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Sample records for agents including oxaliplatin

  1. Hypersensitivity reactions to oxaliplatin and other antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Syrigou, Ekaterini; Syrigos, Kostas; Saif, M Wasif

    2008-03-01

    Although the reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to antineoplastic agents is considered to be uncommon, it is difficult to evaluate their exact prevalence, mainly because their definition is vast and pathogenic mechanisms are vague. HSR include facial flushing, erythema, pruritus, fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, tongue swelling, rash/hives, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness, and edema. Treatment and prevention consists of slowing the infusion rate, steroids, and type 1 and 2 histamine receptor antagonists. Desensitization could allow the small number of patients who experience severe HSR to receive effective therapy for their cancer. Reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitization strategies is still missing. With regard to oxaliplatin, knowledge of its rare but eminent toxicity is paramount, because this drug is widely used in treating colorectal cancer, the second-highest cause of cancer mortality in the United States. PMID:18377776

  2. Management of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Saif, M Wasif; Reardon, John

    2005-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is the most frequent dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin. Acute sensory neurotoxicity manifests as rapid onset of cold-induced distal dysesthesia and/or paresthesia, sometimes accompanied by cold-dependent muscular contractions of the extremities or the jaw. The symptoms, often occurring during or shortly after infusion, are usually transient and mild. A cumulative sensory peripheral neuropathy may also develop with prolonged treatment with oxaliplatin, eventually causing superficial and deep sensory loss, sensory ataxia, and functional impairment. Studies have shown patients with acute sensory symptoms to display little or no axonal degeneration. The similarity of acute symptoms induced by oxaliplatin to those caused by several drugs or toxins acting on neuronal or muscular ion channels suggests that these symptoms may result from a specific interaction of oxaliplatin with voltage-gated sodium (Na+) channels. The current recommendations for the management of the acute and cumulative neurotoxicity from oxaliplatin include education about exposure to cold, dose modification, “stop and go”, and use of neuromodulatory agents, in particular, intravenous calcium and magnesium infusion. Upon the approval of oxaliplatin-based regimens both for adjuvant and metastatic treatment of colon cancer, it is crucial to compile knowledge about the recognition and management of neurotoxicity from oxaliplatin. PMID:18360567

  3. Synergistic Activity of the Src Family Kinase Inhibitor Dasatinib and Oxaliplatin in Colon Carcinoma Cells is Mediated by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kopetz, Scott; Lesslie, Donald P.; Dallas, Nikolas A.; Park, Serk I.; Johnson, Marjorie; Parikh, Nila U.; Kim, Michael P.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Ellis, Lee M.; Chandra, Joya; Gallick, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of colorectal cancer generally include oxaliplatin, although inherent and acquired resistance is common. One potential mediator of oxaliplatin sensitivity is the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, Src, the activity of which correlates with disease stage and patient survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of Src inhibition using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib on oxaliplatin sensitivity. We demonstrate that oxaliplatin acutely activates Src and that combination treatment with dasatinib is synergistic in a cell-line dependent manner, with the level of Src activation correlating with extent of synergy in a panel of six cell lines. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated after oxaliplatin treatment, and ROS potently activates Src. Pretreatment with antioxidants inhibits oxaliplatin-induced Src activation. In oxaliplatin resistant cell lines, Src activity is constitutively increased. In a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases, treatment with oxaliplatin also results in chronic Src activation. The combination of dasatinib and oxaliplatin results in significantly smaller tumors compared to single agent treatment, corresponding with reduced proliferation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we conclude that oxaliplatin activates Src through a ROS-dependent mechanism. Src inhibition increases oxaliplatin activity both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Src inhibitors combined with oxaliplatin may have efficacy in metastatic colon cancer, and may provide the first indication of a molecular phenotype that might be susceptible to such combinations. PMID:19383922

  4. Efficacy of Combination Chemotherapy Using a Novel Oral Chemotherapeutic Agent, TAS-102, with Oxaliplatin on Human Colorectal and Gastric Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nukatsuka, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Fumio; Takechi, Teiji

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent consisting of trifluridine (FTD) and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (at a molar ratio of 1:0.5) that was approved in Japan in 2014 for the treatment of unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. In the present study, the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy using a combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin was evaluated in a xenograft-bearing nude mouse model of colorectal and gastric cancer. TAS-102 was orally administered twice-a-day from day 1 to 14, and oxaliplatin was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8. The in vivo growth-inhibitory activity was evaluated based on the tumor volume and the growth-delay period, was estimated based on the period required to reach a tumor volume five-times greater than the initial volume (RTV5). The tumor growth-inhibitory activity and RTV5 in mice administered TAS-102 with oxaliplatin were significantly superior to those associated with either monotherapy in mice with colorectal (HCT 116, SW-48; p<0.001) and gastric cancer (SC-2, MKN74; p<0.001). MKN74/5FU, a 5-fluorouracil-resistant MKN74 sub-line, was sensitive to both FTD and oxaliplatin in vitro. In vivo, TAS-102 alone was effective in MKN74/5FU, and its anti-tumor activity was significantly enhanced in combination with oxaliplatin (p<0.001). No significant decrease in body weight or toxicity was observed compared to either monotherapy. The present pre-clinical findings indicate that combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin is a promising treatment option for colorectal or gastric cancer, and can be utilized in both chemo-naïve tumors and recurrent tumors after 5-fluorouracil treatment. PMID:26254349

  5. Oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated cytopenias: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Forcello, Nicholas P; Khubchandani, Sapna; Patel, Shrina J; Brahaj, Driola

    2015-04-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum antineoplastic agent that commonly causes diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy. Less common adverse effects that are increasingly being reported include acute immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and pancytopenia. Here, we report a patient case of suspected oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and a thorough literature evaluation of acute oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and pancytopenia that has yet to be reported until now. There have been 39 previously published reports of these cytopenic events with a median number of 16 treatment cycles prior to presentation. Patients experiencing unusual signs and symptoms such as chills, rigors, fever, back pain, abdominal pain, ecchymosis, hematemesis, hematuria, dark urine, hematochezia, petechiae, epistaxis, or mental status changes during or shortly after an oxaliplatin infusion should have complete blood counts ordered and evaluated promptly. PMID:24500808

  6. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2006-09-01

    The reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with oxaliplatin in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is approximately 12%, with 1 - 2% of patients developing grade 3 or 4 in severity. However, the recent rising incidence of HSR to oxaliplatin observed is the result of increasing clinical use. HSR to oxaliplatin may manifest as facial flushing, rash/hives, tachycardia, dyspnoea, erythema, pruritus, fever, tongue swelling, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness and oedema. Anaphylactic shock is rare but serious, and must be considered in the event of hypotension. No definitive approaches to prevent and treat HSR associated with oxaliplatin are available; however, few successful strategies have been reported. Such strategies include: slowing the infusion rate, use of steroids and antagonists of type 1 and 2 histamine receptors, and desensitisation. Successful implementation of oxaliplatin desensitisation protocols based on other platinum-containing compounds have been reported, which could enable a small number of patients who experience severe HSR to further receive an effective therapy for CRC. However, reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitisation strategies are still missing. Recently, subcutaneous adrenaline has also been utilised as an alternative approach to manage HSR to oxaliplatin. Knowledge of this rare but real toxicity of oxaliplatin is paramount because the use of this drug continues to increase not only for the treatment of patients with stage II-IV CRC, but also other solid malignancies. In this article, the author discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, risk factors and current strategies of management of HSR associated with oxaliplatin. PMID:16907658

  7. Ursolic acid synergistically enhances the therapeutic effects of oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jianzhen; Xuan, Yanyan; Zhang, Qi; Zhu, Chunpeng; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Suzhan

    2016-08-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug in chemotherapy of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, its efficacy is unsatisfied due to drug resistance of cancer cells. In this study, we tested whether a natural agent, ursolic acid, was able to enhance the efficacy of oxaliplatin for CRC. Four CRC cell lines including SW480, SW620, LoVo, and RKO were used as in vitro models, and a SW620 xenograft mouse model was used in further in vivo study. We found that ursolic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of all four cells and enhanced the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin. This effect was associated with down-regulation of Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, survivin, activation of caspase-3, 8, 9, and inhibition of KRAS expression and BRAF, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, p-38, JNK, AKT, IKKα, IκBα, and p65 phosphorylation of the MAPK, PI3K/AKT, and NF-κB signaling pathways. The two agents also showed synergistic effects against tumor growth in vivo. In addition, ursolic acid restored liver function and body weight of the mice treated with oxaliplatin. Thus, we concluded that ursolic acid could enhance the therapeutic effects of oxaliplatin against CRC both in vitro and in vivo, which offers an effective strategy to minimize the burden of oxaliplatin-induced adverse events and provides the groundwork for a new clinical strategy to treat CRC. PMID:27472952

  8. Prolonged Oxaliplatin Exposure Alters Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A New Mechanism To Explain Oxaliplatin-Associated Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christin; McGowan, Margit; Jordt, Sven; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum based cytotoxic agent commonly used to treat colorectal cancers. Despite its effectiveness, oxaliplatin administration is associated with the development of cold-induced peripheral neuropathy. This potentially permanent side effect is provoked by cold exposure and can range from mild and self limited to severe and debilitating. Even with tumor shrinkage, these painful side effects can force dose-reduction or discontinuation of treatment. Neither the mechanism of action of oxaliplatin nor that of cold-induced neuropathy is understood. Paclitaxel, an entirely different chemotherapeutic agent used to treat a variety of malignancies, also is associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Unlike oxaliplatin, neurotoxicity arising from paclitaxel treatment is better understood and was found to have profound effects on intracellular calcium signaling (1,2). In this study we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on calcium signaling pathways and found that acute exposure of either a neuroblastoma cell line or primary neurons with therapeutic concentrations of oxaliplatin had no effect on intracellular calcium signaling. We also found that cellular temperature sensors (TRP channels) were also not activated by oxaliplatin. Interestingly, prolonged exposure of oxaliplatin sensitized cells to subsequent stimuli and enhanced the magnitude of intracellular calcium responses. Taken together, our results suggest that acute oxaliplatin exposure will not induce abnormal calcium signaling but oxaliplatin-primed cells do exhibit enhanced sensitivity. These findings provide new insight to the mechanism behind oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21859566

  9. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 107.1620 Section 107.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance...

  10. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  12. β-elemene sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to oxaliplatin by preventing oxaliplatin-induced degradation of copper transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Zhenhai; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Lei; Liu, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jubo; Ye, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    β-elemene, a Curcuma wenyujin plant extract, has been used widely as a tumor adjuvant therapeutic agent. However, how to obtain optimum therapeutic effects by combining this compound with other agents remain unclear. In this study, we found that β-elemene, which alone had little effect on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell proliferation, exerted a synergistic anti-proliferative effect in HCC cells when dosed in combination with oxaliplatin, which increased the amounts of platinum accumulation and platinum-DNA adduct significantly and augmented the oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Western blot and laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that β-elemene enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to oxaliplatin by upregulating copper transporter 1 (CTR1), a major controller of intracellular platinum accumulation. In an orthotopic transplantation HCC model in nude mice, HCC tumor growth was inhibited significantly by oxaliplatin combined with β-elemene, as compared with oxaliplatin alone. Notably, CTR1 protein expression in xenograft HCC was upregulated in mice who received β-elemene treatment. Taken together, our findings show that β-elemene can block the reduction of CTR1 resulting from oxaliplatin treatment, and therefore has a synergistic anti-HCC effect with oxaliplatin by enhancing cellular uptake of oxaliplatin. The synergistic effects of β-elemene and oxaliplatin deserve further evaluation in clinical settings. PMID:26867799

  13. β-elemene sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to oxaliplatin by preventing oxaliplatin-induced degradation of copper transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Zhenhai; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Lei; Liu, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jubo; Ye, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    β-elemene, a Curcuma wenyujin plant extract, has been used widely as a tumor adjuvant therapeutic agent. However, how to obtain optimum therapeutic effects by combining this compound with other agents remain unclear. In this study, we found that β-elemene, which alone had little effect on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell proliferation, exerted a synergistic anti-proliferative effect in HCC cells when dosed in combination with oxaliplatin, which increased the amounts of platinum accumulation and platinum-DNA adduct significantly and augmented the oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Western blot and laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that β-elemene enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to oxaliplatin by upregulating copper transporter 1 (CTR1), a major controller of intracellular platinum accumulation. In an orthotopic transplantation HCC model in nude mice, HCC tumor growth was inhibited significantly by oxaliplatin combined with β-elemene, as compared with oxaliplatin alone. Notably, CTR1 protein expression in xenograft HCC was upregulated in mice who received β-elemene treatment. Taken together, our findings show that β-elemene can block the reduction of CTR1 resulting from oxaliplatin treatment, and therefore has a synergistic anti-HCC effect with oxaliplatin by enhancing cellular uptake of oxaliplatin. The synergistic effects of β-elemene and oxaliplatin deserve further evaluation in clinical settings. PMID:26867799

  14. Atypical presentation of fever as hypersensitivity reaction to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Arushi; Mitsis, Demytra; Kowlgi, Gurukripa N; Holle, Lisa M; Clement, Jessica M

    2016-04-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third-generation, platinum-based agent is widely used, most commonly in the FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin) regimen, which is the first-line therapy in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III colorectal cancer. Platinum-based products are well known for causing hypersensitivity reactions. Fever associated with oxaliplatin-hypersensitivity reactions typically follows a specific pattern. It usually starts during the oxaliplatin infusion or immediately after (within hours instead of days) and happens after several administrations (mean 2-25) with unpredictable clinical presentations. We report a case of oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reaction manifesting as fever but with unusual presentation than the aforementioned features. PMID:25361599

  15. Effects of oxaliplatin on mouse myenteric neurons and colonic motility

    PubMed Central

    Wafai, Linah; Taher, Mohammadali; Jovanovska, Valentina; Bornstein, Joel C.; Dass, Crispin R.; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2013-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of colorectal cancer, commonly causes gastrointestinal side-effects such as constipation, diarrhoea, nausea, and vomiting. Damage to enteric neurons may underlie some of these gastrointestinal side-effects, as the enteric nervous system (ENS) controls functions of the bowel. In this study, neuronal loss and changes to the structure and immunoreactivity of myenteric neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) neurons were examined in colonic segments from mice following exposure to oxaliplatin ex vivo and following repeated intraperitoneal injections of oxaliplatin over 3 weeks in vivo, using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Significant morphological alterations and increases in the proportion of NOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were associated with both short-term oxaliplatin exposure and long-term oxaliplatin administration, confirming that oxaliplatin causes changes to the myenteric neurons. Long-term oxaliplatin administration induced substantial neuronal loss that was correlated with a reduction in both the frequency and propagation speed of colonic migrating motor complexes (CMMCs) in vitro. Similar changes probably produce some symptoms experienced by patients undergoing oxaliplatin treatment. PMID:23486839

  16. Guadecitabine (SGI-110) priming sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yuting; El-Khoueiry, Anthony; Taverna, Pietro; Ljungman, Mats; Neamati, Nouri

    2015-11-01

    Promoter DNA hypermethylation is an important biomarker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), supporting the potential utility of demethylating agents in this disease. Guadecitabine (SGI-110) is a second-generation hypomethylating agent formulated as a dinucleotide of decitabine and deoxyguanosine that yields longer half-life and more extended decitabine exposure than decitabine IV infusion. Here we performed preclinical evaluation of SGI-110 in HCC models to guide the design of a phase I/II clinical trial. HCC cell lines and xenograft models were used to determine the antitumor activity of SGI-110 as a single agent and in combination with oxaliplatin. Pretreatment with low doses of SGI-110 significantly synergized with oxaliplatin yielding enhanced cytotoxicity. The combination of SGI-110 and oxaliplatin was well tolerated and significantly delayed tumor growth in mice compared to oxaliplatin alone. Bromouridine-labeled RNA sequencing (Bru-seq) was employed to elucidate the effects of SGI-110 and/or oxaliplatin on genome-wide transcription. SGI-110 and the combination treatment inhibited the expression of genes involved in WNT/EGF/IGF signaling. DNMT1 and survivin were identified as novel PD markers to monitor the efficacy of the combination treatment. In conclusion, SGI-110 priming sensitizes HCC cells to oxaliplatin by inhibiting distinct signaling pathways. We expect that this combination treatment will show low toxicity and high efficacy in patients. Our study supports the use of the combination of low doses of SGI-110 and oxaliplatin in HCC patients. PMID:26160429

  17. Development of nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH) with portal hypertension following the administration of oxaliplatin for the recurrence of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Hiroaki; Kawaratani, Hideto; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Takeyama, Shinya; Morioka, Chie; Sawai, Masayoshi; Toyohara, Masahisa; Fujimoto, Masao; Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Yamao, Junichi; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH) is associated with autoimmune and hematologic diseases and may lead to portal hypertension. We herein report a case of NRH diagnosed based on a liver biopsy. A 63-year-old woman developed esophageal varices and splenomegaly. She had undergone surgery for transverse colon cancer 24 years earlier and received systemic chemotherapy (FOLFOX4 including oxaliplatin) to treat lymph node metastasis 21 years after the operation. The present liver biopsy confirmed NRH, and, after two years, she received endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. Oxaliplatin was suspected to be the causative agent of NRH in this case. Therefore, physicians must consider the possibility of NRH in patients who receive chemotherapy. PMID:25748953

  18. Oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JUNG-HYE; WON, YOUNG-WOONG; KIM, HYUN SUNG; OH, YOUNG-HA; LIM, SANGHYEOK; KIM, HAN-JOON

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it may cause liver injury, particularly sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). Although SOS does not usually present with focal lesions on radiological images, the present study describes the case of a 22-year-old woman with oxaliplatin-induced SOS mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver. An abdominal computed tomography revealed a novel 1 cm, low-density lesion in segment 1 of the liver following the administration of the fourth round of oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer. Since the lesion was indistinguishable from metastasis, even with detailed imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography, an isolated caudate lobectomy was planned. The cut surface of the resected liver showed a localized reddish congested lesion measuring 1.4 cm in diameter. The adjacent hepatic parenchyma also demonstrated diffuse sinusoidal congestion with a nutmeg-like appearance. Histologically, the lesion exhibited severe sinusoidal congestion with peliosis hepatis-like features. The widened sinusoidal space was outlined by markedly attenuated hepatic cords and filled with erythrocytes. The final diagnosis was oxaliplatin-induced SOS. The patient recovered completely and was relapse-free at the time of writing. PMID:27073565

  19. Sudden hearing loss due to oxaliplatin use in a patient with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Güvenç, M Güven; Dizdar, Denizhan; Dizdar, Senem Kurt; Okutur, Sadi Kerem; Demir, Gökhan

    2016-08-01

    Oxaliplatin is used to treat advanced colorectal cancer. Platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents are known to be ototoxic. However, ototoxicity is rare with newer generation platinum-derived agents, such as oxaliplatin. This case report presents a rare case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss following intravenous (IV) infusion of oxaliplatin in a 64-year-old woman with advanced colon cancer. The hearing loss was severe and did not respond to treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fifth reported case of oxaliplatin ototoxicity. Although oxaliplatin ototoxicity is rare, physicians must be aware of this important adverse effect, and an audiometric evaluation must be performed when necessary. Patients treated with oxaliplatin should be followed closely for early signs and symptoms of hearing loss, and if hearing loss is detected, treatment should be stopped immediately. PMID:25872564

  20. Goshajinkigan reduces oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy without affecting anti-tumour efficacy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Soichiro; Egashira, Nobuaki; Sada, Hikaru; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Shirahama, Masafumi; Masuguchi, Ken; Oishi, Ryozo

    2012-06-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but it causes acute and chronic neuropathies in patients. Goshajinkigan (GJG) is a Kampo medicine that is used for the treatments of several neurological symptoms including pain and numbness. More recently, GJG has been reported to prevent the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in clinical studies. No experimental study, however, has been conducted to date to determine the effect of GJG on pain behaviour in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Moreover, the impact on the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of GJG on the peripheral neuropathy and anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin in rodents. Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused cold hyperalgesia from days 3 to 37 and mechanical allodynia from days 21 to 28. Repeated administration of GJG prevented the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia and axonal degeneration in rat sciatic nerve. Single administration of GJG reduced both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after the development of neuropathy. In addition, GJG did not affect the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin in the tumour cells or tumour cells-implanted mice. These results suggest that GJG relieves the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia without affecting anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin, and, therefore, may be useful for the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in clinical practice. PMID:21907570

  1. Pharmacological characterization of standard analgesics on oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Nakamura, Saki; Miyake, Takahito; So, Kanako; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, causes an acute peripheral neuropathy triggered by cold in almost all patients during or within hours after its infusion. We recently reported that a single administration of oxaliplatin induced cold hypersensitivity 2 h after the administration in mice. In this study, we examined whether standard analgesics relieve the oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity. Gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate significantly inhibited and morphine and milnacipran decreased the acute cold hypersensitivity, while diclofenac and amitriptyline had no effects. These results suggest that gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate are effective against oxaliplatin-induced acute peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24671055

  2. Agents in Safety Related Systems Including Ubiquitous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandén, Lars

    The ADM (Autonomous Decision Maker) concept concerns the possibility of including intelligent interfaces, agent like, for supporting the use of ubiquitous networks, such as the Internet, in safety related applications. The need for such interfaces is inevitable if remote surveillance and control shall be supported. The single most important aspect of ADM is its capability of handling limited resources when making intelligent decisions. Intelligence in ADM is manifested in reasoning and learning. This paper outlines the role of ADM and especially in relation to the standard IEC 61508 and presents the overall properties that result. These are exemplified by a presentation of ADM demonstrator.

  3. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  4. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan. PMID:27221832

  5. Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist relieves mechanical allodynia in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic mice; potentiation by spinal p38 MAPK inhibition without motor dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ji-Hee; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kim, Sol-Ji; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-15

    Cancer chemotherapy with platinum-based antineoplastic agents including oxaliplatin frequently results in a debilitating and painful peripheral neuropathy. We evaluated the antinociceptive effects of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Specifically, we determined if (i) the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clonidine reduces mechanical allodynia in mice with an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and (ii) concurrent inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 enhances clonidine's antiallodynic effect. Clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), with or without SB203580(1-10 nmol, intrathecal) was administered two weeks after oxaliplatin injection(10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to mice. Mechanical withdrawal threshold, motor coordination and blood pressure were measured. Postmortem expression of p38 MAPK and ERK as well as their phosphorylated forms(p-p38 and p-ERK) were quantified 30 min or 4 hr after drug injection in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated and control mice. Clonidine dose-dependently reduced oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and spinal p-p38 MAPK expression, but not p-ERK. At 0.1 mg kg(-1), clonidine also impaired motor coordination and decreased blood pressure. A 10 nmol dose of SB203580 alone significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and p-p38 MAPK expression, while a subeffective dose(3 nmol) potentiated the antiallodynic effect of 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine and reduced the increased p-p38 MAPK. Coadministration of SB203580 and 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine decreased allodynia similar to that of 0.10 mg kg(-1) clonidine, but without significant motor or vascular effects. These findings demonstrate that clonidine treatment reduces oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. The concurrent administration of SB203580 reduces the dosage requirements for clonidine, thereby alleviating allodynia without producing undesirable motor or cardiovascular effects. PMID

  6. Preventive effect of oral goshajinkigan on chronic oxaliplatin-induced hypoesthesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Toru; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Keita; Miyagi, Chika; Omiya, Yuji; Sekine, Hitomi; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Miyano, Kanako; Kase, Yoshio; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, induces peripheral neuropathy that manifests itself as two distinct phases: acute cold hyperesthesia and chronic peripheral hypoesthesia/dysesthesia. The latter is a serious dose-limiting side effect that can often lead to withdrawal of treatment. We have developed a rat model expressing both phases and used the model to investigate the action of goshajinkigan (GJG), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, which was reported to ameliorate oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in a placebo-controlled double-blind randomized phase II study. In this study, neuropathy was induced by injection of oxaliplatin twice weekly for 8 wks. The maximum level of cold hyperesthesia was observed at 4 wks with heat hypoesthesia developing later. Microscopy studies revealed atrophy of axons of myelinated sciatic nerve fibers in oxaliplatin-treated rats at 8 wks. Co-administration of GJG ameliorated both abnormal sensations as well as histological damage to the sciatic nerve. A pharmacokinetic study revealed numerous neuroprotective components of GJG that are rapidly absorbed into the blood. GJG and some of its components attenuated the generation of oxaliplatin-induced reactive oxygen species, which is a possible mechanism of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The present study provides a useful animal model for oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as well as a promising prophylactic agent. PMID:26542342

  7. Biodistribution of gadolinium-based contrast agents, including gadolinium deposition

    PubMed Central

    Aime, Silvio; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The biodistribution of approved gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents (GBCA) is reviewed. After intravenous injection GBCA distribute in the blood and the extracellular space and transiently through the excretory organs. Preclinical animal studies and the available clinical literature indicate that all these compounds are excreted intact. Elimination tends to be rapid and for the most part, complete. In renally insufficient patients the plasma elimination half-life increases substantially from hours to days depending on renal function. In patients with impaired renal function and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the agents gadodiamide, gadoversetamide, and gadopentetate dimeglumine have been shown to result in Gd deposition in the skin and internal organs. In these cases, it is likely that the Gd is no longer present as the GBCA, but this has still not been definitively shown. In preclinical models very small amounts of Gd are retained in the bone and liver, and the amount retained correlates with the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the GBCA with respect to Gd release in vitro. The pattern of residual Gd deposition in NSF subjects may be different than that observed in preclinical rodent models. GBCA are designed to be used via intravenous administration. Altering the route of administration and/or the formulation of the GBCA can dramatically alter the biodistribution of the GBCA and can increase the likelihood of Gd deposition. PMID:19938038

  8. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Abrogation of Oxaliplatin Activity by Cetuximab in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Valeria; Jia, Ruochen; Thompson, Hannah; Nijhuis, Anke; Jeffery, Rosemary; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Silver, Andrew R.; Hartley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antibody cetuximab, targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Clinical trials suggest reduced benefit from the combination of cetuximab with oxaliplatin. The aim of this study was to investigate potential negative interactions between cetuximab and oxaliplatin. Methods: Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Calcusyn software were used to characterize drug interactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction oxidative stress arrays identified genes regulating ROS production. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) measured signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) binding to dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) promoter. SW48, DLD-1 KRAS wild-type cell lines and DLD-1 xenograft models exposed to cetuximab, oxaliplatin, or oxaliplatin + cetuximab (control [saline]; n = 3 mice per treatment group) were used. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Cetuximab and oxaliplatin exhibited antagonistic effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activity reduced by 1.4-fold, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78 to 2.11, P = .003) as opposed to synergistic effects observed with the irinotecan metabolite 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). Although both oxaliplatin and SN-38 produced ROS, only oxaliplatin-mediated apoptosis was ROS dependent. Production of ROS by oxaliplatin was secondary to STAT1-mediated transcriptional upregulation of DUOX2 (3.1-fold, 95% CI = 1.75 to 2.41, P < .001). Inhibition of DUOX2 induction and p38 activation by cetuximab reduced oxaliplatin cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Inhibition of STAT1 and DUOX2-mediated ROS generation by cetuximab impairs p38-dependent apoptosis by oxaliplatin in preclinical models and may contribute to reduced efficacy in clinical settings. Understanding the rationale for unexpected trial results will inform improved rationales for combining EGFR

  9. Anticancer Activity of Methyl-Substituted Oxaliplatin Analogs†

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Xanthos, Dimitris N.; Gojo, Johannes; Bytzek, Anna K.; Körner, Wilfried; Heffeter, Petra; Abramkin, Sergey A.; Jakupec, Michael A.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Windberger, Ursula; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Berger, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is successfully used in systemic cancer therapy. However, resistance development and severe adverse effects are limiting factors for curative cancer treatment with oxaliplatin. The purpose of this study was to comparatively investigate in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties as well as the adverse effects of two methyl-substituted enantiomerically pure oxaliplatin analogs [[(1R,2R,4R)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine] oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1537), and [(1R,2R,4S)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine]oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1691)] and to evaluate the impact of stereoisomerism. Although the novel oxaliplatin analogs demonstrated in multiple aspects activities comparable with those of the parental compound, several key differences were discovered. The analogs were characterized by reduced vulnerability to resistance mechanisms such as p53 mutations, reduced dependence on immunogenic cell death induction, and distinctly attenuated adverse effects including weight loss and cold hyperalgesia. Stereoisomerism of the substituted methyl group had a complex and in some aspects even contradictory impact on drug accumulation and anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. To summarize, methyl-substituted oxaliplatin analogs harbor improved therapeutic characteristics including significantly reduced adverse effects. Hence, they might be promising metal-based anticancer drug candidates for further (pre)clinical evaluation. PMID:22331606

  10. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  11. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  12. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  13. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  14. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  15. [Search for Factors Related to Vascular Pain Expression upon Administration of Oxaliplatin into a Peripheral Vein].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Akiko; Yonemoto, Nao; Aoyama, Yuuya; Touma, Yuri; Kajiwara, Michiko; Watanabe, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Yoshiko; Koinuma, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between vascular pain and various characteristics (age, sex, cancer stage, performance status [PS], height, weight, body mass index [BMI], body surface area, oxaliplatin dose, and presence and absence of the initial administration of dexamethasone) in colorectal cancer patients who were administered initial doses of oxaliplatin intravenously. The study population included 29 patients treated at Higashi Totsuka Memorial Hospital between June 2010 and April 2014. One-way analysis of variance showed that vascular pain was significantly associated with weight (p=0.015), body surface area (p=0.013), and oxaliplatin doses (p=0.0026), where the significance level was p=0.05. Logistic regression analysis and the likelihood ratio test demonstrated that the likelihood of vascular pain increased with the increase in the oxaliplatin dose. According to the cut-off value of vascular pain determined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin was determined to be 175 mg or more. According to the cut-off value established using the ROC analysis, a single dose of oxaliplatin at which vascular pain is expressed was determined to be 175 mg or more. At this dose, 13 patients complained of vascular pain and 8 did not. At doses less than 175 mg, none of the 8 patients complained of vascular pain. These results suggest that lowering the diluted concentration and reducing the infusion rate of intravenously administered oxaliplatin may reduce vascular pain. PMID:26197757

  16. Systemic capillary leak syndrome in a patient receiving adjuvant oxaliplatin for locally advanced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brandon J; Peterson, Lindsay L

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the USA each year. Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapy agent, is part of the standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen FOLFOX (oxaliplatin with 5-fluorouracil [5-FU] and leucovorin [LV]) for the treatment of stage III and some high-risk stage II colorectal cancers. Although oxaliplatin is generally well tolerated, certain side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and peripheral neuropathy are common. We report a case of oxaliplatin-induced capillary-leak syndrome in a 63-year-old man undergoing his 12th and final cycle of FOLFOX for stage III colorectal cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first case of systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) reported in association with oxaliplatin. Currently, there is no prevention for SCLS. Documenting future cases of SCLS attributed to oxaliplatin is vital, as SCLS is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and no standard treatments beyond supportive care measures exist. Early recognition and diagnosis are therefore essential to improving patient outcomes. PMID:26071595

  17. A midline for oxaliplatin infusion: the myth of safety devices

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Ben; Hickish, Tamas; Uña Cidon, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum compound mainly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. According to its manufacturer it is not considered vesicant agent though it has been shown to cause severe tissue damage if extravasation occurs in large doses. Several cases of extravasation have been reported; most of them from incorrectly placed peripheral cannula or incorrect use of central venous access devices. To reduce these risks, peripherally inserted central catheters and midline catheters have been increasingly used and are especially helpful if poor peripheral venous access. Midlines are mainly used for patients not receiving vesicant drugs, and are generally inserted without radiological guidance. They are believed to be safe, but we present the first ever-documented oxaliplatin extravasation injury from a midline catheter. PMID:24903726

  18. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  19. Palliative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy after exposure to oxaliplatin in the adjuvant setting for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Aalok; Lim, Howard John

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the efficacy of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for metastatic colon cancer patients who have already received adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 22 consecutive patients who developed recurrence after adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer and received another course of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for their metastatic disease. The main endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results A total of 635 patients received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer at the British Columbia Cancer Agency from 2006 to 2011. A total of 176 patients recurred, 22 (12.5%) of whom were re-exposed to oxaliplatin in the metastatic scenario. Oxaliplatin in combination with fluoropyrimidine was given as first, second and third line in in 3 (13.6%), 14 (63.6%), and 5 (22.7%) patients respectively. Median time from the last cycle of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy to the first cycle of palliative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was 44.3 months. Median PFS and overall survival (OS) were 3.3 (95% CI, 1.4-5.1) and 10.0 months (95% CI, 5.3-14.6), respectively. There was no difference in PFS for patients re-exposed to oxaliplatin less than 36 months compared to longer (3.6 versus 3.1 months, P=0.793, HR =0.88). Conclusions In this population-based study, only a small proportion of pts who recurred after oxaliplatin-based adjuvant therapy received oxaliplatin in the metastatic setting. Re-exposure of oxaliplatin in combination with fluoropyrimidine is associated with only modest PFS benefit. Larger studies evaluating the role of oxaliplatin re-exposure are needed. PMID:26487941

  20. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53−/− HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53−/− HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  1. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53-/- HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53-/- HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  2. Oxaliplatin antagonizes HIV-1 latency by activating NF-κB without causing global T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Pengfei; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Hanxian; Chen, Huabiao; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 in this cell line model of HIV-1 latency. • Reactivation is synergized when oxaliplatin is used in combination with valproic acid. • Oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 through activation of NF-kB and does not induce T cell activation. - Abstract: Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a promising strategy for the clearance of the viral reservoirs. Because of the limitations of current agents, identification of new latency activators is urgently required. Using an established model of HIV-1 latency, we examined the effect of Oxaliplatin on latent HIV-1 reactivation. We showed that Oxaliplatin, alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA), was able to reactivate HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation. We also provided evidence that Oxaliplatin reactivated HIV-1 expression by inducing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Our results indicated that Oxaliplatin could be a potential drug candidate for anti-latency therapies.

  3. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  4. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents. PMID:16024060

  5. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  6. Polysaccharide from Lentinus edodes combined with oxaliplatin possesses the synergy and attenuation effect in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Qiang; Wang, Junfeng; Cheng, Fang; Huang, Xiao; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Kaiping

    2016-07-28

    Despite the great progress in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, combination chemotherapy is still the main choice of treatment for patients with unresectable metastatic or recurrent hepatocellular cancer. Lentinan, which has been used as an immunomodulator in the treatment of cancer, possesses anti-tumor activities. However, the mechanisms by which Lentinan inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma remain unknown. Our study showed that Lentinan has a significantly synergistic anti-tumor effect with oxaliplatin against HepG2 cells in vitro and in H22 tumor-bearing mice through the mitochondria pathway and for the inhibition of NF-κB, Stat3 and survivin signaling. Moreover, Lentinan moderated side effects induced by oxaliplatin. These findings suggested that Lentinan may be an ideal agent for the combination therapy of oxaliplatin against hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27130669

  7. Oxaliplatin-induced hyperexcitation of rat sciatic nerve fibers: an intra-axonal study.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Kosmidis, Efstratios K; Theophilidis, George

    2013-02-01

    Oxaliplatin is an agent that is used extensively in gastrointestinal cancer chemotherapy. The agent's major dose-limiting toxicity is peripheral neuropathy that can manifest as a chronic or an acute syndrome. Oxaliplatin-induced acute neuropathy is purportedly caused by an alteration of the biophysical properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. However, sodium channel blockers have not been successful at preventing acute neuropathy in the clinical setting. We report intra-axonal recordings from the isolated rat sciatic nerve preparation under the effect of oxaliplatin. The depolarization phase of single action potentials remains intact with a duration of 0.52 ± 0.02 ms (n=68) before and 0.55 ± 0.01 ms (n=68) after 1-5 h of exposure to 150 μM oxaliplatin (unpaired t-test, P > 0.05) whereas there is a significant broadening of the repolarization phase (2.16 ± 0.10 ms, n=68, before and 5.90 ± 0.32 ms after, n=68, unpaired t-test, P < 0.05). Apart from changes in spike shape, oxaliplatin also had drastic concentration- and time-dependent effects on the firing responses of fibers to short stimuli. In the intra-axonal recordings, three groups of firing patterns were indentified. The first group shows bursting (internal frequency 90 - 130 Hz, n=88), the second shows a characteristic plateau (at -19.27�2.84 mV, n=31, with durations ranging from 45 - 140 ms depending on the exposure time), and the third combines a plateau and a bursting period. Our results implicate the voltage-gated potassium channels as additional oxaliplatin targets, opening up new perspectives for the pharmacological prevention of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22721389

  8. Antineuropathic Profile of N-Palmitoylethanolamine in a Rat Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Alessandra; Corti, Francesca; Boccella, Serena; Luongo, Livio; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Maione, Sabatino; Calignano, Antonio; Ghelardini, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is a main side effect of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin. The development of a neuropathic syndrome impairs quality of life and potentially results in chemotherapy dose reductions and/or early discontinuation. In the complex pattern of molecular and morphological alterations induced by oxaliplatin in the nervous system, an important activation of glia has been preclinically evidenced. N-Palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) modulates glial cells and exerts antinociceptive effects in several animal models. In order to improve the therapeutic chances for chemotherapy-dependent neuropathy management, the role of PEA was investigated in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy (2.4 mg kg-1 daily, intraperitoneally). On day 21, a single administration of PEA (30 mg kg-1 i.p.) was able to reduce oxaliplatin-dependent pain induced by mechanical and thermal stimuli. The repeated treatment with PEA (30 mg kg-1 daily i.p. for 21 days, from the first oxaliplatin injection) prevented lowering of pain threshold as well as increased pain on suprathreshold stimulation. Ex vivo histological and molecular analysis of dorsal root ganglia, peripheral nerves and spinal cord highlighted neuroprotective effects and glia-activation prevention induced by PEA repeated administration. The protective effect of PEA resulted in the normalization of the electrophysiological activity of the spinal nociceptive neurons. Finally, PEA did not alter the oxaliplatin-induced mortality of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. The efficacy of PEA in neuropathic pain control and in preventing nervous tissue alteration candidates this endogenous compound as disease modifying agent. These characteristics, joined to the safety profile, suggest the usefulness of PEA in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. PMID:26039098

  9. Phase II study of reintroduction of oxaliplatin for advanced colorectal cancer in patients previously treated with oxaliplatin and irinotecan: RE-OPEN study

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of reintroducing oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to standard chemotherapy has not been verified. We performed a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of reintroducing oxaliplatin. Methods Eligible patients had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and irinotecan that achieved a response or stable disease followed by confirmed disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior oxaliplatin-based therapy. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR) after 12 weeks of treatment starting. The DCR was defined as the sum of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 (range: 35–77) years and the male/female ratio was 19/14. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 in 84.8%. Fourteen primary tumors were in the colon and 19 were in the rectum. All patients received modified FOLFOX6 as the protocol treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment starting, the DCR was 39.4% (95% confidence interval 21.8–57.0) and the response rate (complete response and partial response) was 6.1%. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was five and the median total dose of oxaliplatin was 425 mg/m2. Median progression-free survival time was 98 days and median overall survival was 300 days. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 allergic reactions was 28.1% and 3.1%, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 peripheral sensory neuropathy was 53.1% and 0%, respectively. There were no other severe adverse events and no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion Reintroducing oxaliplatin can be both safe and effective. This may be a salvage option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who achieved a response or stable disease with prior oxaliplatin-based therapy followed by disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior

  10. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Ahmad K.; Truong, Phu V.; Kallail, K. James

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES). A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI). After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES. PMID:26491586

  11. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis during oxaliplatin chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: case report.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Marcelo; O'Brien, Andrés; González, Sergio; Clavero, José Miguel; Orellana, Eric

    2007-12-01

    The patient presented here is a 30-year-old woman who underwent anterior resection for the initial treatment of rectal cancer. A postoperative study showed a single liver metastasis. The patient received adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy with concomitant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment followed by liver metastasectomy 6 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy with 5-FU, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX 4 regimen) was continued. The initial five cycles were well tolerated with the occurrence of only paresthesia that did not interfere with function. After the sixth cycle of the treatment, progressive dyspnea and persistent cough developed in the patient, although her clinical history was negative for lung disease. A chest radiograph revealed diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates, and a chest CT scan showed bilateral alveolar infiltrates predominant in the right lung. Lung biopsy by video-assisted thoracoscopy was performed, and the histologic report showed cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis (COP). Prednisone therapy (1 mg/kg/d) resulted in a very good clinical response. In fact, the patient had complete remission of respiratory symptoms including cough and dyspnea after 4 days of treatment, and the chest CT scan showed complete resolution of lung infiltrates after 4 weeks. One month later, the patient continued adjuvant treatment with six cycles of 5-FU, leucovorin, and irinotecan (ie, the FOLFIRI regimen) without complications. Thus, oxiplatin was implicated as the likely cause of this drug-induced lung toxicity, which is a very rare complication associated with platins. Diffuse interstitial lung disease, particularly COP, has been described following the administration of the cytotoxic agents bleomycin and busulfan, but a connection to oxaliplatin has not been reported before this case. PMID:18079234

