed; Calabrese, Christopher; Wu Jianrong; Nathwani, Amit C.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Davidoff, Andrew M.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation, an important component of glioma therapy, is critically dependent on tumor oxygenation. However, gliomas are notable for areas of necrosis and hypoxia, which foster radioresistance. We hypothesized that pharmacologic manipulation of the typically dysfunctional tumor vasculature would improve intratumoral oxygenation and, thus, the antiglioma efficacy of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87 xenografts were treated with either continuous interferon-beta (IFN-beta) or bevacizumab, alone, or combined with cranial irradiation (RT). Tumor growth was assessed by quantitative bioluminescence imaging; the tumor vasculature using immunohistochemical staining, and tumor oxygenation using hypoxyprobe staining. Results: Both IFN-beta and bevaziumab profoundly affected the tumor vasculature, albeit with different cellular phenotypes. IFN-beta caused a doubling in the percentage of area of perivascular cell staining, and bevacizumab caused a rapid decrease in the percentage of area of endothelial cell staining. However, both agents increased intratumoral oxygenation, although with bevacizumab, the effect was transient, being lost by 5 days. Administration of IFN-beta or bevacizumab before RT was significantly more effective than any of the three modalities as monotherapy or when RT was administered concomitantly with IFN-beta or bevacizumab or 5 days after bevacizumab. Conclusion: Bevacizumab and continuous delivery of IFN-beta each induced significant changes in glioma vascular physiology, improving intratumoral oxygenation and enhancing the antitumor activity of ionizing radiation. Additional investigation into the use and timing of these and other agents that modify the vascular phenotype, combined with RT, is warranted to optimize cytotoxic activity.

  11. Detection and identification of immobilized low-volatility organophosphates by desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Nathan A.; Cornish, Timothy J.; Pilato, Robert S.; van Houten, Kelly A.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lippa, Timothy P.; Becknell, Alan F.; Demirev, Plamen A.

    2008-12-01

    Two desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MS) techniques - ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization (LDI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) - have been used to detect and identify low-volatility organophosphates when deposited on surfaces or loaded into the pore volume of porous inorganic or polymeric organic powders. The insecticides malathion and dicrotophos were chosen for this study as simulants of low vapor pressure chemical warfare agents which are inherently difficult to detect directly by traditional methods. Both liquid and powdered forms of either insecticide were readily detected by LDI or DESI MS. LDI MS was performed on a miniaturized home-built time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer and a commercial TOF/TOF instrument. For DESI MS, a home-built ion source was interfaced to a commercial quadrupole ion trap. In LDI, intact molecular ion signatures could be acquired by using an appropriate cationizing agent and powder additive in positive ion mode. Tandem MS was used to confirm the identity of each analyte based on the observed characteristic fragmentation pattern. In DESI, less than 100 pg of the liquid insecticides spotted on clean surfaces were detected, while detection limits for the powder-loaded preparations were lower than 1 [mu]g. The effects of sample surface, salt additives, nanoparticle admixtures, and analyte solubility on the LDI and DESI MS sensitivity have been investigated as well.

  12. Theoretical determinations of ionization potentials of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. F.; Yu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of nine conformers of dopamine in the gas phase are determined using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91 methods and high level ab initio HF method with 6-311++G** basis set, respectively. And the nine stable cationic states have been found in the ionization process of dopamine. Vertical ionization potentials of nine conformers of dopamine are calculated using the older outer-valence Green's function (OVGF) calculations at 6-311++G** basis set. Vibrational frequencies and infrared spectrum intensities of G1b and G1b+ at B3LYP/6-311++G** level are discussed.

  13. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOEpatents

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  14. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization of Perfluorinated Compounds.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Alexander; Brandt, Sebastian; Liedtke, Sascha; Foest, Daniel; Marggraf, Ulrich; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-11-17

    The soft ionization ability based on plasma-jet protonation of molecules initiated by a dielectric barrier discharge ionization source (DBDI) is certainly an interesting application for analytical chemistry. Since the change of an applied sinusoidal voltage may lead to different discharge modes the applied discharge was powered by a square wave generator in order to get a homogeneous plasma. It is known that besides the protonation [M+H](+) of unpolar as well as some polar molecules the homogeneous DBDI can be used to ionize molecules directly [M](+). Here we prove that the DBDI can be applied to exchange fluorine by oxygen of perfluorinated compounds (PFC). PFC are organofluorine compounds with carbon-fluorine and carbon-carbon bonds only but no carbon-hydrogen bonds. While the position of the introduction into the plasma-jet is essential, PFC can be measured in the negative mass spectrometer (MS) mode.

