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Sample records for agents including oxaliplatin

  1. Hypersensitivity reactions to oxaliplatin and other antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Syrigou, Ekaterini; Syrigos, Kostas; Saif, M Wasif

    2008-03-01

    Although the reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to antineoplastic agents is considered to be uncommon, it is difficult to evaluate their exact prevalence, mainly because their definition is vast and pathogenic mechanisms are vague. HSR include facial flushing, erythema, pruritus, fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, tongue swelling, rash/hives, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness, and edema. Treatment and prevention consists of slowing the infusion rate, steroids, and type 1 and 2 histamine receptor antagonists. Desensitization could allow the small number of patients who experience severe HSR to receive effective therapy for their cancer. Reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitization strategies is still missing. With regard to oxaliplatin, knowledge of its rare but eminent toxicity is paramount, because this drug is widely used in treating colorectal cancer, the second-highest cause of cancer mortality in the United States. PMID:18377776

  2. Synergistic Activity of the Src Family Kinase Inhibitor Dasatinib and Oxaliplatin in Colon Carcinoma Cells is Mediated by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kopetz, Scott; Lesslie, Donald P.; Dallas, Nikolas A.; Park, Serk I.; Johnson, Marjorie; Parikh, Nila U.; Kim, Michael P.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Ellis, Lee M.; Chandra, Joya; Gallick, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of colorectal cancer generally include oxaliplatin, although inherent and acquired resistance is common. One potential mediator of oxaliplatin sensitivity is the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, Src, the activity of which correlates with disease stage and patient survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of Src inhibition using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib on oxaliplatin sensitivity. We demonstrate that oxaliplatin acutely activates Src and that combination treatment with dasatinib is synergistic in a cell-line dependent manner, with the level of Src activation correlating with extent of synergy in a panel of six cell lines. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated after oxaliplatin treatment, and ROS potently activates Src. Pretreatment with antioxidants inhibits oxaliplatin-induced Src activation. In oxaliplatin resistant cell lines, Src activity is constitutively increased. In a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases, treatment with oxaliplatin also results in chronic Src activation. The combination of dasatinib and oxaliplatin results in significantly smaller tumors compared to single agent treatment, corresponding with reduced proliferation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we conclude that oxaliplatin activates Src through a ROS-dependent mechanism. Src inhibition increases oxaliplatin activity both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Src inhibitors combined with oxaliplatin may have efficacy in metastatic colon cancer, and may provide the first indication of a molecular phenotype that might be susceptible to such combinations. PMID:19383922

  3. Efficacy of Combination Chemotherapy Using a Novel Oral Chemotherapeutic Agent, TAS-102, with Oxaliplatin on Human Colorectal and Gastric Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nukatsuka, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Fumio; Takechi, Teiji

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent consisting of trifluridine (FTD) and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (at a molar ratio of 1:0.5) that was approved in Japan in 2014 for the treatment of unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. In the present study, the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy using a combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin was evaluated in a xenograft-bearing nude mouse model of colorectal and gastric cancer. TAS-102 was orally administered twice-a-day from day 1 to 14, and oxaliplatin was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8. The in vivo growth-inhibitory activity was evaluated based on the tumor volume and the growth-delay period, was estimated based on the period required to reach a tumor volume five-times greater than the initial volume (RTV5). The tumor growth-inhibitory activity and RTV5 in mice administered TAS-102 with oxaliplatin were significantly superior to those associated with either monotherapy in mice with colorectal (HCT 116, SW-48; p<0.001) and gastric cancer (SC-2, MKN74; p<0.001). MKN74/5FU, a 5-fluorouracil-resistant MKN74 sub-line, was sensitive to both FTD and oxaliplatin in vitro. In vivo, TAS-102 alone was effective in MKN74/5FU, and its anti-tumor activity was significantly enhanced in combination with oxaliplatin (p<0.001). No significant decrease in body weight or toxicity was observed compared to either monotherapy. The present pre-clinical findings indicate that combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin is a promising treatment option for colorectal or gastric cancer, and can be utilized in both chemo-naïve tumors and recurrent tumors after 5-fluorouracil treatment.

  4. Oxaliplatin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or objects may make some of the side effects of oxaliplatin worse. You should not eat or drink anything colder than room temperature, touch any cold objects, go near air conditioners or freezers, wash your hands in cold ...

  5. Oxaliplatin administration increases expression of the voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ-1 subunit in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ken; Tsuboi, Mayuko; Kambe, Toshie; Abe, Kenji; Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Utsunomiya, Iku; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-02-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various types of cancer including colorectal cancer. Acute cold hyperalgesia is a serious side effect of oxaliplatin treatment. Although the therapeutic drug pregabalin is beneficial for preventing peripheral neuropathic pain by targeting the voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ-1 (Cavα2δ-1) subunit, the effect of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity is uncertain. To analyze the contribution of the Cavα2δ-1 subunit to the development of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity, Cavα2δ-1 subunit expression in the rat spinal cord was analyzed after oxaliplatin treatment. Behavioral assessment using the acetone spray test showed that 6 mg/kg oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity 2 and 4 days later. Oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity 4 days after treatment was significantly inhibited by pregabalin (50 mg/kg, p.o.). Oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment increased the expression level of Cavα2δ-1 subunit mRNA and protein in the spinal cord 2 and 4 days after treatment. Immunohistochemistry showed that oxaliplatin increased Cavα2δ-1 subunit protein expression in superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn 2 and 4 days after treatment. These results suggest that oxaliplatin treatment increases Cavα2δ-1 subunit expression in the superficial layers of the spinal cord and may contribute to functional peripheral acute cold hypersensitivity.

  6. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for... Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. (a) Agents....

  7. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2006-09-01

    The reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with oxaliplatin in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is approximately 12%, with 1 - 2% of patients developing grade 3 or 4 in severity. However, the recent rising incidence of HSR to oxaliplatin observed is the result of increasing clinical use. HSR to oxaliplatin may manifest as facial flushing, rash/hives, tachycardia, dyspnoea, erythema, pruritus, fever, tongue swelling, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness and oedema. Anaphylactic shock is rare but serious, and must be considered in the event of hypotension. No definitive approaches to prevent and treat HSR associated with oxaliplatin are available; however, few successful strategies have been reported. Such strategies include: slowing the infusion rate, use of steroids and antagonists of type 1 and 2 histamine receptors, and desensitisation. Successful implementation of oxaliplatin desensitisation protocols based on other platinum-containing compounds have been reported, which could enable a small number of patients who experience severe HSR to further receive an effective therapy for CRC. However, reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitisation strategies are still missing. Recently, subcutaneous adrenaline has also been utilised as an alternative approach to manage HSR to oxaliplatin. Knowledge of this rare but real toxicity of oxaliplatin is paramount because the use of this drug continues to increase not only for the treatment of patients with stage II-IV CRC, but also other solid malignancies. In this article, the author discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, risk factors and current strategies of management of HSR associated with oxaliplatin. PMID:16907658

  8. Prolonged Oxaliplatin Exposure Alters Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A New Mechanism To Explain Oxaliplatin-Associated Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christin; McGowan, Margit; Jordt, Sven; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum based cytotoxic agent commonly used to treat colorectal cancers. Despite its effectiveness, oxaliplatin administration is associated with the development of cold-induced peripheral neuropathy. This potentially permanent side effect is provoked by cold exposure and can range from mild and self limited to severe and debilitating. Even with tumor shrinkage, these painful side effects can force dose-reduction or discontinuation of treatment. Neither the mechanism of action of oxaliplatin nor that of cold-induced neuropathy is understood. Paclitaxel, an entirely different chemotherapeutic agent used to treat a variety of malignancies, also is associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Unlike oxaliplatin, neurotoxicity arising from paclitaxel treatment is better understood and was found to have profound effects on intracellular calcium signaling (1,2). In this study we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on calcium signaling pathways and found that acute exposure of either a neuroblastoma cell line or primary neurons with therapeutic concentrations of oxaliplatin had no effect on intracellular calcium signaling. We also found that cellular temperature sensors (TRP channels) were also not activated by oxaliplatin. Interestingly, prolonged exposure of oxaliplatin sensitized cells to subsequent stimuli and enhanced the magnitude of intracellular calcium responses. Taken together, our results suggest that acute oxaliplatin exposure will not induce abnormal calcium signaling but oxaliplatin-primed cells do exhibit enhanced sensitivity. These findings provide new insight to the mechanism behind oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21859566

  9. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  11. β-elemene sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to oxaliplatin by preventing oxaliplatin-induced degradation of copper transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Zhenhai; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Lei; Liu, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jubo; Ye, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    β-elemene, a Curcuma wenyujin plant extract, has been used widely as a tumor adjuvant therapeutic agent. However, how to obtain optimum therapeutic effects by combining this compound with other agents remain unclear. In this study, we found that β-elemene, which alone had little effect on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell proliferation, exerted a synergistic anti-proliferative effect in HCC cells when dosed in combination with oxaliplatin, which increased the amounts of platinum accumulation and platinum-DNA adduct significantly and augmented the oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Western blot and laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that β-elemene enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to oxaliplatin by upregulating copper transporter 1 (CTR1), a major controller of intracellular platinum accumulation. In an orthotopic transplantation HCC model in nude mice, HCC tumor growth was inhibited significantly by oxaliplatin combined with β-elemene, as compared with oxaliplatin alone. Notably, CTR1 protein expression in xenograft HCC was upregulated in mice who received β-elemene treatment. Taken together, our findings show that β-elemene can block the reduction of CTR1 resulting from oxaliplatin treatment, and therefore has a synergistic anti-HCC effect with oxaliplatin by enhancing cellular uptake of oxaliplatin. The synergistic effects of β-elemene and oxaliplatin deserve further evaluation in clinical settings. PMID:26867799

  12. Retained platinum uptake and indifference to p53 status make novel transplatinum agents active in platinum-resistant cells compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert F.; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Robey, Rob; Balis, Frank M.; Farrell, Nicholas P.; Fojo, Tito

    2012-01-01

    Despite the clinical success of platinum-containing drugs in the treatment of solid tumors, acquired resistance remains a major obstacle. We previously identified a group of novel transplanaramine or transplatinum compounds based on distinct activity profiles in the NCI-60 panel. In the present study, parental KB-3.1 cells with wild-type p53 and its cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant sublines harboring mutant p53 proteins were used to contrast several transplatinum compounds with cisplatin and oxaliplatin. The transplatinum compounds retained cytotoxic activity in the resistant cell lines. While intracellular accumulation and DNA platination of cisplatin and oxaliplatin was decreased in the resistant cells, the transplatinum compounds both accumulated intracellularly and platinated DNA at comparable levels in all cell lines. Cytoflow analysis confirmed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin alter the cell cycle distribution and result in apoptosis; however, at comparably toxic concentrations, the transplatinum compounds did not alter the cell cycle distribution. Analysis of the cytoplasmic fraction treated with acetone showed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin readily bound to macromolecules in the pellet, whereas a larger percentage of the transplatinum compounds remained in the supernatant. We concluded that, distinct from platinum compounds currently in use, transplatinum compounds accumulate intracellularly in resistant cells at levels comparable to those in drug-sensitive cells, do not affect the cell cycle and thus retain cytotoxicity independent of p53 status and likely have cytoplasmic targets that are important in their activity. PMID:22333583

  13. Guadecitabine (SGI-110) priming sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yuting; El-Khoueiry, Anthony; Taverna, Pietro; Ljungman, Mats; Neamati, Nouri

    2015-11-01

    Promoter DNA hypermethylation is an important biomarker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), supporting the potential utility of demethylating agents in this disease. Guadecitabine (SGI-110) is a second-generation hypomethylating agent formulated as a dinucleotide of decitabine and deoxyguanosine that yields longer half-life and more extended decitabine exposure than decitabine IV infusion. Here we performed preclinical evaluation of SGI-110 in HCC models to guide the design of a phase I/II clinical trial. HCC cell lines and xenograft models were used to determine the antitumor activity of SGI-110 as a single agent and in combination with oxaliplatin. Pretreatment with low doses of SGI-110 significantly synergized with oxaliplatin yielding enhanced cytotoxicity. The combination of SGI-110 and oxaliplatin was well tolerated and significantly delayed tumor growth in mice compared to oxaliplatin alone. Bromouridine-labeled RNA sequencing (Bru-seq) was employed to elucidate the effects of SGI-110 and/or oxaliplatin on genome-wide transcription. SGI-110 and the combination treatment inhibited the expression of genes involved in WNT/EGF/IGF signaling. DNMT1 and survivin were identified as novel PD markers to monitor the efficacy of the combination treatment. In conclusion, SGI-110 priming sensitizes HCC cells to oxaliplatin by inhibiting distinct signaling pathways. We expect that this combination treatment will show low toxicity and high efficacy in patients. Our study supports the use of the combination of low doses of SGI-110 and oxaliplatin in HCC patients.

  14. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of...

  15. Oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JUNG-HYE; WON, YOUNG-WOONG; KIM, HYUN SUNG; OH, YOUNG-HA; LIM, SANGHYEOK; KIM, HAN-JOON

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it may cause liver injury, particularly sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). Although SOS does not usually present with focal lesions on radiological images, the present study describes the case of a 22-year-old woman with oxaliplatin-induced SOS mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver. An abdominal computed tomography revealed a novel 1 cm, low-density lesion in segment 1 of the liver following the administration of the fourth round of oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer. Since the lesion was indistinguishable from metastasis, even with detailed imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography, an isolated caudate lobectomy was planned. The cut surface of the resected liver showed a localized reddish congested lesion measuring 1.4 cm in diameter. The adjacent hepatic parenchyma also demonstrated diffuse sinusoidal congestion with a nutmeg-like appearance. Histologically, the lesion exhibited severe sinusoidal congestion with peliosis hepatis-like features. The widened sinusoidal space was outlined by markedly attenuated hepatic cords and filled with erythrocytes. The final diagnosis was oxaliplatin-induced SOS. The patient recovered completely and was relapse-free at the time of writing. PMID:27073565

  16. Pharmacological characterization of standard analgesics on oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Nakamura, Saki; Miyake, Takahito; So, Kanako; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, causes an acute peripheral neuropathy triggered by cold in almost all patients during or within hours after its infusion. We recently reported that a single administration of oxaliplatin induced cold hypersensitivity 2 h after the administration in mice. In this study, we examined whether standard analgesics relieve the oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity. Gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate significantly inhibited and morphine and milnacipran decreased the acute cold hypersensitivity, while diclofenac and amitriptyline had no effects. These results suggest that gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate are effective against oxaliplatin-induced acute peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24671055

  17. Oxaliplatin-Based Doublets Versus Cisplatin or Carboplatin-Based Doublets in the First-Line Treatment of Advanced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Xiao, Jing; Yang, Yifan; Cao, Bangwei

    2015-07-01

    The efficacy and toxicity of oxaliplatin-based versus carboplatin/cisplatin-based doublets in patients with previously untreated nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been compared.We searched published randomized controlled trials of oxaliplatin-based or carboplatin/cisplatin-based medications for NSCLC. A fixed effect model was used to analyze outcomes which were expressed as the hazard ratio for overall survival (OS) and time-to-progression (TTP), relative risk, overall response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), 1-year survival, and the odds ratios for toxicity were pooled.Eight studies involving 1047 patients were included. ORR tended to favor carboplatin/cisplatin but the effect was not significantly different compared with oxaliplatin doublets (P = 0.05). The effects of OS, TTP, DCR, and 1-year survival between the 2 regimens were comparable. Oxaliplatin doublets caused less grade 3/4 leukocytopenia and neutropenia. Grades 3 to 4 nonhematological toxicities and grades 3 to 4 hematological toxicities showed little difference between oxaliplatin doublets and carboplatin/cisplatin doublets.Meta-analysis shows that the efficacy of oxaliplatin doublets is similar to that of other currently used platinum doublets. The lack of significant differences in the statistic analysis does not preclude genuine differences in clinical efficacy, because higher diversities between the studies covered differences between the 2 groups in each study. Oxaliplatin combined with a third-generation agent should be considered for use as alternative chemotherapy in patients who cannot tolerate conventional platinum-based regimens because the toxicity profile is much more favorable.

  18. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents.

  19. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  20. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan. PMID:27221832

  1. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan.

  2. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of agents... to: (i) Establish performance criteria for Poolers. (ii) Monitor and evaluate the financial...

  3. Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist relieves mechanical allodynia in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic mice; potentiation by spinal p38 MAPK inhibition without motor dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ji-Hee; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kim, Sol-Ji; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-15

    Cancer chemotherapy with platinum-based antineoplastic agents including oxaliplatin frequently results in a debilitating and painful peripheral neuropathy. We evaluated the antinociceptive effects of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Specifically, we determined if (i) the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clonidine reduces mechanical allodynia in mice with an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and (ii) concurrent inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 enhances clonidine's antiallodynic effect. Clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), with or without SB203580(1-10 nmol, intrathecal) was administered two weeks after oxaliplatin injection(10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to mice. Mechanical withdrawal threshold, motor coordination and blood pressure were measured. Postmortem expression of p38 MAPK and ERK as well as their phosphorylated forms(p-p38 and p-ERK) were quantified 30 min or 4 hr after drug injection in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated and control mice. Clonidine dose-dependently reduced oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and spinal p-p38 MAPK expression, but not p-ERK. At 0.1 mg kg(-1), clonidine also impaired motor coordination and decreased blood pressure. A 10 nmol dose of SB203580 alone significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and p-p38 MAPK expression, while a subeffective dose(3 nmol) potentiated the antiallodynic effect of 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine and reduced the increased p-p38 MAPK. Coadministration of SB203580 and 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine decreased allodynia similar to that of 0.10 mg kg(-1) clonidine, but without significant motor or vascular effects. These findings demonstrate that clonidine treatment reduces oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. The concurrent administration of SB203580 reduces the dosage requirements for clonidine, thereby alleviating allodynia without producing undesirable motor or cardiovascular effects.

  4. Preventive effect of oral goshajinkigan on chronic oxaliplatin-induced hypoesthesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kono, Toru; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Keita; Miyagi, Chika; Omiya, Yuji; Sekine, Hitomi; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Miyano, Kanako; Kase, Yoshio; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2015-11-06

    Oxaliplatin, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, induces peripheral neuropathy that manifests itself as two distinct phases: acute cold hyperesthesia and chronic peripheral hypoesthesia/dysesthesia. The latter is a serious dose-limiting side effect that can often lead to withdrawal of treatment. We have developed a rat model expressing both phases and used the model to investigate the action of goshajinkigan (GJG), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, which was reported to ameliorate oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in a placebo-controlled double-blind randomized phase II study. In this study, neuropathy was induced by injection of oxaliplatin twice weekly for 8 wks. The maximum level of cold hyperesthesia was observed at 4 wks with heat hypoesthesia developing later. Microscopy studies revealed atrophy of axons of myelinated sciatic nerve fibers in oxaliplatin-treated rats at 8 wks. Co-administration of GJG ameliorated both abnormal sensations as well as histological damage to the sciatic nerve. A pharmacokinetic study revealed numerous neuroprotective components of GJG that are rapidly absorbed into the blood. GJG and some of its components attenuated the generation of oxaliplatin-induced reactive oxygen species, which is a possible mechanism of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The present study provides a useful animal model for oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as well as a promising prophylactic agent.

  5. Preventive effect of oral goshajinkigan on chronic oxaliplatin-induced hypoesthesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Toru; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Keita; Miyagi, Chika; Omiya, Yuji; Sekine, Hitomi; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Miyano, Kanako; Kase, Yoshio; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, induces peripheral neuropathy that manifests itself as two distinct phases: acute cold hyperesthesia and chronic peripheral hypoesthesia/dysesthesia. The latter is a serious dose-limiting side effect that can often lead to withdrawal of treatment. We have developed a rat model expressing both phases and used the model to investigate the action of goshajinkigan (GJG), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, which was reported to ameliorate oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in a placebo-controlled double-blind randomized phase II study. In this study, neuropathy was induced by injection of oxaliplatin twice weekly for 8 wks. The maximum level of cold hyperesthesia was observed at 4 wks with heat hypoesthesia developing later. Microscopy studies revealed atrophy of axons of myelinated sciatic nerve fibers in oxaliplatin-treated rats at 8 wks. Co-administration of GJG ameliorated both abnormal sensations as well as histological damage to the sciatic nerve. A pharmacokinetic study revealed numerous neuroprotective components of GJG that are rapidly absorbed into the blood. GJG and some of its components attenuated the generation of oxaliplatin-induced reactive oxygen species, which is a possible mechanism of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The present study provides a useful animal model for oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as well as a promising prophylactic agent. PMID:26542342

  6. Protection against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss by minocycline.

    PubMed

    Boyette-Davis, J; Dougherty, P M

    2011-06-01

    Treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin produces a robust painful neuropathy similar to various other neuropathic conditions which result in loss of nerve fibers innervating the skin. This loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) appears to play an important role in neuropathy, but has yet to be investigated in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. For this study, mechanical hyperalgesia and IENF density were measured in rats receiving oxaliplatin, given at a dosage of 2 mg/kg every other day for four injections. The immunomodulatory agent minocycline (25 mg/kg) was also administered and was given 24 h prior to the first dose of oxaliplatin and continued throughout oxaliplatin treatment. Immunohistochemistry using the pan-neuronal marker PGP9.5 was used to investigate IENF densities in hind paw skin on Day 15 and Day 30. The results show that a robust mechanical sensitivity developed in oxaliplatin treated animals, as did a pronounced decrease in epidermal nerve fibers, and these outcomes were effectively prevented by minocycline treatment. This is the first study to show changes in IENF density in oxaliplatin treated animals, and confirm not only a relationship between IENF loss and hypersensitivity but also prevention of both with minocycline treatment.

  7. Oxaliplatin Neurotoxicity Involves Peroxisome Alterations. PPARγ Agonism as Preventive Pharmacological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zanardelli, Matteo; Micheli, Laura; Cinci, Lorenzo; Failli, Paola; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuropathic syndromes is an important, dose limiting side effect of anticancer agents like platinum derivates, taxanes and vinca alkaloids. The causes of neurotoxicity are still unclear but the impairment of the oxidative equilibrium is strictly related to pain. Two intracellular organelles, mitochondria and peroxisomes cooperate to the maintaining of the redox cellular state. Whereas a relationship between chemotherapy-dependent mitochondrial alteration and neuropathy has been established, the role of peroxisome is poor explored. In order to study the mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity, peroxisomal involvement was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In primary rat astrocyte cell culture, oxaliplatin (10 µM for 48 h or 1 µM for 5 days) increased the number of peroxisomes, nevertheless expression and functionality of catalase, the most important antioxidant defense enzyme in mammalian peroxisomes, were significantly reduced. Five day incubation with the selective Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) antagonist G3335 (30 µM) induced a similar peroxisomal impairment suggesting a relationship between PPARγ signaling and oxaliplatin neurotoxicity. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (10 µM) reduced the harmful effects induced both by G3335 and oxaliplatin. In vivo, in a rat model of oxaliplatin induced neuropathy, a repeated treatment with rosiglitazone (3 and 10 mg kg−1 per os) significantly reduced neuropathic pain evoked by noxious (Paw pressure test) and non-noxious (Cold plate test) stimuli. The behavioral effect paralleled with the prevention of catalase impairment induced by oxaliplatin in dorsal root ganglia. In the spinal cord, catalase protection was showed by the lower rosiglitazone dosage without effect on the astrocyte density increase induced by oxaliplatin. Rosiglitazone did not alter the oxaliplatin-induced mortality of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. These results highlight the role of

  8. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Abrogation of Oxaliplatin Activity by Cetuximab in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Valeria; Jia, Ruochen; Thompson, Hannah; Nijhuis, Anke; Jeffery, Rosemary; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Silver, Andrew R.; Hartley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antibody cetuximab, targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Clinical trials suggest reduced benefit from the combination of cetuximab with oxaliplatin. The aim of this study was to investigate potential negative interactions between cetuximab and oxaliplatin. Methods: Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Calcusyn software were used to characterize drug interactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction oxidative stress arrays identified genes regulating ROS production. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) measured signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) binding to dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) promoter. SW48, DLD-1 KRAS wild-type cell lines and DLD-1 xenograft models exposed to cetuximab, oxaliplatin, or oxaliplatin + cetuximab (control [saline]; n = 3 mice per treatment group) were used. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Cetuximab and oxaliplatin exhibited antagonistic effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activity reduced by 1.4-fold, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78 to 2.11, P = .003) as opposed to synergistic effects observed with the irinotecan metabolite 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). Although both oxaliplatin and SN-38 produced ROS, only oxaliplatin-mediated apoptosis was ROS dependent. Production of ROS by oxaliplatin was secondary to STAT1-mediated transcriptional upregulation of DUOX2 (3.1-fold, 95% CI = 1.75 to 2.41, P < .001). Inhibition of DUOX2 induction and p38 activation by cetuximab reduced oxaliplatin cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Inhibition of STAT1 and DUOX2-mediated ROS generation by cetuximab impairs p38-dependent apoptosis by oxaliplatin in preclinical models and may contribute to reduced efficacy in clinical settings. Understanding the rationale for unexpected trial results will inform improved rationales for combining EGFR

  9. Anticancer Activity of Methyl-Substituted Oxaliplatin Analogs†

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Xanthos, Dimitris N.; Gojo, Johannes; Bytzek, Anna K.; Körner, Wilfried; Heffeter, Petra; Abramkin, Sergey A.; Jakupec, Michael A.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Windberger, Ursula; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Berger, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is successfully used in systemic cancer therapy. However, resistance development and severe adverse effects are limiting factors for curative cancer treatment with oxaliplatin. The purpose of this study was to comparatively investigate in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties as well as the adverse effects of two methyl-substituted enantiomerically pure oxaliplatin analogs [[(1R,2R,4R)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine] oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1537), and [(1R,2R,4S)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine]oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1691)] and to evaluate the impact of stereoisomerism. Although the novel oxaliplatin analogs demonstrated in multiple aspects activities comparable with those of the parental compound, several key differences were discovered. The analogs were characterized by reduced vulnerability to resistance mechanisms such as p53 mutations, reduced dependence on immunogenic cell death induction, and distinctly attenuated adverse effects including weight loss and cold hyperalgesia. Stereoisomerism of the substituted methyl group had a complex and in some aspects even contradictory impact on drug accumulation and anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. To summarize, methyl-substituted oxaliplatin analogs harbor improved therapeutic characteristics including significantly reduced adverse effects. Hence, they might be promising metal-based anticancer drug candidates for further (pre)clinical evaluation. PMID:22331606

  10. Anticancer activity of methyl-substituted oxaliplatin analogs.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Ute; Xanthos, Dimitris N; Gojo, Johannes; Bytzek, Anna K; Körner, Wilfried; Heffeter, Petra; Abramkin, Sergey A; Jakupec, Michael A; Hartinger, Christian G; Windberger, Ursula; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K; Berger, Walter

    2012-05-01

    Oxaliplatin is successfully used in systemic cancer therapy. However, resistance development and severe adverse effects are limiting factors for curative cancer treatment with oxaliplatin. The purpose of this study was to comparatively investigate in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties as well as the adverse effects of two methyl-substituted enantiomerically pure oxaliplatin analogs [[(1R,2R,4R)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine] oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1537), and [(1R,2R,4S)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine]oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1691)] and to evaluate the impact of stereoisomerism. Although the novel oxaliplatin analogs demonstrated in multiple aspects activities comparable with those of the parental compound, several key differences were discovered. The analogs were characterized by reduced vulnerability to resistance mechanisms such as p53 mutations, reduced dependence on immunogenic cell death induction, and distinctly attenuated adverse effects including weight loss and cold hyperalgesia. Stereoisomerism of the substituted methyl group had a complex and in some aspects even contradictory impact on drug accumulation and anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. To summarize, methyl-substituted oxaliplatin analogs harbor improved therapeutic characteristics including significantly reduced adverse effects. Hence, they might be promising metal-based anticancer drug candidates for further (pre)clinical evaluation.

  11. Effects of oxaliplatin on DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, HaiPeng; Zhang, HongYan; Li, Wei; Wang, PengYe

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the interactions between DNA and anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin were investigated by using magnetic tweezers. The dynamics of DNA condensation due to oxaliplatin was traced under various forces. It is found that torsion constraint in DNA enhances the ability of oxaliplatin for shortening DNA. The transplatin helps oxaliplatin combine to DNA and increase the rate of DNA condensation. All these results are consistent to the previously proposed model and are helpful for further investigation of interaction between DNA and oxaliplatin.

  12. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  13. [Search for Factors Related to Vascular Pain Expression upon Administration of Oxaliplatin into a Peripheral Vein].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Akiko; Yonemoto, Nao; Aoyama, Yuuya; Touma, Yuri; Kajiwara, Michiko; Watanabe, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Yoshiko; Koinuma, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between vascular pain and various characteristics (age, sex, cancer stage, performance status [PS], height, weight, body mass index [BMI], body surface area, oxaliplatin dose, and presence and absence of the initial administration of dexamethasone) in colorectal cancer patients who were administered initial doses of oxaliplatin intravenously. The study population included 29 patients treated at Higashi Totsuka Memorial Hospital between June 2010 and April 2014. One-way analysis of variance showed that vascular pain was significantly associated with weight (p=0.015), body surface area (p=0.013), and oxaliplatin doses (p=0.0026), where the significance level was p=0.05. Logistic regression analysis and the likelihood ratio test demonstrated that the likelihood of vascular pain increased with the increase in the oxaliplatin dose. According to the cut-off value of vascular pain determined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin was determined to be 175 mg or more. According to the cut-off value established using the ROC analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin at which vascular pain is expressed was determined to be 175 mg or more. At this dose, 13 patients complained of vascular pain and 8 did not. At doses less than 175 mg, none of the 8 patients complained of vascular pain. These results suggest that lowering the diluted concentration and reducing the infusion rate of intravenously administered oxaliplatin may reduce vascular pain.

  14. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  15. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  16. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  17. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  18. Oxaliplatin Alters Expression of T1R2 Receptor and Sensitivity to Sweet Taste in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Akihiro; Nishida, Kentaro; Yamanaka, Yuri; Miyata, Ai; Ikukawa, Akiko; Yabu, Miharu; Miyamoto, Karin; Bansho, Saho; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    As one of the adverse effects of oxaliplatin, a key agent in colon cancer chemotherapy, a taste disorder is a severe issue in a clinical situation because it decreases the quality of life of patients. However, there is little information on the mechanism underlying the oxaliplatin-induced taste disorder. Here, we examined the molecular and behavioral characteristics of the oxaliplatin-induced taste disorder in rats. Oxaliplatin (4-16 mg/kg) was administered to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats intraperitoneally for 2 d. Expression levels of mRNA and protein of taste receptors in circumvallate papillae (CP) were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Taste sensitivity was assessed by their behavioral change using a brief-access test. Morphological change of the taste buds in CP was evaluated by hematoxyline-eosin (HE) staining, and the number of taste cells in taste buds was counted by immunohistochemical analysis. Among taste receptors, the expression levels of mRNA and protein of T1R2, a sweet taste receptor subunit, were increased transiently in CP of oxaliplatin-administered rats on day 7. In a brief-access test, the lick ratio was decreased in oxaliplatin-administered rats on day 7 and the alteration was recovered to the control level on day 14. There was no detectable alteration in the morphology of taste buds, number of taste cells or plasma zinc level in oxaliplatin-administered rats. These results suggest that decreased sensitivity to sweet taste in oxaliplatin-administered rats is due, at least in part, to increased expression of T1R2, while these alterations are reversible. PMID:27040630

  19. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  20. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53-/- HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53-/- HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  1. Oxaliplatin antagonizes HIV-1 latency by activating NF-κB without causing global T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Pengfei; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Hanxian; Chen, Huabiao; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 in this cell line model of HIV-1 latency. • Reactivation is synergized when oxaliplatin is used in combination with valproic acid. • Oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 through activation of NF-kB and does not induce T cell activation. - Abstract: Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a promising strategy for the clearance of the viral reservoirs. Because of the limitations of current agents, identification of new latency activators is urgently required. Using an established model of HIV-1 latency, we examined the effect of Oxaliplatin on latent HIV-1 reactivation. We showed that Oxaliplatin, alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA), was able to reactivate HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation. We also provided evidence that Oxaliplatin reactivated HIV-1 expression by inducing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Our results indicated that Oxaliplatin could be a potential drug candidate for anti-latency therapies.

  2. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53−/− HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53−/− HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  3. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  4. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  5. Oxaliplatin elicits mechanical and cold allodynia in rodents via TRPA1 receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Gees, Maarten; Harrison, Selena; De Siena, Gaetano; Materazzi, Serena; Moretto, Nadia; Failli, Paola; Preti, Delia; Marchetti, Nicola; Cavazzini, Alberto; Mancini, Francesca; Pedretti, Pamela; Nilius, Bernd; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2011-07-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause neurotoxicity. In particular, oxaliplatin produces early-developing, painful, and cold-exacerbated paresthesias. However, the mechanism underlying these bothersome and dose-limiting adverse effects is unknown. We hypothesized that the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a cation channel activated by oxidative stress and cold temperature, contributes to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity caused by oxaliplatin and cisplatin. Oxaliplatin and cisplatin evoked glutathione-sensitive relaxation, mediated by TRPA1 stimulation and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals in isolated guinea pig pulmonary arteries. No calcium response was observed in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons or in naïve Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to oxaliplatin or cisplatin. However, oxaliplatin, and with lower potency, cisplatin, evoked a glutathione-sensitive calcium response in CHO cells expressing mouse TRPA1. One single administration of oxaliplatin produced mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in rats, an effect selectively abated by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Oxaliplatin administration caused mechanical and cold allodynia in mice. Both responses were absent in TRPA1-deficient mice. Administration of cisplatin evoked mechanical allodynia, an effect that was reduced in TRPA1-deficient mice. TRPA1 is therefore required for oxaliplatin-evoked mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, and contributes to cisplatin-evoked mechanical allodynia. Channel activation is most likely caused by glutathione-sensitive molecules, including reactive oxygen species and their byproducts, which are generated after tissue exposure to platinum-based drugs from cells surrounding nociceptive nerve terminals.

  6. miR-203 induces oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancer cells by negatively regulating ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunfei; Wan, Guohui; Spizzo, Riccardo; Ivan, Cristina; Mathur, Rohit; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Ye, Xiangcang; Lu, Jia; Fan, Fan; Xia, Ling; Calin, George A; Ellis, Lee M; Lu, Xiongbin

    2014-02-01

    Chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) is the standard of care, but ultimately nearly all patients develop drug resistance. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to resistance to individual chemotherapeutic agents may help identify novel targets and drugs that will, in turn, improve therapy. Oxaliplatin is a common component combination therapeutic regimen for use in patients with metastatic CRC, but is also used as a component of adjuvant therapy for patients at risk for recurrent disease. In this study, unbiased microRNA array screening revealed that the miR-203 microRNA is up-regulated in three of three oxaliplatin-resistant CRC cell lines, and therefore we investigated the role of miR-203 in chemoresistance. Exogenous expression of miR-203 in chemo-naïve CRC cells induced oxaliplatin resistance. Knockdown of miR-203 sensitized chemoresistant CRC cells to oxaliplatin. In silico analysis identified ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a primary mediator of the DNA damage response, as a potential target of miR-203. ATM mRNA and protein levels were significantly down-regulated in CRC cells with acquired resistance to oxaliplatin. Using TCGA database, we identified a significant reverse correlation of miR-203 and ATM expression in CRC tissues. We validated ATM as a bona fide target of miR-203 in CRC cells. Mutation of the putative miR-203 binding site in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the ATM mRNA abolished the inhibitory effect of miR-203 on ATM. Furthermore, stable knockdown of ATM induced resistance to oxaliplatin in chemo-naïve CRC cells. This is the first report of oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells induced by miR-203-mediated suppression of ATM.

  7. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  8. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  9. Mass spectrometry study of hemoglobin-oxaliplatin complexes in colorectal cancer patients and potential association with chemotherapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rupasri; Sawyer, Michael B; Li, Xing-Fang

    2006-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is the most active platinum (Pt)-containing anticancer drug for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. We report here the study of potential association of the levels of oxaliplatin-protein complexes in 19 cancer patients with treatment efficacy using size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICPMS) and nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) techniques. Blood samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients were collected at 1 and 48 h after the first infusion of oxaliplatin. HPLC/ICPMS quantification of the oxaliplatin-protein complexes showed that the levels of Pt-protein complexes in plasma samples at 48 h were reduced by approximately 50% compared to those at 1 h, whereas those in hemolysates did not change significantly. The concentrations of hemoglobin (Hb)-oxaliplatin complexes determined by HPLC/ICPMS ranged from 3.1 to 8.7 microM. NanoESI-MS analysis of the patient hemolysates showed three distinct mass spectral profiles of the Hb-oxaliplatin complexes: (1) 1:1, (2) 1:1 with 1:2, and (3) multiple complexes of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4, corresponding to the Hb-oxaliplatin complex concentrations determined by HPLC/ICPMS. Potential association of variables including Hb-oxaliplatin complex concentrations with time to progress as the treatment efficacy indicator was analyzed using the Cox model. Multivariate analysis of the potential predictors showed that the statistically significant variables were Hb-oxaliplatin complex concentration (p = 0.02), performance status (p = 0.02), baseline neutrophil count (p = 0.05), and the site of the primary cancer (colon vs. rectal, p = 0.01). The hazard ratio for the concentration of the Hb-oxaliplatin complexes was 2.4, suggesting that the risk of cancer progression significantly increased with increasing of Hb-oxaliplatin complexes in patients. These results demonstrate that the level of the Hb-oxaliplatin complexes in

  10. Curcumin combined with oxaliplatin effectively suppress colorectal carcinoma in vivo through inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-da; Shen, Yong-qing; Zhao, Xiao-han; Guo, Li-jian; Yu, Zhi-jun; Wang, Duo; Liu, Li-meng; Liu, Jing-ze

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic effects of several curcumin-based combinatorial treatments on colorectal cancer cells. However, their in vivo effects remain unclear. This study has demonstrated the therapeutic effect of curcumin and oxaliplatin, alone or in combination, on subcutaneously xenografted LoVo human colorectal cancer cells in immunodeficient (nu/nu) mice in vivo. Combinatorial administration of curcumin and oxaliplatin evidently inhibited the growth of colorectal cancer in nude mice, which was significantly more effective than either agent alone. Curcumin combined with oxaliplatin treatment induced apoptosis, accompanied by ultrastructural changes and cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases. Further mechanism analysis indicated that while the number of apoptotic tumor cells and the expression of Bax, caspase-3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) increased significantly, the expression of Bcl-2, survivin, HSP70, pro-caspase-3, and pro-PARP were dramatically suppressed in tumor cells after the treatment with combinatorial curcumin and oxaliplatin for 22 days. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated that administration of combined curcumin and oxaliplatin effectively suppressed colorectal carcinoma in vivo through inducing apoptosis and thus may provide an effective treatment for colorectal carcinoma.

  11. Antineuropathic Profile of N-Palmitoylethanolamine in a Rat Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Alessandra; Corti, Francesca; Boccella, Serena; Luongo, Livio; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Maione, Sabatino; Calignano, Antonio; Ghelardini, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is a main side effect of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin. The development of a neuropathic syndrome impairs quality of life and potentially results in chemotherapy dose reductions and/or early discontinuation. In the complex pattern of molecular and morphological alterations induced by oxaliplatin in the nervous system, an important activation of glia has been preclinically evidenced. N-Palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) modulates glial cells and exerts antinociceptive effects in several animal models. In order to improve the therapeutic chances for chemotherapy-dependent neuropathy management, the role of PEA was investigated in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy (2.4 mg kg-1 daily, intraperitoneally). On day 21, a single administration of PEA (30 mg kg-1 i.p.) was able to reduce oxaliplatin-dependent pain induced by mechanical and thermal stimuli. The repeated treatment with PEA (30 mg kg-1 daily i.p. for 21 days, from the first oxaliplatin injection) prevented lowering of pain threshold as well as increased pain on suprathreshold stimulation. Ex vivo histological and molecular analysis of dorsal root ganglia, peripheral nerves and spinal cord highlighted neuroprotective effects and glia-activation prevention induced by PEA repeated administration. The protective effect of PEA resulted in the normalization of the electrophysiological activity of the spinal nociceptive neurons. Finally, PEA did not alter the oxaliplatin-induced mortality of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. The efficacy of PEA in neuropathic pain control and in preventing nervous tissue alteration candidates this endogenous compound as disease modifying agent. These characteristics, joined to the safety profile, suggest the usefulness of PEA in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. PMID:26039098

  12. Solution structures of a DNA dodecamer duplex with and without a cisplatin 1,2-d(GG) intrastrand cross-link: comparison with the same DNA duplex containing an oxaliplatin 1,2-d(GG) intrastrand cross-link.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yibing; Bhattacharyya, Debadeep; King, Candice L; Baskerville-Abraham, Irene; Huh, Sung-Ho; Boysen, Gunnar; Swenberg, James A; Temple, Brenda; Campbell, Sharon L; Chaney, Stephen G

    2007-06-01

    Proteins that discriminate between cisplatin-DNA adducts and oxaliplatin-DNA adducts are thought to be responsible for the differences in tumor range, toxicity, and mutagenicity of these two important chemotherapeutic agents. However, the structural basis for differential protein recognition of these adducts has not been determined and could be important for the design of more effective platinum anticancer agents. We have determined high-resolution NMR structures for cisplatin-GG and undamaged DNA dodecamers in the AGGC sequence context and have compared these structures with the oxaliplatin-GG structure in the same sequence context determined previously in our laboratory. This structural study allows the first direct comparison of cisplatin-GG DNA and oxaliplatin-GG DNA solution structures referenced to undamaged DNA in the same sequence context. Non-hydrogen atom rmsds of 0.81 and 1.21 were determined for the 15 lowest-energy structures for cisplatin-GG DNA and undamaged DNA, respectively, indicating good structural convergence. The theoretical NOESY spectra obtained by back-calculation from the final average structures showed excellent agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the final structures are consistent with the NMR data. Several significant conformational differences were observed between the cisplatin-GG adduct and the oxaliplatin-GG adduct, including buckle at the 5' G6.C19 base pair, opening at the 3' G7.C18 base pair, twist at the A5G6.T20C19 base pair step, slide, twist, and roll at the G6G7.C19C18 base pair step, slide at the G7C8.C18G17 base pair step, G6G7 dihedral angle, and overall bend angle. We hypothesize that these conformational differences may be related to the ability of various DNA repair proteins, DNA binding proteins, and DNA polymerases to discriminate between cisplatin-GG and oxaliplatin-GG adducts.

  13. Phase II study of reintroduction of oxaliplatin for advanced colorectal cancer in patients previously treated with oxaliplatin and irinotecan: RE-OPEN study

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of reintroducing oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to standard chemotherapy has not been verified. We performed a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of reintroducing oxaliplatin. Methods Eligible patients had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and irinotecan that achieved a response or stable disease followed by confirmed disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior oxaliplatin-based therapy. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR) after 12 weeks of treatment starting. The DCR was defined as the sum of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 (range: 35–77) years and the male/female ratio was 19/14. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 in 84.8%. Fourteen primary tumors were in the colon and 19 were in the rectum. All patients received modified FOLFOX6 as the protocol treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment starting, the DCR was 39.4% (95% confidence interval 21.8–57.0) and the response rate (complete response and partial response) was 6.1%. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was five and the median total dose of oxaliplatin was 425 mg/m2. Median progression-free survival time was 98 days and median overall survival was 300 days. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 allergic reactions was 28.1% and 3.1%, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 peripheral sensory neuropathy was 53.1% and 0%, respectively. There were no other severe adverse events and no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion Reintroducing oxaliplatin can be both safe and effective. This may be a salvage option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who achieved a response or stable disease with prior oxaliplatin-based therapy followed by disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior

  14. Oxaliplatin and Doxorubicin for relapsed or refractory high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hung C; Marachelian, Araz; Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Jubran, Rima F; Mascarenhas, Leo

    2015-02-01

    Patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma have poor long-term survival. New therapeutic regimens are needed. Doxorubicin and cisplatin are commonly used in the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma. Oxaliplatin, a platinum compound with a 1,2-diaminocyclohexan carrier ligand, is more potent than cisplatin with less nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. We treated seven relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients using oxaliplatin (105-130 mg/m(2)) and doxorubicin (60-75 mg/m(2)) together with dexrazoxane (10 mg/mg of doxorubicin) administered intravenously every three weeks. Prolonged thrombocytopenia causing treatment delay was observed when oxaliplatin was administered at 130 mg/m(2). A reduced dose of oxaliplatin 105 mg/m(2) on day 1 with doxorubicin at 20 mg/m(2)/dose on days 1-3 was well tolerated. Sensory neuropathies were mild and transient. No cardiotoxicity was noted despite all patients having a history of prior anthracycline exposure. Best responses included 1 complete response, 1 partial response, 1 mixed response, 3 stable diseases. In our cohort of heavily pretreated relapsed and refractory neuroblastoma patients, the combination of oxaliplatin and doxorubicin demonstrated anti-tumor activity and merits further investigation.

  15. [Formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin injection diluted with infusion solutions].

    PubMed

    Eto, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kie; Shimazu, Kounosuke; Sugiura, Toshimune; Baba, Kaori; Sato, Ayaka; Goromaru, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Hara, Keiko; Shinohara, Yoshitake; Takahashi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin use can cause acute peripheral neuropathy characterized by sensory paresthesias, which are markedly exacerbated by exposure to cold temperatures, and is a dose-limiting factor in the treatment of colorectal cancer.Oxalate is eliminated in a series of nonenzymatic conversions of oxaliplatin in infusion solutions or biological fluids.Elimination of oxalate from oxaliplatin has been suggested as one of the reasons for the development of acute neuropathy.In this study, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)-based method to detect oxalate formation, and investigated the time dependent formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin diluted with infusion solutions.The results obtained showed that the amount of oxalate in the solution corresponded to 1.6% of oxaliplatin 8 h after oxaliplatin dilution with a 5% glucose solution. On the other hand, oxalate formation from oxaliplatin diluted with a saline solution was ten-fold higher than that from oxaliplatin diluted with the 5% glucose solution.Most patients who were intravenously injected with oxaliplatin experienced venous pain.As a preventive measure against venous pain, dexamethasone was added to the oxaliplatin injection.We measured the amount of oxalate formed in the dexamethasone-containing oxaliplatin injection diluted with a 5% glucose solution.The amount of oxalate formed when dexamethasone was added did not differ significantly from that formed when dexamethasone was not added.Thus, there are no clinical problems associated with the stability of oxaliplatin solutions.

  16. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis during oxaliplatin chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: case report.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Marcelo; O'Brien, Andrés; González, Sergio; Clavero, José Miguel; Orellana, Eric

    2007-12-01

    The patient presented here is a 30-year-old woman who underwent anterior resection for the initial treatment of rectal cancer. A postoperative study showed a single liver metastasis. The patient received adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy with concomitant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment followed by liver metastasectomy 6 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy with 5-FU, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX 4 regimen) was continued. The initial five cycles were well tolerated with the occurrence of only paresthesia that did not interfere with function. After the sixth cycle of the treatment, progressive dyspnea and persistent cough developed in the patient, although her clinical history was negative for lung disease. A chest radiograph revealed diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates, and a chest CT scan showed bilateral alveolar infiltrates predominant in the right lung. Lung biopsy by video-assisted thoracoscopy was performed, and the histologic report showed cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis (COP). Prednisone therapy (1 mg/kg/d) resulted in a very good clinical response. In fact, the patient had complete remission of respiratory symptoms including cough and dyspnea after 4 days of treatment, and the chest CT scan showed complete resolution of lung infiltrates after 4 weeks. One month later, the patient continued adjuvant treatment with six cycles of 5-FU, leucovorin, and irinotecan (ie, the FOLFIRI regimen) without complications. Thus, oxiplatin was implicated as the likely cause of this drug-induced lung toxicity, which is a very rare complication associated with platins. Diffuse interstitial lung disease, particularly COP, has been described following the administration of the cytotoxic agents bleomycin and busulfan, but a connection to oxaliplatin has not been reported before this case. PMID:18079234

  17. ATR CONTRIBUTES TO CELL CYCLE ARREST AND SURVIVAL AFTER CISPLATIN BUT NOT OXALIPLATIN1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kriste A.; Lilly, Kia K.; Reynolds, Evelyn A.; Sullivan, William P.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Cliby, William A.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA cross-linking agents cisplatin and oxaliplatin are widely used in the treatment of human cancer. Lesions produced by these agents are widely known to activate the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. Less is known about the role of the intra-S phase checkpoint in the response to these agents. In the present study, two different cell lines expressing a dominant negative kinase-dead (kd) version of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related) kinase in an inducible fashion were examined for their responses to these two platinating agents and a variety of other DNA cross-linking drugs. Expression of the kdATR allele markedly sensitized the cells to cisplatin, but not oxaliplatin, as assessed by inhibition of colony formation, induction of apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis. Similar differences in survival were noted for melphalan (ATR-dependent) and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC) (ATR-independent). Further experiments demonstrated that ATR function is not necessary for removal of Pt-DNA adducts. The predominant difference between the responses to the two platinum drugs was presence of a drug-specific ATR-dependent S phase arrest after cisplatin but not oxaliplatin. These results indicate that involvement of ATR in the response to DNA cross-linking agents is lesion specific. This observation might need to be taken into account in the development and use of ATR or Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:19372558

  18. Sequence-dependent inhibition of human colon cancer cell growth and of prosurvival pathways by oxaliplatin in combination with ZD6474 (Zactima), an inhibitor of VEGFR and EGFR tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Troiani, Teresa; Lockerbie, Owen; Morrow, Mark; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Eckhardt, S Gail

    2006-07-01

    To date, clinical studies combining the new generation of targeted therapies and chemotherapy have had mixed results. Preclinical studies can be used to identify potential antagonism/synergy between certain agents, with the potential to predict the most efficacious combinations for further investigation in the clinical setting. In this study, we investigated the sequence-dependent interactions of ZD6474 with oxaliplatin in two human colon cell lines in vitro. We evaluated the in vitro antitumor activity of ZD6474, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and RET tyrosine kinase activity, and oxaliplatin using three combination schedules: ZD6474 before oxaliplatin, oxaliplatin before ZD6474, and concurrent exposure. Cell proliferation studies showed that treatment with oxaliplatin followed by ZD6474 was highly synergistic, whereas the reverse sequence was clearly antagonistic as was concurrent exposure. Oxaliplatin induced a G(2)-M arrest, which was antagonized if the cells were previously or concurrently treated with ZD6474. ZD6474 enhanced oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis but only when added after oxaliplatin. The sequence-dependent antitumor effects appeared, in part, to be based on modulation of compensatory prosurvival pathways. Thus, expression of total and active phosphorylated EGFR, as well as AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, was markedly increased by oxaliplatin. This increase was blocked by subsequent treatment with ZD6474. Furthermore, the synergistic sequence resulted in reduced expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and a marked reduction in secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor protein. ZD6474 in combination with oxaliplatin has synergistic antiproliferative properties in human colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro when oxaliplatin is administered before ZD6474.

  19. Combined Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture and Morphine on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Min Joon; Go, Donghyun; Min, Byung-Il; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-22

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer, induces severe peripheral neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been used to attenuate pain, and its effect is known to be mediated by spinal noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Morphine is a well-known opioid used to treat different types of pain. Here, we investigated whether treatment with a combination of these two agents has an additive effect on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice. To assess cold and mechanical allodynia, acetone and von Frey filament tests were used, respectively. Significant allodynia signs were observed three days after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). BVA (0.25, 1, and 2.5 mg/kg, s.c., ST36) or morphine (0.5, 2, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) alone showed dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects. The combination of BVA and morphine at intermediate doses showed a greater and longer effect than either BVA or morphine alone at the highest dose. Intrathecal pretreatment with the opioidergic (naloxone, 20 μg) or 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 15 μg) receptor antagonist, but not with α2 adrenergic (idazoxan, 10 μg) receptor antagonist, blocked this additive effect. Therefore, we suggest that the combination effect of BVA and morphine is mediated by spinal opioidergic and 5-HT3 receptors and this combination has a robust and enduring analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

  20. In Vitro Evidence for the Use of Astragali Radix Extracts as Adjuvant against Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Zanardelli, Matteo; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Karioti, Anastasia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Vannacci, Alfredo; Mugelli, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla

    2015-08-01

    adjuvant agents against oxaliplatin neurotoxicity.

  1. Solid-phase synthesis of oxaliplatin-TAT peptide bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Abramkin, Sergey; Valiahdi, Seied M; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2012-03-14

    Platinum-based drugs play a crucial role in the fight against cancer. Oxaliplatin, which is used in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma, was the last platinum-based agent to be approved worldwide. However, the efficiency of the therapy is limited for example by a low accumulation of the drug in cancer cells. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are known to ease the cellular membrane transport and are used as vectors for low-molecular-weight drugs and drug carriers; of them, TAT peptides are the best-studied group. In this work, a TAT-peptide fragment (YGRKKRRQRRR) was for the first time conjugated to a platinum(IV) analog of oxaliplatin as a vehicle for membrane penetration. Solid-phase peptide synthesis and subsequent coupling with the platinum complex afforded mono- and difunctionalized conjugates, which were separated by preparative HPLC and characterized by analytical HPLC, ESI-MS, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both conjugates are active in the low micromolar range in CH1 and SW480 human cancer cells, requiring much lower concentrations than the untargeted analogs for equal effects.

  2. Potentiation of mitochondrial dysfunction in tumor cells by conjugates of metabolic modulator dichloroacetate with a Pt(IV) derivative of oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Juraj; Kostrhunova, Hana; Novohradsky, Vojtech; Vrana, Oldrich; Raveendran, Raji; Gibson, Dan; Kasparkova, Jana; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms of enhanced toxic effects in tumor cells of the Pt(IV) derivatives of antitumor oxaliplatin containing axial dichloroacetate (DCA) ligands were investigated. DCA ligands were chosen because DCA has shown great potential as an apoptosis sensitizer and anticancer agent reverting the Wartburg effect. In addition, DCA reverses mitochondrial changes in a wide range of cancers, promoting tumor cell apoptosis in a mitochondrial-dependent pathway. We demonstrate that (i) the transformation of oxaliplatin to its Pt(IV) derivatives containing axial DCA ligands markedly enhances toxicity in cancer cells and helps overcome inherent and acquired resistance to cisplatin and oxaliplatin; (ii) a significant fraction of the intact molecules of DCA conjugates with Pt(IV) derivative of oxaliplatin accumulates in cancer cells where it releases free DCA; (iii) mechanism of biological action of the Pt(IV) derivatives of oxaliplatin containing DCA ligands is connected with the effects of DCA released in cancer cells from the Pt(IV) prodrugs on mitochondria and metabolism of glucose; (iv) treatments with the Pt(IV) derivatives of oxaliplatin containing DCA ligands activate an autophagic response in human colorectal cancer cells; (v) the toxic effects in cancer cells of the Pt(IV) derivatives of oxaliplatin containing DCA ligands can be potentiated if cells are treated with these prodrugs in combination with 5-fluorouracil. These properties of the Pt(IV) derivatives of oxaliplatin containing DCA ligands provide opportunities for further development of new platinum-based agents with the capability of killing cancer cells resistant to conventional antitumor platinum drugs used in the clinic.