  12. A case of oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Seong Eun; Jang, Moon Ju; Chong, So Young; Aster, Richard H.; Curtis, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum compound used in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. It is known to evoke a drug-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, which has not been reported in Korea. We describe a 53-year-old man who developed oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia during chemotherapy for colon cancer. Oxaliplatin-dependent IgG platelet antibodies were detected in his serum on flow cytometry. He was treated with immunoglobulin and corticosteroids without any complications. Physicians should consider oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, when a sudden, isolated thrombocytopenia develops during chemotherapy with oxaliplatin. PMID:24724069

  13. ATR CONTRIBUTES TO CELL CYCLE ARREST AND SURVIVAL AFTER CISPLATIN BUT NOT OXALIPLATIN1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kriste A.; Lilly, Kia K.; Reynolds, Evelyn A.; Sullivan, William P.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Cliby, William A.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA cross-linking agents cisplatin and oxaliplatin are widely used in the treatment of human cancer. Lesions produced by these agents are widely known to activate the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. Less is known about the role of the intra-S phase checkpoint in the response to these agents. In the present study, two different cell lines expressing a dominant negative kinase-dead (kd) version of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related) kinase in an inducible fashion were examined for their responses to these two platinating agents and a variety of other DNA cross-linking drugs. Expression of the kdATR allele markedly sensitized the cells to cisplatin, but not oxaliplatin, as assessed by inhibition of colony formation, induction of apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis. Similar differences in survival were noted for melphalan (ATR-dependent) and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC) (ATR-independent). Further experiments demonstrated that ATR function is not necessary for removal of Pt-DNA adducts. The predominant difference between the responses to the two platinum drugs was presence of a drug-specific ATR-dependent S phase arrest after cisplatin but not oxaliplatin. These results indicate that involvement of ATR in the response to DNA cross-linking agents is lesion specific. This observation might need to be taken into account in the development and use of ATR or Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:19372558

  14. (+)-Borneol attenuates oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Hui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Qi-Gang; Fang, Yun; Ge, Wei-Hong

    2016-02-10

    Common chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin often cause neuropathic pain during cancer treatment in patients. Such neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and responds poorly to common analgesics, which represents a clinical challenge. (+)-Borneol, a bicyclic monoterpene present in the essential oil of plants, is used for analgesia and anesthesia in traditional Chinese medicine. Although borneol has an antinociceptive effect on acute pain models, little is known about its effect on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain and its mechanism. We found that (+)-borneol exerted remarkable antihyperalgesic effects in a mouse model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. In addition, (+)-borneol blocked the action of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 agonist in mechanical and cold stimulus tests. Repeated treatment with (+)-borneol did not lead to the development of antinociceptive tolerance and did not affect body weight and locomotor activity. (+)-Borneol showed robust analgesic efficacy in mice with neuropathic pain by blocking transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in the spinal cord and may be a useful analgesic in the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:26730517

  15. Combined Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture and Morphine on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Min Joon; Go, Donghyun; Min, Byung-Il; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-02-01

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer, induces severe peripheral neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been used to attenuate pain, and its effect is known to be mediated by spinal noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Morphine is a well-known opioid used to treat different types of pain. Here, we investigated whether treatment with a combination of these two agents has an additive effect on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice. To assess cold and mechanical allodynia, acetone and von Frey filament tests were used, respectively. Significant allodynia signs were observed three days after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). BVA (0.25, 1, and 2.5 mg/kg, s.c., ST36) or morphine (0.5, 2, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) alone showed dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects. The combination of BVA and morphine at intermediate doses showed a greater and longer effect than either BVA or morphine alone at the highest dose. Intrathecal pretreatment with the opioidergic (naloxone, 20 μg) or 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 15 μg) receptor antagonist, but not with α2 adrenergic (idazoxan, 10 μg) receptor antagonist, blocked this additive effect. Therefore, we suggest that the combination effect of BVA and morphine is mediated by spinal opioidergic and 5-HT3 receptors and this combination has a robust and enduring analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26805884

  16. Combined Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture and Morphine on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Min Joon; Go, Donghyun; Min, Byung-Il; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer, induces severe peripheral neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been used to attenuate pain, and its effect is known to be mediated by spinal noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Morphine is a well-known opioid used to treat different types of pain. Here, we investigated whether treatment with a combination of these two agents has an additive effect on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice. To assess cold and mechanical allodynia, acetone and von Frey filament tests were used, respectively. Significant allodynia signs were observed three days after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). BVA (0.25, 1, and 2.5 mg/kg, s.c., ST36) or morphine (0.5, 2, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) alone showed dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects. The combination of BVA and morphine at intermediate doses showed a greater and longer effect than either BVA or morphine alone at the highest dose. Intrathecal pretreatment with the opioidergic (naloxone, 20 μg) or 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 15 μg) receptor antagonist, but not with α2-adrenergic (idazoxan, 10 μg) receptor antagonist, blocked this additive effect. Therefore, we suggest that the combination effect of BVA and morphine is mediated by spinal opioidergic and 5-HT3 receptors and this combination has a robust and enduring analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26805884

  17. High-throughput RNAi screening of human kinases identifies predictors of clinical outcome in colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ajian; Tang, Erjiang; Peng, Jian; Tang, Wenxian; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Liang; Xiao, Yihua; Wei, Qing; Yin, Lu; Li, Huaguang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify protein kinase genes that modulate oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in vitro and evaluate the roles of these genes in predicting clinical outcomes in CRC patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. A high-throughput RNAi screening targeting 626 human kinase genes was performed to identify kinase genes whose inhibition potentiates oxaliplatin sensitivity in CRC cells. The associations between copy numbers of the candidate genes and recurrence-free survival and overall survival were analyzed in 142 stage III CRC patients receiving first-line oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy who were enrolled from two independent hospitals. HT-RNAi screening identified 40 kinase genes whose inhibition potentiated oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in DLD1 cells. The relative copy number (RCN) of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 were associated with increased risks of both recurrence and death. Moreover, significant genes-based risk score and the ratios of RCN of different genes can further categorize patients into subgroups with distinctly differing outcomes. The estimated AUC for the prediction models including clinical variables plus kinase biomarkers was 0.77 for the recurrence and 0.82 for the survival models. The copy numbers of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 can predict clinical outcomes in CRC patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:25904054

  18. Oxaliplatin Immune-Induced Syndrome Occurs With Cumulative Administration and Rechallenge: Single Institution Series and Systematic Review Study.

    PubMed

    Bencardino, Katia; Mauri, Gianluca; Amatu, Alessio; Tosi, Federica; Bonazzina, Erica; Palmeri, Laura; Querques, Marialuisa; Ravera, Federica; Menegotto, Alberto; Boiani, Elisa; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Oxaliplatin immune-induced syndrome (OIIS) is an uncommon, potentially life-threatening, side effect associated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The present study reports 5 original cases of OIIS and systematically reviewed the available published cases. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical archives of the Niguarda Cancer Center from 2009 to 2015 and conducted a search for OIIS using the PubMed database, followed by deeper investigation of the references of the recorded studies. We pooled our series with other reported cases for systematic review in accordance with the recommendations of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement using only English language as the selection criterion. A total of 61 OIIS cases were analyzed, the largest series reported to date. Of the 61 patients, 56 (91.8%) had received oxaliplatin for metastatic colorectal cancer. In 32 of the 61 patients (52.5%), OIIS was associated with grade 4 thrombocytopenia and in 4 (6.6%) with grade 4 anemia. OIIS was fatal in 4 patients. In 49 patients, oxaliplatin-induced immune system activation was tested using the Coombs test or by detection of antiplatelet antibodies and was positive in 87.7% of the patients. The average number of oxaliplatin cycles until the onset of OIIS was 16.7, and the number was significantly lower when oxaliplatin was administered as a rechallenge after a period of vacancy of treatment with this agent (4.6 cycles as rechallenge vs. 13.6 as first-time exposure; P < .00001). OIIS is triggered by cumulative administration of oxaliplatin, characteristically with a threefold earlier onset when the drug is administered as a rechallenge. Prompt identification of OIIS can be expected to reduce the risk of iatrogenic morbidity and mortality. PMID:26979913

  19. Oxaliplatin-induced posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with isolated involvement of pons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Koay Hean

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pontine lesion can be caused by the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). It does occur in the normotensive patient who is treated with oxaliplatin. We reported a case of 81-year-old Chinese man with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who was initially treated with capecitabine. No significant adverse effects were noted. However, the response to the treatment was poor. Subsequently, Xelox was given. He developed transient altered mental status. Oxaliplatin was thought to be the causative agent and was withheld. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed vasogenic edema in the pons that was reversible after 2 weeks, as well as complete resolution of clinical symptoms. Early identification of the reversible cause of isolated pontine lesion, such as chemo, triggered PRES is crucial to facilitate prompt treatment by removing the offending agent or reducing the dose. PMID:26881576

  20. Delayed reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome following chemotherapy with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Sharief, Ubaidullah; Perry, David J

    2009-07-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (RPLS), also known as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, is characterized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of reversible vasogenic subcortical edema without infarction. The clinical presentation is usually nonspecific and typically involves global encephalopathy, seizures, headache, or visual symptoms. MRI of the brain is essential to the diagnosis of RPLS. Typical findings of RPLS include high-intensity signal on T2-weighted images predominantly in the posterior lobes of the brain that is caused by subcortical white matter vasogenic edema. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences on MRI improve sensitivity and detect subtle peripheral lesions. This clinical radiographic syndrome has been described in a number of medical conditions, with hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, and the use of immunosuppressant drugs (most notably calcineurin inhibitors) being the most common. It has occasionally been reported with cisplatin and rarely with carboplatin. Its occurrence with oxaliplatin is very unusual. An extensive literature search including PUBMED and direct contact with the drug manufacturer yielded only 2 known case reports. Herein, we describe a case that had classic clinical and radiologic features of RPLS. We also briefly describe 2 other patients who have been described to have RPLS with oxaliplatin in the literature. PMID:19632931

  1. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  2. Antiplatelet antibodies in oxaliplatin-induced immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Michael J; Curtis, Brian R; McCrae, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Lesson Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia may be potentially fatal; here we report the development of severe thrombocytopenia with strong oxaliplatin-dependent antiplatelet antibodies. PMID:25057402

  3. A case of delayed oxaliplatin-induced pseudo-obstruction: an atypical presentation of oxaliplatin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, M; Pauwels, W; Bleecker, J De

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity is a serious complication of cancer treatment. Oxaliplatin, a third-generation platinum drug, has become one of the first-line therapies used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of platinum-based chemotherapy. Most commonly a sensory neuropathy occurs with cold-triggered symptoms in the acute phase and numbness and painful paresthesias as a late presentation. Autonomic neurotoxicity and late presentation, months after cessation of the therapy, has rarely been described. We report a patient who clinically presented with a pseudo-obstruction months after treatment with oxaliplatin for metastatic colorectal cancer. Intestinal adhesions and relapsing malignancy were carefully excluded. By exclusion the pseudo-obstruction was attributed to a toxic oxaliplatin-induced autonomic neuropathy which slowly improved during months of follow-up. PMID:25523317

  4. Ototoxic Model of Oxaliplatin and Protection from Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Dalian, Ding; Haiyan, Jiang; Yong, Fu; Yongqi, Li; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anticancer drug commonly used to treat colorectal cancer and other tumors, has a number of serious side effects, most notably neuropathy and ototoxicity. To gain insights into its ototoxic profile, oxaliplatin was applied to rat cochlear organ cultures. Consistent with it neurotoxic propensity, oxaliplatin selectively damaged nerve fibers at a very low dose 1 μM. In contrast, the dose required to damage hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was 50 fold higher (50 μM). Oxailiplatin-induced cochlear lesions initially increased with dose, but unexpectedly decreased at very high doses. This non-linear dose response could be related to depressed oxaliplatin uptake via active transport mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that axonal degeneration involves biologically active processes which can be greatly attenuated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). To determine if NAD+ would protect spiral ganglion axons and the hair cells from oxaliplatin damage, cochlear cultures were treated with oxaliplatin alone at doses of 10 μM or 50 μM respectively as controls or combined with 20 mM NAD+. Treatment with 10 μM oxaliplatin for 48 hours resulted in minor damage to auditory nerve fibers, but spared cochlear hair cells. However, when cochlear cultures were treated with 10 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+, most auditory nerve fibers were intact. 50 μM oxaliplatin destroyed most of spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells with apoptotic characteristics of cell fragmentations. However, 50 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+ treatment greatly reduced neuronal degenerations and hair cell missing. The results suggested that NAD+ provides significant protection against oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, which may be due to its actions of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and energy supply. PMID:25419212

  5. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of oxaliplatin in adults and children identifies important covariates for dosing

    PubMed Central

    Nikanjam, Mina; Stewart, Clinton F.; Takimoto, Chris H.; Synold, Timothy W.; Beaty, Orren; Fouladi, Maryam; Capparelli, Edmund V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the determinants of variability for oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics including age, renal function, and hepatic function in children and adults. Methods Oxaliplatin pharmacokinetic data were combined from phase I and II clinical trials: 3 pediatric trials (Peds1–3) and 2 adult NCI organ dysfunction studies (Hepatic, Renal). A population pharmacokinetic model was developed utilizing platinum ultrafiltrate concentrations to characterize changes in oxaliplatin disposition with age and organ dysfunction along with other potential sources of oxaliplatin pharmacokinetic variability. Results A total of 1508 concentrations from 186 children and adults were used in the study. The data were well described by a three-compartment model. Serum creatinine was an independent predictor of clearance while age was an independent predictor of volume of distribution. While age was a significant covariate on clearance in the univariate analysis, age effects on clearance were entirely accounted for by serum creatinine. Gender, hepatic function, and race had no effect on clearance or volume of distribution. Median clearance values were 0.58 (Hepatic), 0.34 (Renal), 0.78 (Peds1), 0.74 (Peds2), and 0.81 (Peds3) (L/hr/kg0.75). Monte Carlo simulations of the final model with 130 mg/m2 yielded median AUC values of: 14.2 (2–6 yr), 16.8 (6–12 yr), 16.5 (12–18 yr), and 17.3 (>18 yr) (μg*hr/mL). Conclusions Renal function had the greatest effect on clearance with a small age effect seen on the distribution of oxaliplatin. Young pediatric patients had higher clearance values than adults as a result of better renal function. PMID:25557868

  6. Idiosyncratic Reaction with Cytokine Storm Associated with Oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin or irinotecan with 5-fluorouracil form the chemotherapy backbone of any systemic treatment of colorectal cancer. We successfully treated an idiosyncratic reaction to oxaliplatin consisting of severe chills, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever in a patient with metastatic colon cancer.   PMID:27335720

  7. Idiosyncratic Reaction with Cytokine Storm Associated with Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Dembla, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin or irinotecan with 5-fluorouracil form the chemotherapy backbone of any systemic treatment of colorectal cancer. We successfully treated an idiosyncratic reaction to oxaliplatin consisting of severe chills, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever in a patient with metastatic colon cancer. PMID:27335720

  8. Fatal Pneumonitis Induced by Oxaliplatin: Description of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, L.B.; Armentano, D.P.D.; Soares, A.; Gansl, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe 3 fatal cases of interstitial pneumonitis rapidly evolving to pulmonary fibrosis and death after the administration of oxaliplatin as part of the FOLFOX regimen. Due to the widespread use of oxaliplatin in oncology, clinicians should be aware of the risk and severity of oxalipatin-induced interstitial pneumonia. PMID:22539922

  9. Cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fiteni, Frédéric; Nguyen, Thierry; Vernerey, Dewi; Paillard, Marie-Justine; Kim, Stefano; Demarchi, Martin; Fein, Francine; Borg, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Pivot, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin/gemcitabine association has been a standard of care for first-line regimen in advanced biliary tract cancer nevertheless oxaliplatin/gemcitabine regimen is frequently preferred. Because comparative effectiveness in clinical outcomes of cisplatin- versus oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy is not available, a systematic review of studies assessing cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapies in advanced biliary tract cancer was performed. Published studies evaluating cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in advanced biliary tract cancer were included. Each study was weighted according to the number of patients included. The primary objective was to assess weighted median of medians overall survival (mOS) reported for both regimens. Secondary goals were to assess weighted median of medians progression-free survival (mPFS) and toxic effects were pooled and compared within each arm. Thirty-three studies involving 1470 patients were analyzed. In total, 771 and 699 patients were treated by cisplatin/gemcitabine and oxaliplatin/gemcitabine, respectively. Weighted median of mOS was 9.7 months in cisplatin group and 9.5 months in oxaliplatin group. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was significantly associated with more grade 3 and 4 asthenia, diarrhea, liver toxicity, and hematological toxicity. Sensitivity analysis including only the studies with the standard regimen of cisplatin (25–35 mg/m2 administered on days 1 and 8) showed that the weighted median of mOS increased from 9.7 to 11.7 months but Gem/CDDP regimen remained more toxic than Gemox regimen. These results suggest that the Gem/CDDP regimen with cisplatin (25–35 mg/m2) administered on days 1 and 8 is associated with survival advantage than Gemox regimen but with addition of toxicity. PMID:25111859

  10. Treatment of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by intravenous mangafodipir

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Alexandre, Jérôme; Nicco, Carole; Quinquis, Laurent; Benoit, Evelyne; Chéreau, Christiane; Lemaréchal, Hervé; Mir, Olivier; Borderie, Didier; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Weill, Bernard; Coste, Joel; Goldwasser, François; Batteux, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Background. The majority of patients receiving the platinum-based chemotherapy drug oxaliplatin develop peripheral neurotoxicity. Because this neurotoxicity involves ROS production, we investigated the efficacy of mangafodipir, a molecule that has antioxidant properties and is approved for use as an MRI contrast enhancer. Methods. The effects of mangafodipir were examined in mice following treatment with oxaliplatin. Neurotoxicity, axon myelination, and advanced oxidized protein products (AOPPs) were monitored. In addition, we enrolled 23 cancer patients with grade ≥2 oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in a phase II study, with 22 patients receiving i.v. mangafodipir following oxaliplatin. Neuropathic effects were monitored for up to 8 cycles of oxaliplatin and mangafodipir. Results. Mangafodipir prevented motor and sensory dysfunction and demyelinating lesion formation. In mice, serum AOPPs decreased after 4 weeks of mangafodipir treatment. In 77% of patients treated with oxaliplatin and mangafodipir, neuropathy improved or stabilized after 4 cycles. After 8 cycles, neurotoxicity was downgraded to grade ≥2 in 6 of 7 patients. Prior to enrollment, patients received an average of 880 ± 239 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Patients treated with mangafodipir tolerated an additional dose of 458 ± 207 mg/m2 oxaliplatin despite preexisting neuropathy. Mangafodipir responders managed a cumulative dose of 1,426 ± 204 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Serum AOPPs were lower in responders compared with those in nonresponders. Conclusion. Our study suggests that mangafodipir can prevent and/or relieve oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in cancer patients. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00727922. Funding. Université Paris Descartes, Ministère de la Recherche et de l’Enseignement Supérieur, and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris. PMID:24355920

  11. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  12. Silencing of CD59 enhanced the sensitivity of HT29 cells to 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haipeng; Li, Cuiling; Wang, Shaoyu; Guo, Qiang; Ren, Xia; Jiang, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement regulatory proteins (CD55 and CD59) were known to be expressed in many tumors and tumor cell lines including colorectal carcinoma, and were proposed as immunotherapy targets, however whether knocking down of CD55 and CD59 will affect the sensitivity of HT-29 cells to chemotherapy drugs for example, 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin and their possible mechanisms haven't been studied. To address this question, SiRNAs targeting CD55 and CD59 were chemically synthesized and transfected into HT-29 cells by lipofectamine. HT-29 growth curves of CD55 and CD59 knockdown cells were detected by MTT assay, HT29 inhibition curves to chemotherapy drugs (5-Fu and Oxaliplatin) were also assayed, in addition, chemotherapy sensitivity changes of HT29 affected by CD55 and CD59 knockdown were equally detected. Complement mediated lysis was examined by calcein-AM. We found that silencing CD59 in HT-29 cells could significantly enhance their sensitivity to 5-FU (P < 0.05) and Oxaliplatin (P < 0.05), and significantly reduced their IC50 concentration. On the contrary, knocking down of CD55 could inhibit HT-29 growth (P < 0.05). Mechanisms included increasing apoptosis rate of HT-29 by CD59 knocking down and G1/G0 blocking by silencing CD55. Our results thus shed light on the novel mechanism of chemotherapy resistance and provide an alternative strategy to overcome the resistance problem. PMID:25444672

  13. Review of Cisplatin and Oxaliplatin in Current Immunogenic and Monoclonal Antibody Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Rao Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy agents initially transformed cancer treatment. However their effectiveness peaked as combined regimes showed little additional benefit in trials. New research frontiers developed with the discovery that conventional chemotherapy can induce immunological cell death by recruiting high mobility group box 1 protein through T-cell immunity. Simultaneously monoclonal antibody agents (not effective as monotherapies) showed good results in combination with conventional chemotherapy. Some of these combinations are currently in use and researchers hope to develop regimes which can offer substantial benefits. Several resistance mechanisms against platinum compounds are known, but more knowledge is still needed to gain a full understanding. It seems reasonable therefore to revisit the pharmacology of these agents, which may also lead to identify rational combinations with monoclonal agents providing regimes with less toxicity and better efficacy. This article reviews the pharmacology of cisplatin and oxaliplatin and explores their possible association with monoclonal antibody treatments. PMID:25992242

  14. Antibiotic monensin synergizes with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to suppress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Junhui; Wang, Zhongliang; Yan, Zhengjian; Qiao, Min; Ye, Jixing; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Tang, Shengli; Mohammed, Maryam K; Liu, Hao; Fan, Jiaming; Zhang, Fugui; Zou, Yulong; Liao, Junyi; Qi, Hongbo; Haydon, Rex C; Luu, Hue H; He, Tong-Chuan; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy with an overall cure rate of merely 30%. Most patients experience recurrence within 12-24 months of cure and die of progressively chemotherapy-resistant disease. Thus, more effective anti-ovarian cancer therapies are needed. Here, we investigate the possibility of repurposing antibiotic monensin as an anti-ovarian cancer agent. We demonstrate that monensin effectively inhibits cell proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression, and induces apoptosis of human ovarian cancer cells. Monensin suppresses multiple cancer-related pathways including Elk1/SRF, AP1, NFκB and STAT, and reduces EGFR expression in ovarian cancer cells. Monensin acts synergistically with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Xenograft studies confirm that monensin effectively inhibits tumor growth by suppressing cell proliferation through targeting EGFR signaling. Our results suggest monensin may be repurposed as an anti-ovarian cancer agent although further preclinical and clinical studies are needed. PMID:26639992

  15. Antibiotic monensin synergizes with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to suppress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Junhui; Wang, Zhongliang; Yan, Zhengjian; Qiao, Min; Ye, Jixing; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Tang, Shengli; Mohammed, Maryam K.; Liu, Hao; Fan, Jiaming; Zhang, Fugui; Zou, Yulong; Liao, Junyi; Qi, Hongbo; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; He, Tong-Chuan; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy with an overall cure rate of merely 30%. Most patients experience recurrence within 12–24 months of cure and die of progressively chemotherapy-resistant disease. Thus, more effective anti-ovarian cancer therapies are needed. Here, we investigate the possibility of repurposing antibiotic monensin as an anti-ovarian cancer agent. We demonstrate that monensin effectively inhibits cell proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression, and induces apoptosis of human ovarian cancer cells. Monensin suppresses multiple cancer-related pathways including Elk1/SRF, AP1, NFκB and STAT, and reduces EGFR expression in ovarian cancer cells. Monensin acts synergistically with EGFR inhibitors and oxaliplatin to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Xenograft studies confirm that monensin effectively inhibits tumor growth by suppressing cell proliferation through targeting EGFR signaling. Our results suggest monensin may be repurposed as an anti-ovarian cancer agent although further preclinical and clinical studies are needed. PMID:26639992

  16. Toxicogenomics profiling of bone marrow from rats treated with topotecan in combination with oxaliplatin: a mechanistic strategy to inform combination toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Myrtle; Li, Jianying; Knight, Elaine; Eldridge, Sandy R.; Daniels, Kellye K.; Bushel, Pierre R.

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of anticancer agents may have synergistic anti-tumor effects, but enhanced hematological toxicity often limit their clinical use. We examined whether “microarray profiles” could be used to compare early molecular responses following a single dose of agents administered individually with that of the agents administered in a combination. We compared the mRNA responses within bone marrow of Sprague-Dawley rats after a single 30 min treatment with topotecan at 4.7 mg/kg or oxaliplatin at 15 mg/kg alone to that of sequentially administered combination therapy or vehicle control for 1, 6, and 24 h. We also examined the histopathology of the bone marrow following all treatments. Drug-related histopathological lesions were limited to bone marrow hypocellularity for animals dosed with either agent alone or in combination. Lesions had an earlier onset and higher incidence for animals given topotecan alone or in combination with oxaliplatin. Severity increased from mild to moderate when topotecan was administered prior to oxaliplatin compared with administering oxaliplatin first. Notably, six patterns of co-expressed genes were detected at the 1 h time point that indicate regulatory expression of genes that are dependent on the order of the administration. These results suggest alterations in histone biology, chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, bone regeneration, and respiratory and oxidative phosphorylation are among the prominent pathways modulated in bone marrow from animals treated with an oxaliplatin/topotecan combination. These data also demonstrate the potential for early mRNA patterns derived from target organs of toxicity to inform toxicological risk and molecular mechanisms for agents given in combination. PMID:25729387

  17. Organic Cation Transporters Are Determinants of Oxaliplatin Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuzhong; Lovejoy, Katherine S.; Shima, James E.; Lagpacan, Leah L.; Shu, Yan; Lapuk, Anna; Chen, Ying; Komori, Takafumi; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Xin; Lippard, Stephen J.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Although the platinum-based anticancer drugs cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin have similar DNA-binding properties, only oxaliplatin is active against colorectal tumors. The mechanisms for this tumor specificity of platinum-based compounds are poorly understood but could be related to differences in uptake. This study shows that the human organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 and 2 (SLC22A1 and SLC22A2) markedly increase oxaliplatin, but not cisplatin or carboplatin, accumulation and cytotoxicity in transfected cells, indicating that oxaliplatin is an excellent substrate of these transporters. The cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin was greater than that of cisplatin in six colon cancer cell lines [mean ± SE of IC50 in the six cell lines, 3.9 ± 1.4 μmol/L (oxaliplatin) versus 11 ± 2.0 μmol/L (cisplatin)] but was reduced by an OCT inhibitor, cimetidine, to a level similar to, or even lower than that of, cisplatin (29 ± 11 μmol/L for oxaliplatin versus 19 ± 4.3 μmol/L for cisplatin). Structure-activity studies indicated that organic functionalities on nonleaving groups coordinated to platinum are critical for selective uptake by OCTs. These results indicate that OCT1 and OCT2 are major determinants of the anticancer activity of oxaliplatin and may contribute to its antitumor specificity. They also strongly suggest that expression of OCTs in tumors should be investigated as markers for selecting specific platinum-based therapies in individual patients. The development of new anticancer drugs, specifically targeted to OCTs, represents a novel strategy for targeted drug therapy. The results of the present structure-activity studies indicate specific tactics for realizing this goal. PMID:16951202

  18. Geographic Variation in Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy and Survival in Patients With Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Janki M; Lairson, David R; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2016-01-01

    Geographic disparity in colon cancer survival has received less attention, despite the fact that health care delivery varied across regions. To examine geographic variation in colon cancer survival and explore factors affecting this variation, including the use of oxaliplatin chemotherapy, we studied cases with resected stage-III colon cancer in 2004-2009, identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare linked database. Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the effect of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy on survival across regions. Propensity score adjustments were made to control for potential selection bias and confounding. Rural regions showed lowest 3-year survival, whereas big metro regions showed better 3-year survival rate than any other region (67.3% in rural regions vs. 69.5% in big metro regions). Hazard ratio for patients residing in metro region was comparable with those residing in big metro region (1.27, 95% confidence interval: 0.90-1.80). However, patients residing in urban area were exhibiting lower mortality than those in other regions, although not statistically significant. Patients who received oxaliplatin chemotherapy were 23% significantly less likely to die of cancer than those received 5-fluorouracil only chemotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.95). In conclusion, there were some differences in survival across geographic regions, which were not statistically significant after adjusting for sociodemographic, tumor, chemotherapy, and other treatment characteristics. Oxaliplatin chemotherapy was associated with improved survival outcomes compared with 5-fluorouracil only chemotherapy across regions. Further studies may evaluate other factors and newer chemotherapy regimens on mortality/survival of older patients. PMID:24368611

  19. Pharmacokinetic and metabolism determinants of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin activity in treatment of colorectal patients.

    PubMed

    Gnoni, Antonio; Russo, Antonio; Silvestris, Nicola; Maiello, Evaristo; Vacca, Angelo; Marech, Ilaria; Numico, Gianmauro; Paradiso, Angelo; Lorusso, Vito; Azzariti, Amalia

    2011-12-01

    Fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin continued to be the mainstay of therapeutic regimens in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). For this reason, pharmacokinetic and metabolism of these drugs were analyzed and the identification of accurate and validated predictive, prognostic and toxicity markers became necessary to develop an effective therapy adapted to the patient's molecular profile, while minimizing life-threatening toxicities. In this review, we discuss literature data, defining predictive and prognostic markers actually identified in the treatment of CRC. We analyzed predictive markers of fluoropyrimidines effectiveness, principally for 5-Fluorouracil (5- FU) and also for oral fluoropyrimidines, as thymidylate Synthase (TS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase), microsatellite instability. DPD represent the more studied 5-FU toxicity marker, followed by TS and OPRT. Oxaliplatin effectiveness is principally regulated by nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, including excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XDP). The major oxaliplatin toxicity marker is represented by glutathione S-transferase (GST). All these results are based principally on retrospective studies. The future challenge became to validate molecular markers and their association with clinical outcomes in prospective trials, refining technologic platforms and bioinformatics to accommodate the complexity of the multifaceted molecular map that may determine outcome, and determining CRC patients most likely to benefit from therapeutic interventions tailored specifically for them. PMID:21787270

  20. Network insights on oxaliplatin anti-cancer mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Alian, Osama M; Azmi, Asfar S; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin has been a crucial component of combination therapies since admission into the clinic causing modest gains in survival across multiple malignancies. However, oxaliplatin functions in a non-targeted manner, posing a difficulty in ascertaining precise efficacy mechanisms. While previously thought to only affect DNA repair mechanisms, Platinum-protein adducts (Pt-Protein) far outnumber Pt-DNA adducts leaving a big part of oxaliplatin function unknown. Through preliminary network modeling of high throughput data, this article critically reviews the efficacy of oxaliplatin as well as proposes a better model for enhanced efficacy based on a network approach. In our study, not only oxaliplatin's function in interrupting DNA-replication was confirmed, but also its role in initiating or intensifying tumorigenesis pathways was uncovered. From our data we present a novel picture of competing signaling networks that collectively provide a plausible explanation of chemotherapeutic resistance, cancer stem cell survival, as well as invasiveness and metastases. Here we highlight oxaliplatin signaling networks, their significance and the clinical implications of these interactions that verifies the importance of network modeling in rational drug design. PMID:23369220

  1. Modified agar dilution susceptibility testing method for determining in vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Jono, K; Okonogi, K

    1997-01-01

    In vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds, against yeasts were easily determined by using RPMI-1640 agar medium and by incubating the plates in the presence of 20% CO2. The end point of inhibition was clear by this method, even in the case of azole compounds, because of the almost complete inhibition of yeast growth at high concentrations which permitted weak growth of some Candida strains by traditional methods. MICs obtained by the agar dilution method were similar to those obtained by the broth dilution method proposed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. PMID:9174197

  2. Ninjin'yoeito and ginseng extract prevent oxaliplatin-induced neurodegeneration in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Ayano; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Motoo, Yoshiharu; Mizukami, Hajime; Makino, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    Ninjin'yoeito (NYT) is a formula of Japanese traditional kampo medicine composed of 12 crude drugs, and is designed to improve the decline in constitution after recovery from disease, fatigue, anemia, anorexia, perspiration during sleep, cold limbs, slight fever, chills, persistent cough, malaise, mental disequilibrium, insomnia, and constipation. Oxaliplatin (L-OHP) is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat colorectal, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. However, it often causes acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies including cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of NYT on neuronal degeneration caused by L-OHP using PC12 cells, which are derived from the rat adrenal medulla and differentiate into nerve-like cells after exposure to nerve growth factor. L-OHP treatment decreased the elongation of neurite-like projection outgrowths in differentiated PC12 cells. When PC12 cells were treated with NYT hot water extract, neurodegeneration caused by L-OHP was significantly prevented in a concentration-dependent manner. Among the 12 crude drugs composing NYT, the extract of Ginseng (the root of Panax ginseng) exhibited the strongest preventive effects on neurodegeneration in differentiated PC12 cells. By activity-guided fractionation, we found that the fraction containing ginsenosides displayed preventive activity and, among several ginsenosides, ginsenoside F2 exhibited significant preventive effects on L-OHP-induced decreases in neurite-like outgrowths in differentiated PC12 cells. These results suggest that NYT and ginseng are promising agents for preventing L-OHP-induced neuropathies and present ginsenoside F2 as one of the active ingredients in ginseng. PMID:26014046

  3. Phase I-II Trial of Cetuximab, Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Radiotherapy as Preoperative Treatment in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Claus Arnold, Dirk; Hipp, Matthias; Liersch, Torsten; Dellas, Kathrin; Iesalnieks, Igors; Hermann, Robert Michael; Lordick, Florian; Hohenberger, Werner; Sauer, Rolf

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and activity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in rectal cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients with rectal cancer (T3-T4 or N+, M1 allowed) entered the trial at five investigator sites; the data from 58 patients were assessable. Cetuximab was given as an initial dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 7 days before the start of RT, and then at 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Capecitabine and oxaliplatin were administered according to an established schedule of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29) and capecitabine (Days 1-14 and 22-35) at three dose levels: 1,000, 1,300, and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d during the Phase I part of the study. The main endpoint of the Phase II was the pathologic complete response rate. Results: Thirteen patients were included in the Phase I part of the study, and the maximal tolerated dose was not reached. Overall, 48 patients were treated at the recommended dose of capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}) and 45 patients (94%) underwent surgery. A pathologic complete response was observed in 4 patients (9%), and moderate (n = 12), minimal (n = 10), and no tumor regression (n = 2) was noted in 24 (53%) of 45 patients. The mean radiation dose intensity, cetuximab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin was 98%, 95%, 94%, and 94%, respectively. The incidence of Grade 3-4 diarrhea was restricted to 19%. Postoperative complications of any grade occurred in 33% of patients. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that cetuximab can be combined safely with capecitabine and oxaliplatin plus RT. The low pathologic complete response rate achieved should stimulate additional preclinical investigations to establish the best sequence of triple combinations.

  4. von Willebrand Factor-Rich Platelet Thrombi in the Liver Cause Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome following Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishigori, Naoto; Matsumoto, Masanori; Koyama, Fumikazu; Hayakawa, Masaki; Hatakeyayama, Kinta; Ko, Saiho; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is widely used to treat advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) due to oxaliplatin is a serious type of chemotherapy-associated liver injury (CALI) in CRC patients. SOS is thought to be caused by the sinusoidal endothelial cell damage, which results in the release of unusually-large von Willebrand factor multimers (UL-VWFMs) from endothelial cells. To investigate the pathophysiology of CALI after oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, we analyzed plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and the distribution of VWFMs in CRC patients. Twenty-three patients with advanced CRC who received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with (n = 6) and without (n = 17) bevacizumab were analyzed. CALI (n = 6) and splenomegaly (n = 9) were found only in patients who did not treated with bevacizumab. Plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels increased after chemotherapy only in patients without bevacizumab. VWFM analysis in patients who did not receive bevacizumab showed the presence of UL-VWFMs and absence of high molecular weight VWFMs during chemotherapy, especially in those with CALI. In addition, plasma VWF:Ag and AST levels increased after chemotherapy in patients with splenomegaly (n = 9), but not in patients without splenomegaly (n = 14). Histological findings in the liver tissue of patients who did not receive bevacizumab included sinusoidal dilatation and microthrombi in the sinusoids. Many microthrombi were positive for both anti-IIb/IIIa and anti-VWF antibodies. Plasma UL-VWFM levels might be increased by damage to endothelial cells as a result of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Bevacizumab could prevent CALI and splenomegaly through inhibition of VWF-rich platelet thrombus formation. PMID:26580395

  5. An animal model of oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia reveals a crucial role for Nav1.6 in peripheral pain pathways

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Possani, Lourival D; Cabot, Peter J; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Cold allodynia, pain in response to cooling, occurs during or within hours of oxaliplatin infusion and is thought to arise from a direct effect of oxaliplatin on peripheral sensory neurons. To characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying acute oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia, we established a new intraplantar oxaliplatin mouse model that rapidly developed long-lasting cold allodynia mediated entirely through tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav pathways. Using selective inhibitors and knockout animals, we found that Nav1.6 was the key isoform involved, while thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels were not involved. Consistent with a crucial role for delayed-rectifier potassium channels in excitability in response to cold, intraplantar administration of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine mimicked oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and was also inhibited by Navl.6 blockers. Intraplantar injection of the Nav1.6-activator Cn2 elicited spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia and enhanced 4-aminopyridine-induced cold allodynia. These findings provide behavioural evidence for a crucial role of Nav1.6 in multiple peripheral pain pathways including cold allodynia. PMID:23711479

  6. Superior antitumor activity of trastuzumab combined with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin in a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive human gastric cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    HARADA, SUGURU; YANAGISAWA, MIEKO; KANEKO, SAORI; YOROZU, KEIGO; YAMAMOTO, KANAME; MORIYA, YOICHIRO; HARADA, NAOKI

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer, it has been reported that the combination of trastuzumab with capecitabine plus cisplatin, or with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus cisplatin, significantly increased overall survival compared with chemotherapy alone (ToGA trial). In addition, adjuvant therapy with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) improved the survival of patients who received curative D2 gastrectomy (CLASSIC trial). However, the efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab with XELOX for patients with HER2-positive gastric cancer remains unknown. The aim of this study, was to investigate the efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab with XELOX in a HER2-positive human gastric cancer xenograft model. Combination treatment with these three agents (trastuzumab 20 mg/kg, capecitabine 359 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 10 mg/kg), was found to exhibit a significantly stronger antitumor activity in NCI-N87 xenografts compared with either trastuzumab or XELOX alone. In this model, treatment with trastuzumab alone or trastuzumab plus oxaliplatin enhanced the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme in the generation of 5-FU from capecitabine in tumor tissues. In in vitro experiments, trastuzumab induced TP mRNA expression in NCI-N87 cells. In addition, NCI-N87 cells co-cultured with the natural killer (NK) cell line CD16(158V)/NK-92 exhibited increased expression of TP mRNA. When NCI-N87 cells were cultured with CD16(158V)/NK-92 cells in the presence of trastuzumab, the mRNA expression of cytokines reported to have the ability to induce TP was upregulated in tumor cells. Furthermore, a medium conditioned by CD16(158V)/NK-92 cells also upregulated the expression of TP mRNA in NCI-N87 cells. These results suggest that trastuzumab promotes TP expression, either by acting directly on NCI-N87 cells, or indirectly via a mechanism that includes trastuzumab-mediated interactions

  7. Network insights on oxaliplatin anti-cancer mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin has been a crucial component of combination therapies since admission into the clinic causing modest gains in survival across multiple malignancies. However, oxaliplatin functions in a non-targeted manner, posing a difficulty in ascertaining precise efficacy mechanisms. While previously thought to only affect DNA repair mechanisms, Platinum-protein adducts (Pt-Protein) far outnumber Pt-DNA adducts leaving a big part of oxaliplatin function unknown. Through preliminary network modeling of high throughput data, this article critically reviews the efficacy of oxaliplatin as well as proposes a better model for enhanced efficacy based on a network approach. In our study, not only oxaliplatin’s function in interrupting DNA-replication was confirmed, but also its role in initiating or intensifying tumorigenesis pathways was uncovered. From our data we present a novel picture of competing signaling networks that collectively provide a plausible explanation of chemotherapeutic resistance, cancer stem cell survival, as well as invasiveness and metastases. Here we highlight oxaliplatin signaling networks, their significance and the clinical implications of these interactions that verifies the importance of network modeling in rational drug design. PMID:23369220

  8. Gemcitabine-oxaliplatin combination for ovarian cancer resistant to taxane-platinum treatment: a phase II study from the GINECO group

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Coquard, I; Weber, B; Cretin, J; Haddad-Guichard, Z; Lévy, E; Hardy-Bessard, A C; Gouttebel, M C; Geay, J-F; Aleba, A; Orfeuvre, H; Agostini, C; Provencal, J; Ferrero, J M; Fric, D; Dohollou, N; Paraiso, D; Salvat, J; Pujade-Lauraine, É

    2009-01-01

    Advanced ovarian carcinoma in early progression (<6 months) (AOCEP) is considered resistant to most cytotoxic drugs. Gemcitabine (GE) and oxaliplatin (OXA) have shown single-agent activity in relapsed ovarian cancer. Their combination was tested in patients with AOCEP in phase II study. Fifty patients pre-treated with platinum–taxane received q3w administration of OXA (100 mg m–2, d1) and GE (1000 mg m–2, d1, d8, 100-min infusion). Patient characteristics were a : median age 64 years (range 46–79),and 1 (84%) or 2 (16%) earlier lines of treatment. Haematological toxicity included grade 3–4 neutropaenia (33%), anaemia (8%), and thrombocytopaenia (19%). Febrile neutropaenia occurred in 3%. Non-haematological toxicity included grade 2–3 nausea or vomiting (34%), grade 3 fatigue (25%),and grade 2 alopecia (24%). Eighteen (37%) patients experienced response. Median progression-free (PF) and overall survivals (OS) were 4.6 and 11.4 months, respectively. The OXA–GE combination has high activity and acceptable toxicity in AOCEP patients. A comparison of the doublet OXA–GE with single-agent treatment is warranted. PMID:19190632

  9. Oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil hepatic infusion with lipiodolized chemoembolization in large hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Huan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Lan; Le, Fan; Ge, Ning-Ling; Li, Li-Xin; Gan, Yu-Hong; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Ju-Bo; Xue, Tong-Chun; Chen, Rong-Xin; Xia, Jing-Lin; Zhang, Bo-Heng; Ye, Sheng-Long; Wang, Yan-Hong; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with hepatic infusion of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil and Lipiodol chemoembolization in large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: In this retrospective study, 132 patients with unresectable HCCs larger than 10 cm were treated with hepatic infusion of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by Lipiodol chemoembolization. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Sixteen-week disease-control rate, time to progression (TTP), and major complications were also studied. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors affecting OS and TTP. RESULTS: A total of 319 procedures were performed in the 132 patients. Eleven (8.3%) patients received radical resection following TACE treatment (median time to initial TACE 4.3 ± 2.3 mo). The median OS and TTP were 10.3 and 3.0 mo respectively, with a 50.0% 16-wk disease-control rate. Major complications were encountered in 6.0% (8/132) of patients following TACE and included serious jaundice in 1.5% (2/132) patients, aleukia in 1.5% (2/132), and hepatic failure in 3.0% (4/132). One patient died within one month due to serious hepatic failure and severe sepsis after receiving the second TACE. The risk factor associated with TTP was baseline alpha-fetoprotein level, and vascular invasion was an independent factor related to OS. CONCLUSION: Hepatic infusion of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by lipiodolized-chemoembolization is a safe and promising treatment for patients with HCCs larger than 10 cm in diameter. PMID:25852283

  10. Rationally designed oxaliplatin-nanoparticle for enhanced antitumor efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu; Soni, Shivani; Roy, Bhaskar; Papa, Anne-Laure; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2012-02-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles have been extensively studied as carriers for cancer chemotherapeutics. However, the formulation of platinum chemotherapeutics in nanoparticles has been a challenge arising from their physicochemical properties. There are only a few reports describing oxaliplatin nanoparticles. In this study, we derivatized the monomeric units of a polyisobutylene maleic acid copolymer with glucosamine, which chelates trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH) platinum (II) through a novel monocarboxylato and O → Pt coordination linkage. At a specific polymer to platinum ratio, the complex self-assembled into a nanoparticle, where the polymeric units act as the leaving group, releasing DACH-platinum in a sustained pH-dependent manner. Sizing was done using dynamic light scatter and electron microscopy. The nanoparticles were evaluated for efficacy in vitro and in vivo. Biodistribution was quantified using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectroscopy (ICP-AAS). The PIMA-GA-DACH-platinum nanoparticle was found to be more active than free oxaliplatin in vitro. In vivo, the nanoparticles resulted in greater tumor inhibition than oxaliplatin (equivalent to 5 mg kg-1 platinum dose) with minimal nephrotoxicity or body weight loss. ICP-AAS revealed significant preferential tumor accumulation of platinum with reduced biodistribution to the kidney or liver following PIMA-GA-DACH-platinum nanoparticle administration as compared with free oxaliplatin. These results indicate that the rational engineering of a novel polymeric nanoparticle inspired by the bioactivation of oxaliplatin results in increased antitumor potency with reduced systemic toxicity compared with the parent cytotoxic. Rational design can emerge as an exciting strategy in the synthesis of nanomedicines for cancer chemotherapy.