  15. Theoretical IR spectra of ionized naphthalene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauzat, F.; Talbi, D.; Miller, M. D.; DeFrees, D. J.; Ellinger, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study of the effect of ionization on the IR spectrum of naphthalene, using ab initio molecular orbital theory. For that purpose we determined the structures, band frequencies, and intensities of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene. The calculated frequencies and intensities allowed an assignment of the most important bands appearing in the newly reported experimental spectrum of the positive ion. Agreement with the experimental spectrum is satisfactory enough to take into consideration the unexpected and important result that ionization significantly affects the intensities of most vibrations. A possible consequence on the interpretation of the IR interstellar emission, generally supposed to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is briefly presented.

  16. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  17. Camouflaging Agents for Vitiligo Patients.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Claudia; Porto, Dennis A; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Lim, Henry W

    2016-04-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired condition resulting in patches of depigmented skin that is cosmetically disfiguring and can subsequently be psychologically disturbing. For patients seeking to mask their vitiligo, camouflage options have historically been limited and been designated as a cosmetic, rather than a medical, concern. As research has indicated that proper concealment of vitiligo lesions can vastly improve quality of life, we believe it is essential that dermatologists become aware of all the options available to their patients and that discussions of camouflage options be broached from the first visit. Methods for concealment include cosmetic tattoos, dihydroxyacetone, general cosmetics, and various topical camouflage agents, including the newest product, Microskin™. We conducted a literature review of all of the available options for vitiligo concealment and evaluated their advantages and disadvantages. Ultimately, temporary methods of concealment are recommended; but the particular agent used can come from discussion with the patient based on the location of the lesions, degree of concealment desired, cost, and availability. PMID:27050692

  18. Spitzer characterization of dust in the ionized medium of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Lagache, G.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Fukui, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Dust emission associated with ionized gas has so far been detected only in our Galaxy, and for wavelengths longer than 60 μm. Spitzer data now offer the opportunity to carry out a similar analysis in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and to separate dust emission into components associated with different phases of the gas, i.e. atomic, molecular and ionized. We perform a correlation study using infrared Spitzer data as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) and IRAS 12-100 μm combined with gas tracers such as the ATCA/Parkes HI data, for the atomic phase, the NANTEN ^{12}CO data, for the molecular phase, and both the SHASSA Hα and the radio Parkes 5 GHz data, for the ionized phase. In particular, we investigate the presence of dust for different physical regimes of the ionized gas, spanning emission measures from 1 pc cm^{-6} (diffuse medium) to 10^3 pc cm^{-6} (HII regions).

  19. omniSpect: an open MATLAB-based tool for visualization and analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry images.

    PubMed

    Parry, R Mitchell; Galhena, Asiri S; Gamage, Chaminda M; Bennett, Rachel V; Wang, May D; Fernández, Facundo M

    2013-04-01

    We present omniSpect, an open source web- and MATLAB-based software tool for both desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) that performs computationally intensive functions on a remote server. These functions include converting data from a variety of file formats into a common format easily manipulated in MATLAB, transforming time-series mass spectra into mass spectrometry images based on a probe spatial raster path, and multivariate analysis. OmniSpect provides an extensible suite of tools to meet the computational requirements needed for visualizing open and proprietary format MSI data.