  3. Pharmacogenomic approach for the identification of novel determinants of acquired resistance to oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cardús, Anna; Martinez-Balibrea, Eva; Bandrés, Eva; Malumbres, Raquel; Ginés, Alba; Manzano, José Luís; Taron, Miquel; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesús; Abad, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum agent used in colorectal cancer treatment. Oxaliplatin resistance acquisition is a complex process mainly based on alteration of genes and pathways involved in its mechanism of action. Therefore, our purpose was to perform a gene expression screening in an in vitro model to identify genes that could play a role in oxaliplatin resistance acquisition processes. Four colorectal cancer cell lines and their oxaliplatin-resistant derived sublines were compared. Microarray analysis was done using Human 19K Oligo Array Slides. RNA from cells were hybridized with a commercial RNA reference sample and labeled with both fluorochromes Cy3 and Cy5. Data were analyzed by hierarchical clustering method. Subsequently, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to corroborate microarray data, considering as positively validated those genes that showed significant differences in expression levels between groups and a correlation between microarray and qRT-PCR data. By microarray analysis, 32 candidate genes were identified. After validation process by qRT-PCR, the genes AKT1, CDK5, TRIP, GARP, RGS11, and UGCGL1 were positively validated. The 3 first genes proved to be involved in regulation of nuclear factor-kappabeta antiapoptotic transcription factor previously related to drug resistance, and the other 3 genes are novel finds. We have identified 6 genes related to oxaliplatin resistance acquisition. These findings are of paramount importance to understand these processes better and open new lines of study to elucidate the relevance of this pharmacogenomic approach into the clinic.

  4. Speciation of oxaliplatin adducts with DNA nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Aref; Jones, George D D; Reid, Helen J; Shoeib, Tamer; Taylor, Sarah E; Thomas, Anne L; Wood, Joanna P; Sharp, Barry L

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a set of fast and selective high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods coupled to electro-spray ionisation linear ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) and UV detection for in vitro studies of the bifunctional adducts of oxaliplatin with mono-nucleotides, di-nucleotides and cellular DNA. The stationary phases and the optimised conditions used for each separation are discussed. Interaction of oxaliplatin with A and G mono-nucleotides resulted in the formation of five bifunctional platinum diaminocyclohexane (DACHPt) adducts. These were two isomers of the A-DACHPt-A and A-DACHPt-G adducts, and one G-DACHPt-G adduct, as confirmed by MS/MS spectra obtained by collision induced dissociation. These adducts were also characterised by UV absorption data and SF-ICP-MS elemental (195)Pt and (31)P signals. Further, interaction of oxaliplatin with AG and GG di-nucleotides resulted in the formation of three adducts: DACHPt-GG and two isomers of the DACHPt-AG adduct, as confirmed by ESI-MS and the complementary data obtained by UV and SF-ICP-MS. Finally, a very sensitive LC-ICP-MS method for the quantification of oxaliplatin GG intra-strand adducts (DACHPt-GG) was developed and used for monitoring the in vitro formation and repair of these adducts in human colorectal cancer cells. The method detection limit was 0.14 ppb Pt which was equivalent to 0.22 Pt adduct per 10(6) nucleotides based on a 10 μg DNA sample. This detection limit makes this method suitable for in vivo assessment of DACHPt-GG adducts in patients undergoing oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

  5. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  6. Altered glutathione metabolism in oxaliplatin resistant ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    el-akawi, Z; Abu-hadid, M; Perez, R; Glavy, J; Zdanowicz, J; Creaven, P J; Pendyala, L

    1996-07-19

    Elevation of glutathione (GSH) is commonly observed in cellular resistance to a number of anticancer agents. Most frequently reported change in GSH metabolism that is associated with the elevated GSH levels is increased mRNA expression and activity of gamma-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (gamma GCS), the first enzyme of the GSH biosynthetic pathway. We have isolated sublines of the A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line (C10 and C25) that are 8- and 12-fold resistant to oxaliplatin by repeatedly exposing the cells to increasing concentrations of the platinum agent. The GSH levels in C10 and C25 cell sublines are 3.1- and 3.8-fold higher than the parent A2780 cell line. The mRNA levels and activities for gamma GCS and that for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma GT), the GSH salvage pathway enzyme, were measured in these cells. The mRNA for gamma GT and gamma GCS were measured by RT-PCR, with quantitation of the PCR product by HPLC; mRNA levels are expressed as ratios to beta-actin mRNA, used as an endogenous standard. GSH and gamma GCS activity were measured by HPLC assays and gamma GT activity by a colorimetric assay. The increase in GSH in C10 and C25 was associated with an elevation in gamma GT mRNA (2.5- and 8-fold) and gamma GT activity (2.7- and 2.8-fold). No changes were observed in gamma GCS mRNA levels or activity. The data indicate that alterations in GSH metabolism leading to elevations in cellular GSH in A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells selected for low levels of resistance to oxaliplatin are mediated by gamma GT, the "salvage' pathway, rather than an increase in GSH biosynthesis.

  7. PKM2 Subcellular Localization Is Involved in Oxaliplatin Resistance Acquisition in HT29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ginés, Alba; Bystrup, Sara; Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Guardia, Cristina; Musulén, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is the main cause of treatment failure in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). However, molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. In a previous work we identified low levels of PKM2 as a putative oxaliplatin-resistance marker in HT29 CRC cell lines and also in patients. In order to assess how PKM2 influences oxaliplatin response in CRC cells, we silenced PKM2 using specific siRNAs in HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. MTT test demonstrated that PKM2 silencing induced resistance in HT29 and SW480 cells and sensitivity in HCT116 cells. Same experiments in isogenic HCT116 p53 null cells and double silencing of p53 and PKM2 in HT29 cells failed to show an influence of p53. By using trypan blue stain and FITC-Annexin V/PI tests we detected that PKM2 knockdown was associated with an increase in cell viability but not with a decrease in apoptosis activation in HT29 cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed PKM2 nuclear translocation in response to oxaliplatin in HCT116 and HT29 cells but not in OXA-resistant HTOXAR3 cells. Finally, by using a qPCR Array we demonstrated that oxaliplatin and PKM2 silencing altered cell death gene expression patterns including those of BMF, which was significantly increased in HT29 cells in response to oxaliplatin, in a dose and time-dependent manner, but not in siPKM2-HT29 and HTOXAR3 cells. BMF gene silencing in HT29 cells lead to a decrease in oxaliplatin-induced cell death. In conclusion, our data report new non-glycolytic roles of PKM2 in response to genotoxic damage and proposes BMF as a possible target gene of PKM2 to be involved in oxaliplatin response and resistance in CRC cells.

  8. Phase I Study of Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, Bevacizumab, and Everolimus in Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, F.; Bendell, J.; Kozloff, M.; Arrowood, C.; Dellinger, A.; Meadows, J.; Tourt-Uhlig, S.; Murphy, J.; Meadows, K.L.; Starr, A.; Broderick, S.; Brady, J.C.; Cushman, S. M.; Morse, M.; Uronis, H.; Hsu, S.D.; Zafar, S.Y.; Wallace, J.; Starodub, A.; Strickler, J.; Pang, H.; Nixon, A.B.; Hurwitz, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To define maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicities, and pharmacodynamics of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, and everolimus in advanced solid tumor patients. Design This was a standard “3+3” dose-escalation trial. All subjects received bevacizumab 7.5mg/kg on day one of each cycle. Doses for capecitabine, oxaliplatin and everolimus were modified per dose limiting toxicity (DLT). Baseline and on-treatment plasma biomarkers were analyzed. Archived tumor mRNA levels were evaluated for NRP1, NRP2 and VEGF-A isoforms. Results Twenty-nine patients were evaluable for toxicity and 30 for efficacy. Two DLTs were observed in cohort 1 and one DLT each was observed in cohort -1 and -1b. Grade ≥3 toxicities included neutropenia, hypertension, perforation/fistula/hemorrhage, hypertriglyceridemia, diarrhea, and thromboembolism. Twelve subjects experienced partial response (PR); 12 had stable disease as best response. Three of seven chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) subjects experienced PR; eight of 15 chemonaive mCRC subjects experienced PR. Plasma TβRIII and IL-6 increased on treatment but without correlation to outcome. Increased VEGF165 levels significantly correlated with longer progression free survival. Conclusions Everolimus with full dose capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab had unacceptable toxicity. MTD was: everolimus 5mg daily; capecitabine 680mg/m2 BID days 1-14; oxaliplatin 100mg/m2 and bevacizumab 7.5mg/kg, day one. Activity was noted in mCRC. PMID:24711126

  9. A case of delayed oxaliplatin-induced pseudo-obstruction: an atypical presentation of oxaliplatin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, M; Pauwels, W; Bleecker, J De

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity is a serious complication of cancer treatment. Oxaliplatin, a third-generation platinum drug, has become one of the first-line therapies used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of platinum-based chemotherapy. Most commonly a sensory neuropathy occurs with cold-triggered symptoms in the acute phase and numbness and painful paresthesias as a late presentation. Autonomic neurotoxicity and late presentation, months after cessation of the therapy, has rarely been described. We report a patient who clinically presented with a pseudo-obstruction months after treatment with oxaliplatin for metastatic colorectal cancer. Intestinal adhesions and relapsing malignancy were carefully excluded. By exclusion the pseudo-obstruction was attributed to a toxic oxaliplatin-induced autonomic neuropathy which slowly improved during months of follow-up. PMID:25523317

  10. A case of delayed oxaliplatin-induced pseudo-obstruction: an atypical presentation of oxaliplatin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, M; Pauwels, W; Bleecker, J De

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity is a serious complication of cancer treatment. Oxaliplatin, a third-generation platinum drug, has become one of the first-line therapies used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of platinum-based chemotherapy. Most commonly a sensory neuropathy occurs with cold-triggered symptoms in the acute phase and numbness and painful paresthesias as a late presentation. Autonomic neurotoxicity and late presentation, months after cessation of the therapy, has rarely been described. We report a patient who clinically presented with a pseudo-obstruction months after treatment with oxaliplatin for metastatic colorectal cancer. Intestinal adhesions and relapsing malignancy were carefully excluded. By exclusion the pseudo-obstruction was attributed to a toxic oxaliplatin-induced autonomic neuropathy which slowly improved during months of follow-up.

  11. Idiosyncratic Reaction with Cytokine Storm Associated with Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Dembla, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin or irinotecan with 5-fluorouracil form the chemotherapy backbone of any systemic treatment of colorectal cancer. We successfully treated an idiosyncratic reaction to oxaliplatin consisting of severe chills, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever in a patient with metastatic colon cancer. PMID:27335720

  12. Fatal Pneumonitis Induced by Oxaliplatin: Description of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, L.B.; Armentano, D.P.D.; Soares, A.; Gansl, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe 3 fatal cases of interstitial pneumonitis rapidly evolving to pulmonary fibrosis and death after the administration of oxaliplatin as part of the FOLFOX regimen. Due to the widespread use of oxaliplatin in oncology, clinicians should be aware of the risk and severity of oxalipatin-induced interstitial pneumonia. PMID:22539922

  13. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a)...

  14. Cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fiteni, Frédéric; Nguyen, Thierry; Vernerey, Dewi; Paillard, Marie-Justine; Kim, Stefano; Demarchi, Martin; Fein, Francine; Borg, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Pivot, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Cisplatin/gemcitabine association has been a standard of care for first-line regimen in advanced biliary tract cancer nevertheless oxaliplatin/gemcitabine regimen is frequently preferred. Because comparative effectiveness in clinical outcomes of cisplatin- versus oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy is not available, a systematic review of studies assessing cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapies in advanced biliary tract cancer was performed. Published studies evaluating cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in advanced biliary tract cancer were included. Each study was weighted according to the number of patients included. The primary objective was to assess weighted median of medians overall survival (mOS) reported for both regimens. Secondary goals were to assess weighted median of medians progression-free survival (mPFS) and toxic effects were pooled and compared within each arm. Thirty-three studies involving 1470 patients were analyzed. In total, 771 and 699 patients were treated by cisplatin/gemcitabine and oxaliplatin/gemcitabine, respectively. Weighted median of mOS was 9.7 months in cisplatin group and 9.5 months in oxaliplatin group. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was significantly associated with more grade 3 and 4 asthenia, diarrhea, liver toxicity, and hematological toxicity. Sensitivity analysis including only the studies with the standard regimen of cisplatin (25-35 mg/m(2) administered on days 1 and 8) showed that the weighted median of mOS increased from 9.7 to 11.7 months but Gem/CDDP regimen remained more toxic than Gemox regimen. These results suggest that the Gem/CDDP regimen with cisplatin (25-35 mg/m(2)) administered on days 1 and 8 is associated with survival advantage than Gemox regimen but with addition of toxicity.

  15. Preparation and evaluations in vitro of oxaliplatin polylactic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhaoyuan; Sun, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Ju, Fang; Chen, Qian; Gao, Wen; Wei, Haitian

    2013-08-01

    The oxaliplatin nanoparticles were prepared with polylactic acid matrix, orthogonal test was applied to optimize the prescriptions, and the qualities of oxaliplatin nanoparticles were characterized by the shape, particle size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), and drug loading (DL). Oxaliplatin nanoparticle was prepared by solution replacement method. The formation of 0.25% Tween80, DMF-water 1:8 (v/v), oxaliplatin-polylactic acid 1:5 (w/w), and 20 mg/ml polylactic acid showed the suitable EE (17.4 ± 0.47%), DL (3.52 ± 0.07%). We observed the shape of oxaliplatin nanoparticles through SEM. The average size of the particles was 120.5 ± 8.7 nm, which was detected by N5 submicron particle size analyzer.

  16. Exploring binding affinity of oxaliplatin and carboplatin, to nucleoprotein structure of chromatin: spectroscopic study and histone proteins as a target.

    PubMed

    Soori, Hosna; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Davoodi, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Platinum drugs are potent chemotherapeutic agents widely used in cancer therapy. They exert their biological activity by binding to DNA, producing DNA adducts; however, in the cell nucleus, DNA is complexed with histone proteins into a nucleoprotein structure known as chromatin. The aim of this study was to explore the binding affinity of oxaliplatin and carboplatin to chromatin using spectroscopic as well as thermal denaturation and equilibrium dialysis techniques. The results showed that the drugs quenched with chromophores of chromatin and the quenching effect for oxaliplatin (Ksv = 3.156) was higher than carboplatin (Ksv = 0.28). The binding of the drugs exhibited hypochromicity both in thermal denaturation profiles and UV absorbance at 210 nm. The binding was positive cooperation with spontaneous reaction and oxaliplatin (Ka = 5.3 × 10(3) M(-1), n = 1.7) exhibited higher binding constant and number of binding sites than carboplatin (Ka = 0.33 × 10(3) M(-1), n = 1.0) upon binding to chromatin. Also secondary structure of chromatin proteins was altered upon drugs binding. It is concluded that oxaliplatin represents higher binding affinity to chromatin compared to carboplatin. In chromatin where DNA is compacted into nucleosomes structure with histones, the affinity of the platinated drugs is reduced and histone proteins may play a fundamental role in this binding process.

  17. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  18. Celecoxib antagonizes the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin in human esophageal cancer cells by impairing the drug influx.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yi; Gu, Chunping; Zhong, Desheng; Zhao, Xuyan; Lin, Qinghuan; Wang, Keng; Xun, Tianrong; Yu, Le; Liu, Shuwen

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that COX-2-selective inhibitor celecoxib shows synergy with oxaliplatin for suppressing tumor growth. However, the benefit of adding celecoxib to oxaliplatin-based regimen in human esophageal cancer is largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that celecoxib antagonized oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis independent of COX-2 inhibition in human esophageal cancer cells. Celecoxib decreased cellular oxaliplatin accumulation and Pt-DNA adduction formation due to reduced drug influx. Celecoxib alone or combined with oxaliplatin substantially reduced the expression of organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2). To this end, OCT2 knockdown was sufficient to reduce oxaliplatin uptake, connecting OCT2 expression to oxaliplatin accumulation. Moreover, oxaliplatin combined with celecoxib also showed no beneficial effect when compared with monotherapy in esophageal cancer cell-xenografted nude mice. To conclude, our data provide evidence that the addition of celecoxib to oxaliplatin-containing regimens for patients with OCT2-expressing cancers should be cautious.

  19. Silencing of CD59 enhanced the sensitivity of HT29 cells to 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haipeng; Li, Cuiling; Wang, Shaoyu; Guo, Qiang; Ren, Xia; Jiang, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement regulatory proteins (CD55 and CD59) were known to be expressed in many tumors and tumor cell lines including colorectal carcinoma, and were proposed as immunotherapy targets, however whether knocking down of CD55 and CD59 will affect the sensitivity of HT-29 cells to chemotherapy drugs for example, 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin and their possible mechanisms haven't been studied. To address this question, SiRNAs targeting CD55 and CD59 were chemically synthesized and transfected into HT-29 cells by lipofectamine. HT-29 growth curves of CD55 and CD59 knockdown cells were detected by MTT assay, HT29 inhibition curves to chemotherapy drugs (5-Fu and Oxaliplatin) were also assayed, in addition, chemotherapy sensitivity changes of HT29 affected by CD55 and CD59 knockdown were equally detected. Complement mediated lysis was examined by calcein-AM. We found that silencing CD59 in HT-29 cells could significantly enhance their sensitivity to 5-FU (P < 0.05) and Oxaliplatin (P < 0.05), and significantly reduced their IC50 concentration. On the contrary, knocking down of CD55 could inhibit HT-29 growth (P < 0.05). Mechanisms included increasing apoptosis rate of HT-29 by CD59 knocking down and G1/G0 blocking by silencing CD55. Our results thus shed light on the novel mechanism of chemotherapy resistance and provide an alternative strategy to overcome the resistance problem. PMID:25444672

  20. Toxicogenomics profiling of bone marrow from rats treated with topotecan in combination with oxaliplatin: a mechanistic strategy to inform combination toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Myrtle; Li, Jianying; Knight, Elaine; Eldridge, Sandy R.; Daniels, Kellye K.; Bushel, Pierre R.

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of anticancer agents may have synergistic anti-tumor effects, but enhanced hematological toxicity often limit their clinical use. We examined whether “microarray profiles” could be used to compare early molecular responses following a single dose of agents administered individually with that of the agents administered in a combination. We compared the mRNA responses within bone marrow of Sprague-Dawley rats after a single 30 min treatment with topotecan at 4.7 mg/kg or oxaliplatin at 15 mg/kg alone to that of sequentially administered combination therapy or vehicle control for 1, 6, and 24 h. We also examined the histopathology of the bone marrow following all treatments. Drug-related histopathological lesions were limited to bone marrow hypocellularity for animals dosed with either agent alone or in combination. Lesions had an earlier onset and higher incidence for animals given topotecan alone or in combination with oxaliplatin. Severity increased from mild to moderate when topotecan was administered prior to oxaliplatin compared with administering oxaliplatin first. Notably, six patterns of co-expressed genes were detected at the 1 h time point that indicate regulatory expression of genes that are dependent on the order of the administration. These results suggest alterations in histone biology, chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, bone regeneration, and respiratory and oxidative phosphorylation are among the prominent pathways modulated in bone marrow from animals treated with an oxaliplatin/topotecan combination. These data also demonstrate the potential for early mRNA patterns derived from target organs of toxicity to inform toxicological risk and molecular mechanisms for agents given in combination. PMID:25729387

  1. Antibiotic monensin synergizes with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to suppress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Junhui; Wang, Zhongliang; Yan, Zhengjian; Qiao, Min; Ye, Jixing; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Tang, Shengli; Mohammed, Maryam K.; Liu, Hao; Fan, Jiaming; Zhang, Fugui; Zou, Yulong; Liao, Junyi; Qi, Hongbo; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; He, Tong-Chuan; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy with an overall cure rate of merely 30%. Most patients experience recurrence within 12–24 months of cure and die of progressively chemotherapy-resistant disease. Thus, more effective anti-ovarian cancer therapies are needed. Here, we investigate the possibility of repurposing antibiotic monensin as an anti-ovarian cancer agent. We demonstrate that monensin effectively inhibits cell proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression, and induces apoptosis of human ovarian cancer cells. Monensin suppresses multiple cancer-related pathways including Elk1/SRF, AP1, NFκB and STAT, and reduces EGFR expression in ovarian cancer cells. Monensin acts synergistically with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Xenograft studies confirm that monensin effectively inhibits tumor growth by suppressing cell proliferation through targeting EGFR signaling. Our results suggest monensin may be repurposed as an anti-ovarian cancer agent although further preclinical and clinical studies are needed. PMID:26639992

  2. Antibiotic monensin synergizes with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to suppress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Junhui; Wang, Zhongliang; Yan, Zhengjian; Qiao, Min; Ye, Jixing; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Tang, Shengli; Mohammed, Maryam K; Liu, Hao; Fan, Jiaming; Zhang, Fugui; Zou, Yulong; Liao, Junyi; Qi, Hongbo; Haydon, Rex C; Luu, Hue H; He, Tong-Chuan; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy with an overall cure rate of merely 30%. Most patients experience recurrence within 12-24 months of cure and die of progressively chemotherapy-resistant disease. Thus, more effective anti-ovarian cancer therapies are needed. Here, we investigate the possibility of repurposing antibiotic monensin as an anti-ovarian cancer agent. We demonstrate that monensin effectively inhibits cell proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression, and induces apoptosis of human ovarian cancer cells. Monensin suppresses multiple cancer-related pathways including Elk1/SRF, AP1, NFκB and STAT, and reduces EGFR expression in ovarian cancer cells. Monensin acts synergistically with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Xenograft studies confirm that monensin effectively inhibits tumor growth by suppressing cell proliferation through targeting EGFR signaling. Our results suggest monensin may be repurposed as an anti-ovarian cancer agent although further preclinical and clinical studies are needed. PMID:26639992

  3. Intact human holo-transferrin interaction with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Mandal, Rupasri; Li, Xing-Fang

    2005-01-01

    We report the interaction of intact human holo-transferrin (holo-Tf) with oxaliplatin (an anticancer drug), and the characterization of a complex composed of (1:1) intact holo-Tf and the parent oxaliplatin molecule using nanoelectrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nanoESI-QTOF-MS). The molecular weight of this complex was determined to be 80,077 Da, which was an increase of 397 mass units compared to the protein alone (79,680 Da), suggesting that a parent drug molecule was bound to the intact protein. We further examined the interaction between the intact protein and oxaliplatin using size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICPMS). The protein complex and free oxaliplatin were separated by HPLC and quantitatively determined by simultaneous monitoring of both 195Pt and 56Fe using ICPMS. The HPLC/ICPMS detected both Pt and Fe signals at retention time of 2.6 min, identifying the protein-drug complex. The Fe signal at 2.6 min did not change with the increase in incubation time of the reaction mixture containing holo-Tf and oxaliplatin, while the Pt signal at the same retention time increased over time, further demonstrating that the formation of this complex does not affect the protein-bound Fe. The binding constant of the (1:1) intact human holo-Tf-oxaliplatin complex was determined to be 7.7x10(5) M-1. Both nanoESI-MS and HPLC/ICPMS results support that the holo-Tf and parent oxaliplatin molecules form complexes through non-covalent binding, suggesting that holo-Tf may be a useful carrier for oxaliplatin delivery.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Taste Disorder in Oxaliplatin-administered Rats.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Taste disorder is one of the adverse effects of cancer chemotherapy resulting in a loss of appetite, leading to malnutrition and a decrease in the quality of life of the patient. Oxaliplatin, a platinum anticancer drug, has a critical role in colon cancer chemotherapy and is known to induce taste disorder. Here, we evaluated the taste functions in oxaliplatin-administered rats. Among the taste receptors, expression levels of T1R2, one of the sweet receptor subunits, increased in the circumvallate papillae of the oxaliplatin-administered rats. In a brief-access test, i.e., behavioral analysis of the taste response, oxaliplatin-administered rats showed a decreased response to sweet taste. However, we did not detect any differences in the plasma levels of zinc, number of taste cells, or morphology of taste buds between control and oxaliplatin-administered rats. In conclusion, the decreased response to sweet taste by oxaliplatin administration may be due to the upregulation of T1R2 expression. PMID:27374965

  5. Analysis of the efficacy and safety of a combined gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and pegaspargase regimen for NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhong-jun; Huang, Hui-qiang; Jiang, Wen-qi; Lu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is an aggressive neoplasm with a poor outcome. Novel L-asparaginase-based treatment regimens, such as GELOX (gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and L-asparaginase) and P-gemox (gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and pegaspargase), have shown promising results against stage IE/IIE ENKTL. To define the general applicability of P-gemox, in a retrospective analysis we examined the efficacy and safety of P-gemox in a cohort of 117 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory ENKTL. Treatment included 2 to 8 cycles of P-gemox: intravenous gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2) and oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) and intramuscular pegaspargase (2500 IU/m2) on day 1 and repeated every 2 weeks, or intravenous gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 and intravenous oxaliplatin (130 mg/m2) and intramuscular pegaspargase (2500 IU/m2) on day 1 and repeated every 3 weeks. Upon completion of treatment, the overall response rate was 88.8%, and responses were similar for newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory patients. After a median follow-up of 17 months, the 3-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 72.7% and 57.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that CR after treatment was the most significant factor affecting survival. P-gemox thus appears to be an effective and well-tolerated treatment for patients with ENKTL. PMID:27072578

  6. Biotransformations of oxaliplatin in rat blood in vitro.

    PubMed

    Luo, F R; Wyrick, S D; Chaney, S G

    1999-01-01

    The partitioning and biotransformations of oxaliplatin [trans-l-1,2-diaminocyclohexaneoxalatoplatinum(II)] were investigated in the blood of Wistar male rats in vitro. [3-H]-Oxaliplatin was incubated with rat blood at 37 degrees C in 5% CO2 and the concentrations of all Pt complexes containing the [3-H]-dach carrier ligand were followed for up to 12 hours. Decay for both oxaliplatin and Pt-dach in the plasma ultrafiltrate (PUF) was rapid (t 1/2 oxaliplatin = 0.68 h and t 1/2 for Pt-dach in the PUF = 0.85 h). After 9 hours, the concentration of oxaliplatin fell below the detection limit. By 4 hours, the PUF-Pt-dach reached a plateau, which was 12% of total Pt-dach. The binding of Pt-dach to red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma proteins was also very rapid (t 1/2 RBCs = 0.58 h and t 1/2 plasma proteins = 0.78 h) and reached equilibrium by 4 hours. At equilibrium, 35% of total Pt-dach was bound to plasma proteins, 12% was in the plasma ultrafiltrate, and 53% was found associated with RBCs. Of the Pt-dach associated with RBCs, 23% was bound to the RBC membrane, 58% was bound to RBC cytosolic proteins, and 19% was in the RBC cytosol ultrafiltrate. Thus, these studies confirm previous observations of oxaliplatin accumulation by rat RBCs. To better characterize the determinants of this accumulation, oxaliplatin and other Pt-dach complexes were compared with respect to both their uptake by rat RBCs and their partition coefficients in octanol and water. The rank order for the rate of uptake was ormaplatin approximately Pt(dach)Cl2 > oxaliplatin > Pt(dach)(mal); while the rank order for hydrophobicity was ormaplatin > Pt(dach)Cl2 > Pt(dach)(mal) > oxaliplatin. Thus, in general, Pt-dach complexes appeared to be taken up better by RBCs than cisplatin or carboplatin, and the hydrophobicity of most of the Pt-dach complexes appeared to correlate with uptake. However, factors other than the dach carrier ligand and hydrophobicity clearly influence uptake. The biotransformations of

  7. Biotransformations of oxaliplatin in rat blood in vitro.

    PubMed

    Luo, F R; Wyrick, S D; Chaney, S G

    1999-01-01

    The partitioning and biotransformations of oxaliplatin [trans-l-1,2-diaminocyclohexaneoxalatoplatinum(II)] were investigated in the blood of Wistar male rats in vitro. [3-H]-Oxaliplatin was incubated with rat blood at 37 degrees C in 5% CO2 and the concentrations of all Pt complexes containing the [3-H]-dach carrier ligand were followed for up to 12 hours. Decay for both oxaliplatin and Pt-dach in the plasma ultrafiltrate (PUF) was rapid (t 1/2 oxaliplatin = 0.68 h and t 1/2 for Pt-dach in the PUF = 0.85 h). After 9 hours, the concentration of oxaliplatin fell below the detection limit. By 4 hours, the PUF-Pt-dach reached a plateau, which was 12% of total Pt-dach. The binding of Pt-dach to red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma proteins was also very rapid (t 1/2 RBCs = 0.58 h and t 1/2 plasma proteins = 0.78 h) and reached equilibrium by 4 hours. At equilibrium, 35% of total Pt-dach was bound to plasma proteins, 12% was in the plasma ultrafiltrate, and 53% was found associated with RBCs. Of the Pt-dach associated with RBCs, 23% was bound to the RBC membrane, 58% was bound to RBC cytosolic proteins, and 19% was in the RBC cytosol ultrafiltrate. Thus, these studies confirm previous observations of oxaliplatin accumulation by rat RBCs. To better characterize the determinants of this accumulation, oxaliplatin and other Pt-dach complexes were compared with respect to both their uptake by rat RBCs and their partition coefficients in octanol and water. The rank order for the rate of uptake was ormaplatin approximately Pt(dach)Cl2 > oxaliplatin > Pt(dach)(mal); while the rank order for hydrophobicity was ormaplatin > Pt(dach)Cl2 > Pt(dach)(mal) > oxaliplatin. Thus, in general, Pt-dach complexes appeared to be taken up better by RBCs than cisplatin or carboplatin, and the hydrophobicity of most of the Pt-dach complexes appeared to correlate with uptake. However, factors other than the dach carrier ligand and hydrophobicity clearly influence uptake. The biotransformations of

  8. An animal model of oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia reveals a crucial role for Nav1.6 in peripheral pain pathways

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Possani, Lourival D; Cabot, Peter J; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Cold allodynia, pain in response to cooling, occurs during or within hours of oxaliplatin infusion and is thought to arise from a direct effect of oxaliplatin on peripheral sensory neurons. To characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying acute oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia, we established a new intraplantar oxaliplatin mouse model that rapidly developed long-lasting cold allodynia mediated entirely through tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav pathways. Using selective inhibitors and knockout animals, we found that Nav1.6 was the key isoform involved, while thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels were not involved. Consistent with a crucial role for delayed-rectifier potassium channels in excitability in response to cold, intraplantar administration of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine mimicked oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and was also inhibited by Navl.6 blockers. Intraplantar injection of the Nav1.6-activator Cn2 elicited spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia and enhanced 4-aminopyridine-induced cold allodynia. These findings provide behavioural evidence for a crucial role of Nav1.6 in multiple peripheral pain pathways including cold allodynia. PMID:23711479

  9. Phase I-II Trial of Cetuximab, Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Radiotherapy as Preoperative Treatment in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Claus Arnold, Dirk; Hipp, Matthias; Liersch, Torsten; Dellas, Kathrin; Iesalnieks, Igors; Hermann, Robert Michael; Lordick, Florian; Hohenberger, Werner; Sauer, Rolf

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and activity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in rectal cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients with rectal cancer (T3-T4 or N+, M1 allowed) entered the trial at five investigator sites; the data from 58 patients were assessable. Cetuximab was given as an initial dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 7 days before the start of RT, and then at 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Capecitabine and oxaliplatin were administered according to an established schedule of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29) and capecitabine (Days 1-14 and 22-35) at three dose levels: 1,000, 1,300, and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d during the Phase I part of the study. The main endpoint of the Phase II was the pathologic complete response rate. Results: Thirteen patients were included in the Phase I part of the study, and the maximal tolerated dose was not reached. Overall, 48 patients were treated at the recommended dose of capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}) and 45 patients (94%) underwent surgery. A pathologic complete response was observed in 4 patients (9%), and moderate (n = 12), minimal (n = 10), and no tumor regression (n = 2) was noted in 24 (53%) of 45 patients. The mean radiation dose intensity, cetuximab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin was 98%, 95%, 94%, and 94%, respectively. The incidence of Grade 3-4 diarrhea was restricted to 19%. Postoperative complications of any grade occurred in 33% of patients. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that cetuximab can be combined safely with capecitabine and oxaliplatin plus RT. The low pathologic complete response rate achieved should stimulate additional preclinical investigations to establish the best sequence of triple combinations.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastian, G; Barrail, A; Urien, S

    2003-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin in metastatic cancer patients. Oxaliplatin was administered by 2- or 4-h infusions, 50, 65, 75, 85, 100 or 130 mg/m2 to 56 patients. Blood samples were collected over 28 h. Plasma concentrations of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed-effects modeling method. Ultrafilterable oxaliplatin concentration-time profiles showed a secondary peak or a shoulder aspect post-infusion, attributed to the existence of an enterohepatic recirculation (EHR). They were best described by a two-compartment model incorporating an EHR component. Plasma clearance (CL) was related positively to body weight (BW) and negatively to serum creatinine (SCr), and was greater in male patients than in female patients. This covariate modeling resulted in a decrease in the interindividual variability for CL from 104 to 62%. The central distribution volume (V1) and inter-compartmental clearance (Q) were related to BW. Typical population estimates of CL, central distribution volume (V1), input rate constant into gallbladder (k1B) and lag time for drug reabsorption (TLAG) were 14.1 or 8.5 l/h (male or female patients), 24.9 l, 1.8 h-1 and 2.0 h, respectively. The final pharmacokinetic model was validated using 200 bootstrap samples of the original data. We conclude that a two-compartment with EHR model adequately described ultrafilterable oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics, explaining a secondary transient increase in concentration. This study identified combined-covariate-effects ultrafilterable oxaliplatin clearance, supporting dose adjustment of oxaliplatin based on BW, gender and corrected for SCr level, if drug exposure is thought to be related to therapeutic or toxic issues.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastian, G; Barrail, A; Urien, S

    2003-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin in metastatic cancer patients. Oxaliplatin was administered by 2- or 4-h infusions, 50, 65, 75, 85, 100 or 130 mg/m2 to 56 patients. Blood samples were collected over 28 h. Plasma concentrations of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed-effects modeling method. Ultrafilterable oxaliplatin concentration-time profiles showed a secondary peak or a shoulder aspect post-infusion, attributed to the existence of an enterohepatic recirculation (EHR). They were best described by a two-compartment model incorporating an EHR component. Plasma clearance (CL) was related positively to body weight (BW) and negatively to serum creatinine (SCr), and was greater in male patients than in female patients. This covariate modeling resulted in a decrease in the interindividual variability for CL from 104 to 62%. The central distribution volume (V1) and inter-compartmental clearance (Q) were related to BW. Typical population estimates of CL, central distribution volume (V1), input rate constant into gallbladder (k1B) and lag time for drug reabsorption (TLAG) were 14.1 or 8.5 l/h (male or female patients), 24.9 l, 1.8 h-1 and 2.0 h, respectively. The final pharmacokinetic model was validated using 200 bootstrap samples of the original data. We conclude that a two-compartment with EHR model adequately described ultrafilterable oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics, explaining a secondary transient increase in concentration. This study identified combined-covariate-effects ultrafilterable oxaliplatin clearance, supporting dose adjustment of oxaliplatin based on BW, gender and corrected for SCr level, if drug exposure is thought to be related to therapeutic or toxic issues. PMID:14597876

  12. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and oxaliplatin: a causal association?

    PubMed

    Painhas, Teresa; Amorim, Manuela; Soares, Raquel; Duarte, Lilianne; Salgado-Borges, José

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old woman presented at the emergency service with complaints of transitory visual obscurations for four days, and headache, nausea and occasional vomiting in the last two months. She had been diagnosed of colorectal cancer one year ago and she was on treatment with oxaliplatin on a FOLFOX schedule. On ophthalmic examination, the vision was of 20/20 in both eyes and bilateral disc swelling was noted. The neurologic examination was normal. Magnetic resonance revealed no changes. A diagnostic lumbar puncture demonstrated an elevated opening pressure of 290 mm H2O with normal compounds. Due to the suspicion of ocular toxicity, oxaliplatin treatment was stopped. Treatment with oral acetazolamide was started and maintained for one month. In three weeks ocular and systemic symptoms totally disappeared and disc swelling gradually improved in the following months. Ocular toxicity has been reported as an infrequent adverse effect of oxaliplatin, but intracranial idiopathic pressure has not yet been described. Findings in this case suggest that oxaliplatin could be the cause for these symptoms. As the use of oxaliplatin is increasing as first-line treatment in colorectal cancer, we have to be alert to its potential toxicity.

  13. Gemcitabine-oxaliplatin combination for ovarian cancer resistant to taxane-platinum treatment: a phase II study from the GINECO group

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Coquard, I; Weber, B; Cretin, J; Haddad-Guichard, Z; Lévy, E; Hardy-Bessard, A C; Gouttebel, M C; Geay, J-F; Aleba, A; Orfeuvre, H; Agostini, C; Provencal, J; Ferrero, J M; Fric, D; Dohollou, N; Paraiso, D; Salvat, J; Pujade-Lauraine, É

    2009-01-01

    Advanced ovarian carcinoma in early progression (<6 months) (AOCEP) is considered resistant to most cytotoxic drugs. Gemcitabine (GE) and oxaliplatin (OXA) have shown single-agent activity in relapsed ovarian cancer. Their combination was tested in patients with AOCEP in phase II study. Fifty patients pre-treated with platinum–taxane received q3w administration of OXA (100 mg m–2, d1) and GE (1000 mg m–2, d1, d8, 100-min infusion). Patient characteristics were a : median age 64 years (range 46–79),and 1 (84%) or 2 (16%) earlier lines of treatment. Haematological toxicity included grade 3–4 neutropaenia (33%), anaemia (8%), and thrombocytopaenia (19%). Febrile neutropaenia occurred in 3%. Non-haematological toxicity included grade 2–3 nausea or vomiting (34%), grade 3 fatigue (25%),and grade 2 alopecia (24%). Eighteen (37%) patients experienced response. Median progression-free (PF) and overall survivals (OS) were 4.6 and 11.4 months, respectively. The OXA–GE combination has high activity and acceptable toxicity in AOCEP patients. A comparison of the doublet OXA–GE with single-agent treatment is warranted. PMID:19190632

  14. Gemcitabine-oxaliplatin combination for ovarian cancer resistant to taxane-platinum treatment: a phase II study from the GINECO group.

    PubMed

    Ray-Coquard, I; Weber, B; Cretin, J; Haddad-Guichard, Z; Lévy, E; Hardy-Bessard, A C; Gouttebel, M C; Geay, J-F; Aleba, A; Orfeuvre, H; Agostini, C; Provencal, J; Ferrero, J M; Fric, D; Dohollou, N; Paraiso, D; Salvat, J; Pujade-Lauraine, E

    2009-02-24

    Advanced ovarian carcinoma in early progression (<6 months) (AOCEP) is considered resistant to most cytotoxic drugs. Gemcitabine (GE) and oxaliplatin (OXA) have shown single-agent activity in relapsed ovarian cancer. Their combination was tested in patients with AOCEP in phase II study. Fifty patients pre-treated with platinum-taxane received q3w administration of OXA (100 mg m(-2), d1) and GE (1000 mg m(-2), d1, d8, 100-min infusion). Patient characteristics were a : median age 64 years (range 46-79),and 1 (84%) or 2 (16%) earlier lines of treatment. Haematological toxicity included grade 3-4 neutropaenia (33%), anaemia (8%), and thrombocytopaenia (19%). Febrile neutropaenia occurred in 3%. Non-haematological toxicity included grade 2-3 nausea or vomiting (34%), grade 3 fatigue (25%),and grade 2 alopecia (24%). Eighteen (37%) patients experienced response. Median progression-free (PF) and overall survivals (OS) were 4.6 and 11.4 months, respectively. The OXA-GE combination has high activity and acceptable toxicity in AOCEP patients. A comparison of the doublet OXA-GE with single-agent treatment is warranted.

  15. Rural-urban migration including formal and informal workers in the urban sector: an agent-based numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Nilton; Oliveira, Tharnier; Silveira, Jaylson

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this work is to study rural-urban migration in the early stages of industrialization. We use an agent-based model and take into account the existence of informal and formal workers on the urban sector and possible migration movements, dependent on the agents' social and private utilities. Our agents are place on vertices of a square lattice, such that each vertex has only one agent. Rural, urban informal and urban formal workers are represented by different states of a three-state Ising model. At every step, a fraction a of the agents may change sectors or migrate. The total utility of a given agent is then calculated and compared to a random utility, in order to check if this agent turns into an actual migrant or changes sector. The dynamics is carried out until an equilibrium state is reached and equilibrium variables are then calculated and compared to available data. We find that a generalized Harris-Todaro condition is satisfied [1] on these equilibrium regimes, i.e, the ratio between expected wages between any pair of sectors reach a constant value. [4pt] [1] J. J. Silveira, A. L. Esp'indola and T. J. Penna, Physica A, 364, 445 (2006).

  16. Thermotherapy enhances oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Liang; Hu, An-Bin; Cui, Shu-Zhong; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To observe the synergistic effects of hyperthermia in oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human colon adenocarcinoma Lovo cells. METHODS: The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Lovo was obtained from Sun Yat-Sen University. Cells were sealed with parafilm and placed in a circulating water bath, and was maintained within 0.01  °C of the desired temperature (37  °C, 39  °C, 41  °C, 43  °C and 45  °C). Thermal therapy was given alone to the negative control group while oxaliplatin was administered to the treatment group at doses of 12.5 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL. Identification of morphological changes, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry and Western blotting were used to investigate the effect of thermochemotherapy on human colon adenocarcinoma Lovo cells, including changes in the signal pathway related to apoptosis. RESULTS: A temperature-dependent inhibition of cell growth was observed after oxaliplatin exposure, while a synergistic interaction was detected preferentially with sequential combination. Thermochemotherapy changed the morphology of Lovo cells, increased the inhibition rate of the Lovo cells (P < 0.05) and enhanced cellular population in the G0/G1 phase (16.7% ± 4.8 % in phase S plus 3.7% ± 2.4 % in phase G2/M, P < 0.05). Thermochemotherapy increased apoptosis through upregulating p53, Bax and downregulating Bcl-2. Protein levels were elevated in p53, Bax/Bcl-2 in thermochemotherapy group as compared with the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Thermochemotherapy may play an important role in apoptosis via the activation of p53, Bax and the repression of Bcl-2 in Lovo cells. PMID:22363135

  17. RNA-seq identifies determinants of oxaliplatin sensitivity in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xiang; Peng, Jun-Jie; Liang, Lei; Huang, Li-Yong; Li, Da-Wei; Shi, De-Bing; Zheng, Hong-Tu; Cai, San-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, such as FOLFOX, is the first-line therapy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) or metastatic CRC patients. However, the partial response of patients to these regimes and the severe peripheral neuropathy toxicity induced by oxaliplatin makes it urgent to figure out biomarkers for oxaliplatin sensitivity to select suitable patients who benefit from these treatments. In present work, 21 CRC cell lines with different sensitivities to oxaliplatin were applied to RNA-seq. The basal expression profiles of these cell lines were correlated to their response to oxaliplatin. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that expression of 58 genes was correlated, negatively or positively, to oxaliplatin response across the 21 CRC cell lines. These 58 genes were mainly enriched in small molecules biochemistry, Wnt/β-catenin signaling and EMT pathways. The latter two pathways were predicted to be activated in oxaliplatin-resistant CRC cell lines. Moreover, 15 genes were validated by qPCR that their expression levels were actually closely correlated to their response to oxaliplatin, in line with the biocomputation prediction. Taken together, our work might provide potential biomarkers for oxaliplatin sensitivity in CRC cell lines and therapeutic targets for combinational therapy with oxaliplatin.

  18. Structures of oxaliplatin-oligonucleotide adducts from DNA.

    PubMed

    Mowaka, Shereen; Ziehe, Matthias; Mohamed, Dalia; Hochkirch, Ulrike; Thomale, Jürgen; Linscheid, Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Oxaliplatin, [(1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine](ethanedioato-O,O')platinum(II) shows a great efficiency against colorectal cancer. Although the mode of action of oxaliplatin is not yet understood, it is commonly accepted that binding of oxaliplatin to DNA prevents DNA synthesis and alters protein to DNA binding. In order to elucidate the modified DNA-protein interaction and thus to understand the mechanisms leading to cellular misinterpretation of DNA information and apoptosis, we have identified the preferential binding sites and the dynamics of the oxaliplatin-DNA intrastrand and interstrand adducts at the oligomer level using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS) and HPLC/inductively coupled plasma-MS for quantitative studies. We used a combination of benzonase, alkaline phosphatase and Nuclease S1 for digestion. This digestion procedure allows the study of platinated oligomeric nucleotides and more complex interstrand adducts. The digestion products were mostly chromatographically separated and characterized using HPLC/ESI-ion trap MS/MS experiments. We could show that the adducts to guanine and adenine are quite dynamic; that is, the ratios are changing for several days. In addition, the resulting adducts provide evidence for the action of the digesting enzymes and indicate that the adduct spectrum at the oligomeric level is different to that at the commonly studies dinucleotide level.

  19. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  20. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  1. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  2. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  3. Rationally designed oxaliplatin-nanoparticle for enhanced antitumor efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu; Soni, Shivani; Roy, Bhaskar; Papa, Anne-Laure; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2012-02-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles have been extensively studied as carriers for cancer chemotherapeutics. However, the formulation of platinum chemotherapeutics in nanoparticles has been a challenge arising from their physicochemical properties. There are only a few reports describing oxaliplatin nanoparticles. In this study, we derivatized the monomeric units of a polyisobutylene maleic acid copolymer with glucosamine, which chelates trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH) platinum (II) through a novel monocarboxylato and O → Pt coordination linkage. At a specific polymer to platinum ratio, the complex self-assembled into a nanoparticle, where the polymeric units act as the leaving group, releasing DACH-platinum in a sustained pH-dependent manner. Sizing was done using dynamic light scatter and electron microscopy. The nanoparticles were evaluated for efficacy in vitro and in vivo. Biodistribution was quantified using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectroscopy (ICP-AAS). The PIMA-GA-DACH-platinum nanoparticle was found to be more active than free oxaliplatin in vitro. In vivo, the nanoparticles resulted in greater tumor inhibition than oxaliplatin (equivalent to 5 mg kg-1 platinum dose) with minimal nephrotoxicity or body weight loss. ICP-AAS revealed significant preferential tumor accumulation of platinum with reduced biodistribution to the kidney or liver following PIMA-GA-DACH-platinum nanoparticle administration as compared with free oxaliplatin. These results indicate that the rational engineering of a novel polymeric nanoparticle inspired by the bioactivation of oxaliplatin results in increased antitumor potency with reduced systemic toxicity compared with the parent cytotoxic. Rational design can emerge as an exciting strategy in the synthesis of nanomedicines for cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Chemotherapy-induced pain and neuropathy: a prospective study in patients treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin or docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Ventzel, Lise; Jensen, Anders B; Jensen, Anni R; Jensen, Troels S; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer therapy. This study evaluates symptoms of CIPN and CIPN-related pain and its influence on psychological functioning and potential predictors of chronic CIPN and pain. In this large prospective questionnaire study, 174 patients receiving adjuvant oxaliplatin or docetaxel were consecutively included. Patients were asked to complete a questionnaire with validated questions on peripheral neuropathy, pain, anxiety and depression, and quality of life at baseline, after the first cycle, halfway through therapy, and 1 year after baseline. Chronic CIPN symptoms (tingling and/or numbness) in the feet at 1-year follow-up were present in 63.6% of patients without preexisting neuropathy in the oxaliplatin group and in 44.8% in the docetaxel group, whereas pain in hands and feet was found in 31.3% and 35.1%, respectively. Both groups had significantly different pain profiles, and persistent pain in the docetaxel group was found to have effect on psychological function. Cumulative dose predicted oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy (P = 0.004), whereas endocrine therapy predicted peripheral pain in the docetaxel group (P = 0.04). There are important differences in acute neuropathic symptoms and chronic pain profiles in patients after oxaliplatin and docetaxel treatment. It is, however, important to recognize that chronic peripheral pain may be unrelated to neuropathy and can be caused by concomitant treatments. Future studies should focus on characterizing and distinguishing CIPN-related pain from other types of pain to determine the best outcome measures for trials on prevention or relief. PMID:26529271

  5. Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Gastric Cancer-An Extended Phase I MARGIT and AIO Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter Wenz, Frederik; Lukan, Nadine; Mai, Sabine; Kripp, Melanie; Staiger, Wilko; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Willeke, Frank; Moehler, Markus; Post, Stefan; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve the prognosis of gastric cancer. To optimize these results, in the present study oxaliplatin and capecitabine were used instead of 5-fluorouracil. We sought to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) of these drugs in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with resected adenocarcinoma of the stomach or the gastroesophageal junction were included. They received two cycles of induction chemotherapy (oxaliplatin and capecitabine [XelOx] regimen). Using standard Phase I methodology, patients received 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions either in combination with capecitabine 825 mg m{sup -1} twice a day (Dose Level [DL] I) or capecitabine in combination with weekly oxaliplatin 40 or 50 mg m{sup -1} (DL II and III). After the completion of chemoradiation, two additional cycles of XelOx were scheduled. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. Only 1 of 6 patients evaluable on DL I had DLT. Of the first 6 patients on DL II, 1 patient experienced DLT, and 3 of the remaining patients had Grade 3 toxicity. Therefore, DL II was defined as the maximum tolerated dose and a total of 20 patients were treated at this DL. The most frequently observed toxicities (Common Toxicity Criteria Grades 1, 2 and 3) were, respectively, leukocytopenia in 5, 5, and 4 patients; nausea in 3, 7, and 3; and diarrhea in 4, 0, and 1. Conclusions: In summary, capecitabine 825 mg m{sup -1} twice a day (Days 1-33) and weekly oxaliplatin 40 mg m{sup -1} was safe and tolerable in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Furthermore, four cycles of XelOx could be applied before and after chemoradiotherapy in two thirds of the patients.

  6. Study on the interactions between anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin and DNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Leipeng; Liu, Ruisi; Xu, Fengjie; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2015-09-01

    Oxaliplatin is one of the most important anticancer drugs at present. However, the mechanism of action of oxaliplatin is still controversial. In this study, the interactions between oxaliplatin and a plasmid DNA have been studied so as to reveal the structural basis of its activity. The structural characteristic of pUC19 DNA (2ng/μL) incubated with 100μmol/L and 1000μmol/L of oxaliplatin for the different time on a freshly cleaved highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). High resolution AFM observation indicated that oxaliplatin can induce pUC19 DNA molecules change from the extended conformation to the entangled structures with many nodes, and finally to the compact particles. The present AFM results provide structural evidence about the interactions between oxaliplatin and circular duplex DNA containing multiple targets.

  7. A curious case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity: recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Ranjit; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a unique case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity featuring acute, recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria following multiple subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin. A 65-year-old man started chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with oxaliplatin-irinotecan-leucovorin-5-fluorouracil (FOLFIRINOX). During the first and subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin, the patient developed episodes of dysarthria that lasted between 2 and 4 h after oxaliplatin infusions, followed by their complete and uneventful resolution. A thorough neurological examination showed no new neurologic deficits except for very fine tongue fasciculations. Recognizing this self-limiting toxic effect of oxaliplatin is important in order to avoid dose reductions that may affect clinical outcomes.

  8. PKC/MEK inhibitors suppress oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and potentiate the antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Tani, Tadahumi; Shimaoka, Hirotaka; Suzuyama, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Fujita, Arisa; Ogawa, Naoki; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Funakami, Yoshinori; Ichida, Seiji; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-07-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug commonly used in colorectal cancer treatment. Despite high clinical efficacy, its therapeutic application is limited by common, dose-limiting occurrence of neuropathy. As usual symptomatic neuropathy treatments fail to improve the patients' condition, there is an urgent need to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of neuropathy to propose effective therapy and ensure adequate pain management. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy was recently reported to be associated with protein kinase C (PKC) activation. It is unclear, however, whether PKC inhibition can prevent neuropathy. In our current studies, we found that a PKC inhibitor, tamoxifen, inhibited oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy via the PKC/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Fos pathway in lumbar spinal cords (lumbar segments 4-6). Additionally, tamoxifen was shown to act in synergy with oxaliplatin to inhibit growth in tumor cells-implanted mice. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, PD0325901, suppressed oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and enhanced oxaliplatin efficacy. Our results indicate that oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy is associated with PKC/ERK/c-Fos pathway in lumbar spinal cord. Additionally, we demonstrate that disruption of this pathway by PKC and MEK inhibitors suppresses oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, thereby suggesting that PKC and MEK inhibitors may be therapeutically useful in preventing oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and could aid in combination antitumor pharmacotherapy.

  9. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and oral S-1 for advanced recurrent colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shuji; Shimazaki, Jiro; Morishita, Keiichi; Koike, Nobusada; Harada, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of co-administration of oral S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab (bev) in patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer. A retrospective study of 36 patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer was performed, of whom 27 received first-line and 9 received second-line SOX+bev chemotherapy between 2010 and 2013 at the Hachioji Digestive Disease Hospital (Hachioji, Japan). The SOX+bev regimen consisted of administration of intravenous oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) on days 1 and 14, bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) on day 1, and co-administration of oral S-1 twice daily on days 1–14. The drug regimen was repeated every 4 weeks. SOX+bev treatment was associated with a response rate of 45.2%, a disease control rate of 71%, and a median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 9.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Patients who received first-line chemotherapy benefited from treatment in terms of prolonged PFS (13.8 months) and OS (28.2 months). Grade 3/4 adverse events were infrequent and included anaemia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, diarrhea, sensory neuropathy, increased aspartate aminotransferase level and skin rash. In conclusion, SOX+bev therapy was found to be feasible and safe for patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  10. Simultaneous determination of four anti-dandruff agents including octopirox in shampoo products by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, L

    2001-06-01

    A method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the simultaneous identification and quantitative determination of four anti-dandruff agents such as salicylic acid, ketoconazole, climbazole, octopirox in commercial anti-dandruff shampoo products. A symmetry C18 column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) was used at temperature of 35 degrees C, mobile phase with flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1) was acetonitrile: water (containing 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.0, adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) = 60 : 40 (V/V) and UV detection at 224 nm and 305 nm. Samples were extracted with mobile phase by stirring and ultrasonic method. The average recoveries of four anti-dandruff agents were 98.0-104.1%. The relative standard deviations for samples were 0.11-0.90%. The method is simple, rapid and reproducible. PMID:18498472

  11. Efficacy and safety of the oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Ying-hui; Han, Li; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Many clinical studies have demonstrated the survival benefits of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases from their inception to June 2016. Only prospective studies evaluating oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma were selected. The main outcomes included objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and main adverse events. Results: Ten prospective studies involving 525 patients were included. The pooled ORR, 1-year PFS, and OS were 14.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.2–19.6%), 9.3% (95%CI 10–28%), and 35.7% (95%CI 27–44%), respectively, for oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 4.7 and 9.4 months, respectively. The incidences of grade 3/4 toxicities of neutropenia, thrombopenia, anemia, neurotoxicity, diarrhea, and nausea/vomiting were 17.2%, 9.2%, 6.0%, 4.8%, 3.1%, and 1.8%, respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that the pooled ORR was 13.9% (95%CI 6.8–21%) in Asian patients and 12.8% (95%CI 6.8–18.7%) in Western patients. For Asian patients, the median PFS and OS were 4.2 and 9.2 months, and the 1-year PFS and OS were 12.5% and 30.5%, respectively. For Western patients, the median PFS and OS were 4.7 and 9.5 months, and the 1-year PFS and OS were 19.6% and 42.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the ORR, 1-year PFS, and OS (P > 0.05) between Asian and Western patients. Conclusions: Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27749557

  12. Lunasin potentiates the effect of oxaliplatin preventing outgrowth of colon cancer metastasis, binds to α5β1 integrin and suppresses FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2011-12-27

    The effect of lunasin on colon cancer metastasis was studied using three human colon cancer cell lines in vitro and a liver metastasis model of colon cancer in vivo. Lunasin bound with α5β1 integrin and internalized into the nucleus of KM12L4 human colon cancer cells. Lunasin (10 μM) inhibited the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by 28%, 39% and 60% in RKO, HCT-116 and KM12L4 human colon cancer cells, respectively. Lunasin caused an increase in the expression of the inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IκB-α), a decrease in nuclear p50 NF-κB and a reduction in the migration of cancer cells. Lunasin (4 mg/kg bw) inhibited metastasis and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin by reducing the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Liver metastatic nodules were reduced from 28 (PBS) to 14 (lunasin, P = 0.047) while combination of lunasin and oxaliplatin to 5 (P = 0.004). The tumor burden was reduced from 0.13 (PBS) to 0.10 (lunasin, P = 0.039) to 0.04 (lunasin + oxaliplatin, P < 0.0001). Moreover, lunasin potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in modifying expression of proteins involved in apoptosis and metastasis including Bax, Bcl-2, IKK-α and p-p65. Lunasin inhibited metastasis of human colon cancer cells by direct binding with α5β1 integrin suppressing FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling, and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in preventing the outgrowth of metastasis.