  11. Cancer morbidity in British military veterans included in chemical warfare agent experiments at Porton Down: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Linsell, L; Brooks, C; Keegan, T J; Langdon, T; Doyle, P; Maconochie, N E S; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Beral, V

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine cancer morbidity in members of the armed forces who took part in tests of chemical warfare agents from 1941 to 1989. Design Historical cohort study, with cohort members followed up to December 2004. Data source Archive of UK government research facility at Porton Down, UK military personnel records, and national death and cancer records. Participants All veterans included in the cohort study of mortality, excluding those known to have died or been lost to follow-up before 1 January 1971 when the UK cancer registration system commenced: 17 013 male members of the UK armed forces who took part in tests (Porton Down veterans) and a similar group of 16 520 men who did not (non-Porton Down veterans). Main outcome measures Cancer morbidity in each group of veterans; rate ratios, with 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for age group and calendar period. Results 3457 cancers were reported in the Porton Down veterans compared with 3380 cancers in the non-Porton Down veterans. While overall cancer morbidity was the same in both groups (rate ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.05), Porton Down veterans had higher rates of ill defined malignant neoplasms (1.12, 1.02 to 1.22), in situ neoplasms (1.45, 1.06 to 2.00), and those of uncertain or unknown behaviour (1.32, 1.01 to 1.73). Conclusion Overall cancer morbidity in Porton Down veterans was no different from that in non-Porton Down veterans. PMID:19318700

  12. Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Gastric Cancer-An Extended Phase I MARGIT and AIO Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter Wenz, Frederik; Lukan, Nadine; Mai, Sabine; Kripp, Melanie; Staiger, Wilko; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Willeke, Frank; Moehler, Markus; Post, Stefan; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve the prognosis of gastric cancer. To optimize these results, in the present study oxaliplatin and capecitabine were used instead of 5-fluorouracil. We sought to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) of these drugs in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with resected adenocarcinoma of the stomach or the gastroesophageal junction were included. They received two cycles of induction chemotherapy (oxaliplatin and capecitabine [XelOx] regimen). Using standard Phase I methodology, patients received 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions either in combination with capecitabine 825 mg m{sup -1} twice a day (Dose Level [DL] I) or capecitabine in combination with weekly oxaliplatin 40 or 50 mg m{sup -1} (DL II and III). After the completion of chemoradiation, two additional cycles of XelOx were scheduled. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. Only 1 of 6 patients evaluable on DL I had DLT. Of the first 6 patients on DL II, 1 patient experienced DLT, and 3 of the remaining patients had Grade 3 toxicity. Therefore, DL II was defined as the maximum tolerated dose and a total of 20 patients were treated at this DL. The most frequently observed toxicities (Common Toxicity Criteria Grades 1, 2 and 3) were, respectively, leukocytopenia in 5, 5, and 4 patients; nausea in 3, 7, and 3; and diarrhea in 4, 0, and 1. Conclusions: In summary, capecitabine 825 mg m{sup -1} twice a day (Days 1-33) and weekly oxaliplatin 40 mg m{sup -1} was safe and tolerable in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Furthermore, four cycles of XelOx could be applied before and after chemoradiotherapy in two thirds of the patients.

  13. Multicentre phase II trial of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: FFCD 03-03 trial

    PubMed Central

    Boige, V; Raoul, J-L; Pignon, J-P; Bouché, O; Blanc, J-F; Dahan, L; Jouve, J-L; Dupouy, N; Ducreux, M

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of new drug combinations is needed to improve patients' prognosis in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the capecitabine–oxaliplatine combination (XELOX) in HCC patients. First-line chemotherapy with XELOX regimen consisting of a 3-week cycle of intravenous oxaliplatin (130 mg m−2) on Day 1, and oral capecitabine twice daily from Days 1–14 (1000 mg m−2) was administered in patients with measurable, unresectable HCC. Fifty patients (male, 88%; median age, 68 years) received a total of 295 cycles (median, 6) of treatment. Disease control (three partial responses, 29 stable diseases) rate was 72% (95% CI 57–83%). Median overall and median progression-free (PFS) survival was 9.3 months and 4.1 months, respectively. Progression-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 38% (95% CI 26–52%) and 14% (95% CI 7–26%), respectively. Main grade 3–4 drug-related toxicities included diarrhoea (16%), elevation of aminotransferases and/or bilirubin (16%), thrombocytopenia (12%), and neurotoxicity (6%). Capecitabine plus oxaliplatin regimen showed modest anti-tumour activity with tolerable toxicities in patients with advanced HCC. However, the manageable toxicity profile and the encouraging disease control rate deserve further attention for this convenient, outpatient-based chemotherapy regimen. PMID:17876335

  14. Hydrolysis of oxaliplatin-evaluation of the acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate complex.

    PubMed

    Jerremalm, Elin; Eksborg, Staffan; Ehrsson, Hans

    2003-02-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis of the platinum anticancer drug oxaliplatin gives the oxalato monodentate complex and the dihydrated oxaliplatin complex in two consecutive steps. The acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate intermediate was determined by a kinetic approach. The pK(a) value was estimated as 7.23. The monodentate intermediate is assumed to rapidly react with endogenous compounds, resulting in a continuous conversion of oxaliplatin via the monodentate form. PMID:12532393

  15. [A Case of Colorectal Cancer with Anaphylactic Shock to Oxaliplatin].

    PubMed

    Machida, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Jun-ichi; Terashima, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of a 61-year-old woman with cecum cancer, ileal and multiple hepatic metastases, and peritoneal dissemination. Surgery (right hemicolectomy) was performed on December 2013. After surgery, 7 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab were administered. In May 2014, 4 minutes after starting the 8th course of oxaliplatin, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, and general malaise were observed. Oxaliplatin administration was immediately discontinued and an injection of an antiemetic drug was administered, but the patient's blood pressure dropped to 87/53 mmHg and the SpO2 decreased to 87% (room air). The patient showed facial pallor; oxygen administration was initiated. Although blood pressure recovered to 124/69 mmHg 3 minutes after oxygen administration, reddening of the palms, pruritus, and headache were observed. The dyspnea eased 8 minutes after oxygen administration, the SpO2 recovered 18 minutes after oxygen administration, and the headache ceased. The patient subsequently was admitted to the hospital for observation, but no significant change was observed, and she was discharged the following day. Anaphylaxis due to oxaliplatin occurring after the 6th course is commonly reported, and the symptoms in this case were comparable to those described in the literature. PMID:26805295

  16. SNPs in transporter and metabolizing genes as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kap, Elisabeth J; Seibold, Petra; Scherer, Dominique; Habermann, Nina; Balavarca, Yesilda; Jansen, Lina; Zucknick, Manuela; Becker, Natalia; Hoffmeister, Michael; Ulrich, Alexis; Benner, Axel; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-06-15

    Oxaliplatin is frequently used as part of a chemotherapeutic regimen with 5-fluorouracil in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). The cellular availability of oxaliplatin is dependent on metabolic and transporter enzymes. Variants in genes encoding these enzymes may cause variation in response to oxaliplatin and could be potential predictive markers. Therefore, we used a two-step procedure to comprehensively investigate 1,444 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from these pathways for their potential as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment, using 623 stage II-IV CRC patients (of whom 201 patients received oxaliplatin) from a German prospective patient cohort treated with adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy. First, all genes were screened using the global test that evaluated SNP*oxaliplatin interaction terms per gene. Second, one model was created by backward elimination on all SNP*oxaliplatin interactions of the selected genes. The statistical procedure was evaluated using bootstrap analyses. Nine genes differentially associated with overall survival according to oxaliplatin treatment (unadjusted p values < 0.05) were selected. Model selection resulted in the inclusion of 14 SNPs from eight genes (six transporter genes, ABCA9, ABCB11, ABCC10, ATP1A1, ATP1B2, ATP8B3, and two metabolism genes GSTM5, GRHPR), which significantly improved model fit. Using bootstrap analysis we show an improvement of the prediction error of 3.7% in patients treated with oxaliplatin. Several variants in genes involved in metabolism and transport could thus be potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in CRC patients. If confirmed, inclusion of these variants in a predictive test could identify patients who are more likely to benefit from treatment with oxaliplatin. PMID:26835885

  17. Impaired gap junctions in human hepatocellular carcinoma limit intrinsic oxaliplatin chemosensitivity: A key role of connexin 26.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Na; Zhao, Yu; Li, Wan-Yun; Zhao, Fu-You; Ou, Yu-Rong; Qin, Shu-Kui; Wu, Qiong

    2016-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is generally believed to have low sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents including oxaliplatin (OXA). Studies have demonstrated that gap junctions (GJs) composed of connexin (Cx) proteins have the potential to modulate drug chemosensitivity in multiple tumor cells. In the present study, we investigated the characteristics of Cx and GJs in HCC at both histologic and cytologic levels, and the effects of GJ and its effective components on OXA cytotoxicity in HCC cells in vitro. Immunohistochemistry was performed in 76 HCCs and 20 normal liver tissues to detect and locate the expression of Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43. At cytologic levels, the expression and localization of Cxs were evaluated by RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. The GJ function between adjacent cells was detected using dye transfer assay. The role of GJs in the modulation of OXA toxicity in HCC cells was explored using pharmacologic and molecular biologic methods. We found that Cx expression in HCC tissues was significantly lower than in normal liver tissues, and the 'internalization' from cell membrane to cytoplasm was remarkable. In vitro experiments revealed the presence of functional GJs in the SMMC-7721 HCC cells due to a small amount of Cx protein along the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. Regulation of this part of GJs positively influenced OXA cytotoxicity. Using RNA interference, only specific inhibition of Cx26 but not Cx32 or Cx43 reduced OXA cytotoxicity. Conversely, Cx26 overexpression by transfection of Cx26 plasmid DNA enhanced OXA cytotoxicity. This study demonstrated that during hepatocarcinogenesis, the reduced expression and internalization of Cx proteins impaired the GJ function, which further attenuated OXA cytotoxicity. Impaired GJ function may contribute to low intrinsic chemosensitivity of HCC cells to OXA, mediated by Cx26. PMID:26648344

  18. Lunasin potentiates the effect of oxaliplatin preventing outgrowth of colon cancer metastasis, binds to α5β1 integrin and suppresses FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2011-12-27

    The effect of lunasin on colon cancer metastasis was studied using three human colon cancer cell lines in vitro and a liver metastasis model of colon cancer in vivo. Lunasin bound with α5β1 integrin and internalized into the nucleus of KM12L4 human colon cancer cells. Lunasin (10 μM) inhibited the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by 28%, 39% and 60% in RKO, HCT-116 and KM12L4 human colon cancer cells, respectively. Lunasin caused an increase in the expression of the inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IκB-α), a decrease in nuclear p50 NF-κB and a reduction in the migration of cancer cells. Lunasin (4 mg/kg bw) inhibited metastasis and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin by reducing the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Liver metastatic nodules were reduced from 28 (PBS) to 14 (lunasin, P = 0.047) while combination of lunasin and oxaliplatin to 5 (P = 0.004). The tumor burden was reduced from 0.13 (PBS) to 0.10 (lunasin, P = 0.039) to 0.04 (lunasin + oxaliplatin, P < 0.0001). Moreover, lunasin potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in modifying expression of proteins involved in apoptosis and metastasis including Bax, Bcl-2, IKK-α and p-p65. Lunasin inhibited metastasis of human colon cancer cells by direct binding with α5β1 integrin suppressing FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling, and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in preventing the outgrowth of metastasis. PMID:21963225

  19. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, P<0.05) following a 2h incubation with oxaliplatin. Adding carbenoxolone to the oxaliplatin-treated cultures reversed oxaliplatin-evoked coupling to baseline (P<0.05). Immunostaining showed no difference between expression of connexin 43 in control and oxaliplatin-treated cultures. Our findings indicated that oxaliplatin-increased gap junction-mediated coupling between satellite glial cells in primary cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia, and carbenoxolone reversed this effect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment. PMID:25999145

  20. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  1. Exenatide Facilitates Recovery from Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shunsuke; Ushio, Soichiro; Ozawa, Nana; Masuguchi, Ken; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Oishi, Ryozo; Egashira, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin has widely been used as a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it causes peripheral neuropathy. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, is an incretin mimetic secreted from ileal L cells, which is clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 receptor agonists have been reported to exhibit neuroprotective effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of exenatide on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rats and cultured cells. Methods Oxaliplatin (4 mg/kg) was administered intravenously twice per week for 4 weeks, and mechanical allodynia was evaluated using the von Frey test in rats. Axonal degeneration was assessed by toluidine blue staining of sciatic nerves. Results Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused mechanical allodynia from day 14 to 49. Although the co-administration of extended-release exenatide (100 μg/kg) could not inhibit the incidence of oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, it facilitated recovery from the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy with reparation of axonal degeneration. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth was evaluated in cultured pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. Exenatide inhibited oxaliplatin-induced neurite degeneration, but did not affect oxaliplatin-induced cell injury in cultured PC12 cells. Additionally, extended-release exenatide had no effect on the anti-tumor activity of oxaliplatin in cultured murine colon adenocarcinoma 26 (C-26) cells or C-26 cell-implanted mice. Conclusion These results suggest that exenatide may be useful for treating peripheral neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26536615

  2. Oxaliplatin triggers necrosis as well as apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Zhu, Xueping; Jin, Wei; Hao, Shumei; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Linjie

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsic apoptotic pathway is considered to be responsible for cell death induced by platinum anticancer drugs. While in this study, we found that, necrosis is an indispensable pathway besides apoptosis in oxaliplatin-treated gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Upon exposure to oxaliplatin, both apoptotic and necrotic features were observed. The majority of dead cells were double positive for Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential collapsed and caspase cascades were activated. However, ultrastructural changes under transmission electron microscope, coupled with the release of cellular contents, demonstrated the rupture of the plasma membrane. Oxaliplatin administration did not stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and autophagy, but elevated the protein level of Bmf. In addition, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1), but not receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and its downstream components participated in this death process. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) blocked oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely, whereas z-VAD-fmk could partially suppress cell death. Oxaliplatin treatment resulted in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) overactivation, as indicated by the increase of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which led to NAD{sup +} and ATP depletion. PARP-1 inhibitor, olaparib, could significantly block oxaliplatin-induced cell death, thus confirming that PARP-1 activation is mainly responsible for the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin. Phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 and translocalization of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) are critical for this death process. Taken together, these results indicate that oxaliplatin can bypass canonical cell death pathways to kill gastric cancer cells, which may be of therapeutic advantage in the treatment of gastric cancer. - Highlights: • Oxaliplatin induces apoptotic and necrotic cell death. • Nec-1 can inhibit oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely. • RIP3 and its

  3. Prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by a polyamine-reduced diet—NEUROXAPOL: protocol of a prospective, randomised, controlled, single-blind and monocentric trial

    PubMed Central

    Balayssac, David; Ferrier, Jérémy; Pereira, Bruno; Gillet, Brigitte; Pétorin, Caroline; Vein, Julie; Libert, Frédéric; Eschalier, Alain; Pezet, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxaliplatin remains the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for treating advanced colorectal cancer but its efficacy is hampered by dose-limiting neurotoxicity manifested by a painful polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) is characterised by acute and transient cold hyperaesthesia in the hours and days following oxaliplatin infusion (>90% of patients), but also by retarded chronic neuropathy due to the repetition of chemotherapy cycles (30–50% of patients). OIPN impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients and no preventive or curative strategies have as yet proven effective. A polyamine-reduced diet (PRD) has recently demonstrated its efficacy to prevent OIPN in animals without adverse effects. Methods and analysis The NEUROXAPOL trial is a prospective, randomised, controlled, single-blind, monocentric and interventional study. This trial is aimed at evaluating the efficacy and feasibility of a PRD compared to a normal polyamine containing diet to prevent OIPN in patients treated by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients (n=40 per group) will be randomly assigned to receive either a PRD or a normal diet before and during the chemotherapy regimen. The main objectives are to improve the cold pain thresholds, neuropathic pain symptoms, comorbidities (anxiety and depression) and HRQOL of patients. The primary end point is the assessment of cold pain thresholds 2 weeks after the third cycle of chemotherapy. The secondary end points are the evaluation of thermal pain thresholds, the grade of neuropathy, neuropathic pain, symptoms of anxiety and depression and HRQOL, until the 12th cycle of chemotherapy. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by an independent medical ethics committee 1 (CPP Sud Est 1, Saint Etienne, France) and registered by the competent French authority (ANSM, Saint Denis, France). The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international

  4. Preparation, characterisation and antitumour activity of β-, γ- and HP-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of oxaliplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jiang, Kunming; Li, Ke; Cong, Yangwei; Pu, Shaoping; Jin, Yi; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three water-soluble oxaliplatin complexes were prepared by inclusion complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), γ-CD and HP-β-CD. The structures of oxaliplatin/CDs were confirmed by NMR, FTIR, TGA, XRD as well as SEM analysis. The results show that the water solubility of oxaliplatin was increased in the complex with CDs in 1:1 stoichiometry inclusion modes, and the cyclohexane ring of oxaliplatin molecule was deeply inserted into the cavity of CDs. Moreover, the stoichiometry was established by a Job plot and the water stability constant (Kc) of oxaliplatin/CDs was calculated by phase solubility studies, all results show that the oxaliplatin/β-CD complex is more stable than free oxaliplatin, oxaliplatin/HP-β-CD and oxaliplatin/γ-CD. Meanwhile, the inclusion complexes displayed almost twice as high cytotoxicity compared to free oxaliplatin against HCT116 and MCF-7 cells. This satisfactory water solubility and higher cytotoxic activity of the oxaliplatin/CD complexes will potentially be useful for their application in anti-tumour therapy.

  5. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  6. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  7. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use... GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  8. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  9. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  10. Cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia aggravates peripheral sensory neurotoxicity caused by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Kono, Toru; Satomi, Machiko; Asama, Toshiyuki; Ebisawa, Yoshiaki; Chisato, Naoyuki; Suno, Manabu; Karasaki, Hidenori; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    Calcium and magnesium replacement is effective in reducing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. However, cetuximab treatment has been associated with severe hypomagnesaemia. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated whether cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Six patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were previously treated with oxaliplatin-fluorouracil combination therapy were administered cetuximab in combination with irinotecan alone or irinotecan and fluorouracil as a second-line treatment. All patients had normal magnesium levels before receiving cetuximab. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to evaluate the grade of neurotoxicity, hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcaemia, and hypokalemia every week. All six patients had grade 1 or higher hypomagnesaemia after starting cetuximab therapy. The serum calcium and potassium levels were within the normal range at the onset of hypomagnesaemia. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity occurred in all patients at the beginning of cetuximab therapy, with grade 1 neurotoxicity in five patients and grade 2 in one patient. After cetuximab administration, the neurotoxicity worsened in all six patients, and three progressed to grade 3. Among the three patients with grade 3 neurotoxicity, two required a dose reduction and one had to discontinue cetuximab therapy. A discontinuation or dose reduction in cetuximab therapy was associated with exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity due to cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia in half of patients who had previously received oxaliplatin. Therefore, when administering cetuximab after oxaliplatin therapy, we suggest serially evaluating serum magnesium levels and neurotoxicity. PMID:22811813

  11. Cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia aggravates peripheral sensory neurotoxicity caused by oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Satomi, Machiko; Asama, Toshiyuki; Ebisawa, Yoshiaki; Chisato, Naoyuki; Suno, Manabu; Karasaki, Hidenori; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Calcium and magnesium replacement is effective in reducing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. However, cetuximab treatment has been associated with severe hypomagnesaemia. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated whether cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Six patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were previously treated with oxaliplatin-fluorouracil combination therapy were administered cetuximab in combination with irinotecan alone or irinotecan and fluorouracil as a second-line treatment. All patients had normal magnesium levels before receiving cetuximab. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to evaluate the grade of neurotoxicity, hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcaemia, and hypokalemia every week. All six patients had grade 1 or higher hypomagnesaemia after starting cetuximab therapy. The serum calcium and potassium levels were within the normal range at the onset of hypomagnesaemia. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity occurred in all patients at the beginning of cetuximab therapy, with grade 1 neurotoxicity in five patients and grade 2 in one patient. After cetuximab administration, the neurotoxicity worsened in all six patients, and three progressed to grade 3. Among the three patients with grade 3 neurotoxicity, two required a dose reduction and one had to discontinue cetuximab therapy. A discontinuation or dose reduction in cetuximab therapy was associated with exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity due to cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia in half of patients who had previously received oxaliplatin. Therefore, when administering cetuximab after oxaliplatin therapy, we suggest serially evaluating serum magnesium levels and neurotoxicity. PMID:22811813

  12. Clinical benefits of combined chemotherapy with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel in advanced gastric cancer patients with palliative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Feng, Ye; Gao, Yongjian; Hou, Ruizhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Advanced gastric cancer accounts for a substantial portion of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Surgical intervention is the curative therapeutic approach, but patients with advanced gastric cancer are not eligible for the radical resection. The present work aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of palliative surgery combined with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Method A total of 20 patients who underwent palliative resection of gastric cancer in China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University from 2010 to 2011 were evaluated. Days 20–30 postoperative, these patients started to receive chemotherapy of S-1 (40 mg/m2, oral intake twice a day) and intravenous infusion of oxaliplatin (135 mg/m2) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2). After three cycles of chemotherapy (21 days/cycle), patients were evaluated, and only those who responded toward the treatment continued to receive six to eight cycles of the treatment and were included in end point evaluation. Patients’ survival time and adverse reactions observed along the treatment were compared with those treated with FOLFOX. Results Out of 20 patients evaluated, there was one case of complete response, nine cases of partial response, six cases of stable disease, and four cases of progressive disease. The total efficacy (complete response + partial response) and clinical benefit rates were 50% and 80%, respectively. Of importance, the treatment achieved a significantly longer survival time compared to FOLFOX, despite the fact that both regimens shared common adverse reactions. The adverse reactions were gastrointestinal reaction, reduction in white blood cells, and peripheral neurotoxicity. All of them were mild, having no impact on the treatment. Conclusion Combination therapy of S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel improves the survival of gastric cancer patients treated with palliative resection, with adverse reactions being

  13. Association between the ERCC1 rs11615 polymorphism and clinical outcomes of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapies in gastrointestinal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shou-Cheng; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Tao; Ling, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Da

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The relationship between the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1) rs11615 polymorphism (C/T) and responses to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is controversial. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to assess this relationship. Method Relevant studies were retrieved by searching the PubMed database. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the predictive value of the ERCC1 rs11615 polymorphism for the clinical outcomes of GC and CRC patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Therapeutic response to chemotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results A total of 22 studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 1,242 cases of GC and 1,772 cases of CRC. For the ERCC1 rs11615 polymorphism, the T allele was associated with a reduced response to chemotherapy in Asians and GC patients (P<0.05). On the other hand, the T allele was associated with a significant increase in the risk for shorter PFS and OS in all patients (PFS: hazard ratio [HR] =1.22, P<0.001, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.93–1.51 and OS: HR =1.12, P<0.001, 95% CI =0.85–1.40). Conclusion The ERCC1 rs11615 polymorphism was closely associated with the clinical outcomes of GC and CRC patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:25834456

  14. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a patient receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Young; Nam, Tai Seung; Kim, Myeong Kyu; Hwang, Jun Eul; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Sang Hee; Chung, Ik Joo; Bae, Woo Kyun

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) that developed in a patient with cholangiocarcinoma after receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. A 62-year-old man had multiple hypodense lesions with delayed enhancement in the both lobes of the liver on abdominal computed tomography. He was treated with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin (100 mg/m(2)). After eight cycles of treatment and a cumulative oxaliplatin dose of 780 mg/m(2), he developed an unsteady gait, dysphagia, weakness of both the upper and lower limbs and impairment of all sensory modalities. Nerve conduction studies confirmed the diagnosis of AIDP. Immunoglobulin G i.v. was administered for 5 days but the neurological deficits of both his upper and lower limbs did not improve. This case highlights unusual peripheral nervous system manifestations in a patient who received chemotherapy with oxaliplatin. PMID:22524580

  15. Milnacipran inhibits oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia through spinal action in mice.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kitamura, Ryo; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, would have therapeutic effect on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg) induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection and almost completely subsided by day 20. Ten days post-oxaliplatin injection, the intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran (3-30 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the established mechanical allodynia. Intrathecal injections of milnacipran (2.1-21 µg/site) also significantly and dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia, but intracisternal and intracereboventricular injections at the same doses did not. The present results suggest that milnacipran is effective against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and that the antiallodynic effect is mainly mediated by actions on the spinal cord. PMID:25744472

  16. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  17. Sensitization of capsaicin and icilin responses in oxaliplatin treated adult rat DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin chemotherapy induced neuropathy is a dose related cumulative toxicity that manifests as tingling, numbness, and chronic pain, compromising the quality of life and leading to discontinued chemotherapy. Patients report marked hypersensitivity to cold stimuli at early stages of treatment, when sensory testing reveals cold and heat hyperalgesia. This study examined the morphological and functional effects of oxaliplatin treatment in cultured adult rat DRG neurons. Results 48 hour exposure to oxaliplatin resulted in dose related reduction in neurite length, density, and number of neurons compared to vehicle treated controls, using Gap43 immunostaining. Neurons treated acutely with 20 μg/ml oxaliplatin showed significantly higher signal intensity for cyclic AMP immunofluorescence (160.5 ± 13 a.u., n = 3, P < 0.05), compared to controls (120.3 ± 4 a.u.). Calcium imaging showed significantly enhanced capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist), responses after acute 20 μg/ml oxaliplatin treatment where the second of paired capsaicin responses increased from 80.7 ± 0.6% without oxaliplatin, to 171.26 ± 29% with oxaliplatin, (n = 6 paired t test, P < 0.05); this was reduced to 81.42 ± 8.1% (P < 0.05), by pretretreatment with the cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist GW 833972. Chronic oxaliplatin treatment also resulted in dose related increases in capsaicin responses. Similarly, second responses to icilin (TRPA1/TRPM8 agonist), were enhanced after acute (143.85 ± 7%, P = 0.004, unpaired t test, n = 3), and chronic (119.7 ± 11.8%, P < 0.05, n = 3) oxaliplatin treatment, compared to control (85.3 ± 1.7%). Responses to the selective TRPM8 agonist WS-12 were not affected. Conclusions Oxaliplatin treatment induces TRP sensitization mediated by increased intracellular cAMP, which may cause neuronal damage. These effects may be mitigated by co-treatment with adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, like CB2 agonists, to alleviate the neurotoxic effects of oxaliplatin. PMID:21106058

  18. Houttuynia cordata Thunb reverses oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in rat by regulating Th17/Treg balance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cheng-Fu; Zheng, Li-Li; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a widely used anti-advanced colorectal cancer drug, while it could induce neuropathy. Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) has a wide range of biological activities, such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and immune regulation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HCT on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rat models. HCT (1000 mg/kg/day) significantly decreased the number of withdrawal responses and the withdrawal latency in oxaliplatin-treated rats. HCT could down-regulated the serum levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage inflammatory protein1-α (MIP-1α) in oxaliplatin-treated rats. Th17/Treg balance was reversed by HCT in oxaliplatin-treated rats by regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present results suggest that HCT is useful as a therapeutic drug for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27186286

  19. Houttuynia cordata Thunb reverses oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in rat by regulating Th17/Treg balance

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Cheng-Fu; Zheng, Li-Li; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a widely used anti-advanced colorectal cancer drug, while it could induce neuropathy. Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) has a wide range of biological activities, such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and immune regulation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HCT on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rat models. HCT (1000 mg/kg/day) significantly decreased the number of withdrawal responses and the withdrawal latency in oxaliplatin-treated rats. HCT could down-regulated the serum levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage inflammatory protein1-α (MIP-1α) in oxaliplatin-treated rats. Th17/Treg balance was reversed by HCT in oxaliplatin-treated rats by regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present results suggest that HCT is useful as a therapeutic drug for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27186286

  20. Cortical effect of oxaliplatin associated with sustained neuropathic pain: exacerbation of cortical activity and down-regulation of potassium channel expression in somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Dubacq, Sophie; Roualle-de-Rouville, Marie; Sordoillet, Vallier; Rivals, Isabelle; Pezet, Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based chemotherapy drug that has gained importance in the treatment of advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. Its dose-limiting side effect is the production of chronic peripheral neuropathy. Using a modified model of oxaliplatin-induced sensory neuropathy, we investigated plastic changes at the cortical level as possible mechanisms underlying the chronicity of pain sensation in this model. Changes in gene expression were studied using DNA microarray which revealed that when oxaliplatin-treated animals displayed clinical neuropathic pain symptoms, including mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity, approximately 900 were down-regulated in the somatosensory cortex. Because of the known role of potassium channels in neuronal excitability, the study further focussed on the down-regulation of these channels as the possible molecular origin of cortical hyperexcitability. Quantification of the magnitude of neuronal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in cortical neurons as a marker of neuronal activity revealed a 10-fold increase induced by oxaliplatin treatment, suggesting that neurons of cortical areas involved in transmission of painful stimuli undergo a chronic cortical excitability. We further demonstrated, using cortical injection of lentiviral vector shRNA against Kv2.2, that down-regulation of this potassium channel in naive animals induced a sustained thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity. In conclusion, although the detailed mechanisms leading to this cortical excitability are still unknown, our study demonstrated that a cortical down regulation of potassium channels could underlie pain chronicity in this model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22652385

  1. Preventive Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A₂ on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongxing; Kim, Woojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Yongjae; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are aggravated by cold and mechanical stimuli. Here we examined the preventive effects of Bee Venom (BV) derived phospholipase A₂ (bvPLA₂) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice and its immunological mechanism. The cold and mechanical allodynia signs were evaluated by acetone and von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The most significant allodynia signs were observed at three days after an injection of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) and then decreased gradually to a normal level on days 7-9. The oxaliplatin injection also induced infiltration of macrophages and upregulated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Daily treatment with bvPLA₂ (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days prior to the oxaliplatin injection markedly inhibited the development of cold and mechanical allodynia, and suppressed infiltration of macrophages and the increase of IL-1β level in the DRG. Such preventive effects of bvPLA₂ were completely blocked by depleting regulatory T cells (Tregs) with CD25 antibody pre-treatments. These results suggest that bvPLA₂ may prevent oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing immune responses in the DRG by Tregs. PMID:26797636

  2. A Phase II Study of Sequential Capecitabine Plus Oxaliplatin Followed by Docetaxel Plus Capecitabine in Patients With Unresectable Gastric Adenocarcinoma: The TCOG 3211 Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Huang; Lin, Johnson; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Shan, Yan-Shen; Chen, Yeu-Chin; Chen, Li-Tzong; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee

    2016-01-01

    Fluorouracil and platinum are considered the standard treatment options for advanced gastric cancer. Docetaxel is also an effective agent and it shows no cross-resistance with fluorouracil and platinum. The combination treatment of docetaxel with fluorouracil and platinum has been explored, but it demonstrated intolerable toxicities. An alternative approach in the first-line treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma may be to use these agents sequentially. We aimed to evaluate the activity and safety profile of sequential chemotherapy with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin, followed by docetaxel plus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of unresectable gastric cancer.We conducted a phase II study of sequential first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Treatment consisted of 6 cycles of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (capecitabine 1000 mg/m bid on days 1-10 and oxaliplatin 85 mg/m on day 1, every 2 weeks), followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel plus capecitabine (docetaxel 30 mg/m on days 1 and 8, capecitabine 825 mg/m bid on days 1-14, every 3 weeks). The primary end-point was the objective response rate.Fifty-one patients were enrolled: median age, 63 years; male/female: 37/14. The main grade 3 to 4 toxicities were a decreased absolute neutrophil count (25.4%), diarrhea (9.8%), and hand-foot syndrome (15.7%). The objective response rate was 61.7%. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 8.6 and 11.0 months, respectively. Six patients (11.8%) received surgery after chemotherapy and 5 are still disease-free.This sequential treatment demonstrated feasibility with a favorable safety profile and produced encouraging results in terms of activity and efficacy. PMID:26817912

  3. Oxaliplatin activates the Keap1/Nrf2 antioxidant system conferring protection against the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu Jun; Li, Yinyan; Luo, Lin; Wang, Hongyan; Chi, Zhexu; Xin, Ai; Li, Xin; Wu, Jiaguo; Tang, Xiuwen

    2014-05-01

    Oxaliplatin is an important drug in the treatment of advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor that controls genes encoding cytoprotective and detoxifying enzymes through antioxidant-response elements (AREs) in their regulatory regions. Here, we report that oxaliplatin is an activator of the Nrf2 signaling pathway, with upregulation of ARE-driven genes and glutathione elevation. An injection of oxaliplatin into mice enhanced the expression of glutathione transferases and antioxidant enzymes in the small and large intestines of wild-type (WT) mice but not Nrf2(-/-) mice, indicating that oxaliplatin activates Nrf2 in vivo. Oxaliplatin failed to increase Nrf2 accumulation in non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells, which harbor a dysfunctional somatic mutation of KEAP1. However, forced expression of WT mKeap1 restored the ability of oxaliplatin to activate the transcription factor. Cys(151) in Keap1 was required for the response stimulated by oxaliplatin. In addition, dichloro(1,2-diaminocyclohexane) platinum, a metabolite of oxaliplatin, was found to have the same effect in activating the ARE-gene battery as its parent drug, whereas another metabolite, oxalate, was ineffective. Moreover, two other platinum derivatives, cisplatin and carboplatin, had no effect on the Keap1/Nrf2 system. Furthermore, activation of Nrf2 by oxaliplatin reduced the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to therapeutic drugs. Conversely, knockdown of Nrf2 by Nrf2 siRNA reduced oxaliplatin-induced chemoresistance. Our study showed that oxaliplatin exerts protection against the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs via Nrf2, indicating an important role of Nrf2 in oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:24556415

  4. Effect of Vitamin E on Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Zeinab; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most important limitations of oxaliplatin base regimen, which is the standard for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Evidence has shown that Vitamin E may be protective in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Vitamin E administration on prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: This was a prospective randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients with colorectal cancer and scheduled to receive oxaliplatin-based regimens were enrolled in this study. Enrolled patients were randomized into two groups. The first group received Vitamin E at a dose of 400 mg daily and the second group observed, until after the sixth course of the oxaliplatin regimen. For oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy assessment, we used the symptom experience diary questionnaire that completed at baseline and after the sixth course of chemotherapy. Only patients with a score of zero at baseline were eligible for this study. Results: Thirty-two patients were randomized to the Vitamin E group and 33 to the control group. There was no difference in the mean peripheral neuropathy score changes (after − before) between two groups, after sixth course of the oxaliplatin base regimen (mean difference [after − before] of Vitamin E group = 6.37 ± 2.85, control group = 6.57 ± 2.94; P = 0.78). Peripheral neuropathy scores were significantly increased after intervention compared with a base line in each group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results from this current trial demonstrate a lack of benefit for Vitamin E in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26682028

  5. Oxaliplatin evokes P2X7-dependent glutamate release in the cerebral cortex: A pain mechanism mediated by Pannexin 1.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Marcoli, Manuela; Micheli, Laura; Zanardelli, Matteo; Maura, Guido; Ghelardini, Carla; Cervetto, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Anticancer therapy based on the repeated administration of oxaliplatin is limited by the development of a neuropathic syndrome difficult to treat. Oxaliplatin neurotoxicity is based on complex nervous mechanisms, the comprehension of the role of single neurotransmitters and the knowledge of the signal flow among cells is matter of importance to improve therapeutic chances. In a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, we report increased P2X7-evoked glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The release was abolished by the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) antagonists Brilliant-Blue-G (BBG) and A-438079, and significantly reduced by Carbenoxolone and the Pannexin 1 (Panx1) selective inhibitors Erioglaucine and (10)Panx suggesting the recruitment of Panx1. Aimed to evaluate the significance of P2X7R-Panx1 system activation in pain generated by oxaliplatin, pharmacological modulators were spinally infused by intrathecal catheter in oxaliplatin-treated animals. BBG, Erioglaucine and (10)Panx reverted oxaliplatin-dependent pain. Finally, the influence of the P2X7R-Panx1 system blockade on oxaliplatin anticancer activity was evaluated on the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Prevention of HT-29 apoptosis and mortality was dependent by kind and concentration of P2X7R antagonists. On the contrary, the inhibition of Panx1 did not alter oxaliplatin lethality in tumor cells. It is concluded that glutamate release dependent on P2X7R is increased in cerebrocortical nerve terminals from oxaliplatin-treated rats; the increase is mediated by functional recruitment of Panx1; P2X7R antagonists and Panx1 inhibitors revert oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain; Panx1 inhibitors do not alter the oxaliplatin-induced mortality of cancer cells HT-29. The inhibition of Panx1 channel is suggested as a new and safe pharmacological target. PMID:26071109

  6. Screening of antimicrobial agents for in vitro radiation protection and mitigation capacity, including those used in supportive care regimens for bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Rwigema, Jean-Claude; Stone, Brandon; Zhang, Xichen; McBride, William; Georges, George; Wipf, Peter; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic and antifungal agents used in supportive care regimens for bone marrow transplantation recipients contribute to a significant dose-modifying effect of otherwise lethal total body irradiation. To determine whether drugs used in supportive care and other commonly used antibiotics such as tetracycline function as radiation protectors or damage mitigators in vitro, 13 drugs were tested for radiation protection and radiation damage mitigation of 32D cl 3 hematopoietic progenitor cells in clonagenic survival curves in vitro. Antibiotic/Antifungal agents including cilastatin, amikacin, ceftazidine, vancomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, methacycline, minocycline, meclocycline, oxytetracycline and rolitetracycline were added in 1, 10, or 100 micromolar concentrations to murine interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 cells either before or after irradiation of 0 to 8 Gy. Control irradiated 32D cl 3 cells showed radiosensitivity comparable to freshly explanted mouse marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells (D(0) 1.1+/-0.1 Gy, N 1.5+/-0.4). Positive control GS-nitroxide JP4-039 (known radiation mitigator) treated 32D cl 3 cells were radioresistant (D(0) 1.2+/-0.1, N 5.8+/-2.4 (p=0.009)). Of the 13 drugs tested, tetracycline was found to be a significant radiation mitigator (D(0) 0.9+/-0.1, N 13.9+/-0.4 (p=0.0027)). Thus, the radiation dose-modifying effect of some antibiotics, but not those currently used in the supportive care (antibiotic/antifungal regimens) for marrow transplant patients, may act as radiation damage mitigators for hematopoietic cells as well as decreasing the growth and inflammatory response to microbial pathogens. PMID:20133970

  7. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence. PMID:22072024

  8. Two or Three Year Disease Free Survival (DFS) as a Primary Endpoint in Stage III Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trials with fluoropyrimidines with or without Oxaliplatin or Irinotecan: Data from 12,676 patients from MOSAIC, X-ACT, PETACC-3, C-06, C-07, and C89803

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, D; Shi, Q; Yothers, G; Van Cutsem, E; Cassidy, J; Saltz, L; Wolmark, N; Bot, B; Grothey, A; Buyse, M; de Gramont, A

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The ACCENT group previously established disease-free survival (DFS) with 2 or 3 years median follow-up to predict 5 year overall survival (5yr OS) in stage II and III colon cancer. ACCENT further proposed (1) a stronger association between DFS and OS in stage III than II, and (2) 6 or 7 years necessary to demonstrate DFS/OS surrogacy in recent trials. The relationship between endpoints in trials with oral fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan is unknown. Methods Associations between the treatment effect hazard ratios (HRs) on 2 and 3yr DFS, and 5 and 6yr OS were examined in 6 phase III trials not included in prior analyses from 1997-2002. Individual data for 12,676 patients were analyzed; two trials each tested oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and oral treatment vs 5-FU/LV. Findings Overall association between 2/3 yr DFS and 5/6 yr OS HRs was modest to poor (simple R2 measures: 0.58 to 0.76, model-based R2: 0.17 to 0.49). In stage III patients, the association increased (model-based R2≥0.79). Observed treatment effects on 2 yr DFS accurately 5/6 yr OS effects overall and in stage III patients. Interpretation In recent trials of cytotoxic chemotherapy, 2 or 3yr DFS HRs are highly predictive of 5 and 6yr OS HRs in stage III but not stage II patients. In all patients the DFS/OS association is stronger for 6yr OS, thus at least 6 year follow-up is recommended to assess OS benefit. These data support DFS as the primary endpoint for stage III colon cancer trials testing cytotoxic agents. Funding Funded by NCI Grant CA-25224 to the Mayo Clinic to support the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. PMID:21257306

  9. Intravenous Calcium and Magnesium for Oxaliplatin-Induced Sensory Neurotoxicity in Adjuvant Colon Cancer: NCCTG N04C7

    PubMed Central

    Grothey, Axel; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Kugler, John W.; Silberstein, Peter T.; Dentchev, Todor; Wender, Donald B.; Novotny, Paul J.; Chitaley, Umesh; Alberts, Steven R.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cumulative sensory neurotoxicity (sNT) is the dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin, which commonly leads to early discontinuation of oxaliplatin-based therapy in the palliative and adjuvant settings. In a nonrandomized, retrospective study, intravenous (IV) calcium/magnesium (Ca/Mg) was associated with reduced oxaliplatin-induced sNT. Methods Patients with colon cancer undergoing adjuvant therapy with infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) were randomly assigned to Ca/Mg (1g calcium gluconate plus 1g magnesium sulfate pre- and post-oxaliplatin) or placebo, in a double-blinded manner. The primary end point was the percentage of patients with grade 2 or greater sNT at any time during or after oxaliplatin-based therapy by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI CTCAE; version 3) criteria. An oxaliplatin-specific sNT scale and patient questionnaires were also used to assess sNT. After 104 of 300 planned patients were enrolled, the study was closed. This was due to preliminary reports from another trial that suggested that Ca/Mg decreased treatment efficacy; these data were subsequently found to be incorrect. Results Overall, 102 patients were available for analysis. Ca/Mg decreased the incidence of chronic, cumulative, grade 2 or greater sNT, as measured by NCI CTCAE (P = .038) and also by the oxaliplatin-specific sNT scale (P = .018). In addition, acute muscle spasms associated with oxaliplatin were significantly reduced (P = .01) No effect on acute, cold-induced sNT was found. No substantial differences in adverse effects were noted between Ca/Mg and placebo. Conclusion Despite early termination and decreased statistical power, this study supports IV Ca/Mg as an effective neuroprotectant against oxaliplatin-induced cumulative sNT in adjuvant colon cancer. PMID:21189381

  10. [The Molecular Aspect of the Antitumor Effect of Oxaliplatin in Combination with 5-FU].