  20. Statistical analysis of protein structures suggests that buried ionizable residues in proteins are hydrogen bonded or form salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jeffrey; Makhatadze, George I

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that nonpolar residues are largely buried in the interior of proteins, whereas polar and ionizable residues tend to be more localized on the protein surface where they are solvent exposed. Such a distribution of residues between surface and interior is well understood from a thermodynamic point: nonpolar side chains are excluded from the contact with the solvent water, whereas polar and ionizable groups have favorable interactions with the water and thus are preferred at the protein surface. However, there is an increasing amount of information suggesting that polar and ionizable residues do occur in the protein core, including at positions that have no known functional importance. This is inconsistent with the observations that dehydration of polar and in particular ionizable groups is very energetically unfavorable. To resolve this, we performed a detailed analysis of the distribution of fractional burial of polar and ionizable residues using a large set of ˜2600 nonhomologous protein structures. We show that when ionizable residues are fully buried, the vast majority of them form hydrogen bonds and/or salt bridges with other polar/ionizable groups. This observation resolves an apparent contradiction: the energetic penalty of dehydration of polar/ionizable groups is paid off by favorable energy of hydrogen bonding and/or salt bridge formation in the protein interior. Our conclusion agrees well with the previous findings based on the continuum models for electrostatic interactions in proteins.

  1. CONSTRAINING THE X-RAY AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION CHEMISTRY OF THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A SUB-INTERSTELLAR COSMIC-RAY RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Adams, Fred C.; Qi, Chunhua; Öberg, Karin I.

    2015-02-01

    We present an observational and theoretical study of the primary ionizing agents (cosmic rays (CRs) and X-rays) in the TW Hya protoplanetary disk. We use a set of resolved and unresolved observations of molecular ions and other molecular species, encompassing 11 lines total, in concert with a grid of disk chemistry models. The molecular ion constraints comprise new data from the Submillimeter Array on HCO{sup +}, acquired at unprecedented spatial resolution, and data from the literature, including ALMA observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +}. We vary the model incident CR flux and stellar X-ray spectra and find that TW Hya's HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission are best-fit by a moderately hard X-ray spectra, as would be expected during the ''flaring'' state of the star, and a low CR ionization rate, ζ{sub CR} ≲ 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. This low CR rate is the first indication of the presence of CR exclusion by winds and/or magnetic fields in an actively accreting T Tauri disk system. With this new constraint, our best-fit ionization structure predicts a low turbulence ''dead-zone'' extending from the inner edge of the disk out to 50-65 AU. This region coincides with an observed concentration of millimeter grains, and we propose that the inner region of TW Hya is a dust (and possibly planet) growth factory as predicted by previous theoretical work.

  2. Including Conflict in Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvin, Martin

    Conflict is the basis of all stories and thus should appear in some form in the first sentence. There are three kinds of conflict: people vs. people; people vs. nature; and people vs. themselves. Conflict must be repeated in all the various elements of the story's structure, including the plot, which is the plan of action telling what happens to…

  3. Family Living, Including Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlano, George

    This volume describes and evaluates 21 selected New York City Board of Education Umbrella Programs for the 1974-1975 school year. The programs include: (1) the parent resource center, (2) the teacher self-help program, (3) the East Harlem pre-kindergarten center, (4) the Brooklyn College volunteer tutoring program, (5) the parent education for…

  4. Ionized cluster beam technology for material science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Toshinori

    1997-06-01

    The most suitable kinetic energy range of ionized materials in film formation and epitaxial growth is from a few eV to a few hundreds eV, especially, less than about 100eV, when ions are used as a host. The main roles of ions in film formation are the effects due to their kinetic energy and the electronic charge effects which involve the effect to active film formation and the effect acceleration of chemical reactions. Therefore, it is important to develope the technology to transport large volume of a flux of ionized particles with an extremely low incident energy without any troubles due to the space charge effects and charge up problems on the surface. This is the exact motivation for us to have been developing the Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) technology since 1972. By ICB technology materials (actually wide varieties of materials such as metal, semiconductor, magnetic material, insulator, organic material, etc.) are vaporized and ejected through a small hole nozzle into a high vacuum, where the vaporized material condenses into clusters with loosely coupled atoms with the sizes about from 100 to a few 1000 atoms (mainly 100-2000 atoms) by supercondensation phenomena due to the adiabatic expansion in this evaporation process through a small hole nozzle. In the ICB technology an atom in each cluster is ionized by irradiated by electron shower, and the ionized clusters are accelerated by electric field onto a substrate. The ionized clusters with neutral clusters impinged onto a substrate are spreaded separately into atoms migrating over the substrate, so that the surface migration energy of the impinged atoms, that is, surface diffusion energy are controlled by an incident energy of a cluster. In this report the theoretical and also experimental results of ICB technology are summarized.