  13. SNPs in transporter and metabolizing genes as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kap, Elisabeth J; Seibold, Petra; Scherer, Dominique; Habermann, Nina; Balavarca, Yesilda; Jansen, Lina; Zucknick, Manuela; Becker, Natalia; Hoffmeister, Michael; Ulrich, Alexis; Benner, Axel; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-06-15

    Oxaliplatin is frequently used as part of a chemotherapeutic regimen with 5-fluorouracil in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). The cellular availability of oxaliplatin is dependent on metabolic and transporter enzymes. Variants in genes encoding these enzymes may cause variation in response to oxaliplatin and could be potential predictive markers. Therefore, we used a two-step procedure to comprehensively investigate 1,444 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from these pathways for their potential as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment, using 623 stage II-IV CRC patients (of whom 201 patients received oxaliplatin) from a German prospective patient cohort treated with adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy. First, all genes were screened using the global test that evaluated SNP*oxaliplatin interaction terms per gene. Second, one model was created by backward elimination on all SNP*oxaliplatin interactions of the selected genes. The statistical procedure was evaluated using bootstrap analyses. Nine genes differentially associated with overall survival according to oxaliplatin treatment (unadjusted p values < 0.05) were selected. Model selection resulted in the inclusion of 14 SNPs from eight genes (six transporter genes, ABCA9, ABCB11, ABCC10, ATP1A1, ATP1B2, ATP8B3, and two metabolism genes GSTM5, GRHPR), which significantly improved model fit. Using bootstrap analysis we show an improvement of the prediction error of 3.7% in patients treated with oxaliplatin. Several variants in genes involved in metabolism and transport could thus be potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in CRC patients. If confirmed, inclusion of these variants in a predictive test could identify patients who are more likely to benefit from treatment with oxaliplatin. PMID:26835885

  14. SNPs in transporter and metabolizing genes as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kap, Elisabeth J; Seibold, Petra; Scherer, Dominique; Habermann, Nina; Balavarca, Yesilda; Jansen, Lina; Zucknick, Manuela; Becker, Natalia; Hoffmeister, Michael; Ulrich, Alexis; Benner, Axel; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-06-15

    Oxaliplatin is frequently used as part of a chemotherapeutic regimen with 5-fluorouracil in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). The cellular availability of oxaliplatin is dependent on metabolic and transporter enzymes. Variants in genes encoding these enzymes may cause variation in response to oxaliplatin and could be potential predictive markers. Therefore, we used a two-step procedure to comprehensively investigate 1,444 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from these pathways for their potential as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment, using 623 stage II-IV CRC patients (of whom 201 patients received oxaliplatin) from a German prospective patient cohort treated with adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy. First, all genes were screened using the global test that evaluated SNP*oxaliplatin interaction terms per gene. Second, one model was created by backward elimination on all SNP*oxaliplatin interactions of the selected genes. The statistical procedure was evaluated using bootstrap analyses. Nine genes differentially associated with overall survival according to oxaliplatin treatment (unadjusted p values < 0.05) were selected. Model selection resulted in the inclusion of 14 SNPs from eight genes (six transporter genes, ABCA9, ABCB11, ABCC10, ATP1A1, ATP1B2, ATP8B3, and two metabolism genes GSTM5, GRHPR), which significantly improved model fit. Using bootstrap analysis we show an improvement of the prediction error of 3.7% in patients treated with oxaliplatin. Several variants in genes involved in metabolism and transport could thus be potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in CRC patients. If confirmed, inclusion of these variants in a predictive test could identify patients who are more likely to benefit from treatment with oxaliplatin.

  15. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  16. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, P<0.05) following a 2h incubation with oxaliplatin. Adding carbenoxolone to the oxaliplatin-treated cultures reversed oxaliplatin-evoked coupling to baseline (P<0.05). Immunostaining showed no difference between expression of connexin 43 in control and oxaliplatin-treated cultures. Our findings indicated that oxaliplatin-increased gap junction-mediated coupling between satellite glial cells in primary cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia, and carbenoxolone reversed this effect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment. PMID:25999145

  17. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, P<0.05) following a 2h incubation with oxaliplatin. Adding carbenoxolone to the oxaliplatin-treated cultures reversed oxaliplatin-evoked coupling to baseline (P<0.05). Immunostaining showed no difference between expression of connexin 43 in control and oxaliplatin-treated cultures. Our findings indicated that oxaliplatin-increased gap junction-mediated coupling between satellite glial cells in primary cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia, and carbenoxolone reversed this effect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment.

  18. Exenatide Facilitates Recovery from Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shunsuke; Ushio, Soichiro; Ozawa, Nana; Masuguchi, Ken; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Oishi, Ryozo; Egashira, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin has widely been used as a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it causes peripheral neuropathy. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, is an incretin mimetic secreted from ileal L cells, which is clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 receptor agonists have been reported to exhibit neuroprotective effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of exenatide on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rats and cultured cells. Methods Oxaliplatin (4 mg/kg) was administered intravenously twice per week for 4 weeks, and mechanical allodynia was evaluated using the von Frey test in rats. Axonal degeneration was assessed by toluidine blue staining of sciatic nerves. Results Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused mechanical allodynia from day 14 to 49. Although the co-administration of extended-release exenatide (100 μg/kg) could not inhibit the incidence of oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, it facilitated recovery from the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy with reparation of axonal degeneration. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth was evaluated in cultured pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. Exenatide inhibited oxaliplatin-induced neurite degeneration, but did not affect oxaliplatin-induced cell injury in cultured PC12 cells. Additionally, extended-release exenatide had no effect on the anti-tumor activity of oxaliplatin in cultured murine colon adenocarcinoma 26 (C-26) cells or C-26 cell-implanted mice. Conclusion These results suggest that exenatide may be useful for treating peripheral neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26536615

  19. Oxaliplatin triggers necrosis as well as apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Zhu, Xueping; Jin, Wei; Hao, Shumei; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Linjie

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsic apoptotic pathway is considered to be responsible for cell death induced by platinum anticancer drugs. While in this study, we found that, necrosis is an indispensable pathway besides apoptosis in oxaliplatin-treated gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Upon exposure to oxaliplatin, both apoptotic and necrotic features were observed. The majority of dead cells were double positive for Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential collapsed and caspase cascades were activated. However, ultrastructural changes under transmission electron microscope, coupled with the release of cellular contents, demonstrated the rupture of the plasma membrane. Oxaliplatin administration did not stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and autophagy, but elevated the protein level of Bmf. In addition, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1), but not receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and its downstream components participated in this death process. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) blocked oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely, whereas z-VAD-fmk could partially suppress cell death. Oxaliplatin treatment resulted in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) overactivation, as indicated by the increase of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which led to NAD{sup +} and ATP depletion. PARP-1 inhibitor, olaparib, could significantly block oxaliplatin-induced cell death, thus confirming that PARP-1 activation is mainly responsible for the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin. Phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 and translocalization of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) are critical for this death process. Taken together, these results indicate that oxaliplatin can bypass canonical cell death pathways to kill gastric cancer cells, which may be of therapeutic advantage in the treatment of gastric cancer. - Highlights: • Oxaliplatin induces apoptotic and necrotic cell death. • Nec-1 can inhibit oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely. • RIP3 and its

  20. Prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by a polyamine-reduced diet—NEUROXAPOL: protocol of a prospective, randomised, controlled, single-blind and monocentric trial

    PubMed Central

    Balayssac, David; Ferrier, Jérémy; Pereira, Bruno; Gillet, Brigitte; Pétorin, Caroline; Vein, Julie; Libert, Frédéric; Eschalier, Alain; Pezet, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxaliplatin remains the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for treating advanced colorectal cancer but its efficacy is hampered by dose-limiting neurotoxicity manifested by a painful polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) is characterised by acute and transient cold hyperaesthesia in the hours and days following oxaliplatin infusion (>90% of patients), but also by retarded chronic neuropathy due to the repetition of chemotherapy cycles (30–50% of patients). OIPN impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients and no preventive or curative strategies have as yet proven effective. A polyamine-reduced diet (PRD) has recently demonstrated its efficacy to prevent OIPN in animals without adverse effects. Methods and analysis The NEUROXAPOL trial is a prospective, randomised, controlled, single-blind, monocentric and interventional study. This trial is aimed at evaluating the efficacy and feasibility of a PRD compared to a normal polyamine containing diet to prevent OIPN in patients treated by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients (n=40 per group) will be randomly assigned to receive either a PRD or a normal diet before and during the chemotherapy regimen. The main objectives are to improve the cold pain thresholds, neuropathic pain symptoms, comorbidities (anxiety and depression) and HRQOL of patients. The primary end point is the assessment of cold pain thresholds 2 weeks after the third cycle of chemotherapy. The secondary end points are the evaluation of thermal pain thresholds, the grade of neuropathy, neuropathic pain, symptoms of anxiety and depression and HRQOL, until the 12th cycle of chemotherapy. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by an independent medical ethics committee 1 (CPP Sud Est 1, Saint Etienne, France) and registered by the competent French authority (ANSM, Saint Denis, France). The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international

  1. Preparation, characterisation and antitumour activity of β-, γ- and HP-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jiang, Kunming; Li, Ke; Cong, Yangwei; Pu, Shaoping; Jin, Yi; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three water-soluble oxaliplatin complexes were prepared by inclusion complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), γ-CD and HP-β-CD. The structures of oxaliplatin/CDs were confirmed by NMR, FTIR, TGA, XRD as well as SEM analysis. The results show that the water solubility of oxaliplatin was increased in the complex with CDs in 1:1 stoichiometry inclusion modes, and the cyclohexane ring of oxaliplatin molecule was deeply inserted into the cavity of CDs. Moreover, the stoichiometry was established by a Job plot and the water stability constant (Kc) of oxaliplatin/CDs was calculated by phase solubility studies, all results show that the oxaliplatin/β-CD complex is more stable than free oxaliplatin, oxaliplatin/HP-β-CD and oxaliplatin/γ-CD. Meanwhile, the inclusion complexes displayed almost twice as high cytotoxicity compared to free oxaliplatin against HCT116 and MCF-7 cells. This satisfactory water solubility and higher cytotoxic activity of the oxaliplatin/CD complexes will potentially be useful for their application in anti-tumour therapy.

  2. Preparation, characterisation and antitumour activity of β-, γ- and HP-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of oxaliplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jiang, Kunming; Li, Ke; Cong, Yangwei; Pu, Shaoping; Jin, Yi; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three water-soluble oxaliplatin complexes were prepared by inclusion complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), γ-CD and HP-β-CD. The structures of oxaliplatin/CDs were confirmed by NMR, FTIR, TGA, XRD as well as SEM analysis. The results show that the water solubility of oxaliplatin was increased in the complex with CDs in 1:1 stoichiometry inclusion modes, and the cyclohexane ring of oxaliplatin molecule was deeply inserted into the cavity of CDs. Moreover, the stoichiometry was established by a Job plot and the water stability constant (Kc) of oxaliplatin/CDs was calculated by phase solubility studies, all results show that the oxaliplatin/β-CD complex is more stable than free oxaliplatin, oxaliplatin/HP-β-CD and oxaliplatin/γ-CD. Meanwhile, the inclusion complexes displayed almost twice as high cytotoxicity compared to free oxaliplatin against HCT116 and MCF-7 cells. This satisfactory water solubility and higher cytotoxic activity of the oxaliplatin/CD complexes will potentially be useful for their application in anti-tumour therapy.

  3. Glucose conjugated platinum(II) complex: antitumor superiority to oxaliplatin, combination effect and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Gao, Xiangqian; Liu, Ran; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Menghua; Fu, Zheng; Mi, Yi; Wang, Yiqiang; Yao, Zhi; Gao, Qingzhi

    2015-08-28

    A glucose-conjugate of (trans-R,R-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine)-2-fluoromalonato-platinum(II) complex (Glu-Pt) is designed to target tumor-specific active glucose transporters (GLUTs). Despite of very high water solubility, Glu-Pt exhibits improved cytotoxicity as compared to oxaliplatin. In this study, we investigated the in vivo toxicity profiles with the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) evaluation followed by antitumor efficacy study in leukemia-bearing DBA/2 mice. Glu-Pt showed 6-fold increase in the MTD and was more efficacious against mouse L1210 ascetic leukemia than oxaliplatin at equitoxic doses. To explore the combination effect of Glu-Pt and compare with oxaliplatin-based FOLFOX chemotherapy, we investigated the two-component synergistic antitumor activity of Glu-Pt with folinic acid (FA) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) respectively in five human cancer cell lines followed by a comparison study with oxaliplatin in a fixed three-component in vitro FOFLOX combination. As the result, Glu-Pt exhibited superior synergistic cytotoxicity compared to oxaliplatin. Flow cytometry-based cell cycle and apoptosis study demonstrated that Glu-Pt follows the same mechanistic principles as of oxaliplatin. Glu-Pt monotherapy and its combination with FA and 5-FU may result in improved efficacy over oxaliplatin and FOLFOX regimen. The study provides fundamental data supporting the potential of Glu-Pt as a drug candidate for further (pre)clinical development.

  4. [Clinical Response of Metastatic Colon Cancer to Chemotherapy with S-1 and Oxaliplatin - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Tomonori; Yata, Yoshihiro; Yonenaga, Yoshikuni; Hanaki, Kouji; Mise, Masahiro; Higaside, Shunichi; Kanda, Yuuji; Noda, Hideki

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy with S-1 and oxaliplatin is a new treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. We present the first case of S-1, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab therapy in our hospital. The patient was a 69-year-old woman with ascending colon cancer and multiple lung and liver metastases. She tended to suffer from constipation; stenoses at the cecum and colon cancer were detected by colon fiberscopy. Following surgical resection of the primary tumor, the patient received systemic chemotherapy with S-1, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab. Following chemotherapy, CT showed no cancer in the lung and cancer reduction in the liver or dissemination. The patient had diarrhea and no appetite at first, so we reduced the oxaliplatin dose by 80%. After reduction of the oxaliplatin dose, we could treat the patient with S-1 and oxaliplatin continuously with no toxicity. S-1 and oxaliplatin chemotherapy is cost-effective, and has less toxicity than other chemotherapies, if proper measures are taken. It seemed to have a non-inferior response rate and disease control compared to other chemotherapies, such as FOLFOX. Thus, this chemotherapy is a valid choice for metastatic colorectal cancer.

  5. Cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and cellular biotransformations of oxaliplatin in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, F R; Wyrick, S D; Chaney, S G

    1998-01-01

    Biotransformation products of platinum anticancer drugs have been suggested to be responsible for drug efficacy and toxicity. This study was designed to determine whether the efficacy of the closely related 1,2-diaminocyclohexane-Pt (dach-Pt) compounds oxaliplatin and ormaplatin were determined primarily by the parent drugs or by one of their biotransformation products. Based on consideration of both in vitro cytotoxicity in human colon carcinoma cells (HT-29) and concentrations following oxaliplatin administration in vivo, our data suggest that the efficacy of oxaliplatin is primarily determined by the plasma levels of the parent drug, with the biotransformation products Pt(dach)Cl2, Pt(dach)(H2O)Cl, and Pt(dach)(H2O)2 making only minor contributions. The stable biotransformation products containing amino acids did not have any significant cytotoxicity. In contrast, our data suggest that the efficacy of ormaplatin is primarily determined by plasma levels of Pt(dach)Cl2. The cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin, Pt(dach)Cl2, and Pt(dach)(H2O)Cl was approximately proportional to their cellular uptake, whereas the cytotoxicity of ormaplatin, Pt(dach)(H2O)2, and Pt(dach)(Met) was less than predicted from their uptake. Treatment of HT-29 cells with equimolar external concentrations of Pt(dach)Cl2 and oxaliplatin resulted in the formation of twofold more Pt-DNA adducts following Pt(dach)Cl2 treatment than following oxaliplatin treatment. However, intracellular Pt(dach)Cl2 levels were 30-fold higher for Pt(dach)Cl2-treated cells than for oxaliplatin-treated cells. These data suggest that intracellular conversion of oxaliplatin to Pt(dach)Cl2 makes only a minor contribution to Pt-DNA adduct formation and the resultant cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin. PMID:10367941

  6. Clinical benefits of combined chemotherapy with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel in advanced gastric cancer patients with palliative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Feng, Ye; Gao, Yongjian; Hou, Ruizhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Advanced gastric cancer accounts for a substantial portion of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Surgical intervention is the curative therapeutic approach, but patients with advanced gastric cancer are not eligible for the radical resection. The present work aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of palliative surgery combined with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Method A total of 20 patients who underwent palliative resection of gastric cancer in China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University from 2010 to 2011 were evaluated. Days 20–30 postoperative, these patients started to receive chemotherapy of S-1 (40 mg/m2, oral intake twice a day) and intravenous infusion of oxaliplatin (135 mg/m2) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2). After three cycles of chemotherapy (21 days/cycle), patients were evaluated, and only those who responded toward the treatment continued to receive six to eight cycles of the treatment and were included in end point evaluation. Patients’ survival time and adverse reactions observed along the treatment were compared with those treated with FOLFOX. Results Out of 20 patients evaluated, there was one case of complete response, nine cases of partial response, six cases of stable disease, and four cases of progressive disease. The total efficacy (complete response + partial response) and clinical benefit rates were 50% and 80%, respectively. Of importance, the treatment achieved a significantly longer survival time compared to FOLFOX, despite the fact that both regimens shared common adverse reactions. The adverse reactions were gastrointestinal reaction, reduction in white blood cells, and peripheral neurotoxicity. All of them were mild, having no impact on the treatment. Conclusion Combination therapy of S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel improves the survival of gastric cancer patients treated with palliative resection, with adverse reactions being

  7. Effects of pH on Oxaliplatin-Induced Condensation of Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Ji, Chao; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Wei-Chi; Zhang, Ling-Yun; Xie, Ping; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2014-02-01

    By using magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscope and mass spectrometry, we study the effects of pH on oxaliplatin-induced DNA condensation, the DNA persistence length, the amounts of micro-loops and of oxaliplatin bound to DNA. It is found that the DNA condensation degree, the amounts of micro-loops and of oxaliplatin bound to DNA increase with the decrease in the pH value while the DNA persistence length has an opposite behavior. The observed effects may be related to the drug resistance of cancer cells.

  8. Ultra-fast HPLC-ICP-MS analysis of oxaliplatin in patient urine.

    PubMed

    Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    A novel method for rapid HPLC-ICP-MS analysis of oxaliplatin in human urine was developed implementing a stationary HPLC phase with a particle size of 1.8 microm. The method allowed a cycle time of <1 min at a HPLC flow rate of 0.9 mL min(-1). Procedural limits of detection of 0.05 microg L(-1) oxaliplatin (150 fg on column) were obtained. Analysis of oxaliplatin in patient urine showed that accurate quantification of the intact drug demanded for storage at -80 degrees C and rapid measurement after thawing.

  9. The alkaline single cell electrophoresis assay with eight mouse organs: results with 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Matsusaka, N; Madarame, H; Miyamae, Y; Ishida, K; Satoh, M; Sekihashi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-04-13

    The genotoxicity of 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers selected from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) groups 1, 2A, and 2B was evaluated in eight mouse organs with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) (comet) assay. Groups of four mice were treated once intraperitoneally at the dose at which micronucleus tests had been conducted, and the stomach, colon, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, brain, and bone marrow were sampled 3, 8, and/or 24 h later. All chemicals were positive in the SCGE assay in at least one organ. Of the 22 mono-functional alkylating agents, over 50% were positive in all organs except the brain and bone marrow. The two subsets of mono-functional alkylating agents differed in their bone marrow genotoxicity: only 1 of the 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines was positive in bone marrow as opposed to 8 of the 13 other alkylating agents, reflecting the fact that dialkyl N-nitrosoamines are poor micronucleus inducers in hematopoietic cells. The two groups of mono-functional alkylating agents also differ in hepatic carcinogenicity in spite of the fact that they are similar in hepatic genotoxicity. While dialkyl N-nitrosoamines produce tumors primarily in mouse liver, only one (styrene-7,8-oxide) out of 10 of the other type of mono-functional alkylating agents is a mouse hepatic carcinogen. Taking into consideration our previous results showing high concordance between hepatic genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for aromatic amines and azo compounds, a possible explanation for the discrepancy might be that chemicals that require metabolic activation show high concordance between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the liver. A high percent of the 10 DNA crosslinkers were positive in the SCGE assay in the gastrointestinal mucosa, but less than 50% were positive in the liver and lung. In this study, we allowed 10 min alkali-unwinding to obtain low and stable control values

  10. First-line bevacizumab and capecitabine–oxaliplatin in elderly patients with mCRC: GEMCAD phase II BECOX study

    PubMed Central

    Feliu, J; Salud, A; Safont, M J; García-Girón, C; Aparicio, J; Vera, R; Serra, O; Casado, E; Jorge, M; Escudero, P; Bosch, C; Bohn, U; Pérez-Carrión, R; Carmona, A; Martínez-Marín, V; Maurel, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subgroup analyses of clinical studies suggest that bevacizumab plus XELOX is effective and tolerable in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The prospective BECOX study examined the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus XELOX, followed by bevacizumab plus capecitabine in elderly patients with mCRC. Methods: Patients aged ⩾70 years with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 out of 1 and confirmed mCRC were included. Patients received bevacizumab 7.5 mg kg−1 and oxaliplatin 130 mg m−2 on day 1, plus capecitabine 1000 mg m−2 bid orally on days 1–14 every 21 days; oxaliplatin was discontinued after 6 cycles. The primary end point was time to progression (TTP). Results: The intent-to-treat population comprised 68 patients (65% male, median age 76 years). Median TTP was 11.1 months; median overall survival was 20.4 months; overall response rate was 46%. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events included diarrhoea (18%) and asthenia (16%). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events of special interest for bevacizumab included deep-vein thrombosis (6%) and pulmonary embolism (4%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab plus XELOX was effective and well tolerated in elderly patients in the BECOX study. The adverse-event profile was similar to previous reports; no new safety concerns were identified. Fit elderly patients with mCRC should be considered for treatment with bevacizumab plus XELOX. PMID:24946000

  11. Clinical evaluation of a frozen commercially prepared microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents, including the new triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Huynh, H; Hollis, R J

    2002-05-01

    A commercially prepared frozen broth microdilution panel (Trek Diagnostic Systems, Westlake, Ohio) was compared with a reference microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of two quality control (QC) strains and 99 clinical isolates of Candida spp. The antifungal agents tested included amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole. Microdilution testing was performed according to NCCLS recommendations. MIC endpoints were read visually after 48 h of incubation and were assessed independently for each microdilution panel. The MICs for the QC strains were within published limits for both the reference and Trek microdilution panels. Discrepancies among MIC endpoints of no more than 2 dilutions were used to calculate the percent agreement. Acceptable levels of agreement between the Trek and reference panels were observed for all antifungal agents tested against the 99 clinical isolates. The overall agreement for each antifungal agent ranged from 96% for ravuconazole to 100% for amphotericin B. The Trek microdilution panel appears to be a viable alternative to frozen microdilution panels prepared in-house. PMID:11980944

  12. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  13. Determination of intact oxaliplatin in human plasma using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjiang; Seymour, Lesley; Chen, Eric X

    2008-12-15

    A HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the quantitation of intact oxaliplatin in human plasma. Plasma ultrafiltrates were precipitated with acetonitrile and separation was performed on a 250 mm Beckman ODS reverse phase column using a gradient mobile phase. The mass spectrometer was operated in positive ionization mode using TurboionSpray and precursor-product ion combinations of m/z 391.1-->305.1 and 371.1-->247.0 were monitored for oxaliplatin and carboplatin, the internal standard, respectively. The lower limit of quantitation for oxaliplatin was 20 ng/ml. The linear range of the method was 20-1000 ng/ml. The between- and within-day relative standard deviations ranged from 3.1 to 7.7%, and accuracy was within 5%. This method was successfully applied in a clinical study of oxaliplatin.

  14. Milnacipran inhibits oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia through spinal action in mice.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kitamura, Ryo; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, would have therapeutic effect on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg) induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection and almost completely subsided by day 20. Ten days post-oxaliplatin injection, the intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran (3-30 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the established mechanical allodynia. Intrathecal injections of milnacipran (2.1-21 µg/site) also significantly and dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia, but intracisternal and intracereboventricular injections at the same doses did not. The present results suggest that milnacipran is effective against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and that the antiallodynic effect is mainly mediated by actions on the spinal cord. PMID:25744472

  15. Houttuynia cordata Thunb reverses oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in rat by regulating Th17/Treg balance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cheng-Fu; Zheng, Li-Li; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a widely used anti-advanced colorectal cancer drug, while it could induce neuropathy. Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) has a wide range of biological activities, such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and immune regulation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HCT on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rat models. HCT (1000 mg/kg/day) significantly decreased the number of withdrawal responses and the withdrawal latency in oxaliplatin-treated rats. HCT could down-regulated the serum levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage inflammatory protein1-α (MIP-1α) in oxaliplatin-treated rats. Th17/Treg balance was reversed by HCT in oxaliplatin-treated rats by regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present results suggest that HCT is useful as a therapeutic drug for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27186286

  16. Houttuynia cordata Thunb reverses oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in rat by regulating Th17/Treg balance

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Cheng-Fu; Zheng, Li-Li; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a widely used anti-advanced colorectal cancer drug, while it could induce neuropathy. Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) has a wide range of biological activities, such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and immune regulation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HCT on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rat models. HCT (1000 mg/kg/day) significantly decreased the number of withdrawal responses and the withdrawal latency in oxaliplatin-treated rats. HCT could down-regulated the serum levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage inflammatory protein1-α (MIP-1α) in oxaliplatin-treated rats. Th17/Treg balance was reversed by HCT in oxaliplatin-treated rats by regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present results suggest that HCT is useful as a therapeutic drug for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27186286

  17. Radix Astragali-Based Chinese Herbal Medicine for Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) remains a big challenge for oncologists. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Radix Astragali- (RA-) based Chinese herbal medicine in the prevention and treatment of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy, including the incidence and grading of neurotoxicity, effective percentage, and nerve conduction velocity. Methods. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were found using PubMed, Cochrane, Springer, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang Database of China Science Periodical Database (CSPD) by keyword search. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.0. Results. A total of 1552 participants were included in 24 trials. Meta-analysis showed the incidence of all-grade neurotoxicity was significantly lower in experimental groups and high-grade neurotoxicity was also significantly less. Effective percentage was significantly higher and sensory nerve conduction velocity was improved significantly, but changes in motor nerve conduction velocity were not statistically significant. No adverse events associated with RA-based intervention were reported. Conclusion. RA-based intervention may be beneficial in relieving oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. However, more double-blind, multicenter, large-scale RCTs are needed to support this theory. Trial Registration. PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews has registration number  CRD42015019903. PMID:27795728

  18. Oxaliplatin triggers necrosis as well as apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Zhu, Xueping; Jin, Wei; Hao, Shumei; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Linjie

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsic apoptotic pathway is considered to be responsible for cell death induced by platinum anticancer drugs. While in this study, we found that, necrosis is an indispensable pathway besides apoptosis in oxaliplatin-treated gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Upon exposure to oxaliplatin, both apoptotic and necrotic features were observed. The majority of dead cells were double positive for Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential collapsed and caspase cascades were activated. However, ultrastructural changes under transmission electron microscope, coupled with the release of cellular contents, demonstrated the rupture of the plasma membrane. Oxaliplatin administration did not stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and autophagy, but elevated the protein level of Bmf. In addition, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1), but not receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and its downstream components participated in this death process. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) blocked oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely, whereas z-VAD-fmk could partially suppress cell death. Oxaliplatin treatment resulted in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) overactivation, as indicated by the increase of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which led to NAD(+) and ATP depletion. PARP-1 inhibitor, olaparib, could significantly block oxaliplatin-induced cell death, thus confirming that PARP-1 activation is mainly responsible for the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin. Phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 and translocalization of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) are critical for this death process. Taken together, these results indicate that oxaliplatin can bypass canonical cell death pathways to kill gastric cancer cells, which may be of therapeutic advantage in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  19. A Phase II Study of Sequential Capecitabine Plus Oxaliplatin Followed by Docetaxel Plus Capecitabine in Patients With Unresectable Gastric Adenocarcinoma: The TCOG 3211 Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Huang; Lin, Johnson; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Shan, Yan-Shen; Chen, Yeu-Chin; Chen, Li-Tzong; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee

    2016-01-01

    Fluorouracil and platinum are considered the standard treatment options for advanced gastric cancer. Docetaxel is also an effective agent and it shows no cross-resistance with fluorouracil and platinum. The combination treatment of docetaxel with fluorouracil and platinum has been explored, but it demonstrated intolerable toxicities. An alternative approach in the first-line treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma may be to use these agents sequentially. We aimed to evaluate the activity and safety profile of sequential chemotherapy with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin, followed by docetaxel plus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of unresectable gastric cancer.We conducted a phase II study of sequential first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Treatment consisted of 6 cycles of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (capecitabine 1000 mg/m bid on days 1-10 and oxaliplatin 85 mg/m on day 1, every 2 weeks), followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel plus capecitabine (docetaxel 30 mg/m on days 1 and 8, capecitabine 825 mg/m bid on days 1-14, every 3 weeks). The primary end-point was the objective response rate.Fifty-one patients were enrolled: median age, 63 years; male/female: 37/14. The main grade 3 to 4 toxicities were a decreased absolute neutrophil count (25.4%), diarrhea (9.8%), and hand-foot syndrome (15.7%). The objective response rate was 61.7%. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 8.6 and 11.0 months, respectively. Six patients (11.8%) received surgery after chemotherapy and 5 are still disease-free.This sequential treatment demonstrated feasibility with a favorable safety profile and produced encouraging results in terms of activity and efficacy. PMID:26817912

  20. Oxaliplatin activates the Keap1/Nrf2 antioxidant system conferring protection against the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu Jun; Li, Yinyan; Luo, Lin; Wang, Hongyan; Chi, Zhexu; Xin, Ai; Li, Xin; Wu, Jiaguo; Tang, Xiuwen

    2014-05-01

    Oxaliplatin is an important drug in the treatment of advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor that controls genes encoding cytoprotective and detoxifying enzymes through antioxidant-response elements (AREs) in their regulatory regions. Here, we report that oxaliplatin is an activator of the Nrf2 signaling pathway, with upregulation of ARE-driven genes and glutathione elevation. An injection of oxaliplatin into mice enhanced the expression of glutathione transferases and antioxidant enzymes in the small and large intestines of wild-type (WT) mice but not Nrf2(-/-) mice, indicating that oxaliplatin activates Nrf2 in vivo. Oxaliplatin failed to increase Nrf2 accumulation in non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells, which harbor a dysfunctional somatic mutation of KEAP1. However, forced expression of WT mKeap1 restored the ability of oxaliplatin to activate the transcription factor. Cys(151) in Keap1 was required for the response stimulated by oxaliplatin. In addition, dichloro(1,2-diaminocyclohexane) platinum, a metabolite of oxaliplatin, was found to have the same effect in activating the ARE-gene battery as its parent drug, whereas another metabolite, oxalate, was ineffective. Moreover, two other platinum derivatives, cisplatin and carboplatin, had no effect on the Keap1/Nrf2 system. Furthermore, activation of Nrf2 by oxaliplatin reduced the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to therapeutic drugs. Conversely, knockdown of Nrf2 by Nrf2 siRNA reduced oxaliplatin-induced chemoresistance. Our study showed that oxaliplatin exerts protection against the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs via Nrf2, indicating an important role of Nrf2 in oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

  1. Genetic variants in DNA repair genes as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin chemotherapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kap, E J; Seibold, P; Richter, S; Scherer, D; Habermann, N; Balavarca, Y; Jansen, L; Becker, N; Pfütze, K; Popanda, O; Hoffmeister, M; Ulrich, A; Benner, A; Ulrich, C M; Burwinkel, B; Brenner, H; Chang-Claude, J

    2015-12-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy exerts its effects through generating DNA damage. Hence, genetic variants in DNA repair pathways could modulate treatment response. We used a prospective cohort of 623 colorectal cancer patients with stage II-IV disease treated with adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy to comprehensively investigate 1727 genetic variants in the DNA repair pathways as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associations with overall survival and recurrence-free survival were assessed using a Cox regression model. Pathway analysis was performed using the gamma method. Patients carrying variant alleles of rs3783819 (MNAT1) and rs1043953 (XPC) experienced a longer overall survival after treatment with oxaliplatin than patients who did not carry the variant allele, while the opposite association was found in patients who were not treated with oxaliplatin (false discovery rate-adjusted P-values for heterogeneity 0.0047 and 0.0237, respectively). The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway was found to be most likely associated with overall survival in patients who received oxaliplatin (P-value=0.002). Our data show that genetic variants in the NER pathway are potentially predictive of treatment response to oxaliplatin.

  2. Preventive Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A₂ on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongxing; Kim, Woojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Yongjae; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-19

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are aggravated by cold and mechanical stimuli. Here we examined the preventive effects of Bee Venom (BV) derived phospholipase A₂ (bvPLA₂) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice and its immunological mechanism. The cold and mechanical allodynia signs were evaluated by acetone and von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The most significant allodynia signs were observed at three days after an injection of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) and then decreased gradually to a normal level on days 7-9. The oxaliplatin injection also induced infiltration of macrophages and upregulated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Daily treatment with bvPLA₂ (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days prior to the oxaliplatin injection markedly inhibited the development of cold and mechanical allodynia, and suppressed infiltration of macrophages and the increase of IL-1β level in the DRG. Such preventive effects of bvPLA₂ were completely blocked by depleting regulatory T cells (Tregs) with CD25 antibody pre-treatments. These results suggest that bvPLA₂ may prevent oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing immune responses in the DRG by Tregs.

  3. Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Descoeur, Juliette; Pereira, Vanessa; Pizzoccaro, Anne; Francois, Amaury; Ling, Bing; Maffre, Violette; Couette, Brigitte; Busserolles, Jérôme; Courteix, Christine; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain; Authier, Nicolas; Bourinet, Emmanuel

    2011-05-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK null mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21438154

  4. Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Descoeur, Juliette; Pereira, Vanessa; Pizzoccaro, Anne; Francois, Amaury; Ling, Bing; Maffre, Violette; Couette, Brigitte; Busserolles, Jérôme; Courteix, Christine; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain; Authier, Nicolas; Bourinet, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK null mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21438154

  5. Coordination of platinum therapeutic agents to met-rich motifs of human copper transport protein1.

    PubMed

    Crider, Sarah E; Holbrook, Robert J; Franz, Katherine J

    2010-01-01

    Platinum therapeutic agents are widely used in the treatment of several forms of cancer. Various mechanisms for the transport of the drugs have been proposed including passive diffusion across the cellular membrane and active transport via proteins. The copper transport protein Ctr1 is responsible for high affinity copper uptake but has also been implicated in the transport of cisplatin into cells. Human hCtr1 contains two methionine-rich Mets motifs on its extracellular N-terminus that are potential platinum-binding sites: the first one encompasses residues 7-14 with amino acid sequence Met-Gly-Met-Ser-Tyr-Met-Asp-Ser and the second one spans residues 39-46 with sequence Met-Met-Met-Met-Pro-Met-Thr-Phe. In these studies, we use liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to compare the binding interactions between cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin with synthetic peptides corresponding to hCtr1 Mets motifs. The interactions of cisplatin and carboplatin with Met-rich motifs that contain three or more methionines result in removal of the carrier ligands of both platinum complexes. In contrast, oxaliplatin retains its cyclohexyldiamine ligand upon platinum coordination to the peptide.

  6. Oxaliplatin evokes P2X7-dependent glutamate release in the cerebral cortex: A pain mechanism mediated by Pannexin 1.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Marcoli, Manuela; Micheli, Laura; Zanardelli, Matteo; Maura, Guido; Ghelardini, Carla; Cervetto, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Anticancer therapy based on the repeated administration of oxaliplatin is limited by the development of a neuropathic syndrome difficult to treat. Oxaliplatin neurotoxicity is based on complex nervous mechanisms, the comprehension of the role of single neurotransmitters and the knowledge of the signal flow among cells is matter of importance to improve therapeutic chances. In a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, we report increased P2X7-evoked glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The release was abolished by the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) antagonists Brilliant-Blue-G (BBG) and A-438079, and significantly reduced by Carbenoxolone and the Pannexin 1 (Panx1) selective inhibitors Erioglaucine and (10)Panx suggesting the recruitment of Panx1. Aimed to evaluate the significance of P2X7R-Panx1 system activation in pain generated by oxaliplatin, pharmacological modulators were spinally infused by intrathecal catheter in oxaliplatin-treated animals. BBG, Erioglaucine and (10)Panx reverted oxaliplatin-dependent pain. Finally, the influence of the P2X7R-Panx1 system blockade on oxaliplatin anticancer activity was evaluated on the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Prevention of HT-29 apoptosis and mortality was dependent by kind and concentration of P2X7R antagonists. On the contrary, the inhibition of Panx1 did not alter oxaliplatin lethality in tumor cells. It is concluded that glutamate release dependent on P2X7R is increased in cerebrocortical nerve terminals from oxaliplatin-treated rats; the increase is mediated by functional recruitment of Panx1; P2X7R antagonists and Panx1 inhibitors revert oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain; Panx1 inhibitors do not alter the oxaliplatin-induced mortality of cancer cells HT-29. The inhibition of Panx1 channel is suggested as a new and safe pharmacological target.

  7. Oxaliplatin Is a Safe Alternative Option for Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic Cancers After Hypersensitivity Reaction to Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna V.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Miller, Austin; Riebandt, Grazyna C.; Blum, Bonnie L.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Frederick, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the tolerability and efficacy of oxaliplatin in patientswith recurrent gynecologic malignancies after carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions in comparison with conventionally used cisplatin. Methods Forty-six patients were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy from 2006 to 2011 and developed hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin. Oxaliplatin was administered to 27 patients; 19 patients received cisplatin. Clinicopathologic variables, toxicity, and time-to-failure were analyzed retrospectively using descriptive statistics, Fisher exact, and independent sample permutation t tests. Results The median number of carboplatin cycles and cumulative dose before reaction were similar in the oxaliplatin and cisplatin groups, respectively (6 vs 7.5 cycles, P = 0.93; 980 [662] mg vs 686 [579.6] mg, P = 0.49). Non–life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction to oxaliplatin developed in 2 of 27 patients. No reactions to cisplatin occurred. The median number of oxaliplatin/cisplatin cycles was 6 in both groups. Complete response to therapy was 34.6% (oxaliplatin) and 31.6% (cisplatin); stable disease was seen in 50.0% and 36.8% of oxaliplatin- and cisplatin-treated patients, respectively (P = 0.46). Exposure to oxaliplatin resulted in less neurotoxicity than cisplatin (25.9% vs 68.4%, P = 0.01). The median number of prior chemotherapy lines in both groups was 2. The median time-to-failure was 10.8 months in oxaliplatin group and 9.8 months in cisplatin group (P = 0.86). Conclusions Salvage therapy with oxaliplatin after hypersensitivity reaction to carboplatin is associated with excellent tolerability and time-to-failure comparable to cisplatin. When further administration of carboplatin is precluded, oxaliplatin represents a safe and effective treatment strategy in the platinum-sensitive relapse setting. The significantly lower neurotoxicity profile makes it an attractive alternative to cisplatin. PMID:25356535

  8. A Polyamine-Deficient Diet Prevents Oxaliplatin-Induced Acute Cold and Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Pereira, Bruno; Daulhac, Laurence; Eschalier, Alain; Pezet, Denis; Moulinoux, Jacques-Philippe; Balayssac, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin is an anticancer drug used for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, but it can also cause painful peripheral neuropathies. The pathophysiology of these neuropathies has not been yet fully elucidated, but may involve spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, particularly the NR2B subunit. As polyamines are positive modulators of NMDA-NR2B receptors and mainly originate from dietary intake, the modulation of polyamines intake could represent an interesting way to prevent/modulate neuropathic pain symptoms by opposing glutamate neurotransmission. Methods The effect of a polyamine deficient diet was investigated in an animal model of oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity using behavioral tests (mechanical and cold hypersensitivity). The involvement of spinal glutamate neurotransmission was monitored by using a proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomic approach and by assessing the expression and phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Results A 7-day polyamine deficient diet totally prevented oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia. Oxaliplatin-induced pain hypersensitivity was not associated with an increase in NR2B subunit expression or phosphorylation, but with an increase of glutamate level in the spinal dorsal horn which was completely prevented by a polyamine deficient diet. As a validation that the oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity could be due to an increased activity of the spinal glutamate system, an intrathecal administration of the specific NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, totally reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical and cold hypersensitivity. Conclusion A polyamine deficient diet could represent a promising and valuable nutritional therapy to prevent oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity. PMID:24204988

  9. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  10. Two or Three Year Disease Free Survival (DFS) as a Primary Endpoint in Stage III Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trials with fluoropyrimidines with or without Oxaliplatin or Irinotecan: Data from 12,676 patients from MOSAIC, X-ACT, PETACC-3, C-06, C-07, and C89803

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, D; Shi, Q; Yothers, G; Van Cutsem, E; Cassidy, J; Saltz, L; Wolmark, N; Bot, B; Grothey, A; Buyse, M; de Gramont, A

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The ACCENT group previously established disease-free survival (DFS) with 2 or 3 years median follow-up to predict 5 year overall survival (5yr OS) in stage II and III colon cancer. ACCENT further proposed (1) a stronger association between DFS and OS in stage III than II, and (2) 6 or 7 years necessary to demonstrate DFS/OS surrogacy in recent trials. The relationship between endpoints in trials with oral fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan is unknown. Methods Associations between the treatment effect hazard ratios (HRs) on 2 and 3yr DFS, and 5 and 6yr OS were examined in 6 phase III trials not included in prior analyses from 1997-2002. Individual data for 12,676 patients were analyzed; two trials each tested oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and oral treatment vs 5-FU/LV. Findings Overall association between 2/3 yr DFS and 5/6 yr OS HRs was modest to poor (simple R2 measures: 0.58 to 0.76, model-based R2: 0.17 to 0.49). In stage III patients, the association increased (model-based R2≥0.79). Observed treatment effects on 2 yr DFS accurately 5/6 yr OS effects overall and in stage III patients. Interpretation In recent trials of cytotoxic chemotherapy, 2 or 3yr DFS HRs are highly predictive of 5 and 6yr OS HRs in stage III but not stage II patients. In all patients the DFS/OS association is stronger for 6yr OS, thus at least 6 year follow-up is recommended to assess OS benefit. These data support DFS as the primary endpoint for stage III colon cancer trials testing cytotoxic agents. Funding Funded by NCI Grant CA-25224 to the Mayo Clinic to support the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. PMID:21257306

  11. Separation and characterization of oxaliplatin dinucleotides from DNA using HPLC-ESI ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mowaka, Shereen; Linscheid, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum complex, and has a broad spectrum of antitumor activity. Such platinum complexes with the DACH carrier ligand have recently received increasing attention since they show efficacy against cisplatin-resistant cell lines. As the foremost indication of antitumor activity of platinum drugs is the formation of adducts with genomic DNA, calf thymus DNA-oxaliplatin adducts were the major target in this study. Calf thymus DNA was incubated with oxaliplatin, resulting in the formation of a large number of platinum-DNA adducts. Treated DNA was digested into the dinucleotides with a combination of enzymes, namely, benzonase, alkaline phosphatase, and nuclease S1. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography, we carried out the separation of individual platinum-DNA adducts which were concurrently identified using electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (MS). Both 1,2-intrastrand and 1,2-interstrand cross-linked adducts were found; however, those of the intrastrand nature have a considerably higher abundance than those of the interstrand cross-links. Among them, d(GpG)-oxaliplatin was the most abundant bifuctional adduct. To a lesser extent, a few monofunctional adducts were detected as well. MS(n) experiments served to ascertain the detailed structures of oxaliplatin adducts of dinucleoside monophosphates and of dinucleotides.

  12. HMGB1-mediated autophagy modulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to oxaliplatin via MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weijun; Zhang, Zhenyong; Zhang, Yongxue; Chen, Xinju; Guo, Shikui; Lei, Yi; Xu, Yu; Ji, Chao; Bi, Zhigang; Wang, Kunhua

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced drug resistance in human colorectal cancer cell lines HT29 and HCT116. Our results demonstrate a significant autophagy expression in CRC cells after an oxaliplatin treatment. Administration of oxaliplatin to human CRC cells significantly enhanced the expression of HMGB1, which regulated the autophagy response and negatively regulate the cell apoptosis. Moreover, a decreased oxaliplatin -induced autophagy response and an increased apoptosis level were detected in stable CRC cells harboring HMGB1 shRNA. Then we noted that HMGB1 significantly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/Extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest that HMGB1-mediated autophagy modulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to oxaliplatin via MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the self-association of oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Predrag V; Grimme, Stefan; Zarić, Snežana D; Pfeffer, Michel; Djukic, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-28

    Self-aggregation in water of anti-cancer agents such as oxaliplatin (1) or its palladium-containing parent (2) is suspected to be the main reason for the exceptional resistance of concentrated infusions of these complexes to hydrolysis; this hypothesis, i.e. the self-association of metal chelates, was investigated in a systematic manner by experimental and theoretical means. (1)H diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY NMR) and UV-visible absorption titration were inconclusive as to the formation of a dimer of 1 in water or DMSO. Further isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods allowed the accurate determination of the enthalpy of formation of only the homodimer [2]2 and putative heterodimer [1·2] together with an estimation of the formation constants, which indicate that dimer formation is not a spontaneous process in solution, whereas electrospray ESI mass spectroscopy tends to suggest the contrary in the gas phase. A dispersion-corrected DFT method, i.e. DFT-D (BLYP-D3), was used to model the aggregation in solution (COSMO) and to investigate the assisting role of London force in the cohesion of bimolecular aggregates. The concordance of experimental and theoretical thermodynamic parameters was judged reasonably even though the treatment of solvation by conventional continuum models does not account for specific interactions of the solute with molecules of solvent; nonetheless these results outline the importance of dispersion, a.k.a. London force. The role of the latter was further stressed by computing the affinities of 1 and 2 for the lipophilic cavity of cucurbit[7]uril in modeled water (COSMO-RS), which were preliminarily determined experimentally by ITC methods using pure water as solvent. From our investigations carried out in pure water the connection between the notorious chemical stability of “concentrated” infusions of 1 in aqueous media and the formation of oligomers remains unsettled.

  14. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the self-association of oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Predrag V; Grimme, Stefan; Zarić, Snežana D; Pfeffer, Michel; Djukic, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-28

    Self-aggregation in water of anti-cancer agents such as oxaliplatin (1) or its palladium-containing parent (2) is suspected to be the main reason for the exceptional resistance of concentrated infusions of these complexes to hydrolysis; this hypothesis, i.e. the self-association of metal chelates, was investigated in a systematic manner by experimental and theoretical means. (1)H diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY NMR) and UV-visible absorption titration were inconclusive as to the formation of a dimer of 1 in water or DMSO. Further isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods allowed the accurate determination of the enthalpy of formation of only the homodimer [2]2 and putative heterodimer [1·2] together with an estimation of the formation constants, which indicate that dimer formation is not a spontaneous process in solution, whereas electrospray ESI mass spectroscopy tends to suggest the contrary in the gas phase. A dispersion-corrected DFT method, i.e. DFT-D (BLYP-D3), was used to model the aggregation in solution (COSMO) and to investigate the assisting role of London force in the cohesion of bimolecular aggregates. The concordance of experimental and theoretical thermodynamic parameters was judged reasonably even though the treatment of solvation by conventional continuum models does not account for specific interactions of the solute with molecules of solvent; nonetheless these results outline the importance of dispersion, a.k.a. London force. The role of the latter was further stressed by computing the affinities of 1 and 2 for the lipophilic cavity of cucurbit[7]uril in modeled water (COSMO-RS), which were preliminarily determined experimentally by ITC methods using pure water as solvent. From our investigations carried out in pure water the connection between the notorious chemical stability of “concentrated” infusions of 1 in aqueous media and the formation of oligomers remains unsettled. PMID:24916014

  15. [Preparation and characterization of oxaliplatin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Qiu, Li-peng; Yan, Xiao-xiao; Li, Lin; Li, Xiang; Wang, Lu; Liu, Mei; Wang, Dong-kai

    2010-09-01

    Oxaliplatin-loaded nanostuctured lipid carriers (OP-NLC) were prepared by ultrasonic emulsification method. And its optimal prescription was selected by orthogonal design. The laser light scattering technique, zeta potential analyzer, TEM, DSC, XRD and HPLC were employed to study the physicochemical parameters of OP-NLC, which displayed in terms of particle size, zeta potential, crystalline, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency. The results showed that OP-NLC had an average diameter of (111 +/- 20) nm, zeta potential of (-27.4 +/- 13.1) mV, encapsulation efficiency of (77.4 +/- 2.5) % and drug content of (0.8 +/- 1.5) mg mL(-1). TEM, DSC and XRD indicated that OP-NLC was spherical and the drug was dispersed as nanoparticles by means of non-crystalline. The in vitro release test showed that the drug could be sustained-released from NLC in buffer solution (pH 4.5) after a burst release in initial phase.

  16. A TRPA1 antagonist reverts oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Nativi, Cristina; Gualdani, Roberta; Dragoni, Elisa; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Sostegni, Silvia; Norcini, Martina; Gabrielli, Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Richichi, Barbara; Francesconi, Oscar; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Ghelardini, Carla; Roelens, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NeP) is generally considered an intractable problem, which becomes compelling in clinical practice when caused by highly effective chemotherapeutics, such as in the treatment of cancer with oxaliplatin (OXA) and related drugs. In the present work we describe a structurally new compound, ADM_09, which proved to effectively revert OXA-induced NeP in vivo in rats without eliciting the commonly observed negative side-effects. ADM_09 does not modify normal behavior in rats, does not show any toxicity toward astrocyte cell cultures, nor any significant cardiotoxicity. Patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that ADM_09 is an effective antagonist of the nociceptive sensor channel TRPA1, which persistently blocks mouse as well as human variants of TRPA1. A dual-binding mode of action has been proposed for ADM_09, in which a synergic combination of calcium-mediated binding of the carnosine residue and disulphide-bridge-forming of the lipoic acid residue accounts for the observed persistent blocking activity toward the TRPA1 channel.

  17. A TRPA1 antagonist reverts oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Nativi, Cristina; Gualdani, Roberta; Dragoni, Elisa; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Sostegni, Silvia; Norcini, Martina; Gabrielli, Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Richichi, Barbara; Francesconi, Oscar; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Ghelardini, Carla; Roelens, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NeP) is generally considered an intractable problem, which becomes compelling in clinical practice when caused by highly effective chemotherapeutics, such as in the treatment of cancer with oxaliplatin (OXA) and related drugs. In the present work we describe a structurally new compound, ADM_09, which proved to effectively revert OXA-induced NeP in vivo in rats without eliciting the commonly observed negative side-effects. ADM_09 does not modify normal behavior in rats, does not show any toxicity toward astrocyte cell cultures, nor any significant cardiotoxicity. Patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that ADM_09 is an effective antagonist of the nociceptive sensor channel TRPA1, which persistently blocks mouse as well as human variants of TRPA1. A dual-binding mode of action has been proposed for ADM_09, in which a synergic combination of calcium-mediated binding of the carnosine residue and disulphide-bridge-forming of the lipoic acid residue accounts for the observed persistent blocking activity toward the TRPA1 channel. PMID:23774285

  18. Serotonergic modulation in neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin: effect on the 5HT2C receptor.

    PubMed

    Baptista-de-Souza, Daniela; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Zanardelli, Matteo; Micheli, Laura; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz; Canto-de-Souza, Azair; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-07-15

    Fluoxetine has been shown to be effective in clinical and experimental studies of neuropathic pain. Besides to increase serotonin levels in the synaptic cleft, fluoxetine is able to block the serotonergic 5-HT2C receptor subtype, which in turn has been involved in the modulation of neuropathic pain. This study investigated the effect of repeated treatments with fluoxetine on the neuropathic nociceptive response induced by oxaliplatin and the effects of both treatments on 5-HT2C receptor mRNA expression and protein levels in the rat spinal cord (SC), rostral ventral medulla (RVM), midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) and amygdala (Amy). Nociception was assessed by paw-pressure, cold plate and Von Frey tests. Fluoxetine prevented mechanical hypersensitivity and pain threshold alterations induced by oxaliplatin but did not prevent the impairment in weight gain induced by this anticancer drug. Ex vivo analysis revealed that oxaliplatin increased the 5-HT2C receptor mRNA expression and protein levels in the SC and PAG. Similar effects were observed in fluoxetine-treated animals but only within the PAG. While oxaliplatin decreased the 5-HT2C mRNA expression levels in the Amy, fluoxetine increased their protein levels in this area. Fluoxetine impaired the oxaliplatin effects on the 5-HT2C receptor mRNA expression in the SC and Amy and protein levels in the SC. All treatments increased of 5-HT2C receptor mRNA expression and protein levels in the PAG. These results suggest that the effects of fluoxetine on neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin are associated with quantitative changes in the 5-HT2C receptors located within important areas of the nociceptive system.

  19. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  20. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  1. Cross section calculations for electron scattering from platinum chemotherapeutic compounds. Electron scattering from carboplatin and oxaliplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żywicka, B.; Możejko, P.

    2013-10-01

    Cross section for electron impact ionization of carboplatin, C6H12N2O4Pt, and oxaliplatin, C8H14N2O4Pt, have been calculated within binary-encounter-Bethe model for energies from the ionization threshold up to 5000 eV. Cross section for elastic electron scattering from carboplatin and oxaliplatin molecules have also been derived using independent atom method (IAM) and additivity rule for collision energies ranging from 50 eV to 3000 eV. Obtained cross sections have been compared with relevant cross sections for cisplatin molecules.

  2. Cytotoxic, antioxidant activities and structure activity relationship of some newly synthesized terpenoidal oxaliplatin analogs.

    PubMed

    Amr, Abd El-Galil E; Ali, Korany A; Abdalla, Mohamed M

    2009-02-01

    The terpenoidal oxaliplatin derivatives (6) and (12) were newly synthesized using 2beta,3alpha-dihydroxy-11-oxo-18beta-olean-12-ene-30-oic acid (1) and 2alpha,2beta-dihydroxy-18beta-ursan-12-ene-28-oic acid (7) as starting materials. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and antioxidant activities and were compared to Oxaliplatin and vitamin C as positive controls. Some of the compounds exhibited better cytotoxicity and antioxidant activities than the reference controls. The detailed synthesis, spectroscopic data, toxicity (LD(50)) and pharmacological screening for the synthesized compounds were reported.