    PubMed

    Kitao, Hiroyuki; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Iimori, Makoto; Niimi, Shinichiro; Kataoka, Yuki; Akiyama, Shingo; Edahiro, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Ryota; Tokunaga, Eriko; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kanaji, Shingo; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs as a component of combination chemotherapy are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In particular, oxaliplatin(L-OHP), one such platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug, has a synergistic effect in combination with 5-FU and Leucovorin for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of this synergistic effect has not been fully clarified yet. In this review, we summarize several updates about the in vitro action of oxaliplatin in human tumor cells and discuss the underlying mechanism of its synergistic effect with 5-FU. PMID:27306806

  11. Which is false: oxaliplatin or fluoropyrimidine? An analysis of patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer treated with first-line epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Tang, Ruilei; Sang, Yaxiong; Li, Meng; Hu, Qiancheng; Du, Zedong; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Pengfei; He, Xiaofeng; Li, Qiu

    2013-10-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to determine whether the addition of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy treatment improves efficacy in KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and whether infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin is a preferred combination for EGFR mAbs. Oxaliplatin (including treatment), EGFR mAbs, first-line treatment, KRAS wild-type, and mCRC were used as key words. The PRIME, OPUS, COIN, and NORDIC VII trials were identified by two independent authors. Time-to-event outcomes of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed using HRs (hazard ratios) with fixed effect, and response rate (RR) using odd ratios (OR) with fixed effect. A total of 1767 patients who were KRAS wild-type were included in this meta-analysis, with 866 patients in the mAbs and chemotherapy combination group and 901 patients in the chemotherapy alone group. The addition of mAbs to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with KRAS wild-type mCRC as first-line treatment resulted in significant improvements in PFS (HR = 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-0.99; P = 0.03) and response rate (RR) (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.14-1.66; P = 0.009) compared with chemotherapy alone, but the difference in OS was not significant (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.85-1.08; P = 0.48). However, the differences in OS and PFS were not significant when mAbs were added to bolus 5-FU or capecitabine-based regimens compared with chemotherapy alone, whereas PFS improved with an infusional 5-FU and oxaliplatin combination (P = 0.06; PFS, HR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.65-0.86; P = 0.0002), and even OS was marginally significant, which was consistent with the subgroup analysis of cetuximab and panitumumab. EGFR mAbs combined with oxaliplatin and an infusional 5-FU regimen was associated with significantly improved RR, PFS and OS as first-line treatment in KRAS wild-type mCRC. PMID:23822592

  12. Convection-enhancement delivery of liposomal formulation of oxaliplatin shows less toxicity than oxaliplatin yet maintains a similar median survival time in F98 glioma-bearing rat model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Minghan; Fortin, David; Paquette, Benoit; Sanche, Léon

    2016-06-01

    Results of clinical trials with oxaliplatin in treating glioblastoma are dismal. Previous works showed that intravenous (i.v.) delivery of oxaliplatin did not increase the survival of F98 glioma-bearing Fisher rats. Low accumulation of the drug in tumor cells is presumed to be responsible for the lack of antitumor effect. In the present study, convection-enhanced delivery (CED) was used to directly inject oxaliplatin in brain tumor implanted in rats. Since CED can led to severe toxicity, the liposomal formulation of oxaliplatin (Lipoxal™) was also assessed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oxaliplatin was 10 μg, while that of Lipoxal™ was increased by 3-times reaching 30 μg. Median survival time (MeST) of F98 glioma-bearing rats injected with 10 μg oxaliplatin by CED was 31 days, 7.5 days longer than untreated control (p = 0.0002); while CED of 30 μg Lipoxal™ reached the same result. Compared to previous study on i.v. delivery of these drugs, their injection by CED significantly increased their tumoral accumulations as well as MeSTs in the F98 glioma bearing rat model. The addition of radiotherapy (15 Gy) to CED of oxaliplatin or Lipoxal™ increased the MeST by 4.0 and 3.0 days, respectively. The timing of radiotherapy (4 h or 24 h after CED) produced similar results. However, the treatment was better tolerated when radiotherapy was performed 24 h after CED. In conclusion, a better tumoral accumulation was achieved when oxaliplatin and Lipoxal™ were injected by CED. The liposomal encapsulation of oxaliplatin reduced its toxic, while maintaining its antitumor potential. PMID:26961906

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediate oxaliplatin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive potential in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Lin; Li, Dan-Dan; Yang, Chen-Lu; Peng, Rui-Qing; Guo, Yi-Qun; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic benefits offered by common chemotherapy drugs, such as oxaliplatin, are limited due to the development of resistance, which contributes to treatment failure and metastasis. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event contributing to the development of resistance to chemotherapeutics. Although the relationship between oxaliplatin and chemotherapy resistance has been described for decades, the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of oxaliplatin-mediated metastasis. Here, we identify reactive oxygen species (ROS) as mediators that promote the oxaliplatin-induced EMT. Following oxaliplatin treatment, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of most peroxiredoxin family genes, except for peroxiredoxin 1 (prdx1) gene, were constant or even decreased, resulting in ROS abundance. And the antioxidant guardian Nrf2 was unconspicuously raised both transcriptionally and translationally with oxaliplatin treatment as compared to those induced by topotecan treatment, which has been proved with no induced metastasis. In addition, the study evaluated high levels of ROS leading to EMT via activation of the known oncogenes Akt and Snail. Using the Akt inhibitor LY294002 or knocking down Snail expression via RNA interference (RNAi) reversed the effects of oxaliplatin on the EMT and metastasis. Our studies establish a role for the ROS-Akt-Snail axis as a mechanism by which chemotherapeutics induce EMT and cancer metastasis. PMID:26733168

  14. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hee; Chae, Jisook; Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3∙6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  15. Pharmacological comparison of a nonhuman primate and a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shidahara, Yuka; Ogawa, Shinya; Nakamura, Mari; Nemoto, Shingo; Awaga, Yuji; Takashima, Miyuki; Hama, Aldric; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Oxaliplatin is a first-line treatment for colorectal cancer. However, shortly following treatment, cold-evoked hypersensitivity appears in the extremities and over time, the pain is such that oxaliplatin dosing may need to be markedly reduced or even terminated. There is currently a lack of efficacious treatments for oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy, which is due in part to the difficulty in translating findings obtained from preclinical rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Nonhuman primates (NHP) are phylogenetically closer to humans than rodents and may show drug responses that parallel those of humans. A significant decrease in tail withdrawal latency to 10°C water ("cold hypersensitivity") was observed beginning 3 days after intravenous infusion of oxaliplatin (5 mg/kg) in Macaca fascicularis. A single treatment of duloxetine (30 mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity, whereas pregabalin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) and tramadol (30 mg/kg, p.o.) did not. By contrast, in rats, no significant cold hypersensitivity, or increased responsiveness to acetone applied to the hind paws, was observed 3 days after the first injection of oxaliplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p., once per day, two injections). Therefore, rats were tested after six treatments of oxaliplatin, 17 days after the first treatment. All analgesics (30 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly ameliorated cold hypersensitivity in rats. The activity of analgesics in the oxaliplatin-treated macaques parallel clinical findings. The current results indicate that the NHP could serve as a bridge species to improve translatability of preclinical findings into clinically useful treatments for oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26977304

  16. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3∙6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  17. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  18. Oxaliplatin analogues with carboxy derivatives of boldine with enhanced antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Marco; Jara, Carlos; Astudillo, David; Villena, Joan; Reveco, Patricio G; Thomet, Franz A

    2015-01-01

    A new oxaliplatin analog [Pt(dach)(L5)] (1) was synthesized and characterized as a continuation of a study of the previously reported [Pt(dach)(L6)] (2), where dach = (1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane, L5 = 3-carboxyboldine, and L6 = 3-carboxypredicentrine. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited a substantially enhanced antioxidant activity compared to oxaliplatin (130 and 30 times for 1 and 13 and 4 times for 2 using the DPPH and FRAP assays, resp.). In addition, 1 and 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity in the same range as oxaliplatin toward the two human tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and HT-29) studied and two to four times lower activity in the human colon nontumor cell line (CCD-841). Preadministration of L5 or L6 to the colon tumor (HT-29) and the colon nontumor (CCD-841) cell lines prior to oxaliplatin addition increased the viability of the nontumor cell line to a greater extent than that of the tumor cell line. PMID:25814916

  19. Oxaliplatin Analogues with Carboxy Derivatives of Boldine with Enhanced Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Marco; Jara, Carlos; Astudillo, David; Villena, Joan; Reveco, Patricio G.; Thomet, Franz A.

    2015-01-01

    A new oxaliplatin analog [Pt(dach)(L5)] (1) was synthesized and characterized as a continuation of a study of the previously reported [Pt(dach)(L6)] (2), where dach = (1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane, L5 = 3-carboxyboldine, and L6 = 3-carboxypredicentrine. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited a substantially enhanced antioxidant activity compared to oxaliplatin (130 and 30 times for 1 and 13 and 4 times for 2 using the DPPH and FRAP assays, resp.). In addition, 1 and 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity in the same range as oxaliplatin toward the two human tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and HT-29) studied and two to four times lower activity in the human colon nontumor cell line (CCD-841). Preadministration of L5 or L6 to the colon tumor (HT-29) and the colon nontumor (CCD-841) cell lines prior to oxaliplatin addition increased the viability of the nontumor cell line to a greater extent than that of the tumor cell line. PMID:25814916

  20. Epididymitis following Cytoreductive Surgery with Intraperitoneal Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Luiza Damian Ribeiro; Belotto, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has emerged as an aggressive treatment option with intent to either cure or extend disease-free survival of selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. However, postoperative complications are common. We describe the cases of 2 men who underwent CRS with hyperthermic intraperitoneal oxaliplatin and developed scrotal pain, which was consistent with noninfectious epididymitis. PMID:27293401

  1. Clinical curative effect of oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Baodong; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Jinbang; Xu, Dongli; Feng, Weiyu; Zhuang, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Aiming at exploring clinical curative effect of oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumor, this study divided 60 patients with gastrointestinal tumor into control and observation groups, each containing 30 patients. The observation group was treated with oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil, while the control was treated with FOLFOX4, i.e., intravenously dropping 85mg/m(2)Oxaliplatin (L-OHP), 200mg/m(2) calcium folinate (CF) and intravenously injecting 400mg/m(2) 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), and 600mg/m(2) 5-Fu; then continuously performing intravenous drop infusion for 22h, every two weeks for a cycle. Hypodermic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was conducted immediately when leukocytes occurred the III, IV degree of inhibition. The observation results of curative effect and negative reaction indicated higher effective rate with 83.33% in the observation and 50.00% in the control. Besides, in the observation, negative reactions possessed 10.00% that was much lower than 33.33% in the control. Thereby, the conclusion reached that the treatment of gastrointestinal tumor with oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil was worth promoting. PMID:26051738

  2. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates. PMID:26965078

  3. Dovitinib synergizes with oxaliplatin in suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells regardless of RAS-RAF mutation status

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer is the result of a multistep process of genomic alterations, including mutations in key regulatory proteins that result in loss of balanced gene expression and subsequent malignant transformation. Throughout the various stages of colorectal carcinoma (CRC), complex genetic alterations occur, of which over-expression of growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derive growth factor and their corresponding receptor tyrosine kinases, have been shown to correlate with invasiveness, tumor angiogenesis, metastasis, recurrence, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancer. To evaluate the therapeutic effect, we combined Dovitinib, an orally bioavailable, potent inhibitor of class III-V receptor tyrosine kinases with chemotherapeutic drug, oxaliplatin in preclinical models of colon cancer. Methods Human colon cancer cells with different RAS-RAF mutation status (HCT-116, HT-29, SW-480, CaCO2 and LS174T) were treated with a combination of Dovitinib and Oxaliplatin at low dosage followed by assays to investigate the effect of the combination on cell proliferation, cell migration, cell apoptosis and signaling pathways involved in molecular mechanism of drug(s). The antitumor effects of either of the drugs were compared to the combination using human colon carcinoma cell line HT-29 xenograft model. Treated vs untreated tumor sections were also compared for proliferation and angiogenesis markers by immunohistochemistry. Results The combination of dovitinib and oxaliplatin showed higher in vitro cytotoxicity in colon cell lines irrespective of their RAS-RAF status as compared to either of the drugs alone. Simultaneous inhibition of MAP kinase and AKT pathways and induction of apoptosis via activation of caspases 9/caspases 3 contributed to the synergistic effect of this combination therapy. In the xenograft model, the combination showed a significantly higher antitumor activity. Immunohistochemistry of post

  4. Efficacy Endpoints of RTOG 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, J.; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0247 demonstrated preoperative RT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pCR pre-specified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas the RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan arm did not (10%). Secondary efficacy endpoints are reported here. Methods and Materials A randomized phase II trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) with two concurrent chemotherapy regimens: 1—capecitabine (1200 mg/m2/d M-F) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m2 /week × 4); and 2—capecitabine (1650 mg/m2/d M-F) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 /week × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks following chemoradiation, then 4-6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2; leucovorin 400 mg/m2; 5FU 400 mg/m2; 5FU 2400 mg/m2) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local-regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms as each was evaluated individually. Results 104 patients (median age 57) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm are 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm are 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pCR is an unsuitable surrogate for traditional survival metrics of clinical outcome. While it remains uncertain if the addition of a second cytotoxic agent enhances the effectiveness of fluorouracil plus RT, these results suggest further

  5. Efficacy Endpoints of Radiation Therapy Group Protocol 0247: A Randomized, Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, Jennifer; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). Methods and Materials: A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m{sup 2}; leucovorin 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m{sup 2}) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local–regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. Results: A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an

  6. Cetuximab-oxaliplatin-liposomes for epidermal growth factor receptor targeted chemotherapy of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zalba, Sara; Contreras, Ana M; Haeri, Azadeh; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Navarro, Iñigo; Koning, Gerben; Garrido, María J

    2015-07-28

    Oxaliplatin (L-OH), a platinum derivative with good tolerability is currently combined with Cetuximab (CTX), a monoclonal antibody (mAb), for the treatment of certain (wild-type KRAS) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) expressing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Improvement of L-OH pharmacokinetics (PK) can be provided by its encapsulation into liposomes, allowing a more selective accumulation and delivery to the tumor. Here, we aim to associate both agents in a novel liposomal targeted therapy by linking CTX to the drug-loaded liposomes. These EGFR-targeted liposomes potentially combine the therapeutic activity and selectivity of CTX with tumor-cell delivery of L-OH in a single therapeutic approach. L-OH liposomes carrying whole CTX or CTX-Fab' fragments on their surface were designed and characterized. Their functionality was tested in vitro using four human CRC cell lines, expressing different levels of EGFR to investigate the role of CTX-EGFR interactions in the cellular binding and uptake of the nanocarriers and encapsulated drug. Next, those formulations were evaluated in vivo in a colorectal cancer xenograft model with regard to tumor drug accumulation, toxicity and therapeutic activity. In EGFR-overexpressing cell lines, intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes increased with receptor density reaching up to 3-fold higher levels than with non-targeted liposomes. Receptor specific uptake was demonstrated by competition with free CTX, which reduced internalization to levels similar to non-targeted liposomes. In a CRC xenograft model, drug delivery was strongly enhanced upon treatment with targeted formulations. Liposomes conjugated with monovalent CTX-Fab' fragments showed superior drug accumulation in tumor tissue (2916.0±507.84ng/g) compared to CTX liposomes (1546.02±362.41ng/g) or non-targeted liposomes (891.06±155.1ng/g). Concomitantly, CTX-Fab' targeted L-OH liposomes outperformed CTX-liposomes, which on its turn was still more

  7. Preventive Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Kim, Woojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Yongjae; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are aggravated by cold and mechanical stimuli. Here we examined the preventive effects of Bee Venom (BV) derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice and its immunological mechanism. The cold and mechanical allodynia signs were evaluated by acetone and von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The most significant allodynia signs were observed at three days after an injection of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) and then decreased gradually to a normal level on days 7–9. The oxaliplatin injection also induced infiltration of macrophages and upregulated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Daily treatment with bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days prior to the oxaliplatin injection markedly inhibited the development of cold and mechanical allodynia, and suppressed infiltration of macrophages and the increase of IL-1β level in the DRG. Such preventive effects of bvPLA2 were completely blocked by depleting regulatory T cells (Tregs) with CD25 antibody pre-treatments. These results suggest that bvPLA2 may prevent oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing immune responses in the DRG by Tregs. PMID:26797636

  8. Oxaliplatin induces different cellular and molecular chemoresistance patterns in colorectal cancer cell lines of identical origins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer cells frequently adopt cellular and molecular alterations and acquire resistance to cytostatic drugs. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin is among the leading treatments for colorectal cancer with a response rate of 50%, inducing intrastrand cross-links on the DNA. Despite of this drug’s efficiency, resistance develops in nearly all metastatic patients. Chemoresistance being of crucial importance for the drug’s clinical efficiency this study aimed to contribute to the identification and description of some cellular and molecular alterations induced by prolonged oxaliplatin therapy. Resistance to oxaliplatin was induced in Colo320 (Colo320R) and HT-29 (HT-29R) colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines by exposing the cells to increasing concentrations of the drug. Alterations in morphology, cytotoxicity, DNA cross-links formation and gene expression profiles were assessed in the parental and resistant variants with microscopy, MTT, alkaline comet and pangenomic microarray assays, respectively. Results Morphology analysis revealed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the resistant vs parental cells suggesting alterations of the cells’ adhesion complexes, through which they acquire increased invasiveness and adherence. Cytotoxicity measurements demonstrated resistance to oxaliplatin in both cell lines; Colo320 being more sensitive than HT-29 to this drug (P < 0.001). The treatment with oxaliplatin caused major DNA cross-links in both parental cell lines; in Colo320R small amounts of DNA cross-links were still detectable, while in HT-29R not. We identified 441 differentially expressed genes in Colo320R and 613 in HT-29R as compared to their parental counterparts (at least 1.5 -fold up- or down- regulation, p < 0.05). More disrupted functions and pathways were detected in HT-29R cell line than in Colo320R, involving genes responsible for apoptosis inhibition, cellular proliferation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Several upstream

  9. Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy combined with traditional medicines for neutropenia in colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis of the contributions of specific plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Menghua; May, Brian H; Zhou, Iris W; Sze, Daniel Man-Yuen; Xue, Charlie C; Zhang, Anthony L

    2016-09-01

    This review assessed the effects on chemotherapy induced neutropenia (CIN) of combining oxaliplatin regimens with traditional plant-based medicines (TMs) in the management of colorectal cancer (CRC). 32 RCTs (2224 participants) were included. Meta-analysis showed reduced incidence of grade 3/4 CIN (RR 0.45[0.31, 0.65], I(2)=0%). No studies reported serious adverse events or reduction in tumour response rates associated with concurrent use of oxaliplatin and TM. Due to small sample sizes and risk of bias, these results should be interpreted with caution. Analyses of sub-groups of studies that used similar TM interventions assessed the relative contributions of individual plant-based ingredients to the results. Astragalus, Codonopsis, Atractylodes, Poria and Coix, in various combinations were consistently associated with reduced CIN incidence when administered orally. Experimental studies of these plants have reported reduced myelosuppression and/or enhanced immune response. Further studies of these plants may lead to the development of interventions to supplement conventional CIN treatment. PMID:27497028

  10. Evaluation of oxaliplatin exposure of healthcare workers during heated intraperitoneal perioperative chemotherapy (HIPEC).

    PubMed

    Villa, Antoine F; El Balkhi, Souleiman; Aboura, Radia; Sageot, Herve; Hasni-Pichard, Helene; Pocard, Marc; Elias, Dominique; Joly, Nathalie; Payen, Didier; Blot, François; Poupon, Joel; Garnier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate air and surface contaminations, and internal contamination of healthcare workers during open-abdomen HIPEC using oxaliplatin. Platinum (Pt) was measured in urine of exposed workers and in multiple air and surface samples. Three successive HIPEC procedures were investigated in each of the two hospitals participating in the study. Analysis of air samples did not detect any oxaliplatin contamination. Heavy contamination of the operating table, the floor at the surgeon's feet, and the surgeon's overshoes were observed. Hand contamination was observed in surgeons using double gloves for intra-abdominal chemotherapy administration, but not in those using three sets of gloves. Pt was not detected in urine samples obtained after HIPEC (<5 ng/L). The main risk of HIPEC is related to direct or indirect skin exposure and can be prevented by correct use of adapted protective equipment. PMID:25327298

  11. Severe Generalized Weakness, Paralysis, and Aphasia following Administration of Irinotecan and Oxaliplatin during FOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chandar, Manisha; de Wilton Marsh, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Irinotecan is commonly used in combination with oxaliplatin as a component of FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy for several gastrointestinal malignancies. The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who developed acute paralysis and aphasia while receiving her initial infusion of irinotecan. Case Report A 67-year-old woman with newly diagnosed metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presented for her first cycle of FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy. During her infusion of irinotecan, she developed acute onset of generalized weakness, paralysis of all extremities, and nonfluent aphasia with complete inability to communicate. This episode was self-limited and resolved within 2 h. Prior to subsequent infusions she received intravenous repletion of potassium and had no recurrence of symptoms. Discussion In selected cases, coadministration of irinotecan and oxaliplatin may result in severe generalized weakness and aphasia, which may be triggered by underlying electrolyte disturbances. Careful monitoring and correction of potassium may help prevent this reaction. PMID:25873880

  12. Evaluation of oxaliplatin exposure of healthcare workers during heated intraperitoneal perioperative chemotherapy (HIPEC)

    PubMed Central

    VILLA, Antoine F.; EL BALKHI, Souleiman; ABOURA, Radia; SAGEOT, Herve; HASNI-PICHARD, Helene; POCARD, Marc; ELIAS, Dominique; JOLY, Nathalie; PAYEN, Didier; BLOT, François; POUPON, Joel; GARNIER, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate air and surface contaminations, and internal contamination of healthcare workers during open-abdomen HIPEC using oxaliplatin. Platinum (Pt) was measured in urine of exposed workers and in multiple air and surface samples. Three successive HIPEC procedures were investigated in each of the two hospitals participating in the study. Analysis of air samples did not detect any oxaliplatin contamination. Heavy contamination of the operating table, the floor at the surgeon’s feet, and the surgeon’s overshoes were observed. Hand contamination was observed in surgeons using double gloves for intra-abdominal chemotherapy administration, but not in those using three sets of gloves. Pt was not detected in urine samples obtained after HIPEC (<5 ng/L). The main risk of HIPEC is related to direct or indirect skin exposure and can be prevented by correct use of adapted protective equipment. PMID:25327298

  13. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  14. Antitumor activity of electrospun polylactide nanofibers loaded with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayu; Wang, Xue; Liu, Tongjun; Liu, Shi; Jing, Xiabin

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate both in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities against colorectal cancer (CRC) of electrospun polylactide (PLA) nanofibers loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-Flu) and oxaliplatin. For in vitro evaluation, human CRC HCT8 cells were directly exposed to the drug-loaded fiber mats, followed with MTT and flow cytometry (FCM) assay. For in vivo evaluation, the drug-loaded fiber mats were locally implanted into mouse colorectal CT26 tumor-bearing mice, followed with histological analysis and detection of survival rate. The results showed that the drug-loaded fiber mats was similar to that of the combination of free 5-Flu and oxaliplatin in vitro cytotoxicity but was much superior to intravenous injection of free drug in vivo anticancer activities, presenting with suppressed tumor growth rate and prolonged survival time of mice. In conclusion, anticancer activities of 5-Flu and oxaliplatin against CRC can be significantly improved by using PLA electrospun nanofibers as local drug delivery system. PMID:24870201

  15. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin for the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qing; Qian, Sheng; Zhu, Liang; Qu, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Cheng, Jie-Min; Liu, Qing-Xin; Liu, Rong; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic efficacy and safety of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes for 65 patients with advanced BTC treated by TACE with gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 and oxaliplatin 100 mg/m2. Follow-up laboratory tests and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging were performed routinely to evaluate the response of the tumor to treatment. All patients were assessed for adverse effects. Results Of the 65 patients, 19 (29.2%) achieved a partial response, 36 (55.4%) showed stable disease, and ten (15.4%) showed progressive disease. The overall response rate was 29.2%. At the end of this study, five patients were still alive. The median overall survival was 12.0 months (95% confidence interval 8.5–15.5). There were no serious complications after TACE. Conclusion The disease control rate and overall survival in this retrospective study were consistent with those in previous reports. TACE with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin was well tolerated and highly effective in patients with advanced BTC. PMID:25792843

  16. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-xi; Sun, Jing-xu; Chen, Xiao-wan; Zhao, Jun-hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992–2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I–III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category, and but did not translate into survival benefits in patients aged ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category. No significant interactions were observed among ypN− patients, and oxaliplatin did not significantly improve OS, regardless of age. Conclusions In patients with rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN− patients. PMID:26910371

  17. Discovery and basic pharmacology of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), including the hyperglycosylated ESA, darbepoetin alfa: an update of the rationale and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Zoltán; Elliott, Steven; Jedynasty, Kinga; Tesar, Vladimír; Szegedi, János

    2010-04-01

    Cloning of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene and development of the first recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) drug were truly breakthroughs. This allowed a deeper understanding of the structure and pharmacology of rHuEpo, which in turn inspired the discovery and development of additional erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In vivo specific activity and serum half-life of rHuEPO are influenced by the amount and structure of the attached carbohydrate. Increased numbers of sialic acids on carbohydrate attached to rHuEPO correlated with a relative increase in in-vivo-specific activity and increased serum half-life. The effect of increasing the number of sialic-acid-containing carbohydrates on in-vivo-specific activity was explored. Initial research focused on solving the problem of how the protein backbone could be engineered so a cell would add more carbohydrate to it. Additional work resulted in darbepoetin alfa, a longer-acting molecule with two additional carbohydrate chains. PMID:20127232

  18. Protocol of a randomised phase III clinical trial of sequential capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus bevacizumab (Cape/5-FU-Bmab) to capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab (CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab) versus combination CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab in advanced colorectal cancer: the C-cubed (C3) study

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hideyuki; Sawaki, Akira; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Inukai, Michio; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Nasu, Junichiro; Nishina, Tomohiro; Hazama, Shoichi; Okajima, Masazumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Results from several randomised trials suggest that the sequential use of cytotoxic agents in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has the potential to improve overall survival compared with combination chemotherapy. This study is designed to investigate whether sequential treatment with bevacizumab-based first-line treatment with oxaliplatin is superior to combination treatment of mCRC. Methods and analysis The C-cubed (C3) study is a two-arm, multicentre, open-label, randomised phase III trial in Japan comparing the efficacy and safety of sequential capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus bevacizumab (Cape/5-FU-Bmab) with escalation to capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab (CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab) versus combination CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab as the first-line treatment of mCRC. In the sequential arm (Arm A: oxaliplatin ‘wait-and-go’), treatment escalation from Cape/5-FU-Bmab to CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab is recommended in the case of progressive disease. In the combination arm (Arm B: oxaliplatin ‘stop-and-go’), de-escalation from CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab to Cape/5-FU-Bmab is possible after 12 weeks of treatment. Re-escalation to CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab after progressive disease is considered only for patients who received de-escalation of oxaliplatin after 12 weeks of treatment not caused by oxaliplatin-associated toxicity. A target sample size of 304 evaluable patients is considered sufficient to validate an expected HR for time to failure of strategy of the sequential approach ‘wait-and-go’ compared to the combination approach ‘stop-and go’ with 80% power and 2-sided 5% α in case of a true HR<0.69. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted according to the standards of Good Clinical Practice and in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki 2013 and local regulations, and has been submitted and approved by the Ethical Committee of the Non-Profit Organization MINS Institutional Review Board. The protocol

  19. Gemcitabine and oxaliplatin as second-line treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma pre-treated with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Mir, Olivier; Coriat, Romain; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Ropert, Stanislas; Durand, Jean-Philippe; Cessot, Anatole; Mallet, Vincent; Sogni, Philippe; Chaussade, Stanislas; Pol, Stanislas; Goldwasser, François

    2012-12-01

    Some patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progressing under sorafenib remain eligible for further systemic therapy. Little is known on the feasibility of systemic treatment beyond sorafenib in this setting. Consecutive HCC patients pre-treated with sorafenib received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m² and oxaliplatin 100 mg/m² every 14 days. Exclusion criteria included Child C cirrhosis, PS≥3, creatinine clearance<20 ml/min, albumin<25 g/L and bilirubin>54 μmol/L. Pre-treatment body composition was evaluated by CT scan to detect muscle wasting (sarcopenia). The primary evaluation criterion was safety. Secondary evaluation criteria were response rate, and progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Eighteen patients (median age: 64 years, range 25-77) received a total of 90 cycles (median per patient: 4, range 1-16). Eight patients (44.4 %) had a PS of 2, 5 (27.8%) had Child-Pugh B cirrhosis and 13 (72.2%) had a CLIP score>3. The most frequent toxicities were thrombocytopenia (grade 2-4: n=7, 38.9%) and peripheral neuropathy (grade 2-3: n=7, 38.9%). The overall response rate was 18.8% (95% CI: 0-37.9), and another 18.8 % of patients had stable disease. The median PFS and OS were 3.2 (95% CI: 2.3-3.9) and 4.7 (95% CI: 3.8-8.1) months, respectively. Overall survival was significantly longer in patients without sarcopenia [10.0 months (95% CI: 7.0-13.8) vs. 3.0 months (95 % CI: 2.5-3.9), p<0.001] and in patients with an ECOG PS<2 [8.1 months (95% CI: 7.0-13.8) vs. 3.8 months (95% CI: 2.5-3.9), p=0.017]. In our experience, gemcitabine-oxaliplatin was feasible and had detectable clinical activity in HCC patients pre-treated with sorafenib. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:22427209

  20. The α9α10 nicotinic receptor antagonist α-conotoxin RgIA prevents neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Alessandra; Micheli, Laura; Maresca, Mario; Branca, Jacopo Juno Valerio; McIntosh, J Michael; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third-generation diaminocyclohexane platinum drug, is widely used alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin to treat metastatic colorectal, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers. Oxaliplatin long-term treatment is associated with the development of a dose-limiting painful neuropathy that dramatically impairs the patient's quality of life and therapy possibility. To study novel strategies to treat oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, we evaluated α-conotoxin RgIA, a peptide that potently blocks the α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype in a rat model of oxaliplatin-dependent neurotoxicity (2.4mgkg(-1) oxaliplatin intraperitoneally daily for 21days). The administration of RgIA (2 and 10nmol injected intramuscularly once a day concomitantly with oxaliplatin treatment), reduced the oxaliplatin-dependent hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal noxious and non-noxious stimuli. Moreover, morphological modifications of L4-L5 dorsal root ganglia were significantly prevented. In the spinal cord the numerical increase of astrocyte cell density present in oxaliplatin-treated rats is partially prevented by RgIA treatment. Nevertheless, the administration of the α-conotoxin is able per se to elicit a numerical increase and a morphological activation of microglia and astrocytes in specific brain areas. PMID:27132993

  1. S100A10 protein expression is associated with oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individual responses to oxaliplatin (L-OHP)-based chemotherapy remain unpredictable. The objective of our study was to find candidate protein markers for tumor sensitivity to L-OHP from intracellular proteins of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. We performed expression difference mapping (EDM) analysis of whole cell lysates from 11 human CRC cell lines with different sensitivities to L-OHP by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS), and identified a candidate protein by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry ion trap time-of-flight (LCMS-IT-TOF). Results Of the qualified mass peaks obtained by EDM analysis, 41 proteins were differentially expressed in 11 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Among these proteins, the peak intensity of 11.1 kDa protein was strongly correlated with the L-OHP sensitivity (50% inhibitory concentrations) (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.80). We identified this protein as Protein S100-A10 (S100A10) by MS/MS ion search using LCMS-IT-TOF. We verified its differential expression and the correlation between S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells and their L-OHP sensitivities by Western blot analyses. In addition, S100A10 protein expression levels were not correlated with sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, suggesting that S100A10 is more specific to L-OHP than to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. S100A10 was detected in cell culture supernatant, suggesting secretion out of cells. Conclusions By proteomic approaches including SELDI technology, we have demonstrated that intracellular S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells differ according to cell lines and are significantly correlated with sensitivity of CRC cells to L-OHP exposure. Our findings provide a new clue to searching predictive markers of the response to L-OHP, suggesting that S100A10 is expected to be one of the candidate protein markers. PMID:22206547

  2. Raltitrexed plus oxaliplatin-based transarterial chemoembolization in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang; Fan, Liwei; Qi, Feng; Ou, Shengqiu; Yu, Lei; Yi, Xiaoyu; Ni, Bingqiang; Zheng, Zhiyong; Lu, Jianxun; Zhang, Chengwen; Chen, Changsheng; Lu, Xiong; Cheng, Lin; Hu, Tianlian; Ma, Yilong

    2016-08-01

    Raltitrexed has shown efficacy and safety in many tumor types; however, the clinical data on the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma is rare. In this report, we aim to assess the efficacy and safety of raltitrexed plus oxaliplatin (OXA)-based transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (uHCC). Patients with uHCC were recruited from multi-centers in China and assigned randomly to raltitrexed+OXA-based (n=76), fluorouracil+OXA-based (n=76), and doxorubicin+OXA-based (n=75) TACE treatment. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Tumor response was assessed using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST), and European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria (EASL). Safety and toxicity were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. The raltitrexed group showed a better disease control rate evaluated using RECIST (raltitrexed vs. fluorouracil vs. doxorubicin: 96.1 vs. 84.2 vs. 86.7%, P=0.05) and a better overall response rate on the basis of mRECIST (67.1 vs. 47.4 vs. 50.7%, P=0.03) and EASL (67.1 vs. 47.4 vs. 49.3%, P=0.02). The median OS and median progression-free survival (PFS) were higher in the raltitrexed group (median OS: 13.4 vs. 9.6 vs. 8.5 months; median PFS: 6.7 vs 4.9 vs 4.6 months). The most common toxicities included elevated aspartate aminotransferase (78.9 vs. 86.8 vs. 81.3%) and abdominal nonspecific pain (68.4 vs. 81.6 vs. 78.7%). No significant differences were found in the overall number of patients who experienced any toxicity. Raltitrexed plus OXA-based TACE suggested a safe and efficacious regimen in uHCC patients. The results warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:27145327

  3. Impact of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer: a prospective evaluation at a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Dault, R.; Rousseau, M.P.; Beaudoin, A.; Frenette, M.A.; Lemay, F.; Beauchesne, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin plays a major role in the treatment of colorectal cancer (crc), but is associated with the development of neuropathies. The main objective of the present prospective study was to estimate the proportion of participants with grade 1, 2, 3, or 4 peripheral sensory neuropathies according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4) among crc patients treated with oxaliplatin (adjuvant or metastatic, folfox or xelox regimens) at the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke. Among the 57 patients so treated between May 2012 and April 2013, about 60% reported grade 2 neuropathy, at maximum, during treatment. About 25% of patients had to stop treatment because of neuropathies. In a subset of patients contacted approximately 22 months after treatment cessation, neuropathies persisted in 70%. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy affects a significant number of crc patients and can influence the course of treatment and outcomes. PMID:26966415