  5. Guided ionization waves: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on one of the fundamental phenomena that occur upon application of sufficiently strong electric fields to gases, namely the formation and propagation of ionization waves-streamers. The dynamics of streamers is controlled by strongly nonlinear coupling, in localized streamer tip regions, between enhanced (due to charge separation) electric field and ionization and transport of charged species in the enhanced field. Streamers appear in nature (as initial stages of sparks and lightning, as huge structures-sprites above thunderclouds), and are also found in numerous technological applications of electrical discharges. Here we discuss the fundamental physics of the guided streamer-like structures-plasma bullets which are produced in cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. Plasma bullets are guided ionization waves moving in a thin column of a jet of plasma forming gases (e.g., He or Ar) expanding into ambient air. In contrast to streamers in a free (unbounded) space that propagate in a stochastic manner and often branch, guided ionization waves are repetitive and highly-reproducible and propagate along the same path-the jet axis. This property of guided streamers, in comparison with streamers in a free space, enables many advanced time-resolved experimental studies of ionization waves with nanosecond precision. In particular, experimental studies on manipulation of streamers by external electric fields and streamer interactions are critically examined. This review also introduces the basic theories and recent advances on the experimental and computational studies of guided streamers, in particular related to the propagation dynamics of ionization waves and the various parameters of relevance to plasma streamers. This knowledge is very useful to optimize the efficacy of applications of plasma streamer discharges in various fields ranging from health care and medicine to materials science and nanotechnology.

  6. Electrospray ionization of volatiles in breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lozano, P.; de La Mora, J. Fernández

    2007-08-01

    Recent work by Zenobi and colleagues [H. Chen, A. Wortmann, W. Zhang, R. Zenobi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 580] reports that human breath charged by contact with an electrospray (ES) cloud yields many mass peaks of species such as urea, glucose, and other ions, some with molecular weights above 1000 Da. All these species are presumed to be involatile, and to originate from breath aerosols by so-called extractive electrospray ionization EESI [H. Chen, A. Venter, R.G. Cooks, Chem. Commun. (2006) 2042]. However, prior work by Fenn and colleagues [C.M. Whitehouse, F. Levin, C.K. Meng, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 34th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, Denver, 1986 p. 507; S. Fuerstenau, P. Kiselev, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 47th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry, 1999, Dallas, TX, 1999] and by Hill and colleagues [C. Wu, W.F. Siems, H.H. Hill Jr., Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 396] have reported the ability of electrospray drops to ionize a variety of low vapor pressure substances directly from the gas phase, without an apparent need for the vapor to be brought into the charging ES in aerosol form. The Ph.D. Thesis of Martínez-Lozano [P. Martínez-Lozano Sinués, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Thermal and Fluid Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid; April 5, 2006 (in Spanish); http://hdl.handle.net/10016/655] had also previously argued that the numerous human breath species observed via a similar ES ionization approach were in fact ionized directly from the vapor. Here, we observe that passage of the breath stream through a submicron filter does not eliminate the majority of the breath vapors seen in the absence of the filter. We conclude that direct vapor charging is the leading mechanism in breath ionization by electrospray drops, though aerosol ionization may also play a role.

  7. Do Low Molecular Weight Agents Cause More Severe Asthma than High Molecular Weight Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Meca, Olga; Cruz, María-Jesús; Sánchez-Ortiz, Mónica; González-Barcala, Francisco-Javier; Ojanguren, Iñigo; Munoz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to analyse whether patients with occupational asthma (OA) caused by low molecular weight (LMW) agents differed from patients with OA caused by high molecular weight (HMW) with regard to risk factors, asthma presentation and severity, and response to various diagnostic tests. Methods Seventy-eight patients with OA diagnosed by positive specific inhalation challenge (SIC) were included. Anthropometric characteristics, atopic status, occupation, latency periods, asthma severity according to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) control classification, lung function tests and SIC results were analysed. Results OA was induced by an HMW agent in 23 patients (29%) and by an LMW agent in 55 (71%). A logistic regression analysis confirmed that patients with OA caused by LMW agents had a significantly higher risk of severity according to the GINA classification after adjusting for potential confounders (OR = 3.579, 95% CI 1.136–11.280; p = 0.029). During the SIC, most patients with OA caused by HMW agents presented an early reaction (82%), while in patients with OA caused by LMW agents the response was mainly late (73%) (p = 0.0001). Similarly, patients with OA caused by LMW agents experienced a greater degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, measured as the difference in the methacholine dose-response ratio (DRR) before and after SIC (1.77, range 0–16), compared with patients with OA caused by HMW agents (0.87, range 0–72), (p = 0.024). Conclusions OA caused by LMW agents may be more severe than that caused by HMW agents. The severity of the condition may be determined by the different mechanisms of action of these agents. PMID:27280473