  3. Which is false: oxaliplatin or fluoropyrimidine? An analysis of patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer treated with first-line epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Tang, Ruilei; Sang, Yaxiong; Li, Meng; Hu, Qiancheng; Du, Zedong; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Pengfei; He, Xiaofeng; Li, Qiu

    2013-10-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to determine whether the addition of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy treatment improves efficacy in KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and whether infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin is a preferred combination for EGFR mAbs. Oxaliplatin (including treatment), EGFR mAbs, first-line treatment, KRAS wild-type, and mCRC were used as key words. The PRIME, OPUS, COIN, and NORDIC VII trials were identified by two independent authors. Time-to-event outcomes of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed using HRs (hazard ratios) with fixed effect, and response rate (RR) using odd ratios (OR) with fixed effect. A total of 1767 patients who were KRAS wild-type were included in this meta-analysis, with 866 patients in the mAbs and chemotherapy combination group and 901 patients in the chemotherapy alone group. The addition of mAbs to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with KRAS wild-type mCRC as first-line treatment resulted in significant improvements in PFS (HR = 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-0.99; P = 0.03) and response rate (RR) (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.14-1.66; P = 0.009) compared with chemotherapy alone, but the difference in OS was not significant (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.85-1.08; P = 0.48). However, the differences in OS and PFS were not significant when mAbs were added to bolus 5-FU or capecitabine-based regimens compared with chemotherapy alone, whereas PFS improved with an infusional 5-FU and oxaliplatin combination (P = 0.06; PFS, HR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.65-0.86; P = 0.0002), and even OS was marginally significant, which was consistent with the subgroup analysis of cetuximab and panitumumab. EGFR mAbs combined with oxaliplatin and an infusional 5-FU regimen was associated with significantly improved RR, PFS and OS as first-line treatment in KRAS wild-type mCRC.

  4. Convection-enhancement delivery of liposomal formulation of oxaliplatin shows less toxicity than oxaliplatin yet maintains a similar median survival time in F98 glioma-bearing rat model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Minghan; Fortin, David; Paquette, Benoit; Sanche, Léon

    2016-06-01

    Results of clinical trials with oxaliplatin in treating glioblastoma are dismal. Previous works showed that intravenous (i.v.) delivery of oxaliplatin did not increase the survival of F98 glioma-bearing Fisher rats. Low accumulation of the drug in tumor cells is presumed to be responsible for the lack of antitumor effect. In the present study, convection-enhanced delivery (CED) was used to directly inject oxaliplatin in brain tumor implanted in rats. Since CED can led to severe toxicity, the liposomal formulation of oxaliplatin (Lipoxal™) was also assessed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oxaliplatin was 10 μg, while that of Lipoxal™ was increased by 3-times reaching 30 μg. Median survival time (MeST) of F98 glioma-bearing rats injected with 10 μg oxaliplatin by CED was 31 days, 7.5 days longer than untreated control (p = 0.0002); while CED of 30 μg Lipoxal™ reached the same result. Compared to previous study on i.v. delivery of these drugs, their injection by CED significantly increased their tumoral accumulations as well as MeSTs in the F98 glioma bearing rat model. The addition of radiotherapy (15 Gy) to CED of oxaliplatin or Lipoxal™ increased the MeST by 4.0 and 3.0 days, respectively. The timing of radiotherapy (4 h or 24 h after CED) produced similar results. However, the treatment was better tolerated when radiotherapy was performed 24 h after CED. In conclusion, a better tumoral accumulation was achieved when oxaliplatin and Lipoxal™ were injected by CED. The liposomal encapsulation of oxaliplatin reduced its toxic, while maintaining its antitumor potential.

  5. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediate oxaliplatin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive potential in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Lin; Li, Dan-Dan; Yang, Chen-Lu; Peng, Rui-Qing; Guo, Yi-Qun; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic benefits offered by common chemotherapy drugs, such as oxaliplatin, are limited due to the development of resistance, which contributes to treatment failure and metastasis. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event contributing to the development of resistance to chemotherapeutics. Although the relationship between oxaliplatin and chemotherapy resistance has been described for decades, the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of oxaliplatin-mediated metastasis. Here, we identify reactive oxygen species (ROS) as mediators that promote the oxaliplatin-induced EMT. Following oxaliplatin treatment, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of most peroxiredoxin family genes, except for peroxiredoxin 1 (prdx1) gene, were constant or even decreased, resulting in ROS abundance. And the antioxidant guardian Nrf2 was unconspicuously raised both transcriptionally and translationally with oxaliplatin treatment as compared to those induced by topotecan treatment, which has been proved with no induced metastasis. In addition, the study evaluated high levels of ROS leading to EMT via activation of the known oncogenes Akt and Snail. Using the Akt inhibitor LY294002 or knocking down Snail expression via RNA interference (RNAi) reversed the effects of oxaliplatin on the EMT and metastasis. Our studies establish a role for the ROS-Akt-Snail axis as a mechanism by which chemotherapeutics induce EMT and cancer metastasis.

  7. Characterization of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation in DNA and differentiation of cancer cell drug sensitivity at microdose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hah, Sang Soo; Sumbad, Rhoda A; de Vere White, Ralph W; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Henderson, Paul T

    2007-12-01

    (trans-R, R)-1,2-diaminocyclohexaneoxalatoplatinum(II) (oxaliplatin) is a recently approved platinum analogue for use in the chemotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer. Like many cytotoxic drugs, oxaliplatin exerts its antitumor effects by covalent modification of DNA. We report an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) assay to measure the kinetics of oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage and repair. We determined the apparent rate of oxaliplatin adduction to salmon sperm DNA. The oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution was further investigated at the nucleoside level by HPLC-AMS. Cultured platinum-sensitive testicular (833K) and platinum-resistant breast and bladder (MDA-MB-231 and T24, respectively) cancer cells were incubated with a subpharmacological concentration of oxaliplatin (0.2 microM). Both cellular and DNA radiocarbon contents in the drug-sensitive testicular cells had approximately twice the area under the curve as compared to the more platinum-resistant cell lines, implying that differential accumulation of the drug may be responsible for the sensitivity of cancer cells to platinum treatment. The lowest concentration of radiocarbon measured was approximately 1+/-0.1 amol/microg of DNA, when assaying 1 microg of DNA. This sensitivity for measuring oxaliplatin-DNA adducts is the highest reported to date. The sensitivity offered by this method may be applicable to other DNA-damaging drugs, metabolisms studies, and diagnostics development.

  8. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hee; Chae, Jisook; Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3∙6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice.

  9. Clinical evaluation of cetuximab combined with an S-1 and oxaliplatin regimen for Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer is poor. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of cetuximab and S-1 combined with oxaliplatin (SOX) in Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer. Methods For patients in the experimental group (cetuximab in combination with SOX (Ce-SOX), 30 patients), once-weekly cetuximab (400 mg/m2 at the first infusion then 250 mg/m2 every week) was administered. For patients in both the control (SOX alone, 26 patients) and experimental groups, oxaliplatin (100 mg/m2) was administered intravenously on day 1, while S-1 (80 mg/m2/day) was given orally twice daily for 14 days. The endpoints of this study included progression-free survival, response rate, and disease-control rate. Results There was no statistically significant difference in response rate between the Ce-SOX and SOX groups (54.8% versus 44%, P = 0.225). The difference in disease-control rate was also statistically insignificant between the two groups (87.1% versus 76%, P = 0.162). Median progression-free survival in the Ce-SOX group was significantly higher than that in the SOX group (12.8 versus 10.1 months, P = 0.007). The median overall survival of the Ce-SOX group and SOX group was 14.0 and 12.2 months, respectively (P = 0.043). The one-year survival rate for the Ce-SOX group was 57% compared to 40% in the SOX group. There was no statistical difference in the grade 3 or 4 adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that the cetuximab combined with SOX regimen is feasible and shows promising efficacy with tolerable adverse effects in Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:24758484

  10. Impact of the oxaliplatin-5 fluorouracil-folinic acid combination on respective intracellular determinants of drug activity

    PubMed Central

    Fischel, J L; Formento, P; Ciccolini, J; Rostagno, P; Etienne, M C; Catalin, J; Milano, G

    2002-01-01

    The combination of 5-fluorouracil-folinic acid and oxaliplatin has led to a significant improvement of chemotherapy efficacy in advanced pretreated colorectal cancer. The objective of the present study was, considering the oxaplatin-5-fluorouracil-folinic acid combination, to examine the impact of one given drug on the cellular determinants of cytotoxic activity of the other drug. These cellular factors were analysed on the human colon cancer cell line WiDr in clinically relevant conditions of drug exposure (‘De Gramont’ schedule) with oxaliplatin-folinic acid during 2 h followed by 5-fluorouracil 48 h. The DNA binding of oxaliplatin was significantly reduced by the presence of 5-fluorouracil but this effect was time-dependent and after 50 h the platinum incorporated into DNA was identical in controls and in the drug combination. In the presence of oxaliplatin, there was less formation of FUH2 which is the first catabolite produced in the cascade of 5-fluorouracil metabolic degradation. The effects of drugs on cell cycle were quite different from one drug to the other with oxaliplatin inducing a shift towards G2 accumulation and 5-fluorouracil-folinic acid to a greater proportion of cells in G1–S. When oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil-folinic acid were combined the cell cycle effects were very similar to that of the 5-fluorouracil-folinic acid sequence alone. Oxaliplatin was able to reduce thymidylate synthase activity with a marked impact 28 h after the beginning of cell exposure to the drug. The 5-fluorouracil-folinic acid drug sequence led to a profound reduction in thymidylate synthase activity and this decrease was not markedly enhanced by the presence of oxaliplatin. Regarding apoptosis, changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability were observed in the presence of the tested drugs and the impact of 5-fluorouracil-folinic acid was greater than that of oxaliplatin. The addition of oxaliplatin did not amplify the action of 5-fluorouracil

  11. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates.

  12. Oxaliplatin Analogues with Carboxy Derivatives of Boldine with Enhanced Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Marco; Jara, Carlos; Astudillo, David; Villena, Joan; Reveco, Patricio G.; Thomet, Franz A.

    2015-01-01

    A new oxaliplatin analog [Pt(dach)(L5)] (1) was synthesized and characterized as a continuation of a study of the previously reported [Pt(dach)(L6)] (2), where dach = (1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane, L5 = 3-carboxyboldine, and L6 = 3-carboxypredicentrine. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited a substantially enhanced antioxidant activity compared to oxaliplatin (130 and 30 times for 1 and 13 and 4 times for 2 using the DPPH and FRAP assays, resp.). In addition, 1 and 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity in the same range as oxaliplatin toward the two human tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and HT-29) studied and two to four times lower activity in the human colon nontumor cell line (CCD-841). Preadministration of L5 or L6 to the colon tumor (HT-29) and the colon nontumor (CCD-841) cell lines prior to oxaliplatin addition increased the viability of the nontumor cell line to a greater extent than that of the tumor cell line. PMID:25814916

  13. Epididymitis following Cytoreductive Surgery with Intraperitoneal Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Luiza Damian Ribeiro; Belotto, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has emerged as an aggressive treatment option with intent to either cure or extend disease-free survival of selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. However, postoperative complications are common. We describe the cases of 2 men who underwent CRS with hyperthermic intraperitoneal oxaliplatin and developed scrotal pain, which was consistent with noninfectious epididymitis. PMID:27293401

  14. Oxaliplatin analogues with carboxy derivatives of boldine with enhanced antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Marco; Jara, Carlos; Astudillo, David; Villena, Joan; Reveco, Patricio G; Thomet, Franz A

    2015-01-01

    A new oxaliplatin analog [Pt(dach)(L5)] (1) was synthesized and characterized as a continuation of a study of the previously reported [Pt(dach)(L6)] (2), where dach = (1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane, L5 = 3-carboxyboldine, and L6 = 3-carboxypredicentrine. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited a substantially enhanced antioxidant activity compared to oxaliplatin (130 and 30 times for 1 and 13 and 4 times for 2 using the DPPH and FRAP assays, resp.). In addition, 1 and 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity in the same range as oxaliplatin toward the two human tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and HT-29) studied and two to four times lower activity in the human colon nontumor cell line (CCD-841). Preadministration of L5 or L6 to the colon tumor (HT-29) and the colon nontumor (CCD-841) cell lines prior to oxaliplatin addition increased the viability of the nontumor cell line to a greater extent than that of the tumor cell line. PMID:25814916

  15. Cetuximab potentiates oxaliplatin cytotoxic effect through a defect in NER and DNA replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Balin-Gauthier, D; Delord, J-P; Pillaire, M-J; Rochaix, P; Hoffman, J-S; Bugat, R; Cazaux, C; Canal, P; Allal, B C

    2008-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that the chemotherapeutic action of oxaliplatin, a third generation platinum derivative, is improved when combined with cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptors. To explore the mechanism of this synergistic benefit, we used HCT-8 and HCT-116, two human colon cancer cell lines, respectively, responsive and non-responsive to the oxaliplatin/cetuximab combination. We examined the effect of drug exposure on glutathione-S-transferase-mediated oxaliplatin detoxification, DNA–platinum adducts formation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and the expression of multiple targets involved in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The major changes we found in HCT-8 were a stimulation of oxaliplatin–DNA adduct formation associated with reduced expression of the key enzyme (excision repair cross complementation group1: ERCC1) in the key repair process of oxaliplatin–DNA platinum adduct, the nucleotide excision repair (NER), both at the mRNA and protein levels. We also observed a reduced expression of factors involved in DNA replication initiation, which correlates with an enrichment of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle as well as an acceleration of apoptosis. None of these changes occurred in the non-responsive HCT-116 cell that we used as a negative control. These findings support the fact that cetuximab potentiates the oxaliplatin-mediated cytotoxic effect as the result of inhibition of NER and also DNA replication initiation. PMID:18182978

  16. α7 Nicotinic Receptor Promotes the Neuroprotective Functions of Astrocytes against Oxaliplatin Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Tenci, Barbara; Zanardelli, Matteo; Failli, Paola; Ghelardini, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathies are characterized by a complex response of the central nervous system to injuries. Glial cells are recruited to maintain neuronal homeostasis but dysregulated activation leads to pain signaling amplification and reduces the glial neuroprotective power. Recently, we highlighted the property of α7 nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor (nAChR) agonists to relieve pain and induce neuroprotection simultaneously with a strong increase in astrocyte density. Aimed to study the role of α7 nAChR in the neuron-glia cross-talk, we treated primary rat neurons and astrocytes with the neurotoxic anticancer drug oxaliplatin evaluating the effect of the α7 nAChR agonist PNU-282987 (PNU). Oxaliplatin (1 μM, 48 h) reduced cell viability and increased caspase-3 activity of neuron monocultures without damaging astrocytes. In cocultures, astrocytes were not able to protect neurons by oxaliplatin even if glial cell metabolism was stimulated (pyruvate increase). On the contrary, the coculture incubation with 10 μM PNU improved neuron viability and inhibited apoptosis. In the absence of astrocytes, the protection disappeared. Furthermore, PNU promoted the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 and the expression of the glutamate-detoxifying enzyme glutamine synthetase. The α7 nAChR stimulation protects neurons from oxaliplatin toxicity through an astrocyte-mediated mechanism. α7 nAChR is suggested for recovering the homeostatic role of astrocytes. PMID:26146570

  17. Efficacy Endpoints of RTOG 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, J.; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0247 demonstrated preoperative RT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pCR pre-specified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas the RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan arm did not (10%). Secondary efficacy endpoints are reported here. Methods and Materials A randomized phase II trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) with two concurrent chemotherapy regimens: 1—capecitabine (1200 mg/m2/d M-F) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m2 /week × 4); and 2—capecitabine (1650 mg/m2/d M-F) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 /week × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks following chemoradiation, then 4-6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2; leucovorin 400 mg/m2; 5FU 400 mg/m2; 5FU 2400 mg/m2) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local-regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms as each was evaluated individually. Results 104 patients (median age 57) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm are 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm are 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pCR is an unsuitable surrogate for traditional survival metrics of clinical outcome. While it remains uncertain if the addition of a second cytotoxic agent enhances the effectiveness of fluorouracil plus RT, these results suggest further

  18. Efficacy Endpoints of Radiation Therapy Group Protocol 0247: A Randomized, Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, Jennifer; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). Methods and Materials: A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m{sup 2}; leucovorin 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m{sup 2}) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local–regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. Results: A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an

  19. Interaction of oxaliplatin, cisplatin, and carboplatin with hemoglobin and the resulting release of a heme group.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rupasri; Kalke, Robyn; Li, Xing-Fang

    2004-10-01

    Oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and cisplatin are widely used to treat a number of cancers. While their DNA adducts are believed to cause cell death, the involvement of their protein adducts in the toxicity and action of these drugs is unclear. Here, we report the interactions of hemoglobin (Hb) with the three platinum (Pt) drugs, demonstrating the formation of Hb-Pt complexes and the release of a heme group from Hb. Oxaliplatin (0.05 microM) was able to form three major complexes with Hb (3-10 microM) after 1 h of incubation at room temperature, and these complexes accounted for approximately 60% of the total oxaliplatin. Cisplatin and carboplatin formed one major and two minor complexes only after 24 and 96 h of incubation, respectively. Incubation of these Pt drugs (0.05-10 microM) with whole blood of healthy volunteers and the analysis of red blood cells confirmed the relative ability of these Pt drugs binding to Hb. For the whole blood samples incubated with oxaliplatin and cisplatin for 24 h, only protein complexes were detected in red blood cells, indicating a complete binding of oxaliplatin and cisplatin to the protein. In contrast, carboplatin was partially bound; both the free and the protein-bound carboplatin species were detected in red blood cells. The binding of the Pt drugs to Hb was accompanied by the release of a heme group from Hb, which was monitored by size fractionation, chromatographic separation, and selective detection of both Pt- and iron (Fe)-containing molecular species. The released heme was further identified by size fractionation and nanospray mass spectrometry. The findings of the Pt drug interaction with Hb and the dissociation of heme from Hb are potentially useful for a better understanding of the toxicity and side effects of these chemotherapeutic drugs.

  20. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  1. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity is mediated through gap junction channels and hemichannels and can be prevented by octanol.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Theophilidis, George; Sargiannidou, Irene; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2015-10-01

    Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity (OIN) is a common complication of chemotherapy without effective treatment. In order to clarify the mechanisms of both acute and chronic OIN, we used an ex-vivo mouse sciatic nerve model. Exposure to 25 μM oxaliplatin caused a marked prolongation in the duration of the nerve evoked compound action potential (CAP) by nearly 1200% within 300 min while amplitude remained constant for over 20 h. This oxaliplatin effect was almost completely reversed by the gap junction (GJ) inhibitor octanol in a concentration-dependent manner. Further GJ blockers showed similar effects although with a narrower therapeutic window. To clarify the target molecule we studied sciatic nerves from connexin32 (Cx32) and Cx29 knockout (KO) mice. The oxaliplatin effect and neuroprotection by octanol partially persisted in Cx29 better than in Cx32 KO nerves, suggesting that oxaliplatin affects both, but Cx32 GJ channels more than Cx29 hemichannels. Oxaliplatin also accelerated neurobiotin uptake in HeLa cells expressing the human ortholog of Cx29, Cx31.3, as well as dye transfer between cells expressing the human Cx32, and this effect was blocked by octanol. Oxaliplatin caused no morphological changes initially (up to 3 h of exposure), but prolonged nerve exposure caused juxtaparonodal axonal edema, which was prevented by octanol. Our study indicates that oxaliplatin causes forced opening of Cx32 channels and Cx29 hemichannels in peripheral myelinated fibers leading to disruption of axonal K(+) homeostasis. The GJ blocker octanol prevents OIN at very low concentrations and should be further studied as a neuroprotectant.

  2. Differential pharmacological alleviation of oxaliplatin-induced hyperalgesia/allodynia at cephalic versus extra-cephalic level in rodents.

    PubMed

    Michot, Benoit; Kayser, Valérie; Bastian, Gérard; Bourgoin, Sylvie; Hamon, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Previous data showed that neuropathic pain induced by mechanical lesion of peripheral nerves responds differently to alleviating drugs at cephalic versus extracephalic level. Because neuropathic pain evoked by anti-cancer drugs differs from that triggered by mechanical nerve lesion, we investigated whether differences between cephalic and extracephalic levels could also be characterized in rodents rendered neuropathic by treatment with the anti-cancer platinum derivative oxaliplatin. C57BL/6J mice received two injections and Sprague-Dawley rats three injections of oxaliplatin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle, with three days intervals. Supersensitivity to mechanical (von Frey filaments), cold (acetone drop) and chemical/inflammatory (formalin) stimulations was assessed in vibrissae and hindpaw territories. Transcripts of neuroinflammatory markers were quantified by real-time RT-qPCR in rat ganglia and central tissues. Oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, cold hyperalgesia and chemical/inflammatory supersensitivity at both hindpaw and vibrissal levels in mice and rats. Acute treatment with gabapentin (30 mg/kg i.p.), morphine (3 mg/kg s.c.) or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.16 mg/kg s.c.) significantly reduced oxaliplatin-induced supersensitivity in hindpaw but not vibrissal territory. In contrast, the antimigraine drugs naratriptan (0.1 mg/kg s.c.) and olcegepant (0.6 mg/kg i.v.) decreased oxaliplatin-induced supersensitivity in vibrissal territory only. Among the various markers investigated, only TRPA1 transcript was upregulated in ganglia of oxaliplatin-treated rats. These data showed that oxaliplatin induced supersensitivity to various stimuli in both cephalic and extra-cephalic territories in rodents. Regional differences in the efficacy of drugs to alleviate oxaliplatin-induced allodynia/hyperalgesia further support the idea that mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain have peculiarities at cephalic versus extra-cephalic level.

  3. Wen-Luo-Tong Prevents Glial Activation and Nociceptive Sensitization in a Rat Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    One of the main dose-limiting complications of the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin (OXL) is painful neuropathy. Glial activation and nociceptive sensitization may be responsible for the mechanism of neuropathic pain. The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Wen-luo-tong (WLT) has been widely used in China to treat chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain. However, there is no study on the effects of WLT on spinal glial activation induced by OXL. In this study, a rat model of OXL-induced chronic neuropathic pain was established and WLT was administrated. Pain behavioral tests and morphometric examination of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were conducted. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining was performed, glial activation was evaluated, and the excitatory neurotransmitter substance P (SP) and glial-derived proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were analyzed. WLT treatment alleviated OXL-induced mechanical allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. Changes in the somatic, nuclear, and nucleolar areas of neurons in DRG were prevented. In the spinal dorsal horn, hypertrophy and activation of GFAP-positive astrocytes were averted, and the level of GFAP mRNA decreased significantly. Additionally, TNF-α mRNA and protein levels decreased. Collectively, these results indicate that WLT reversed both glial activation in the spinal dorsal horn and nociceptive sensitization during OXL-induced chronic neuropathic pain in rats.

  4. Wen-Luo-Tong Prevents Glial Activation and Nociceptive Sensitization in a Rat Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    One of the main dose-limiting complications of the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin (OXL) is painful neuropathy. Glial activation and nociceptive sensitization may be responsible for the mechanism of neuropathic pain. The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Wen-luo-tong (WLT) has been widely used in China to treat chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain. However, there is no study on the effects of WLT on spinal glial activation induced by OXL. In this study, a rat model of OXL-induced chronic neuropathic pain was established and WLT was administrated. Pain behavioral tests and morphometric examination of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were conducted. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining was performed, glial activation was evaluated, and the excitatory neurotransmitter substance P (SP) and glial-derived proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were analyzed. WLT treatment alleviated OXL-induced mechanical allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. Changes in the somatic, nuclear, and nucleolar areas of neurons in DRG were prevented. In the spinal dorsal horn, hypertrophy and activation of GFAP-positive astrocytes were averted, and the level of GFAP mRNA decreased significantly. Additionally, TNF-α mRNA and protein levels decreased. Collectively, these results indicate that WLT reversed both glial activation in the spinal dorsal horn and nociceptive sensitization during OXL-induced chronic neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:27642352

  5. Wen-Luo-Tong Prevents Glial Activation and Nociceptive Sensitization in a Rat Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Jia, Liqun; Pan, Lin; Song, Aiping; Wang, Yuanyuan; Tan, Huangying; Xiang, Qing; Yu, Lili; Ke, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    One of the main dose-limiting complications of the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin (OXL) is painful neuropathy. Glial activation and nociceptive sensitization may be responsible for the mechanism of neuropathic pain. The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Wen-luo-tong (WLT) has been widely used in China to treat chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain. However, there is no study on the effects of WLT on spinal glial activation induced by OXL. In this study, a rat model of OXL-induced chronic neuropathic pain was established and WLT was administrated. Pain behavioral tests and morphometric examination of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were conducted. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining was performed, glial activation was evaluated, and the excitatory neurotransmitter substance P (SP) and glial-derived proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were analyzed. WLT treatment alleviated OXL-induced mechanical allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. Changes in the somatic, nuclear, and nucleolar areas of neurons in DRG were prevented. In the spinal dorsal horn, hypertrophy and activation of GFAP-positive astrocytes were averted, and the level of GFAP mRNA decreased significantly. Additionally, TNF-α mRNA and protein levels decreased. Collectively, these results indicate that WLT reversed both glial activation in the spinal dorsal horn and nociceptive sensitization during OXL-induced chronic neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:27642352

  6. EGCG synergizes the therapeutic effect of cisplatin and oxaliplatin through autophagic pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fen; Wei, Fei; Wang, Yulei; Wu, Bibo; Fang, Yuan; Xiong, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Application of the platinum-based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is restricted due to its severe cytotoxic effects. In this study we used synergistic strategies by combining (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) with cisplatin or oxaliplatin to minimize the ill effects of platinum-based therapy. MTS assay was used to examine the effect of EGCG, cisplatin and oxaliplatin on the proliferation of human colorectal cancer DLD-1 and HT-29 cells. Autophagic process was evaluated by detection of LC3-II protein, autophagosome formation, and quantification of Acidic Vesicular. Treatment of DLD-1 and HT-29 cells with EGCG plus cisplatin or oxaliplatin showed a synergistic effect on inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell death. EGCG enhanced the effect of cisplatin and oxaliplatin-induced autophagy in DLD-1 and HT-29 cells, as characterized by the accumulation of LC3-II protein, the increase of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), and the formation of autophagosome. In addition, transfection of DLD-1 and HT-29 cells with siRNA against ATG genes reduced EGCG synergistic effect. Our findings suggest that combining EGCG with cisplatin or oxaliplatin could potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer cells through autophagy related pathway.

  7. Preventive Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Kim, Woojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Yongjae; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are aggravated by cold and mechanical stimuli. Here we examined the preventive effects of Bee Venom (BV) derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice and its immunological mechanism. The cold and mechanical allodynia signs were evaluated by acetone and von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The most significant allodynia signs were observed at three days after an injection of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) and then decreased gradually to a normal level on days 7–9. The oxaliplatin injection also induced infiltration of macrophages and upregulated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Daily treatment with bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days prior to the oxaliplatin injection markedly inhibited the development of cold and mechanical allodynia, and suppressed infiltration of macrophages and the increase of IL-1β level in the DRG. Such preventive effects of bvPLA2 were completely blocked by depleting regulatory T cells (Tregs) with CD25 antibody pre-treatments. These results suggest that bvPLA2 may prevent oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing immune responses in the DRG by Tregs. PMID:26797636

  8. Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy combined with traditional medicines for neutropenia in colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis of the contributions of specific plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Menghua; May, Brian H; Zhou, Iris W; Sze, Daniel Man-Yuen; Xue, Charlie C; Zhang, Anthony L

    2016-09-01

    This review assessed the effects on chemotherapy induced neutropenia (CIN) of combining oxaliplatin regimens with traditional plant-based medicines (TMs) in the management of colorectal cancer (CRC). 32 RCTs (2224 participants) were included. Meta-analysis showed reduced incidence of grade 3/4 CIN (RR 0.45[0.31, 0.65], I(2)=0%). No studies reported serious adverse events or reduction in tumour response rates associated with concurrent use of oxaliplatin and TM. Due to small sample sizes and risk of bias, these results should be interpreted with caution. Analyses of sub-groups of studies that used similar TM interventions assessed the relative contributions of individual plant-based ingredients to the results. Astragalus, Codonopsis, Atractylodes, Poria and Coix, in various combinations were consistently associated with reduced CIN incidence when administered orally. Experimental studies of these plants have reported reduced myelosuppression and/or enhanced immune response. Further studies of these plants may lead to the development of interventions to supplement conventional CIN treatment. PMID:27497028

  9. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  10. Severe Generalized Weakness, Paralysis, and Aphasia following Administration of Irinotecan and Oxaliplatin during FOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chandar, Manisha; de Wilton Marsh, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Irinotecan is commonly used in combination with oxaliplatin as a component of FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy for several gastrointestinal malignancies. The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who developed acute paralysis and aphasia while receiving her initial infusion of irinotecan. Case Report A 67-year-old woman with newly diagnosed metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presented for her first cycle of FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy. During her infusion of irinotecan, she developed acute onset of generalized weakness, paralysis of all extremities, and nonfluent aphasia with complete inability to communicate. This episode was self-limited and resolved within 2 h. Prior to subsequent infusions she received intravenous repletion of potassium and had no recurrence of symptoms. Discussion In selected cases, coadministration of irinotecan and oxaliplatin may result in severe generalized weakness and aphasia, which may be triggered by underlying electrolyte disturbances. Careful monitoring and correction of potassium may help prevent this reaction. PMID:25873880

  11. Evaluation of oxaliplatin exposure of healthcare workers during heated intraperitoneal perioperative chemotherapy (HIPEC)

    PubMed Central

    VILLA, Antoine F.; EL BALKHI, Souleiman; ABOURA, Radia; SAGEOT, Herve; HASNI-PICHARD, Helene; POCARD, Marc; ELIAS, Dominique; JOLY, Nathalie; PAYEN, Didier; BLOT, François; POUPON, Joel; GARNIER, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate air and surface contaminations, and internal contamination of healthcare workers during open-abdomen HIPEC using oxaliplatin. Platinum (Pt) was measured in urine of exposed workers and in multiple air and surface samples. Three successive HIPEC procedures were investigated in each of the two hospitals participating in the study. Analysis of air samples did not detect any oxaliplatin contamination. Heavy contamination of the operating table, the floor at the surgeon’s feet, and the surgeon’s overshoes were observed. Hand contamination was observed in surgeons using double gloves for intra-abdominal chemotherapy administration, but not in those using three sets of gloves. Pt was not detected in urine samples obtained after HIPEC (<5 ng/L). The main risk of HIPEC is related to direct or indirect skin exposure and can be prevented by correct use of adapted protective equipment. PMID:25327298

  12. Reversible bilateral blepharoptosis following oxaliplatin infusion: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fanetti, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Laura A M; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum analogue employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer and various other neoplasms, is characterized by a broad range of adverse events. Peripheral neuropathy is probably the most peculiar and clinically relevant toxicity associated with its use and can be distinguished into two types: acute and chronic neurotoxicity.We report a case of acute reversible bilateral palpebral ptosis and dyspnea without bronchospasm or laryngospasm which occurred at the end of the third administration of adjuvant oxaliplatin by infusion for stage III colon cancer in a 54-year-old woman. Chlorphenamine and hydrocortisone were administered with fast resolution of dyspnea and slight improvement of ptosis. Complete resolution with no sequelae occurred in one hour. No further recurrence of blepharoptosis was described during the following days. The subsequent cycles were prescribed at reduced dosage without acute complications.

  13. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-xi; Sun, Jing-xu; Chen, Xiao-wan; Zhao, Jun-hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992–2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I–III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category, and but did not translate into survival benefits in patients aged ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category. No significant interactions were observed among ypN− patients, and oxaliplatin did not significantly improve OS, regardless of age. Conclusions In patients with rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN− patients. PMID:26910371

  14. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the biotransformation products of oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Luo, F R; Yen, T Y; Wyrick, S D; Chaney, S G

    1999-03-19

    A novel single reversed-phase HPLC system was developed for separating oxaliplatin and its biotransformation products formed in rat plasma. The major stable biotransformation products of oxaliplatin formed in rat plasma were identified as Pt(dach)(Cys)2, Pt(dach)(Met) and free dach. The minor biotransformation products Pt(dach)Cl2, Pt(dach)(GSH) and Pt(dach)(GSH)2 could also be resolved from other Pt-dach complexes. Among these biotransformation products, the identification of Pt(dach)(Met) was further confirmed by LC-ESI-MS, and the identification of Pt(dach)(Cys)2, Pt(dach)(GSH), Pt(dach)(GSH)2 and free dach was confirmed by atomic absorption and double isotope labeling. This HPLC technique should prove useful for separating and identifying the biotransformation products of Pt-dach drugs such as oxaliplatin, ormaplatin and Pt(dach)(mal) in biological fluids. This will allow a more complete characterization of the pharmacokinetics and biotransformations of these Pt-dach drugs, which should in turn lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to their toxicity and efficacy.

  15. The tissue distribution in mice and pharmacokinetics in rabbits of oxaliplatin liposome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-ping; Geng, Dan-qing; Xu, Hai-xing; Sui, Xiao-hui

    2009-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with an ultraviolet detector (UV) has been developed for the determination of oxaliplatin in the plasma of rabbits and tissues of mice. The sample preparation was carried out by complexation with 0.5 mL of DETC (diethyl-dithiocarbamate) solution and extracted by ether and chloroform. Then, 20 microL of supernatant was injected into the HPLC system with 0.25 mol/L of sodium chloride solution and methanol (30:70 v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Separation was performed with a C(18) column at 25 degrees C. The peak was detected at 254 nm. The calibration curve was linear (R(2) > or = 0.9995) in the concentration range of 0.1 approximately 200 microg/mL in plasma and tissues. The intra- and interday variation coefficients were not more than 2.61 and 3.83%, respectively. The limit of detection was 20 ng/mL. The mean recoveries of oxaliplatin were ranged from 97.83 to 104.17% in plasma and tissues. The present method has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of oxaliplatin liposome in mice and rabbits.

  16. Effects of electroacupuncture on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hak Jin; Lim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Dae-Il; Ye, Min Sook; Lee, Giseog; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated whether and how electroacupuncture (EA) attenuates cold hypersensitivity (allodynia) in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Cold allodynia [evaluated by immersing the tail into cold water (4 °C) and measuring the withdrawal latency] was induced 3 days after an oxaliplatin administration (6 mg/kg, i.p.). EA stimulation (2/100 Hz, 0.3-ms pulse duration, 0.2-0.3 mA) was delivered to ST36 acupoint or non-acupoint for 20 min. Low-frequency (2 Hz) EA at ST36 relieved cold allodynia more effectively than high-frequency EA at ST36 or low-frequency EA at non-acupoint. Naloxone (opioid antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked such EA-induced anti-allodynia, whereas phentolamine (α-adrenergic antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. Moreover, plasma β-endorphin levels significantly increased right after the end of EA and subsequently decreased. These results indicate that low-frequency EA at ST36 in rats has a marked relieving effect on oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia that is mediated by the endogenous opioid, but not noradrenergic, system.

  17. Effects of electroacupuncture on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hak Jin; Lim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Dae-Il; Ye, Min Sook; Lee, Giseog; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated whether and how electroacupuncture (EA) attenuates cold hypersensitivity (allodynia) in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Cold allodynia [evaluated by immersing the tail into cold water (4 °C) and measuring the withdrawal latency] was induced 3 days after an oxaliplatin administration (6 mg/kg, i.p.). EA stimulation (2/100 Hz, 0.3-ms pulse duration, 0.2-0.3 mA) was delivered to ST36 acupoint or non-acupoint for 20 min. Low-frequency (2 Hz) EA at ST36 relieved cold allodynia more effectively than high-frequency EA at ST36 or low-frequency EA at non-acupoint. Naloxone (opioid antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked such EA-induced anti-allodynia, whereas phentolamine (α-adrenergic antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. Moreover, plasma β-endorphin levels significantly increased right after the end of EA and subsequently decreased. These results indicate that low-frequency EA at ST36 in rats has a marked relieving effect on oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia that is mediated by the endogenous opioid, but not noradrenergic, system. PMID:24158835

  18. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the biotransformation products of oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Luo, F R; Yen, T Y; Wyrick, S D; Chaney, S G

    1999-03-19

    A novel single reversed-phase HPLC system was developed for separating oxaliplatin and its biotransformation products formed in rat plasma. The major stable biotransformation products of oxaliplatin formed in rat plasma were identified as Pt(dach)(Cys)2, Pt(dach)(Met) and free dach. The minor biotransformation products Pt(dach)Cl2, Pt(dach)(GSH) and Pt(dach)(GSH)2 could also be resolved from other Pt-dach complexes. Among these biotransformation products, the identification of Pt(dach)(Met) was further confirmed by LC-ESI-MS, and the identification of Pt(dach)(Cys)2, Pt(dach)(GSH), Pt(dach)(GSH)2 and free dach was confirmed by atomic absorption and double isotope labeling. This HPLC technique should prove useful for separating and identifying the biotransformation products of Pt-dach drugs such as oxaliplatin, ormaplatin and Pt(dach)(mal) in biological fluids. This will allow a more complete characterization of the pharmacokinetics and biotransformations of these Pt-dach drugs, which should in turn lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to their toxicity and efficacy. PMID:10219677

  19. Protocol of a randomised phase III clinical trial of sequential capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus bevacizumab (Cape/5-FU-Bmab) to capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab (CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab) versus combination CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab in advanced colorectal cancer: the C-cubed (C3) study

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hideyuki; Sawaki, Akira; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Inukai, Michio; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Nasu, Junichiro; Nishina, Tomohiro; Hazama, Shoichi; Okajima, Masazumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Results from several randomised trials suggest that the sequential use of cytotoxic agents in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has the potential to improve overall survival compared with combination chemotherapy. This study is designed to investigate whether sequential treatment with bevacizumab-based first-line treatment with oxaliplatin is superior to combination treatment of mCRC. Methods and analysis The C-cubed (C3) study is a two-arm, multicentre, open-label, randomised phase III trial in Japan comparing the efficacy and safety of sequential capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus bevacizumab (Cape/5-FU-Bmab) with escalation to capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab (CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab) versus combination CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab as the first-line treatment of mCRC. In the sequential arm (Arm A: oxaliplatin ‘wait-and-go’), treatment escalation from Cape/5-FU-Bmab to CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab is recommended in the case of progressive disease. In the combination arm (Arm B: oxaliplatin ‘stop-and-go’), de-escalation from CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab to Cape/5-FU-Bmab is possible after 12 weeks of treatment. Re-escalation to CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab after progressive disease is considered only for patients who received de-escalation of oxaliplatin after 12 weeks of treatment not caused by oxaliplatin-associated toxicity. A target sample size of 304 evaluable patients is considered sufficient to validate an expected HR for time to failure of strategy of the sequential approach ‘wait-and-go’ compared to the combination approach ‘stop-and go’ with 80% power and 2-sided 5% α in case of a true HR<0.69. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted according to the standards of Good Clinical Practice and in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki 2013 and local regulations, and has been submitted and approved by the Ethical Committee of the Non-Profit Organization MINS Institutional Review Board. The protocol

  20. The α9α10 nicotinic receptor antagonist α-conotoxin RgIA prevents neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Alessandra; Micheli, Laura; Maresca, Mario; Branca, Jacopo Juno Valerio; McIntosh, J Michael; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third-generation diaminocyclohexane platinum drug, is widely used alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin to treat metastatic colorectal, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers. Oxaliplatin long-term treatment is associated with the development of a dose-limiting painful neuropathy that dramatically impairs the patient's quality of life and therapy possibility. To study novel strategies to treat oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, we evaluated α-conotoxin RgIA, a peptide that potently blocks the α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype in a rat model of oxaliplatin-dependent neurotoxicity (2.4mgkg(-1) oxaliplatin intraperitoneally daily for 21days). The administration of RgIA (2 and 10nmol injected intramuscularly once a day concomitantly with oxaliplatin treatment), reduced the oxaliplatin-dependent hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal noxious and non-noxious stimuli. Moreover, morphological modifications of L4-L5 dorsal root ganglia were significantly prevented. In the spinal cord the numerical increase of astrocyte cell density present in oxaliplatin-treated rats is partially prevented by RgIA treatment. Nevertheless, the administration of the α-conotoxin is able per se to elicit a numerical increase and a morphological activation of microglia and astrocytes in specific brain areas.

  1. EXAFS Debye-Waller factors issued from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics: Application to the fit of oxaliplatin and derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, K.; Beret, E. C.; Muller, D. Bouvet; Michalowicz, A.; Marcos, E. Sánchez

    2013-02-01

    One of the main pitfalls in EXAFS fitting is correlation among parameters, which can lead to unreliable fits. The use of theoretical Debye-Waller factors (DWs) is a promising way to reduce the number of fitted parameters. When working with molecular dynamics, it is not only possible to evaluate DWs from the statistical distributions issued from the trajectory but also to estimate the distribution anharmonicity, and to compute simulated average EXAFS spectra that can be fitted as experimental ones, in order to assess the ability of EXAFS fitting to recover information on DWs, as well as other structural and spectroscopical parameters. The case studied is oxaliplatin, a third generation anticancer drug. The structural information and the simulated average spectra were derived from a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CP-MD) trajectory of a compound closely related to oxaliplatin. We present the DWs issued from this simulation and their use, by taking their theoretical absolute values (no DW fitted) or their ratios (one DW fitted). In this second approach, the fit of oxaliplatin experimental spectra leads to DWs values very close to the theoretical ones. This shows that the CP-MD trajectory provides a good representation of the distance distributions for oxaliplatin. Transferability of oxaliplatin DWs, for all relevant single and multiple scattering paths, to closely related compounds is proven for the case of bis(oxalato)platinum(II) and bis(ethylene diamine)platinum(II).

  2. Changes in Noninvasive Liver Fibrosis Indices and Spleen Size During Chemotherapy: Potential Markers for Oxaliplatin-Induced Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Sehhoon; Kim, Hwi Young; Kim, Haeryoung; Park, Jin Hyun; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Won; Choi, In Sil; Jung, Yong Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are standard treatments for the patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and advanced gastric cancer (AGC). However, owing to hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), the use of oxaliplatin sometimes results in splenomegaly. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between chemotherapy-associated changes of noninvasive liver fibrosis indices and volumetric changes of the spleen.From February 2004 to April 2014, patients with CRC or AGC receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were studied. The possibility of SOS development was evaluated before and after the oxaliplatin exposure with splenic volume index (SVI). Four different noninvasive liver fibrosis indices were used for risk analysis, namely age-platelet index (API), AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), platelet-to-spleen ratio (PSR), and fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4).A total of 275 patients were eligible for evaluation: 200 patients had CRC and 75 patients had AGC. Using the cutoff of SVI increase ≥ 0.3, 113 patients (41.1%) were positive for splenomegaly. The changes of indices significantly correlated with SVI increase. Adjusted odds ratios for those indices were as follows: API = 1.16 (95% confidential interval [CI], 1.01-1.32; P = .03); APRI = 2.45 (95% CI, 1.30-4.63; P = .01); PSR = 0.69 (95% CI, 0.59-0.80; P < .01); and FIB-4 = 1.37 (95% CI, 1.16-1.63; P < .01). Optimal cutoff values with statistical significance were calculated and suggested.The changes of noninvasive liver fibrosis indices showed a good correlation with the increase in the spleen volume during oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Validation of these indices for monitoring of oxaliplatin-induced hepatic SOS is warranted.

  3. Phase 1 study on S-1 and oxaliplatin therapy as an adjuvant after hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Oba, Masaru; Saiura, Akio; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Eiji; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-08-01

    of Background Data The effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer has been confirmed in various studies. However, no adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) classified to stage IV has been established. Objectives We conducted a phase 1 study of S-1 and oxaliplatin to determine the recommended dose (RD) in patients with CLM as adjuvant therapy in two institutes. Methods S-1 and oxaliplatin were administered from day 1 to day 14 of a 3-week cycle as a 2-h infusion every 3 weeks, respectively. The initial doses of S-1 and oxaliplatin were fixed to 80 mg/m(2) and 100 mg/m(2), respectively (level 1). We scheduled in the protocol a dose change of S-1 and oxaliplatin to level 2 (S-1: 80 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 130 mg/m(2)) or level 0 (S-1: 65 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 100 mg/m(2)) depending on the incidence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at level 1 in six patients. Results Because DLT occurred in one among the initial six patients at level 1, the doses were increased to level 2 in the next six patients. At level 2, grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia occurred in one (16.7 %) and two (33.3 %) patients, respectively, in the absence of non-hematological event. Because no DLT occurred at level 2, we suggest that the RD can be set to the level 2 dose. The median number of cycles delivered at RD was 8. The mean relative dose intensity of S-1 and oxaliplatin at RD was 0.90 and 0.63, respectively. Conclusion In a patient undergoing hepatectomy for CLM, 80 mg/m(2) of S-1 and 130 mg/m(2) of oxaliplatin are recommended as adjuvant therapy. A further study is required to confirm the efficacy and safety of this regimen on a larger scale.

  4. GALNT14 Genotype Predicts Postoperative Outcome of Stage III Colorectal Cancer With Oxaliplatin as Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wey-Ran; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Liang, Kung-Hao; Lim, Siew-Na; Lai, Ming-Wei; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Hsieh, Tzu-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Kai; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is widely used for stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) after curative surgery. CRC is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and our current knowledge of therapeutic response-related genetic factors remains limited. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GALNT14)-rs9679162 genotype is a prognostic predictor for chemotherapy response in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we investigated whether this genotype was related to the therapeutic outcome of stage III CRC. A cohort of 300 stage III CRC patients receiving curative resection followed by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was retrospectively recruited. GALNT14 genotypes and the clinicopathological factors were correlated with posttherapeutic prognosis. Of these patients, 18% patients had GALNT14-rs9679162 “TT” and 82% had the “GT” + “GG” genotypes. The analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS, P = 0.009) but not with recurrence-free survival (RFS, P = 0.700). The subgroup analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in the following subgroups: age ≤65 years, men, left side CRC, N2 stage, carcinoembryonic antigen >5 ng/mL, and mucinous histology (P = 0.012, 0.011, 0.009, 0.025, 0.013, and 0.007, respectively). Within the latter 2 subgroups, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for OS. Finally, the “TT” genotype was associated with the T4 tumor stage (P = 0.017) and in patients with T4 tumors, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for unfavorable RFS (P = 0.007). GALNT14 “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in stage III CRC patients receiving curative surgery and adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27124048

  5. Rituximab plus gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who are not candidates for high-dose therapy. A phase II Lymphoma Study Association trial.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Nicolas; El Gnaoui, Taoufik; Tilly, Hervé; Canioni, Danièle; Sebban, Catherine; Casasnovas, René-Olivier; Delarue, Richard; Sonet, Anne; Beaussart, Pauline; Petrella, Tony; Castaigne, Sylvie; Bologna, Serge; Salles, Gilles; Rahmouni, Alain; Gaulard, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne

    2013-11-01

    A previous pilot study with rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin showed promising activity in patients with refractory/relapsed B-cell lymphoma. We, therefore, conducted a phase II study to determine whether these results could be reproduced in a multi-institutional setting. This phase II study included 49 patients with refractory (n=6) or relapsing (n=43) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The median age of the patients was 69 years. Prior treatment included rituximab in 31 (63%) and autologous transplantation in 17 (35%) patients. International Prognostic Index at enrollment was >2 in 34 patients (71%). The primary endpoint was overall response rate after four cycles of treatment. Patients were planned to receive eight cycles if they reached at least partial remission after four cycles. After four cycles 21 patients (44%) were in complete remission and 8 (17%) in partial remission, resulting in an overall response rate of 61%. Factors significantly affecting overall response rate were early (<1 year) progression/relapse (18% versus 54%; P=0.001) and prior exposure to rituximab (23% versus 65%; P=0.004). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 12.8% and 13.9%, respectively. Rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin were well tolerated with grade 3-4 infectious episodes in 22% of the cycles. These results are the first confirmation from a multicenter study that rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin provide a consistent response rate in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This therapy can now be considered as a platform for new combinations with targeted treatments. This trial was registered at clinicaltrial.gov under #NCT00169195. PMID:23753028

  6. Rituximab plus gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who are not candidates for high-dose therapy. A phase II Lymphoma Study Association trial

    PubMed Central

    Mounier, Nicolas; El Gnaoui, Taoufik; Tilly, Hervé; Canioni, Danièle; Sebban, Catherine; Casasnovas, René-Olivier; Delarue, Richard; Sonet, Anne; Beaussart, Pauline; Petrella, Tony; Castaigne, Sylvie; Bologna, Serge; Salles, Gilles; Rahmouni, Alain; Gaulard, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    A previous pilot study with rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin showed promising activity in patients with refractory/relapsed B-cell lymphoma. We, therefore, conducted a phase II study to determine whether these results could be reproduced in a multi-institutional setting. This phase II study included 49 patients with refractory (n=6) or relapsing (n=43) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The median age of the patients was 69 years. Prior treatment included rituximab in 31 (63%) and autologous transplantation in 17 (35%) patients. International Prognostic Index at enrollment was >2 in 34 patients (71%). The primary endpoint was overall response rate after four cycles of treatment. Patients were planned to receive eight cycles if they reached at least partial remission after four cycles. After four cycles 21 patients (44%) were in complete remission and 8 (17%) in partial remission, resulting in an overall response rate of 61%. Factors significantly affecting overall response rate were early (<1 year) progression/relapse (18% versus 54%; P=0.001) and prior exposure to rituximab (23% versus 65%; P=0.004). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 12.8% and 13.9%, respectively. Rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin were well tolerated with grade 3–4 infectious episodes in 22% of the cycles. These results are the first confirmation from a multicenter study that rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin provide a consistent response rate in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This therapy can now be considered as a platform for new combinations with targeted treatments. This trial was registered at clinicaltrial.gov under #NCT00169195. PMID:23753028

  7. Acute coronary artery thrombosis and vasospasm following capecitabine in conjunction with oxaliplatin treatment for cancer

    PubMed Central

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Cleator, Suzy; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Oral capecitabine is a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil that has been used into the management of multiple cancers because of the convenience of administration and efficacy at least comparable with 5-fluorouracil. While cardiac complications associated with the use of 5-fluorouracil are well-documented, capecitabine-induced acute coronary syndrome has rarely been reported and often attributed to coronary vasospasm. We report a patient presented with acute coronary syndrome secondary to thrombotic coronary occlusion following treatment with oral capecitabine and intravenous oxaliplatin after resection of non-metastatic, node positive colon carcinoma. Capecitabine may induce acute coronary thrombotic occlusion in addition to coronary vasospasm. PMID:25246465

  8. Label-free monitoring of interaction between DNA and oxaliplatin in aqueous solution by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojun; E, Yiwen; Xu, Xinlong; Wang, Li

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrated the feasibility of applying terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to monitor the molecular reactions in aqueous solutions of anticancer drug oxaliplatin with λ-DNA and macrophages DNA. The reaction time dependent refractive index and absorption coefficient were extracted and analyzed. The reaction half-decaying time of about 4.0 h for λ-DNA and 12.9 h for M-DNA was established. The results suggest that the THz-TDS detection could be an effective label-free technique to sense the molecular reaction in aqueous solutions and could be very useful in biology, medicine, and pharmacy industry.

  9. Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y.; Griffith, Kent A.; Francis, Isaac R.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Desai, Sameer; Murphy, James D.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor

  10. UFT/leucovorin and oxaliplatin alternated with UFT/leucovorin and irinotecan in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, R; Sabatino, M; Fiaschi, A I; Marsili, S; Pozzessere, D; Messinese, S; Correale, P; Civitelli, S; Tanzini, G; Tani, F; De Martino, A; Marzocca, G; Lorenzi, M; Giorgi, G; Francini, G

    2004-01-26

    A total of 41 metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients received tegafur/uracil (UFT)+leucovorin (LV)+oxaliplatin alternated with UFT/LV+irinotecan. The overall response rate was 58.5% (95% confidence interval, 42.2-73.3%), and the median progression-free survival was 8.8 months. There were no grade 4 toxicities; 12 patients (29%) experienced grade 3 diarrhoea. There were no cases of hand-foot syndrome. This alternating regimen seems to be effective and well tolerated in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic CRC. PMID:14735168

  11. Fragmentation pathways analysis for the gas phase dissociation of protonated carnosine-oxaliplatin complexes.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Ida; Moustafa, Eslam M; Sicilia, Emilia; Russo, Nino; Shoeib, Tamer

    2015-03-14

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the protonated carnosine-oxaliplatin complex, [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) using several collision energies were shown to yield nine different fragment ions. Energy-resolved CID experiments on [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) showed that the generation of the product ion [Carnosine - H + Pt(dach)](+) (where dach is 1,2-diaminocyclohexane) is the lowest energy process. At slightly higher collision energies, the loss of neutral carnosine from [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) to produce [OxPt + H](+) was observed, followed by the loss of oxaliplatin from the same precursor ion to produce [Carnosine + H](+). At significantly higher energies, the ion [OxPt - CO2 + H](+) was shown to be formed, while the last two investigated ions [Carnosine + OxPt - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine - NH3 - H + Pt(dach)](+) did not attain any significant relative abundance. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level were employed to probe the fragmentation mechanisms that account for all experimental data. The lowest free energy barriers for the generation of each of the ions [Carnosine - H + Pt(dach)](+), [OxPt + H](+), [Carnosine + H](+), [Carnosine + OxPt - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine - NH3 - H + Pt(dach)](+) from [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) according to the fragmentation mechanisms offered here were calculated to be 31.9, 38.8, 49.3, 75.2, and 85.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. PMID:25325236

  12. Chlorogenic Acid Interaction with Cisplatin and Oxaliplatin: Studies in Cervical Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Filippini, Raffaella; Vianello, Caterina; Carrara, Maria; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Montopoli, Monica

    2016-04-01

    The antiproliferative effect of the naturally occurring polyphenol chlorogenic acid (CGA) was evaluated in combination with either cisplatin or oxaliplatin in human cervical carcinoma cell lines that were either sensitive (A431) or resistant to cisplatin (A431Pt), in order to provide evidence to overcome drug resistance. Cytotoxicity of platinating drugs (IC50 - 10(-6) - 10(-5) M) was enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude by increasing incubation times (1, 4, and 24 hours) in the two cell lines. CGA treatment presented low cytotoxicity per se (IC50 ~ 10(-4) M at 24 h) if compared with platinum drugs and its activity was similar in A431Pt cells and in their sensitive A431 counterpart. The combination of the platinating drugs with CGA (10(-6) - 10(-4) M) indicated variable effects on cytotoxicity, ranging from potentiation to various degrees of antagonism (in A431 cells) and no effect (in A431Pt cells). In order to explain the different cytotoxic activity elicited by oxaliplatin and cisplatin in association with CGA, the possible presence of chemical interactions was investigated by HPLC analysis. The drug association with CGA caused evident changes in their chromatographic profile, suggesting occurrence of in vitro chemical interactions.