  4. Impact of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer: a prospective evaluation at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Dault, R; Rousseau, M P; Beaudoin, A; Frenette, M A; Lemay, F; Beauchesne, M F

    2016-02-01

    Oxaliplatin plays a major role in the treatment of colorectal cancer (crc), but is associated with the development of neuropathies. The main objective of the present prospective study was to estimate the proportion of participants with grade 1, 2, 3, or 4 peripheral sensory neuropathies according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4) among crc patients treated with oxaliplatin (adjuvant or metastatic, folfox or xelox regimens) at the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke. Among the 57 patients so treated between May 2012 and April 2013, about 60% reported grade 2 neuropathy, at maximum, during treatment. About 25% of patients had to stop treatment because of neuropathies. In a subset of patients contacted approximately 22 months after treatment cessation, neuropathies persisted in 70%. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy affects a significant number of crc patients and can influence the course of treatment and outcomes. PMID:26966415

  5. Changes in Noninvasive Liver Fibrosis Indices and Spleen Size During Chemotherapy: Potential Markers for Oxaliplatin-Induced Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Sehhoon; Kim, Hwi Young; Kim, Haeryoung; Park, Jin Hyun; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Won; Choi, In Sil; Jung, Yong Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are standard treatments for the patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and advanced gastric cancer (AGC). However, owing to hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), the use of oxaliplatin sometimes results in splenomegaly. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between chemotherapy-associated changes of noninvasive liver fibrosis indices and volumetric changes of the spleen.From February 2004 to April 2014, patients with CRC or AGC receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were studied. The possibility of SOS development was evaluated before and after the oxaliplatin exposure with splenic volume index (SVI). Four different noninvasive liver fibrosis indices were used for risk analysis, namely age-platelet index (API), AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), platelet-to-spleen ratio (PSR), and fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4).A total of 275 patients were eligible for evaluation: 200 patients had CRC and 75 patients had AGC. Using the cutoff of SVI increase ≥ 0.3, 113 patients (41.1%) were positive for splenomegaly. The changes of indices significantly correlated with SVI increase. Adjusted odds ratios for those indices were as follows: API = 1.16 (95% confidential interval [CI], 1.01-1.32; P = .03); APRI = 2.45 (95% CI, 1.30-4.63; P = .01); PSR = 0.69 (95% CI, 0.59-0.80; P < .01); and FIB-4 = 1.37 (95% CI, 1.16-1.63; P < .01). Optimal cutoff values with statistical significance were calculated and suggested.The changes of noninvasive liver fibrosis indices showed a good correlation with the increase in the spleen volume during oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Validation of these indices for monitoring of oxaliplatin-induced hepatic SOS is warranted. PMID:26765438

  6. Analgesic effects of clinically used compounds in novel mouse models of polyneuropathy induced by oxaliplatin and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Lim, Yu Ling; Rodrigues de Sousa, Silmara; Lewis, Richard J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Cabot, Peter J.; Vetter, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is the major dose-limiting side effect of cisplatin and oxaliplatin, and there are currently no effective treatments available. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacological mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in novel animal models based on intraplantar administration of cisplatin and oxaliplatin and to systematically evaluate the analgesic efficacy of a range of therapeutics. Methods Neuropathy was induced by a single intraplantar injection of cisplatin or oxaliplatin in C57BL/6J mice and assessed by quantification of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The pharmacological basis of cisplatin-induced neuropathy was characterized using a range of selective pharmacological inhibitors. The analgesic effects of phenytoin, amitriptyline, oxcarbazepine, mexiletine, topiramate, retigabine, gabapentin, fentanyl, and Ca2+/Mg2+ were assessed 24 hours after induction of neuropathy. Results Intraplantar administration of cisplatin led to the development of mechanical allodynia, mediated through Nav1.6-expressing sensory neurons. Unlike intraplantar injection of oxaliplatin, cold allodynia was not observed with cisplatin, consistent with clinical observations. Surprisingly, only fentanyl was effective at alleviating cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia despite a lack of efficacy in oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia. Conversely, lamotrigine, phenytoin, retigabine, and gabapentin were effective at reversing oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia but had no effect on cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Oxcarbazepine, amitriptyline, mexiletine, and topiramate lacked efficacy in both models of acute chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. Conclusion This study established a novel animal model of cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia consistent with the A-fiber neuropathy seen clinically. Systematic assessment of a range of therapeutics identified several candidates that warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:24714523

  7. Fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy with or without oxaliplatin for stage II/III rectal cancer: a 3-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dexin; Zhang, Rui; Gong, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fang; Chen, Yue; Yu, Qinrui; Sun, Liping; Duan, Hongyan; Zhu, Shendong; Liu, Fei; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for stage II/III rectal cancer. In order to improve the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), we added oxaliplatin to the standard treatment, and compared the effectiveness of these two treatment patterns. Methods A total of 206 patients enrolled in the prospective study had histologically confirmed rectal cancer of clinical stage II/III during July 2007 to July 2010. They were randomized into the experimental group received oxaliplatin and capecitabine in combination with radiotherapy, and the control group received capecitabine in combination with radiotherapy. All patients received surgery in 6−10 weeks after chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6. The primary endpoints were DFS and OS, and the secondary endpoints included toxicity, compliance, and histopathological response. Results The 3-year OS in the experimental group and the control group was 90.29% vs. 86.41% (P>0.05), and the 3-year DFS was 80.58% vs. 69.90% (P>0.05). The pathological complete remission (pCR) rates were 23.30% and 19.42%, respectively (P=0.497). The 3-year local recurrence rates were 4.85% vs. 5.83% (P=0.694), and the 3-year distant metastasis rates were 16.50% and 28.16%, respectively (P=0.045). There were no significant differences in most grade 3−4 toxicities between two groups, however, grade 3−4 diarrhea occurred in 16.50% (17/103) of the experimental group, compared with 6.80% (7/103) of the control group (P=0.030). Also, the total grade 3−4 acute toxicity showed a significant difference (10.68% vs. 21.36%, P=0.037). Conclusions The experimental treatment did not lead significantly improved OS and DFS, and thus longer follow-up is warranted for our patient cohort. Adding oxaliplatin to capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy can significantly reduce metastasis, but has only minimal impact on local recurrence. Although grade 3−4

  8. Phase 1 study on S-1 and oxaliplatin therapy as an adjuvant after hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Oba, Masaru; Saiura, Akio; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Eiji; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-08-01

    of Background Data The effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer has been confirmed in various studies. However, no adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) classified to stage IV has been established. Objectives We conducted a phase 1 study of S-1 and oxaliplatin to determine the recommended dose (RD) in patients with CLM as adjuvant therapy in two institutes. Methods S-1 and oxaliplatin were administered from day 1 to day 14 of a 3-week cycle as a 2-h infusion every 3 weeks, respectively. The initial doses of S-1 and oxaliplatin were fixed to 80 mg/m(2) and 100 mg/m(2), respectively (level 1). We scheduled in the protocol a dose change of S-1 and oxaliplatin to level 2 (S-1: 80 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 130 mg/m(2)) or level 0 (S-1: 65 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 100 mg/m(2)) depending on the incidence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at level 1 in six patients. Results Because DLT occurred in one among the initial six patients at level 1, the doses were increased to level 2 in the next six patients. At level 2, grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia occurred in one (16.7 %) and two (33.3 %) patients, respectively, in the absence of non-hematological event. Because no DLT occurred at level 2, we suggest that the RD can be set to the level 2 dose. The median number of cycles delivered at RD was 8. The mean relative dose intensity of S-1 and oxaliplatin at RD was 0.90 and 0.63, respectively. Conclusion In a patient undergoing hepatectomy for CLM, 80 mg/m(2) of S-1 and 130 mg/m(2) of oxaliplatin are recommended as adjuvant therapy. A further study is required to confirm the efficacy and safety of this regimen on a larger scale. PMID:27155613

  9. GALNT14 Genotype Predicts Postoperative Outcome of Stage III Colorectal Cancer With Oxaliplatin as Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wey-Ran; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Liang, Kung-Hao; Lim, Siew-Na; Lai, Ming-Wei; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Hsieh, Tzu-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Kai; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is widely used for stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) after curative surgery. CRC is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and our current knowledge of therapeutic response-related genetic factors remains limited. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GALNT14)-rs9679162 genotype is a prognostic predictor for chemotherapy response in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we investigated whether this genotype was related to the therapeutic outcome of stage III CRC. A cohort of 300 stage III CRC patients receiving curative resection followed by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was retrospectively recruited. GALNT14 genotypes and the clinicopathological factors were correlated with posttherapeutic prognosis. Of these patients, 18% patients had GALNT14-rs9679162 “TT” and 82% had the “GT” + “GG” genotypes. The analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS, P = 0.009) but not with recurrence-free survival (RFS, P = 0.700). The subgroup analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in the following subgroups: age ≤65 years, men, left side CRC, N2 stage, carcinoembryonic antigen >5 ng/mL, and mucinous histology (P = 0.012, 0.011, 0.009, 0.025, 0.013, and 0.007, respectively). Within the latter 2 subgroups, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for OS. Finally, the “TT” genotype was associated with the T4 tumor stage (P = 0.017) and in patients with T4 tumors, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for unfavorable RFS (P = 0.007). GALNT14 “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in stage III CRC patients receiving curative surgery and adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27124048

  10. Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y.; Griffith, Kent A.; Francis, Isaac R.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Desai, Sameer; Murphy, James D.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor

  11. Label-free monitoring of interaction between DNA and oxaliplatin in aqueous solution by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojun; E, Yiwen; Xu, Xinlong; Wang, Li

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrated the feasibility of applying terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to monitor the molecular reactions in aqueous solutions of anticancer drug oxaliplatin with λ-DNA and macrophages DNA. The reaction time dependent refractive index and absorption coefficient were extracted and analyzed. The reaction half-decaying time of about 4.0 h for λ-DNA and 12.9 h for M-DNA was established. The results suggest that the THz-TDS detection could be an effective label-free technique to sense the molecular reaction in aqueous solutions and could be very useful in biology, medicine, and pharmacy industry.

  12. Rituximab plus gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who are not candidates for high-dose therapy. A phase II Lymphoma Study Association trial.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Nicolas; El Gnaoui, Taoufik; Tilly, Hervé; Canioni, Danièle; Sebban, Catherine; Casasnovas, René-Olivier; Delarue, Richard; Sonet, Anne; Beaussart, Pauline; Petrella, Tony; Castaigne, Sylvie; Bologna, Serge; Salles, Gilles; Rahmouni, Alain; Gaulard, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne

    2013-11-01

    A previous pilot study with rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin showed promising activity in patients with refractory/relapsed B-cell lymphoma. We, therefore, conducted a phase II study to determine whether these results could be reproduced in a multi-institutional setting. This phase II study included 49 patients with refractory (n=6) or relapsing (n=43) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The median age of the patients was 69 years. Prior treatment included rituximab in 31 (63%) and autologous transplantation in 17 (35%) patients. International Prognostic Index at enrollment was >2 in 34 patients (71%). The primary endpoint was overall response rate after four cycles of treatment. Patients were planned to receive eight cycles if they reached at least partial remission after four cycles. After four cycles 21 patients (44%) were in complete remission and 8 (17%) in partial remission, resulting in an overall response rate of 61%. Factors significantly affecting overall response rate were early (<1 year) progression/relapse (18% versus 54%; P=0.001) and prior exposure to rituximab (23% versus 65%; P=0.004). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 12.8% and 13.9%, respectively. Rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin were well tolerated with grade 3-4 infectious episodes in 22% of the cycles. These results are the first confirmation from a multicenter study that rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin provide a consistent response rate in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This therapy can now be considered as a platform for new combinations with targeted treatments. This trial was registered at clinicaltrial.gov under #NCT00169195. PMID:23753028

  13. Rituximab plus gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who are not candidates for high-dose therapy. A phase II Lymphoma Study Association trial

    PubMed Central

    Mounier, Nicolas; El Gnaoui, Taoufik; Tilly, Hervé; Canioni, Danièle; Sebban, Catherine; Casasnovas, René-Olivier; Delarue, Richard; Sonet, Anne; Beaussart, Pauline; Petrella, Tony; Castaigne, Sylvie; Bologna, Serge; Salles, Gilles; Rahmouni, Alain; Gaulard, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    A previous pilot study with rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin showed promising activity in patients with refractory/relapsed B-cell lymphoma. We, therefore, conducted a phase II study to determine whether these results could be reproduced in a multi-institutional setting. This phase II study included 49 patients with refractory (n=6) or relapsing (n=43) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The median age of the patients was 69 years. Prior treatment included rituximab in 31 (63%) and autologous transplantation in 17 (35%) patients. International Prognostic Index at enrollment was >2 in 34 patients (71%). The primary endpoint was overall response rate after four cycles of treatment. Patients were planned to receive eight cycles if they reached at least partial remission after four cycles. After four cycles 21 patients (44%) were in complete remission and 8 (17%) in partial remission, resulting in an overall response rate of 61%. Factors significantly affecting overall response rate were early (<1 year) progression/relapse (18% versus 54%; P=0.001) and prior exposure to rituximab (23% versus 65%; P=0.004). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 12.8% and 13.9%, respectively. Rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin were well tolerated with grade 3–4 infectious episodes in 22% of the cycles. These results are the first confirmation from a multicenter study that rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin provide a consistent response rate in patients with refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This therapy can now be considered as a platform for new combinations with targeted treatments. This trial was registered at clinicaltrial.gov under #NCT00169195. PMID:23753028

  14. Molecular characteristics and in vitro susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, including the des-fluoro(6) quinolone DX-619, of Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the community and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Dohmae, Soshi; Saito, Kohei; Otsuka, Taketo; Takano, Tomomi; Chiba, Megumi; Fujikawa, Katsuko; Tanaka, Mayumi

    2006-12-01

    Highly virulent, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) genes have been found increasingly worldwide. Among a total of 2,101 MRSA strains isolated from patients in hospitals in Japan, two were positive for PVL genes. One strain was identified as a community-acquired MRSA strain with genotype sequence type 30 (ST30) and spa (staphylococcal protein A gene) type 19 from Japan and was resistant only to beta-lactam antimicrobial agents. The other strain was closely related to PVL+ multidrug-resistant, hospital-acquired MRSA strains (ST30, spa type 43) derived from nosocomial outbreaks in the 1980s to 1990s in Japan but with a divergent sequence type, ST765 (a single-locus variant of ST30). Twenty-two PVL+ MRSA strains, including those from Japan and those from other countries with various sequence types (ST1, ST8, ST30, ST59, and ST80) and genotypes, were examined for susceptibility to 31 antimicrobial agents. Among the agents, DX-619, a des-fluoro(6) quinolone, showed the greatest activity, followed by rifampin and sitafloxacin, a fluoroquinolone. The data suggest that DX-619 exhibits a superior activity against PVL+ MRSA strains with various virulence genetic traits from the community as well as from hospitals. PMID:17043124

  15. Fragmentation pathways analysis for the gas phase dissociation of protonated carnosine-oxaliplatin complexes.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Ida; Moustafa, Eslam M; Sicilia, Emilia; Russo, Nino; Shoeib, Tamer

    2015-03-14

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the protonated carnosine-oxaliplatin complex, [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) using several collision energies were shown to yield nine different fragment ions. Energy-resolved CID experiments on [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) showed that the generation of the product ion [Carnosine - H + Pt(dach)](+) (where dach is 1,2-diaminocyclohexane) is the lowest energy process. At slightly higher collision energies, the loss of neutral carnosine from [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) to produce [OxPt + H](+) was observed, followed by the loss of oxaliplatin from the same precursor ion to produce [Carnosine + H](+). At significantly higher energies, the ion [OxPt - CO2 + H](+) was shown to be formed, while the last two investigated ions [Carnosine + OxPt - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine - NH3 - H + Pt(dach)](+) did not attain any significant relative abundance. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level were employed to probe the fragmentation mechanisms that account for all experimental data. The lowest free energy barriers for the generation of each of the ions [Carnosine - H + Pt(dach)](+), [OxPt + H](+), [Carnosine + H](+), [Carnosine + OxPt - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine - NH3 - H + Pt(dach)](+) from [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) according to the fragmentation mechanisms offered here were calculated to be 31.9, 38.8, 49.3, 75.2, and 85.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. PMID:25325236

  16. Data showing the circumvention of oxaliplatin resistance by vatalanib in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K.W.; Poon, Daniel C.; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-wu

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that vatalanib, an orally active small molecule multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Hess-Stumpp et al., 2005 [1]), can sensitize multidrug resistant (MDR) colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting two MDR transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 (To et al., 2015 [2]). This data article describes the possible circumvention of resistance to specifically platinum (Pt)-based anticancer drugs by vatalanib via inhibition of two other efflux transporters ABCC2 and ATP7A. Data from the flow cytometric transporter efflux assay showed specific inhibition of ABCC2 activity by vatalanib in stable transfected cells and ABCC2-overexpressing oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells HCT116/Oxa. We also performed the transporter ABCC2 ATPase assay and showed an increase in ATP hydrolysis by ABCC2 in the presence of vatalanib. ATP7A mRNA expression was also shown to be upregulated in HCT116/Oxa cells. Vatalanib was shown to suppress this upregulated ATP7A expression. Data from the cellular Pt accumulation assay showed a lower Pt accumulation in HCT116/Oxa cells than the parental sensitive HCT116 cells. Vatalanib was shown to increase cellular Pt accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of oxaliplatin and vatalanib was shown to restore the suppressed apoptosis in HCT116/Oxa cells. PMID:27014726

  17. Data showing the circumvention of oxaliplatin resistance by vatalanib in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-06-01

    We have recently reported that vatalanib, an orally active small molecule multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Hess-Stumpp et al., 2005 [1]), can sensitize multidrug resistant (MDR) colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting two MDR transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 (To et al., 2015 [2]). This data article describes the possible circumvention of resistance to specifically platinum (Pt)-based anticancer drugs by vatalanib via inhibition of two other efflux transporters ABCC2 and ATP7A. Data from the flow cytometric transporter efflux assay showed specific inhibition of ABCC2 activity by vatalanib in stable transfected cells and ABCC2-overexpressing oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells HCT116/Oxa. We also performed the transporter ABCC2 ATPase assay and showed an increase in ATP hydrolysis by ABCC2 in the presence of vatalanib. ATP7A mRNA expression was also shown to be upregulated in HCT116/Oxa cells. Vatalanib was shown to suppress this upregulated ATP7A expression. Data from the cellular Pt accumulation assay showed a lower Pt accumulation in HCT116/Oxa cells than the parental sensitive HCT116 cells. Vatalanib was shown to increase cellular Pt accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of oxaliplatin and vatalanib was shown to restore the suppressed apoptosis in HCT116/Oxa cells. PMID:27014726

  18. Epigenetic activation of the drug transporter OCT2 sensitizes renal cell carcinoma to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanqing; Zheng, Xiaoli; Yu, Qinqin; Wang, Hua; Tan, Fuqing; Zhu, Qianying; Yuan, Lingmin; Jiang, Huidi; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2016-07-20

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is known for its multidrug resistance. Using data obtained from the cancer transcriptome database Oncomine and the proteome database The Human Protein Atlas, we identified the repression of organic cation transporter OCT2 as a potential factor contributing to oxaliplatin resistance in RCC. By analyzing OCT2 expression in collected patient tissues and commercial tissue microarray specimens, we demonstrated OCT2 repression in RCC at both transcription and protein levels. Epigenetic analysis revealed that the repressed OCT2 promoter in RCC is characterized by hypermethylated CpG islands and the absence of H3K4 methylation. Further mechanistic studies showed that DNA hypermethylation blocked MYC activation of OCT2 by disrupting its interaction with the E-Box motif, which prevented MYC from recruiting MLL1 to catalyze H3K4me3 at the OCT2 promoter and resulted in repressed OCT2 transcription. Targeting this mechanism, we designed a sequential combination therapy and demonstrated that epigenetic activation of OCT2 by decitabine sensitizes RCC cells to oxaliplatin both in vitro and in xenografts. Our study highlights the potential of translating "omics" data into the development of targeted therapies. PMID:27440728

  19. Assessment of Injection Site Reactions for Peripheral Intravenous Oxaliplatin Infusion and Potential Remedies.

    PubMed

    Handa, Satoko; Kuroiwa, Ryohei; Miyano, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hisanori; Kamei, Daisuke; Takei, Hiromi; Sonou, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Murayama, JunIchiro; Sato, Atsushi; Kato, Yasuhisa

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the medical and nursing records of 19 patients with unresectable advanced recurrent colorectal cancers treated using oxaliplatin and capecitabine(CapeOX)with or without bevacizumab at the outpatient tumor center of Showa UniversityHospital between November 1, 2009 and November 30, 2011, to clarifydifferences in the incidence of injection site reactions according to the use or non-use of an intravenous infusion solution warming device. Vascular pain and other injection site reactions occurred in 13 patients(68.4%). Injection site reactions occurred in 33 of the total of 77 chemotherapytreatments (42.9%). No difference in incidence of injection site reactions was seen according to whether the intravenous infusion solution warmer was used. The most common time to onset of injection site reactions after commencing oxaliplatin administration was 60-90 min, and symptoms were seen to decrease when non-steroidal anti-inflammatorydrugs were coadministered. We intend to leverage these studyfindings to demonstrate the mechanism of onset for injection site reactions and to propose measures for handling adverse drug reactions. PMID:27539041

  20. Time-programmed DCA and oxaliplatin release by multilayered nanofiber mats in prevention of local cancer recurrence following surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyun; Liu, Shi; Qi, Yanxin; Zhou, Dongfang; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2016-08-10

    Local recurrence following surgery in cancer treatment remains a major clinical challenge. To increase antitumor activity but maintain toxicity in an acceptable level in prevention of local cancer recurrence, we demonstrated a dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats strategy, in which DCA and oxaliplatin were co-electrospun into the distinct layer of resultant fabrics and the oxaliplatin-loaded fibers layer was sealed between the basement film layer and other two fibers layers. The dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats exhibit time-programmed dual release behavior and synergistic effect upon cancer cells. Nontoxic DCA selectively promotes apoptosis of cancer cells through modulating cellular metabolism, and oxaliplatin subsequently kills the remained cancer cells in a low concentration. After implantation on the resection margin of cervical carcinoma on a murine model, the dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats displayed enhanced anti-recurrence efficacy and decreased side toxic effects over 30days compared with drug-loaded monolayered fiber mats. The time-programmed combination of DCA and oxaliplatin within multilayered nanofiber mats appears to be a promising strategy for local cancer treatment following resection. PMID:27221069

  1. Assessment of thermal sensitivity in rats using the thermal place preference test: description and application in the study of oxaliplatin-induced acute thermal hypersensitivity and inflammatory pain models.

    PubMed

    Balayssac, David; Ling, Bing; Ferrier, Jérémy; Pereira, Bruno; Eschalier, Alain; Authier, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    Thermal sensitivity is an essential characteristic of some painful states, including oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. The thermal place preference test (TPPT) was designed to finely assess thermal sensitivity in rodents. The TPPT monitors the time spent by unrestrained rodents on a test plate at fixed temperatures (5-50°C) compared with an adjacent reference plate at a neutral temperature (25°C). Here, we report the results of a study designed (i) to validate the optimal methodological parameters for measuring thermal sensitivity in rats, (ii) to assess the thermal sensitivity of healthy rats and animal models of pain and (iii) to explore the pharmacological effects of analgesic drugs. The most reproducible conditions occurred when the TPPT was performed in the morning and in the dark for 3 min with the reference plate set to 25°C. The temperature preferences of healthy rats were more than 17°C and less than 40°C. When compared with control animals, oxaliplatin-treated rats showed thermal hypersensitivity at 12, 20 and 35°C, and carrageenan-treated rats showed thermal hypersensitivity at 15 and 45°C. Duloxetine (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity (20°C) and morphine (1 mg/kg, intravenous) reversed carrageenan-induced heat hypersensitivity (45°C). We conclude that the TPPT enables a fine-grained assessment of thermal sensitivity that is relevant to the pathophysiological exploration of animal pain models and to the pharmacological assessment of analgesic drugs. PMID:24525711

  2. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia. PMID:25782915

  3. Oxaliplatin immuno hybrid nanoparticles for active targeting: an approach for enhanced apoptotic activity and drug delivery to colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Shashank; Gowthamarajan, K; Satish Kumar, M N; Wadhwani, Ashish

    2016-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) proved to be a promising new target for colorectal cancer treatment. Elevated expression of TRAIL protein in tumor cells distinguishes it from healthy cells, thereby delivering the drug at the specific site. Here, we formulated oxaliplatin immunohybrid nanoparticles (OIHNPs) to deliver oxaliplatin and anti-TRAIL for colorectal cancer treatment in xenograft tumor models. The polymeric chitosan layer binds to the lipid film with the mixture of phospholipids by an ultra sound method followed by conjugating with thiolated antibody using DSPE-PEG-mal3400, resulting in the formation of OIHNPs. The polymer layer helps in more encapsulation of the drug (71 ± 0.09%) with appreciable particle size (95 ± 0.01 nm), and lipid layer prevents degradation of the drug in serum by preventing nanoparticle aggregation. OIHNPs have shown a 4-fold decrease in the IC50 value compared to oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells by the MTT assay. These immuno-nanoparticles represent the successful uptake and internalization of oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells rather than in MCF-7 cells determined by triple fluorescence method. Apoptotic activity in vitro of OIHNPs was determined by the change in the mitochondria membrane potential that further elevates its anti-tumor property. Furthermore, the conjugated nanoparticles can effectively deliver the drug to the tumor sites, which can be attributed to its ability in reducing tumor mass and tumor volume in xenograft tumor models in vivo along with sustaining its release in vitro. These findings indicated that the oxaliplatin immuno-hybrid nanoparticles would be a promising nano-sized active targeted formulation for colorectal-tumor targeted therapy. PMID:26377238

  4. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-01-01

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system. PMID:26131771

  5. Intensive chemotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer: weighing between safety and clinical efficacy: Evaluation of Masi G, Loupakis F, Salvatore L, et al. Bevacizumab with FOLFOXIRI (irinotecan, oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and folinate) as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer: a phase 2 trial. Lancet Oncol 2010;11:845-52.

    PubMed

    Bruera, Gemma; Ricevuto, Enrico

    2011-06-01

    This paper evaluates a recent study whereby a four-drug combination regimen adding bevacizumab to triplet fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan chemotherapy is described for the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. It extends the use of intensive medical treatments combining chemotherapy and the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab, opening new perspectives for the design of four-drug intensive regimen-associating chemotherapy and targeted agents. In the future, these four-drug intensive regimens should be further improved for efficacy:toxicity ratio and verification in randomized trials. PMID:21545334

  6. Trends in the susceptibility of commonly encountered clinically significant anaerobes and susceptibilities of blood isolates of anaerobes to 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, 2008-2012, northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, F D; Liao, C H; Lin, Y T; Sheng, W H; Hsueh, P R

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial resistance trends and profiles of clinical anaerobic isolates in northern Taiwan. Trends in the susceptibility of five commonly encountered clinical anaerobic isolates to seven agents from 2008 to 2012 were measured using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, against anaerobic blood isolates from two medical centers were determined using the agar dilution method. During the study period, susceptibility data on 11,105 isolates were evaluated. Metronidazole and chloramphenicol retained excellent activities. Around 20-30 % of isolates of Bacteroides and Prevotella species were resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam, cefmetazole, flomoxef, and clindamycin. Of the 507 tested blood isolates, the rates of resistance to commonly used agents were much higher, namely, 16.2 % for amoxicillin-clavulanate, 15.6 % for ampicillin-sulbactam, 24.7 % for cefmetazole, and 36.1 % for clindamycin. Notably, 13.5 % of B. fragilis isolates were resistant to ertapenem. Also, 15.2 % of B. uniformis, 17.2 % of other Bacteroides species, 14.3 % of Prevotella species, and 14 % of Clostridium other than C. perfringens isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin. Cefoperazone-sulbactam was active against most isolates, except for Clostridium species other than perfringens (resistance rate, 18.6 %). Fidaxomicin exerted poor activities against most anaerobes tested (MIC90 of >128 μg/ml for B. fragilis and all isolates), except for C. perfringens (MIC90 of 0.03 μg/ml) and Peptostreptococcus micros (MIC90 of 2 μg/ml). However, rifaximin showed a wide range of susceptibilities against the tested anaerobes (MIC90 of 0.5 μg/ml for B. fragilis). The emergence of resistance to ertapenem and moxifloxacin among bacteremic anaerobes highlights the need for continuous monitoring. PMID:24930042

  7. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  8. Toward a better understanding of the oxaliplatin mode of action upon the steric hindrance of 1,2-diaminocyclohexane and its analogue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhimei; Wu, Mian; Gou, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    The present research is concerned with the mechanism investigation on the interaction between oxaliplatin and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). The binding modes of oxaliplatin with GMP and GSH were explored by HPLC and LC-MS techniques, respectively, in which four key intermediates were found and five adducts were determined in the reaction. The results indicated that GSH can interfere with the reaction between oxaliplatin and DNA in two ways. One is by competing with GMP to bind the active platinum unit, and the other is by substituting the guanine-N7 atom of DNA to form inactive platinum species. In contrast to oxaliplatin with trans 1,2-diaminocyclohexane as spatial framework, a known platinum(II) complex, characteristic of trans-bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-7,8-diamine possessing dicyclic steric hindrance, was also studied in the same way to explore its mode of action with DNA. PMID:26816108

  9. Anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF agents: important targeted therapies of colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qing-Yang; Wei, Ye; Chen, Jing-Wen; Chang, Wen-Ju; Ye, Le-Chi; Zhu, De-Xiang; Xu, Jian-Min

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) is common worldwide. Targeted therapies with monoclonal antibodies have been proven effective in numerous clinical trials, and are now becoming standards for patients with CLM. The development and application of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) antibodies represents significant advances in the treatment of this disease. However, new findings continue to emerge casting doubt on the efficacy of this approach. The Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS) has been proven to be a crucial predictor of the success of anti-EGFR treatment in CLM. Whereas a recent study summarized several randomized controlled trials, and showed that patients with the KRAS G13D mutation significantly benefited from the addition of cetuximab in terms of progress-free survival (PFS, 4.0 mo vs 1.9 mo, HR = 0.51, P = 0.004) and overall survival (OS, 7.6 mo vs 5.7 mo, HR = 0.50, P = 0.005). Some other studies also reported that the KRAS G13D mutation might not be absolutely predictive of non-responsiveness to anti-EGFR therapy. At the same time, "new" RAS mutations, including mutations in neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog (NRAS) and exons 3 and 4 of KRAS, have been suggested to be predictors of a poor treatment response. This finding was first reported by the update of the PRIME trial. The update showed that for patients with non-mutated KRAS exon 2 but other RAS mutations, panitumumab-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX)4 treatment led to inferior PFS (HR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.79-2.07) and OS (HR = 1.29, 95%CI: 0.79-2.10), which was consistent with the findings in patients with KRAS mutations in exon 2. Then, the update of the PEAK trial and the FIRE-III trial also supported this finding, which would reduce candidates for anti-EGFR therapy but enhance the efficacy. In first-line targeted combination therapy, the regimens of cetuximab plus FOLFOX was called into

  10. Uracil/ftorafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX) as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results of randomised phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Bajetta, E; Di Bartolomeo, M; Buzzoni, R; Mariani, L; Zilembo, N; Ferrario, E; Lo Vullo, S; Aitini, E; Isa, L; Barone, C; Jacobelli, S; Recaldin, E; Pinotti, G; Iop, A

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase II study evaluates the safety and efficacy profile of uracil/tegafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX). One hundred and forty-three patients with measurable, non-resectable metastatic colorectal cancer were randomised in a multicentre study to receive TEGAFIRI (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, irinotecan 240 mg m−2 day 1; q21) or TEGAFOX (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, oxaliplatin 120 mg m−2 day 1; q21). Among 143 randomised patients, 141 were analysed (68 received TEGAFIRI and 73 TEGAFOX). The main characteristics of the two arms were well balanced. The most common grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse events were neutropenia (13% of cases with TEGAFIRI; 1% in the TEGAFOX group). Diarrhoea was prevalent in the TEGAFIRI arm (16%) vs TEGAFOX (4%). Six complete remission (CR) and 19 partial remission (PR) were recorded in the TEGAFIRI arm (odds ratio (OR): 41.7; 95% confidence limit (CL), 29.1–55.1%), and six CR and 22 PR were recorded in the TEGAFOX group, (OR: 38.9; 95% CL, 27.6–51.1). At a median time follow-up of 17 months (intequartile (IQ) range 12–23), a median survival probability of 20 and 19 months was obtained in the TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX groups, respectively. Median time to progression was 8 months for both groups. TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX are both effective and tolerable first-line therapies in MCRC patients. The employment of UFT/LV given in doublet combination is interesting and the presented data appear comparable to equivalent infusion regimens described in the literature. The safety profile of the two combinations also allows an evaluation with other biological agents such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17245343

  11. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Fluorouracil Followed by Systemic Therapy Using Oxaliplatin Plus Fluorouracil and Leucovorin for Patients with Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hiroshi Ozaki, Toshirou; Shiina, Makoto

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the sequential treatment of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy followed by systemic therapy using oxaliplatin plus 5-flourouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin, namely, FOLFOX, for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. We reviewed 20 patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Patients were initially treated with HAI chemotherapy until disease progression (5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intra-arterial infusion, weekly) and then with FOLFOX thereafter (FOLFOX4, n = 13; modified FOLFOX6, n = 7). Adverse events, tumor response, and time to progression for each therapy were evaluated retrospectively, and overall survival was estimated. Toxicity of HAI chemotherapy was generally mild. Of 20 patients, adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in only 1 patient (5%) during initial therapy using HAI chemotherapy, while 9 patients (45%) exhibited adverse events during subsequent FOLFOX therapy. For HAI chemotherapy and FOLFOX, objective response rates were 85.0% and 35.0%, respectively, and median time to progression was 11.6 and 5.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival was 30.1 months. In conclusion, the sequence of HAI chemotherapy followed by FOLFOX is a promising treatment strategy for the long-term use of active chemotherapeutic agents, leading to a superior tumor response and fewer toxic effects in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

  12. Protection of stromal cell-derived factor 2 by heat shock protein 72 prevents oxaliplatin-induced cell death in oxaliplatin-resistant human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Tanaka, Masako; Yashiro, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Asuka; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Nagayama, Katsuya; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi; Shiota, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) is a molecular chaperone that assists in the folding of nascent polypeptides and in the refolding of denatured proteins. In many cancers, Hsp72 is constitutively expressed at elevated levels, which can result in enhanced stress tolerance. Similarly, following treatment with anticancer drugs, Hsp72 binds to denatured proteins that may be essential for survival. We therefore hypothesized that Hsp72 client proteins may play a crucial role in drug resistance. Here, we aimed to identify proteins that are critical for oxaliplatin (OXA) resistance by analyzing human gastric cancer cell lines, as well as OXA-resistant cells via a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach combined with affinity purification using anti-Hsp72 antibodies. Stromal cell-derived factor 2 (SDF-2) was identified as an Hsp72 client protein unique to OCUM-2M/OXA cells. SDF-2 was overexpressed in OXA-resistant cells and SDF-2 silencing promoted the apoptotic effects of OXA. Furthermore, Hsp72 prevented SDF-2 degradation in a chaperone activity-dependent manner. Together, our data demonstrate that Hsp72 protected SDF-2 to avoid OXA-induced cell death. We propose that inhibition of SDF-2 may comprise a novel therapeutic strategy to counteract OXA-resistant cancers. PMID:27157913

  13. miR-625-3p regulates oxaliplatin resistance by targeting MAP2K6-p38 signalling in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov; Lyskjær, Iben; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hansen, Flemming; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Pfeiffer, Per; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancers (CRC) is a major medical problem, and predictive markers are urgently needed. Recently, miR-625-3p was reported as a promising predictive marker. Herein, we show that miR-625-3p functionally induces oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells, and identify the signalling networks affected by miR-625-3p. We show that the p38 MAPK activator MAP2K6 is a direct target of miR-625-3p, and, accordingly, is downregulated in non-responder patients of oxaliplatin therapy. miR-625-3p-mediated resistance is reversed by anti-miR-625-3p treatment and ectopic expression of a miR-625-3p insensitive MAP2K6 variant. In addition, reduction of p38 signalling by using siRNAs, chemical inhibitors or expression of a dominant-negative MAP2K6 protein induces resistance to oxaliplatin. Transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome profiles confirm inactivation of MAP2K6-p38 signalling as one likely mechanism of oxaliplatin resistance. Our study shows that miR-625-3p induces oxaliplatin resistance by abrogating MAP2K6-p38-regulated apoptosis and cell cycle control networks, and corroborates the predictive power of miR-625-3p. PMID:27526785

  14. Oxaliplatin regulates expression of stress ligands in ovarian cancer cells and modulates their susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Siew, Yin-Yin; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yew, Hui-Chuing; Lim, Shun-Wei; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lew, Si-Min; Seetoh, Wei-Guang; Seow, See-Voon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Selected cytotoxic chemicals can provoke the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant tumors. Most of the studies on immunogenic cell death are focused on the signals that operate on a series of receptors expressed by dendritic cells to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Here, we explored the effects of oxaliplatin, an immunogenic cell death inducer, on the induction of stress ligands and promotion of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that treatment of tumor cells with oxaliplatin induced the production of type I interferons and chemokines and enhanced the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains (MIC) A/B, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)-3, CD155 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-R1/R2. Furthermore, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin treatment enhanced susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis. In addition, activated NK cells completely abrogated the growth of cancer cells that were pretreated with oxaliplatin. However, cancer cells pretreated with the same concentration of oxaliplatin alone were capable of potentiating regrowth over a period of time. These results suggest an advantage in combining oxaliplatin and NK cell-based therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Further investigation on such potential combination therapy is warranted. PMID:26138671

  15. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z; Farias, Iria Luiza G; Rigo, Melânia L; Glanzner, Werner G; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D; Cadoná, Francine C; Cruz, Ivana B; Farias, Júlia G; Duarte, Marta M M F; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C; Rocha, João Batista T; Leal, Daniela B R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  16. [A Case of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia Resulting from Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taiki; Nagai, Kagami; Sanada, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from advanced transverse colon cancer. Thus, a local resection was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was started. Sixteen courses were carried out without problems. However, he complained of chills and chest discomfort 2 hours after beginning the 17th course of chemotherapy. Laboratory data showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, and platelet-associated IgG level was high. After administration of steroids and platelet transfusions, the platelet count improved. Therefore, we diagnosed drug-induced thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin (L-OHP). Since then, sLV5FU2 therapy was started, and the patient received the whole adjuvant chemotherapy without problems. Thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to L-OHP is a relatively rare side effect. We herein report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26805296

  17. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z.; Farias, Iria Luiza G.; Rigo, Melânia L.; Glanzner, Werner G.; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D.; Cadoná, Francine C.; Cruz, Ivana B.; Farias, Júlia G.; Duarte, Marta M. M. F.; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C.; Rocha, João Batista T.; Leal, Daniela B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  18. Role of the DNA Base Excision Repair Protein, APE1 in Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin, or Carboplatin Induced Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R.; Jiang, Yanlin; Guo, Chunlu; Reed, April; Meng, Hongdi; Vasko, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of platinum drugs, the mechanisms of this toxicity remain unknown. Previous work in our laboratory suggests that cisplatin-induced CIPN is secondary to DNA damage which is susceptible to base excision repair (BER). To further examine this hypothesis, we studied the effects of cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin on cell survival, DNA damage, ROS production, and functional endpoints in rat sensory neurons in culture in the absence or presence of reduced expression of the BER protein AP endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1). Using an in situ model of peptidergic sensory neuron function, we examined the effects of the platinum drugs on hind limb capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation. Exposing sensory neurons in culture to the three platinum drugs caused a concentration-dependent increase in apoptosis and cell death, although the concentrations of carboplatin were 10 fold higher than cisplatin. As previously observed with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin also increased DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-H2AX and reduced the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from neuronal cultures. Both cisplatin and oxaliplatin increased the production of ROS as well as 8-oxoguanine DNA adduct levels, whereas carboplatin did not. Reducing levels of APE1 in neuronal cultures augmented the cisplatin and oxaliplatin induced toxicity, but did not alter the effects of carboplatin. Using an in vivo model, systemic injection of cisplatin (3 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg), or carboplatin (30 mg/kg) once a week for three weeks caused a decrease in capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation, which was delayed in onset. The effects of cisplatin on capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation were attenuated by chronic administration of E3330, a redox inhibitor of APE1 that serendipitously enhances APE1 DNA repair activity in sensory neurons. These outcomes support the importance of the BER pathway, and particularly APE

  19. Stereoselective peripheral sensory neurotoxicity of diaminocyclohexane platinum enantiomers related to ormaplatin and oxaliplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Screnci, D.; Er, H. M.; Hambley, T. W.; Galettis, P.; Brouwer, W.; McKeage, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    The diaminocyclohexane platinum (Pt(DACH)) derivatives ormaplatin and oxaliplatin have caused severe and dose-limiting peripheral sensory neurotoxicity in a clinical trial. We hypothesized that this toxicity could vary in relation to the biotransformation and stereochemistry of these Pt(DACH) derivatives. We prepared pure R,R and S,S enantiomers of ormaplatin (Pt(DACH)Cl4), oxaliplatin (Pt(DACH)oxalato) and their metabolites (Pt(DACH)Cl2 and Pt(DACH)methionine) and assessed their peripheral sensory neurotoxicity and tissue distribution in the rat and in vitro anti-tumour activity in human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. The R,R enantiomers of Pt(DACH)Cl4, Pt(DACH)oxalato and Pt(DACH)Cl2, induced peripheral sensory neurotoxicity at significantly lower cumulative doses (18 +/- 5.7 vs 32 +/- 2.3 micromol kg(-1); P < 0.01) and at earlier times (4 +/- 1 vs 6.7 +/- 0.6 weeks; P = 0.016) during repeat-dose treatment than the S,S enantiomers. Pt(DACH)methionine enantiomers showed no biological activity. There was no difference between Pt(DACH) enantiomers in the platinum concentration in sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, brain or blood at the end of each experiment. Three human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (41 M, 41 McisR and SKOV-3) showed no (or inconsistent) chiral discrimination in their sensitivity to Pt(DACH) enantiomers, whereas two cell lines (CH-1 and CH-1cisR) showed modest enantiomeric selectivity favouring the R,R isomer (more active). In conclusion, Pt(DACH) derivatives exhibit enantiomeric-selective peripheral sensory neurotoxicity during repeated dosing in rats favouring S,S isomers (less neurotoxic). They exhibited less chiral discrimination in their accumulation within peripheral nerves and in vitro anti-tumour activity. PMID:9275028

  20. Development and evaluation of oxaliplatin and irinotecan co-loaded liposomes for enhanced colorectal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Tianqi; Yang, Shaomei; Xiao, Yanan; Song, Yunmei; Zhang, Na; Garg, Sanjay

    2016-09-28

    Drug combinations are widely employed in chemotherapy for colorectal cancer treatment. However, traditional cocktail combination in clinic causes the uncertainty of the treatment, owing to varying pharmacokinetics of different drugs. The aim of this study was to design co-loaded liposomes to achieve the synchronised delivery and release. Oxaliplatin and irinotecan hydrochloride, as one of recommended combination schemes for the treatment of colorectal cancer in clinic, were co-loaded into the liposomes. The particle sizes of the liposomes were <200nm with uniform size distribution. In vitro release study showed that both drugs could be synchronously released from the liposomes, which means the optimized synergistic ratio of two drugs could be achieved. In vitro cellular uptake revealed that co-loaded liposomes could efficiently deliver different drugs into the same cells, indicating their potential as carriers for enhancing the cancer therapy. CLSM images of cryo-sections for in vivo co-delivery study also revealed that co-loaded liposomes had superior ability to co-deliver both the cargoes into the same tumor cells. Besides, in vivo NIRF imaging indicated that the liposomes could increase the drug accumulation in tumor compared with free drug. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation demonstrated that co-loaded liposomes exhibited higher cytotoxicity than the mixture of single loaded liposomes in both CT-26 and HCT-116 cells. Furthermore, co-loaded liposomes also presented superior anti-tumor activity in CT-26 bearing BALB/c mice. In vivo safety assessment demonstrated that liposomes had lower toxicities than their solution formulations. These results indicated that oxaliplatin and irinotecan hydrochloride co-loaded liposomes would be an efficient formulation for improving colorectal cancer therapy with potential clinical applications. PMID:27432750

  1. The role of targeted agents in preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wadlow, Raymond C; Ryan, David P

    2010-08-01

    In the United States, randomized trials have established preoperative chemoradiation as the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologic complete response (pCR) rates occur in 10% to 16% of patients and have been shown to be correlated with both disease-free and overall survival. Therefore, recent efforts incorporating newer cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents into chemoradiotherapy regimens have reported the pCR rate to be a surrogate marker of clinical outcomes. Substitution of oral fluoropyrimidines, including capecitabine, for infusional 5-fluorouracil reportedly generated pCR rates of up to 32% in phase 2 studies, but definitive evaluation awaits results from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) R-04 trial. Similarly, regimens incorporating irinotecan generated pCR rates as high as 38%, but to the authors' knowledge have not been evaluated in randomized trials. In contrast, 2 large randomized trials reported that the addition of weekly oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation led to an increase in grade 3/4 toxicity but no difference in pCR rates. Early phase trials evaluating the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab in combination with chemoradiation reported modest pCR rates of 5% to 12%, and efforts have focused on identifying biomarkers of response including EGFR copy number, k-ras mutational status, and both serum and tumor-specific expression of EGFR ligands. Finally, incorporation of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab into chemoradiation appears to be safe and feasible, with initial studies reporting a beneficial effect on vascular normalization and correlations between circulating biomarkers of angiogenesis and pathologic response. Future efforts should include prospective studies of these agents in biomarker-defined subpopulations, as well as studies of novel agents that target angiogenesis, tumor-stromal interaction

  2. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  3. Oxaliplatin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used with other medications to treat advanced colon or rectal cancer (cancer that begins in the ... is also used with other medications to prevent colon cancer from spreading in people who have had ...