  8. New Results in Electron-Atom Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Don

    1997-10-01

    A deeper insight into atomic ionization by electron impact is gained by studying electron-electron correlation in a model-independent approach for calculating (e,2e) triply-differential cross sections using correlated (three-body) wave functions of arbitrary complexity. Results will be presented from the continuum distorted wave (CDW) model, three Coulomb-wave (3C) model, three-body distorted-wave Born approximation (3DWBA), Alt and Mukhamedzhanov (AM) model, dynamic-screening three Coulomb-wave (DS3C) model, and the eikonal approximation (EA). The sucesses and failures of the above models can be used to gain a better understanding of ionization processes.

  9. Hazards to space workers from ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    A compilation of background information and a preliminary assessment of the potential risks to workers from the ionizing radiation encountered in space is provided. The report: (1) summarizes the current knowledge of the space radiation environment to which space workers will be exposed; (2) reviews the biological effects of ionizing radiation considered of major importance to a SPS project; and (3) discusses the health implications of exposure of populations of space workers to the radiations likely to penetrate through the shielding provided by the SPS work stations and habitat shelters of the SPS Reference System.

  10. Nondipole effects in strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Dubau, J.; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the relativistic nondipole effects in strong-field tunneling ionization process driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse. We consider the role of these effects in breaking the symmetry with respect to the inversion of the momentum component perpendicular to the laser-field polarization direction, which the dipole differential ionization probabilities possess. The study is based on the solution of a three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation taking into account the leading-order relativistic corrections.

  11. Dissociative Ionization of Pyridine by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the damage of biomolecules by electrons, a process important in radiation damage, we undertake a study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of pyridine (C5H5N) from the low-lying ionization channels. The methodology used is the same as in the benzene study. While no experimental DI data are available, we compare the dissociation products from our calculations with the dissociative photoionization measurements of Tixier et al. using dipole (e, e(+) ion) coincidence spectroscopy. Comparisons with the DI of benzene is also made so as to understand the difference in DI between a heterocyclic and an aromatic molecule.

  12. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.

    1997-07-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM`s). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  13. Double ionization of helium by particle impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, Finn M.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are reviewed of the ratio, R sq., of double to single ionization of He by proton, antiproton, electron and positron impact in the energy range from 0.15 to about 10 MeV/amu. At high velocities (greater than 1 to 2 MeV/amu) values of R sq. caused by electron impact merge with those for the proton with the antiproton, electron values being up to a factor of 2 greater than that for the p, positron. At these velocities the single ionization cross sections caused by impact of any of these four particles are indistinguishable.

  14. Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Karl JR., Robert R.

    1990-03-06

    Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

  15. Indistinguishability in electron-impact excitation-ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, A. L.; Milum, B.; Madison, D. H.

    2011-11-15

    We present fully differential cross section (FDCS) calculations for electron-impact excitation-ionization of helium using the four-body distorted wave-exchange (4DWE) model. This model includes both the direct and exchange amplitudes, which account for the indistinguishability of the free electrons in the final state. The results of the 4DWE model are compared with absolute experimental results, and we find that the exchange amplitude has a minimal impact in determining the shape and magnitude of the FDCS.

  16. Collisional-radiative nonequilibrium in partially ionized atomic nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1989-01-01

    A nonlinear collisional-radiative model for determination of nonequilibrium production of electrons, excited atoms, and bound-bound, dielectronic and continuum line intensities in stationary partially ionized atomic nitrogen is presented. Populations of 14 atomic levels and line intensities are calculated in plasma with T(e) = 8000-15,000 K and N(t) = 10 to the 12th - 10 to the 18th/cu cm. Transport of radiation is included by coupling the rate equations of production of the electrons and excited atoms with the radiation escape factors, which are not constant but depend on plasma conditions.