  13. Assessment of Injection Site Reactions for Peripheral Intravenous Oxaliplatin Infusion and Potential Remedies.

    PubMed

    Handa, Satoko; Kuroiwa, Ryohei; Miyano, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hisanori; Kamei, Daisuke; Takei, Hiromi; Sonou, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Murayama, JunIchiro; Sato, Atsushi; Kato, Yasuhisa

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the medical and nursing records of 19 patients with unresectable advanced recurrent colorectal cancers treated using oxaliplatin and capecitabine(CapeOX)with or without bevacizumab at the outpatient tumor center of Showa UniversityHospital between November 1, 2009 and November 30, 2011, to clarifydifferences in the incidence of injection site reactions according to the use or non-use of an intravenous infusion solution warming device. Vascular pain and other injection site reactions occurred in 13 patients(68.4%). Injection site reactions occurred in 33 of the total of 77 chemotherapytreatments (42.9%). No difference in incidence of injection site reactions was seen according to whether the intravenous infusion solution warmer was used. The most common time to onset of injection site reactions after commencing oxaliplatin administration was 60-90 min, and symptoms were seen to decrease when non-steroidal anti-inflammatorydrugs were coadministered. We intend to leverage these studyfindings to demonstrate the mechanism of onset for injection site reactions and to propose measures for handling adverse drug reactions. PMID:27539041

  14. Data showing the circumvention of oxaliplatin resistance by vatalanib in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K.W.; Poon, Daniel C.; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-wu

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that vatalanib, an orally active small molecule multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Hess-Stumpp et al., 2005 [1]), can sensitize multidrug resistant (MDR) colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting two MDR transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 (To et al., 2015 [2]). This data article describes the possible circumvention of resistance to specifically platinum (Pt)-based anticancer drugs by vatalanib via inhibition of two other efflux transporters ABCC2 and ATP7A. Data from the flow cytometric transporter efflux assay showed specific inhibition of ABCC2 activity by vatalanib in stable transfected cells and ABCC2-overexpressing oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells HCT116/Oxa. We also performed the transporter ABCC2 ATPase assay and showed an increase in ATP hydrolysis by ABCC2 in the presence of vatalanib. ATP7A mRNA expression was also shown to be upregulated in HCT116/Oxa cells. Vatalanib was shown to suppress this upregulated ATP7A expression. Data from the cellular Pt accumulation assay showed a lower Pt accumulation in HCT116/Oxa cells than the parental sensitive HCT116 cells. Vatalanib was shown to increase cellular Pt accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of oxaliplatin and vatalanib was shown to restore the suppressed apoptosis in HCT116/Oxa cells. PMID:27014726

  15. Data showing the circumvention of oxaliplatin resistance by vatalanib in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-06-01

    We have recently reported that vatalanib, an orally active small molecule multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Hess-Stumpp et al., 2005 [1]), can sensitize multidrug resistant (MDR) colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting two MDR transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 (To et al., 2015 [2]). This data article describes the possible circumvention of resistance to specifically platinum (Pt)-based anticancer drugs by vatalanib via inhibition of two other efflux transporters ABCC2 and ATP7A. Data from the flow cytometric transporter efflux assay showed specific inhibition of ABCC2 activity by vatalanib in stable transfected cells and ABCC2-overexpressing oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells HCT116/Oxa. We also performed the transporter ABCC2 ATPase assay and showed an increase in ATP hydrolysis by ABCC2 in the presence of vatalanib. ATP7A mRNA expression was also shown to be upregulated in HCT116/Oxa cells. Vatalanib was shown to suppress this upregulated ATP7A expression. Data from the cellular Pt accumulation assay showed a lower Pt accumulation in HCT116/Oxa cells than the parental sensitive HCT116 cells. Vatalanib was shown to increase cellular Pt accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of oxaliplatin and vatalanib was shown to restore the suppressed apoptosis in HCT116/Oxa cells. PMID:27014726

  16. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia. PMID:25782915

  17. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia.

  18. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A(2) in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-06-29

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system.

  19. Coupling CP-MD simulations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy: exploring the structure of oxaliplatin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Beret, Elizabeth C; Provost, Karine; Müller, Diane; Marcos, Enrique Sánchez

    2009-09-10

    A combined experimental-theoretical approach applying X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics (CP-MD) simulations is used to get insight into the structural determination of oxaliplatin, a third-generation anticancer drug of the cisplatin family, in aqueous solution. Experimental Pt L(III)-edge EXAFS and XANES spectra of oxaliplatin in water are compared with theoretical XAS spectra. The latter are obtained as statistically averaged spectra computed for a set of selected snapshots extracted from the MD trajectory of ethyldiamineoxalatoplatinum(II) (EDO-Pt) in liquid water. This compound is a simplified structure of oxaliplatin, where the outer part of the cyclohexane ring contained in the cyclohexanediamine ligand of oxaliplatin has been removed. We show that EDO-Pt is an appropriate model to simulate the spectroscopical properties of oxaliplatin given that the cyclohexane ring does not generate particular features in neither the EXAFS nor the XANES spectra. The computation of average EXAFS spectra using structures from the MD simulation in which atoms are selected according to different cutoff radii around the Pt center allows the assignment of spectral features to particular structural motifs, both in k and R-spaces. The outer oxygen atoms of the oxalate ligand (R(Pt-O(II)) = 3.97 +/- 0.03 A) are responsible for a well-defined hump at around 6.5 A(-1) in the k(2)-weighted EXAFS spectrum. The conventional EXAFS analysis data procedure is reexamined by its application to the simulated average EXAFS spectra. The structural parameters resulting from the fit may then be compared with those obtained from the simulation, providing an estimation of the methodological error associated with the global fitting procedure. A thorough discussion on the synergy between the experimental and theoretical XAS approaches is presented, and evidence for the detection of a slight hydration structure around the Pt complex is shown, leading to the suggestion of a

  20. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-01-01

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system. PMID:26131771

  1. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  2. Toward a better understanding of the oxaliplatin mode of action upon the steric hindrance of 1,2-diaminocyclohexane and its analogue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhimei; Wu, Mian; Gou, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    The present research is concerned with the mechanism investigation on the interaction between oxaliplatin and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). The binding modes of oxaliplatin with GMP and GSH were explored by HPLC and LC-MS techniques, respectively, in which four key intermediates were found and five adducts were determined in the reaction. The results indicated that GSH can interfere with the reaction between oxaliplatin and DNA in two ways. One is by competing with GMP to bind the active platinum unit, and the other is by substituting the guanine-N7 atom of DNA to form inactive platinum species. In contrast to oxaliplatin with trans 1,2-diaminocyclohexane as spatial framework, a known platinum(II) complex, characteristic of trans-bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-7,8-diamine possessing dicyclic steric hindrance, was also studied in the same way to explore its mode of action with DNA.

  3. Chemotherapeutic agents for GI tumor chemoradiotherapy overview of chemotherapeutic agents to be combined with radiotherapy in the GI tract and their potential as radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Klautke, G; Müller, K

    2016-08-01

    In the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors, simultaneous radiochemotherapy plays an important role. It is one of the principles of simultaneous radiochemotherapy, applying only chemotherapeutic agents simultaneously to radiation, which are primarily effective in the treated tumor entity, therefore a lot of different agents, like antimetabolites, mostly 5-fluorouracil, platinum derivates (mostly cisplatinum and oxaliplatin), mitomycin C and taxanes are used in simultaneous radiochemotherapy. Most of these have also radiation-intensifying effects. The mechanisms and interactions with ionizing radiation are presented in the article. PMID:27644902

  4. Uracil/ftorafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX) as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results of randomised phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Bajetta, E; Di Bartolomeo, M; Buzzoni, R; Mariani, L; Zilembo, N; Ferrario, E; Lo Vullo, S; Aitini, E; Isa, L; Barone, C; Jacobelli, S; Recaldin, E; Pinotti, G; Iop, A

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase II study evaluates the safety and efficacy profile of uracil/tegafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX). One hundred and forty-three patients with measurable, non-resectable metastatic colorectal cancer were randomised in a multicentre study to receive TEGAFIRI (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, irinotecan 240 mg m−2 day 1; q21) or TEGAFOX (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, oxaliplatin 120 mg m−2 day 1; q21). Among 143 randomised patients, 141 were analysed (68 received TEGAFIRI and 73 TEGAFOX). The main characteristics of the two arms were well balanced. The most common grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse events were neutropenia (13% of cases with TEGAFIRI; 1% in the TEGAFOX group). Diarrhoea was prevalent in the TEGAFIRI arm (16%) vs TEGAFOX (4%). Six complete remission (CR) and 19 partial remission (PR) were recorded in the TEGAFIRI arm (odds ratio (OR): 41.7; 95% confidence limit (CL), 29.1–55.1%), and six CR and 22 PR were recorded in the TEGAFOX group, (OR: 38.9; 95% CL, 27.6–51.1). At a median time follow-up of 17 months (intequartile (IQ) range 12–23), a median survival probability of 20 and 19 months was obtained in the TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX groups, respectively. Median time to progression was 8 months for both groups. TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX are both effective and tolerable first-line therapies in MCRC patients. The employment of UFT/LV given in doublet combination is interesting and the presented data appear comparable to equivalent infusion regimens described in the literature. The safety profile of the two combinations also allows an evaluation with other biological agents such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17245343

  5. The 1,2-Diaminocyclohexane Carrier Ligand in Oxaliplatin Induces p53-Dependent Transcriptional Repression of Factors Involved in Thymidylate Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kiyonari, Shinichi; Iimori, Makoto; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Watanabe, Sugiko; Morikawa-Ichinose, Tomomi; Miura, Daisuke; Niimi, Shinichiro; Saeki, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Eriko; Oki, Eiji; Morita, Masaru; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Kitao, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs are widely used as components of combination chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer. One such drug, oxaliplatin, exerts a synergistic effect against advanced colorectal cancer in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin. In the p53-proficient colorectal cancer cell line HCT116, oxaliplatin represses the expression of deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase), a ubiquitous pyrophosphatase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of dUTP to dUMP and inhibits dUTP-mediated cytotoxicity. However, the underlying mechanism of this activity has not been completely elucidated, and it remains unclear whether factors other than downregulation of dUTPase contribute to the synergistic effect of 5-FU and oxaliplatin. In this study, we found that oxaliplatin and dachplatin, platinum-based drugs containing the 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH) carrier ligand, repressed the expression of nuclear isoform of dUTPase (DUT-N), whereas cisplatin and carboplatin did not. Oxaliplatin induced early p53 accumulation, upregulation of primary miR-34a transcript expression, and subsequent downregulation of E2F3 and E2F1. Nutlin-3a, which activates p53 nongenotoxically, had similar effects. Introduction of miR-34a mimic also repressed E2F1 and DUT-N expression, indicating that this miRNA plays a causative role. In addition to DUT-N, oxaliplatin repressed, in a p53-dependent manner, the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in thymidylate biosynthesis. Consequently, oxaliplatin significantly decreased the level of dTTP in the dNTP pool in a p53-dependent manner. These data indicate that the DACH carrier ligand in oxaliplatin triggers signaling via the p53-miR-34a-E2F axis, leading to transcriptional regulation that ultimately results in accumulation of dUTP and reduced dTTP biosynthesis, potentially enhancing 5-FU cytotoxicity.

  6. Long-term Neurotoxicity Effects of Oxaliplatin added to Fluorouracil and Leucovorin as Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer: Results from NSABP trials C-07 and LTS-01

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Kelley M.; Yothers, Greg; Ganz, Patricia A.; Land, Stephanie R.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Cecchini, Reena S.; Kopec, Jacek A.; Wolmark, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Neurotoxicity from adjuvant treatment with oxaliplatin has been studied in colorectal patients in short-term studies, but this is the first long-term assessment from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) investigating whether excess neurotoxicity persists beyond 4 years. Patients and Methods As part of a colorectal cancer long-term survivor study (LTS-01), long-term neurotoxicity was assessed in 353 C-07 patients (cross-sectional sample). Ninety-two of these LTS-01 patients also had longitudinal data and were re-assessed at 5-8 (median 7) years from randomization (longitudinal sample). Contingency tables compared cohorts, a mixed model compared neurotoxicity between treatments over time, and a Wilcoxon rank sum test compared neurotoxicity between treatments (cross-sectional sample). Results In the cross-sectional sample, the increase in mean total neurotoxicity scores of 1.8 with oxaliplatin was statistically significant (P= .005), but not clinically significant (minimally important difference was 4 at the long-term assessment. Patients treated with oxaliplatin had increased odds of numbness and tingling in hands (OR= 2.00, P= .015) and feet (OR= 2.78, P< .001) versus patients treated without oxaliplatin. The magnitude of the oxaliplatin effect varied with time (P< .001) in the longitudinal sample such that oxaliplatin-treated patients did not have significantly greater total neurotoxicity scores by 7 years. Conclusion At the long-term endpoint, there was no clinically significant increase in total neurotoxicity scores for patients treated with oxaliplatin, but the specific neurotoxicities of numbness and tingling of the hands and feet remained significantly elevated for oxaliplatin-treated patients. PMID:22569841

  7. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Fluorouracil Followed by Systemic Therapy Using Oxaliplatin Plus Fluorouracil and Leucovorin for Patients with Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hiroshi Ozaki, Toshirou; Shiina, Makoto

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the sequential treatment of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy followed by systemic therapy using oxaliplatin plus 5-flourouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin, namely, FOLFOX, for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. We reviewed 20 patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Patients were initially treated with HAI chemotherapy until disease progression (5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intra-arterial infusion, weekly) and then with FOLFOX thereafter (FOLFOX4, n = 13; modified FOLFOX6, n = 7). Adverse events, tumor response, and time to progression for each therapy were evaluated retrospectively, and overall survival was estimated. Toxicity of HAI chemotherapy was generally mild. Of 20 patients, adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in only 1 patient (5%) during initial therapy using HAI chemotherapy, while 9 patients (45%) exhibited adverse events during subsequent FOLFOX therapy. For HAI chemotherapy and FOLFOX, objective response rates were 85.0% and 35.0%, respectively, and median time to progression was 11.6 and 5.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival was 30.1 months. In conclusion, the sequence of HAI chemotherapy followed by FOLFOX is a promising treatment strategy for the long-term use of active chemotherapeutic agents, leading to a superior tumor response and fewer toxic effects in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

  8. Oxaliplatin regulates expression of stress ligands in ovarian cancer cells and modulates their susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Siew, Yin-Yin; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yew, Hui-Chuing; Lim, Shun-Wei; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lew, Si-Min; Seetoh, Wei-Guang; Seow, See-Voon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Selected cytotoxic chemicals can provoke the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant tumors. Most of the studies on immunogenic cell death are focused on the signals that operate on a series of receptors expressed by dendritic cells to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Here, we explored the effects of oxaliplatin, an immunogenic cell death inducer, on the induction of stress ligands and promotion of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that treatment of tumor cells with oxaliplatin induced the production of type I interferons and chemokines and enhanced the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains (MIC) A/B, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)-3, CD155 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-R1/R2. Furthermore, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin treatment enhanced susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis. In addition, activated NK cells completely abrogated the growth of cancer cells that were pretreated with oxaliplatin. However, cancer cells pretreated with the same concentration of oxaliplatin alone were capable of potentiating regrowth over a period of time. These results suggest an advantage in combining oxaliplatin and NK cell-based therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Further investigation on such potential combination therapy is warranted.

  9. miR-625-3p regulates oxaliplatin resistance by targeting MAP2K6-p38 signalling in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov; Lyskjær, Iben; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hansen, Flemming; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Pfeiffer, Per; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancers (CRC) is a major medical problem, and predictive markers are urgently needed. Recently, miR-625-3p was reported as a promising predictive marker. Herein, we show that miR-625-3p functionally induces oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells, and identify the signalling networks affected by miR-625-3p. We show that the p38 MAPK activator MAP2K6 is a direct target of miR-625-3p, and, accordingly, is downregulated in non-responder patients of oxaliplatin therapy. miR-625-3p-mediated resistance is reversed by anti-miR-625-3p treatment and ectopic expression of a miR-625-3p insensitive MAP2K6 variant. In addition, reduction of p38 signalling by using siRNAs, chemical inhibitors or expression of a dominant-negative MAP2K6 protein induces resistance to oxaliplatin. Transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome profiles confirm inactivation of MAP2K6-p38 signalling as one likely mechanism of oxaliplatin resistance. Our study shows that miR-625-3p induces oxaliplatin resistance by abrogating MAP2K6-p38-regulated apoptosis and cell cycle control networks, and corroborates the predictive power of miR-625-3p. PMID:27526785

  10. miR-625-3p regulates oxaliplatin resistance by targeting MAP2K6-p38 signalling in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov; Lyskjær, Iben; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hansen, Flemming; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Pfeiffer, Per; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancers (CRC) is a major medical problem, and predictive markers are urgently needed. Recently, miR-625-3p was reported as a promising predictive marker. Herein, we show that miR-625-3p functionally induces oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells, and identify the signalling networks affected by miR-625-3p. We show that the p38 MAPK activator MAP2K6 is a direct target of miR-625-3p, and, accordingly, is downregulated in non-responder patients of oxaliplatin therapy. miR-625-3p-mediated resistance is reversed by anti-miR-625-3p treatment and ectopic expression of a miR-625-3p insensitive MAP2K6 variant. In addition, reduction of p38 signalling by using siRNAs, chemical inhibitors or expression of a dominant-negative MAP2K6 protein induces resistance to oxaliplatin. Transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome profiles confirm inactivation of MAP2K6-p38 signalling as one likely mechanism of oxaliplatin resistance. Our study shows that miR-625-3p induces oxaliplatin resistance by abrogating MAP2K6-p38-regulated apoptosis and cell cycle control networks, and corroborates the predictive power of miR-625-3p. PMID:27526785

  11. [Risk Factors for Oxaliplatin-Induced Phlebitis and Venous Pain, and Evaluation of the Preventive Effect of Preheating with a Hot Compress for Administration of Oxaliplatin].

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Kana; Kawazoe, Hitoshi; Miyajima, Risa; Waizumi, Chieko; Rokkaku, Yuki; Tsuneoka, Kikue; Higuchi, Noriko; Fujiwara, Mitsuko; Kojima, Yoh; Yakushijin, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Venous pain induced by oxaliplatin(L-OHP)is a clinical issue related to adherence to the Cape OX regimen. To prevent LOHP- induced venous pain, we provided nursing care to outpatients who were administered a preheated L -OHP diluted solution using a hot compress. We retrospectively evaluated the risk factors for colorectal cancer patients who had L -OHP induced phlebitis and venous pain. Furthermore, the preventive effect of nursing care was compared between inpatients and outpatients from January 2010 to March 2012. At the L-OHP administration site, any symptoms were defined as phlebitis, whereas pain was defined as venous pain. A total of 132 treatment courses among 31 patients were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that both phlebitis and venous pain were significantly more common in female patients (adjusted odds ratio, 2.357; 95%CI: 1.053-5.418; and adjusted odds ratio, 5.754; 95%CI: 2.119-18.567, respectively). The prevalence of phlebitis and venous pain did not differ between inpatients and outpatients (phlebitis, 61.3% vs 67.7%; venous pain, 29.0%vs 19.4%). These results suggest that administration of L-OHP via a central venous route should be considered in female patients.

  12. [Preventive trial of preheating administration of oxaliplatin-diluted solution in combination with a hot compress for oxaliplatin-induced venous pain].

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Risa; Kawazoe, Hitoshi; Tsuneoka, Kikue; Fujiwara, Mitsuko; Kojima, Yoh; Yakushijin, Yoshihiro

    2013-04-01

    Venous pain induced by oxaliplatin (L-OHP) is a clinical problem in relation to adherence in the CapeOX regimen. We investigated the preventive effect of nursing care preheating administration of L-OHP a hot compress for colorectal cancer patients who received L-OHP via the peripheral venous route between January 2010 and January 2011. L-OHP was diluted in 500 mL of 5% glucose and administered by 2 hours. We evaluated a total of 64 courses among fifteen patients. The presence of any symptoms, any pain with or without touch, and some symptoms of numbness at the L-OHP-administered arm were defined as phlebitis, venous pain, and acute peripheral neuropathy, respectively. The prevalence of phlebitis, venous pain, and acute peripheral neuropathy in the nursing care group was 56.5%, 32.6%, and 25.8%, respectively, which was not significantly less in comparison with the control group (72.2%, 38.9%, and 54.5%, respectively). These results suggest that both types of nursing care, preheating administration and a hot compress, may be effective for the relief of acute peripheral neuropathy induced by L-OHP.

  13. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  14. Mechanisms of reaction of L-methionine with carboplatin and oxaliplatin in different media: a comparison with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Heudi, O; Mercier-Jobard, S; Cailleux, A; Allain, P

    1999-03-01

    The activity of platinum compounds is dependent on nucleophile substitution reactions. In this paper, we study the reactivity of L-met with carboplatin, oxaliplatin and cisplatin by following with HPLC-UV the concentration of L-met and by characterizing the resulting adducts with LC-MS. In the absence of NaCl, in water, the initial rate at which L-met concentration decreases with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin is 0.25 +/- 0.007, 0.057 +/- 0.01 and 0.17 +/- 0.02 mM h(-1), respectively. In phosphate buffer this rate is 0.056 +/- 0.009 for cisplatin, 0.019 +/- 0.001 and 0.13 +/- 0.02 for carboplatin and oxaliplatin, respectively. Reactions of L-met with cisplatin occurred via its conversion into monoaqua species in water and into phosphato-derivatives (AP) in phosphate buffer but finally the same methionine-platinum adducts M2 [(NH3)2(met)]Pt, M4 and M5 [(met)2]Pt were characterized. Reaction of carboplatin with L-met occurred via the formation of M0 [(NH3)2(met)(CBDCA)]Pt whose structure is consistent with the direct interaction of L-met with carboplatin. However, the same final products as those found with cisplatin were characterized. The reaction of oxaliplatin with L-met proceeded through a mechanism similar to that of carboplatin to give M7 [(met)(DACH)]Pt. In the presence of NaCl, cisplatin directly reacted with L-met to yield at least five methionine-platinum adducts. The reaction of carboplatin gave the same adducts suggesting its transformation into cisplatin. The reaction of oxaliplatin with L-met occurred via the formation of aquated species A [(OH)(Cl)(DACH)]Pt which readily underwent reaction with L-met to form M6 [(met)(Cl)(DACH)]Pt and M7. This study shows that the reactivity of cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin is dependent on the media in which they occur. The discrepancy between their reactions with L-met could partly explain their therapeutic differences.

  15. Role of the DNA base excision repair protein, APE1 in cisplatin, oxaliplatin, or carboplatin induced sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Mark R; Jiang, Yanlin; Guo, Chunlu; Reed, April; Meng, Hongdi; Vasko, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of platinum drugs, the mechanisms of this toxicity remain unknown. Previous work in our laboratory suggests that cisplatin-induced CIPN is secondary to DNA damage which is susceptible to base excision repair (BER). To further examine this hypothesis, we studied the effects of cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin on cell survival, DNA damage, ROS production, and functional endpoints in rat sensory neurons in culture in the absence or presence of reduced expression of the BER protein AP endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1). Using an in situ model of peptidergic sensory neuron function, we examined the effects of the platinum drugs on hind limb capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation. Exposing sensory neurons in culture to the three platinum drugs caused a concentration-dependent increase in apoptosis and cell death, although the concentrations of carboplatin were 10 fold higher than cisplatin. As previously observed with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin also increased DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-H2AX and reduced the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from neuronal cultures. Both cisplatin and oxaliplatin increased the production of ROS as well as 8-oxoguanine DNA adduct levels, whereas carboplatin did not. Reducing levels of APE1 in neuronal cultures augmented the cisplatin and oxaliplatin induced toxicity, but did not alter the effects of carboplatin. Using an in vivo model, systemic injection of cisplatin (3 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg), or carboplatin (30 mg/kg) once a week for three weeks caused a decrease in capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation, which was delayed in onset. The effects of cisplatin on capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation were attenuated by chronic administration of E3330, a redox inhibitor of APE1 that serendipitously enhances APE1 DNA repair activity in sensory neurons. These outcomes support the importance of the BER pathway, and particularly APE

  16. Role of the DNA Base Excision Repair Protein, APE1 in Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin, or Carboplatin Induced Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R.; Jiang, Yanlin; Guo, Chunlu; Reed, April; Meng, Hongdi; Vasko, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of platinum drugs, the mechanisms of this toxicity remain unknown. Previous work in our laboratory suggests that cisplatin-induced CIPN is secondary to DNA damage which is susceptible to base excision repair (BER). To further examine this hypothesis, we studied the effects of cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin on cell survival, DNA damage, ROS production, and functional endpoints in rat sensory neurons in culture in the absence or presence of reduced expression of the BER protein AP endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1). Using an in situ model of peptidergic sensory neuron function, we examined the effects of the platinum drugs on hind limb capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation. Exposing sensory neurons in culture to the three platinum drugs caused a concentration-dependent increase in apoptosis and cell death, although the concentrations of carboplatin were 10 fold higher than cisplatin. As previously observed with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin also increased DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-H2AX and reduced the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from neuronal cultures. Both cisplatin and oxaliplatin increased the production of ROS as well as 8-oxoguanine DNA adduct levels, whereas carboplatin did not. Reducing levels of APE1 in neuronal cultures augmented the cisplatin and oxaliplatin induced toxicity, but did not alter the effects of carboplatin. Using an in vivo model, systemic injection of cisplatin (3 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg), or carboplatin (30 mg/kg) once a week for three weeks caused a decrease in capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation, which was delayed in onset. The effects of cisplatin on capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation were attenuated by chronic administration of E3330, a redox inhibitor of APE1 that serendipitously enhances APE1 DNA repair activity in sensory neurons. These outcomes support the importance of the BER pathway, and particularly APE

  17. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z; Farias, Iria Luiza G; Rigo, Melânia L; Glanzner, Werner G; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D; Cadoná, Francine C; Cruz, Ivana B; Farias, Júlia G; Duarte, Marta M M F; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C; Rocha, João Batista T; Leal, Daniela B R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended.

  18. Preliminary pharmacokinetics of PEGylated oxaliplatin polylactic acid nanoparticles in rabbits and tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haitian; Xu, Lisa; Sun, Yong; Li, Gaohong; Cui, Zhaoyuan; Yan, Guowen; Chen, Qian; Yin, Hongli; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    To testify the targeting effect of PEGylated Oxaliplatin polylactic acid (OP-PEG-PLA) nanoparticles (NPs), we studied drug concentration in rabbit plasma and tissue distribution in tumor-bearing mice. Concentration of nanoparticle colloidal solution was performed with dialysis. Qualities of enriched NPs were characterized by particle size and drug content. OP concentration in samples was detected using ICP-MS. Compared to OP solution groups, OP concentration of NPs groups increased in the tumor (p < 0.05) and decreased in the kidney and heart (p < 0.05). Compared to OP-PLA NPs groups, OP concentration of OP-PEG-PLA NPs groups increased in the tumor and decreased in the liver and lung (p < 0.05). The concentrated OP-PEG-PLA NPs are good in clinical application and tumor delivery.

  19. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z.; Farias, Iria Luiza G.; Rigo, Melânia L.; Glanzner, Werner G.; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D.; Cadoná, Francine C.; Cruz, Ivana B.; Farias, Júlia G.; Duarte, Marta M. M. F.; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C.; Rocha, João Batista T.; Leal, Daniela B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  20. [A Case of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia Resulting from Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taiki; Nagai, Kagami; Sanada, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from advanced transverse colon cancer. Thus, a local resection was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was started. Sixteen courses were carried out without problems. However, he complained of chills and chest discomfort 2 hours after beginning the 17th course of chemotherapy. Laboratory data showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, and platelet-associated IgG level was high. After administration of steroids and platelet transfusions, the platelet count improved. Therefore, we diagnosed drug-induced thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin (L-OHP). Since then, sLV5FU2 therapy was started, and the patient received the whole adjuvant chemotherapy without problems. Thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to L-OHP is a relatively rare side effect. We herein report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26805296

  1. Development and evaluation of oxaliplatin and irinotecan co-loaded liposomes for enhanced colorectal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Tianqi; Yang, Shaomei; Xiao, Yanan; Song, Yunmei; Zhang, Na; Garg, Sanjay

    2016-09-28

    Drug combinations are widely employed in chemotherapy for colorectal cancer treatment. However, traditional cocktail combination in clinic causes the uncertainty of the treatment, owing to varying pharmacokinetics of different drugs. The aim of this study was to design co-loaded liposomes to achieve the synchronised delivery and release. Oxaliplatin and irinotecan hydrochloride, as one of recommended combination schemes for the treatment of colorectal cancer in clinic, were co-loaded into the liposomes. The particle sizes of the liposomes were <200nm with uniform size distribution. In vitro release study showed that both drugs could be synchronously released from the liposomes, which means the optimized synergistic ratio of two drugs could be achieved. In vitro cellular uptake revealed that co-loaded liposomes could efficiently deliver different drugs into the same cells, indicating their potential as carriers for enhancing the cancer therapy. CLSM images of cryo-sections for in vivo co-delivery study also revealed that co-loaded liposomes had superior ability to co-deliver both the cargoes into the same tumor cells. Besides, in vivo NIRF imaging indicated that the liposomes could increase the drug accumulation in tumor compared with free drug. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation demonstrated that co-loaded liposomes exhibited higher cytotoxicity than the mixture of single loaded liposomes in both CT-26 and HCT-116 cells. Furthermore, co-loaded liposomes also presented superior anti-tumor activity in CT-26 bearing BALB/c mice. In vivo safety assessment demonstrated that liposomes had lower toxicities than their solution formulations. These results indicated that oxaliplatin and irinotecan hydrochloride co-loaded liposomes would be an efficient formulation for improving colorectal cancer therapy with potential clinical applications. PMID:27432750

  2. [A Case of Colon Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Successfully Treated with Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin plus Bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Suematsu, Yuki; Ishibashi, Yuji; Hiratsuka, Miyuki; Suda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Miyuki; Saito, Hiroyuki; Omori, Keita; Morita, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with descending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases, and a left hemicolectomy was performed. The patient was treated with capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CapeOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab). After 5 courses of chemotherapy, the number and size of liver metastases remarkably reduced, and after the 12th course, because of peripheral neuropathy, a "stop-and-go"fashion of administering oxaliplatin (L-OHP) was initiated. After 14 courses, the liver metastases had disappeared. After the 33rd course of L-OHP treatment, the patient started receiving capecitabine therapy. The patient is recurrence-free 3 years after surgery, 14 months after achieving a complete response (CR). We report a case of long-term CR after surgery for descending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases, followed by a "stop-and-go" method of administering L-OHP or CapeOX plus Bmab therapy. PMID:26805277

  3. Role of copper transporters in resistance to platinating agents

    PubMed Central

    Rabik, Cara A.; Maryon, Edward B.; Kasza, Kristen; Shafer, John T.; Bartnik, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Copper transporters have been proposed to be involved in cellular import and export of platinating agents. Expression of the human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is thought to result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, whereas expression of ATP7A and ATP7B are thought to be involved in resistance to cisplatin either by sequestering drug away from its targets (ATP7A) or by exporting the drug from the cell (ATP7B). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of cells expressing copper transporters to cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. We also examined whether O6-benzylguanine, a modulator of platinating agent cytotoxicity, enhanced sensitivity of cells with or without the transporters to cisplatin. Overexpression of hCtr1 in the HEK293 cell line did not result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, either alone or following treatment with O6-benzylguanine. In contrast, overexpression of ATP7A and ATP7B in Me32a fibroblasts resulted in increased resistance to cisplatin, but not to carboplatin or oxaliplatin. ATP7A-expressing cells (MeMNK) showed a significant enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity following O6-benzylguanine treatment, but ATP7B-expressing cells (MeWND) did not. Notably, expression of either ATP7A or ATP7B did not result in a change in total cytoplasmic platinum levels following treatment with BG plus cisplatin. The mechanism of BG enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity is not likely through regulation of copper transporters. PMID:18998134

  4. Optimal Sequence of Irinotecan and Oxaliplatin-Based Regimens in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    The optimal sequence of irinotecan and oxaliplatin-based regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer remains unclear. We conducted a population-based observational study by retrospectively reviewing records from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database to explore this issue. Patients aged ≥20 years with metastatic colorectal cancer newly diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 (n = 9490) were enrolled in current study. Among these 9490 patients, 3895 patients (41.04%) did not receive any chemotherapy within the first three months after catastrophic illness registration. Patients who received best supportive care were older and had higher Charlson comorbidity indexes and incidences of comorbidities than those who received irinotecan-based regimens, oxaliplatin-based regimens, and 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine alone. Patients who received irinotecan followed by oxaliplatin-based regimens and those who received the reverse sequence were further stratified into arm A (n = 542) and arm B (n = 1156), respectively. The median first time to next treatment was not significantly different between arm A and arm B (210 days vs. 196 days; p = 0.17). However, the median second time to next treatment was longer in arm A than in arm B (155 days vs. 123 days; p = 0.006), which translated into a better overall survival (487 days vs. 454 days; p = 0.02). The crossover rate was higher in arm A than in arm B (47.84% vs. 41.61%; p<0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that overall survival was comparable between the two chemotherapy sequences (p = 0.27). Our study suggested that irinotecan followed by oxaliplatin-based regimens might be a better chemotherapy treatment option for metastatic colorectal cancer than the reverse sequence given the higher crossover rate and potential overall survival benefit. PMID:26273837

  5. PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin potentialization of antitumor efficiency in a nude mouse tumor-xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuang; Liu, Hai-Zhong; Lu, Wei-Dong; Fu, Zhong-Xue

    2011-06-01

    The non-selectivity of chemotherapeutics between normal tissue and pathological sites poses a challenge for the treatment strategy for advanced colorectal carcinoma. To obtain sufficient antitumor activity, optimization of the therapeutic regimen is of great importance. We investigated PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin potentialization of antitumor efficiency in a nude mouse tumor-xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma. A tumor-bearing nude mouse model, intravenous injections of (Dio)-labeled PEG-liposomes via tail vein and fluorescence imaging with in vivo imaging system were employed. Mice were treated with free L-oHP, PEG-liposomal L-oHP via the tail vein, followed by analysis of the accumulation of L-oHP in tumor tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), observation of the tumor volume and the survival rate. Apoptosis and proliferation of tumors were detected by TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 (P17) and Ki-67 were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Fluorescence imaging with in vivo imaging showed PEG-liposome targeting in tumor tissues. After intravenous injections of PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin, tumor tissue maximum accumulation of L-oHP was 9.37 ± 0.79 µg/g at 24 h; The tumor volume was significantly suppressed, and mice showed longer survival, compared with the free oxaliplatin group. Apoptosis increased, but proliferation decreased in tumor tissues. The mRNA expression of Bcl-2 and Ki-67 was down-regulated, while Bax and caspase-3 expression was up-regulated. Protein expression of Bcl-2 was down-regulated, while Bax and P17 expression was up-regulated. The results indicate that PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin can improve antitumor efficiency in a nude mouse tumor-xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma.

  6. Tonic-Clonic Seizure following Cytoreductive Surgery with Intraperitoneal Oxaliplatin: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Jessica Sayuri; Belotto de Oliveira, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D'alpino

    2016-01-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy (HIPEC) is believed to improve outcomes in well-selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. However, morbidity and mortality rates associated with this procedure are substantial. Here, we describe the case of a previously healthy young man who underwent CRS with hyperthermic IP oxaliplatin and developed one episode of tonic-clonic seizure on the second postoperative day. PMID:26933425

  7. Mechanistic basis of a combination D-penicillamine and platinum drugs synergistically inhibits tumor growth in oxaliplatin-resistant human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Jung; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Pan, Hsin-Yi; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2015-05-01

    The platinum-based regimen is the front-line treatment of chemotherapy. However, development of platinum resistance often causes therapeutic failure in this disease. We previously have generated an oxaliplatin-resistant subline, named S3, from human cervical carcinoma SiHa cells, and its resistant phenotype was well-characterized. In the present study, we aimed to identify the novel therapeutic strategy by combining copper chelator D-penicillamine with oxaliplatin, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for overcoming oxaliplatin resistance. As the result, D-penicillamine exerted synergistic killing effects only in S3 cells when combined with oxaliplatin and cisplatin by using Chou-Talalay method. Further study showed that the amounts of platinum DNA adduct formed were positively correlated to the percentage of cell death in S3 cells when co-treated D-penicillamine with oxaliplatin and cisplatin. D-penicillamine promoted copper influx transporter hCtr1 expression through upregulation of Sp1. Sp1 overexpression induced p53 translocation from nucleus to cytosol and caused p53 degradation through ubiquitination, which subsequently suppressed the expression of the copper efflux transporter ATP7A. Importantly, co-treatment of cisplatin with D-penicillamine enhanced oxaliplatin-elicited antitumor effect in the oxalipatin-resistant S3 xenograft tumors, but not found in SiHa xenograft model. Notably, Mice received D-penicillamine alone or in combination of D-penicillamine ad oxalipatin, increased hCtrl protein level in S3 xenograft tumor, however, the protein level of ATP7A was decreased. Taken together, this study provides insight into that the co-manipulation of hCtrl and ATP7A by D-penicillamine could increase the therapeutic efficacy of platinum drugs in oxaliplatin resistant tumors, especially in resistant phenotype with downexpression of hCtrl and overexpression of ATP7A.

  8. In vivo and in vitro antitumor activity of oxaliplatin in combination with cetuximab in human colorectal tumor cell lines expressing different level of EGFR.

    PubMed

    Balin-Gauthier, Diane; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Rochaix, Philippe; Mallard, Valérie; Thomas, Fabienne; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bugat, Roland; Canal, Pierre; Allal, Cuider

    2006-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of cetuximab (C225, Erbitux, a chimeric anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody) in combination with oxaliplatin in vitro and in vivo on four colon cancer cell lines (HCT-8; HT-29, SW620, HCT-116) expressing different levels of EGFR. In vitro, cetuximab combined with oxaliplatin significantly decreased the IC50 values of oxaliplatin in HCT-8 (EGF-R moderate) and HT-29 (EGF-R weak) cell lines, while SW620 (EGF-R negative) and HCT-116 (EGFR strong) cell lines remained unresponsive. This combination was synergistic in HCT-8 and HT-29 cell lines while cetuximab induced no major modification of the IC50 of oxaliplatin in HCT-116 or SW620 cell lines. We then determined the effect of cetuximab on the EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation and we highlight a correlation between the basal level of phospho-EGFR and the response to the combination. In vivo, the combination of cetuximab plus oxaliplatin significantly inhibited tumor growth of HCT-8 and HT-29 (tumor delay or Td = 21.6+/-2.9 and 18.0+/-2.9 days respectively, synergistic effect) compared to either oxaliplatin (Td=12.6+/-2.3 and 14.4+/-3.2 days respectively) or cetuximab (Td=13.4+/-2.9 and 14.5+/-2.4 days, respectively) alone in xenograft models. The combination had no effect on HCT-116 and SW-620 cell lines. The observed responses are strictly dependent on the cell type, and are not correlated with the level of EGFR expression but related to the basal level of phospho-EGFR. This study provides promising preclinical results for a possible clinical investigation of the combination of oxaliplatin plus cetuximab in chemorefractory colorectal tumors.

  9. Comparative effectiveness and safety between oxaliplatin-based and cisplatin-based therapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanjie; Huang, Jiale; Liu, Yanna; Zhao, Liying; Li, Zhijia; Liu, Hao; Wang, Qi-long; Qi, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Platinum-based drugs are the most significant chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. The study aims to compare the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin-based therapy versus cisplatin-based therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods An adequate literature search in EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) was conducted. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared effectiveness and safety between oxaliplatin-based and cisplatin-based therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The second endpoint was the adverse events. Results Five phase II or III RCTs involving a total of 2,046 patients were identified. The results showed that there were no significant difference in ORR (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.98–1.40, p = 0.08, I2 = 0%), PFS (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.84–1.01, p = 0.09, I2 = 0%) and OS (HR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.82–1.01, p = 0.07, I2 = 0%) between oxaliplatin-based therapy and cisplatin-based therapy. In addition, oxaliplatin-based therapy had lower risk of neutropenia, anemia, nausea, alopecia, thromboembolism, stomatitis and creatinine increased at all grades, and neutropenia, anemia, leukopenia and alopecia at 3–4 grades than cisplatin-based therapy. However, oxaliplatin-based therapy was associated with increased risk of neurosensory toxicity and thrombocytopenia. Conclusions Our meta-analysis showed that there were no significant difference in ORR, PFS and OS between oxaliplatin-based therapy and cisplatin-based therapy. The oxaliplatin-based therapy could generally decrease the risk of adverse effects except neurosensory toxicity and thrombocytopenia. PMID:27166187

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of the First Oxaliplatin Pt(IV) Derivative Having a TSPO Ligand in the Axial Position

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Salvatore; Denora, Nunzio; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Porcelli, Letizia; Azzariti, Amalia; Natile, Giovanni; Margiotta, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The first Pt(IV) derivative of oxaliplatin carrying a ligand for TSPO (the 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein) has been developed. The expression of the translocator protein in the brain and liver of healthy humans is usually low, oppositely to steroid-synthesizing and rapidly proliferating tissues, where TSPO is much more abundant. The novel Pt(IV) complex, cis,trans,cis-[Pt(ethanedioato)Cl{2-(2-(4-(6,8-dichloro-3-(2-(dipropylamino)-2-oxoethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)phenoxy)acetate)-ethanolato}(1R,2R-DACH)] (DACH = diaminocyclohexane), has been fully characterized by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques and tested in vitro against human MCF7 breast carcinoma, U87 glioblastoma, and LoVo colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. In addition, affinity for TSPO (IC50 = 18.64 nM), cellular uptake (ca. 2 times greater than that of oxaliplatin in LoVo cancer cells, after 24 h treatment), and perturbation of cell cycle progression were investigated. Although the new compound was less active than oxaliplatin and did not exploit a synergistic proapoptotic effect due to the presence of the TSPO ligand, it appears to be promising in a receptor-mediated drug targeting context towards TSPO-overexpressing tumors, in particular colorectal cancer (IC50 = 2.31 μM after 72 h treatment). PMID:27347942

  11. Oxaliplatin-chitosan nanoparticles induced intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway: a "smart" drug delivery system to breast cancer cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Vivek, Raju; Thangam, Ramar; Nipunbabu, Varukattu; Ponraj, Thondhi; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-04-01

    This study was to investigate "smart" pH-responsive drug delivery system (DDS) based on chitosan nano-carrier for its potential intelligent controlled release and enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency of Oxalipaltin. Oxaliplatin was loaded onto chitosan by forming complexes with degradable to construct nano-carrier as a DDS. Oxaliplatin was released from the DDS much more rapidly at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.4, which is a desirable characteristic for tumor-targeted drug delivery. Furthermore, the possible intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway was explored by Western blot. It was found that expression of Bax, Bik, cytochrome C, caspase-9 and -3 was significantly up-regulated while the Bcl-2 and Survivin were inhibited in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. For instance, nanoparticles inducing apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner indicate that chitosan nanoparticles could act as an efficient DDS importing Oxalipaltin to target cancer cells. These approaches suggest that "smart" Oxaliplatin delivery strategy is a promising approach to cancer therapy.

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of the First Oxaliplatin Pt(IV) Derivative Having a TSPO Ligand in the Axial Position.

    PubMed

    Savino, Salvatore; Denora, Nunzio; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Porcelli, Letizia; Azzariti, Amalia; Natile, Giovanni; Margiotta, Nicola

    2016-06-25

    The first Pt(IV) derivative of oxaliplatin carrying a ligand for TSPO (the 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein) has been developed. The expression of the translocator protein in the brain and liver of healthy humans is usually low, oppositely to steroid-synthesizing and rapidly proliferating tissues, where TSPO is much more abundant. The novel Pt(IV) complex, cis,trans,cis-[Pt(ethanedioato)Cl{2-(2-(4-(6,8-dichloro-3-(2-(dipropylamino)-2-oxoethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)phenoxy)acetate)-ethanolato}(1R,2R-DACH)] (DACH = diaminocyclohexane), has been fully characterized by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques and tested in vitro against human MCF7 breast carcinoma, U87 glioblastoma, and LoVo colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. In addition, affinity for TSPO (IC50 = 18.64 nM), cellular uptake (ca. 2 times greater than that of oxaliplatin in LoVo cancer cells, after 24 h treatment), and perturbation of cell cycle progression were investigated. Although the new compound was less active than oxaliplatin and did not exploit a synergistic proapoptotic effect due to the presence of the TSPO ligand, it appears to be promising in a receptor-mediated drug targeting context towards TSPO-overexpressing tumors, in particular colorectal cancer (IC50 = 2.31 μM after 72 h treatment).

  13. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  14. Randomized Phase 2 Trial of S1 and Oxaliplatin-Based Chemoradiotherapy With or Without Induction Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Jang, Geundoo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Ji Youn; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Lee, Gin-Hyug; Song, Ho Young; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a randomized, phase 2 trial, the efficacy and safety of chemoradiotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy (ICT) of S1 and oxaliplatin for esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with stage II, III, or IVA esophageal cancer were randomly allocated to either 2 cycles of ICT (oxaliplatin 130 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1 and S1 at 40 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on days 1-14, every 3 weeks) followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) (46 Gy, 2 Gy/d with oxaliplatin 130 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1 and 21 and S1 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily, 5 days per week during radiation therapy) and esophagectomy (arm A), or the same CCRT followed by esophagectomy without ICT (arm B). The primary endpoint was the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: A total of 97 patients were randomized (arm A/B, 47/50), 70 of whom underwent esophagectomy (arm A/B, 34/36). The intention-to-treat pCR rate was 23.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2-35.6%) in arm A and 38% (95% CI 24.5% to 51.5%) in arm B. With a median follow-up duration of 30.3 months, the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 58.4% in arm A and 58.6% in arm B, whereas the 2-year overall survival rate was 60.7% and 63.7%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia during CCRT was more common in arm A than in arm B (35.4% vs 4.1%). The relative dose intensity of S1 (89.5% ± 20.6% vs 98.3% ± 5.2%, P=.005) and oxaliplatin (91.4% ± 16.8% vs 99.0% ± 4.2%, P=.007) during CCRT was lower in arm A compared with arm B. Three patients in arm A, compared with none in arm B, died within 90 days after surgery. Conclusions: Combination chemotherapy of S1 and oxaliplatin is an effective chemoradiotherapy regimen to treat esophageal cancer. However, we failed to show that the addition of ICT to the regimen can improve the pCR rate.

  15. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Conradi, Lena; Weiss, Christian; Sprenger, Thilo; Middel, Peter; Rau, Tillman; Dellas, Kathrin; Kitz, Julia; Rödel, Franz; Sauer, Rolf; Rüschoff, Josef; Beissbarth, Tim; Arnold, Dirk; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Rödel, Claus; Liersch, Torsten

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  16. Towards biomarker-dependent individualized chemotherapy: exploring cell-specific differences in oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hah, Sang Soo; Henderson, Paul T; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2010-04-15

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based anticancer drug that is currently used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin, like other platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and carboplatin, is known to induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming monoadducts, and intra- and interstrand diadducts. Previously, we reported an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) assay to measure the kinetics of oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage and repair [Hah, S. S.; Sumbad, R. A.; de Vere White, R. W.; Turteltaub, K. W.; Henderson, P. T. Chem. Res. Toxicol.2007, 20, 1745]. Here, we describe another application of AMS to the measurement of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution in cultured platinum-sensitive testicular (833K) and platinum-resistant breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cells, which resulted in elucidation of cell-dependent differentiation of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation, implying that differential adduction and/or accumulation of the drug in cellular DNA may be responsible for the sensitivity of cancer cells to platinum treatment. Ultimately, we hope to use this method to measure the intrinsic platinated DNA adduct repair capacity in cancer patients for use as a biomarker for diagnostics or a predictor of patient outcome.

  17. Adverse effects on cardiovascular status and lipid levels of albino Wistar rats treated with cisplatin and oxaliplatin in combination with 5 Fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Najam, Rahila; Bano, Nusrat; Mirza, Talat; Hassan, Saba

    2014-09-01

    The study was designed to comparatively assess direct damages on cardiac tissues and aorta associated with abnormalities in lipid profile and cardiac biomarkers induced by two platinum cytotoxic compounds with and without 5FU (5Fluorouracil) in rats. Albino Wistar rats were treated with 5FU (15mg/kg), cisplatin (0.8mg/kg) and oxaliplatin (0.8mg/kg) in different dosing schedules. The changes in the lipid levels, CPK and Tropinin I levels, following treatment with single and combination schedules of CDDP, 5FU and Oxaliplatin were compared with the control group maintained on normal saline. Changes in LDL and cholesterol levels were highly significant in cisplatin and oxaliplatin treated rats. Myofibrillar loss and vascular wall thickening was seen in cisplatin treatment groups in the acute model of toxicity. The damages were mild but progressive. Tropinin I levels were raised well above diagnostic risk levels in the delayed model of toxicity in the rats treated with oxaliplatin in combination of 5FU, indicative of definite cardiotoxic potential of oxaliplatin in combination of 5FU mimicking the FOLFOX regimen.

  18. {(1R,2R,4R)-4-Methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine}oxalatoplatinum(II): A Novel Enantiomerically Pure Oxaliplatin Derivative Showing Improved Anticancer Activity in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Abramkin, Sergey A.; Jungwirth, Ute; Valiahdi, Seied M.; Dworak, Claudia; Habala, Ladislav; Meelich, Kristof; Berger, Walter; Jakupec, Michael A.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2012-01-01

    Novel derivatives of the clinically established anticancer drug oxaliplatin were synthesized. Cytotoxicity of the compounds was studied in six human cancer cell lines by means of the MTT assay. Additionally, most promising complexes were also investigated in cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant human cancer cell models. The therapeutic efficacy in vivo was studied in the murine L1210 leukemia model. Most remarkably, {(1R,2R,4R)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine}oxalatoplatinum(II), comprising an equatorial methyl substituent at position 4 of the cyclohexane ring, was as potent as oxaliplatin in vitro but distinctly more effective in the L1210 model in vivo at the optimal dose. The advantage observed in the in vivo situation was mainly based on a more favorable therapeutic index. The maximum tolerated dose of the novel analogue was higher than that of oxaliplatin and caused a greater increase in life span (>200% versus 152%), with more animals experiencing long-term survival (5/6 versus 2/6). These data support further (pre)clinical development of the methyl-substituted oxaliplatin analogue with improved anticancer activity. PMID:20886814

  19. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  20. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  1. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  2. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin for locally advanced rectal cancer: long-term results of a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Luying; Cao, Caineng; Zhu, Yuan; Li, Dechuan; Feng, Haiyang; Luo, Jialin; Tang, Zhongzhu; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ke; Ju, Haixing; Zhang, Na

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to report long-term results of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin. From February 2002 to November 2006, a total of 58 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were recruited. Secondary endpoints included the cumulative incidence of local and distant recurrences, disease-free survival, and overall survival. The median follow-up time was 138 months (109-151 months). The cumulative incidence of local recurrence at 10 years was 12.1%. The cumulative incidence of distant recurrence at 10 years was 53.4%. The overall survival in the intention-to-treat population was 39.5% at 10 years. Disease-free survival in the intention-to-treat population was 41.8% at 10 years. Univariate analysis revealed that pathologic complete response was associated with local recurrence, distant recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival (p < .05). Distant recurrence remains the predominant pattern of failure for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision. Pathologic complete response is an independent prognostic factor for locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  3. The long-term impact of oxaliplatin chemotherapy on rodent cognition and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fardell, Joanna E; Vardy, Janette; Monds, Lauren A; Johnston, Ian N

    2015-09-15

    Chemotherapy treatment is associated with cognitive dysfunction in cancer survivors after treatment completion. The duration of these impairments is unclear. Therefore this paper aims to evaluate the lasting impact of varying doses of the chemotherapy oxaliplatin (OX) on cognition and peripheral neuropathy. In Experiment 1 rats were treated once a week for 3 weeks with either physiological saline (control) or 6 mg/kg OX i.p. and were assessed for peripheral neuropathy, using von Frey filaments, and cognitive function, using novel object and location recognition, up to 2 weeks after treatment completion. For Experiment 2 rats received 3 weekly i.p. injections of either physiological saline (control), 0.6 mg/kg, 2mg/kg or 6 mg/kg OX and assessed for peripheral neuropathy and cognitive function up to 11 months after treatment completion. Systemic OX treatment induced lasting effects on cognitive function at 11 months after treatment, and peripheral neuropathy at 1 month after treatment and these were dose dependent; higher doses of OX resulted in worse cognitive outcomes and more severe peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Labelling Herceptin with a novel oxaliplatin derivative: a computational approach towards the selective drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Cerezo, Javier; Requena, Alberto; Zuñiga, José; Contreras-García, Julia; Chavan, Sonali; Manrubia-Cobo, Miguel; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio

    2014-09-01

    The clinical use of platinum(II)-based drugs has serious side effects due to the non-specific reactions with both malignant and normal cells. To circumvent such major drawback, novel metallodrugs might be combined with suitable carrier molecules, as antibodies, to ensure selective attacks on tumours while sparing healthy tissues. In this contribution, we investigate the stability of a novel oxaliplatin derivate drug embedded in Herceptin (trastuzumab), an antibody which is able to recognise breast cancer cells, by using a wide panel of theoretical tools: docking, molecular dynamics and quantum calculations. Our calculations reveal the binding mechanism: the drug initially interacts non-covalently with the Pro40A and Asp167A residues, and the nitrogen of His171B subsequently replaces one of the water molecules coordinated to the platinum center, where the latter step reversibly fixes the drug into the antibody. These data might be used to further rationalise the synthesis of improved drugs beyond classical platinum(II) derivatives by improving the ligand-protein coupling mode. PMID:25149438

  5. A quantitative sensory analysis of peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer and its exacerbation by oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R; Simone, Donald A; Wang, Xin S; Cleeland, Charles S; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially platins and taxanes, is a widespread problem among cancer survivors that is likely to continue to expand in the future. However, little work to date has focused on understanding this challenge. The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight into the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared with those from 47 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function before any therapy compared with healthy volunteers, and they became more pronounced in patients who received chemotherapy. Sensory modalities that involved large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers were most affected by chemotherapy, whereas sensory modalities conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers were less sensitive to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were tested again 6 to 12 months after chemotherapy presented with the most numbness and pain and also the most pronounced sensory deficits. Our results illuminate a mechanistic connection between the pattern of effects on sensory function and the nerve fiber types that appear to be most vulnerable to chemotherapy-induced toxicity, with implications for how to focus future work to ameloirate risks of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25183707

  6. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer,, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing non-classical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore non-classical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry and with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-treat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanodelivery particles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also reflect our optimism that the next generation of platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  7. A Phase I study of weekly intravenous oxaliplatin in combination with oral daily capecitabine and radiation therapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. . E-mail: marwan.fakih@roswellpark.org; Rajput, Ashwani; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Smith, Judy L.; Lawrence, David D.; Rustum, Youcef M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We conducted a Phase I study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of neoadjuvant capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (RT) in Stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Capecitabine was given orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given i.v. once weekly x 5 (for 5 weeks) starting the first day of RT. RT was given daily except on weekends and holidays at 1.8 Gy per fraction x 28. Escalation for capecitabine or oxaliplatin was to occur in cohorts of three patients until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined. Endorectal tumor biopsy samples were obtained before and on Day 3 of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled on this study. Two of 6 patients at dose level (DL) 1 (capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally (p.o.) given twice daily (b.i.d.); oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) had a dose-limiting diarrhea. One of 6 patients at DL (-)1 (capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., b.i.d.; oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) experienced-dose-limiting diarrhea. Three of 11 patients who underwent resection had a complete pathologic response. No remarkable variations in rectal tumor biologic endpoints were noted on Day 3 of treatment in comparison to baseline. However, a higher apotosis index was observed at baseline and on Day 3 in complete pathologic responders (no statistical analysis performed). Conclusions: Capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., twice daily in combination with oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week and RT 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions is the recommended dose for future studies.