  4. [A Case of Colon Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Successfully Treated with Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin plus Bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Suematsu, Yuki; Ishibashi, Yuji; Hiratsuka, Miyuki; Suda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Miyuki; Saito, Hiroyuki; Omori, Keita; Morita, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with descending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases, and a left hemicolectomy was performed. The patient was treated with capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CapeOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab). After 5 courses of chemotherapy, the number and size of liver metastases remarkably reduced, and after the 12th course, because of peripheral neuropathy, a "stop-and-go"fashion of administering oxaliplatin (L-OHP) was initiated. After 14 courses, the liver metastases had disappeared. After the 33rd course of L-OHP treatment, the patient started receiving capecitabine therapy. The patient is recurrence-free 3 years after surgery, 14 months after achieving a complete response (CR). We report a case of long-term CR after surgery for descending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases, followed by a "stop-and-go" method of administering L-OHP or CapeOX plus Bmab therapy. PMID:26805277

  5. Optimal Sequence of Irinotecan and Oxaliplatin-Based Regimens in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    The optimal sequence of irinotecan and oxaliplatin-based regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer remains unclear. We conducted a population-based observational study by retrospectively reviewing records from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database to explore this issue. Patients aged ≥20 years with metastatic colorectal cancer newly diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 (n = 9490) were enrolled in current study. Among these 9490 patients, 3895 patients (41.04%) did not receive any chemotherapy within the first three months after catastrophic illness registration. Patients who received best supportive care were older and had higher Charlson comorbidity indexes and incidences of comorbidities than those who received irinotecan-based regimens, oxaliplatin-based regimens, and 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine alone. Patients who received irinotecan followed by oxaliplatin-based regimens and those who received the reverse sequence were further stratified into arm A (n = 542) and arm B (n = 1156), respectively. The median first time to next treatment was not significantly different between arm A and arm B (210 days vs. 196 days; p = 0.17). However, the median second time to next treatment was longer in arm A than in arm B (155 days vs. 123 days; p = 0.006), which translated into a better overall survival (487 days vs. 454 days; p = 0.02). The crossover rate was higher in arm A than in arm B (47.84% vs. 41.61%; p<0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that overall survival was comparable between the two chemotherapy sequences (p = 0.27). Our study suggested that irinotecan followed by oxaliplatin-based regimens might be a better chemotherapy treatment option for metastatic colorectal cancer than the reverse sequence given the higher crossover rate and potential overall survival benefit. PMID:26273837

  6. Tonic-Clonic Seizure following Cytoreductive Surgery with Intraperitoneal Oxaliplatin: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Jessica Sayuri; Belotto de Oliveira, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D'alpino

    2016-01-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy (HIPEC) is believed to improve outcomes in well-selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. However, morbidity and mortality rates associated with this procedure are substantial. Here, we describe the case of a previously healthy young man who underwent CRS with hyperthermic IP oxaliplatin and developed one episode of tonic-clonic seizure on the second postoperative day. PMID:26933425

  7. PIK3C2G copy number is associated with clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ajian; Chen, Hui; Lin, Moubin; Zhang, Chenbo; Tang, Erjiang; Peng, Jian; Wei, Qing; Li, Huaguang; Yin, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the copy number of PIK3C2G is associated with clinical outcomes for stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Methods: A total of 142 CRC patients who received first-line oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy after curative surgery in Ruijin Hospital and The Tenth People’s Hospital were recruited in this study. Patients were enrolled between June 2006 and December 2011, with follow-up to January 2014. Quantitative real-time PCR method was used to detect the copy number of PIK3C2G. Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to analyze the association between PIK3C2G copy number and clinical outcome. Results: In patients with stage III disease, low copy number of PIK3C2G was associated with increased risk of both recurrence (HR, 2.44, 95% CI, 1.33-4.47, P=0.004) and death (HR, 2.89, 95% CI, 1.49-5.60, P=0.002). Multivariate analysis also indicated that low PIK3C2G copy number was a significant and independent predictor of OS and RFS of stage III CRC. Conclusions: PIK3C2G is capable of predicting the recurrence and overall survival of stage III CRC patients receiving oxaliplatin-based therapy. PMID:25785104

  8. Explorative study to identify novel candidate genes related to oxaliplatin efficacy and toxicity using a DNA repair array

    PubMed Central

    Kweekel, D M; Antonini, N F; Nortier, J W R; Punt, C J A; Gelderblom, H; Guchelaar, H-J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify new polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) in DNA repair pathways that are associated with efficacy and toxicity in patients receiving oxaliplatin and capecitabine for advanced colorectal cancer (ACC). Methods: We studied progression-free survival (PFS) in 91 ACC patients, of whom germ-line DNA was isolated and genotyped using an Asper Biotech array. Overall survival (OS) and toxicity were studied as secondary end points. A step-wise selection of SNPs was performed, involving univariate and multivariate log-rank tests and Cox regression analysis, with age and performance status as covariates. Results: A total of 81 SNPs in 46 genes on the array were selected for further analysis, based on genotyping success rates and minor allele frequencies. After step-wise selection, we found that homozygosity for the ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) rs1801516 or excision repair cross-complementing gene (ERCC5) rs1047768 SNPs was associated with shorter PFS; however there were no significant associations (P>0.01) with OS or toxicity. Discussion: This is the first study describing the pathway gene approach for the selection of new candidate genes involved in oxaliplatin efficacy and toxicity. The results suggest that the ATM and ERCC5 genes may be associated with oxaliplatin efficacy in ACC. PMID:19536092

  9. A clinical exploration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil potassium capsules combined with oxaliplatin for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xinting; Zhang, Li; Huang, Renjun; Song, Weiyong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Advanced gastric cancer refers to tumor invasion into the gastric muscularis propria or even the layer beyond, and has low early gastric cancer diagnosis rate. Purpose: To determine the clinical efficacy and side effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil potassium capsules (TGOP) combined with oxaliplatin (SOX regimen) in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Methods: We evaluated 25 patients with advanced gastric cancer who were admitted and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy with the SOX regimen (intravenous injection of 130 mg/m2 oxaliplatin on day 1 followed by oral administration of 60 mg TGOP twice daily on days 1-14), every 3 weeks. The clinical efficacy and side effects of the SOX regimen were evaluated after two courses of treatment, before surgery. Results: Of the 25 patients enrolled in this study, 23 completed two courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and of these, 12 achieved downstaging as determined by the clinical TNM stage, resulting in a total response rate of 52.2%. The 23 patients underwent surgery, with 22 receiving radical resection (95.7%). Among these 23 patients, R0 resection was achieved in 16 (69.6%) and pathological complete remission was observed in one. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with TGOP combined with oxaliplatin was effective for advanced gastric cancer and had tolerable side effects. PMID:26770529

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of the First Oxaliplatin Pt(IV) Derivative Having a TSPO Ligand in the Axial Position.

    PubMed

    Savino, Salvatore; Denora, Nunzio; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Porcelli, Letizia; Azzariti, Amalia; Natile, Giovanni; Margiotta, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The first Pt(IV) derivative of oxaliplatin carrying a ligand for TSPO (the 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein) has been developed. The expression of the translocator protein in the brain and liver of healthy humans is usually low, oppositely to steroid-synthesizing and rapidly proliferating tissues, where TSPO is much more abundant. The novel Pt(IV) complex, cis,trans,cis-[Pt(ethanedioato)Cl{2-(2-(4-(6,8-dichloro-3-(2-(dipropylamino)-2-oxoethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)phenoxy)acetate)-ethanolato}(1R,2R-DACH)] (DACH = diaminocyclohexane), has been fully characterized by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques and tested in vitro against human MCF7 breast carcinoma, U87 glioblastoma, and LoVo colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. In addition, affinity for TSPO (IC50 = 18.64 nM), cellular uptake (ca. 2 times greater than that of oxaliplatin in LoVo cancer cells, after 24 h treatment), and perturbation of cell cycle progression were investigated. Although the new compound was less active than oxaliplatin and did not exploit a synergistic proapoptotic effect due to the presence of the TSPO ligand, it appears to be promising in a receptor-mediated drug targeting context towards TSPO-overexpressing tumors, in particular colorectal cancer (IC50 = 2.31 μM after 72 h treatment). PMID:27347942

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of the First Oxaliplatin Pt(IV) Derivative Having a TSPO Ligand in the Axial Position

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Salvatore; Denora, Nunzio; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Porcelli, Letizia; Azzariti, Amalia; Natile, Giovanni; Margiotta, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The first Pt(IV) derivative of oxaliplatin carrying a ligand for TSPO (the 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein) has been developed. The expression of the translocator protein in the brain and liver of healthy humans is usually low, oppositely to steroid-synthesizing and rapidly proliferating tissues, where TSPO is much more abundant. The novel Pt(IV) complex, cis,trans,cis-[Pt(ethanedioato)Cl{2-(2-(4-(6,8-dichloro-3-(2-(dipropylamino)-2-oxoethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)phenoxy)acetate)-ethanolato}(1R,2R-DACH)] (DACH = diaminocyclohexane), has been fully characterized by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques and tested in vitro against human MCF7 breast carcinoma, U87 glioblastoma, and LoVo colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. In addition, affinity for TSPO (IC50 = 18.64 nM), cellular uptake (ca. 2 times greater than that of oxaliplatin in LoVo cancer cells, after 24 h treatment), and perturbation of cell cycle progression were investigated. Although the new compound was less active than oxaliplatin and did not exploit a synergistic proapoptotic effect due to the presence of the TSPO ligand, it appears to be promising in a receptor-mediated drug targeting context towards TSPO-overexpressing tumors, in particular colorectal cancer (IC50 = 2.31 μM after 72 h treatment). PMID:27347942

  12. Randomized Phase 2 Trial of S1 and Oxaliplatin-Based Chemoradiotherapy With or Without Induction Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Jang, Geundoo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Ji Youn; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Lee, Gin-Hyug; Song, Ho Young; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a randomized, phase 2 trial, the efficacy and safety of chemoradiotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy (ICT) of S1 and oxaliplatin for esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with stage II, III, or IVA esophageal cancer were randomly allocated to either 2 cycles of ICT (oxaliplatin 130 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1 and S1 at 40 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on days 1-14, every 3 weeks) followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) (46 Gy, 2 Gy/d with oxaliplatin 130 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1 and 21 and S1 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily, 5 days per week during radiation therapy) and esophagectomy (arm A), or the same CCRT followed by esophagectomy without ICT (arm B). The primary endpoint was the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: A total of 97 patients were randomized (arm A/B, 47/50), 70 of whom underwent esophagectomy (arm A/B, 34/36). The intention-to-treat pCR rate was 23.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2-35.6%) in arm A and 38% (95% CI 24.5% to 51.5%) in arm B. With a median follow-up duration of 30.3 months, the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 58.4% in arm A and 58.6% in arm B, whereas the 2-year overall survival rate was 60.7% and 63.7%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia during CCRT was more common in arm A than in arm B (35.4% vs 4.1%). The relative dose intensity of S1 (89.5% ± 20.6% vs 98.3% ± 5.2%, P=.005) and oxaliplatin (91.4% ± 16.8% vs 99.0% ± 4.2%, P=.007) during CCRT was lower in arm A compared with arm B. Three patients in arm A, compared with none in arm B, died within 90 days after surgery. Conclusions: Combination chemotherapy of S1 and oxaliplatin is an effective chemoradiotherapy regimen to treat esophageal cancer. However, we failed to show that the addition of ICT to the regimen can improve the pCR rate.

  13. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Conradi, Lena; Weiss, Christian; Sprenger, Thilo; Middel, Peter; Rau, Tillman; Dellas, Kathrin; Kitz, Julia; Rödel, Franz; Sauer, Rolf; Rüschoff, Josef; Beissbarth, Tim; Arnold, Dirk; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Rödel, Claus; Liersch, Torsten

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  14. Oxaliplatin Binding to Human Copper Chaperone Atox1 and Protein Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Belviso, Benny D; Galliani, Angela; Lasorsa, Alessia; Mirabelli, Valentina; Caliandro, Rocco; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Copper trafficking proteins have been implicated in the cellular response to platinum anticancer drugs. We investigated the reaction of the chaperone Atox1 with an activated form of oxaliplatin, the third platinum drug to reach worldwide approval. Unlike cisplatin, which contains monodentate ammines, oxaliplatin contains chelated 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH), which is more resistant to displacement by nucleophiles. In solution, one or two {Pt(DACH)(2+)} moieties bind to the conserved CXXC metal-binding motif of Atox1; in the latter case the two sulfur atoms likely bridging the two platinum units. At longer reaction times, a dimeric species is formed whose composition, Atox12·Pt(2+)2, indicates complete loss of the diamine ligands. Such a dimerization process is accompanied by partial unfolding of the protein. Crystallization experiments aiming at the characterization of the monomeric species have afforded, instead, a dimeric species resembling that already obtained by Boal and Rosenzweig in a similar reaction performed with cisplatin. However, while in the latter case there was only one Pt-binding site (0.4 occupancy) made of four sulfur atoms of the CXXC motifs of the two Atox1 chains in a tetrahedral arrangement, we found, in addition, a secondary Pt-binding site involving Cys41 of the B chain (0.25 occupancy). Moreover, both platinum atoms have lost their diamines. Thus, there appears to be little relationship between what is observed in solution and what is formed in the solid state. Since full occupancy of the tetrahedral cavity is a common feature of all Atox1 dimeric structures obtained with other metal ions (Cu(+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+)), we propose that in the case of platinum, where the occupancy is only 0.4, the remaining cavities are occupied by Cu(+) ions. Experimental evidence is reported in support of the latter hypothesis. Our proposal represents a meeting point between the initial proposal of Boal and Rosenzweig (0.4 Pt occupancy) and the

  15. Platelet Dynamics in Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Patients Treated with Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruixo, Carlos; Valenzuela, Belén; Peris, José Esteban; Bretcha-Boix, Pedro; Escudero-Ortiz, Vanesa; Farré-Alegre, José; Pérez-Ruixo, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the platelet count (PLT) dynamics in peritoneal carcinomatosis patients treated with cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal oxaliplatin (HIO). Data from patients treated with CRS alone (N = 18) or CRS and HIO (N = 62) were used to estimate the baseline platelet count (PLT0), rate constants for platelet maturation (k tr ) and platelet random destruction (k s ), feedback on progenitor cell proliferation (γ), and the drug-specific model parameters (α, β). Plasma oxaliplatin concentrations, C p , reduced the proliferation rate of progenitor cells (k prol) according to a power function α × C p (β) . The surgery effect on k prol and k s was explored. The typical values (between subject variability) of the PLT0, k tr , k s , γ, α, and β were estimated to be 237 × 10(9) cells/L (32.9%), 7.09 × 10(-3) h(-1) (47.1%), 8.86 × 10(-3) h(-1) (80.0%), 0.621, 0.88 L/mg (56.9%), and 2.63. Surgery induced a maximal 2.09-fold increase in k prol that was attenuated with a half-life of 8.42 days. Splenectomy decreased k s by 47.5%. Age, sex, body surface area, sex, total proteins, and HIO carrier solution did not impact the model parameters. The model developed suggests that, following CRS and HIO, thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis were reversible and short-lasting; the severity of the thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis was inversely correlated, with splenectomized patients having thrombocytopenia of lower severity and thrombocytosis of higher severity; and the HIO dose and treatment duration determine the severity and duration of the thrombocytopenia. Higher HIO dose or longer treatment duration could be used without substantially increasing the risk of major hematological toxicity. PMID:26577587

  16. Effects of taxol resistance gene 1 expression on the chemosensitivity of SGC-7901 cells to oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LIANCHENG; BAI, ZHIGANG; MA, XUEMEI; WANG, TINGTING; YANG, YAO; ZHANG, ZHONGTAO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of taxol resistance gene 1 (Txr1) in the development of oxaliplatin (L-OHP) resistance in gastric cancer (GC). Using SGC-7901 cells as a model, Txr1 was exogenously expressed or knocked down using small interfering RNA. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blotting were performed to establish whether the Txr1 gene is involved in chemoresistance, and cell proliferation was assessed using an MTS assay. To this end, the mRNA and protein levels of Txr1, thrombospondin-1 and excision repair cross-complementing 1 protein were measured using qPCR and western blotting, respectively. Txr1-knockdown significantly increased the sensitivity of the SGC-7901 cells to L-OHP, whereas Txr1 overexpression promoted the resistance of the SGC-7901 cells to L-OHP. Exogenous Txr1 expression in the SGC-7901 cells induced L-OHP resistance, and the siRNA knockdown of Txr1 sensitized the human GC cells to L-OHP. Txr1 is, therefore, likely to play a role in L-OHP resistance, acting via TSP1, and should be investigated as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of GC. PMID:26998002

  17. Neutral and acidic hydrolysis reactions of the third generation anticancer drug oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Maria Fatima A; Pavelka, Mateij; Alberto, Marta E; Russo, Nino

    2009-01-22

    The hydrolysis of oxaliplatin, a third generation anticancer drug, is expected to play an important role in the activation of this compound before it reaches DNA. The first and second hydrolysis corresponding to the addition of the first water molecule concomitant with the ring-opening, followed by addition of a second water and loss of the monodentate oxalato ligand, respectively, were studied combining density functional theory (DFT) with the conductor-like dielectric continuum model (CPCM) approach. The reaction was studied in neutral and acidic conditions, and all stationary points have been identified. The computed potential energy surfaces show that, for the neutral hydrolysis, the ring-opening reaction is the rate-limiting process, with an activation barrier of about 28 kcal/mol. For the acid degradation in water, according to experimental data, the reaction is expected to proceed in a faster biphasic process, and the rate-limiting process is the ligand detachment that occurs with a barriers of about 22 kcal/mol. According to the calculated results, we expect that the reaction is favored in acidic conditions and that the monoaquated complex should be the species reacting with DNA. PMID:19143575

  18. A Chinese herbal Formula, Chang-Wei-Qin, Synergistically Enhances Antitumor Effect of Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Zhongze; Sun, Jue; Liu, Xulin; Cheng, Lingling; Li, Ao; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-04-01

    Chang-Wei-Qing (CWQ), a Chinese herbal formula, has long been employed clinically to treat cancers. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CWQ with oxaliplatin (OXA) on the tumor growth inhibition of orthotopic transplanted colon cancer and explored the underlying mechanism. By generating the orthotopic transplanted nude mouse model of human colon carcinoma, we found that (1) CWQ enhanced OXA-mediated tumor suppression by 4.25-fold. (2) The body weights of nude mice in CWQ group and combination group were increased. (3) The survival time of tumor-bearing nude mice was dramatically improved in CWQ and CWQ/OXA group. (4) CWQ could restore OXA-mediated deregulation of copper transporter genes, hCTR1, ATP7A and ATP7B. (5) OXA-induced drug resistance index for OXA, 5-FU, HCPT and THP were 7.59, 4.28, 5.78 and 4.50 respectively, while the reversal index by combined CWQ treatment were 6.57, 2.61, 4.97 and 3.10, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the repeated intraperitoneal injection of OXA can induce multi-drug resistance of orthotopic transplanted nude mouse model of human colon carcinoma. The CWQ treatment can alleviate OXA-triggered side effects and reverse platinum drug resistance via up-regulation of hCTR1 expression and down-regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B levels. PMID:25103530

  19. A quantitative sensory analysis of peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer and its exacerbation by oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R; Simone, Donald A; Wang, Xin S; Cleeland, Charles S; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially platins and taxanes, is a widespread problem among cancer survivors that is likely to continue to expand in the future. However, little work to date has focused on understanding this challenge. The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight into the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared with those from 47 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function before any therapy compared with healthy volunteers, and they became more pronounced in patients who received chemotherapy. Sensory modalities that involved large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers were most affected by chemotherapy, whereas sensory modalities conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers were less sensitive to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were tested again 6 to 12 months after chemotherapy presented with the most numbness and pain and also the most pronounced sensory deficits. Our results illuminate a mechanistic connection between the pattern of effects on sensory function and the nerve fiber types that appear to be most vulnerable to chemotherapy-induced toxicity, with implications for how to focus future work to ameloirate risks of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25183707

  20. [Adjuvant Systemic Chemotherapy with S-1/Oxaliplatin or mFOLFOX6 after Curative Resection of Distant Metastases in Patients with Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Ryohei; Kameyama, Noriaki; Tomita, Masato; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Baba, Shigeaki; Amada, En

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to assess the feasibility and short-term outcomes of adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with either S-1/oxaliplatin (SOX) or mFOLFOX6 (FOLFOX)after curative resection of distant metastases from colorectal cancer. We retrospectively examined 16 patients who underwent R0 resection of colorectal metastases, including the liver (n=6), lung (n=5), lymph node (n=3), and peritoneum (n=2), followed by chemotherapy with SOX (n=7) or FOLFOX (n=9) until disease progression. The mean recurrence-free survival was 13.2 months in the SOX group and 16.9 months in the FOLFOX group. The mean overall survival was 17.9 and 22.9 months, respectively. The number of given courses were 6.5 and 11.0, respectively. Although sensory neuropathy was observed in 38% of the patients, relative dose intensity was higher than 80%. Adjuvant chemotherapy with SOX or FOLFOX was feasible and effective. Further randomized prospective trials are warranted to confirm these results. PMID:27067848

  1. Transcription factor-binding sites in the thymidylate synthase gene: predictors of outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin?

    PubMed

    Paré, L; Marcuello, E; Altés, A; del Rio, E; Sedano, L; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2008-10-01

    The identification of clinical and genetic parameters to predict the outcome in advanced colorectal cancer is a key issue in the management of this disease. We ascertained whether the clinical determinants of survival defined in a large cohort of patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC model) also apply to 109 colorectal cancer patients receiving a therapy including oxaliplatin/5-FU as their first-line treatment. Our results confirm the considerable discriminatory power of the clinical model proposed in patients treated with a combined chemotherapy regimen. With the aim of identifying additional genetic prognostic parameters, we determined whether the polymorphisms in the promoter region of the thymidylate synthase (TS) gene that modifies the number of operative binding sites of a transcription factor (USF) could predict the clinical outcome of our patients and complement the EORTC clinical model. Our results indicate that this new genetic parameter (the number of USF-binding sites) could be considered when evaluating the role of TS genotype in the efficacy of the 5-FU-based regimens. Further, confirmatory studies aimed at evaluating the effect of the number of binding sites of transcription factors for selecting 5-FU-treated patients are warranted. PMID:17684476

  2. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  3. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  4. MiR-492 is functionally involved in Oxaliplatin resistance in colon cancer cells LS174T via its regulating the expression of CD147.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lipan; Zhu, Huaqiang; Wang, Jinshen; Sui, Haina; Zhang, Honglai; Jin, Changqing; Li, Leping; Xu, Tao; Miao, Ruizheng

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy remains the core of anticancer treatment. However, despite the tremendous strides made in the development of targeted anticancer therapies, emergence of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is still a major obstacle in the successful management of resistant tumors. Therefore, profound investigation into the in-depth molecular mechanisms of drug resistance is essential and may hopefully translate into effective therapies that can flip the switch from drug resistance to susceptibility. To develop novel-targeted therapy holds promise for conquering chemotherapy resistance, one of the major hurdles in current colon cancer treatment. Previous studies indicate that CD147 is involved in the progression of chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer and ovarian cancer cells and its expression is negative regulated by miR-492 in muscles cells. In the present study, we found that lower level of miR-492 is accompanied with increased expression of CD147 in Oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cell line LS174T/L-OHP as compared with its parental cell line LS174T. Exogenous expression of miR-492 in LS174T/L-OHP could sensitize its reaction on the treatment of Oxaliplatin, which is coincided with its directly reducing the expression of CD147. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of CD147 in LS174T/L-OHP could also sensitize its reaction of the treatment with Oxaliplatin. Besides, intratumoral delivering of miR-492 could also restore Oxaliplatin treatment response in Oxaliplatin-resistant xenografts in vivo. These findings provide direct evidences that the miR-492/CD147 axis might play an essential role in the Oxaliplatin resistance of colon cancer cells, suggesting that the miR-492/CD147 signaling cohort could be served as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of chemotherapy resistant in colon cancer. PMID:25862460

  5. A Phase I study of weekly intravenous oxaliplatin in combination with oral daily capecitabine and radiation therapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. . E-mail: marwan.fakih@roswellpark.org; Rajput, Ashwani; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Smith, Judy L.; Lawrence, David D.; Rustum, Youcef M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We conducted a Phase I study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of neoadjuvant capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (RT) in Stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Capecitabine was given orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given i.v. once weekly x 5 (for 5 weeks) starting the first day of RT. RT was given daily except on weekends and holidays at 1.8 Gy per fraction x 28. Escalation for capecitabine or oxaliplatin was to occur in cohorts of three patients until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined. Endorectal tumor biopsy samples were obtained before and on Day 3 of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled on this study. Two of 6 patients at dose level (DL) 1 (capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally (p.o.) given twice daily (b.i.d.); oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) had a dose-limiting diarrhea. One of 6 patients at DL (-)1 (capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., b.i.d.; oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) experienced-dose-limiting diarrhea. Three of 11 patients who underwent resection had a complete pathologic response. No remarkable variations in rectal tumor biologic endpoints were noted on Day 3 of treatment in comparison to baseline. However, a higher apotosis index was observed at baseline and on Day 3 in complete pathologic responders (no statistical analysis performed). Conclusions: Capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., twice daily in combination with oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week and RT 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions is the recommended dose for future studies.

  6. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  7. Phase I Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation With S-1 and Oxaliplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Mi-Jung; Jang, Se-Jin; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a Phase I study of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) with S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, plus oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the recommended dose. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was delivered to a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions and followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a fixed dose of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29 and escalated doses of S-1 on Days 1-14 and 22-35. The initial dose of S-1 was 50 mg/m{sup 2}/day, gradually increasing to 60, 70, and 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Surgery was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled and tolerated up to Dose Level 4 (3 patients at each dose level) without dose-limiting toxicity. An additional 3 patients were enrolled at Dose Level 4, with 1 experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity of Grade 3 diarrhea. Although maximum tolerated dose was not attained, Dose Level 4 (S-1 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was chosen as the recommended dose for further Phase II studies. No Grade 4 toxicity was observed, and Grade 3 toxicities of leukopenia and diarrhea occurred in the same patient (1 of 15, 6.7%). Pathologic complete responses were observed in 2 of 15 patients (13.3%). Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day when combined with oxaliplatin in preoperative CRT, and a Phase II trial is now ongoing.

  8. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer,, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing non-classical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore non-classical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry and with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-treat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanodelivery particles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also reflect our optimism that the next generation of platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  9. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing nonclassical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown, and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this Review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore nonclassical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry or with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-threat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanoparticles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations, including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers, will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also will reflect our optimism that the next generation of approved platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  10. Preparation and Evaluation of Oxaliplatin Thermosensitive Liposomes with Rapid Release and High Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaohui; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Shiqing; Yang, Zhenbo; Li, Mingyuan; Li, Zhiping; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (OXP) was reported to show low anti-tumor activity when used alone and to display side effects; this low activity was attributed to high partitioning to erythrocytes and low accumulation in tumors. Thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) were considered able to specifically deliver drugs to heated tumors and to resolve the OXP distribution problem. Regretfully, TSL encapsulating doxorubicin did not demonstrate significant improvement in progression-free survival. Drug release below 41°C and significant leakage were considered major reasons for the failure. The purpose of this study was to acquire OXP TSL with rapid release at the triggered temperature and high stability at body temperature and at storage temperatures. A small quantity of poloxamer 188 was introduced into the TSL formulation to stabilize the encapsulated drug. It was shown that the addition of poloxamer 188 had no influence on the TSL characteristics. More than 90% of OXP was released within 10 min at 42°C, and less than 15% was released within 60 min at temperatures below 39°C. TSL were stable at 37°C for 96 h and at 4°C for 6 months. The anti-tumor activity of TSL at the dose of 2.5 mg/kg was certified to be equal to those of OXP injection and non-thermosensitive liposomes (NTSL) at the dose of 5 mg/kg, and significant improvement of tumor inhibition was observed in TSL compared with injection and NTSL at the same dose. It was also shown from the histological transmutation of tumors that TSL had stronger anti-tumor activity. Therefore, it could be concluded that TSL composed of a proper amount of poloxamer had rapid release and high stability, and OXP TSL would be anticipated to exert prominent anti-tumor activity in the clinic. PMID:27415823

  11. Genetic variations in the VEGF pathway as prognostic factors in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré-Brunet, L; Sebio, A; Salazar, J; Berenguer-Llergo, A; Río, E; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M; Páez, D

    2015-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a significant biological mechanism in the progression and metastasis of solid tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), its receptors and signaling effectors have a central role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Genetic variation in the VEGF pathway may impact on tumor angiogenesis and, hence, on clinical cancer outcomes. This study evaluates the influence of common genetic variations within the VEGF pathway in the clinical outcomes of 172 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. A total of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 16 genes in the VEGF-dependent angionenesis process were genotyped using a dynamic array on the BioMark™ system. After assessing the KRAS mutational status, we found that four SNPs located in three genes (KISS1, KRAS and VEGFR2) were associated with progression-free survival. Five SNPs in three genes (ITGAV, KRAS and VEGFR2) correlated with overall survival. The gene-gene interactions identified in the survival tree analysis support the importance of VEGFR2 rs2071559 and KISS1 rs71745629 in modulating these outcomes. This study provides evidence that functional germline polymorphisms in the VEGF pathway may help to predict outcome in mCRC patients who undergo oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. PMID:25707392

  12. Osseous metastasis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma treated successfully with oxaliplatin, tegafur and leucovorin combination chemotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-wei; Ren, Feng; Chen, Wei; Wang, Ying-jie; Chen, Jin; Xie, Zhi-hui; Yang, Jin-hu; Chu, Jian-jun; You, Xu-yang

    2012-01-01

    Bone metastasis from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare. We report a case of cutaneous SCC which was diagnosed by the presence of bone metastasis and treated with combination chemotherapy. A 53 year male had tissue contusion and persistent ulcer in the multiple regions of body for about 30 years and treat with Chinese Herbal Drugs in several hospitals, however, did not thorough cure. He was referred to our hospital for a dermatological examination in March 2009. Excisional biopsy and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan showed an invasive cutaneous SCC concomitant bone metastasis. Surgical treatment is limited, because of multiple cancerous ulcer and metastatic spreading. Therefore, we proceed to treat with oxaliplatin, tegafur and leucovorin (LV) combination chemotherapy and other adjuvant therapy. About 5 months following chemotherapy, the general situation of the patient was improved. Further cycle of chemotherapy resulted in complete disappearance of the tumor masses (confirmed by PET-CT). So far, there was no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis. This report indicates that the combination chemotherapy of oxaliplatin, tegafur and LV seems to have a considerable therapeutic effect for cutaneous SCC concomitant malignant bone metastasis. PMID:22328953

  13. Meta-Analysis of Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy Combined With Traditional Medicines for Colorectal Cancer: Contributions of Specific Plants to Tumor Response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Menghua; May, Brian H; Zhou, Iris W; Xue, Charlie C L; Zhang, Anthony L

    2016-03-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates the clinical evidence for the addition of traditional medicines (TMs) to oxaliplatin-based regimens for colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of tumor response rate (TRR). Eight electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy combined with TMs compared to the same oxaliplatin-based regimen. Data on TRR from 42 randomized controlled trials were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1. Studies were conducted in China or Japan. Publication bias was not evident. The meta-analyses suggest that the combination of the TMs with oxaliplatin-based regimens increased TRR in the palliative treatment of CRC (risk ratio [RR] 1.31 [1.20-1.42], I(2) = 0%). Benefits were evident for both injection products (RR 1.36 [1.18-1.57], I(2) = 0%) and orally administered TMs (RR 1.27 [1.15-1.41], I(2) = 0%). Further sensitivity analysis of specific plant-based TMs found that Paeonia, Curcuma, and Sophora produced consistently higher contributions to the RR results. Compounds in each of these TMs have shown growth-inhibitory effects in CRC cell-line studies. Specific combinations of TMs appeared to produce higher contributions to TRR than the TMs individually. Notable among these was the combination of Hedyotis, Astragalus, and Scutellaria. PMID:26254190

  14. Antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, N S

    1999-12-01

    At this year's ICAAC Meeting, new data on approximately 20 different antifungal agents were presented, while no new agents were disclosed. Drugs in late development include the triazoles, voriconazole (Pfizer Ltd) and Sch-56592 (Schering-Plough Corp), and the echinocandins, caspofungin (Merck & Co Inc) and FK-463 (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). In contrast to previous years, presentations on these and earlier developmental compounds were relatively modest in scope, with few significant new data. Little new information appeared on the most recent novel class of agents, the sordarins (Glaxo Wellcome plc). Early clinical results were presented for FK-463, showing acceptable tolerability and dose-dependent efficacy in AIDS-associated esophageal candidiasis. A new liposomal formulation of nystatin (Nyotran; Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc) was shown to be equivalent to conventional amphotericin B in empiric therapy of presumed fungal infection in neutropenic patients, but with reduced toxicity. Intravenous itraconazole (Janssen Pharmaceutica NV) was an effective prophylactic therapy in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, while oral itraconazole was discussed as a treatment for fungal infection in heart and liver transplant patients. The allylamine compound, terbinafine (Novartis AG), showed good clinical efficacy against fungal mycetoma, a serious tropical infection. A major highlight was the first presentation of inhibitors of fungal efflux pumps as a strategy for overcoming resistance. MC-510027 (milbemycin alpha-9; Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) and its derivatives, potentiated the antifungal activity of triazoles and terbinafine in a number of Candida spp. Another pump inhibitor, MC-005172 (Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) showed in vivo potentiation of fluconazole in a mouse kidney infection model. Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc also presented inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps. PMID:16113946

  15. Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in the Preoperative Multimodality Treatment of Rectal Cancer: Surgical End Points From National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Trial R-04

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Michael J.; Colangelo, Linda H.; Beart, Robert W.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Allegra, Carmen J.; Sharif, Saima; Pitot, Henry C.; Shields, Anthony F.; Landry, Jerome C.; Ryan, David P.; Parda, David S.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Arora, Amit; Evans, Lisa S.; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini S.; Eakle, Janice; Robertson, John M.; Moore, Dennis F.; Mullane, Michael R.; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Ward, Patrick J.; Wozniak, Timothy F.; Roh, Mark S.; Yothers, Greg; Wolmark, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The optimal chemotherapy regimen administered concurrently with preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for patients with rectal cancer is unknown. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04 compared four chemotherapy regimens administered concomitantly with RT. Patients and Methods Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer who were undergoing preoperative RT (45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks plus a boost of 5.4 Gy to 10.8 Gy in three to six daily fractions) were randomly assigned to one of the following chemotherapy regimens: continuous intravenous infusional fluorouracil (CVI FU; 225 mg/m2, 5 days per week), with or without intravenous oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 once per week for 5 weeks) or oral capecitabine (825 mg/m2 twice per day, 5 days per week), with or without oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 once per week for 5 weeks). Before random assignment, the surgeon indicated whether the patient was eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery based on clinical staging. The surgical end points were complete pathologic response (pCR), sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging (conversion to sphincter-sparing surgery). Results From September 2004 to August 2010, 1,608 patients were randomly assigned. No significant differences in the rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, or surgical downstaging were identified between the CVI FU and capecitabine regimens or between the two regimens with or without oxaliplatin. Patients treated with oxaliplatin experienced significantly more grade 3 or 4 diarrhea (P < .001). Conclusion Administering capecitabine with preoperative RT achieved similar rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging compared with CVI FU. Adding oxaliplatin did not improve surgical outcomes but added significant toxicity. The definitive analysis of local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival will be performed when the protocol-specified number of events has occurred. PMID:24799484