  17. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques.

  18. Nondestructive intervention to multi-agent systems through an intelligent agent.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    For a given multi-agent system where the local interaction rule of the existing agents can not be re-designed, one way to intervene the collective behavior of the system is to add one or a few special agents into the group which are still treated as normal agents by the existing ones. We study how to lead a Vicsek-like flocking model to reach synchronization by adding special agents. A popular method is to add some simple leaders (fixed-headings agents). However, we add one intelligent agent, called 'shill', which uses online feedback information of the group to decide the shill's moving direction at each step. A novel strategy for the shill to coordinate the group is proposed. It is strictly proved that a shill with this strategy and a limited speed can synchronize every agent in the group. The computer simulations show the effectiveness of this strategy in different scenarios, including different group sizes, shill speed, and with or without noise. Compared to the method of adding some fixed-heading leaders, our method can guarantee synchronization for any initial configuration in the deterministic scenario and improve the synchronization level significantly in low density groups, or model with noise. This suggests the advantage and power of feedback information in intervention of collective behavior.

  19. Matrix assisted ionization in vacuum, a sensitive and widely applicable ionization method for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D

    2013-05-01

    An astonishingly simple new method to produce gas-phase ions of small molecules as well as proteins from the solid state under cold vacuum conditions is described. This matrix assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) mass spectrometry (MS) method produces multiply charged ions similar to those that typify electrospray ionization (ESI) and uses sample preparation methods that are nearly identical to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Unlike these established methods, MAIV does not require a laser or voltage for ionization, and unlike the recently introduced matrix assisted ionization inlet method, does not require added heat. MAIV-MS requires only introduction of a crystalline mixture of the analyte incorporated with a suitable small molecule matrix compound such as 3-nitrobenzonitrile directly to the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. Vacuum intermediate pressure MALDI sources and modified ESI sources successfully produce ions for analysis by MS with this method. As in ESI-MS, ion formation is continuous and, without a laser, little chemical background is observed. MAIV, operating from a surface offers the possibility of significantly improved sensitivity relative to atmospheric pressure ionization because ions are produced in the vacuum region of the mass spectrometer eliminating losses associated with ion transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum. Mechanistic aspects and potential applications for this new ionization method are discussed.

  20. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. 1. Ionization of compounds in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Francisco J; Shelley, Jacob T; Wetzel, William C; Webb, Michael R; Gamez, Gerardo; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-04-15

    A novel chemical ionization source for organic mass spectrometry is introduced. This new source uses a glow discharge in the flowing afterglow mode for the generation of excited species and ions. The direct-current gas discharge is operated in helium at atmospheric pressure; typical operating voltages and currents are around 500 V and 25 mA, respectively. The species generated by this atmospheric pressure glow discharge are mixed with ambient air to generate reagent ions (mostly ionized water clusters and NO+), which are then used for the ionization of gaseous organic compounds. A wide variety of substances, both polar and nonpolar, can be ionized. The resulting mass spectra generally show the parent molecular ion (M+ or MH+) with little or no fragmentation. Proton transfer from ionized water clusters has been identified as the main ionization pathway. However, the presence of radical molecular ions (M+) for some compounds indicates that other ionization mechanisms are also involved. The analytical capabilities of this source were evaluated with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and preliminary characterization shows very good stability, linearity, and sensitivity. Limits of detection in the single to tens of femtomole range are reported for selected compounds. PMID:18345693

  1. Emulsified blasting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chironis, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    This article describes an improved blasting agent which is being tailor-blended with bulk ANFO to provide more explosive energy and better water resistance when the blasting conditions call for it. The proportions of the emulsion/ANFO mix are easily changed at the blasthole site because both materials can be selectively mixed in modified bulk-explosive trucks before loading the blasting agents into the holes. Such blends are helping speed stripping at a number of surface mines and are leading to cost savings in production, ranging from 10% to 30%, depending upon application, even though the actual cost of a blend will be higher than if bulk ANFO is used alone.