  8. Phase I Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation With S-1 and Oxaliplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Mi-Jung; Jang, Se-Jin; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a Phase I study of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) with S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, plus oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the recommended dose. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was delivered to a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions and followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a fixed dose of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29 and escalated doses of S-1 on Days 1-14 and 22-35. The initial dose of S-1 was 50 mg/m{sup 2}/day, gradually increasing to 60, 70, and 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Surgery was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled and tolerated up to Dose Level 4 (3 patients at each dose level) without dose-limiting toxicity. An additional 3 patients were enrolled at Dose Level 4, with 1 experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity of Grade 3 diarrhea. Although maximum tolerated dose was not attained, Dose Level 4 (S-1 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was chosen as the recommended dose for further Phase II studies. No Grade 4 toxicity was observed, and Grade 3 toxicities of leukopenia and diarrhea occurred in the same patient (1 of 15, 6.7%). Pathologic complete responses were observed in 2 of 15 patients (13.3%). Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day when combined with oxaliplatin in preoperative CRT, and a Phase II trial is now ongoing.

  9. The Association of CXC Receptor 4 Mediated Signaling Pathway with Oxaliplatin-Resistant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Yi; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Tung, Shui-Yi; Shen, Chien-Heng; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Teng, Chih-Chuan; Lee, Kam-Fai; Chen, Te-Chuan; Lee, Ko-Chao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. In addition, metastatic CRC remains one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat because of its chemoresistant behavior. However, the mechanism by which correlation occurs between CXCR4 and the clinical response of CRC to chemotherapy remains unknown. We generated chemoresistant cells with increasing doses of oxaliplatin (OXA) and 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) to develop resistance at a clinical dose. We found that the putative markers did not change in the parental cells, but HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR were more aggressive and had higher tumor growth (demonstrated by wound healing, chemotaxis assay, and a nude mice xenograft model) with the use of oxaliplatin. Apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin treatment was significantly decreased in HCT-116/OxR compared to the parental cells. Moreover, HCT-116/OxR cells displayed increased levels of p-gp, p-Akt p-ERK, p-IKBβ, CXCR4, and Bcl-2, but they also significantly inhibited the apoptotic pathways when compared to the parental strain. We evaluated the molecular mechanism governing the signaling pathway associated with anti-apoptosis activity and the aggressive status of chemoresistant cells. Experiments involving specific inhibitors demonstrated that the activation of the pathways associated with CXCR4, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt is critical to the functioning of the HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR characteristics of chemosensitivity. These findings elucidate the mechanism of CXCR4/PI3K/Akt downstream signaling and provide strategies to inhibit CXCR4 mediated signaling pathway in order to overcome CRC’s resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27668882

  10. Inclusion complexes of α-cyclodextrin and the cisplatin analogues oxaliplatin, carboplatin and nedaplatin: A theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anconi, Cleber P. A.; da Silva Delgado, Luciano; Alves dos Reis, João B.; De Almeida, Wagner B.; Costa, Luiz Antônio S.; Dos Santos, Hélio F.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum mechanics theoretical methodology has been applied in order to access and compare the relative stability of inclusion compounds formed by α-CD and the platinum (II) based drugs carboplatin, oxaliplatin and nedaplatin. The relative stability of the studied inclusion compounds has been discussed based on the number and type of hydrogen bonds identified between host and guest molecules. The evaluated energies at B3LYP/6-31G ∗ level of theory strongly indicates that α-CD forms stable supramolecular systems with all studied cisplatin analogues, being the carboplatin@α-CD found as the most favorable inclusion complex among the platinum (II) derivatives studied in the present paper.

  11. Preparation and Evaluation of Oxaliplatin Thermosensitive Liposomes with Rapid Release and High Stability.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunying; Yu, Fanglin; Yang, Yang; Cheng, Xiaohui; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Shiqing; Yang, Zhenbo; Li, Mingyuan; Li, Zhiping; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (OXP) was reported to show low anti-tumor activity when used alone and to display side effects; this low activity was attributed to high partitioning to erythrocytes and low accumulation in tumors. Thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) were considered able to specifically deliver drugs to heated tumors and to resolve the OXP distribution problem. Regretfully, TSL encapsulating doxorubicin did not demonstrate significant improvement in progression-free survival. Drug release below 41°C and significant leakage were considered major reasons for the failure. The purpose of this study was to acquire OXP TSL with rapid release at the triggered temperature and high stability at body temperature and at storage temperatures. A small quantity of poloxamer 188 was introduced into the TSL formulation to stabilize the encapsulated drug. It was shown that the addition of poloxamer 188 had no influence on the TSL characteristics. More than 90% of OXP was released within 10 min at 42°C, and less than 15% was released within 60 min at temperatures below 39°C. TSL were stable at 37°C for 96 h and at 4°C for 6 months. The anti-tumor activity of TSL at the dose of 2.5 mg/kg was certified to be equal to those of OXP injection and non-thermosensitive liposomes (NTSL) at the dose of 5 mg/kg, and significant improvement of tumor inhibition was observed in TSL compared with injection and NTSL at the same dose. It was also shown from the histological transmutation of tumors that TSL had stronger anti-tumor activity. Therefore, it could be concluded that TSL composed of a proper amount of poloxamer had rapid release and high stability, and OXP TSL would be anticipated to exert prominent anti-tumor activity in the clinic. PMID:27415823

  12. Preparation and Evaluation of Oxaliplatin Thermosensitive Liposomes with Rapid Release and High Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaohui; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Shiqing; Yang, Zhenbo; Li, Mingyuan; Li, Zhiping; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (OXP) was reported to show low anti-tumor activity when used alone and to display side effects; this low activity was attributed to high partitioning to erythrocytes and low accumulation in tumors. Thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) were considered able to specifically deliver drugs to heated tumors and to resolve the OXP distribution problem. Regretfully, TSL encapsulating doxorubicin did not demonstrate significant improvement in progression-free survival. Drug release below 41°C and significant leakage were considered major reasons for the failure. The purpose of this study was to acquire OXP TSL with rapid release at the triggered temperature and high stability at body temperature and at storage temperatures. A small quantity of poloxamer 188 was introduced into the TSL formulation to stabilize the encapsulated drug. It was shown that the addition of poloxamer 188 had no influence on the TSL characteristics. More than 90% of OXP was released within 10 min at 42°C, and less than 15% was released within 60 min at temperatures below 39°C. TSL were stable at 37°C for 96 h and at 4°C for 6 months. The anti-tumor activity of TSL at the dose of 2.5 mg/kg was certified to be equal to those of OXP injection and non-thermosensitive liposomes (NTSL) at the dose of 5 mg/kg, and significant improvement of tumor inhibition was observed in TSL compared with injection and NTSL at the same dose. It was also shown from the histological transmutation of tumors that TSL had stronger anti-tumor activity. Therefore, it could be concluded that TSL composed of a proper amount of poloxamer had rapid release and high stability, and OXP TSL would be anticipated to exert prominent anti-tumor activity in the clinic. PMID:27415823

  13. RKIP phosphorylation and STAT3 activation is inhibited by oxaliplatin and camptothecin and are associated with poor prognosis in stage II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A major obstacle in treating colorectal cancer (CRC) is the acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. An important protein in the regulation of cancer cell death and clinical outcome is Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP). In contrast, activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a protein that promotes tumor cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis and has an important role in cancer progression in many of cancer types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of RKIP and STAT3 after treatment with clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents (camptothecin (CPT) and oxaliplatin (OXP)) and the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in HCT116 colon cancer cells as well as evaluate the association between RKIP and STAT3 with clinical outcome of Stage II colon cancer patients. Methods HCT-116 colon cancer cells were treated with CPT, OXP, and IL-6 separately or in combination in a time and dose-dependent manner and examined for phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated RKIP and STAT3 via Western blot analysis. STAT3 transcriptional activity was measured via a luciferase reporter assay in HCT116 cells treated with CPT, IL-6 or transfected with JAK 1, 2 separately or in combination. We extended these observations and determined STAT3 and RKIP/ pRKIP in tumor microarrays (TMA) in stage II colon cancer patients. Results We demonstrate IL-6-mediated activation of STAT3 occurs in conjunction with the phosphorylation of RKIP in vitro in human colon cancer cells. OXP and CPT block IL-6 mediated STAT3 activation and RKIP phosphorylation via the inhibition of the interaction of STAT3 with gp130. We determined that STAT3 and nuclear pRKIP are significantly associated with poor patient prognosis in stage II colon cancer patients. Conclusions In the analysis of tumor samples from stage II colon cancer patients and the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, pRKIP and STAT3, 2 proteins potentially involved in the resistance to conventional

  14. [A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Severe Jaundice from Multiple Liver Metastases That Was Significantly Improved after Capecitabine plus Oxaliplatin Treatment].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroaki; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Nishino, Takaaki; Mihara, Hiroshi; Yoshita, Hiroki; Nakada, Naokatsu; Nanjo, Sohachi; Miura, Yoshiaki; Kajiura, Shinya; Fujinami, Haruka; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old man with advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital. His liver function was impaired(total bilirubin 1.6mg/dL)with multiple liver metastases. He was treated with chemotherapy of S-1 plus cisplatin but it was discon- tinued due to severe diarrhea(CTCAE Grade 3)on day 6 and his liver dysfunction progressed(total bilirubin 10.3mg/dL). After his diarrhea improved, he was treated with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin(capecitabine 3,600mg/day on day 1-14, oxaliplatin 130mg/m2 on day 1, q3 weeks). His severe jaundice and general condition improved without severe non-hematological toxicity, and he was ultimately discharged. He achieved a partial response(RECIST v1.1)after capecitabine plus oxaliplatin treatment, and this therapy has been continued for 15 months. This case suggests that capecitabine plus oxaliplatin may be beneficial even in advanced gastric cancer patients with impaired liver function from multiple liver metastases. PMID:27628556

  15. Osseous metastasis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma treated successfully with oxaliplatin, tegafur and leucovorin combination chemotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-wei; Ren, Feng; Chen, Wei; Wang, Ying-jie; Chen, Jin; Xie, Zhi-hui; Yang, Jin-hu; Chu, Jian-jun; You, Xu-yang

    2012-01-01

    Bone metastasis from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare. We report a case of cutaneous SCC which was diagnosed by the presence of bone metastasis and treated with combination chemotherapy. A 53 year male had tissue contusion and persistent ulcer in the multiple regions of body for about 30 years and treat with Chinese Herbal Drugs in several hospitals, however, did not thorough cure. He was referred to our hospital for a dermatological examination in March 2009. Excisional biopsy and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan showed an invasive cutaneous SCC concomitant bone metastasis. Surgical treatment is limited, because of multiple cancerous ulcer and metastatic spreading. Therefore, we proceed to treat with oxaliplatin, tegafur and leucovorin (LV) combination chemotherapy and other adjuvant therapy. About 5 months following chemotherapy, the general situation of the patient was improved. Further cycle of chemotherapy resulted in complete disappearance of the tumor masses (confirmed by PET-CT). So far, there was no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis. This report indicates that the combination chemotherapy of oxaliplatin, tegafur and LV seems to have a considerable therapeutic effect for cutaneous SCC concomitant malignant bone metastasis. PMID:22328953

  16. Addition of erlotinib to fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab: Two sequential phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Chiara; Daniele, Gennaro; Bianco, Roberto; Marciano, Roberta; Damiano, Vincenzo; Matano, Elide; Nappi, Lucia; Pepe, Stefano; DE Placido, Sabino; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2011-05-01

    The combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs has a strong pre-clinical rationale, yet its use has produced controversial clinical results. We conducted two sequential phase I trials to evaluate the feasibility and the recommended dose of erlotinib when combined with fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. A total of 21 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients were treated in two sequential phase I trials. In the first trial, 12 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib plus FOLFOX. In the second, 9 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib combined with oxaliplatin, capecitabine and bevacizumab. No MTD was reached in either of the trials. The only dose-limiting toxicities observed were neutropenia and diarrhea. No unexpected toxicities were noted. Hematological toxicity was the most frequently noted adverse event with infusional 5FU therapy, while gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common adverse event. In the second trial most patients withdrew from treatment due to toxicity, and less than half completed the therapeutic program as per protocol, mostly due to toxicity. In conclusion, the present study confirms the disappointing results of the double combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs in mCRC patients.

  17. Genetic variations in the VEGF pathway as prognostic factors in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré-Brunet, L; Sebio, A; Salazar, J; Berenguer-Llergo, A; Río, E; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M; Páez, D

    2015-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a significant biological mechanism in the progression and metastasis of solid tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), its receptors and signaling effectors have a central role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Genetic variation in the VEGF pathway may impact on tumor angiogenesis and, hence, on clinical cancer outcomes. This study evaluates the influence of common genetic variations within the VEGF pathway in the clinical outcomes of 172 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. A total of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 16 genes in the VEGF-dependent angionenesis process were genotyped using a dynamic array on the BioMark™ system. After assessing the KRAS mutational status, we found that four SNPs located in three genes (KISS1, KRAS and VEGFR2) were associated with progression-free survival. Five SNPs in three genes (ITGAV, KRAS and VEGFR2) correlated with overall survival. The gene-gene interactions identified in the survival tree analysis support the importance of VEGFR2 rs2071559 and KISS1 rs71745629 in modulating these outcomes. This study provides evidence that functional germline polymorphisms in the VEGF pathway may help to predict outcome in mCRC patients who undergo oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

  18. Addition of erlotinib to fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab: Two sequential phase I trials

    PubMed Central

    CARLOMAGNO, CHIARA; DANIELE, GENNARO; BIANCO, ROBERTO; MARCIANO, ROBERTA; DAMIANO, VINCENZO; MATANO, ELIDE; NAPPI, LUCIA; PEPE, STEFANO; DE PLACIDO, SABINO; TORTORA, GIAMPAOLO

    2011-01-01

    The combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs has a strong pre-clinical rationale, yet its use has produced controversial clinical results. We conducted two sequential phase I trials to evaluate the feasibility and the recommended dose of erlotinib when combined with fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. A total of 21 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients were treated in two sequential phase I trials. In the first trial, 12 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib plus FOLFOX. In the second, 9 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib combined with oxaliplatin, capecitabine and bevacizumab. No MTD was reached in either of the trials. The only dose-limiting toxicities observed were neutropenia and diarrhea. No unexpected toxicities were noted. Hematological toxicity was the most frequently noted adverse event with infusional 5FU therapy, while gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common adverse event. In the second trial most patients withdrew from treatment due to toxicity, and less than half completed the therapeutic program as per protocol, mostly due to toxicity. In conclusion, the present study confirms the disappointing results of the double combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs in mCRC patients. PMID:22977524

  19. Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in the Preoperative Multimodality Treatment of Rectal Cancer: Surgical End Points From National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Trial R-04

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Michael J.; Colangelo, Linda H.; Beart, Robert W.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Allegra, Carmen J.; Sharif, Saima; Pitot, Henry C.; Shields, Anthony F.; Landry, Jerome C.; Ryan, David P.; Parda, David S.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Arora, Amit; Evans, Lisa S.; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini S.; Eakle, Janice; Robertson, John M.; Moore, Dennis F.; Mullane, Michael R.; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Ward, Patrick J.; Wozniak, Timothy F.; Roh, Mark S.; Yothers, Greg; Wolmark, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The optimal chemotherapy regimen administered concurrently with preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for patients with rectal cancer is unknown. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04 compared four chemotherapy regimens administered concomitantly with RT. Patients and Methods Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer who were undergoing preoperative RT (45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks plus a boost of 5.4 Gy to 10.8 Gy in three to six daily fractions) were randomly assigned to one of the following chemotherapy regimens: continuous intravenous infusional fluorouracil (CVI FU; 225 mg/m2, 5 days per week), with or without intravenous oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 once per week for 5 weeks) or oral capecitabine (825 mg/m2 twice per day, 5 days per week), with or without oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 once per week for 5 weeks). Before random assignment, the surgeon indicated whether the patient was eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery based on clinical staging. The surgical end points were complete pathologic response (pCR), sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging (conversion to sphincter-sparing surgery). Results From September 2004 to August 2010, 1,608 patients were randomly assigned. No significant differences in the rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, or surgical downstaging were identified between the CVI FU and capecitabine regimens or between the two regimens with or without oxaliplatin. Patients treated with oxaliplatin experienced significantly more grade 3 or 4 diarrhea (P < .001). Conclusion Administering capecitabine with preoperative RT achieved similar rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging compared with CVI FU. Adding oxaliplatin did not improve surgical outcomes but added significant toxicity. The definitive analysis of local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival will be performed when the protocol-specified number of events has occurred. PMID:24799484

  20. Oxaliplatin-based first-line chemotherapy is associated with improved overall survival compared to first-line treatment with irinotecan-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer – Results from a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Marschner, Norbert; Arnold, Dirk; Engel, Erik; Hutzschenreuter, Ulrich; Rauh, Jacqueline; Freier, Werner; Hartmann, Holger; Frank, Melanie; Jänicke, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Several randomized trials investigating the preferable first-line combination chemotherapy regimen for metastatic colorectal cancer have shown inconsistent findings. Because a substantial number of patients are still being treated with “chemo-only” first-line therapies without targeted agents, we compared overall survival (OS) of patients treated in routine practice with oxaliplatin–fluoropyrimidine and irinotecan–fluoropyrimidine. Patients and methods Using the database of the Tumor Registry Colorectal Cancer, we identified 605 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who received first-line fluoropyrimidine combination chemotherapy with either oxaliplatin (n=430) or irinotecan (n=175). The Tumor Registry Colorectal Cancer is a cohort study that prospectively documents treatment of colorectal cancer by office-based medical oncologists in Germany and has recruited over 5,000 patients. OS was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for potentially confounding variables. Results Median OS was 26.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 22.4–31.9) months with an oxaliplatin–fluoropyrimidine combination and 18.3 (95% CI 15.1–23.2) months with irinotecan–fluoropyrimidine first-line “chemo-only” therapy. Median progression-free survival was 9.0 (8.1–10.2) and 7.9 (7.2–10.2) months, respectively. The difference in OS was confirmed if analysis was restricted to patients with synchronous metastases (no prior treatment). Among other variables, proportion of patients receiving any second-line therapy did not differ between groups. Oxaliplatin-based first-line therapy was associated with improved OS in multivariate analysis adjusted for potentially confounding variables (hazard ratio 0.678, 95% CI 0.510–0.901, P=0.007). Conclusion In clinical routine practice, first-line treatment with oxaliplatin–fluoropyrimidine combination chemotherapy compared to irinotecan

  1. Genome Wide Association Study for Predictors of Progression Free Survival in Patients on Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, Bevacizumab and Cetuximab in First-Line Therapy of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Böhringer, Stefan; van der Straaten, Tahar; Gelderblom, Hans; Punt, Cornelis; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite expanding options for systemic treatment, survival for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) remains limited and individual response is difficult to predict. In search of pre-treatment predictors, pharmacogenetic research has mainly used a candidate gene approach. Genome wide association (GWA) studies offer the benefit of simultaneously analyzing a large number of SNPs, in both known and still unidentified functional regions. Using a GWA approach, we searched for genetic markers affecting progression free survival (PFS) in mCRC patients treated with first-line capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab (CAPOX-B), with or without cetuximab. Patients and Methods 755 patients were included in the CAIRO2-trial, a multicenter phase III trial, randomizing between first-line treatment with CAPOX-B versus CAPOX-B plus cetuximab. Germline DNA and complete clinical information was available from 553 patients and genome wide genotyping was performed, using Illumina’s OmniExpress beadchip arrays, with 647,550 markers passing all quality checks. Another 2,202,473 markers were imputated by using HapMap2. Association with PFS was analysed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results One marker, rs885036, associated significantly with PFS (P = 2.17x10-8) showing opposite effects on PFS depending on treatment arm. The minor allele was associated with increased PFS in patients receiving cetuximab. A cluster of markers located on chromosome 8 associated with PFS, irrespective of treatment arm (P-values of 2.30x10-7 to 1.04x10-6). Conclusion This is the first GWA study to find SNPs affecting PFS in mCRC patients treated with CAPOX-B, either with or without cetuximab. Rs885036 is a potential predictive marker for cetuximab efficacy. These markers need to be validated in independent treatment cohorts. PMID:26222057

  2. 5-Fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) plus sunitinib or bevacizumab as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer: a randomized Phase IIb study

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, J Randolph; Mitchell, Edith P; Yoshino, Takayuki; Welslau, Manfred; Lin, Xun; Chow Maneval, Edna; Paolini, Jolanda; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Kretzschmar, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Background Sunitinib is an oral inhibitor of tyrosine kinase receptors implicated in tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In this randomized, multicenter, open-label Phase IIb study, sunitinib plus mFOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin plus leucovorin plus 5-fluorouracil) was compared with bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX6 as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods Patients were stratified by performance status, baseline lactate dehydrogenase level, and prior adjuvant treatment, and randomized 1:1 to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg/day for 4 weeks on and 2 weeks off plus mFOLFOX6 every 2 weeks or bevacizumab 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks plus mFOLFOX6 every 2 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included objective response rate, overall survival, safety, and quality of life. Results Enrollment was closed early following accrual of 191 patients, based on an interim analysis showing an inferior trend in the primary progression-free survival efficacy endpoint for sunitinib. Ninety-six patients were randomized to sunitinib plus mFOLFOX6 and 95 to bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX6. Median progression-free survival was 9.3 months and 15.4 months, respectively, but the objective response rate was similar between the study arms. Median overall survival was 23.7 months and 34.1 months, respectively. Dose reductions and interruptions were more common with sunitinib. Hematologic toxicity was more common in the sunitinib arm. Conclusion While the results of the sunitinib arm are comparable with those of previously reported FOLFOX combinations, the sunitinib-based combination was associated with more toxicity than that observed with bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. The bevacizumab arm had an unexpectedly good outcome, and was much better than that seen in the Phase III trials. Combination therapy with sunitinib plus mFOLFOX6 is not recommended for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26109878

  3. Randomized, Multicenter, Phase IIB Study of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in T3 Mid-Distal Rectal Cancer: Raltitrexed + Oxaliplatin + Radiotherapy Versus Cisplatin + 5-Fluorouracil + Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo Coco, Claudio; Minsky, Bruce D.; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Bellavita, Rita; Morganti, Alessio G.; La Torre, Giuseppe; Trodella, Lucio; Genovesi, Domenico; Portaluri, Maurizio; Maurizi-Enrici, Riccardo; Barbera, Fernando; Maranzano, Ernesto; Lupattelli, Marco

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare the rates of pathologic response, acute toxicity, and sphincter preservation with two different schedules of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with cT3 mid-distal rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3 and/or N+ resectable rectal carcinoma were randomized to receive one of the two following chemoradiotherapy regimens: cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and radiotherapy (PLAFUR) or raltitrexed, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (TOMOX-RT). For PLAFUR, cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) was given on Days 1 and 29, with a prolonged infusion of 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1-4 and 29-32, plus concurrent radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions daily). For TOMOX-RT, raltitrexed (3 mg/m{sup 2}) and oxaliplatin (130 mg/m{sup 2}) was given on Days 1, 19, and 38 with the same radiotherapy regimen as used for PLAFUR. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. All pathologic specimens were reviewed by a designated expert pathologist. The primary endpoint of this study was pathologic tumor downstaging (defined as tumor regression grade 1-2). Secondary endpoints included the incidence of ypT0, clinical tumor downstaging, sphincter-saving surgery, and acute treatment-related toxicity. Results: Between 2002 and 2005, 164 patients were accrued in 10 Italian centers, 83 patients in the PLAFUR arm and 81 in the TOMOX-RT arm. Overall, tumor regression grade 1-2 was observed in 76 patients (46.4%) and ypT0 in 49 (29.9%). The tumor regression grade 1-2 rate was 41.0% vs. 51.9% (p = 0.162) and the ypT0 rate was 24.1% vs. 35.8% (p = 0.102) for the PLAFUR vs. TOMOX-RT arm, respectively. The overall rate of tumor regression grade 1 and ypN+ was 4.6%. The occurrence of ypT downstaging was significantly greater in the TOMOX-RT arm (p = 0.035). Grade 3-4 acute toxicity occurred in 19 patients (11.6%): 7.1% in the PLAFUR arm vs. 16.4% in the TOMOX-RT arm. Sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 143 patients

  4. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer, are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSC/CSLC), underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is unexplored. The primary objectives of this investigation are (i) to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (ii) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemoresistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were used for this study. Although EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (i) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation, and sphere-forming frequency, (ii) increasing sphere disintegration, (iii) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (iv) decreasing proinflammatory metabolites in mice. In addition, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization, and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for the PTEN-Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring colorectal cancer.

  5. Validation of a LC method for the analysis of oxaliplatin in a pharmaceutical formulation using an experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, R; Calabrò, M L; Cutroneo, P; Tommasini, S; Melardi, S; Semreen, M; Furlanetto, S; Ficarra, P; Altavilla, G

    2002-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive RP-HPLC method with UV detection for routine control of oxaliplatin in a pharmaceutical formulation (Eloxatin) was developed. Quantitation was accomplished with the internal standard method. The procedure was validated by linearity (correlation coefficient=0.999948), accuracy, robustness and intermediate precision. Experimental design was used during validation to calculate method robustness and intermediate precision. For robustness test three factors were considered: percentage v/v of acetonitrile, flow rate and temperature; an increase in the flow rate results in a decrease of the drug found concentration, while the percentage of organic modifier and temperature have no important effect on the response. For intermediate precision measure the considered variables were: analyst, equipment and days. The RSD value (2.27%, n=24) indicated a good precision of the analytical method.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) in combination with 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kho, Yuhan; Jansman, Frank G A; Prins, Nicolaas H; Neef, Cees; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J

    2006-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of oxaliplatin, using a dose regimen of 85 mg/m, are lacking. A PK model may be used in future studies to investigate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and dose limiting toxicity. The purpose of this study was to construct a population PK model to describe platinum (Pt) concentrations in plasma in 33 patients with colorectal cancer. The secondary objective was to determine the relationship between the amount of Pt in 24-hour urine and the amount of Pt in fractionated urine collection periods. Plasma and urine samples were collected from patients during their first oxaliplatin treatment course. Population PK analysis was performed with WinNonMix. The model that best described the Pt concentrations in plasma was a two-compartment PK model. The elimination clearance (CL) and the elimination clearance of the peripheral compartment (CL2) (median +/- SE) were 25.2 +/- 6.3 L/hr and 68 +/- 24.8 L/hr, respectively. The median volume of distribution (V1) was determined to be 41.6 +/- 9.4 L and the median volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment (V2) was 452.5 +/- 96.4 L. The relationship between the cumulative amount of Pt in urine in the first 12 hours compared with the amount of Pt in 24 hours urine was reflected by a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.95. The cumulative Pt concentration in urine in the first 10 hours and the first 8 hours compared with 24 hours was reflected by correlation coefficients r2 = 0.93 and r2 = 0.897, respectively. This PK model could be useful in identifying predictors for PK and pharmacodynamic variability to individualize dosing. The results of this study suggest that fractionated urine samples can replace 24-hour urine collection. PMID:16628132

  7. Pathological complete response of colorectal liver metastases following chemotherapy with S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YOKOTA, TOMOYA; SANO, TSUYOSHI; SHIMIZU, YASUHIRO; TAKAHARI, DAISUKE; SENDA, YOSHIKI; SHIMURA, MASAHIRO; URA, TAKASHI; SHITARA, KOHEI; NIMURA, YUJI; YATABE, YASUSHI; MURO, KEI

    2011-01-01

    Pathological complete response to systemic chemotherapy is associated with more favorable survival in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases. We present a case of a 63-year-old man with multiple liver metastases from descending colon cancer. Following surgical resection of the primary tumor, the patient received systemic chemotherapy with S-1 and oxaliplatin in combination with bevacizumab. On achievement of a markedly favorable response to chemotherapy, surgical treatment of liver metastases was performed, and the liver tumors were successfully resected without any macroscopic residue. Histopathological analyses showed necrotic tissue in the complete absence of residual viable tumor cells. This is the first reported case of a patient with multiple liver metastases from descending colorectal cancer to achieve a pathological complete response following systemic chemotherapy with S-1 and oxaliplatin in combination with bevacizumab. This regimen is a systemic chemotherapy option to ‘cure’ liver metastasis from colorectal cancer. PMID:22866064

  8. Agent oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1994-01-01

    The goal of our research is a methodology for creating robust software in distributed and dynamic environments. The approach taken is to endow software objects with explicit information about one another, to have them interact through a commitment mechanism, and to equip them with a speech-acty communication language. System-level applications include software interoperation and compositionality. A government application of specific interest is an infrastructure for coordination among multiple planners. Daily activity applications include personal software assistants, such as programmable email, scheduling, and new group agents. Research topics include definition of mental state of agents, design of agent languages as well as interpreters for those languages, and mechanisms for coordination within agent societies such as artificial social laws and conventions.

  9. Printing metal-spiked inks for LA-ICP-MS bioimaging internal standardization: comparison of the different nephrotoxic behavior of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Moraleja, Irene; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Lázaro, Alberto; Humanes, Blanca; Neumann, Boris; Tejedor, Alberto; Luz Mena, M; Jakubowski, Norbert; Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros

    2016-03-01

    The study of the distribution of the cytostatic drugs cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin along the kidney may help to understand their different nephrotoxic behavior. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) allows the acquisition of trace element images in biological tissues. However, results obtained are affected by several variations concerning the sample matrix and instrumental drifts. In this work, an internal standardization method based on printing an Ir-spiked ink onto the surface of the sample has been developed to evaluate the different distributions and accumulation levels of the aforementioned drugs along the kidney of a rat model. A conventional ink-jet printer was used to print fresh sagittal kidney tissue slices of 4 μm. A reproducible and homogenous deposition of the ink along the tissue was observed. The ink was partially absorbed on top of the tissue. Thus, this approach provides a pseudo-internal standardization, due to the fact that the ablation sample and internal standard take place subsequently and not simultaneously. A satisfactory normalization of LA-ICP-MS bioimages and therefore a reliable comparison of the kidney treated with different Pt-based drugs were achieved even for tissues analyzed on different days. Due to the complete ablation of the sample, the transport of the ablated internal standard and tissue to the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is practically taking place at the same time. Pt accumulation in the kidney was observed in accordance to the dosages administered for each drug. Although the accumulation rate of cisplatin and oxaliplatin is high in both cases, their Pt distributions differ. The strong nephrotoxicity observed for cisplatin and the absence of such side effect in the case of oxaliplatin could explain these distribution differences. The homogeneous distribution of oxaliplatin in the cortical and medullar areas could be related with its higher affinity for

  10. Mutation Profiling and Microsatellite Instability in Stage II and III Colon Cancer: An Assessment of Their Prognostic and Oxaliplatin Predictive Value

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Patrick G.; Colangelo, Linda H.; Fumagalli, Debora; Tanaka, Noriko; Remillard, Matthew Y.; Yothers, Greg; Kim, Chungyeul; Taniyama, Yusuke; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Hyun Joo; Blackmon, Nicole L.; Lipchik, Corey; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Wolmark, Norman; Paik, Soonmyung; Pogue-Geile, Kay L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the prognostic and oxaliplatin predictive value of mismatch repair (MMR) status and common hot spot mutations, which we previously identified in stage II and III colon cancer. Experimental Design Mutations in BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, MET, and PIK3CA were profiled in 2,299 stage II and III colon tumors from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) clinical trials C-07 (n = 1,836) and C-08 (n = 463) with Type Plex chemistry and mass spectrometry. C-07 tested the worth of adding oxaliplatin to 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin, and C-08 tested the worth of adding bevacizumab to FOLFOX. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess prognostic or oxaliplatin predictive value of mutations for tumor recurrence, overall survival (OS), and survival after recurrence (SAR). Results BRAF mutations were associated with MMR-deficient tumors (P < 0.0001), poor OS [HR, 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.20–1.79; P S: 0.0002], and poor SAR (HR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.83–2.95; P < 0.0001). Mutations in KRAS, NRAS, MET, and PIK3CA were not associated with recurrence, OS, or SAR. MMR-deficient tumors were associated with an improved prognosis based on recurrence (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.33–0.70; P < 0.0001). Mutations and MMR status were not predictive for oxaliplatin benefit. Conclusions This study shows that BRAF mutations profiled from stage II and III colon cancer tumors were associated with poor SAR and validates and explains, at least in part, previous observations associating it with poor OS. Profiling of all of these mutations is warranted for future clinical trials testing new targeted therapies that block relevant signaling pathways. Such clinical trials are under development at NSABP. PMID:23045248

  11. Printing metal-spiked inks for LA-ICP-MS bioimaging internal standardization: comparison of the different nephrotoxic behavior of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Moraleja, Irene; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Lázaro, Alberto; Humanes, Blanca; Neumann, Boris; Tejedor, Alberto; Luz Mena, M; Jakubowski, Norbert; Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros

    2016-03-01

    The study of the distribution of the cytostatic drugs cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin along the kidney may help to understand their different nephrotoxic behavior. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) allows the acquisition of trace element images in biological tissues. However, results obtained are affected by several variations concerning the sample matrix and instrumental drifts. In this work, an internal standardization method based on printing an Ir-spiked ink onto the surface of the sample has been developed to evaluate the different distributions and accumulation levels of the aforementioned drugs along the kidney of a rat model. A conventional ink-jet printer was used to print fresh sagittal kidney tissue slices of 4 μm. A reproducible and homogenous deposition of the ink along the tissue was observed. The ink was partially absorbed on top of the tissue. Thus, this approach provides a pseudo-internal standardization, due to the fact that the ablation sample and internal standard take place subsequently and not simultaneously. A satisfactory normalization of LA-ICP-MS bioimages and therefore a reliable comparison of the kidney treated with different Pt-based drugs were achieved even for tissues analyzed on different days. Due to the complete ablation of the sample, the transport of the ablated internal standard and tissue to the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is practically taking place at the same time. Pt accumulation in the kidney was observed in accordance to the dosages administered for each drug. Although the accumulation rate of cisplatin and oxaliplatin is high in both cases, their Pt distributions differ. The strong nephrotoxicity observed for cisplatin and the absence of such side effect in the case of oxaliplatin could explain these distribution differences. The homogeneous distribution of oxaliplatin in the cortical and medullar areas could be related with its higher affinity for

  12. Expression and localization of the immunophilin FKBP51 in colorectal carcinomas and primary metastases, and alterations following oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rotoli, Deborah; Morales, Manuel; Del Carmen Maeso, María; Del Pino García, María; Morales, Araceli; Ávila, Julio; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The immunophilin FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP51) is a scaffold protein that serves a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple signaling pathways, integrating external and internal stimuli into distinct signal outputs. In a previous study, we identified several genes that are significantly up- or downregulated in the peripheral white cells (PWCs) of colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) patients undergoing oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. In our screening, FKBP51 gene expression was downregulated following chemotherapy. In order to determine whether this alteration in gene expression observed in PWCs may be detected at the protein level in tumors and metastases following the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy, an immunohistochemical analysis of FKBP51 in CRC and primary metastasis tissues was performed. The present study confirmed the downregulation of FKBP51 gene expression elicited by chemotherapy with folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in metastasized liver tissue that had been resected after the oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, compared with tissue section samples of CRC from patients (prior to antineoplastic treatment). Furthermore, the results indicated that, in CRC tissue sections, the expression of FKBP51 protein is associated with an immature phenotype of stromal fibroblasts and with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype, suggesting a role for this protein in the EMT process in CRC. Finally, the observation that only certain cells of the stroma express FKBP51 protein suggests a potential role for this immunophilin as a stroma cell subtype marker. PMID:27446431

  13. Involvement of spinal muscarinic and serotonergic receptors in the anti-allodynic effect of electroacupuncture in rats with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hwan; Go, Donghyun; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Giseog; Bae, Hyojeong; Quan, Fu Shi

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether the spinal cholinergic and serotonergic analgesic systems mediate the relieving effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold allodynia in rats. The cold allodynia induced by an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated by immersing the rat's tail into cold water (4℃) and measuring the withdrawal latency. EA stimulation (2 Hz, 0.3-ms pulse duration, 0.2~0.3 mA) at the acupoint ST36, GV3, or LI11 all showed a significant anti-allodynic effect, which was stronger at ST36. The analgesic effect of EA at ST36 was blocked by intraperitoneal injection of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist (atropine, 1 mg/kg), but not by nicotinic (mecamylamine, 2 mg/kg) receptor antagonist. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of M2 (methoctramine, 10 µg) and M3 (4-DAMP, 10 µg) receptor antagonist, but not M1 (pirenzepine, 10 µg) receptor antagonist, blocked the effect. Also, spinal administration of 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 12 µg) receptor antagonist, but not 5-HT1A (NAN-190, 15 µg) or 5-HT2A (ketanserin, 30 µg) receptor antagonist, prevented the anti-allodynic effect of EA. These results suggest that EA may have a signifi cant analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain, which is mediated by spinal cholinergic (M2, M3) and serotonergic (5-HT3) receptors. PMID:27382357

  14. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer. A Phase I–II Multicenter Study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Tesselaar, Margot E.; Cats, Annemieke; Havenga, Klaas; Leer, Jan W. H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.; Jansen, Edwin P.; Van Krieken, Han H. J. M.; Wiggers, Theo; Van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2007-01-01

    Background We studied the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of oxaliplatin added to capecitabine and radiotherapy (Capox-RT) as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Methods T3-4 rectal cancer patients received escalating doses of oxaliplatin (day 1 and 29) with a fixed dose of capecitabine of 1000 mg/m2 twice daily (days 1–14, 25–38) added to RT with 50.4 Gy and surgery after 6–8 weeks. The MTD, determined during phase I, was used in the subsequent phase II, in which R0 resection rate (a negative circumferential resection margin) was the primary end point. Results Twenty-one patients were evaluable. In the phase I part, oxaliplatin at 85 mg/m2 was established as MTD. In phase II, the main toxicity was grade III diarrhea (18%). All patients underwent surgery, and 20 patients had a resectable tumor. An R0 was achieved in 17/21 patients, downstaging to T0-2 in 7/21 and a pCR in 2/21. Conclusion Combination of Capox-RT has an acceptable acute toxicity profile and a high R0 resection rate of 81% in locally advanced rectal cancer. However the pCR rate was low. PMID:17653805

  15. Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin, but Not Sorafenib or Paclitaxel, Have a Synergistic Effect with Yttrium-90 in Reducing Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Line Viability.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Julien; Coulouarn, Cédric; Crouzet, Laurence; Pracht, Marc; Lepareur, Nicolas; Clément, Bruno; Garin, Etienne

    2015-12-01

    Synergy between yttrium-90 (90Y) and antineoplastic drugs was investigated. Viability of HepaRG (hepatocellular carcinoma) and HuCCT1 (cholangiocarcinoma) cells was studied through a tetrazolium dye reduction assay. A combination index (CI) was calculated, with CI < 1 denoting synergy and CI > 1 denoting antagonism. In HepaRG cells, gemcitabine showed synergy with 90Y (CI = 0.70 [95% confidence interval = 0.65-0.75]), whereas oxaliplatin (CI = 1.15 [1.08-1.21]), paclitaxel (CI = 1.26 [1.15-1.37]), and sorafenib (CI = 1.77 [1.65-1.89]) showed antagonism. In HuCCT1 cells, gemcitabine (CI = 0.54 [0.50-0.58]) and oxaliplatin (CI = 0.86 [0.82-0.90]) showed synergy with 90Y, whereas paclitaxel (CI = 1.18 [1.09-1.27]) and sorafenib (CI = 1.21 [1.12-1.30]) showed antagonism. These results suggest that gemcitabine and oxaliplatin should be tested in combination with 90Y radioembolization for treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26596183

  16. Thymidine phosphorylase expression in metastatic sites is predictive for response in patients with colorectal cancer treated with continuous oral capecitabine and biweekly oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, Roberto; Bargagli, Gianluca; Lazzi, Stefano; Pascucci, Alessandra; Francini, Edoardo; Bellan, Cristiana; Conca, Raffaele; Martellucci, Ignazio; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Lorenzi, Bruno; Francini, Guido

    2010-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the activity and safety profile of biweekly oxaliplatin combined with continuous oral capecitabine in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. A secondary endpoint was to investigate the correlation between thymidylate synthase and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) expression in metastatic tissues and tumor response. Forty-one patients received oral capecitabine 1331 mg/m every day combined with intravenous oxaliplatin 85 mg/m every 2 weeks. The overall response rate was 58.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 43.3-73.6%], the median progression-free survival 9.4 months (95% CI: 7.7-11.2 months) and the median survival 22.3 months (95% CI: 16.1-27.5 months). There were no grade 4 toxicities, and grade 3 toxicity was also uncommon. High TP expression in metastatic tissue was significantly associated with response to treatment (P=0.019), and also with a trend towards a better median progression-free survival and overall survival compared with patients expressing low TP (P=0.056; P=0.073). This study suggests that biweekly oxaliplatin and continuous oral capecitabine is an active and well-tolerated chemotherapy regimen in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Moreover, these findings add to a growing body of evidence that patients with high levels of intratumoral TP expression are the ideal candidates for capecitabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:20016369

  17. Interim analysis of postoperative chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin versus capecitabine alone for pathological stage II and III rectal cancer: a randomized multicenter phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan-Ru; Zhu, Yuan; Liu, Lu-Ying; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Song, Yong-Wen; Wang, Xin; Tang, Yuan; Liu, Yue-Ping; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Liu, Xin-Fan; Yu, Zi-Hao; Li, Ye-Xiong; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present an interim analysis of a phase III trial (NCT00714077) of postoperative concurrent capecitabine and radiotherapy with or without oxaliplatin for pathological stage II and III rectal cancer. Patients with pathologically confirmed stage II and III rectal cancer were randomized to either radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine (Cap-RT group) or with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (Capox-RT group). The primary endpoint was 3-year disease-free survival rate (DFS). The 3-year DFS rate was 73.9% in the Capox-RT group and 71.6% in the Cap-RT group (HR 0.92, p = 0.647), respectively. No significant difference was observed in overall survival, cumulative incidence of local recurrence and distant metastasis between the two groups (p > 0.05). More grade 3–4 acute toxicity was observed in the Capox-RT group than in the Cap-RT group (38.1% vs. 29.2%, p = 0.041). Inclusion of oxaliplatin in the capecitabine-based postoperative regimen did not improve DFS but increased toxicities for pathological stage II and III rectal cancer in this interim analysis. PMID:27014909

  18. Identification of thiostrepton as a novel therapeutic agent that targets human colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, S-Y; Huang, C-Y F; Huang, W-C; Su, Y

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that colorectal cancer stem cells (CRSCs) are largely responsible for the metastasis and relapse of colorectal cancer (CRC) after therapy. Hence, identifying new agents that specifically target CRSCs would help improve the effectiveness of current CRC therapies. To accelerate identification of agents targeting CRSCs, the Connectivity Map (CMap) approach was used. Among the top-ranked candidates, thiostrepton, a thiazole antibiotic, was selected for further investigation because of its known tumoricidal activity. Thiostrepton could selectively induce apoptosis in CRSC subpopulations in both parental HCT-15 and HT-29 human CRC lines as well as in EMT and chemoresistant clones derived from them. Further, we investigated its inhibitory effects on the sphere- and colony-forming capabilities of the aforementioned CRC lines. The in vitro inhibition of sphere and colony formation was associated with downregulation of various modulators of the stem cell phenotype. The combination of thiostrepton and oxaliplatin eradicated both CD44(+) HCT-15 and HT-29 cells more efficiently than either drug alone. FoxM1, an oncogenic transcription factor, was identified as a critical positive modulator of stemness and as the main target of thiostrepton in the CRC lines. This is the first report showing the selective killing of CRSCs by thiostrepton, which has been proposed to be a promising anti-neoplastic agent. On the basis of its synergism with oxaliplatin in killing CRSCs in vitro, if this activity is confirmed in vivo, thiostrepton may be a promising agent to be used clinically in combination with current chemotherapies to improve the efficacy of these regimens. PMID:26136074

  19. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  20. DPD and UGT1A1 deficiency in colorectal cancer patients receiving triplet chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin and irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Falvella, Felicia Stefania; Cheli, Stefania; Martinetti, Antonia; Mazzali, Cristina; Iacovelli, Roberto; Maggi, Claudia; Gariboldi, Manuela; Pierotti, Marco Alessandro; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Sottotetti, Elisa; Mennitto, Roberta; Bossi, Ilaria; de Braud, Filippo; Clementi, Emilio; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Aims Triplet chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin and irinotecan is a standard therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DPYD and UGT1A1 influence fluoropyrimdines and irinotecan adverse events (AEs). Low frequency DPYD variants (c.1905 + 1G > A, c.1679 T > G, c.2846A > T) are validated but more frequent ones (c.496A > G, c.1129-5923C > G and c.1896 T > C) are not. rs895819 T > C polymorphism in hsa-mir-27a is associated with reduced DPD activity. In this study, we evaluated the clinical usefulness of a pharmacogenetic panel for patients receiving triplet combinations. Methods Germline DNA was available from 64 CRC patients enrolled between 2008 and 2013 in two phase II trials of capecitabine, oxaliplatin and irinotecan plus bevacizumab or cetuximab. SNPs were determined by Real-Time PCR. We evaluated the functional variants in DPYD (rare: c.1905 + 1G > A, c.1679 T > G, c.2846A > T; most common: c.496A > G, c.1129-5923C > G, c.1896 T > C), hsa-mir-27a (rs895819) and UGT1A1 (*28) genes to assess their association with grade 3–4 AEs. Results None of the patients carried rare DPYD variants. We found DPYD c.496A > G, c.1129-5923C > G, c.1896 T > C in heterozygosity in 19%, 5% and 8%, respectively, homozygous rs895819 in hsa-mir-27a in 9% and homozygous UGT1A1*28 in 8%. Grade 3–4 AEs were observed in 36% patients and were associated with DPYD c.496A > G (odds ratio (OR) 4.93, 95% CI 1.29, 18.87; P = 0.021) and homozygous rs895819 in hsa-mir-27a (OR 11.11, 95% CI 1.21, 102.09; P = 0.020). Carriers of DPYD c.1896 T > C and homozygous UGT1A1*28 showed an OR of 8.42 (95% CI 0.88, 80.56; P = 0.052). Multivariate analysis confirmed an independent value for DPYD c.496A > G and c.1896 T > C. Conclusions Concomitant assessment of DPYD variants and the UGT1A1*28 allele is a promising strategy needing further validation for dose personalization. PMID:25782327

  1. Multi-Agent Information Classification Using Dynamic Acquaintance Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Peng, Shengquan; Raje, Rajeev; Palakal, Mathew; Mostafa, Javed

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of automated information services focuses on information classification and collaborative agents, i.e. intelligent computer programs. Highlights include multi-agent systems; distributed artificial intelligence; thesauri; document representation and classification; agent modeling; acquaintances, or remote agents discovered through…

  2. Quantitative Sensory Analysis of Peripheral Neuropathy Produced by Colorectal Cancer and its Exacerbation by Cumulative Dose of Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R.; Simone, Donald A.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight to the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared to that from age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. The patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function prior to any therapy compared to healthy volunteers. Sensory deficits became more pronounced in patients with chemotherapy. Sensory deficits were most pronounced for modalities mediated by large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers whereas those modalities of sensation conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers appeared showed less sensitivity to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were re-tested 6 to 12 months following chemotherapy showed the most numbness and pain as well as the most pronounced sensory deficits. The pattern of effects on sensory function has clear mechanistic implications for the fibers types that are vulnerable to the toxicity of chemotherapy. PMID:25183707

  3. Systemic release of osteoprotegerin during oxaliplatin-containing induction chemotherapy and favorable systemic outcome of sequential radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Sebastian; Kalanxhi, Erta; Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti; Redalen, Kathrine Røe; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2016-01-01

    In colorectal cancer, immune effectors may be determinative for disease outcome. Following curatively intended combined-modality therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer metastatic disease still remains a dominant cause of failure. Here, we investigated whether circulating immune factors might correlate with outcome. An antibody array was applied to assay changes of approximately 500 proteins in serial serum samples collected from patients during oxaliplatin-containing induction chemotherapy and sequential chemoradiotherapy before final pelvic surgery. Array data was analyzed by the Significance Analysis of Microarrays software and indicated significant alterations in serum osteoprotegerin (TNFRSF11B) during the treatment course, which were confirmed by osteoprotegerin measures using a single-parameter immunoassay. Patients experiencing increase in circulating osteoprotegerin during the chemotherapy had significantly better 5-year progression-free survival than those without increase (78% versus 48%; P = 0.009 by log-rank test). Hence, systemic release of this soluble tumor necrosis factor decoy receptor following the induction phase of neoadjuvant therapy was associated with favorable long-term outcome in patients given curatively intended chemoradiotherapy and surgery but with metastatic disease as the main adverse event. This finding suggests that osteoprotegerin may mediate or reflect systemic anti-tumor immunity invoked by combined-modality therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:27145458

  4. Factors Influencing Clinicians' Choice of Adjuvant S-1 versus Capecitabine plus Oxaliplatin after Curative Gastrectomy in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Yeon; Hwang, In Gyu; Park, Song-Ee; Kim, Moon Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Kang, Jung Hun; Kim, Young Saing; Oh, Sung Yong; Won, Young-Woong; Lee, Soon Il; Ji, Jun Ho; Chi, Kyong-Choun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Two recent randomized, phase III trials in Asia (ACTS-GC and CLASSIC) documented the survival benefit of postoperative chemotherapy after D2 lymph node dissection in patients with gastric cancer. We sought to determine what factors influenced clinicians' choices of either S-1 or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPOX) as adjuvant therapy after curative D2 gastrectomy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinicopathologic factors and adjuvant treatments for 435 patients from nine centers in Korea who were treated with either S-1 or CAPOX adjuvant chemotherapy after undergoing curative D2 gastrectomy between January 2013 and July 2014. Results: Of the 435 patients, 204 (46.9%) were treated with S-1 and 231 (53.1%) were treated with CAPOX. The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range, 30-88). CAPOX was prescribed more often for patients who were 65 years of age or younger than for patients who were age 65 or older (77.1% vs. 22.9%, P<0.0001). Of the patients in stage II, 121 (60.8%) were treated with S-1 and 78 (39.2%) were given CAPOX; however, of those in stage III, 83 (35.2%) received S-1 and 153 (64.8%) were treated with CAPOX (P<0.0001). Conclusions: Clinicians only preferred CAPOX for younger patients with stage III gastric cancer after curative D2 gastrectomy. However, for elderly patients, clinicians more chose S-1 regardless of the stage.

  5. A novel glycyrrhetinic acid-modified oxaliplatin liposome for liver-targeting and in vitro/vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingde; Jiang, Hong; Wu, Yin; Li, Yandong; Gao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oxaliplatin (OX) liposomes surface-modified with glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) were developed by the film-dispersion method. Their morphology, physical and chemical properties, and in vitro release performance were investigated. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) image showed that most liposomes were spherical particles with similar size and uniform dispersion. Both OX-liposomes and GA-OX-liposomes had an average size of 90 nm. They were negatively charged, with zeta potentials of -20.6 and -21.3 mV, respectively, and the entrapment efficiency values of both were higher than 94%. In vitro data showed that the application of liposomes could prolong the OX release. The relatively high correlation coefficient values obtained from analyzing the amount of drug released versus the square root of time depicted that release followed the Weibull model. No significant changes were observed after the addition of GA to the liposomes. In vivo, the relatively long time to reach the maximum plasma concentration of OX-liposomes suggested a sustained-release profile of liposomes, which was consistent with the results of the in vitro release study. The increased area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of OX-liposomes and GA-OX-liposomes demonstrated an increased absorption. The drug concentration in tissues indicated that the GA-modified liposomes delivered OX mainly to liver after intravenous administration. In addition, no severe signs, such as appearance of epithelial necrosis or sloughing of epithelial cells, were detected in histology studies.

  6. Phase I Study of Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin Followed by Surgery and Postoperative 5-Fluorouracil Plus Leucovorin for T3/T4 Rectal Adenocarcinoma: ECOG E1297

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Catalano, Paul J.; Haller, Daniel G.; Landry, Jerome C.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Spitz, Francis R.; Benson, Al B.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Oxaliplatin is a platinum analog and radiosensitizer active in colorectal cancer. We performed a Phase I trial to test the safety and preliminary efficacy of adding oxaliplatin to standard preoperative chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had T3 to T4 rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients received standard-dose radiation (50.4 Gy for 5.5 weeks) with concurrent infused 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at 200 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week. Oxaliplatin was given three times at 14-day intervals at 55, 70, or 85 mg/m{sup 2} during the 5.5-week radiation period, before resection. Adjuvant therapy consisted of four cycles of 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2} per week) with leucovorin (500 mg/m{sup 2} per week) given every 6 weeks. The main goals were to identify the maximum tolerated dose of oxaliplatin and the dose-limiting toxicities when given with 5-FU and RT. Secondary goals were to determine resectability, pathologic response, sphincter preservation, and overall survival rates. Results: Twenty-one patients were enrolled, 5 at the 55 mg/m{sup 2} oxaliplatin dose level, 5 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}, and 11 at 85 mg/m{sup 2}. All patients were able to complete the preoperative chemoradiation regimen with no dose adjustments. No dose-limiting toxicities or differences in the type or extent of toxicity were noted among the groups. Nineteen patients underwent surgery (three abdominopelvic resections and 16 low anterior resections), for an 84% sphincter preservation rate. The pathologic complete response rate was 26% (5 patients), and minimal microscopic residual tumor was found in 21% (4 additional patients). Conclusions: Oxaliplatin was well tolerated at 85 mg/m{sup 2} given every 2 weeks in combination with standard preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The rates of major pathologic response and sphincter preservation are promising.

  7. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  8. Phase II Study of Weekly Intravenous Oxaliplatin Combined With Oral Daily Capecitabine and Radiotherapy With Biologic Correlates in Neoadjuvant Treatment of Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. BullardDunn, Kelli; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Andrews, Chris; Rustum, Youcef M.; Ross, Mary Ellen; LeVea, Charles; Puthillath, Ajithkumar; Park, Young-Mee; Rajput, Ashwani

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (RT) in the neoadjuvant treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancers. Methods: Capecitabine was given at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given intravenously at 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly five times starting the first day of RT. The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction), five fractions weekly. Endorectal tumor biopsies were obtained before treatment and on the third day of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and apoptosis. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled in this study; 6 patients (24%) had a complete pathologic response. T-downstaging occurred in 52% of patients, and N-downstaging occurred in 53%. Grade 3 diarrhea was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity, occurring in 20% of patients. Only 2 patients experienced disease recurrence, with a median of 20 months of follow-up. Thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, ERCC1, and apoptosis did not vary significantly between the pretreatment and Day 3 tumor biopsies, nor did they predict for T-downstaging or a complete pathologic response. Conclusion: Capecitabine at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, and RT at 50.4 Gy is an effective neoadjuvant combination for Stage II and III rectal cancer and results in a greater rate of complete pathologic responses than historically shown in fluoropyrimidine plus RT controls.