  16. 5-Fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) plus sunitinib or bevacizumab as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer: a randomized Phase IIb study

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, J Randolph; Mitchell, Edith P; Yoshino, Takayuki; Welslau, Manfred; Lin, Xun; Chow Maneval, Edna; Paolini, Jolanda; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Kretzschmar, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Background Sunitinib is an oral inhibitor of tyrosine kinase receptors implicated in tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In this randomized, multicenter, open-label Phase IIb study, sunitinib plus mFOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin plus leucovorin plus 5-fluorouracil) was compared with bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX6 as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods Patients were stratified by performance status, baseline lactate dehydrogenase level, and prior adjuvant treatment, and randomized 1:1 to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg/day for 4 weeks on and 2 weeks off plus mFOLFOX6 every 2 weeks or bevacizumab 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks plus mFOLFOX6 every 2 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included objective response rate, overall survival, safety, and quality of life. Results Enrollment was closed early following accrual of 191 patients, based on an interim analysis showing an inferior trend in the primary progression-free survival efficacy endpoint for sunitinib. Ninety-six patients were randomized to sunitinib plus mFOLFOX6 and 95 to bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX6. Median progression-free survival was 9.3 months and 15.4 months, respectively, but the objective response rate was similar between the study arms. Median overall survival was 23.7 months and 34.1 months, respectively. Dose reductions and interruptions were more common with sunitinib. Hematologic toxicity was more common in the sunitinib arm. Conclusion While the results of the sunitinib arm are comparable with those of previously reported FOLFOX combinations, the sunitinib-based combination was associated with more toxicity than that observed with bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. The bevacizumab arm had an unexpectedly good outcome, and was much better than that seen in the Phase III trials. Combination therapy with sunitinib plus mFOLFOX6 is not recommended for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26109878

  17. The potential predictive role of nuclear NHERF1 expression in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine first line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Anita; Caldarola, Lucia; Dell'Endice, Stefania; Scarpi, Emanuela; Saragoni, Luca; Monti, Manlio; Santini, Daniele; Brunetti, Oronzo; Simone, Giovanni; Silvestris, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resistance in advanced gastric cancer (GC) might be related to function of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins. The adaptor protein NHERF1 (Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor) is an important player in cancer progression for a number of solid malignancies, even if its role to develop drug resistance remains uncertain. Herein, we aimed to analyze the potential association between NHERF1 expression and P-gp, sorcin and HIF-1α MDR-related proteins in advanced GC patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX) chemotherapy regimen, and its relation to response. Total number of 28 untreated patients were included into the study. Expression and subcellular localization of all proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumor samples. We did not found significant association between NHERF1 expression and the MDR-related proteins. A trend was observed between positive cytoplasmic NHERF1 (cNHERF1) expression and negative nuclear HIF-1α (nHIF-1α) expression (68.8% versus 31.3% respectively, P = 0.054). However, cytoplasmic P-gp (cP-gp) expression was positively correlated with both cHIF-1α and sorcin expression (P = 0.011; P = 0.002, respectively). Interestingly, nuclear NHERF1 (nNHERF1) staining was statistically associated with clinical response. In detail, 66.7% of patients with high nNHERF1 expression had a disease control rate, while 84.6% of subjects with negative nuclear expression of the protein showed progressive disease (P = 0.009). Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant correlation between nNHERF1 and clinical response (OR 0.06, P = 0.019). These results suggest that nuclear NHERF1 could be related to resistance to the EOX regimen in advanced GC patients, identifying this marker as a possible independent predictive factor. PMID:26126066

  18. The potential predictive role of nuclear NHERF1 expression in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine first line chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangia, Anita; Caldarola, Lucia; Dell'Endice, Stefania; Scarpi, Emanuela; Saragoni, Luca; Monti, Manlio; Santini, Daniele; Brunetti, Oronzo; Simone, Giovanni; Silvestris, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resistance in advanced gastric cancer (GC) might be related to function of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins. The adaptor protein NHERF1 (Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor) is an important player in cancer progression for a number of solid malignancies, even if its role to develop drug resistance remains uncertain. Herein, we aimed to analyze the potential association between NHERF1 expression and P-gp, sorcin and HIF-1α MDR-related proteins in advanced GC patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX) chemotherapy regimen, and its relation to response. Total number of 28 untreated patients were included into the study. Expression and subcellular localization of all proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumor samples. We did not found significant association between NHERF1 expression and the MDR-related proteins. A trend was observed between positive cytoplasmic NHERF1 (cNHERF1) expression and negative nuclear HIF-1α (nHIF-1α) expression (68.8% versus 31.3% respectively, P = 0.054). However, cytoplasmic P-gp (cP-gp) expression was positively correlated with both cHIF-1α and sorcin expression (P = 0.011; P = 0.002, respectively). Interestingly, nuclear NHERF1 (nNHERF1) staining was statistically associated with clinical response. In detail, 66.7% of patients with high nNHERF1 expression had a disease control rate, while 84.6% of subjects with negative nuclear expression of the protein showed progressive disease (P = 0.009). Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant correlation between nNHERF1 and clinical response (OR 0.06, P = 0.019). These results suggest that nuclear NHERF1 could be related to resistance to the EOX regimen in advanced GC patients, identifying this marker as a possible independent predictive factor. PMID:26126066

  19. Feasibility of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma and a performance status of 2.

    PubMed

    Mir, Olivier; Coriat, Romain; Dhooge, Marion; Perkins, Géraldine; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Brezault, Catherine; Ropert, Stanislas; Durand, Jean-Philippe; Chaussade, Stanislas; Goldwasser, François

    2012-08-01

    The use of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well documented in selected patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma (BTC), but little is known on the feasibility of systemic treatments in patients with a performance status (PS) of 2. We retrospectively examined the medical records of consecutive BTC patients with a PS of 2 receiving gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) plus oxaliplatin 100 mg/m(2) every 2 weeks from January 2003 to December 2011 in our institution. Body composition was analysed by computed tomography scan to detect sarcopenia. The primary evaluation criterion was safety. The secondary evaluation criteria were the response rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-eight patients (median age: 63 years, range 41-83) received a total of 175 cycles (median per patient: 6, range 2-12). Ten patients (35.7%) had sarcopenia on the pretreatment computed tomography scan. The most frequent toxicities were thrombocytopenia (grades 2-4: n=4, 14.3%), peripheral neuropathy (grades 2-3: n=9, 32.1%) and cholangitis (n=4, 14.3%). The best response was a partial response in 10.7% of patients [95% confidence interval (CI): 0-22.2] and stable disease in 42.9% of patients. The median PFS and OS were 4.6 (95% CI: 2.5-6.3) and 7.5 (95% CI: 5.2-9.5) months, respectively. The median PFS and OS were significantly longer in patients without sarcopenia: 7.0 months (95% CI: 4.4-8.0) vs. 2.2 months (95% CI: 2.0-2.5), P less than 0.01, and 10.4 months (95% CI: 7.5-11.6) vs. 4.9 months (95% CI: 3.7-5.2), P less than 0.01, respectively. In our experience, gemcitabine-oxaliplatin was feasible and induced effective palliation in PS2 patients with advanced BTC. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:22700002

  20. Oxaliplatin-based first-line chemotherapy is associated with improved overall survival compared to first-line treatment with irinotecan-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer – Results from a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Marschner, Norbert; Arnold, Dirk; Engel, Erik; Hutzschenreuter, Ulrich; Rauh, Jacqueline; Freier, Werner; Hartmann, Holger; Frank, Melanie; Jänicke, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Several randomized trials investigating the preferable first-line combination chemotherapy regimen for metastatic colorectal cancer have shown inconsistent findings. Because a substantial number of patients are still being treated with “chemo-only” first-line therapies without targeted agents, we compared overall survival (OS) of patients treated in routine practice with oxaliplatin–fluoropyrimidine and irinotecan–fluoropyrimidine. Patients and methods Using the database of the Tumor Registry Colorectal Cancer, we identified 605 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who received first-line fluoropyrimidine combination chemotherapy with either oxaliplatin (n=430) or irinotecan (n=175). The Tumor Registry Colorectal Cancer is a cohort study that prospectively documents treatment of colorectal cancer by office-based medical oncologists in Germany and has recruited over 5,000 patients. OS was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for potentially confounding variables. Results Median OS was 26.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 22.4–31.9) months with an oxaliplatin–fluoropyrimidine combination and 18.3 (95% CI 15.1–23.2) months with irinotecan–fluoropyrimidine first-line “chemo-only” therapy. Median progression-free survival was 9.0 (8.1–10.2) and 7.9 (7.2–10.2) months, respectively. The difference in OS was confirmed if analysis was restricted to patients with synchronous metastases (no prior treatment). Among other variables, proportion of patients receiving any second-line therapy did not differ between groups. Oxaliplatin-based first-line therapy was associated with improved OS in multivariate analysis adjusted for potentially confounding variables (hazard ratio 0.678, 95% CI 0.510–0.901, P=0.007). Conclusion In clinical routine practice, first-line treatment with oxaliplatin–fluoropyrimidine combination chemotherapy compared to irinotecan

  1. Chemical crowd control agents.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Hussain, Syed Ather; Rameez, Mansoor Ali Merchant; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Madadin, Mohammed; Anwar, Naureen; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Chemical crowd control agents are also referred to as riot control agents and are mainly used by civil authorities and government agencies to curtail civil disobedience gatherings or processions by large crowds. Common riot control agents used to disperse large numbers of individuals into smaller, less destructive, and more easily controllable numbers include chloroacetophenone, chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile, dibenzoxazepine, diphenylaminearsine, and oleoresin capsicum. In this paper, we discuss the emergency medical care needed by sufferers of acute chemical agent contamination and raise important issues concerning toxicology, safety and health. PMID:26658556

  2. The effects of selected drugs, including chlorpromazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, on polyclonal IgG synthesis and interleukin 1 production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martinez, F; Coleman, J W

    1989-05-01

    We tested a range of drugs for their effects on in vitro polyclonal IgG synthesis by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with the lectin pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The test drugs were selected on the basis of reported disruptive effects on immune function in vivo. IgG production between day 4 and days 7 or 8 of culture was measured by biotin-streptavidin sandwich ELISA. The anti-psychotic agent chlorpromazine (0.55-1.7 microM) enhanced IgG synthesis to approximately double control levels. In contrast, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin, piroxicam, ibuprofen and aspirin inhibited IgG synthesis by up to 50%, with a rank order of potency that reflects their activity as inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase. Phenytoin, procainamide, propylthiouracil, methimazole, D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine all failed to modulate IgG synthesis at non-toxic concentrations. The potentiation and inhibition of IgG synthesis by chlorpromazine and indomethacin, respectively, was observed only when the drug was present during the first 24 h of culture. Neither chlorpromazine nor indomethacin, at non-toxic concentrations, affected PHA- and PWM-stimulated proliferation of PBMC. In addition, chlorpromazine, indomethacin and piroxicam, at concentrations which produced maximal modulation of IgG synthesis, and D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine at 10 microM failed to influence production of interleukin-1-like activity. We conclude that chlorpromazine and NSAIDs, although they exert opposite effects on IgG synthesis, act at an early stage of B cell differentiation that appears to be independent of interleukin 1 synthesis and early proliferative events. PMID:2788047

  3. Assessment of the Relation between the Expression of Oxaliplatin Transporters in Colorectal Cancer and Response to FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Roy, Bertrand; Tixier, Lucie; Pereira, Bruno; Sauvanet, Pierre; Buc, Emmanuel; Pétorin, Caroline; Déchelotte, Pierre; Pezet, Denis; Balayssac, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is mainly based on the combination of 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-4). The pharmacological target of oxaliplatin remains intracellular and therefore dependent on its entry into cells. The intracellular distribution of oxaliplatin is mediated by organic cation transporters 1, 2 and 3 (OCT1, 2 and 3), copper transporter 1 (CTR1) and ATPase Cu2+ transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and may modulate the efficacy of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective study to assess the relation between the expression of oxaliplatin transporters in colorectal cancer before chemotherapy and the response to FOLFOX-4 adjuvant chemotherapy in responder and non-responder patients. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at a single center (University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, France). The target population was patients with resectable colorectal cancer operated between 2006 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were defined for the responder patients as no cancer recurrence 3 years after the end of chemotherapy, and for the non-responder patients as cancer recurrence within 1 year. Other inclusion criteria were stages IIb–IV cancers, first-line adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy, and the availability of resected primary tumor samples. Exclusion criteria were preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, a targeted therapy, other anticancer drugs, cancer recurrence between the first and the third year after the end of chemotherapy and follow-up < 3 years. Immunostaining of oxaliplatin transporters (OCT1, 2, 3, CTR1 and ATP7B) and Ki-67 was assessed in tumor samples. Results Retrospectively, 31 patients have been selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria (15 responders and 16 non-responders). Before FOLFOX-4 regimen, OCT3 expression was significantly lower in responder patients compared to non-responders (p<0.001). According to multivariate analysis

  4. Gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and dexamethasone as salvage treatment for elderly patients with refractory and relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi-yun; Tang, Yong; Zhu, Qi; Zhuang, Yan; Cheng, Yi-min; Wang, Lei; Zou, Li-fang

    2013-06-01

    The development of a more effective and less toxic salvage regimen remains a major challenge in elderly patients with relapsed and/or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). From April 2004 to May 2010, we used a new salvage regimen combining gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and dexamethasone (GemOD) in 24 elderly patients with relapsed (n = 11) or refractory (n = 13) PTCL unsuitable for high dose therapy. GemOD consisted of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) on day 1), oxaliplatin (100 mg/m(2) on day 1) and dexamethasone (20 mg/day from day 1 to day 4), which was given every 3 weeks. Patients were scheduled to receive up to six courses of GemOD therapy unless there was evidence of progressive disease. The median number of GemOD courses delivered was four (range 3-6). After three courses of GemOD, the overall response rate (ORR) was 38%, with two complete responses (CRs) and seven partial responses (PRs). Among 11 patients who received three additional planned courses of therapy, there were three CRs and three PRs, for an ORR of 25% after complete treatment as per the study protocol. With a median follow-up of 18 months, the median overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) reached 14 and 10 months, respectively. Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were moderate in all patients. We conclude that the GemOD regimen can be administered safely and effectively in elderly patients with relapsed and refractory PTCL who are ineligible for high dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant. PMID:23061678

  5. Printing metal-spiked inks for LA-ICP-MS bioimaging internal standardization: comparison of the different nephrotoxic behavior of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Moraleja, Irene; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Lázaro, Alberto; Humanes, Blanca; Neumann, Boris; Tejedor, Alberto; Luz Mena, M; Jakubowski, Norbert; Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros

    2016-03-01

    The study of the distribution of the cytostatic drugs cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin along the kidney may help to understand their different nephrotoxic behavior. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) allows the acquisition of trace element images in biological tissues. However, results obtained are affected by several variations concerning the sample matrix and instrumental drifts. In this work, an internal standardization method based on printing an Ir-spiked ink onto the surface of the sample has been developed to evaluate the different distributions and accumulation levels of the aforementioned drugs along the kidney of a rat model. A conventional ink-jet printer was used to print fresh sagittal kidney tissue slices of 4 μm. A reproducible and homogenous deposition of the ink along the tissue was observed. The ink was partially absorbed on top of the tissue. Thus, this approach provides a pseudo-internal standardization, due to the fact that the ablation sample and internal standard take place subsequently and not simultaneously. A satisfactory normalization of LA-ICP-MS bioimages and therefore a reliable comparison of the kidney treated with different Pt-based drugs were achieved even for tissues analyzed on different days. Due to the complete ablation of the sample, the transport of the ablated internal standard and tissue to the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is practically taking place at the same time. Pt accumulation in the kidney was observed in accordance to the dosages administered for each drug. Although the accumulation rate of cisplatin and oxaliplatin is high in both cases, their Pt distributions differ. The strong nephrotoxicity observed for cisplatin and the absence of such side effect in the case of oxaliplatin could explain these distribution differences. The homogeneous distribution of oxaliplatin in the cortical and medullar areas could be related with its higher affinity for

  6. Integrative Medicine for Relief of Nausea and Vomiting in the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Using Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng Hua; May, Brian H; Zhou, Iris W; Zhang, Anthony L; Xue, Charlie C

    2016-05-01

    The management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains an issue in the treatment of colorectal cancer using oxaliplatin-based regimens. Certain traditional plant-based medicines (TMs) have histories of use for nausea and vomiting and have been integrated with conventional therapies for CINV. To assess the effectiveness of integrative management of CINV, meta-analysis was conducted of 27 randomised controlled studies (1843 participants) published from 2005 to 2013. The oxaliplatin plus TM groups showed significantly reduced CINV (risk ratio 0.65 [0.59, 0.71], I(2)  = 28%) compared with oxaliplatin controls, with or without the addition of conventional anti-emetics. Further sensitivity analyses based on the ingredients of the TMs identified six plants (Atractylodes macrocephala, Poria cocos, Coix lacryma-jobi, Astragalus membranaceus, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Panax ginseng) that were associated with significant reductions in CINV without important heterogeneity. Experimental studies of these six plants have reported inhibitory effects on nausea and vomiting (or its animal equivalent), regulation of gastrointestinal motility, gastroprotective effects and antioxidant actions, which may at least partially explain the effects identified in the meta-analyses of the clinical trial results. These plants warrant further clinical research as potential additions to chemotherapy regimens in patients whose CINV is not sufficiently well controlled by conventional therapies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26912094

  7. PPP1R12A Copy Number Is Associated with Clinical Outcomes of Stage III CRC Receiving Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenbo; Li, Ajian; Li, Huaguang; Peng, Kangsheng; Wei, Qing; Lin, Moubin; Liu, Zhanju; Yin, Lu; Li, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the correlation between PPP1R12A gene copy number and clinical outcomes of oxaliplatin-based regimen in stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods. A total of 139 paraffin-embedded tissue samples of stage III CRC patients who received oxaliplatin-based treatment after radical surgery were recruited. Genomic DNA was extracted and purified from paraffin-embedded sections. Quantitative PCR methods were used to detect the relative copy number (RCN) of PPP1R12A. Results. Statistical analysis demonstrated that low PPP1R12A RCN was associated with poor RFS (HR = 2.186, 95% CI: 1.293–3.696; P = 0.003) and OS (HR = 2.782, 95% CI: 1.531–5.052; P < 0.001). Additionally, when patients were stratified according to subgroups of stage III and tumor location, poor RFS and OS were also observed in the low PPP1R12A RCN group with significance (RFS: IIIB HR = 2.870, P < 0.001; colon HR = 1.910, P = 0.037; OS: IIIB HR = 3.527, P < 0.001; IIIC HR = 2.662, P = 0.049; rectum HR = 4.229, P = 0.002). Conclusion. Our findings suggest the copy number of PPP1R12A can independently predict recurrence and overall survival of stage III colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:26113782

  8. Involvement of spinal muscarinic and serotonergic receptors in the anti-allodynic effect of electroacupuncture in rats with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hwan; Go, Donghyun; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Giseog; Bae, Hyojeong; Quan, Fu Shi

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether the spinal cholinergic and serotonergic analgesic systems mediate the relieving effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold allodynia in rats. The cold allodynia induced by an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated by immersing the rat's tail into cold water (4℃) and measuring the withdrawal latency. EA stimulation (2 Hz, 0.3-ms pulse duration, 0.2~0.3 mA) at the acupoint ST36, GV3, or LI11 all showed a significant anti-allodynic effect, which was stronger at ST36. The analgesic effect of EA at ST36 was blocked by intraperitoneal injection of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist (atropine, 1 mg/kg), but not by nicotinic (mecamylamine, 2 mg/kg) receptor antagonist. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of M2 (methoctramine, 10 µg) and M3 (4-DAMP, 10 µg) receptor antagonist, but not M1 (pirenzepine, 10 µg) receptor antagonist, blocked the effect. Also, spinal administration of 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 12 µg) receptor antagonist, but not 5-HT1A (NAN-190, 15 µg) or 5-HT2A (ketanserin, 30 µg) receptor antagonist, prevented the anti-allodynic effect of EA. These results suggest that EA may have a signifi cant analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain, which is mediated by spinal cholinergic (M2, M3) and serotonergic (5-HT3) receptors. PMID:27382357

  9. Expression and localization of the immunophilin FKBP51 in colorectal carcinomas and primary metastases, and alterations following oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rotoli, Deborah; Morales, Manuel; Del Carmen Maeso, María; Del Pino García, María; Morales, Araceli; Ávila, Julio; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The immunophilin FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP51) is a scaffold protein that serves a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple signaling pathways, integrating external and internal stimuli into distinct signal outputs. In a previous study, we identified several genes that are significantly up- or downregulated in the peripheral white cells (PWCs) of colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) patients undergoing oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. In our screening, FKBP51 gene expression was downregulated following chemotherapy. In order to determine whether this alteration in gene expression observed in PWCs may be detected at the protein level in tumors and metastases following the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy, an immunohistochemical analysis of FKBP51 in CRC and primary metastasis tissues was performed. The present study confirmed the downregulation of FKBP51 gene expression elicited by chemotherapy with folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in metastasized liver tissue that had been resected after the oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, compared with tissue section samples of CRC from patients (prior to antineoplastic treatment). Furthermore, the results indicated that, in CRC tissue sections, the expression of FKBP51 protein is associated with an immature phenotype of stromal fibroblasts and with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype, suggesting a role for this protein in the EMT process in CRC. Finally, the observation that only certain cells of the stroma express FKBP51 protein suggests a potential role for this immunophilin as a stroma cell subtype marker. PMID:27446431

  10. Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin, but Not Sorafenib or Paclitaxel, Have a Synergistic Effect with Yttrium-90 in Reducing Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Line Viability.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Julien; Coulouarn, Cédric; Crouzet, Laurence; Pracht, Marc; Lepareur, Nicolas; Clément, Bruno; Garin, Etienne

    2015-12-01

    Synergy between yttrium-90 (90Y) and antineoplastic drugs was investigated. Viability of HepaRG (hepatocellular carcinoma) and HuCCT1 (cholangiocarcinoma) cells was studied through a tetrazolium dye reduction assay. A combination index (CI) was calculated, with CI < 1 denoting synergy and CI > 1 denoting antagonism. In HepaRG cells, gemcitabine showed synergy with 90Y (CI = 0.70 [95% confidence interval = 0.65-0.75]), whereas oxaliplatin (CI = 1.15 [1.08-1.21]), paclitaxel (CI = 1.26 [1.15-1.37]), and sorafenib (CI = 1.77 [1.65-1.89]) showed antagonism. In HuCCT1 cells, gemcitabine (CI = 0.54 [0.50-0.58]) and oxaliplatin (CI = 0.86 [0.82-0.90]) showed synergy with 90Y, whereas paclitaxel (CI = 1.18 [1.09-1.27]) and sorafenib (CI = 1.21 [1.12-1.30]) showed antagonism. These results suggest that gemcitabine and oxaliplatin should be tested in combination with 90Y radioembolization for treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26596183

  11. Agent oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1994-01-01

    The goal of our research is a methodology for creating robust software in distributed and dynamic environments. The approach taken is to endow software objects with explicit information about one another, to have them interact through a commitment mechanism, and to equip them with a speech-acty communication language. System-level applications include software interoperation and compositionality. A government application of specific interest is an infrastructure for coordination among multiple planners. Daily activity applications include personal software assistants, such as programmable email, scheduling, and new group agents. Research topics include definition of mental state of agents, design of agent languages as well as interpreters for those languages, and mechanisms for coordination within agent societies such as artificial social laws and conventions.

  12. Pediatric Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Moran, Cassandra; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review In immunocompromised hosts, invasive fungal infections are common and fatal. In the past decade, the antifungal armamentarium against invasive mycoses has expanded greatly. The purpose of this report is to review the most recent literature addressing the use of antifungal agents in children. Recent findings Most studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of antifungal agents are limited to adults. However, important progress has been made in describing the pharmacokinetics and safety of newer antifungal agents in children, including the echinocandins. Summary Dosage guidelines for newer antifungal agents are currently based on adult and limited pediatric data. Because important developmental pharmacology changes occur throughout childhood impacting the pharmacokinetics of these agents, antifungal studies specifically designed for children are necessary. PMID:19741525

  13. DPD and UGT1A1 deficiency in colorectal cancer patients receiving triplet chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin and irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Falvella, Felicia Stefania; Cheli, Stefania; Martinetti, Antonia; Mazzali, Cristina; Iacovelli, Roberto; Maggi, Claudia; Gariboldi, Manuela; Pierotti, Marco Alessandro; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Sottotetti, Elisa; Mennitto, Roberta; Bossi, Ilaria; de Braud, Filippo; Clementi, Emilio; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Aims Triplet chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin and irinotecan is a standard therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DPYD and UGT1A1 influence fluoropyrimdines and irinotecan adverse events (AEs). Low frequency DPYD variants (c.1905 + 1G > A, c.1679 T > G, c.2846A > T) are validated but more frequent ones (c.496A > G, c.1129-5923C > G and c.1896 T > C) are not. rs895819 T > C polymorphism in hsa-mir-27a is associated with reduced DPD activity. In this study, we evaluated the clinical usefulness of a pharmacogenetic panel for patients receiving triplet combinations. Methods Germline DNA was available from 64 CRC patients enrolled between 2008 and 2013 in two phase II trials of capecitabine, oxaliplatin and irinotecan plus bevacizumab or cetuximab. SNPs were determined by Real-Time PCR. We evaluated the functional variants in DPYD (rare: c.1905 + 1G > A, c.1679 T > G, c.2846A > T; most common: c.496A > G, c.1129-5923C > G, c.1896 T > C), hsa-mir-27a (rs895819) and UGT1A1 (*28) genes to assess their association with grade 3–4 AEs. Results None of the patients carried rare DPYD variants. We found DPYD c.496A > G, c.1129-5923C > G, c.1896 T > C in heterozygosity in 19%, 5% and 8%, respectively, homozygous rs895819 in hsa-mir-27a in 9% and homozygous UGT1A1*28 in 8%. Grade 3–4 AEs were observed in 36% patients and were associated with DPYD c.496A > G (odds ratio (OR) 4.93, 95% CI 1.29, 18.87; P = 0.021) and homozygous rs895819 in hsa-mir-27a (OR 11.11, 95% CI 1.21, 102.09; P = 0.020). Carriers of DPYD c.1896 T > C and homozygous UGT1A1*28 showed an OR of 8.42 (95% CI 0.88, 80.56; P = 0.052). Multivariate analysis confirmed an independent value for DPYD c.496A > G and c.1896 T > C. Conclusions Concomitant assessment of DPYD variants and the UGT1A1*28 allele is a promising strategy needing further validation for dose personalization. PMID:25782327

  14. Functional Analysis of SNPs in the ERCC5 Promoter in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated With Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianfang; Luo, Xi; Xie, Ganfeng; Chen, Keli; Jiang, Heng; Pan, Feng; Li, Jianjun; Ruan, Zhihua; Pang, Xueli; Liang, Houjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The promoter is the center for regulation of gene transcription due to containing numerous transcription factor binding sites. The aim of the study was to determine whether genetic variations at excision repair cross complementation group 5 (ERCC5) promoter could affect transcription factor binding and whether such single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-dependent binding could affect gene expression, drug response, and clinical outcome. A total of 170 patients who were cytologically or histologically confirmed with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), at least 1 measurable lesion, and underwent oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were studied. The polymerase chain reaction–ligation detection reaction (PCR-LDR) was used to analyze SNPs. The reporter gene assay system and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were performed to investigate the effect of SNPs on the ERCC5 promoter activity and DNA-binding activity, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression of ERCC5 in tumor tissues of colorectal cancer patients with different genotypes were detected by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Both −763A and −763G allele had nuclear protein-binding ability. +25A allele did not show any nuclear protein-binding ability, whereas +25G allele did. The relative luciferase activity of the −763A/+25G haplotype was significantly higher than other 3 haplotypes (P < 0.05). The expression level of ERCC5 mRNA and protein was significantly higher in tumor tissues with −763AA+25GG genotype combination than that with −763GG+25AA genotype combination (P < 0.05, respectively). Allelic variants (−763AA vs −763AG or –763GG, +25GG versus +25AG or +25AA) were significantly associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.05, respectively). At multivariate analysis, patients with risk genotypes (−763AA or +25GG genotype) demonstrated a significantly increasing risk of progression (P = 0.01) or worse OS

  15. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  16. Identification of thiostrepton as a novel therapeutic agent that targets human colon cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, S-Y; Huang, C-YF; Huang, W-C; Su, Y

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that colorectal cancer stem cells (CRSCs) are largely responsible for the metastasis and relapse of colorectal cancer (CRC) after therapy. Hence, identifying new agents that specifically target CRSCs would help improve the effectiveness of current CRC therapies. To accelerate identification of agents targeting CRSCs, the Connectivity Map (CMap) approach was used. Among the top-ranked candidates, thiostrepton, a thiazole antibiotic, was selected for further investigation because of its known tumoricidal activity. Thiostrepton could selectively induce apoptosis in CRSC subpopulations in both parental HCT-15 and HT-29 human CRC lines as well as in EMT and chemoresistant clones derived from them. Further, we investigated its inhibitory effects on the sphere- and colony-forming capabilities of the aforementioned CRC lines. The in vitro inhibition of sphere and colony formation was associated with downregulation of various modulators of the stem cell phenotype. The combination of thiostrepton and oxaliplatin eradicated both CD44+ HCT-15 and HT-29 cells more efficiently than either drug alone. FoxM1, an oncogenic transcription factor, was identified as a critical positive modulator of stemness and as the main target of thiostrepton in the CRC lines. This is the first report showing the selective killing of CRSCs by thiostrepton, which has been proposed to be a promising anti-neoplastic agent. On the basis of its synergism with oxaliplatin in killing CRSCs in vitro, if this activity is confirmed in vivo, thiostrepton may be a promising agent to be used clinically in combination with current chemotherapies to improve the efficacy of these regimens. PMID:26136074

  17. Identification of thiostrepton as a novel therapeutic agent that targets human colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, S-Y; Huang, C-Y F; Huang, W-C; Su, Y

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that colorectal cancer stem cells (CRSCs) are largely responsible for the metastasis and relapse of colorectal cancer (CRC) after therapy. Hence, identifying new agents that specifically target CRSCs would help improve the effectiveness of current CRC therapies. To accelerate identification of agents targeting CRSCs, the Connectivity Map (CMap) approach was used. Among the top-ranked candidates, thiostrepton, a thiazole antibiotic, was selected for further investigation because of its known tumoricidal activity. Thiostrepton could selectively induce apoptosis in CRSC subpopulations in both parental HCT-15 and HT-29 human CRC lines as well as in EMT and chemoresistant clones derived from them. Further, we investigated its inhibitory effects on the sphere- and colony-forming capabilities of the aforementioned CRC lines. The in vitro inhibition of sphere and colony formation was associated with downregulation of various modulators of the stem cell phenotype. The combination of thiostrepton and oxaliplatin eradicated both CD44(+) HCT-15 and HT-29 cells more efficiently than either drug alone. FoxM1, an oncogenic transcription factor, was identified as a critical positive modulator of stemness and as the main target of thiostrepton in the CRC lines. This is the first report showing the selective killing of CRSCs by thiostrepton, which has been proposed to be a promising anti-neoplastic agent. On the basis of its synergism with oxaliplatin in killing CRSCs in vitro, if this activity is confirmed in vivo, thiostrepton may be a promising agent to be used clinically in combination with current chemotherapies to improve the efficacy of these regimens. PMID:26136074

  18. Enhancement of oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colorectal cancer by hypericin mediated photodynamic therapy via ROS-related mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shengchao; Lei, Kecheng; Du, Wenpei; Yang, Liyan; Shi, Haiyang; Gao, Yuwei; Yin, Peihao; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-02-01

    The resistance to oxaliplatin (L-OHP) is a major obstacle to ideal therapeutic outcomes in colorectal cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) induces tumor damage through photosensitizer-mediated oxidative cytotoxicity. Hypericin is a well-studied photosensitizer. In this study, we explored the role of hypericin-mediated PDT (HY-PDT) in sensitizing human colorectal cancer cells towards L-OHP. Pre-treatment with HY-PDT enhanced the anti-tumor activity of L-OHP via decreasing drug efflux and increasing platinum accumulation. Further research showed that HY-PDT-mediated resensitization of resistance cells towards L-OHP was dependent on regulation of MRP-2, instead of p-gp. HY-PDT was also found to inhibit intracellular glutathione (GSH) and Glutathione S-transferase (GST), suggesting the involvement of GSH-related detoxification in the sensitization effect. Additionally, enhanced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) was observed following HY-PDT/L-OHP combined treatment. HY-PDT lowered the removing rate of platinum from DNA and down-regulated the expression of ERCC1 and XPF, two critical enzymes involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. GSH monoethyl ester (GSH-EE) antagonized HY-PDT-induced ROS and repressed sensitization to platinum. Taken together, HY-PDT mediated sensitization of L-OHP in human colorectal cancer is mediated by ROS, whose mechanism involves affecting drug efflux, GSH-related detoxification and NER-mediated DNA repair. PMID:26673998

  19. Neutropenia predicts better prognosis in patients with metastatic gastric cancer on a combined epirubicin, oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil regimen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoying; Peng, Wei; Sun, Si; Cao, Jun; Ji, Dongmei; Wang, Chenchen; Guo, Weijian; Li, Jin; Yin, Jiliang; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) reportedly indicated better prognosis for some cancers. We retrospectively analyzed 150 evaluable metastatic gastric cancer (MGC) patients who had received first-line EOF5 (combination regimen of epirubicin, oxaliplatin and 5-day continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil) treatment. We divided patients into three groups according to the worst grade of CIN: absent group (grade 0), moderate group (grade 1–2) and severe group (grade 3–4). Multivariate analyses of overall survival (OS) proved moderate and severe CIN were important prognostic factors whether regarding CIN as a time-varying covariate (TVC) or not. Compared with absent CIN, hazard ratio (HR) for moderate and severe CIN were 0.31 (95% confidential interval (CI): 0.17–0.55; P < 0.001) and 0.36 (95% CI: 0.20–0.64; P = 0.001) respectively with TVC; and were 0.31 (95% CI: 0.17–0.56; P < 0.001) and 0.34 (95% CI: 0.19–0.61; P < 0.001) respectively without TVC. In progression-free survival (PFS) analyses, moderate and severe CIN showed similar results. In the landmark group (n = 122 patients) analyses with TVC, moderate and severe CIN remained prognostic factors for PFS, while only moderate CIN was prognostic factor for OS. CIN predicted longer OS and PFS in MGC patients treated with first-line EOF5 chemotherapy. PMID:26528696

  20. Multi-Agent Information Classification Using Dynamic Acquaintance Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Peng, Shengquan; Raje, Rajeev; Palakal, Mathew; Mostafa, Javed

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of automated information services focuses on information classification and collaborative agents, i.e. intelligent computer programs. Highlights include multi-agent systems; distributed artificial intelligence; thesauri; document representation and classification; agent modeling; acquaintances, or remote agents discovered through…

  1. Phase I Study of Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin Followed by Surgery and Postoperative 5-Fluorouracil Plus Leucovorin for T3/T4 Rectal Adenocarcinoma: ECOG E1297

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Catalano, Paul J.; Haller, Daniel G.; Landry, Jerome C.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Spitz, Francis R.; Benson, Al B.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Oxaliplatin is a platinum analog and radiosensitizer active in colorectal cancer. We performed a Phase I trial to test the safety and preliminary efficacy of adding oxaliplatin to standard preoperative chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had T3 to T4 rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients received standard-dose radiation (50.4 Gy for 5.5 weeks) with concurrent infused 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at 200 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week. Oxaliplatin was given three times at 14-day intervals at 55, 70, or 85 mg/m{sup 2} during the 5.5-week radiation period, before resection. Adjuvant therapy consisted of four cycles of 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2} per week) with leucovorin (500 mg/m{sup 2} per week) given every 6 weeks. The main goals were to identify the maximum tolerated dose of oxaliplatin and the dose-limiting toxicities when given with 5-FU and RT. Secondary goals were to determine resectability, pathologic response, sphincter preservation, and overall survival rates. Results: Twenty-one patients were enrolled, 5 at the 55 mg/m{sup 2} oxaliplatin dose level, 5 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}, and 11 at 85 mg/m{sup 2}. All patients were able to complete the preoperative chemoradiation regimen with no dose adjustments. No dose-limiting toxicities or differences in the type or extent of toxicity were noted among the groups. Nineteen patients underwent surgery (three abdominopelvic resections and 16 low anterior resections), for an 84% sphincter preservation rate. The pathologic complete response rate was 26% (5 patients), and minimal microscopic residual tumor was found in 21% (4 additional patients). Conclusions: Oxaliplatin was well tolerated at 85 mg/m{sup 2} given every 2 weeks in combination with standard preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The rates of major pathologic response and sphincter preservation are promising.

  2. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  3. The Efficacy of Taxanes- and Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Gastric Cancer After D2 Gastrectomy for Different Lauren Types

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhen; Jin, Xiance; He, Qiuxiang; Lin, Baochai; Su, Huafang; Chen, Hanbin; Fei, Shaoran; Fei, Zhenghua; Chen, Guorong; Pan, Huangle; Chen, Xiaolei; Xie, Congying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the efficacy of Taxanes- and Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapies (TC and OC) in the treatment of gastric cancer patients after D2 gastrectomy with different Lauren types. In this study, 299 patients of gastric adenocarcinoma with D2 lymph node dissection were reviewed between 2007 and 2014. Chemotherapies were classified as Oxaliplatin-based and Taxanes-based regimen. Treatment outcomes were analyzed according to different Lauren types, such as the intestinal type, diffuse type, and mixed type groups, respectively. The disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. The log-rank test was used for univariate analysis, and Cox regression was used for multivariate analysis. In diffuse type gastric cancer, the Oxaliplatin-based arm had a longer median DFS and OS compared with Taxanes-based arm (DFS: 47.0 vs 28.6 months, P = 0.04; OS: 51.9 vs 34.5 months, P = 0.048). The chemotherapy regimen was an independent prognostic factor for DFS and OS of diffuse type gastric cancer patients by multivariate analysis (P = 0.01). In the intestinal type, although the DFS and OS of intestinal type patients in TC group were higher than those in OC group (DFS: 53.4 vs 42.4 months; OS: 69.7 vs 57.8 months), there was no statistical significance observed (both P > 0.05). For the mixed type, the 2 different chemotherapy regimens achieved similar median DFS and OS. In a conclusion, the patients of diffuse type were more sensitive to OC, and the intestinal type patients may be benefit from TC. Therefore, it will be of benefit for gastric patients by introducing Lauren classification clinically and to help the choice of chemotherapy regimen for gastric patients after D2 gastrectomy. PMID:26871834

  4. Phase II Study of Weekly Intravenous Oxaliplatin Combined With Oral Daily Capecitabine and Radiotherapy With Biologic Correlates in Neoadjuvant Treatment of Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. BullardDunn, Kelli; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Andrews, Chris; Rustum, Youcef M.; Ross, Mary Ellen; LeVea, Charles; Puthillath, Ajithkumar; Park, Young-Mee; Rajput, Ashwani

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (RT) in the neoadjuvant treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancers. Methods: Capecitabine was given at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given intravenously at 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly five times starting the first day of RT. The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction), five fractions weekly. Endorectal tumor biopsies were obtained before treatment and on the third day of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and apoptosis. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled in this study; 6 patients (24%) had a complete pathologic response. T-downstaging occurred in 52% of patients, and N-downstaging occurred in 53%. Grade 3 diarrhea was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity, occurring in 20% of patients. Only 2 patients experienced disease recurrence, with a median of 20 months of follow-up. Thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, ERCC1, and apoptosis did not vary significantly between the pretreatment and Day 3 tumor biopsies, nor did they predict for T-downstaging or a complete pathologic response. Conclusion: Capecitabine at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, and RT at 50.4 Gy is an effective neoadjuvant combination for Stage II and III rectal cancer and results in a greater rate of complete pathologic responses than historically shown in fluoropyrimidine plus RT controls.