  2. The highly intelligent virtual agents for modeling financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Chen, Y.; Huang, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Researchers have borrowed many theories from statistical physics, like ensemble, Ising model, etc., to study complex adaptive systems through agent-based modeling. However, one fundamental difference between entities (such as spins) in physics and micro-units in complex adaptive systems is that the latter are usually with high intelligence, such as investors in financial markets. Although highly intelligent virtual agents are essential for agent-based modeling to play a full role in the study of complex adaptive systems, how to create such agents is still an open question. Hence, we propose three principles for designing high artificial intelligence in financial markets and then build a specific class of agents called iAgents based on these three principles. Finally, we evaluate the intelligence of iAgents through virtual index trading in two different stock markets. For comparison, we also include three other types of agents in this contest, namely, random traders, agents from the wealth game (modified on the famous minority game), and agents from an upgraded wealth game. As a result, iAgents perform the best, which gives a well support for the three principles. This work offers a general framework for the further development of agent-based modeling for various kinds of complex adaptive systems.

  3. Mechanisms underlying strong-field double ionization of argon dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Manschwetus, B.; Rottke, H.; Steinmeyer, G.; Sandner, W.; Foucar, L.; Czasch, A.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate double ionization of argon dimers in high-intensity ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser pulses. We are able to identify several strong-field excitation pathways of the dimer that terminate in atomic ion pairs from a Coulomb explosion. The explosion starts from two-site double-ionized dimers and from one-site double-ionized ones after radiative charge transfer at small internuclear separation. One-site double ionization is accomplished by laser-induced charge transfer in the high-intensity laser pulse following two-site double ionization. The highest energy ion pairs we observed can be attributed to ''frustrated triple ionization'' of the argon dimer.

  4. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    2000-02-08

    Bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  5. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, M.P.; Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo[2.2.2] octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1] heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  6. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo›2.2.2! octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo›2.2.1! heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  7. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  8. Electron-impact ionization of the K-shells of Heavy Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindzola, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Fully-relativistic subconfiguration-average distorted-wave (SCADW) calculations are made for the electron-impact ionization of the K-shells of heavy atoms. One set of calculations only include the two-body electrostatic interaction, while the other set includes the full two-body retarded electromagnetic interaction. The SCADW retarded electromagnetic calculations are found to be in good agreement with recent measurements made at the Institute for Physics at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil for Au and Bi atoms. Calculations and measurements will also be presented for the K-shell ionization of the Ta atom. Work supported in part by Grants from NSF and DOE.

  9. Ionizing radiation exposure of LDEF (pre-recovery estimates).

    PubMed

    Benton, E V; Heinrich, W; Parnell, T A; Armstrong, T W; Derrickson, J H; Fishman, G J; Frank, A L; Watts, J W; Wiegel, B

    1992-01-01

    The long duration exposure facility (LDEF), launched into a 258 nautical mile orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees, remained in space for nearly 6 yr. The 21,500 lb NASA satellite was one of the largest payloads ever deployed by the Space Shuttle. LDEF completed 32,422 orbits and carried 57 major experiments representing more than 200 investigators from 33 private companies, 21 universities and nine countries. The experiments covered a wide range of disciplines including basic science, electronics, optics, materials, structures and power and propulsion. A number of the experiments were specifically designed to measure the radiation environment. These experiments are of specific interest, since the LDEF orbit is essentially the same as that of the Space Station Freedom. Consequently, the radiation measurements on LDEF will play a significant role in the design of radiation shielding of the space station. The contributions of the various authors presented here attempt to predict the major aspects of the radiation exposure received by the various LDEF experiments and therefore should be helpful to investigators who are in the process of analyzing experiments which may have been affected by exposure to ionizing radiation. The paper discusses the various types and sources of ionizing radiation including cosmic rays, trapped particles (both protons and electrons) and secondary particles (including neutrons, spallation products and high-LET recoils), as well as doses and LET spectra as a function of shielding. Projections of the induced radioactivity of LDEF are also discussed. PMID:11537534

  10. Ion/molecule reactions of arsenic and phosphorus cluster ions: Ionization potentials and novel reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.A.; Bach, S.B.H.; Watson, C.H.; Eyler, J.R. )

    1991-01-10

    Ionization potentials (IP's) for arsenic and phosphorus clusters (As{sub n}, n = 1-5; P{sub n}, n = 1-4) have been determined by gas-phase charge-transfer reactions. Arsenic and phosphorus cluster ions were generated by pulsed CO{sub 2} laser desorption from GaAs and InP substrates, mass-selected, thermalized, and allowed to react with compounds of known ionization potential in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The IP's for As{sub 3} and As{sub 5} previously unreported, as well as more accurate IP values for several of the other clusters, have been determined. Products and rate coefficients of some interesting reactions of the cluster ions with the charge-transfer agents are also reported.