  9. The Efficacy of Taxanes- and Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Gastric Cancer After D2 Gastrectomy for Different Lauren Types

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhen; Jin, Xiance; He, Qiuxiang; Lin, Baochai; Su, Huafang; Chen, Hanbin; Fei, Shaoran; Fei, Zhenghua; Chen, Guorong; Pan, Huangle; Chen, Xiaolei; Xie, Congying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the efficacy of Taxanes- and Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapies (TC and OC) in the treatment of gastric cancer patients after D2 gastrectomy with different Lauren types. In this study, 299 patients of gastric adenocarcinoma with D2 lymph node dissection were reviewed between 2007 and 2014. Chemotherapies were classified as Oxaliplatin-based and Taxanes-based regimen. Treatment outcomes were analyzed according to different Lauren types, such as the intestinal type, diffuse type, and mixed type groups, respectively. The disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. The log-rank test was used for univariate analysis, and Cox regression was used for multivariate analysis. In diffuse type gastric cancer, the Oxaliplatin-based arm had a longer median DFS and OS compared with Taxanes-based arm (DFS: 47.0 vs 28.6 months, P = 0.04; OS: 51.9 vs 34.5 months, P = 0.048). The chemotherapy regimen was an independent prognostic factor for DFS and OS of diffuse type gastric cancer patients by multivariate analysis (P = 0.01). In the intestinal type, although the DFS and OS of intestinal type patients in TC group were higher than those in OC group (DFS: 53.4 vs 42.4 months; OS: 69.7 vs 57.8 months), there was no statistical significance observed (both P > 0.05). For the mixed type, the 2 different chemotherapy regimens achieved similar median DFS and OS. In a conclusion, the patients of diffuse type were more sensitive to OC, and the intestinal type patients may be benefit from TC. Therefore, it will be of benefit for gastric patients by introducing Lauren classification clinically and to help the choice of chemotherapy regimen for gastric patients after D2 gastrectomy. PMID:26871834

  10. Pharmacogenetic predictors of outcome in patients with stage II and III colon cancer treated with oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Ana; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Aparicio, Jorge; Gallego-Plazas, Javier; Yaya, Ricardo; Maurel, Joan; Rodríguez-Salas, Nuria; Burgos, Emilio; Ramos, David; Calatrava, Ana; Andrada, Encarna; Díaz-López, Esther; Sánchez, Antonio; Madero, Rosario; Cejas, Paloma; Feliu, Jaime

    2014-09-01

    Identifying molecular markers for tumor recurrence is critical in successfully selecting patients with colon cancer who are more likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. We investigated the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) within genes involved in oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines metabolism, DNA repair mechanisms, drug transport, or angiogenesis pathways on outcome for patients with stage II and III colon cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of 202 patients with stage II and III colon cancer receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy from January 2004 to December 2009. Genotyping was performed for 67 SNPs in 32 genes using the MassARRAY (SEQUENOM) technology. Our results were validated in an independent cohort of 177 patients treated with the same chemotherapy regimens. The combination of the selectin E (SELE) rs3917412 G>A G/G and the methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) rs1801133 T/T genotypes was associated with a significantly increased risk for recurrence in both the training [RR = 4.103; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.803-9.334; P = 0.001] and the validation cohorts (RR = 3.567; 95% CI, 1.253-10.151; P = 0.017) in the multiple regression analysis considering the stage, lymphovascular invasion, and bowel perforation as covariates. The combined analysis of these polymorphisms was also significantly associated with overall survival in both cohorts (RR = 3.388; 95% CI, 0.988-11.623; P = 0.052, and RR = 3.929; 95% CI, 1.144-13.485; P = 0.020, respectively). Our findings suggest that the SELE rs3917412 and MTHFR rs1801133 SNPs could serve as pharmacogenetic predictors of tumor recurrence in patients with early-stage colon cancer treated with oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy, thus allowing personalized selection of treatment to optimize clinical outcomes.

  11. KGB agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    A short story is reported in which the activity of Communist Party of the USSR and secret KGB agents, which were payed by the State, in view of controlling of the conscience of population. The story reffers to the Physics Department of the Moscow University, Planing Institute of the Gosplan of Moldavian S.S.R. and Chishinau Technical University (actually: Technical University of Moldova), where the author has worked during Soviet times. Almost every 6-th citizen in the USSR was engaged in this activity, while actually the former communists rule in the Republic of Moldova.

  12. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of K1 acupoint acustimulation to prevent cisplatin- or oxaliplatin-induced nausea

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yehua; Liu, Luming; Chiang, Joseph S.; Meng, Zhiqiang; Garcia, M. Kay; Chen, Zhen; Peng, Huiting; Bei, Wenying; Zhao, Qi; Spelman, Amy R.; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 70% of cancer patients experience chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). We examined the effects of electrostimulation of the K1 acupoint located on the sole of the foot, as it is thought to have potential to control CINV. Methods In this trial, 103 patients diagnosed with primary or metastatic liver cancer were recruited before trans-catheter arterial infusion (TAI) of cisplatin (CDDP) or oxaliplatin (OXA) and randomized to group A (N=51; treated with the antiemetic tropisetron and acustimulation at the K1 acupoint for 20 minutes, 1-2 hours before TAI on the first day and then daily for the subsequent 5 days) or group B (N=53; treated with tropisetron and electrostimulation at a placebo point on the heel). The rate, intensity, and duration of nausea and vomiting were collected at baseline and then daily for 5 days after TAI. Quality of life was assessed daily using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) and the EuroQoL scale. Results No differences were found between groups A and B in the incidence and degree of nausea or vomiting on day 1 or the consecutive 5 days. Patients in group A had better EuroQoL scores than did patients in group B (A: 72.83 versus B: 65.94, P = 0.04) on day 4 but not on the other days. No group differences were noted at any time point for MDASI scores. Conclusions Electrostimulation of K1 combined with antiemetics did not result in initial prevention of CDDP- or OXA-induced nausea or vomiting. PMID:25204437

  13. Improved Treatment of MT-3 Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases in a Mouse Xenograft by LRP-Targeted Oxaliplatin Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Orthmann, Andrea; Peiker, Lisa; Fichtner, Iduna; Hoffmann, Annika; Hilger, Ralf Axel; Zeisig, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxP) has rarely been used to treat breast carcinoma, as it cannot cross the BBB to treat the frequently subsequent brain metastases. Here, we encapsulated OxP in liposomes prepared to reduce side effects and to simultaneously treat primary tumor and brain metastasis. The angiopep LRP-receptor ligand was bound to the vesicular surface for targeting. Targeted and non-targeted OxP liposomes were tested in vitro (binding, uptake, and transcytosis) and in vivo. Liposomes contained 0.65 mg OxP/mL, their mean diameter was 165 nm, and they released 50% of OxP within 8 days at 4 degrees C and within 22 h at 36 degrees C. MDCK cells were used for uptake and transcytosis quantification. Compared to non-targeted liposomes, targeted liposomes showed 12-fold greater uptake, and 2.25-fold higher transcytosis. In vivo efficacy was tested using human MT-3 breast cancer cells transplanted subcutaneously and intracerebrally into female nude mice, and tumor growth inhibition was measured. OxP was injected (6 mg OxP/kg) four times. The best results were obtained with targeted liposomes (T/C: 21% for subcutaneous and 50% for intracerebral). OxP liposomes with a fluid membrane all inhibited MT-3 tumors significantly better than free OxP, with no significant difference between targeted and non-targeted liposomes. The therapeutic effect was accompanied with strong leukopenia and mild thrombocytopenia with all formulations. The newly developed OxP liposomes significantly improved the treatment of subcutaneously and intracerebrally growing breast cancer, but the targeted angiopep-equipped liposomes showed no superior effect in vivo.

  14. Exogenous IL-1Ra attenuates intestinal mucositis induced by oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil through suppression of p53-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Gao, Jin; Qian, Lan; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Shunying; Wu, Mingyuan; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Wen; Ye, Hao; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis (CIM) is a major dose-limiting side effect of many chemoagents, resulting in weight loss, diarrhea, and even death. The current treatments for CIM are palliative and have limited benefit. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist is a natural antagonist of interleukin-1. Our previous studies showed the protective effect of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1Ra) on the intestine in mice after 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. In this study, we further evaluated rhIL-1Ra in the treatment of CIM induced by different chemoagents and their combination. Normal as well as tumor-bearing mice were administered oxaliplatin (L-OHP), 5-fluorouracil, or their combination to induce intestinal mucositis and mortality. rhIL-1Ra administered after the chemotherapy, but not after the onset of diarrhea, significantly improved mouse survival, attenuated body weight loss, and reduced the incidence, severity, and duration of diarrhea. Histological examination showed that rhIL-1Ra-treated mice had a relatively intact mucosa structure, more proliferating crypt cells, and higher acid mucin content than the vehicle-treated mice. rhIL-1Ra suppressed crypt apoptosis by reducing the levels of proapoptotic proteins in wild-type, but not in IL-1RI or p53 mice. In addition, rhIL-1Ra was as effective as octreotide acetate in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea, but with the advantage of reducing the epithelial apoptosis, the major cause of CIM. Importantly, the tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy was not affected by rhIL-1Ra. Thus, our data strongly suggest that rhIL-1Ra may be useful for the treatment of intestinal mucositis and improving the quality of life for cancer patients on chemotherapy.

  15. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy with irinotecan or oxaliplatin-involved regimen for untreated metastatic advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Luhong; Bai, Jianling; Huang, Huaying; Tang, Cuiju; Yang, Jinsong; Zhou, Baoning; Gong, Yongling; Duanmu, Zhong; Chen, Jinfei

    2010-01-01

    A large number of randomized controlled trials involving chemotherapy in the management of advanced colorectal cancer were conducted. 5-FU/LV in combination with irinotecan (IRI) or oxaliplatin (OXA) was used. The aim of the meta-analysis was to compare and evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the two therapeutic approaches for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A literature search, study selection and assessment, data collection, and analysis were undertaken by two reviewers according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing IRI versus OXA, in combination with 5-FU/LV in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer were performed. Seven studies involving 2,107 patients met the inclusion criteria. The OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen showed a significant increase in survival by lower hazard ratios (HR) [HR 1.28; 95% CI (1.13-1.45)] and was associated with lower toxicities. The OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen was superior or equal to the IRI + 5-FU/LV regimen in prolonging time to progression and median survival. The IRI + 5-FU/LV regimen resulted in higher hazard ratios in nausea vomiting/emesis and diarrhea [HR 1.99, 95% CI (1.19-3.31); HR 1.83, 95% CI (1.38-2.44)] and lower hazard ratios in paresthesia, sensory neuropathy, and thrombocytopenia [HR 0.09, 95% CI (0.03-0.23); HR 0.04 95% CI (0.01-0.13); HR 0.19 95% CI (0.05-0.64)] than the OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen. Compared with IRI, OXA is more appropriate for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer when combined with 5-FU/LV. OXA + 5-FU/LV should be considered as the first-line standard of care for advanced CRC patients.

  16. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  17. Filling agents.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ioannis P

    2005-06-01

    Injectable fillers have become an important component of minimally invasive facial rejuvenation modalities. Their ease of use, effectiveness, low morbidity, and fast results with minimal downtime are factors that have made them popular among patients. Soft tissue augmentation has evolved to a unique combination of medicine and art. A wide selection of available agents and new products, each one with unique properties, may be used alone or in combination. The physician acquires the tools to rebalance facial characteristics not only by filling wrinkles but also by having the ability to shape the face and restore bony contours and lines. Careful selection of candidates, realistic expectations, and an understanding of the limitations of fillers are crucial for a successful result.

  18. Gelled Anti-icing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O. F.; Sperber, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Pectin added to antifreeze/water mixture. Formulations include water with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as deicer and pectin as gel former. Without gelling agent, deicer runs off vertical surfaces. Without pectin solution will completely evaporate in far less time. Agents developed have wide potential for ice prevention on runways, highways, bridges and sidewalks.

  19. Direct separation of the enantiomers of oxaliplatin on a cellulose-based chiral stationary phase in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mode.

    PubMed

    Gallinella, Bruno; Bucciarelli, Lucia; Zanitti, Leo; Ferretti, Rosella; Cirilli, Roberto

    2014-04-25

    (R,R)-oxaliplatin is an anticancer enantiopure active pharmaceutical ingredient. Little attention has been devoted to the analysis of its enantiomeric composition. The enantioselective HPLC method reported in the current Pharmacopoeias shows clear disadvantages with regard to the low resolution and long elution times. In this work, it has been proven the applicability of a last generation polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phase (CSP), i.e. the Chiralpak IC-3, in the enantioseparation of oxaliplatin. Experimental results demonstrated the benefits arising from the development of enantioselective hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) based strategies. A baseline separation with resolution factor of 5.8 was achieved using a 100mm×4.6mm I.D. IC-3 column set at the temperature of 40°C and a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-water 100:5 mixture. At a flow rate of 1mLmin(-1) the separation was completed within 8min. The optimized method was proven to be sensitive with LOD and LOQ of the enantiomeric impurity of 0.07 and 0.21μgmL(-1), respectively.

  20. LoVo colon cancer cells resistant to oxaliplatin overexpress c-MET and VEGFR-1 and respond to VEGF with dephosphorylation of c-MET.

    PubMed

    Mezquita, Belén; Pineda, Estela; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Mora, Conchi; Maurel, Joan; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2016-05-01

    Oxaliplatin-resistant LoVo colon cancer cells overexpressing c-MET and VEGFR-1 were selected to study several signaling pathways involved in chemoresistance, as well as the effect of increasing amounts of VEGF in the regulation of c-MET. In comparison with chemosensitive LoVo colon cancer cells, oxaliplatin-resistant cells (LoVoR) overexpress and phosphorylate c-MET, upregulate the expression of transmembrane and soluble VEGFR-1 and, unexpectedly, downregulate VEGF. In addition, LoVoR cells activate other transduction pathways involved in chemoresistance such as Akt, β-catenin-TCF4 and E-cadherin. While c-MET is phosphorylated in LoVoR cells expressing low levels of VEGF, c-MET phosphorylation decreases when recombinant VEGF is added into the culture medium. Inhibition of c-MET by VEGF is mediated by VEGFR-1, since phosphorylation of c-MET in the presence of VEGF is restored after silencing VEGFR-1. Dephosphorylation of c-MET by VEGF suggests that tumors coexpressing VEGFR-1 and c-MET may activate c-MET as a result of anti-VEGF therapy.

  1. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  2. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  3. Detecting agents.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews a recent set of behavioural studies that examine the scope and nature of the representational system underlying theory-of-mind development. Studies with typically developing infants, adults and children with autism all converge on the claim that there is a specialized input system that uses not only morphological cues, but also behavioural cues to categorize novel objects as agents. Evidence is reviewed in which 12- to 15-month-old infants treat certain non-human objects as if they have perceptual/attentional abilities, communicative abilities and goal-directed behaviour. They will follow the attentional orientation of an amorphously shaped novel object if it interacts contingently with them or with another person. They also seem to use a novel object's environmentally directed behaviour to determine its perceptual/attentional orientation and object-oriented goals. Results from adults and children with autism are strikingly similar, despite adults' contradictory beliefs about the objects in question and the failure of children with autism to ultimately develop more advanced theory-of-mind reasoning. The implications for a general theory-of-mind development are discussed. PMID:12689380

  4. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  5. [Stability study of oxaliplatin and doxorubicin for intraperitoneal administration with hyperthermia].

    PubMed

    Escudero-Ortiz, V; Duart-Duart, M J; Pérez-Ruixo, C; Pérez-Ruixo, J J; Valenzuela, B

    2014-05-01

    hipertermia basada en estos agentes antineoplásicos.

  6. Preparation of Oxaliplatin-Deoxycholic Acid Derivative Nanocomplexes and In Vivo Evaluation of Their Oral Absorption and Tumor Growth Suppression.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-02-01

    To prepare orally available oxaliplatin (OXA), nanocomplexes were formed by ionic conjugation of OXA with the deoxycholic acid derivative, Nalpha-deoxycholy-L-lysyl-methylester (DCK), as an oral absorption enhancer. We characterized the DCK-conjugated OXA nanocomplexes by differential scanning calorimetry, particle size determination, and morphological analysis. To evaluate the effects of DCK on the intestinal permeability of OXA, we assessed the solubilities and partition coefficients of OXA and the OXA/DCK nanocomplex, and then conducted in vitro artificial intestinal membrane and Caco-2 cell permeability studies. Finally, bioavailability in rats and tumor growth inhibition in the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC7) model after oral administration of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex were investigated compared to pure OXA. Analysis of the ionic complex formation of OXA with DCK revealed that OXA existed in an amorphous form within the complex, resulting in for- mation of nanocomp;exes (35.05 +/- 4.48 nm in diameter). The solubility of OXA in water was approximately 7.07 mg/mL, whereas the water solubility of OXA/DCK was approximately 2.04 mg/mL and its partition coefficient was approximately 1.2-fold higher than that of OXA. The in vitro intestinal membrane permeability of OXA was significantly enhanced by complex formation with DCK. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed that the Cm value of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex was 3.18-fold higher than that of OXA (32.22 +/- 10.24 ng/mL), and the resulting oral bioavailability of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex was 39.3-fold more than that of OXA. Furthermore, the oral administration of OXA/DCK significantly inhibited tumor growth in SCC7-bearing mice, and maximally inhibited tumor volume by 54% compared to the control. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex as an oral anti-cancer therapy because it improves the oral absorption of OXA, which may improve patient compliance and expand the therapeutic

  7. Oxaliplatin Plus Dual Inhibition of Thymidilate Synthase During Preoperative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Long-Term Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella; Scott, Nigel; Marone, Pietro; Aloi, Luigi; Sandomenico, Claudia; Lastoria, Secondo; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo Rosario; Scala, Dario; Iodice, Giovanni; Budillon, Alfredo; Comella, Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of oxaliplatin (OXA) plus dual inhibition of thymidilate synthase during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with poor prognosis for rectal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty-three patients with the following characteristics, a clinical (c) stage T4, cN1-2, or cT3N0 of {<=}5 cm from the anal verge and/or with a circumferential resection margin (CRM) of {<=}5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging), received three biweekly courses of chemotherapy with OXA, 100 mg/m{sup 2}; raltitrexed (RTX), 2.5 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 900 mg/m{sup 2} (31 patients) or 800 mg/m{sup 2} (32 patients); levo-folinic acid (LFA), 250 mg/m{sup 2} on day 2, during pelvic RT (45 Gy). Pathologic response was defined as complete pathological response (ypCR), major (tumor regression grade(TRG) 2 to 3, with ypCRM-ve and ypN-ve) or minor or no response (TRG4 to -5, or ypCRM+ve, or ypN+ve). Adjuvant 5-FU/LFA regimen was given in cases of cT4, ypN+ve, or ypCRM+ve. Results: Overall, neutropenia (40%) and diarrhea (13%) were the most common grade {>=}3 toxicities, and tolerability was better with a 5-FU dose reduction. No significant difference in pathologic response was seen according 5-FU dosage: overall, a ypCR was obtained in 24 (39%) patients, and a major response in 20 (32%) patients. The 5-year probability of freedom from recurrence was 80% (95% confidence interval, 68%-92%); it was 56% for the minor/no response group, while it was around 90% for both the ypCR and the major response group. Conclusions: OXA, RTX, and 5-FU/LFA administered during pelvic RT produced promising early and long-term results in rectal carcinoma patients with poor prognosis. The postoperative treatment strategy applied in our study supports the risk-adapted approach in postoperative management.

  8. Phase I/II trial of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab in first line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bazarbashi, Shouki; Aljubran, Ali; Alzahrani, Ahmad; Mohieldin, Ahmed; Soudy, Hussein; Shoukri, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Phase III studies have demonstrated the efficacy of FOLFOXIRI regimens (5-fluorouracil/leucovorin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan) with/without bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Capecitabine is an orally administered fluoropyrimidine that may be used instead of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. We evaluated a triple-chemotherapy regimen of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, plus bevacizumab in 53 patients with mCRC. A Phase I study identified the maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan as 150 mg/m2. Median follow-up in a subsequent Phase II study using this dose was 28 months (74% progressed). For all patients, a complete response was achieved in 4% and a partial response in 60%; median progression-free survival (PFS) was 16 months and median overall survival (OS) was 28 months. Median PFS was longer for patients with an early treatment response (28 vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.024), or early tumor shrinkage (25 vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.006), or for patients suitable for surgical removal of metastases with curative intent (median not reached vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.001). Median OS was longer for patients with early tumor shrinkage (median not reached vs. 22 months for others; P = 0.006) or surgery (median not reached vs. 22 months for others, P = 0.002). K-ras mutations status did not influence PFS (P = 0.88) or OS (P = 0.82). Considerable Grade 3/4 toxicity was encountered (36% for diarrhea, 21% for vomiting and 17% for fatigue). In conclusion, the 3-weekly triple-chemotherapy regimen of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, plus bevacizumab, was active in the first-line treatment of mCRC, although at the expense of a high level of toxicity. PMID:26207614

  9. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  10. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  11. Web Search Agents: "One-Stop Shopping" for Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Explains Web search agents as tools that apply intelligent agent software technology for the purpose of automating, improving, and speeding up online search operations. Topics include intelligent desktop agents; search agent marketplace; comparing Web search agents; subjective evaluations; and use by researchers. (LRW)

  12. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  13. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion with high dose oxaliplatin: Influence of perfusion temperature on postoperative outcome and survival

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is becoming a standard therapy in the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). Compared to systemic chemotherapy, HIPEC improves survival in patients with PC. This therapy has high morbidity rates (up to 41%). In vitro it has been demonstrated that hyperthermia has a toxic effect on malign cells. However, hyperthermia also affects normal tissue. To my knowledge, any additional effect of hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy has never been demonstrated in a clinical setting. In this study, the effects of hyperthermia on outcome and survival were analyzed. Methods : Patients with PC from any origin who were treated with HIPEC were included in this retrospective, non-randomized study. Data on patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, features of the surgery and postoperative complications were extracted from patient files. Models predicting time to removal of nasogastric tube (TRNT), post-operative major complications, the occurrence of anastomotic leaks and post-operative survival were built, using negative binomial regression, logistic regression or Cox proportional hazards regression as appropriate. Results: 138 patients treated with HIPEC were included. Maximal temperature during the operation was not statistically significantly associated with anastomotic leaks or post-operative major complications. Maximal temperature during the operation was negatively associated with post-operative survival (P=0.01). Conclusion : The results suggest that hyperthermia may negatively affect survival in patients who are treated with HIPEC for PC of various origins. This study has the classical limitations of a retrospective study. Therefore, randomized trials are required to confirm the results. PMID:26913184

  14. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Scarrow, R.C.; White, D.L.

    1985-11-12

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided. 4 tabs.

  15. Using Intelligent Agents To Assist Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knode, Steve; Knode, Jon-David W.

    This paper begins with background on intelligent agents (software programs built to perform certain specific tasks for the user). A taxonomy that categorizes intelligent agents by the degree of intelligence embedded in the software is presented. Applications of today's intelligent agents are discussed, including specific examples of the following:…

  16. Preparing Change Agents for Change Agent Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, James R.

    Seventy-seven Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking agricultural change agents from developing Central and South American countries responded to a questionnaire which sought perceptions of the roles in which the change agents felt they were involved and the roles for which they felt they were being trained. The agents were participating in training…

  17. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  18. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  19. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  20. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  1. Phase II study of bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin followed by bevacizumab plus erlotinib as first-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Alberto; Pericay, Carles; García-Girón, Carlos; Alonso, Vicente; Dueñas, Rosario; Cirera, Luis; Rivera, Fernando; Falcó, Esther; Bustos, Iñaki Alvarez; Salud, Antonieta

    2013-01-01

    This phase II trial investigated the efficacy of an induction regimen of bevacizumab, capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) followed by maintenance therapy with bevacizumab plus erlotinib as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received intravenous bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg plus oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) on day 1 followed by oral capecitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1-14 every 3 weeks for six cycles. In the absence of disease progression, patients then received bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg every 3 weeks plus oral erlotinib 150 mg once daily. The primary study endpoint was progression-free survival. In the intention-to-treat population (n = 90), the median progression-free survival was 9.2 [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.9-11.9] months, and the median overall survival was 25.8 (95% CI: 18.0-30.9) months. In the patient subpopulation who received both induction and maintenance therapy (n = 52), median progression-free survival was 11.1 (95% CI: 9.0-15.7) months, and the median overall survival was 29.5 (95% CI: 23.7-36.7) months. KRAS status did not predict efficacy. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were diarrhea, asthenia, and neutropenia. XELOX-bevacizumab for 6 cycles followed by bevacizumab-erlotinib maintenance therapy has been shown to be a highly active and well-tolerated first-line regimen in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  2. Prospective phase II trial of pazopanib plus CapeOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Jung, Sin-Ho; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2016-01-01

    We designed a single-arm, open label phase II study to determine the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of pazopanib with CapeOx (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in metastatic /recurrent advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Previously untreated AGC patients received capecitabine (850 mg/m2 bid, day 1–14) plus oxaliplatin (130 mg/m2, day 1) in combination with pazopanib (800 mg, day 1–21) every three weeks. Treatment was continued until progression of the disease or intolerable toxicity was observed. In all, 66 patients were treated with pazopanib plus CapeOx. The median age of the patients was 51.5 years (range, 23.0–77), and the median ECOG performance status was 1 (0–1). Among all 66 patients, one complete response and 37 partial responses were observed (overall response rate, 62.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 45.7–73.5% accounting for the 2-stage design of this trial). Stable disease was observed in 23 patients (34.8%), revealing a 92.4% disease control rate. The median progression free survival and overall survival were 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.6–7.4) and 10.5 months (95% CI, 8.1–12.9), respectively. Thirty-four patients (51.5%) experienced a treatment-related toxicity of grade 3 or more. The most common toxicities of grade 3 or more were neutropenia (15.1%), anemia (10.6%), thrombocytopenia (10.6%), anorexia (7.6%), nausea (3.0%), and vomiting (3.0%). There were no treatment-related deaths. The combination of pazopanib and CapeOx showed moderate activity and an acceptable toxicity profile as a first-line treatment in metastatic / recurrent AGC patients (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130805). PMID:27003363

  3. Synthesis and Structures of 9-Oxabispidine Analogues of Cisplatin, Carboplatin, and Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Pollak, David; Goddard, Richard; Pörschke, Klaus-Richard

    2016-09-19

    The literature synthesis of 9-oxabispidine [OC6H10(NH)2, C] has been revisited and optimized, which includes determination of the crystal structures of C, the secondary component trans-(PhSO2)NC4H6O(CH2I)2 (trans-III), and the unexpected solute intermediate OC6H10(NSO2Ph)2·(1)/2py (V·(1)/2py). The reaction of (1,5-hexadiene)platinum dichloride with C yields {OC6H10(NH)2}PtCl2 (C1), which is converted to {OC6H10(NH)2}Pt(cbdca)·5H2O (C2) and {OC6H10(NH)2}Pt(C2O4) (C3). In the crystal, C1 forms a planar 2D network by N-H··Cl and N-H··O hydrogen bonding. In the crystal structure of C2, which is isomorphous to the parent bispidine compound (A2), all complex molecules are encapsulated by a water shell. While complexes C1 and C3 are virtually insoluble in water, C2 dissolves quite well. The low cytotoxicity of compounds C1-C3 is explained by an increased polarity of the bonds in the C skeleton as a consequence of the electronegative O atom. PMID:27603202

  4. Antibacterial agents in the cinema.

    PubMed

    García Sánchez, J E; García Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2006-12-01

    Numerous procedures used as antibacterial therapy are present in many films and include strategies ranging from different antimicrobial drugs to surgery and supporting measures. Films also explore the correct use and misuse of antimicrobial agents. Side effects and other aspects related to antibacterial therapy have also been reflected in some films. This article refers to the presence of antibacterial agents in different popular movies. There are movies in which antibacterial agents form part of the central plot, while in others it is merely an important part of the plot. In still others, its presence is isolated, and in these it plays an ambient or anecdotal role.

  5. Listening to Include

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  6. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  7. Terpinen-4-ol: A Novel and Promising Therapeutic Agent for Human Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Shiran; Pleban, Shlomo; Kazanov, Diana; Tirosh, Peter; Arber, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    Background Terpinen-4-ol, a naturally occurring monoterpene is the main bioactive component of tea-tree oil and has been shown to have many biological activities. Aim To study the antitumor effects of terpinen-4-ol and its mechanism of action in prostate and GI malignancies, alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and biological agents. Methods Terpinen-4-ol was administrated alone or combined with standard chemotherapy (Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Gemcitabine, Tarceva) and biological agent (Cetuximab). It was also combined with humanized anti-CD24 mAbs (was developed by us). Killing effects were measured qualitatively by light microscopy and quantitatively using the MTT and FACS analysis, following treatment of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric and prostate cancer cells. Terpinen-4-ol effect on tumor development was evaluated in xenograft model. Results Terpinen-4-ol induces a significant growth inhibition of colorectal, pancreatic, prostate and gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner (10–90% in 0.005–0.1%). Terpinen-4-ol and various anti-cancer agents (0.2μM oxaliplatin and 0.5μM fluorouracil) demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect (83% and 91%, respectively) on cancer cell proliferation. In KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, which are resistant to anti-EGFR therapy, combining of terpinen-4-ol with cetuximab (1 μM) resulted in impressive efficacy of 80–90% growth inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of terpinen-4-ol potentiate anti-CD24 mAb (150μg/ml)-induced growth inhibition (90%). Considerable reduction in tumor volume was seen following terpinen-4-ol (0.2%) treatment alone and with cetuximab (10mg/kg) (40% and 63%, respectively) as compare to the control group. Conclusion Terpinen-4-ol significantly enhances the effect of several chemotherapeutic and biological agents. The possible molecular mechanism for its activity involves induction of cell-death rendering this compound as a potential anti-cancer drug alone and in

  8. Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

    1993-01-01

    An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

  9. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Kuca, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Biological warfare agents are a group of pathogens and toxins of biological origin that can be potentially misused for military or criminal purposes. The present review attempts to summarize necessary knowledge about biological warfare agents. The historical aspects, examples of applications of these agents such as anthrax letters, biological weapons impact, a summary of biological warfare agents and epidemiology of infections are described. The last section tries to estimate future trends in research on biological warfare agents.

  10. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  11. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented. PMID:23811423

  12. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented.

  13. Natural products as antimitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Natural products still play an important role in the medicinal chemistry, especially in some therapeutic areas. As example more than 60% of currently-used anticancer agents are derives from natural sources including plants, marine organisms or micro-organism. Thus natural products (NP) are an high-impact source of new "lead compounds" or new potential therapeutic agents despite the large development of biotechnology and combinatorial chemistry in the drug discovery and development. Many examples of anticancer drugs as paclitaxel, combretastatin, bryostatin and discodermolide have shown the importance of NP in the anticancer chemotherapy through many years. Many organisms have been studied as sources of drugs namely plants, micro-organisms and marine organisms and the obtained NP can be considered a group of "privileged chemical structures" evolved in nature to interact with other organisms. For this reason NP are a good starting points for pharmaceutical research and also for library design. Tubulin and microtubules are one of the most studied targets for the search of anticancer compounds. Microtubule targeting agents (MTA) also named antimitotic agents are compounds that are able to perturb mitosis but are also able to arrest cell growing during interphase. The anticancer drugs, taxanes and vinca alkaloids have established tubulin as important target in cancer therapy. More recently the vascular disrupting agents (VDA) combretastatin analogues were studied for their antimitotics properties. This review will consider the anti mitotic NP and their potential impact in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  14. Chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S; Chauhan, S; D'Cruz, R; Faruqi, S; Singh, K K; Varma, S; Singh, M; Karthik, V

    2008-09-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA's) are defined as any chemical substance whose toxic properties are utilised to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy in warfare and associated military operations. Chemical agents have been used in war since times immemorial, but their use reached a peak during World War I. During World War II only the Germans used them in the infamous gas chambers. Since then these have been intermittently used both in war and acts of terrorisms. Many countries have stockpiles of these agents. There has been a legislative effort worldwide to ban the use of CWA's under the chemical weapons convention which came into force in 1997. However the manufacture of these agents cannot be completely prohibited as some of them have potential industrial uses. Moreover despite the remedial measures taken so far and worldwide condemnation, the ease of manufacturing these agents and effectiveness during combat or small scale terrorist operations still make them a powerful weapon to reckon with. These agents are classified according to mechanism of toxicity in humans into blister agents, nerve agents, asphyxiants, choking agents and incapacitating/behavior altering agents. Some of these agents can be as devastating as a nuclear bomb. In addition to immediate injuries caused by chemical agents, some of them are associated with long term morbidities and psychological problems. In this review we will discuss briefly about the historical background, properties, manufacture techniques and industrial uses, mechanism of toxicity, clinical features of exposure and pharmacological management of casualties caused by chemical agents. PMID:21783898

  15. A clinical prognostic scoring system for resectable gastric cancer to predict survival and benefit from paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing; Qian, Yingying; Wang, Jian; Gu, Bing; Pei, Dong; He, Shaohua; Zhu, Fang; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Xu, Jin; Liu, Lianke; Gu, Yanhong; Guo, Renhua; Yin, Yongmei; Shu, Yongqian; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy is a standard procedure of curative resection for gastric cancer (GC). The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable prognostic scoring system for GC treated with D2 gastrectomy combined with adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods A prognostic scoring system was established based on clinical and laboratory data from 579 patients with localized GC without distant metastasis treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Results From the multivariate model for overall survival (OS), five factors were selected for the scoring system: ≥50% metastatic lymph node rate, positive lymphovascular invasion, pathologic TNM Stage II or III, ≥5 ng/mL preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level, and <110 g/L preoperative hemoglobin. Two models were derived using different methods. Model A identified low- and high-risk patients for OS (P<0.001), while Model B differentiated low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients for OS (P<0.001). Stage III patients in the low-risk group had higher survival probabilities than Stage II patients. Both Model A (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69–0.78) and Model B (AUC: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.72–0.83) were better predictors compared with the pathologic TNM classification (AUC: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.59–0.71, P<0.001). Adjuvant paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based or triple chemotherapy showed significantly better outcomes in patients classified as high risk, but not in those with low and intermediate risk. Conclusion A clinical three-tier prognostic risk scoring system was established to predict OS of GC treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The potential advantage of this scoring system is that it can identify high-risk patients in Stage II or III who may benefit from paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based regimens. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results before they are applied clinically. PMID:26966350

  16. Oxaliplatin complexes with carnosine and its derivatives: in vitro cytotoxicity, mass spectrometric and computational studies with a focus on complex fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Eslam M; Camp, Claire L; Youssef, Ahmed S; Amleh, Asma; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L; Shoeib, Tamer

    2013-11-01

    The complexation of the Pt-based anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxPt) with biological ligands other than DNA is believed to be a major cellular sink for the drug reducing its therapeutic potential and acting as a potential cause of toxicity. In this paper, the very first hypothesis driven investigation of the role of the naturally abundant cytoplasmic dipeptide ligand β-alanyl-l-histidine dipeptide (carnosine) in OxPt detoxification is presented. In vitro studies on hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells suggest that carnosine may inhibit the cytotoxic action of OxPt most likely through the formation of complexes that are less cytotoxic than OxPt alone. Evidence is provided to suggest that pre-exposure of HepG2 cells to elevated levels of carnosine appears to have a lasting effect on reducing the cytotoxicity of OxPt even after the removal of the externally added carnosine. This effect, however, is likely under kinetic control as its magnitude was shown not to vary significantly with the level of carnosine exposure within the concentration range used in this study. Various mass spectrometry techniques employing electrospray ionization and chip nanospray were employed to study the interaction of oxaliplatin with carnosine as well as two of its derivatives β-alanyl-N-methylhistidine (anserine) and N-acetylcarnosine (NAC). Evidence of complexation between OxPt and each of the three ligands examined is presented. Most species observed were unambiguously assigned and compared to their theoretical isotopic patterns. Common fragmentation products due to the collisionally-activated protonated complexes of each of the ligands examined with OxPt, [M + OxPt + H](+), where M = carnosine, anserine or NAC, were reported. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level were used to obtain structural information and relative free energies of different isomers of the observed precursor [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) both in the gas phase and in solution as well as to probe its

  17. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  18. [New agents for hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier; García Gómez, María Carmen

    2016-02-19

    An elevated proportion of high cardiovascular risk patients do not achieve the therapeutic c-LDL goals. This owes to physicians' inappropriate or insufficient use of cholesterol lowering medications or to patients' bad tolerance or therapeutic compliance. Another cause is an insufficient efficacy of current cholesterol lowering drugs including statins and ezetimibe. In addition, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 inhibitors are a new cholesterol lowering medications showing safety and high efficacy to reduce c-LDL in numerous already performed or underway clinical trials, potentially allowing an optimal control of hypercholesterolemia in most patients. Agents inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis and microsomal transfer protein are also providing a new potential to decrease cholesterol in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia and in particular in homozygote familial hypercholesterolemia. Last, cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have shown powerful effects on c-HDL and c-LDL, although their efficacy in cardiovascular prevention and safety has not been demonstrated yet. We provide in this article an overview of the main characteristics of therapeutic agents for hypercholesterolemia, which have been recently approved or in an advanced research stage.

  19. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  20. Mother ship and physical agents collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Budulas, Peter P.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that investigates the feasibility of developing a collaboration architecture between small physical agents and a mother ship. This incudes the distribution of planning, perception, mobility, processing and communications requirements between the mother ship and the agents. Small physical agents of the future will be virtually everywhere on the battlefield of the 21st century. A mother ship that is coupled to a team of small collaborating physical agents (conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); logistics; sentry; and communications relay) will be used to build a completely effective and mission capable intelligent system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the smaller agents. The mother ship also establishes a robust communications network between the agents and is the primary information disseminating and receiving point to the external world. Because of its global knowledge and processing power, the mother ship does the high-level control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. This high level control and interaction between the mother ship and its agents (including inter agent collaboration) will be software agent architecture based. The mother ship incorporates multi-resolution battlefield visualization and analysis technology, which aids in mission planning and sensor fusion.

  1. The EO-1 Autonomous Science Agent Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Lee, Rachel; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Hengemihle, Jerry; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Ungar, Stephen; Brakke, Thomas; Boyer, Darrell; Van Gaasbeck, Jim; Greeley, Ronald; Doggett, Thomas; Baker, Victor; Dohm, James; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent is currently flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and respond to science events occurring on the Earth. The package includes software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. Because of the deployment to a remote spacecraft, this Autonomous Science Agent has stringent constraints of autonomy, reliability, and limited computing resources. We describe these constraints and how they are reflected in our agent architecture.

  2. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  3. Overexpression of Lin28 Decreases the Chemosensitivity of Gastric Cancer Cells to Oxaliplatin, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin, and Fluorouracil in Part via microRNA-107

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Rongyue; Hu, Yan; Zhou, Jichun; Seifer, Benjamin; Chen, Yongxia

    2015-01-01

    Higher Lin28 expression is associated with worse pathologic tumor responses in locally advanced gastric cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, the characteristics of Lin28 and its mechanism of action in chemotherapy resistance is still unclear. In this study, we found that transfection of Lin28 into gastric cancer cells (MKN45 and MKN28) increased their resistance to the chemo-drugs oxaliplatin (OXA), paclitaxel (PTX), doxorubicin (ADM), and fluorouracil (5-Fu) compared with gastric cancer cells transfected with a control vector. When knockdown Lin28 expression by Lin28 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was evaluated in vitro, we found that the resistance to chemo-drugs was reduced. Furthermore, we found that Lin28 up-regulates C-myc and P-gp and down-regulates Cylin D1. Finally, we found that miR-107 is a target microRNA of Lin28 and that it participates in the mechanism of chemotherapy resistance. Our results suggest that the Lin28/miR-107 pathway could be one of many signaling pathways regulated by Lin28 and associated with gastric cancer chemo-resistance. PMID:26636340

  4. The Phase 2 Study of "(TOX) Preoperative Chemotherapy" Response Rate and Side Effects in [Locally Advanced Operable Gastric Adenocarcinoma] Patients With Docetaxel, Oxaliplatin and Capcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadeh-Jabbari, Seyyed-Hossein; Malekpour, Nasser; Salmanian, Bahram; Foodazi, Hossein; Salehi, Masoud; Noorizadeh, Farsad

    2013-01-01

    Background Early stage gastric cancer diagnosis has ensued different approaches in resection strategies. In order to increase the proportion of cases which have undergone radical resection or have reduced the recurrence rate, different pre-operative treatments have introduced. Here, we have verified an active preoperative chemotherapeutic regimen in locally advanced gastric cancer patients. Methods Forty nine patients who have found eligible to enter this phase 2 trial have treated with oxaliplatin 100 mg/m2 IV, docetaxel 50 mg/m2 IV, plus capecitabine 625 mg/m2 PO (TOX). Clinical staging has been following the first 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy. Patients that have further undergone radical surgery, have evaluated for pathological response rate. Results Anemia (10.2%), nausea (10.2%) and vomiting (6.1%) were the most frequent grade 3 or 4 adverse effects. Regarding the pathologic staging, 6 patients (12.2%) had complete response (95% CI 3% to 21.4%), 18 of them (36.7%) had partial response (95% CI 23.2% to 50.2%), then 3 patients (6.1%) had stable disease (95% CI 0%-12.8%). Among the patients who had surgery, 22% had pathologic complete response. Conclusion Preoperative chemotherapeutic regimen of TOX seems to be an active and safe neoadjuvant therapy in non metastatic gastric cancer. It should further be considered with concurrent radiotherapy. PMID:25250123

  5. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  6. Opinion evolution influenced by informed agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kangqi; Pedrycz, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Guiding public opinions toward a pre-set target by informed agents can be a strategy adopted in some practical applications. The informed agents are common agents who are employed or chosen to spread the pre-set opinion. In this work, we propose a social judgment based opinion (SJBO) dynamics model to explore the opinion evolution under the influence of informed agents. The SJBO model distinguishes between inner opinions and observable choices, and incorporates both the compromise between similar opinions and the repulsion between dissimilar opinions. Three choices (support, opposition, and remaining undecided) are considered in the SJBO model. Using the SJBO model, both the inner opinions and the observable choices can be tracked during the opinion evolution process. The simulation results indicate that if the exchanges of inner opinions among agents are not available, the effect of informed agents is mainly dependent on the characteristics of regular agents, including the assimilation threshold, decay threshold, and initial opinions. Increasing the assimilation threshold and decay threshold can improve the guiding effectiveness of informed agents. Moreover, if the initial opinions of regular agents are close to null, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion can be realized, indicating that, to maximize the influence of informed agents, the guidance should be started when regular agents have little knowledge about a subject under consideration. If the regular agents have had clear opinions, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion cannot be achieved. However, the introduction of informed agents can make the majority of agents choose the pre-set opinion.

  7. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  8. First-Line XELOX Plus Bevacizumab Followed by XELOX Plus Bevacizumab or Single-Agent Bevacizumab as Maintenance Therapy in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Phase III MACRO TTD Study

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-España, Auxiliadora; Massutí, Bartomeu; Sastre, Javier; Abad, Albert; Valladares, Manuel; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, Maria J.; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Gallén, Manuel; González, Encarnación; Marcuello, Eugenio; Benavides, Manuel; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Losa, Ferrán; Escudero, Pilar; Arrivi, Antonio; Cervantes, Andrés; Dueñas, Rosario; López-Ladrón, Amelia; Lacasta, Adelaida; Llanos, Marta; Tabernero, Jose M.; Antón, Antonio; Aranda, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this phase III trial was to compare the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab alone with those of bevacizumab and capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) as maintenance treatment following induction chemotherapy with XELOX plus bevacizumab in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients and Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to receive six cycles of bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin every 3 weeks followed by XELOX plus bevacizumab or bevacizumab alone until progression. The primary endpoint was the progression-free survival (PFS) interval; secondary endpoints were the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (RR), time to response, duration of response, and safety. Results. The intent-to-treat population comprised 480 patients (XELOX plus bevacizumab, n = 239; bevacizumab, n = 241); there were no significant differences in baseline characteristics. The median follow-up was 29.0 months (range, 0–53.2 months). There were no statistically significant differences in the median PFS or OS times or in the RR between the two arms. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities in the XELOX plus bevacizumab versus bevacizumab arms were diarrhea, hand–foot syndrome, and neuropathy. Conclusion. Although the noninferiority of bevacizumab versus XELOX plus bevacizumab cannot be confirmed, we can reliably exclude a median PFS detriment >3 weeks. This study suggests that maintenance therapy with single-agent bevacizumab may be an appropriate option following induction XELOX plus bevacizumab in mCRC patients. PMID:22234633

  9. Next Generation Remote Agent Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Muscettola, Nicola; Morris, Paul H.; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    In May 1999, as part of a unique technology validation experiment onboard the Deep Space One spacecraft, the Remote Agent became the first complete autonomous spacecraft control architecture to run as flight software onboard an active spacecraft. As one of the three components of the architecture, the Remote Agent Planner had the task of laying out the course of action to be taken, which included activities such as turning, thrusting, data gathering, and communicating. Building on the successful approach developed for the Remote Agent Planner, the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner is a completely redesigned and reimplemented version of the planner. The new system provides all the key capabilities of the original planner, while adding functionality, improving performance and providing a modular and extendible implementation. The goal of this ongoing project is to develop a system that provides both a basis for future applications and a framework for further research in the area of autonomous planning for spacecraft. In this article, we present an introductory overview of the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner. We present a new and simplified definition of the planning problem, describe the basics of the planning process, lay out the new system design and examine the functionality of the core reasoning module.

  10. Investigational Antimicrobial Agents of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  11. Phytonutrients as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients present in various foods plays an important role in maintaining the normal functions of the human body. The major nutrients present in foods include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. Besides these, there are some bioactive food components known as "phytonutrients" that play an important role in human health. They have tremendous impact on the health care system and may provide medical health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of disease and various physiological disorders. Phytonutrients play a positive role by maintaining and modulating immune function to prevent specific diseases. Being natural products, they hold a great promise in clinical therapy as they possess no side effects that are usually associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. They are also comparatively cheap and thus significantly reduce health care cost. Phytonutrients are the plant nutrients with specific biological activities that support human health. Some of the important bioactive phytonutrients include polyphenols, terpenoids, resveratrol, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, carotenoids, limonoids, glucosinolates, phytoestrogens, phytosterols, anthocyanins, ω-3 fatty acids, and probiotics. They play specific pharmacological effects in human health such as anti-microbial, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anti-spasmodic, anti-cancer, anti-aging, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, neuroprotective, hypotensive, diabetes, osteoporosis, CNS stimulant, analgesic, protection from UVB-induced carcinogenesis, immuno-modulator, and carminative. This mini-review attempts to summarize the major important types of phytonutrients and their role in promoting human health and as therapeutic agents along with the current market trend and commercialization.

  12. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  13. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wan-Ting; Dai, Ming-Xiang; Xue, Fang-Zheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all of the agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all of the agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups and that agents in the same group collaborate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203080 and 61473051) and the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City (Grant No. CSTC 2011BB0081).

  14. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials.

  15. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  16. God's Beliefs versus Mother's: The Development of Nonhuman Agent Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Justin L.; Richert, Rebekah A.; Driesenga, Amanda

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments examined assumption that children attribute human properties to nonhuman agents. Two- to 8-year-olds participated in false-belief tests concerning human and various nonhuman agents, including animals and God, and in a modified perspective-taking task including nonhuman agents. Results suggested that children do not consistently…

  17. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course.Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations,which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

  18. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    : Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course. Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations, which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

  19. Agent Reward Shaping for Alleviating Traffic Congestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Traffic congestion problems provide a unique environment to study how multi-agent systems promote desired system level behavior. What is particularly interesting in this class of problems is that no individual action is intrinsically "bad" for the system but that combinations of actions among agents lead to undesirable outcomes, As a consequence, agents need to learn how to coordinate their actions with those of other agents, rather than learn a particular set of "good" actions. This problem is ubiquitous in various traffic problems, including selecting departure times for commuters, routes for airlines, and paths for data routers. In this paper we present a multi-agent approach to two traffic problems, where far each driver, an agent selects the most suitable action using reinforcement learning. The agent rewards are based on concepts from collectives and aim to provide the agents with rewards that are both easy to learn and that if learned, lead to good system level behavior. In the first problem, we study how agents learn the best departure times of drivers in a daily commuting environment and how following those departure times alleviates congestion. In the second problem, we study how agents learn to select desirable routes to improve traffic flow and minimize delays for. all drivers.. In both sets of experiments,. agents using collective-based rewards produced near optimal performance (93-96% of optimal) whereas agents using system rewards (63-68%) barely outperformed random action selection (62-64%) and agents using local rewards (48-72%) performed worse than random in some instances.

  20. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  1. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  2. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  3. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  4. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals including radium-223.

    PubMed

    Brady, Darren; Parker, Chris C; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2013-01-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides including samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate and strontium-89 have been used for decades in the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially from prostate cancer. Emerging evidence of improved survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the first-in-class α-radionuclide, radium-223 (Ra) has rekindled interest in the role of bone-seeking radionuclide therapy.We review the literature for randomized controlled trials of bone-seeking radionuclides and explore some of the issues regarding the optimal use of these agents. In particular, we discuss dose, dose rate, radiobiology, and quality of radiation and postulate on potential future directions in particular combination schedules. β-Emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides have proven ability to control pain in prostate cancer metastatic to bone with pain response rates in the order of 60% to 70% when used as single agents. Most of the published trials were underpowered to detect differences in survival; however, there is evidence of the potential for disease modification when these agents are used in combination with chemotherapy or in multiple cycles.Data from the recent phase III ALSYMPCA trial that compared Ra to placebo in symptomatic CRPC demonstrate a significant improvement in median overall survival of 3.6 months for patients with symptomatic CRPC metastatic to bone treated with 6 cycles of the α-emitting radionuclide Ra compared with placebo. The success of Ra in improving survival in CRPC will lead this agent to become part of the treatment paradigm for this disease, and with such an excellent safety profile, Ra has huge potential in combination strategies as well as for use earlier in the natural history of metastatic prostate cancer.

  5. Putative neuroprotective agents in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Maes, Michael; Anderson, George; Dean, Olivia M; Moylan, Steven; Berk, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In many individuals with major neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, their disease characteristics are consistent with a neuroprogressive illness. This includes progressive structural brain changes, cognitive and functional decline, poorer treatment response and an increasing vulnerability to relapse with chronicity. The underlying molecular mechanisms of neuroprogression are thought to include neurotrophins and regulation of neurogenesis and apoptosis, neurotransmitters, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, cortisol and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and epigenetic influences. Knowledge of the involvement of each of these pathways implies that specific agents that act on some or multiple of these pathways may thus block this cascade and have neuroprotective properties. This paper reviews the potential of the most promising of these agents, including lithium and other known psychotropics, aspirin, minocycline, statins, N-acetylcysteine, leptin and melatonin. These agents are putative neuroprotective agents for schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  6. Detecting biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Song, Linan; Ahn, Soohyoun; Walt, David R

    2005-10-01

    We developed a fiber-optic, microsphere-based, high-density array composed of 18 species-specific probe microsensors to identify biological warfare agents. We simultaneously identified multiple biological warfare agents in environmental samples by looking at specific probe responses after hybridization and response patterns of the multiplexed array.

  7. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  8. Change Agent Survival Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Folwell L.

    2011-01-01

    Consulting is a rough racket. Only a tarantula hair above IRS agents, meter maids and used car sales people, the profession is a prickly burr for slings and arrows. Throw in education, focus on dysfunctional schools and call oneself a "change agent," and this bad rap all but disappears. Unfortunately, though, consulting/coaching/mentoring in…

  9. Ferrimagnetic susceptibility contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bach-Gansmo, T

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on superparamagnetic particles have been in clinical development for more than 5 years, and the complexity of their effects is still not elucidated. The relaxivities are frequently used to give an idea of their efficacy, but these parameters can only be used if they are concentration independent. For large superparamagnetic systems, the evolution of the transverse magnetization is biexponential, after an initial loss of magnetization. Both these characteristics of large superparamagnetic systems should lead to prudence in using the relaxivities as indicators of contrast medium efficacy. Susceptibility induced artefacts have been associated with the use of superparamagnetic contrast agents since the first imaging evaluation took place. The range of concentrations where good contrast effect was achieved without inducing artefacts, as well as blurring and metal artefacts were evaluated. The influence of motion on the induction of artefacts was studied, and compared to the artefacts induced by a paramagnetic agent subject to motion. With a suitable concentration of a negative contrast agent, a signal void could be achieved in the region prone to motion, and no artefacts were induced. If the concentration was too high, a displacement of the region close to the contrast agent was observed. The artefacts occurred in a volume surrounding the contrast agent, i.e., also outside the imaging plane. In comparison a positive, paramagnetic contrast agent induced heavy artefacts in the phase encoding direction, appearing as both high intensity regions and black holes, in a mosaic pattern. Clinical trials of the oral contrast agent OMP for abdominal MR imaging showed this agent to be safe and efficacious. OMP increased the diagnostic efficacy of abdominal MR imaging in 2 of 3 cases examined, with a significant decrease in motion artefacts. Susceptibility contrast agents may also be of use in the evaluation of small lesions in the liver. Particulate material

  10. Standard Agent Framework 1

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4)more » Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.« less

  11. How do agents represent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Alex

    Representation is inherent to the concept of an agent, but its importance in complex systems has not yet been widely recognised. In this paper I introduce Peirce's theory of signs, which facilitates a definition of representation in general. In summary, representation means that for some agent, a model is used to stand in for another entity in a way that shapes the behaviour of the agent with respect to that entity. Representation in general is then related to the theories of representation that have developed within different disciplines. I compare theories of representation from metaphysics, military theory and systems theory. Additional complications arise in explaining the special case of mental representations, which is the focus of cognitive science. I consider the dominant theory of cognition — that the brain is a representational device — as well as the sceptical anti-representational response. Finally, I argue that representation distinguishes agents from non-representational objects: agents are objects capable of representation.

  12. Phase I Study of Oxaliplatin in Combination With Capecitabine and Radiotherapy as Postoperative Treatment for Stage II and III Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of oxaliplatin (OXA) combined with capecitabine and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment in patients with operable rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 21 patients with Stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma after curative surgery were treated with radiotherapy to a total dose of 50 Gy in 5 weeks. OXA was administered at a dosage of 40 (n = 6), 50 (n = 3),60 (n = 3), 70 (n = 3), or 80 mg/m{sup 2} (n = 6) once a week for 2 weeks (first cycle) followed by a second cycle after a 7-day break. Capecitabine at a fixed dose of 1,300 mg/m{sup 2}/d was administered orally at the same schedule as for OXA. DLT was defined as Grade 3 or 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Grade 1-3 leukopenia, diarrhea, and nausea/vomiting were the most common toxic side effects, and most were Grade 1-2. A DLT was first observed in 1 of 3 patients at 40 mg/m{sup 2} (Grade 3 diarrhea) but was not observed in the next 3 patients at the same level or in patients who received a dose level of 50-70 mg/m{sup 2}. At 80 mg/m{sup 2}, DLT occurred in 3 of 6 patients (1 Grade 4 leukopenia and 2 Grade 3 diarrhea). Conclusions: OXA combined with a fixed dose of capecitabine at 625 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily by mouth plus radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting was tolerable and clinically feasible. The maximal tolerated dose of OXA in this setting was 80 mg/m{sup 2}, comparable to the maximal tolerated dose of OXA in the neoadjuvant setting.

  13. Preoperative Radiotherapy of Advanced Rectal Cancer With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Phase I-II Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian; Arnold, Dirk; Dellas, Kathrin; Liersch, Torsten; Hipp, Matthias; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf; Hinke, Axel; Roedel, Claus

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: A pooled analysis of three prospective trials of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal cancer by using oxaliplatin and capecitabine with or without cetuximab was performed to evaluate the impact of additional cetuximab on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and tumor regression (TRG) grades. Methods and Materials: Of 202 patients, 172 patients met the inclusion criteria (primary tumor stage II/III, M0). All patients received concurrent RCT, and 46 patients received additional cetuximab therapy. A correlation of pretreatment clinicopathologic factors and cetuximab treatment with early pCR rates (TRG > 50%) was performed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Toxicity data were recorded for all patients. Results: Of 172 patients, 24 (14%) patients achieved a pCR, and 84 of 172 (71%) patients showed a TRG of >50% in the surgical specimen assessment after preoperative treatment. Age, gender, and T/N stages, as well as localization of the tumor, were not associated with pCR or good TRG. The pCR rate was 16% after preoperative RCT alone and 9% with concurrent cetuximab therapy (p = 0.32). A significantly reduced TRG of >50% was found after RCT with cetuximab compared to RCT alone (p = 0.0035). This was validated by a multivariate analysis with all available clinical factors (p = 0.0037). Acute toxicity and surgical complications were not increased with additional cetuximab. Conclusions: Triple therapy with RCT and cetuximab seems to be feasible, with no unexpected toxicity. Early response assessment (TRG), however, suggests subadditive interaction. A longer follow-up (and finally randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates.

  14. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin in Rectal Cancer: Is There Still a Place for Ecoendoscopic Ultrasound?

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Sola, Josu; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Moreno, Marta; Aristu, Javier

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: The main goals of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) in rectal cancer are to achieve pathological response and to ensure tumor control with functional surgery when possible. Assessment of the concordance between clinical and pathological responses is necessary to make decisions regarding alternative conservative procedures. The present study evaluates the patterns of response after a preoperative CHRT regimen, and the value of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in assessing response. Methods and Materials: A total of 51 EUS-staged T3 to T4 and/or N0 to N+ rectal cancer patients received preoperative CHRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy and capecitabine/oxaliplatin (XELOX) followed by radical resection. Clinical response was assesed by EUS. Rates of pathological tumor regression grade (TRG) and lymph node (LN) involvement were determined in the surgical specimen. Clinical and pathological responses were compared, and the accuracy of EUS in assessing response was calculated. Results: Twenty-four patients (45%) achieved a major pathological response (complete or >95% pathological response (TRG 3+/4)). Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of EUS in predicting pathological T response after preoperative CHRT were 77.8%, 37.5%, 60%, and 58%, respectively. The EUS sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for nodal staging were 44%, 88%, 88%, and 44%, respectively. Furthermore, EUS after CHRT accurately predicted the absence of LN involvement in 7 of 7 patients (100%) with major pathological response of the primary tumor. Conclusion: Preoperative IMRT with concomitant XELOX induces favorable rates of major pathological response. EUS has a limited ability to predict primary tumor response after preoperative CHRT, but it is useful for accurately determining LN status. EUS may have a potential value in identifying patients with a very low risk of LN involvement in association

  15. Tissue MicroRNAs as Predictors of Outcome in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with First Line Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin with or without Bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Mogens K.; Dehlendorff, Christian; Linnemann, Dorte; Nielsen, Boye S.; Larsen, Jim S.; Østerlind, Kell; Nielsen, Svend E.; Tarpgaard, Line S.; Qvortrup, Camilla; Pfeiffer, Per; Holländer, Niels H.; Keldsen, Nina; Hansen, Torben F.; Jensen, Brita B.; Høgdall, Estrid V. S.; Jensen, Benny V.; Johansen, Julia S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer tissue can predict effectiveness of bevacizumab added to capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPEOX) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Experimental Design Patients with mCRC treated with first line CAPEOX and bevacizumab (CAPEOXBEV): screening (n = 212) and validation (n = 121) cohorts, or CAPEOX alone: control cohort (n = 127), were identified retrospectively and archival primary tumor samples were collected. Expression of 754 miRNAs was analyzed in the screening cohort using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays and expression levels were related to time to disease progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Significant miRNAs from the screening study were analyzed in all three cohorts using custom PCR arrays. In situ hybridization (ISH) was done for selected miRNAs. Results In the screening study, 26 miRNAs were significantly correlated with outcome in multivariate analyses. Twenty-two miRNAs were selected for further study. Higher miR-664-3p expression and lower miR-455-5p expression were predictive of improved outcome in the CAPEOXBEV cohorts and showed a significant interaction with bevacizumab effectiveness. The effects were strongest for OS. Both miRNAs showed high expression in stromal cells. Higher expression of miR-196b-5p and miR-592 predicted improved outcome regardless of bevacizumab treatment, with similar effect estimates in all three cohorts. Conclusions We have identified potentially predictive miRNAs for bevacizumab effectiveness and additional miRNAs that could be related to chemotherapy effectiveness or prognosis in patients with mCRC. Our findings need further validation in large cohorts, preferably from completed randomized trials. PMID:25329796

  16. Multi-agent autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  17. Selection of luting agents, part 1.

    PubMed

    Jivraj, Sajid A; Kim, Tae Hyung; Donovan, Terry E

    2006-02-01

    The clinical success of indirect restorations is dependent on multiple factors that include preparation design, mechanical forces, restorative material selection, oral hygiene, and selection of a proper luting agent. The selection of the luting agent is dependent on the specific clinical situation, the type of restoration utilized and the physical, biologic, and handling properties of the luting agent. Although it is important to choose the best luting agent for each clinical situation, far greater variations in physical properties result from improper manipulation of a given luting agent than exist between different types of cements. One study listed loss of retention as the third-leading cause of prosthetic replacement, with failure occurring after only 5.8 years in service. The primary purpose of the luting procedure is to achieve a durable bond and to have good marginal adaptation of the luting material to the restoration and tooth. Conventional cements have always relied upon retention and resistance forms in tooth preparations; Adhesive-type luting agents offer the clinician an added advantage by bonding to the tooth structure. Three main types of conventional "cements" are commonly used, zinc phosphate and the polyelectrolyte cements polycarboxylate, and glass ionomer cements. Because of its long history of successful clinical use, zinc phosphate is considered the gold standard against which all other luting agents are compared because of its long clinical history of successful use. Currently, two additional types of luting agents have gained considerable popularity. These include the resin-modified glass ionomer cements and resin cements. The resin cement category includes light-cured, dual-cured and chemically cured agents. The purpose of this article is to discuss the ideal attributes of a luting agent and make clinical recommendations for their use.

  18. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-07-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies.

  19. Biological warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-01-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies. PMID:21829313

  20. Irinotecan Plus S-1 Followed by Hepatectomy for a Patient with Initially Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases, Who Showed Severe Drug Rash with Oxaliplatin Plus 5-FU and Leucovorin (FOLFOX)

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Toru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Imai, Katsunori; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    For unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), hepatic resection with or without chemotherapy is the only curative treatment that sufficiently achieves long-term survival. However, occasional severe allergic responses to anticancer drugs necessitate treatment discontinuation. A 45-year-old woman presented with metachronous unresectable colorectal liver metastases. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin plus 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) was initiated, but severe allergic dermatitis developed after the second cycle. Although she reported no prior history of adverse reactions to tegafur-uracil, a drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed an allergic response to 5-FU. We subsequently replaced with Irinotecan plus S-1 (IRIS) chemotherapy which was well tolerated and resulted in a partial response after 3 cycles. As a result, right trisectionectomy was successfully performed and no recurrence was detected in the following 3 years. A severe allergic reaction to intravenous 5-FU-containing drug regimens can be successfully alleviated by switching to S-1-containing regimens such as IRIS or S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX). PMID:25031875

  1. Dioxin, agent orange

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: dioxin, a prevalent problem; nobody wanted dioxin; agent organe and Vietnam; what we know about and may learn about agent orange and Veterans' health; agent organe and birth defects; dioxin in Missouri; 2, 4, 5-T: the U.S.' disappearing herbicide; Seveso: high-level environmental exposure; the nitro explosion; industrial exposures to dioxin; company behavior in the face of dioxin exposures; dioxin and specific cancers; animal tests of dioxin toxicity; dioxin decions; the present and the future.

  2. 78 FR 56234 - Multi-Agency Informational Meeting Concerning Compliance with the Select Agent Regulations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Compliance with the Select Agent Regulations; Public Webcast AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... guidance related to the select agent regulations established under the Public Health Security and... 11(Security) of the select agent regulations including information security, physical security,...

  3. Riot Control Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly ... agent from your skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will ...

  4. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  5. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  6. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  7. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  8. A Multi-Agent System for Intelligent Online Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riordan, Colm; Griffith, Josephine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the system architecture of an intelligent Web-based education system that includes user modeling agents, information filtering agents for automatic information gathering, and the multi-agent interaction. Discusses information management; user interaction; support for collaborative peer-peer learning; implementation; testing; and future…

  9. Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fuhua, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents" reports on the most recent advances in agent technologies for distributed learning. Chapters are devoted to the various aspects of intelligent software agents in distributed learning, including the methodological and technical issues on where and how intelligent agents…

  10. 32 CFR 552.66 - Actions required by agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... officer or counselor. Agents must complete DA Form 2056 (Commercial Insurance Solicitation Record). Blank DA Forms 2056 (not allotment forms) will be available to insurance agents on request. In the “Remarks” section of DA Form 2056, agents will include all pertinent information and a clear statement...

  11. Agent amplified communication

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.; Selman, B.; Milewski, A.

    1996-12-31

    We propose an agent-based framework for assisting and simplifying person-to-person communication for information gathering tasks. As an example, we focus on locating experts for any specified topic. In our approach, the informal person-to-person networks that exist within an organization are used to {open_quotes}referral chain{close_quotes} requests for expertise. User-agents help automate this process. The agents generate referrals by analyzing records of e-mail communication patterns. Simulation results show that the higher responsiveness of an agent-based system can be effectively traded for the higher accuracy of a completely manual approach. Furthermore, preliminary experience with a group of users on a prototype system has shown that useful automatic referrals can be found in practice. Our experience with actual users has also shown that privacy concerns are central to the successful deployment of personal agents: an advanced agent-based system will therefore need to reason about issues involving trust and authority.

  12. Proceedings of the Agent 2002 Conference on Social Agents : Ecology, Exchange, and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C., ed.; Sallach, D., ed.

    2003-04-10

    Welcome to the ''Proceedings'' of the third in a series of agent simulation conferences cosponsored by Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago. The theme of this year's conference, ''Social Agents: Ecology, Exchange and Evolution'', was selected to foster the exchange of ideas on some of the most important social processes addressed by agent simulation models, namely: (1) The translation of ecology and ecological constraints into social dynamics; (2) The role of exchange processes, including the peer dependencies they create; and (3) The dynamics by which, and the attractor states toward which, social processes evolve. As stated in the ''Call for Papers'', throughout the social sciences, the simulation of social agents has emerged as an innovative and powerful research methodology. The promise of this approach, however, is accompanied by many challenges. First, modeling complexity in agents, environments, and interactions is non-trivial, and these representations must be explored and assessed systematically. Second, strategies used to represent complexities are differentially applicable to any particular problem space. Finally, to achieve sufficient generality, the design and experimentation inherent in agent simulation must be coupled with social and behavioral theory. Agent 2002 provides a forum for reviewing the current state of agent simulation scholarship, including research designed to address such outstanding issues. This year's conference introduces an extensive range of domains, models, and issues--from pre-literacy to future projections, from ecology to oligopolistic markets, and from design to validation. Four invited speakers highlighted major themes emerging from social agent simulation.

  13. Sunscreening agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Latha, M S; Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B R

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents.

  14. Who's your neighbor? neighbor identification for agent-based modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; Howe, T. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation, based on the cellular automata paradigm, is an approach to modeling complex systems comprised of interacting autonomous agents. Open questions in agent-based simulation focus on scale-up issues encountered in simulating large numbers of agents. Specifically, how many agents can be included in a workable agent-based simulation? One of the basic tenets of agent-based modeling and simulation is that agents only interact and exchange locally available information with other agents located in their immediate proximity or neighborhood of the space in which the agents are situated. Generally, an agent's set of neighbors changes rapidly as a simulation proceeds through time and as the agents move through space. Depending on the topology defined for agent interactions, proximity may be defined by spatial distance for continuous space, adjacency for grid cells (as in cellular automata), or by connectivity in social networks. Identifying an agent's neighbors is a particularly time-consuming computational task and can dominate the computational effort in a simulation. Two challenges in agent simulation are (1) efficiently representing an agent's neighborhood and the neighbors in it and (2) efficiently identifying an agent's neighbors at any time in the simulation. These problems are addressed differently for different agent interaction topologies. While efficient approaches have been identified for agent neighborhood representation and neighbor identification for agents on a lattice with general neighborhood configurations, other techniques must be used when agents are able to move freely in space. Techniques for the analysis and representation of spatial data are applicable to the agent neighbor identification problem. This paper extends agent neighborhood simulation techniques from the lattice topology to continuous space, specifically R2. Algorithms based on hierarchical (quad trees) or non-hierarchical data structures (grid cells) are

  15. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  16. MpcAgent

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of themore » building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.« less

  17. MpcAgent

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of the building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.

  18. Hypersensitivity reactions to biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Alessandra; Castells, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Biologic agents (BAs) are important therapeutic tools; their use has rapidly expanded and they are used in oncology, immunology, and inflammatory diseases. Their use may be limited, however, by adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current literature on clinical presentation and pathogenic mechanisms of both acute and delayed reactions. In addition, procedures for management of BA-induced reactions, including preventive and diagnostic work-up, are provided. Lastly, this article summarizes the current knowledge of desensitization to several widely used monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Anticancer agents from marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjun; Zhou, Feng; Al-Kareef, Ammar M Q; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of anticancer active compounds found in the marine ecosystems. More than 5300 different known metabolites are from sponges and their associated microorganisms. To survive in the complicated marine environment, most of the sponge species have evolved chemical means to defend against predation. Such chemical adaptation produces many biologically active secondary metabolites including anticancer agents. This review highlights novel secondary metabolites in sponges which inhibited diverse cancer species in the recent 5 years. These natural products of marine sponges are categorized based on various chemical characteristics.

  20. Method For Detecting Biological Agents

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan W.; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Whitten, David G.

    2005-12-27

    A sensor is provided including a polymer capable of having an alterable measurable property from the group of luminescence and electrical conductivity, the polymer having an intermediate combination of a recognition element, a tethering element and a property-altering element bound thereto and capable of altering the measurable property, the intermediate combination adapted for subsequent separation from the polymer upon exposure to an agent having an affinity for binding to the recognition element whereupon the separation of the intermediate combination from the polymer results in a detectable change in the alterable measurable property, and, detecting said detectable change in the alterable measurable property.

  1. VOLTTRON: An Agent Execution Platform for the Electric Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.; Ciraci, Selim; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Tews, Cody W.

    2012-06-05

    Volttron is an agent execution platform that is engineered for use in the electric power system. Volttron provides resource guarantees for agents and the platform including memory and processor utilization; authentication and authorization services; directory services for agent and resource location; and agent mobility. Unlike most other agent platforms, Volttron does not depend on a single agent authoring language. Instead, we chose to design and implement Volttron as a platform service and framework that is decoupled from the agent execution environment. A prototype implementation of Volttron has been written in Python (using Python v2.7.2) and we have executed agents written in Python and Java and as shell scripts. The intended use of Volttron is in the power distribution system for managing distributed generation, demand-response, and plug-in electric vehicles.

  2. [Decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination].

    PubMed

    Ohmachi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    When radionuclides are accidentally ingested or inhaled, blood circulation or tissue/organ deposition of the radionuclides causes systemic or local radiation effects. In such cases, decorporation therapy is used to reduce the health risks due to their intake. Decorporation therapy includes reduction and/or inhibition of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, isotopic dilution, and the use of diuretics, adsorbents, and chelating agents. For example, penicillamine is recommended as a chelating agent for copper contamination, and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid is approved for the treatment of internal contamination with plutonium. During chelation therapy, the removal effect of the drugs should be monitored using a whole-body counter and/or bioassay. Some authorities, such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and International Atomic Energy Agency, have reported recommended decorporation agents for each radionuclide. However, few drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and many are off-label-use agents. Because many decontamination agents are drugs that have been available for a long time and have limited efficacy, the development of new, higher-efficacy drugs has been carried out mainly in the USA and France. In this article, in addition to an outline of decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination, an outline of our research on decorporation agents for actinide (uranium and plutonium) contamination and for radio-cesium contamination is also presented. PMID:25832835

  3. Intelligent Agents, Internet Information and Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, James

    1995-01-01

    Reviews intelligent software agents and their relevance to networked information, particularly concerning future patterns of information gathering in research and education. Discussion of Internet information includes differing interfaces, the need for indexing, and map-making and information overload. Additional highlights include characteristics…

  4. Modelling of robotic work cells using agent based-approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sękala, A.; Banaś, W.; Gwiazda, A.; Monica, Z.; Kost, G.; Hryniewicz, P.

    2016-08-01

    In the case of modern manufacturing systems the requirements, both according the scope and according characteristics of technical procedures are dynamically changing. This results in production system organization inability to keep up with changes in a market demand. Accordingly, there is a need for new design methods, characterized, on the one hand with a high efficiency and on the other with the adequate level of the generated organizational solutions. One of the tools that could be used for this purpose is the concept of agent systems. These systems are the tools of artificial intelligence. They allow assigning to agents the proper domains of procedures and knowledge so that they represent in a self-organizing system of an agent environment, components of a real system. The agent-based system for modelling robotic work cell should be designed taking into consideration many limitations considered with the characteristic of this production unit. It is possible to distinguish some grouped of structural components that constitute such a system. This confirms the structural complexity of a work cell as a specific production system. So it is necessary to develop agents depicting various aspects of the work cell structure. The main groups of agents that are used to model a robotic work cell should at least include next pattern representatives: machine tool agents, auxiliary equipment agents, robots agents, transport equipment agents, organizational agents as well as data and knowledge bases agents. In this way it is possible to create the holarchy of the agent-based system.

  5. Agent Persuasion Mechanism of Acquaintance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinghua, Wu; Wenguang, Lu; Hailiang, Meng

    Agent persuasion can improve negotiation efficiency in dynamic environment based on its initiative and autonomy, and etc., which is being affected much more by acquaintance. Classification of acquaintance on agent persuasion is illustrated, and the agent persuasion model of acquaintance is also illustrated. Then the concept of agent persuasion degree of acquaintance is given. Finally, relative interactive mechanism is elaborated.

  6. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  7. E-Learning Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Dawn G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the advantages of using intelligent agents to facilitate the location and customization of appropriate e-learning resources and to foster collaboration in e-learning environments. Design/methodology/approach: This paper proposes an e-learning environment that can be used to provide customized…

  8. Remote Agent Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benard, Doug; Dorais, Gregory A.; Gamble, Ed; Kanefsky, Bob; Kurien, James; Millar, William; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, Pandu; Rouquette, Nicolas; Rajan, Kanna; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Remote Agent (RA) is a model-based, reusable artificial intelligence (At) software system that enables goal-based spacecraft commanding and robust fault recovery. RA was flight validated during an experiment on board of DS1 between May 17th and May 21th, 1999.

  9. Can Subscription Agents Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Marcia

    1985-01-01

    With the saturation of traditional markets for their services, subscription agents have evolved from orders and invoices to serving customers by communicating with librarians and publishers and making automated and paper products available. Magazine fulfillment centers, publisher discounts, and electronic publishing will influence the subscription…

  10. Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Smart, N.G.; Wai, C.M.; Lin, Y.; Kwang, Y.H.

    1998-11-24

    Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO{sub 2} and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process. 1 fig.

  11. Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Smart, Neil G.; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Kwang, Yak Hwa

    1998-01-01

    Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO.sub.2, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO.sub.2 and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process.

  12. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  13. Camouflaging Agents for Vitiligo Patients.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Claudia; Porto, Dennis A; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Lim, Henry W

    2016-04-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired condition resulting in patches of depigmented skin that is cosmetically disfiguring and can subsequently be psychologically disturbing. For patients seeking to mask their vitiligo, camouflage options have historically been limited and been designated as a cosmetic, rather than a medical, concern. As research has indicated that proper concealment of vitiligo lesions can vastly improve quality of life, we believe it is essential that dermatologists become aware of all the options available to their patients and that discussions of camouflage options be broached from the first visit. Methods for concealment include cosmetic tattoos, dihydroxyacetone, general cosmetics, and various topical camouflage agents, including the newest product, Microskin™. We conducted a literature review of all of the available options for vitiligo concealment and evaluated their advantages and disadvantages. Ultimately, temporary methods of concealment are recommended; but the particular agent used can come from discussion with the patient based on the location of the lesions, degree of concealment desired, cost, and availability. PMID:27050692

  14. Efficacy of combined gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and pegaspargase (P-gemox regimen) in patients with newly diagnosed advanced-stage or relapsed/refractory extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhong-jun; Huang, Hui-qiang; Lin, Tong-yu; Jiang, Wen-qi; Lu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is an aggressive neoplasm with a poor outcome. Asparaginase-based regimens are recommended for patients with advanced-stage or relapsed/refractory ENKTL. We retrospectively investigated the efficacy and toxicity of combined gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and pegaspargase (P-gemox) in these patients. A total of 35 patients with newly diagnosed stage III–IV, relapsed or refractory ENKTL were treated with 2 to 8 cycles of P-gemox: gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2) and oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) injected intravenously and pegaspargase (2500 IU/m2) injected intramuscularly on day 1 and repeated every 2 weeks. Upon completion of treatment, the overall response rate was 80.0%, with a complete response in 51.4% of patients. The 1-, 2- and 3- year progression-free survival rates were 45.0%, 38.6% and 38.6%, and overall survival rates were 76.8%, 64.7% and 64.7%, respectively. Patients who attained a complete response showed better progression-free survival than those without a complete response (p = 0.01). The major adverse effects were hematologic toxicity and liver dysfunction. Grade 3/4 leucopenia and neutropenia occurred in 40.0% of patients. No treatment-related deaths occurred. These results indicate the P-gemox regimen is a safe and effective treatment for patients with newly diagnosed advanced-stage or relapsed/refractory ENKTL. We anticipate future prospective trials will confirm the efficacy. PMID:27093153

  15. Including Conflict in Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvin, Martin

    Conflict is the basis of all stories and thus should appear in some form in the first sentence. There are three kinds of conflict: people vs. people; people vs. nature; and people vs. themselves. Conflict must be repeated in all the various elements of the story's structure, including the plot, which is the plan of action telling what happens to…

  16. Family Living, Including Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlano, George

    This volume describes and evaluates 21 selected New York City Board of Education Umbrella Programs for the 1974-1975 school year. The programs include: (1) the parent resource center, (2) the teacher self-help program, (3) the East Harlem pre-kindergarten center, (4) the Brooklyn College volunteer tutoring program, (5) the parent education for…

  17. Do Low Molecular Weight Agents Cause More Severe Asthma than High Molecular Weight Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Meca, Olga; Cruz, María-Jesús; Sánchez-Ortiz, Mónica; González-Barcala, Francisco-Javier; Ojanguren, Iñigo; Munoz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to analyse whether patients with occupational asthma (OA) caused by low molecular weight (LMW) agents differed from patients with OA caused by high molecular weight (HMW) with regard to risk factors, asthma presentation and severity, and response to various diagnostic tests. Methods Seventy-eight patients with OA diagnosed by positive specific inhalation challenge (SIC) were included. Anthropometric characteristics, atopic status, occupation, latency periods, asthma severity according to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) control classification, lung function tests and SIC results were analysed. Results OA was induced by an HMW agent in 23 patients (29%) and by an LMW agent in 55 (71%). A logistic regression analysis confirmed that patients with OA caused by LMW agents had a significantly higher risk of severity according to the GINA classification after adjusting for potential confounders (OR = 3.579, 95% CI 1.136–11.280; p = 0.029). During the SIC, most patients with OA caused by HMW agents presented an early reaction (82%), while in patients with OA caused by LMW agents the response was mainly late (73%) (p = 0.0001). Similarly, patients with OA caused by LMW agents experienced a greater degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, measured as the difference in the methacholine dose-response ratio (DRR) before and after SIC (1.77, range 0–16), compared with patients with OA caused by HMW agents (0.87, range 0–72), (p = 0.024). Conclusions OA caused by LMW agents may be more severe than that caused by HMW agents. The severity of the condition may be determined by the different mechanisms of action of these agents. PMID:27280473

  18. Nondestructive intervention to multi-agent systems through an intelligent agent.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    For a given multi-agent system where the local interaction rule of the existing agents can not be re-designed, one way to intervene the collective behavior of the system is to add one or a few special agents into the group which are still treated as normal agents by the existing ones. We study how to lead a Vicsek-like flocking model to reach synchronization by adding special agents. A popular method is to add some simple leaders (fixed-headings agents). However, we add one intelligent agent, called 'shill', which uses online feedback information of the group to decide the shill's moving direction at each step. A novel strategy for the shill to coordinate the group is proposed. It is strictly proved that a shill with this strategy and a limited speed can synchronize every agent in the group. The computer simulations show the effectiveness of this strategy in different scenarios, including different group sizes, shill speed, and with or without noise. Compared to the method of adding some fixed-heading leaders, our method can guarantee synchronization for any initial configuration in the deterministic scenario and improve the synchronization level significantly in low density groups, or model with noise. This suggests the advantage and power of feedback information in intervention of collective behavior.

  19. Emulsified blasting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chironis, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    This article describes an improved blasting agent which is being tailor-blended with bulk ANFO to provide more explosive energy and better water resistance when the blasting conditions call for it. The proportions of the emulsion/ANFO mix are easily changed at the blasthole site because both materials can be selectively mixed in modified bulk-explosive trucks before loading the blasting agents into the holes. Such blends are helping speed stripping at a number of surface mines and are leading to cost savings in production, ranging from 10% to 30%, depending upon application, even though the actual cost of a blend will be higher than if bulk ANFO is used alone.

  20. The highly intelligent virtual agents for modeling financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Chen, Y.; Huang, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Researchers have borrowed many theories from statistical physics, like ensemble, Ising model, etc., to study complex adaptive systems through agent-based modeling. However, one fundamental difference between entities (such as spins) in physics and micro-units in complex adaptive systems is that the latter are usually with high intelligence, such as investors in financial markets. Although highly intelligent virtual agents are essential for agent-based modeling to play a full role in the study of complex adaptive systems, how to create such agents is still an open question. Hence, we propose three principles for designing high artificial intelligence in financial markets and then build a specific class of agents called iAgents based on these three principles. Finally, we evaluate the intelligence of iAgents through virtual index trading in two different stock markets. For comparison, we also include three other types of agents in this contest, namely, random traders, agents from the wealth game (modified on the famous minority game), and agents from an upgraded wealth game. As a result, iAgents perform the best, which gives a well support for the three principles. This work offers a general framework for the further development of agent-based modeling for various kinds of complex adaptive systems.

  1. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    2000-02-08

    Bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  2. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, M.P.; Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo[2.2.2] octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1] heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  3. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo›2.2.2! octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo›2.2.1! heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  4. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  5. Environmental mimics of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Claborn, David M

    2004-12-01

    There are several natural and artificial factors that mimic the effects of chemical warfare agents, thereby causing unwarranted alarm and confusion on the battlefield. Symptoms associated with chemical warfare include paralysis, muscle tremors, heavy salivation, severe burns, blistering, and corrosive skin injuries among others. Similar symptoms can be produced from a variety of environmental sources, artificial and natural. This article reviews several published and unpublished examples of environmental factors that produce syndromes similar to those caused by these agents. Examples of such mimics include pesticides, blistering exudates from insects and plants, various types of bites, and naturally occurring diseases. The potential for confusion caused by these factors is discussed and means of discriminating between warfare agents and naturally occurring events are identified. Recommendations for the use of this information and for needed research are also discussed. PMID:15646185

  6. A review of responsive MRI contrast agents: 2005–2014

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Bernstein, Adam S.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on MRI contrast agents that are responsive to a change in a physiological biomarker. The response mechanisms are dependent on six physicochemical characteristics, including the accessibility of water to the agent, tumbling time, proton exchange rate, electron spin state, MR frequency, or superparamagnetism of the agent. These characteristics can be affected by changes in concentrations or activities of enzymes, proteins, nucleic acids, metabolites, or metal ions, or changes in redox state, pH, temperature, or light. A total of 117 examples are presented, including examples that employ nuclei other than 1H, which attests to the creativity of multidisciplinary research efforts to develop responsive MRI contrast agents. PMID:25355685

  7. Multi-Agent Design and Implementation for an Online Peer Help System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Anbo

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid advance of e-learning, the online peer help is playing increasingly important role. This paper explores the application of MAS to an online peer help system (MAPS). In the design phase, the architecture of MAPS is proposed, which consists of a set of agents including the personal agent, the course agent, the diagnosis agent, the DF…

  8. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  9. Collaborating with Autonomous Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Cross, Charles D.; Fan, Henry; Hempley, Lucas E.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc D.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated increase of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) entering into the National Airspace System, it is highly likely that vehicle operators will be teaming with fleets of small autonomous vehicles. The small vehicles may consist of sUAS, which are 55 pounds or less that typically will y at altitudes 400 feet and below, and small ground vehicles typically operating in buildings or defined small campuses. Typically, the vehicle operators are not concerned with manual control of the vehicle; instead they are concerned with the overall mission. In order for this vision of high-level mission operators working with fleets of vehicles to come to fruition, many human factors related challenges must be investigated and solved. First, the interface between the human operator and the autonomous agent must be at a level that the operator needs and the agents can understand. This paper details the natural language human factors e orts that NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator is focusing on. In particular these e orts focus on allowing the operator to interact with the system using speech and gestures rather than a mouse and keyboard. With this ability of the system to understand both speech and gestures, operators not familiar with the vehicle dynamics will be able to easily plan, initiate, and change missions using a language familiar to them rather than having to learn and converse in the vehicle's language. This will foster better teaming between the operator and the autonomous agent which will help lower workload, increase situation awareness, and improve performance of the system as a whole.

  10. Hydroxypyridonate and hydroxypyrimidinone chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Doble, Daniel M.; Sunderland, Christopher J.; Thompson, Marlon

    2005-01-25

    The present invention provides hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrimidone chelating agents. Also provides are Gd(III) complexes of these agents, which are useful as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The invention also provides methods of preparing the compounds of the invention, as well as methods of using the compounds in magnetic resonance imaging applications.

  11. Chemical warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, K.; Raza, S. K.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    2010-01-01

    Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW) is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided. PMID:21829312

  12. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  13. Eukaryotic transposable elements as mutagenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.E. . Banbury Center); McDonald, J.F. ); Weinstein, I.B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on eukaryotic transposable elements as mutagenic agents. Topics covered include: overview of prokaryotic transposable elements, mutational effects of transposable element insertions, inducers/regulators of transposable element expression and transposition, genomic stress and environmental effects, and inducers/regulators of retroviral element expression.

  14. Multiple medical problems following agent orange exposure.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Islam, A; Akhter, S; Dembinski, W; Kulaylat, M; Ambrus, C M

    2004-01-01

    A patient exposed to agent orange and a gunshot wound during the Vietnam War has developed multiple medical problems including nocardiosis, onychomycosis (Trichophyton rubrum), multiple thromboembolic episodes, hemochromatosis, diabetes mellitus type 2, diabetic neuropathy, activated protein C resistance (without Leyden V 1st mutation), degree A-V block, lung cancer (metastatic adenocarcinoma), carpal tunnel syndrome and arthritis. PMID:18084883

  15. [Use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents].

    PubMed

    Lapierre, A; Souquet, P-J

    2014-02-01

    Anemia is fairly common in lung neoplasms and adequate management can influence both the prognosis and the quality of life of patients. Anemia can stem from diverse mechanisms, and its management must include the search for correctable causes (iron deficiency, inflammation, disease- or treatment-related), and their subsequent treatment. Use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, namely recombinant erythropoietin, results in hemoglobin increase, fewer blood transfusions, and better quality of life. However, there is also a significant increase in thromboembolic risk associated with this treatment, and their effect on overall survival is still debated. Thus, their use must be restricted to patients treated with palliative intent, receiving chemotherapy but no radiotherapy, with a baseline hemoglobin level under 100 g/L, and target hemoglobin level must not exceed 120 g/L.

  16. Holograms as Teaching Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robin A.

    2013-02-01

    Hungarian physicist Dennis Gabor won the Pulitzer Prize for his 1947 introduction of basic holographic principles, but it was not until the invention of the laser in 1960 that research scientists, physicians, technologists and the general public began to seriously consider the interdisciplinary potentiality of holography. Questions around whether and when Three-Dimensional (3-D) images and systems would impact American entertainment and the arts would be answered before educators, instructional designers and students would discover how much Three-Dimensional Hologram Technology (3DHT) would affect teaching practices and learning environments. In the following International Symposium on Display Holograms (ISDH) poster presentation, the author features a traditional board game as well as a reflection hologram to illustrate conventional and evolving Three-Dimensional representations and technology for education. Using elements from the American children's toy Operation® (Hasbro, 2005) as well as a reflection hologram of a human brain (Ko, 1998), this poster design highlights the pedagogical effects of 3-D images, games and systems on learning science. As teaching agents, holograms can be considered substitutes for real objects, (human beings, organs, and animated characters) as well as agents (pedagogical, avatars, reflective) in various learning environments using many systems (direct, emergent, augmented reality) and electronic tools (cellphones, computers, tablets, television). In order to understand the particular importance of utilizing holography in school, clinical and public settings, the author identifies advantages and benefits of using 3-D images and technology as instructional tools.

  17. [Bacteriophages as antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M; Sharon, Nehama; Inbar, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria. They have played an important role in the development of molecular biology and have been used as anti-bacterial agents. Since their independent discovery by Twort and d'Herelle, they have been extensively used to prevent and treat bacterial infections, mainly in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In western countries this method has been sporadically employed on humans and domesticated animals. However, the discovery and widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with doubts about the efficacy of phage therapy, led to an eclipse in the use of phage in medicine. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, especially strains that are multiply resistant, has resulted in a renewed interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One of the possible replacements for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. This brief review aims to describe the history of bacteriophage and early clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophage in this regard.

  18. Advances in antithrombotic agents.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Ranjan; Das, Saibal Kumar

    2007-07-01

    Thrombosis is the condition where an imbalance in the homeostatic mechanism results in unwanted intravascular thrombus formation. Imbalances in this highly regulated process of coagulation and anticoagulation can lead to a variety of pathophysiological conditions leading to stroke, pulmonary heart attack and other serious conditions. In the western world, thromboembolic diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Remarkable progress has occurred over the last decade in the development of antithrombotic drugs, which can be classified into 3 major categories - Anticoagulants, Antiplatelets and thrombolytics. Increased understanding of the pathobiology of thrombotic and vascular disorders has helped researchers to target novel pathways involving the coagulation, thrombolytic, fibrinolytic and integrin systems. Traditionally aspirin and unfractionated heparin was used for myocardial infarction. Newer antiplatelet agents such as, clopidogrel, GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors, low molecular weight heparin, direct thrombin inhibitors and several improved thrombolytic agents have been introduced for clinical use. This review will discuss different important drugs, which have been launched in recent years and also some new targets pursued by different companies. PMID:17630943

  19. Development of polyimide foams with blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of preparing a polyimide foam which includes the steps of: preparing, foaming, and curing a precursor containing at least one alkyl ester of 3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid; a meta- or para-substituted aromatic diamine; a heterocyclic diamine; an aliphatic diamine; and a solid blowing agent. The blowing agent is added to said precursor in a concentration which is sufficient to effect at least one of the following attributes of the foam: cell size, proportion of open cells, cell density, and indentation load deflection.

  20. Flexible, secure agent development framework

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith; Steven Y.

    2009-04-07

    While an agent generator is generating an intelligent agent, it can also evaluate the data processing platform on which it is executing, in order to assess a risk factor associated with operation of the agent generator on the data processing platform. The agent generator can retrieve from a location external to the data processing platform an open site that is configurable by the user, and load the open site into an agent substrate, thereby creating a development agent with code development capabilities. While an intelligent agent is executing a functional program on a data processing platform, it can also evaluate the data processing platform to assess a risk factor associated with performing the data processing function on the data processing platform.

  1. Autonomous Formations of Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhali, Sanjana; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous formation control of multi-agent dynamic systems has a number of applications that include ground-based and aerial robots and satellite formations. For air vehicles, formation flight ("flocking") has the potential to significantly increase airspace utilization as well as fuel efficiency. This presentation addresses two main problems in multi-agent formations: optimal role assignment to minimize the total cost (e.g., combined distance traveled by all agents); and maintaining formation geometry during flock motion. The Kuhn-Munkres ("Hungarian") algorithm is used for optimal assignment, and consensus-based leader-follower type control architecture is used to maintain formation shape despite the leader s independent movements. The methods are demonstrated by animated simulations.

  2. Antiseptic skin agents for percutaneous procedures.

    PubMed

    Lepor, Norman E; Madyoon, Hooman

    2009-01-01

    Infections associated with percutaneously implanted devices, such as pacemakers, internal cardiac defibrillators, and endovascular prostheses, create difficult and complex clinical scenarios because management can entail complete device removal, antibiotic therapy, and prolonged hospitalization. A source for pathogens is often thought to be the skin surface, making skin preparation at the time of the procedure a critical part of minimizing implantation of infected devices and prostheses. The most common skin preparation agents used today include products containing iodophors or chlorhexidine gluconate. Agents are further classified by whether they are aqueous-based or alcoholbased solutions. Traditional aqueous-based iodophors, such as povidone-iodine, are one of the few products that can be safely used on mucous membrane surfaces. Alcohol-based solutions are quick, sustained, and durable, with broader spectrum antimicrobial activity. These agents seem ideal for percutaneous procedures associated with prosthesis implantation, when it is critical to minimize skin colony counts to prevent hardware infection.

  3. Physical Agents for Soft Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The clinical management of soft tissue injuries of the lower limb commonly includes physical agents such as electrotherapy or ultrasound. However, the evidence about the effectiveness of physical agents varies, and their use remains controversial. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), published in the July 2016 issue of JOSPT, examined the benefits and safety risks of various physical agents for soft tissue injuries of the lower limb. Importantly, the review looked closely at the quality of the RCTs and focused on studies with low risk of bias. In this Perspectives for Practice, the authors explain the impact of their findings for clinicians treating patients with such musculoskeletal conditions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):555. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0503. PMID:27363571

  4. Agents: An approach for dynamic process modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, Axel; Kopetzky, Roland; Lurk, Alexander

    1999-03-01

    With the growing amount of distributed and heterogeneous information and services, conventional information systems have come to their limits. This gave rise to the development of a Multi-Agent System (the "Logical Client") which can be used in complex information systems as well as in other advanced software systems. Computer agents are proactive, reactive and social. They form a community of independent software components that can communicate and co-operate in order to accomplish complex tasks. Thus the agent-oriented paradigm provides a new and powerful approach to programming distributed systems. The communication framework developed is based on standards like CORBA, KQML and KIF. It provides an embedded rule based system to find adequate reactions to incoming messages. The macro-architecture of the Logical Client consists of independent agents and uses artificial intelligence to cope with complex patterns of communication and actions. A set of system agents is also provided, including the Strategy Service as a core component for modelling processes at runtime, the Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) Component for supporting remote co-operation between human users and the Repository for managing and hiding the file based data flow in heterogeneous networks. This architecture seems to be capable of managing complexity in information systems. It is also being implemented in a complex simulation system that monitors and simulates the environmental radioactivity in the country Baden-Württemberg.

  5. Direct anti-HCV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the "cure HCV" goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others.

  6. Direct anti-HCV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2015-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the “cure HCV” goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others. PMID:26904396

  7. Biological agents and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, U

    1995-08-01

    Pregnant women are exposed to many biological, eg microbial, agents, which are potentially harmful to the fetus. The reported rates of vertical transmission of hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus vary between 3 to 90% and 0 to 65%, respectively. The susceptibility to hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency infection is increased in pregnant physicians, midwives, and nurses because of the bloodborne nature of these viruses. Also, TORCH (toxoplasmosis-rubella-cytomegalovirus-herpes) infections, acquired during pregnancy, may result in congenital infection, and serious sequelae in the neonatal period or years after birth. Schoolteachers and daycare personnel have an increased risk of perinatal varicella, "fifth disease," and mumps. Perinatal listeriosis affects one in 20,000 births and may result in fetal wastage. Because of the risk of the possibility of vertical transmission, immunization during pregnancy with live virus vaccines is not recommended. PMID:8520961

  8. Arylthiosemicarbazones as antileishmanial agents.

    PubMed

    Manzano, José Ignacio; Cochet, Florent; Boucherle, Benjamin; Gómez-Pérez, Verónica; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Gamarro, Francisco; Peuchmaur, Marine

    2016-11-10

    Based on a screening process, we targeted substituted thiosemicarbazone as potential antileishmanial agents. Our objective was to identify the key structural elements contributing to the anti-parasite activity that might be used for development of effective drugs. A series of 32 compounds was synthesized and their efficacy was evaluated against the clinically relevant intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania donovani. From these, 22 compounds showed EC50 values below 10 μM with the most active derivative (compound 14) showing an EC50 of 0.8 μM with very low toxicity on two different mammalian cell lines. The most relevant structural elements required for higher activity indicate that the presence of a fused bicyclic aromatic ring such as a naphthalene bearing an alkyl or an alkoxy group substituent are prerequisites. Owing to the easy synthesis, high activity and low toxicity, the most active compounds could be considered as a lead for further development.

  9. Itch Management: Topical Agents.

    PubMed

    Metz, Martin; Staubach, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a common problem in patients with inflammatory skin diseases as well as in subjects with dry or sensitive skin. Regardless of the underlying cause of the pruritus, a topical therapy is not only useful but most often necessary to achieve symptom control. A good topical therapy should fulfill different functions. An optimal basic therapy based on the condition of the skin is important to repair epithelial barrier defects and to rehydrate the skin. An adequate disease-specific topical therapy is crucial for inflamed skin, e.g. anti-inflammatory topical therapy is an important part in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Finally, the use of specific antipruritic substances can help to improve pruritus in patients irrespective of the underlying disease. Here, we summarize topical agents used in the treatment of chronic pruritus. PMID:27578070

  10. [Ribonucleases as antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Il'inskaia, O N; Shakh Makhmud, R

    2014-01-01

    Many ribonucleases (RNases) are able to inhibit the reproduction of viruses in infected cell cultures and laboratory animals, but molecular mechanisms of their antiviral activity remain unclear. The review observes the most known RNases which possess established antiviral effects, actually intracellular RNases (RNase L, MCPIPI protein, eosinophylic RNases) as well as exogenously applied ones (RNase A, BS-RNase, onconase, binase, synthetic RNases). Attention is given on two important but not always obligatory aspects in molecule of RNases, which have antiviral properties: catalytic activity and ability to the dimerization. The hypothetic scheme of virus elimination by exogenous RNases, that reflects possible types of interaction of viruses and RNases with a cell, is proposed. The evidence for RNases as classical components of immune defense which are perspective agents for development of new antiviral therapeutics is produced.

  11. Colleges and Universities as Agents of Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, W., John, Ed.; Thompason, Ian M., Ed.

    Papers of the Tenth Annual College Self-Study Institute, held in 1968, are presented. They include: "Colleges and Universities as Agents of Social Change: An Introduction," by T.R. McConnell; "Agent of Whom?" by Harris L. Wofford, Jr.; "The University as an Instrument of Social Action," by Roger W. Heyns; "The Tightening Tension: The University's…

  12. Agricultural work safety efforts by Wisconsin extension agricultural agents.

    PubMed

    Chapman, L J; Schuler, R T; Skjolaas, C A; Wilkinson, T L

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the agricultural work-related safety and health programming of county-level cooperative extension agents who work through land grant universities to provide a range of educational programs to agricultural producers. A questionnaire was designed and administered to all 89 Wisconsin agriculture and agribusiness extension county faculty. The questionnaire obtained valid responses from 98.9 percent of the agents. Ninety percent of all agents conducted some occupational safety and health promotion programming in the last year. These activities occupied an average of 4.8 days per agent per year. Most of the reported activities were group programs for the agricultural labor force that involved other extension agents and included the use of videotapes. The greatest barrier to more programming was lack of time on the part of both the agricultural work force and the agents. Most extension agents placed greater emphasis on training in how to work safely around hazards than on how to recognize and permanently correct hazards. For future programs agents requested more short format materials to use in programming, such as fact sheets, videotapes, and farm hazard inspection checklists. Agents are important training delivery resources for controlling farm-related injury and disease. Agents could be more effective with more time, better materials, and with more emphasis on hazard correction in workplace safety programs.

  13. Lithium Modulates Autophagy in Esophageal and Colorectal Cancer Cells and Enhances the Efficacy of Therapeutic Agents In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    O’Donovan, Tracey R.; Rajendran, Simon; O’Reilly, Seamus; McKenna, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Many epithelial cancers, particularly gastrointestinal tract cancers, remain poor prognosis diseases, due to resistance to cytotoxic therapy and local or metastatic recurrence. We have previously shown that apoptosis incompetent esophageal cancer cells induce autophagy in response to chemotherapeutic agents and this can facilitate their recovery. However, known pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy could not enhance cytotoxicity. In this study, we have examined two well known, clinically approved autophagy inducers, rapamycin and lithium, for their effects on chemosensitivity in apoptosis incompetent cancer cells. Both lithium and rapamycin were shown to induce autophagosomes in esophageal and colorectal cancer cells by western blot analysis of LC3 isoforms, morphology and FACS quantitation of Cyto-ID or mCherry-GFP-LC3. Analysis of autophagic flux indicates inefficient autophagosome processing in lithium treated cells, whereas rapamycin treated cells showed efficient flux. Viability and recovery was assessed by clonogenic assays. When combined with the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil, rapamycin was protective. In contrast, lithium showed strong enhancement of non-apoptotic cell death. The combination of lithium with 5-fluorouracil or oxaliplatin was then tested in the syngenic mouse (balb/c) colorectal cancer model—CT26. When either chemotherapeutic agent was combined with lithium a significant reduction in tumor volume was achieved. In addition, survival was dramatically increased in the combination group (p < 0.0001), with > 50% of animals achieving long term cure without re-occurrence (> 1 year tumor free). Thus, combination treatment with lithium can substantially improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in apoptosis deficient cancer cells. Induction of compromised autophagy may contribute to this cytotoxicity. PMID:26248051

  14. Reconfigurable networking for coordinated multi-agent sensing and communications.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Jeffrey P; Jamieson, Ian M D

    2002-12-01

    An implementation of a neurally-inspired system comprised of multiple mobile sensor-effector agents is described. Each agent has features of a complex neural network that is able to communicate and adjust its behavior depending upon a variety of parameters, including changes in the environment and the behavior of other agents. The system as a whole spatiotemporally reconfigures itself to perform coordinated behaviors not obtainable with single agents. Transient clustering of agents into functional subsystems to perform specific tasks generates a "system of systems" architecture. The interesting findings of this dynamic platform show that (a) the formation and dissolution of functional subsystems is a local phenomenon without the need for global control and (b) minimal intermittent communication among the agents can yield large-scale, coordinated, goal-driven behavior under a wide range of conditions. PMID:14983838

  15. Agent-based enterprise integration

    SciTech Connect

    N. M. Berry; C. M. Pancerella

    1998-12-01

    The authors are developing and deploying software agents in an enterprise information architecture such that the agents manage enterprise resources and facilitate user interaction with these resources. The enterprise agents are built on top of a robust software architecture for data exchange and tool integration across heterogeneous hardware and software. The resulting distributed multi-agent system serves as a method of enhancing enterprises in the following ways: providing users with knowledge about enterprise resources and applications; accessing the dynamically changing enterprise; locating enterprise applications and services; and improving search capabilities for applications and data. Furthermore, agents can access non-agents (i.e., databases and tools) through the enterprise framework. The ultimate target of the effort is the user; they are attempting to increase user productivity in the enterprise. This paper describes their design and early implementation and discusses the planned future work.

  16. Collaborating Fuzzy Reinforcement Learning Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier, we introduced GARIC-Q, a new method for doing incremental Dynamic Programming using a society of intelligent agents which are controlled at the top level by Fuzzy Relearning and at the local level, each agent learns and operates based on ANTARCTIC, a technique for fuzzy reinforcement learning. In this paper, we show that it is possible for these agents to compete in order to affect the selected control policy but at the same time, they can collaborate while investigating the state space. In this model, the evaluator or the critic learns by observing all the agents behaviors but the control policy changes only based on the behavior of the winning agent also known as the super agent.

  17. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  18. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  19. Phase II Trial of Cetuximab, Gemcitabine, and Oxaliplatin Followed by Chemoradiation With Cetuximab for Locally Advanced (T4) Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Correlation of Smad4(Dpc4) Immunostaining With Pattern of Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Yordy, John S.; Staerkel, Gregg A.; Javle, Milind M.; Safran, Howard; Haque, Waqar; Hobbs, Bridgett D.; Krishnan, Sunil; Fleming, Jason B.; Das, Prajnan; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II trial was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab, gemcitabine, and oxaliplatin followed by cetuximab, capecitabine, and radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Patients and Methods Treatment-naive eligible patients (n = 69) received intravenous gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2) and oxaliplatin (100 mg/m2) every 2 weeks for four doses, followed by radiation (50.4 Gy to the gross tumor only) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiation treatment days). Cetuximab (500 mg/m2) was started on day 1 of chemotherapy and was continued every 2 weeks during chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Diagnostic cytology specimens were immunostained for Smad4(Dpc4) expression. Results Median overall survival time was 19.2 months (95% CI, 14.2 to 24.2 months), and 1-year, 2-year, and 4-year actuarial overall survival rates were 66.0%, 25.02%, and 11.3%, respectively. Acneiform rash correlated with improved survival (P = .001), but initial CA19-9, borderline resectable initial stage, and surgical resection (n = 7) did not. The 1-year and 2-year radiographic local progression rates were 22.8% and 61.0%, respectively. The worst acute toxic effects were GI toxicity (32% and 10% for grades 2 and 3, respectively); fatigue (26% and 6% for grades 2 and 3, respectively); sensory neuropathy (9% and 1% for grades 2 and 3, respectively); and acneiform rash (54% and 3% for grades 2 and 3, respectively). Smad4(Dpc4) expression correlated with a local rather than a distant dominant pattern of disease progression (P = .016). Conclusion This regimen appears effective and has acceptable toxicity. The primary end point (1-year overall survival rate > 45%) was met, with encouraging survival duration. Smad4(Dpc4) immunostaining correlated with the pattern of disease progression. Prospective validation of Smad4(Dpc4) expression in cytology specimens as a predictive biomarker is warranted and may lead to personalized treatment

  20. A New Approach To Secure Federated Information Bases Using Agent Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weippi, Edgar; Klug, Ludwig; Essmayr, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Discusses database agents which can be used to establish federated information bases by integrating heterogeneous databases. Highlights include characteristics of federated information bases, including incompatible database management systems, schemata, and frequently changing context; software agent technology; Java agents; system architecture;…

  1. [Contact sensitization to external agents].

    PubMed

    Erdmann, S M; Merk, H-F

    2003-04-01

    The following review describes contact sensitization to topically applied medications--especially topical dermatological agents--and to external agents in the broadest sense. Particularly skin care products constitute a special source for sensitization due to their widespread use. Especially fragrances and preservatives in cosmetics play an important global role in eliciting contact allergies. Because of the extremely broad spectrum covered by the active and adjuvant ingredients contained in external agents, the following discussion focuses on specific substance groups.

  2. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  3. Incorporating BDI Agents into Human-Agent Decision Making Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphorst, Bart; van Wissen, Arlette; Dignum, Virginia

    Artificial agents, people, institutes and societies all have the ability to make decisions. Decision making as a research area therefore involves a broad spectrum of sciences, ranging from Artificial Intelligence to economics to psychology. The Colored Trails (CT) framework is designed to aid researchers in all fields in examining decision making processes. It is developed both to study interaction between multiple actors (humans or software agents) in a dynamic environment, and to study and model the decision making of these actors. However, agents in the current implementation of CT lack the explanatory power to help understand the reasoning processes involved in decision making. The BDI paradigm that has been proposed in the agent research area to describe rational agents, enables the specification of agents that reason in abstract concepts such as beliefs, goals, plans and events. In this paper, we present CTAPL: an extension to CT that allows BDI software agents that are written in the practical agent programming language 2APL to reason about and interact with a CT environment.

  4. TACtic- A Multi Behavioral Agent for Trading Agent Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Hassan; Shiri, Mohammad E.; Khosravi, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Ehsan; Davoodi, Alireza

    Software agents are increasingly being used to represent humans in online auctions. Such agents have the advantages of being able to systematically monitor a wide variety of auctions and then make rapid decisions about what bids to place in what auctions. They can do this continuously and repetitively without losing concentration. To provide a means of evaluating and comparing (benchmarking) research methods in this area the trading agent competition (TAC) was established. This paper describes the design, of TACtic. Our agent uses multi behavioral techniques at the heart of its decision making to make bidding decisions in the face of uncertainty, to make predictions about the likely outcomes of auctions, and to alter the agent's bidding strategy in response to the prevailing market conditions.

  5. Multi-agent tasks scheduling system in software defined networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, P. O.; Granichin, O. N.; Budaev, D. S.; Laryukhin, V. B.; Mayorov, I. V.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a multi-agent tasks scheduling system in software defined networks is considered. This system is designed for distribution simulation and tasks implementation on computational resources including network dynamic characteristics and topology.

  6. Agent-Based Literacy Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEneaney, John E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this theoretical essay is to explore the limits of traditional conceptualizations of reader and text and to propose a more general theory based on the concept of a literacy agent. The proposed theoretical perspective subsumes concepts from traditional theory and aims to account for literacy online. The agent-based literacy theory…

  7. Intelligent Software Agents: Sensor Integration and Response

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesz, James J; Lee, Ronald W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In a post Macondo world the buzzwords are Integrity Management and Incident Response Management. The twin processes are not new but the opportunity to link the two is novel. Intelligent software agents can be used with sensor networks in distributed and centralized computing systems to enhance real-time monitoring of system integrity as well as manage the follow-on incident response to changing, and potentially hazardous, environmental conditions. The software components are embedded at the sensor network nodes in surveillance systems used for monitoring unusual events. When an event occurs, the software agents establish a new concept of operation at the sensing node, post the event status to a blackboard for software agents at other nodes to see , and then react quickly and efficiently to monitor the scale of the event. The technology addresses a current challenge in sensor networks that prevents a rapid and efficient response when a sensor measurement indicates that an event has occurred. By using intelligent software agents - which can be stationary or mobile, interact socially, and adapt to changing situations - the technology offers features that are particularly important when systems need to adapt to active circumstances. For example, when a release is detected, the local software agent collaborates with other agents at the node to exercise the appropriate operation, such as: targeted detection, increased detection frequency, decreased detection frequency for other non-alarming sensors, and determination of environmental conditions so that adjacent nodes can be informed that an event is occurring and when it will arrive. The software agents at the nodes can also post the data in a targeted manner, so that agents at other nodes and the command center can exercise appropriate operations to recalibrate the overall sensor network and associated intelligence systems. The paper describes the concepts and provides examples of real-world implementations

  8. Dialogue Games for Agent Argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBurney, Peter; Parsons, Simon

    The rise of the Internet and the growth of distributed computing have led to a major paradigm shift in software engineering and computer science. Until recently, the notion of computation has been variously construed as numerical calculation, as information processing, or as intelligent symbol analysis, but increasingly, it is now viewed as distributed cognition and interaction between intelligent entities [60]. This new view has major implications for the conceptualization, design, engineering and control of software systems, most profoundly expressed in the concept of systems of intelligent software agents, or multi-agent systems [99]. Agents are software entities with control over their own execution; the design of such agents, and of multi-agent systems of them, presents major research and software engineering challenges to computer scientists.

  9. Intelligent Agents in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; Mora, César

    2010-07-01

    Intelligent Agents are being applied in a wide range of processes and everyday applications. Their development is not new, in recent years they have had an increased attention and design; like learning and mentoring tools. In this work we discuss the definition of what an intelligent agent is; how they are applied; how they look like; recent implementations of agents; agents as support in the learning process, more precisely intelligent tutors; their state in Latin-American countries and future developments and trends that will permit a better communication between people and agents. Also we present an Intelligent Tutor applied as a tool for improving high-school students' skills and reasoning for the first five topics of Mechanics curricula.

  10. Markov Tracking for Agent Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) axe an attractive representation for representing agent behavior, since they capture uncertainty in both the agent's state and its actions. However, finding an optimal policy for POMDPs in general is computationally difficult. In this paper we present Markov Tracking, a restricted problem of c