  11. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, N A; Loughlin, J E; Friedlander, E R; Clapp, R W; Fahey, F H

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public. PMID:7294269

  12. Environmental mimics of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Claborn, David M

    2004-12-01

    There are several natural and artificial factors that mimic the effects of chemical warfare agents, thereby causing unwarranted alarm and confusion on the battlefield. Symptoms associated with chemical warfare include paralysis, muscle tremors, heavy salivation, severe burns, blistering, and corrosive skin injuries among others. Similar symptoms can be produced from a variety of environmental sources, artificial and natural. This article reviews several published and unpublished examples of environmental factors that produce syndromes similar to those caused by these agents. Examples of such mimics include pesticides, blistering exudates from insects and plants, various types of bites, and naturally occurring diseases. The potential for confusion caused by these factors is discussed and means of discriminating between warfare agents and naturally occurring events are identified. Recommendations for the use of this information and for needed research are also discussed. PMID:15646185

  13. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  14. Detection of singly ionized oxygen around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, C. B.; Morgan, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Forbidden emission from singly ionized oxygen at wavelengths of 3726 and 3729 angstroms has been detected in the inner Jovian magnetosphere. The emission is present between approximately 4 and 7 to 8 Jovian radii from the planet and appears concentrated in the magnetic equator. The line intensity ratio indicates the same plasma characteristics as those derived from observations of forbidden sulfur emission.

  15. Applying the helium ionization detector in chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Andrawes, F. F.; Brazell, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    High noise levels and oversensitivity of helium detector make flame-ionization and thermal-conductivity detectors more suitable for chromotography. Deficiencies are eliminated by modifying helium device to operate in saturation rather than multiplication mode. Result is low background current, low noise, high stability, and high sensitivity. Detector analyzes halocarbons, hydrocarbons, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, and inorganics without requiring expensive research-grade helium.

  16. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    We proposed an investigation of genetically-determined individual differences in sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The model organism is Drosophila melanogaster. The gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) is the target locus, but the effects of variation in other components of the genome that modulate SOD levels are also taken into account. SOD scavenges oxygen radicals generated during exposure to ionizing radiation. It has been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Two alleles, S and F, are commonly found in natural populations of D. melanogaster; in addition we have isolated from a natural population of null'' (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide an ideal model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CA1. The role of SOD levels in radioresistance are being investigated in a series of experiments that measure the somatic and germ-line effects of increasing doses of ionizing radiation. During the first seven months of funding we have completed a number of experiments and are proceeding with many others. We have made progress along all the research lines anticipated for the first year of this grant, as summarized in the following pages.

  17. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  18. Roles of ionizing radiation in cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, C.A.; Albright, N.W.; Yang, T.C.

    1983-07-01

    Earlier the authors described a repair misrepair model (RMR-I) which is applicable for radiations of low LET, e.g., x rays and gamma rays. RMR-II was described later. Here is introduced a mathematical modification of the RMR model, RMR-III, which is intended to describe lethal effects caused by heavily ionizing tracks. 31 references, 4 figures.

  19. Collisional Ionization Equilibrium for Optically Thin Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryans, P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Reliably interpreting spectra from electron-ionized cosmic plasmas requires accurate ionization balance calculations for the plasma in question. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and their reliability are often highly suspect. We have utilized state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He to Zn. We have also utilized state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bare through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998), we have calculated improved collisional ionization equilibrium calculations. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. (1998) for all elements from H to Ni, and with the fractional abundances derived from the modern DR and RR calculations of Gu (2003a,b, 2004) for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni.

  20. Conduction in fully ionized liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    Electron transport is considered in high density fully ionized liquid metals. Ionic structure is described in terms of hard-sphere correlation functions and the scattering is determined from self-consistently screened point ions. Applications to the physical properties of the deep interior of Jupiter are briefly considered.