  5. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1999-11-01

    Several important developments have occurred in recent years in the chemotherapy for and prophylaxis of parasitic infections. Although mefloquine is clearly the most effective agent for prevention of chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria, its use has been compromised by side effects, both real and imagined. Well-designed studies have shown that side effects occur no more frequently with low-dose mefloquine than with chloroquine. Use of mefloquine in pregnant women has not been associated with birth defects, but the incidence of stillbirths may be increased. Malarone is a new agent that combines atovaquone and proguanil, and it may be as effective as mefloquine; however, it is not yet available in the United States. Several newer agents have appeared in response to the development of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, especially in Southeast Asia. Halofantrine is available for the treatment of mild to moderate malaria due to P. falciparum and for P. vivax infections. Because of severe toxic effects, use of halofantrine should be restricted to only those unusual and rare situations in which other agents cannot be used. Artemisinin (an extract of the Chinese herbal remedy qinghaosu) and two derivatives, artesunate and artemether, are active against multidrug resistant P. falciparum and are widely used in Asia in oral, parenteral, and rectal forms. The antibacterial azithromycin in combination with atovaquone or quinine has now been reported to treat babesiosis effectively in experimental animals and in a few patients. Azithromycin in combination with paromomycin has also shown promise in the treatment of cryptosporidiosis (and toxoplasmosis when combined with pyrimethamine) in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Albendazole is currently the only systemic agent available for treatment of microsporidiosis, an infection primarily of patients with AIDS. In addition, albendazole and ivermectin have emerged as effective broad

  6. New agents for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, N; Di Lorenzo, G; Sonpavde, G; Bellmunt, J

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has been revolutionized by the arrival of multiple novel agents in the past 2 years. Immunotherapy in the form of sipuleucel-T, androgen axis inhibitors, including abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, a chemotherapeutic agent, cabazitaxel, and a radiopharmaceutical, radium-223, have all yielded incremental extensions of survival and have been recently approved. A number of other agents appear promising in early studies, suggesting that the armamentarium against castrate-resistant prostate cancer is likely to continue to expand. Emerging androgen pathway inhibitors include androgen synthesis inhibitors (TAK700), androgen receptor inhibitors (ARN-509, ODM-201), AR DNA binding domain inhibitors (EPI-001), selective AR downregulators or SARDs (AZD-3514), and agents that inhibit both androgen synthesis and receptor binding (TOK-001/galeterone). Promising immunotherapeutic agents include poxvirus vaccines and CTLA-4 inhibitor (ipilimumab). Biologic agents targeting the molecular drivers of disease are also being investigated as single agents, including cabozantinib (Met and VEGFR2 inhibitor) and tasquinimod (angiogenesis and immune modulatory agent). Despite the disappointing results seen from studies evaluating docetaxel in combination with other agents, including GVAX, anti-angiogentic agents (bevacizumab, aflibercept, lenalinomide), a SRC kinase inhibitor (dasatinib), endothelin receptor antagonists (atrasentan, zibotentan), and high-dose calcitriol (DN-101), the results from the trial evaluating docetaxel in combination with the clusterin antagonist, custirsen, are eagerly awaited. New therapeutic hurdles consist of discovering new targets, understanding resistance mechanisms, the optimal sequencing and combinations of available agents, as well as biomarkers predictive for benefit. Novel agents targeting bone metastases are being developed following the success of zoledronic acid

  7. Development of oxaliplatin encapsulated in magnetic nanocarriers of pectin as a potential targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Raj Kumar; Sahu, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and oxaliplatin (OHP) were in-situ encapsulated in pectin cross-linked with Ca2+ forming 100–200 nm sized magnetically functionalized pectin nanocarriers, referred here as MP-OHP nanocarriers. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed formation of spherical nanostructures. The magnetic measurements by vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) revealed high saturation magnetization (Ms=45.65 emu/g). The superparamagnetic property of MP-OHP was confirmed from the blocking temperature (TB) determined from field cooled and zero field cooled magnetization, measured by superconducting quantum unit interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. The stability of the aqueous dispersion of MP-OHP nanocarriers was confirmed from its high zeta potential (−30.5 mV). The drug encapsulation efficiency (55.2±4.8% w/w) and the drug loading content (0.10±0.04 wt%) in MP-OHP nanocarriers were determined from corresponding platinum contents in OHP and MP-OHP batches measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). These nanocarriers exhibited a sustained release of OHP in phosphate buffer solution maintained at pH 5.5 and 7.4, where the drug release profile satisfied a combination of diffusion and swelling controlled mechanism. The cytotoxicity effect of MP-OHP nanocarriers was studied on MIA-PaCa-2 (pancreas) cancer cell line, where the GI50 values were more than 5 mg/mL and it exhibited 10 folds higher cytoxicity than the equivalent concentration of free drug. PMID:25755993

  8. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of K1 acupoint acustimulation to prevent cisplatin- or oxaliplatin-induced nausea

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yehua; Liu, Luming; Chiang, Joseph S.; Meng, Zhiqiang; Garcia, M. Kay; Chen, Zhen; Peng, Huiting; Bei, Wenying; Zhao, Qi; Spelman, Amy R.; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 70% of cancer patients experience chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). We examined the effects of electrostimulation of the K1 acupoint located on the sole of the foot, as it is thought to have potential to control CINV. Methods In this trial, 103 patients diagnosed with primary or metastatic liver cancer were recruited before trans-catheter arterial infusion (TAI) of cisplatin (CDDP) or oxaliplatin (OXA) and randomized to group A (N=51; treated with the antiemetic tropisetron and acustimulation at the K1 acupoint for 20 minutes, 1-2 hours before TAI on the first day and then daily for the subsequent 5 days) or group B (N=53; treated with tropisetron and electrostimulation at a placebo point on the heel). The rate, intensity, and duration of nausea and vomiting were collected at baseline and then daily for 5 days after TAI. Quality of life was assessed daily using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) and the EuroQoL scale. Results No differences were found between groups A and B in the incidence and degree of nausea or vomiting on day 1 or the consecutive 5 days. Patients in group A had better EuroQoL scores than did patients in group B (A: 72.83 versus B: 65.94, P = 0.04) on day 4 but not on the other days. No group differences were noted at any time point for MDASI scores. Conclusions Electrostimulation of K1 combined with antiemetics did not result in initial prevention of CDDP- or OXA-induced nausea or vomiting. PMID:25204437

  9. Pharmacogenetic prediction of clinical outcome in advanced colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil as first-line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré, L; Marcuello, E; Altés, A; del Río, E; Sedano, L; Salazar, J; Cortés, A; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2008-10-01

    To determine whether molecular parameters could be partly responsible for resistance or sensitivity to oxaliplatin (OX)-based chemotherapy used as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the usefulness of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), XRCC1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms as predictors of clinical outcome in these patients. We treated 126 CRC patients with a first-line OX/5-fluorouracil chemotherapeutic regimen. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by real-time PCR on an ABI PRISM 7000, using DNA from peripheral blood. Clinical response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated according to each genotype. In the univariate analysis for CR, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant (P=0.02 and P=0.05, respectively). After adjustment for the most relevant clinical variables, only ERCC1-118 retained significance (P=0.008). In the univariate analysis for PFS, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 were significant (P=0.003 and P=0.009, respectively). In the multivariant analysis, only the XPD 751 was significant for PFS (P=0.02). Finally, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant in the univariate analysis for OS (P=0.006 and P=0.015, respectively). Both genetic variables remained significant in the multivariate Cox survival analysis (P=0.022 and P=0.03). Our data support the hypothesis that enhanced DNA repair diminishes the benefit of platinum-based treatments. PMID:18797464

  10. Pharmacogenetic prediction of clinical outcome in advanced colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil as first-line chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paré, L; Marcuello, E; Altés, A; Río, E del; Sedano, L; Salazar, J; Cortés, A; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether molecular parameters could be partly responsible for resistance or sensitivity to oxaliplatin (OX)-based chemotherapy used as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the usefulness of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), XRCC1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms as predictors of clinical outcome in these patients. We treated 126 CRC patients with a first-line OX/5-fluorouracil chemotherapeutic regimen. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by real-time PCR on an ABI PRISM 7000, using DNA from peripheral blood. Clinical response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated according to each genotype. In the univariate analysis for CR, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant (P=0.02 and P=0.05, respectively). After adjustment for the most relevant clinical variables, only ERCC1-118 retained significance (P=0.008). In the univariate analysis for PFS, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 were significant (P=0.003 and P=0.009, respectively). In the multivariant analysis, only the XPD 751 was significant for PFS (P=0.02). Finally, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant in the univariate analysis for OS (P=0.006 and P=0.015, respectively). Both genetic variables remained significant in the multivariate Cox survival analysis (P=0.022 and P=0.03). Our data support the hypothesis that enhanced DNA repair diminishes the benefit of platinum-based treatments. PMID:18797464

  11. Improved Treatment of MT-3 Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases in a Mouse Xenograft by LRP-Targeted Oxaliplatin Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Orthmann, Andrea; Peiker, Lisa; Fichtner, Iduna; Hoffmann, Annika; Hilger, Ralf Axel; Zeisig, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxP) has rarely been used to treat breast carcinoma, as it cannot cross the BBB to treat the frequently subsequent brain metastases. Here, we encapsulated OxP in liposomes prepared to reduce side effects and to simultaneously treat primary tumor and brain metastasis. The angiopep LRP-receptor ligand was bound to the vesicular surface for targeting. Targeted and non-targeted OxP liposomes were tested in vitro (binding, uptake, and transcytosis) and in vivo. Liposomes contained 0.65 mg OxP/mL, their mean diameter was 165 nm, and they released 50% of OxP within 8 days at 4 degrees C and within 22 h at 36 degrees C. MDCK cells were used for uptake and transcytosis quantification. Compared to non-targeted liposomes, targeted liposomes showed 12-fold greater uptake, and 2.25-fold higher transcytosis. In vivo efficacy was tested using human MT-3 breast cancer cells transplanted subcutaneously and intracerebrally into female nude mice, and tumor growth inhibition was measured. OxP was injected (6 mg OxP/kg) four times. The best results were obtained with targeted liposomes (T/C: 21% for subcutaneous and 50% for intracerebral). OxP liposomes with a fluid membrane all inhibited MT-3 tumors significantly better than free OxP, with no significant difference between targeted and non-targeted liposomes. The therapeutic effect was accompanied with strong leukopenia and mild thrombocytopenia with all formulations. The newly developed OxP liposomes significantly improved the treatment of subcutaneously and intracerebrally growing breast cancer, but the targeted angiopep-equipped liposomes showed no superior effect in vivo. PMID:27301172

  12. KGB agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    A short story is reported in which the activity of Communist Party of the USSR and secret KGB agents, which were payed by the State, in view of controlling of the conscience of population. The story reffers to the Physics Department of the Moscow University, Planing Institute of the Gosplan of Moldavian S.S.R. and Chishinau Technical University (actually: Technical University of Moldova), where the author has worked during Soviet times. Almost every 6-th citizen in the USSR was engaged in this activity, while actually the former communists rule in the Republic of Moldova.

  13. AGXT and ERCC2 polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU/oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, J B; Thomsen, M; Guren, T; Hamfjord, J; Carlsson, G; Gustavsson, B; Ikdahl, T; Indrebø, G; Pfeiffer, P; Lingjærde, O; Tveit, K M; Wettergren, Y; Kure, E H

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with influence on drug transport, biotransformation and repair mechanisms are associated with treatment outcome and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We genotyped blood samples from 519 mCRC patients treated with first-line 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin +/- cetuximab for 17 SNPs in 10 genes involved in membrane transport (ABCC1 and ABCC2), drug biotransformation (GSTP1 and AGXT) and DNA repair (ERCC1, ERCC2, XRCC1, XRCC3, XPG and MSH6). The AGXT-rs34116584 and the ERCC2-rs238406 polymorphisms were significantly associated with progression-free survival (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively). Associations between 18 toxicity variables and SNPs were identified, although none were significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The study identified SNPs of potential use as markers of clinical outcome in oxaliplatin-treated mCRC patients. If validated in other studies, they could improve the selection of therapy in mCRC. PMID:26261061

  14. A phase II study of oxaliplatin and prednisone for patients with relapsed or refractory marginal zone lymphoma: Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma trial.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung Yong; Kim, Won Seog; Kim, Jin Seok; Chae, Yee Soo; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Ryoo, Hun Mo; Lee, Suee; Kim, Seok Jin; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Junshik; Park, Jinny; Lee, Sang-Min; Hong, Jung Yong; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Suh, Cheolwon

    2016-06-01

    Overall, more than 50% of marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) patients experience a relapse within 10 years. This phase II trial was conductedto assess the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin-prednisone (Ox-P) chemotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory MZL. Patients received oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) on day 1 and prednisone 100 mg/day on days 1-5 of each cycle. A total of 38 patients were enrolled. The median age of the 34 (16 males, 18 females) evaluated patients was 53 (range = 27-74) years. There were seven complete responses (20.6%) and 15 partial responses (44.1%) (Overall response rate = 64.7%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. The median progression-free survival was 14.2 months (95% CI = 2.1-26.3 months); 3-year overall survival rate was 77.7%. Thus, salvage Ox-P chemotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory MZL at the stated dosage and schedule showed moderate clinical activity and was considerable in very few selected patients (NCT01068392). PMID:26413982

  15. First clinical experience with the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and superoxide dismutase mimetic mangafodipir as an adjunct in cancer chemotherapy-a translational study.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jan Olof G; Adolfsson, Karin; Thelin, Bo; Jynge, Per; Andersson, Rolf Gg; Falkmer, Ursula G

    2012-02-01

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes' C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P < .05). Of the grade 3 and 4 events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P < .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients. PMID:22348174

  16. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  17. Effect of KRAS codon13 mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (advanced CRC) under oxaliplatin containing chemotherapy. Results from a translational study of the AIO colorectal study group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the value of KRAS codon 13 mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (advanced CRC) treated with oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines. Methods Tumor specimens from 201 patients with advanced CRC from a randomized, phase III trial comparing oxaliplatin/5-FU vs. oxaliplatin/capecitabine were retrospectively analyzed for KRAS mutations. Mutation data were correlated to response data (Overall response rate, ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results 201 patients were analysed for KRAS mutation (61.2% males; mean age 64.2 ± 8.6 years). KRAS mutations were identified in 36.3% of tumors (28.8% in codon 12, 7.4% in codon 13). The ORR in codon 13 patients compared to codon 12 and wild type patients was significantly lower (p = 0.008). There was a tendency for a better overall survival in KRAS wild type patients compared to mutants (p = 0.085). PFS in all patients was not different in the three KRAS genetic groups (p = 0.72). However, we found a marked difference in PFS between patients with codon 12 and 13 mutant tumors treated with infusional 5-FU versus capecitabine based regimens. Conclusions Our data suggest that the type of KRAS mutation may be of clinical relevance under oxaliplatin combination chemotherapies without the addition of monoclonal antibodies in particular when overall response rates are important. Trial registration number 2002-04-017 PMID:22876876

  18. Gelled Anti-icing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O. F.; Sperber, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Pectin added to antifreeze/water mixture. Formulations include water with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as deicer and pectin as gel former. Without gelling agent, deicer runs off vertical surfaces. Without pectin solution will completely evaporate in far less time. Agents developed have wide potential for ice prevention on runways, highways, bridges and sidewalks.

  19. Inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export sensitizes malignant cells to cytotoxic and targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Turner, Joel G; Dawson, Jana; Cubitt, Christopher L; Baz, Rachid; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2014-08-01

    the addition of alkylating agents (melphalan), anthracyclines (doxorubicin and daunomycin), BRAF inhibitors, platinum drugs (cisplatin and oxaliplatin), proteosome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib), or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (imatinib). Also, the sequence of treatment may be important for combination therapy. We found that the most effective treatment regimen involved first priming the cancer cells with the CRM1 inhibitor followed by doxorubicin, bortezomib, carfilzomib, or melphalan. This order sensitized both de novo and acquired drug-resistant cancer cell lines. PMID:24631834

  20. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  1. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  2. Agent Building Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    AgentBuilder is a software component developed under an SBIR contract between Reticular Systems, Inc., and Goddard Space Flight Center. AgentBuilder allows software developers without experience in intelligent agent technologies to easily build software applications using intelligent agents. Agents are components of software that will perform tasks automatically, with no intervention or command from a user. AgentBuilder reduces the time and cost of developing agent systems and provides a simple mechanism for implementing high-performance agent systems.

  3. Preparation of Oxaliplatin-Deoxycholic Acid Derivative Nanocomplexes and In Vivo Evaluation of Their Oral Absorption and Tumor Growth Suppression.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-02-01

    To prepare orally available oxaliplatin (OXA), nanocomplexes were formed by ionic conjugation of OXA with the deoxycholic acid derivative, Nalpha-deoxycholy-L-lysyl-methylester (DCK), as an oral absorption enhancer. We characterized the DCK-conjugated OXA nanocomplexes by differential scanning calorimetry, particle size determination, and morphological analysis. To evaluate the effects of DCK on the intestinal permeability of OXA, we assessed the solubilities and partition coefficients of OXA and the OXA/DCK nanocomplex, and then conducted in vitro artificial intestinal membrane and Caco-2 cell permeability studies. Finally, bioavailability in rats and tumor growth inhibition in the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC7) model after oral administration of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex were investigated compared to pure OXA. Analysis of the ionic complex formation of OXA with DCK revealed that OXA existed in an amorphous form within the complex, resulting in for- mation of nanocomp;exes (35.05 +/- 4.48 nm in diameter). The solubility of OXA in water was approximately 7.07 mg/mL, whereas the water solubility of OXA/DCK was approximately 2.04 mg/mL and its partition coefficient was approximately 1.2-fold higher than that of OXA. The in vitro intestinal membrane permeability of OXA was significantly enhanced by complex formation with DCK. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed that the Cm value of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex was 3.18-fold higher than that of OXA (32.22 +/- 10.24 ng/mL), and the resulting oral bioavailability of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex was 39.3-fold more than that of OXA. Furthermore, the oral administration of OXA/DCK significantly inhibited tumor growth in SCC7-bearing mice, and maximally inhibited tumor volume by 54% compared to the control. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex as an oral anti-cancer therapy because it improves the oral absorption of OXA, which may improve patient compliance and expand the therapeutic

  4. Oxaliplatin Plus Dual Inhibition of Thymidilate Synthase During Preoperative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Long-Term Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella; Scott, Nigel; Marone, Pietro; Aloi, Luigi; Sandomenico, Claudia; Lastoria, Secondo; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo Rosario; Scala, Dario; Iodice, Giovanni; Budillon, Alfredo; Comella, Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of oxaliplatin (OXA) plus dual inhibition of thymidilate synthase during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with poor prognosis for rectal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty-three patients with the following characteristics, a clinical (c) stage T4, cN1-2, or cT3N0 of {<=}5 cm from the anal verge and/or with a circumferential resection margin (CRM) of {<=}5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging), received three biweekly courses of chemotherapy with OXA, 100 mg/m{sup 2}; raltitrexed (RTX), 2.5 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 900 mg/m{sup 2} (31 patients) or 800 mg/m{sup 2} (32 patients); levo-folinic acid (LFA), 250 mg/m{sup 2} on day 2, during pelvic RT (45 Gy). Pathologic response was defined as complete pathological response (ypCR), major (tumor regression grade(TRG) 2 to 3, with ypCRM-ve and ypN-ve) or minor or no response (TRG4 to -5, or ypCRM+ve, or ypN+ve). Adjuvant 5-FU/LFA regimen was given in cases of cT4, ypN+ve, or ypCRM+ve. Results: Overall, neutropenia (40%) and diarrhea (13%) were the most common grade {>=}3 toxicities, and tolerability was better with a 5-FU dose reduction. No significant difference in pathologic response was seen according 5-FU dosage: overall, a ypCR was obtained in 24 (39%) patients, and a major response in 20 (32%) patients. The 5-year probability of freedom from recurrence was 80% (95% confidence interval, 68%-92%); it was 56% for the minor/no response group, while it was around 90% for both the ypCR and the major response group. Conclusions: OXA, RTX, and 5-FU/LFA administered during pelvic RT produced promising early and long-term results in rectal carcinoma patients with poor prognosis. The postoperative treatment strategy applied in our study supports the risk-adapted approach in postoperative management.

  5. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  6. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion with high dose oxaliplatin: Influence of perfusion temperature on postoperative outcome and survival

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is becoming a standard therapy in the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). Compared to systemic chemotherapy, HIPEC improves survival in patients with PC. This therapy has high morbidity rates (up to 41%). In vitro it has been demonstrated that hyperthermia has a toxic effect on malign cells. However, hyperthermia also affects normal tissue. To my knowledge, any additional effect of hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy has never been demonstrated in a clinical setting. In this study, the effects of hyperthermia on outcome and survival were analyzed. Methods : Patients with PC from any origin who were treated with HIPEC were included in this retrospective, non-randomized study. Data on patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, features of the surgery and postoperative complications were extracted from patient files. Models predicting time to removal of nasogastric tube (TRNT), post-operative major complications, the occurrence of anastomotic leaks and post-operative survival were built, using negative binomial regression, logistic regression or Cox proportional hazards regression as appropriate. Results: 138 patients treated with HIPEC were included. Maximal temperature during the operation was not statistically significantly associated with anastomotic leaks or post-operative major complications. Maximal temperature during the operation was negatively associated with post-operative survival (P=0.01). Conclusion : The results suggest that hyperthermia may negatively affect survival in patients who are treated with HIPEC for PC of various origins. This study has the classical limitations of a retrospective study. Therefore, randomized trials are required to confirm the results. PMID:26913184

  7. Phase I/II trial of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab in first line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bazarbashi, Shouki; Aljubran, Ali; Alzahrani, Ahmad; Mohieldin, Ahmed; Soudy, Hussein; Shoukri, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Phase III studies have demonstrated the efficacy of FOLFOXIRI regimens (5-fluorouracil/leucovorin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan) with/without bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Capecitabine is an orally administered fluoropyrimidine that may be used instead of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. We evaluated a triple-chemotherapy regimen of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, plus bevacizumab in 53 patients with mCRC. A Phase I study identified the maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan as 150 mg/m2. Median follow-up in a subsequent Phase II study using this dose was 28 months (74% progressed). For all patients, a complete response was achieved in 4% and a partial response in 60%; median progression-free survival (PFS) was 16 months and median overall survival (OS) was 28 months. Median PFS was longer for patients with an early treatment response (28 vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.024), or early tumor shrinkage (25 vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.006), or for patients suitable for surgical removal of metastases with curative intent (median not reached vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.001). Median OS was longer for patients with early tumor shrinkage (median not reached vs. 22 months for others; P = 0.006) or surgery (median not reached vs. 22 months for others, P = 0.002). K-ras mutations status did not influence PFS (P = 0.88) or OS (P = 0.82). Considerable Grade 3/4 toxicity was encountered (36% for diarrhea, 21% for vomiting and 17% for fatigue). In conclusion, the 3-weekly triple-chemotherapy regimen of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, plus bevacizumab, was active in the first-line treatment of mCRC, although at the expense of a high level of toxicity. PMID:26207614

  8. Hippuric acid nanocomposite enhances doxorubicin and oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity in MDA-MB231, MCF-7 and Caco2 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Al Ali, Samer Hasan Hussein; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Bullo, Saifullah

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study is to design a new nanocomposite for inducing cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and oxaliplatin toward MDA-MB231, MCF-7, and Caco2 cell lines. A hippuric acid (HA) zinc layered hydroxide (ZLH) nanocomposite was synthesized under an aqueous environment using HA and zinc oxide (ZnO) as the precursors. Methods The hippuric acid nanocomposite (HAN) was prepared by the direct reaction of a HA solution with an aqueous suspension of ZnO. Results The basal spacing of the nanocomposite was 21.3 Å, which is average of four harmonics at 2θ = 8.32°, 12.50°, 16.68°, and 20.84°. This result indicates that the hippurate anion was successfully intercalated into the interlayer space of ZLH. The combinations of HAN with chemotherapy (drugs) has inhibited the cell growth of the MDA-MB231, MCF-7, and Caco2 cancer cells when compared to drugs alone. An IC50 value for the combination of HAN with doxorubicin toward MCF-7 is 0.19 ± 0.15 μg/mL and toward MDA-MB231 is 0.13 ± 0.10 μg/mL. Similarly, the IC50 for the combination of HAN with oxaliplatin toward Caco2 is 0.24 ± 0.11 μg/mL. In the antiproliferative results, the equal combination of HAN (0.5 μg/mL) with doxorubicin (0.5 μg/mL) has reduced the cell proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells into 37.3% and 17.6%, respectively after 24 hours. Similarly, the antiproliferation percentage for equal combination HAN with oxaliplatin (5.00 μg/mL) toward Caco2 is 72.7% after 24 hours. Conclusion The resulting combination HAN with drugs has exhibited higher inhibition in cells growth in all cancer cell lines. PMID:23345969

  9. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  10. Web Search Agents: "One-Stop Shopping" for Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Explains Web search agents as tools that apply intelligent agent software technology for the purpose of automating, improving, and speeding up online search operations. Topics include intelligent desktop agents; search agent marketplace; comparing Web search agents; subjective evaluations; and use by researchers. (LRW)

  11. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  12. Feasibility Of Administering Adjuvant Chemotherapy Of Pemetrexed Followed By Pemetrexed/oxaliplatin Immediately Post-VATS In Patients With Completely Resected NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianxing; Shao, Wenlong; Li, Shuben; Chen, Manyin; Chen, Hanzhang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Daoyuan

    2009-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the largest number of cancer deaths annually, worldwide. It seems reasonable to test a less toxic regimen also in early stages after complete (R0) resection of the tumor, where reduced toxicities might improve the feasibility of drug delivery, compliance and the convenience of treatment for the patient and hence perhaps improve survival. The main purpose of this phase II trial is to evaluate the clinical feasibility-in terms of patients without dose limiting toxicities or premature treatment withdrawal or death-of administering adjuvant chemotherapy of pemetrexed followed by pemetrexed/oxaliplatin immediately post-VATS (video-assisted thoracic surgery) in patients with completely resected NSCLC. PMID:22263005

  13. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  14. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  15. Prospective phase II trial of pazopanib plus CapeOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Jung, Sin-Ho; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2016-04-26

    We designed a single-arm, open label phase II study to determine the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of pazopanib with CapeOx (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in metastatic /recurrent advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Previously untreated AGC patients received capecitabine (850 mg/m2 bid, day 1-14) plus oxaliplatin (130 mg/m2, day 1) in combination with pazopanib (800 mg, day 1-21) every three weeks. Treatment was continued until progression of the disease or intolerable toxicity was observed. In all, 66 patients were treated with pazopanib plus CapeOx. The median age of the patients was 51.5 years (range, 23.0-77), and the median ECOG performance status was 1 (0-1). Among all 66 patients, one complete response and 37 partial responses were observed (overall response rate, 62.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 45.7-73.5% accounting for the 2-stage design of this trial). Stable disease was observed in 23 patients (34.8%), revealing a 92.4% disease control rate. The median progression free survival and overall survival were 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.6-7.4) and 10.5 months (95% CI, 8.1-12.9), respectively. Thirty-four patients (51.5%) experienced a treatment-related toxicity of grade 3 or more. The most common toxicities of grade 3 or more were neutropenia (15.1%), anemia (10.6%), thrombocytopenia (10.6%), anorexia (7.6%), nausea (3.0%), and vomiting (3.0%). There were no treatment-related deaths. The combination of pazopanib and CapeOx showed moderate activity and an acceptable toxicity profile as a first-line treatment in metastatic / recurrent AGC patients (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130805). PMID:27003363

  16. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  17. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  18. Combination adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: a preliminary open-label study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Chen, Hong; Li, Qin; Zang, Yunjin; Chen, Xinguo; Zou, Weilong; Wang, Letian; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX regimen on the outcome after LT for HCC patients who did not meet the Milan criteria. Ninety-five consecutive HCC patients with liver cirrhosis undergoing LT were enrolled. Fifty-eight who did not meet the Milan criteria were randomized to open-label treatment with or without adjuvant chemotherapy after LT (n = 29/group). The FOLFOX chemotherapy protocol comprised 3-week cycles of oxaliplatin 100 mg/m(2) on day 1, leucovorin (calcium folinate, CF) 200 mg/m(2) on day 1 followed by 3-day, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 2000 mg/m(2) as a 48-h continuous infusion, for up to six courses in the 1st year after transplantation. Median survival was extended by 4.57 months by combination chemotherapy. The 1- and 3-year survival rates were 89.7% and 79.3% with chemotherapy versus 69.0% and 62.1% without chemotherapy. The cumulative 1-year survival was significantly increased by chemotherapy (log-rank test, P = 0.043). The 6-month tumor-free survival rate was 24.1% higher with chemotherapy than without. The recurrence rate after LT was significantly different between the two groups at 6 months (P = 0.036), but not at 3 years (P = 0.102). The chemotherapy regimen was generally well tolerated. Post-LT adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin/5-FU/CF could not prevent tumor recurrence post-LT but may contribute to improve the survival of HCC patients who do not meet the Milan criteria. These results should be verified in a larger sample with a longer follow-up period. PMID:21809025

  19. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Scarrow, R.C.; White, D.L.

    1985-11-12

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided. 4 tabs.

  20. Preparing Change Agents for Change Agent Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, James R.

    Seventy-seven Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking agricultural change agents from developing Central and South American countries responded to a questionnaire which sought perceptions of the roles in which the change agents felt they were involved and the roles for which they felt they were being trained. The agents were participating in training…

  1. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  2. Perioperative allergy: uncommon agents.

    PubMed

    Caimmi, S; Caimmi, D; Cardinale, F; Indinnimeo, L; Crisafulli, G; Peroni, D G; Marseglia, G L

    2011-01-01

    Anesthesia may often be considered as a high-risk procedure and anaphylaxis remains a major cause of concern for anesthetists who routinely administer many potentially allergenic agents. Neuromuscular blocking agents, latex and antibiotics are the substances involved in most of the reported reactions. Besides these three agents, a wide variety of substances may cause an anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia. Basically all the administered drugs or substances may be potential causes of anaphylaxis. Among them, those reported the most in literature include hypnotics, opioids, local anesthetics, colloids, dye, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), Iodinated Contrast Media (ICM), antiseptics, aprotinin, ethylene oxyde and formaldehyde, and protamine and heparins. No premedication can effectively prevent an allergic reaction and a systematic preoperative screening is not justified for all patients; nevertheless, an allergy specialist should evaluate those patients with a history of anesthesia-related allergy. Patients must be fully informed of investigation results, and advised to provide a detailed report prior to future anesthesia. PMID:22014927

  3. Intelligent Agents: It's Nice To Get Stuff Done for You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Explains intelligent agents, special software tools that help make the Web more interactive by helping with information retrieval. Describes major types of agents, including search agents and agents for specialized tasks including monitors and knowledge management; and lists relevant Web sites. (LRW)

  4. Terpinen-4-ol: A Novel and Promising Therapeutic Agent for Human Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Shiran; Pleban, Shlomo; Kazanov, Diana; Tirosh, Peter; Arber, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    Background Terpinen-4-ol, a naturally occurring monoterpene is the main bioactive component of tea-tree oil and has been shown to have many biological activities. Aim To study the antitumor effects of terpinen-4-ol and its mechanism of action in prostate and GI malignancies, alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and biological agents. Methods Terpinen-4-ol was administrated alone or combined with standard chemotherapy (Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Gemcitabine, Tarceva) and biological agent (Cetuximab). It was also combined with humanized anti-CD24 mAbs (was developed by us). Killing effects were measured qualitatively by light microscopy and quantitatively using the MTT and FACS analysis, following treatment of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric and prostate cancer cells. Terpinen-4-ol effect on tumor development was evaluated in xenograft model. Results Terpinen-4-ol induces a significant growth inhibition of colorectal, pancreatic, prostate and gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner (10–90% in 0.005–0.1%). Terpinen-4-ol and various anti-cancer agents (0.2μM oxaliplatin and 0.5μM fluorouracil) demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect (83% and 91%, respectively) on cancer cell proliferation. In KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, which are resistant to anti-EGFR therapy, combining of terpinen-4-ol with cetuximab (1 μM) resulted in impressive efficacy of 80–90% growth inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of terpinen-4-ol potentiate anti-CD24 mAb (150μg/ml)-induced growth inhibition (90%). Considerable reduction in tumor volume was seen following terpinen-4-ol (0.2%) treatment alone and with cetuximab (10mg/kg) (40% and 63%, respectively) as compare to the control group. Conclusion Terpinen-4-ol significantly enhances the effect of several chemotherapeutic and biological agents. The possible molecular mechanism for its activity involves induction of cell-death rendering this compound as a potential anti-cancer drug alone and in

  5. Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

    1993-01-01

    An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

  6. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  7. Anchor Toolkit - a secure mobile agent system

    SciTech Connect

    Mudumbai, Srilekha S.; Johnston, William; Essiari, Abdelilah

    1999-05-19

    Mobile agent technology facilitates intelligent operation insoftware systems with less human interaction. Major challenge todeployment of mobile agents include secure transmission of agents andpreventing unauthorized access to resources between interacting systems,as either hosts, or agents, or both can act maliciously. The Anchortoolkit, designed by LBNL, handles the transmission and secure managementof mobile agents in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment. Itprovides users with the option of incorporating their security managers.This paper concentrates on the architecture, features, access control anddeployment of Anchor toolkit. Application of this toolkit in a securedistributed CVS environment is discussed as a case study.

  8. Addition of cetuximab to oxaliplatin-based first-line combination chemotherapy for treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: results of the randomised phase 3 MRC COIN trial

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, Timothy S; Adams, Richard A; Smith, Christopher G; Meade, Angela M; Seymour, Matthew T; Wilson, Richard H; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Harris, Rebecca; Fisher, David; Kenny, Sarah L; Kay, Edward; Mitchell, Jenna K; Madi, Ayman; Jasani, Bharat; James, Michelle D; Bridgewater, John; Kennedy, M John; Claes, Bart; Lambrechts, Diether; Kaplan, Richard; Cheadle, Jeremy P

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background In the Medical Research Council (MRC) COIN trial, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted antibody cetuximab was added to standard chemotherapy in first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer with the aim of assessing effect on overall survival. Methods In this randomised controlled trial, patients who were fit for but had not received previous chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy (arm A), the same combination plus cetuximab (arm B), or intermittent chemotherapy (arm C). The choice of fluoropyrimidine therapy (capecitabine or infused fluouroracil plus leucovorin) was decided before randomisation. Randomisation was done centrally (via telephone) by the MRC Clinical Trials Unit using minimisation. Treatment allocation was not masked. The comparison of arms A and C is described in a companion paper. Here, we present the comparison of arm A and B, for which the primary outcome was overall survival in patients with KRAS wild-type tumours. Analysis was by intention to treat. Further analyses with respect to NRAS, BRAF, and EGFR status were done. The trial is registered, ISRCTN27286448. Findings 1630 patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups (815 to standard therapy and 815 to addition of cetuximab). Tumour samples from 1316 (81%) patients were used for somatic molecular analyses; 565 (43%) had KRAS mutations. In patients with KRAS wild-type tumours (arm A, n=367; arm B, n=362), overall survival did not differ between treatment groups (median survival 17·9 months [IQR 10·3–29·2] in the control group vs 17·0 months [9·4–30·1] in the cetuximab group; HR 1·04, 95% CI 0·87–1·23, p=0·67). Similarly, there was no effect on progression-free survival (8·6 months [IQR 5·0–12·5] in the control group vs 8·6 months [5·1–13·8] in the cetuximab group; HR 0·96, 0·82–1·12, p=0·60). Overall response rate increased from 57% (n=209

  9. Hepatocytes as Immunological Agents.

    PubMed

    Crispe, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes are targeted for infection by a number of major human pathogens, including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria. However, hepatocytes are also immunological agents in their own right. In systemic immunity, they are central in the acute-phase response, which floods the circulation with defensive proteins during diverse stresses, including ischemia, physical trauma, and sepsis. Hepatocytes express a variety of innate immune receptors and, when challenged with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, can deliver cell-autonomous innate immune responses that may result in host defense or in immunopathology. Important human pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert these responses. Finally, hepatocytes talk directly to T cells, resulting in a bias toward immune tolerance. PMID:26685314

  10. Oxaliplatin complexes with carnosine and its derivatives: in vitro cytotoxicity, mass spectrometric and computational studies with a focus on complex fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Eslam M; Camp, Claire L; Youssef, Ahmed S; Amleh, Asma; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L; Shoeib, Tamer

    2013-11-01

    The complexation of the Pt-based anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxPt) with biological ligands other than DNA is believed to be a major cellular sink for the drug reducing its therapeutic potential and acting as a potential cause of toxicity. In this paper, the very first hypothesis driven investigation of the role of the naturally abundant cytoplasmic dipeptide ligand β-alanyl-l-histidine dipeptide (carnosine) in OxPt detoxification is presented. In vitro studies on hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells suggest that carnosine may inhibit the cytotoxic action of OxPt most likely through the formation of complexes that are less cytotoxic than OxPt alone. Evidence is provided to suggest that pre-exposure of HepG2 cells to elevated levels of carnosine appears to have a lasting effect on reducing the cytotoxicity of OxPt even after the removal of the externally added carnosine. This effect, however, is likely under kinetic control as its magnitude was shown not to vary significantly with the level of carnosine exposure within the concentration range used in this study. Various mass spectrometry techniques employing electrospray ionization and chip nanospray were employed to study the interaction of oxaliplatin with carnosine as well as two of its derivatives β-alanyl-N-methylhistidine (anserine) and N-acetylcarnosine (NAC). Evidence of complexation between OxPt and each of the three ligands examined is presented. Most species observed were unambiguously assigned and compared to their theoretical isotopic patterns. Common fragmentation products due to the collisionally-activated protonated complexes of each of the ligands examined with OxPt, [M + OxPt + H](+), where M = carnosine, anserine or NAC, were reported. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level were used to obtain structural information and relative free energies of different isomers of the observed precursor [Carnosine + OxPt + H](+) both in the gas phase and in solution as well as to probe its

  11. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  12. A clinical prognostic scoring system for resectable gastric cancer to predict survival and benefit from paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing; Qian, Yingying; Wang, Jian; Gu, Bing; Pei, Dong; He, Shaohua; Zhu, Fang; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Xu, Jin; Liu, Lianke; Gu, Yanhong; Guo, Renhua; Yin, Yongmei; Shu, Yongqian; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy is a standard procedure of curative resection for gastric cancer (GC). The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable prognostic scoring system for GC treated with D2 gastrectomy combined with adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods A prognostic scoring system was established based on clinical and laboratory data from 579 patients with localized GC without distant metastasis treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Results From the multivariate model for overall survival (OS), five factors were selected for the scoring system: ≥50% metastatic lymph node rate, positive lymphovascular invasion, pathologic TNM Stage II or III, ≥5 ng/mL preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level, and <110 g/L preoperative hemoglobin. Two models were derived using different methods. Model A identified low- and high-risk patients for OS (P<0.001), while Model B differentiated low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients for OS (P<0.001). Stage III patients in the low-risk group had higher survival probabilities than Stage II patients. Both Model A (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69–0.78) and Model B (AUC: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.72–0.83) were better predictors compared with the pathologic TNM classification (AUC: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.59–0.71, P<0.001). Adjuvant paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based or triple chemotherapy showed significantly better outcomes in patients classified as high risk, but not in those with low and intermediate risk. Conclusion A clinical three-tier prognostic risk scoring system was established to predict OS of GC treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The potential advantage of this scoring system is that it can identify high-risk patients in Stage II or III who may benefit from paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based regimens. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results before they are applied clinically. PMID:26966350

  13. Phase III Noninferiority Trial Comparing Irinotecan With Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Previously Treated With Fluorouracil: N9841

    PubMed Central

    Kim, George P.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Philip, Philip A.; Mitchell, Edith; Mathews, Abraham P.; Fitch, Tom R.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Alberts, Steven R.; Pitot, Henry C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this multicenter phase III trial was to determine whether overall survival (OS) of fluorouracil (FU) -refractory patients was noninferior when treated with second-line infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4; arm B) versus irinotecan (arm A). Cross-over to the other treatment on disease progression was mandated. Patients and Methods Patients who experienced treatment failure with one prior FU-based therapy and had not received prior irinotecan or oxaliplatin, either for metastatic disease or within 6 months of adjuvant FU therapy, were randomly assigned to arm A (irinotecan 350 or 300 mg/m2 every 3 weeks) or arm B (FOLFOX4). Results A total of 491 patients were randomly assigned (arm A, n = 245; arm B, n = 246); 288 (59%) had experienced treatment failure with FU for metastatic colorectal cancer. Two hundred twenty-seven patients (46%) received protocol-mandated third-line therapy (arm A, 43%; arm B, 57%). Median survival was 13.8 months (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.0 months) for initial treatment with FOLFOX4 and 14.3 months (95% CI, 12.0 to 15.9 months) for irinotecan (P = .38; hazard ratio = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.1). Response rates (RR; 28% v 15.5%; P = .0009) and time to progression (TTP; 6.2 v 4.4 months; P = .0009) were significantly superior with FOLFOX4. In the nonrandom subset of patients who crossed over, RR and TTP improvements with FOLFOX4 continued into third-line treatment. Irinotecan therapy was associated with more grade 3 nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and febrile neutropenia; FOLFOX4 was associated with more neutropenia and paresthesias. Conclusion In patients who experienced treatment failure with front-line FU therapy, OS does not significantly differ whether second-line therapy begins with irinotecan or FOLFOX4. FOLFOX4 produces higher RR and longer TTP. Both arms had notable OS in patients who experienced treatment failure with first-line FU therapy. PMID:19380443

  14. [New agents for hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier; García Gómez, María Carmen

    2016-02-19

    An elevated proportion of high cardiovascular risk patients do not achieve the therapeutic c-LDL goals. This owes to physicians' inappropriate or insufficient use of cholesterol lowering medications or to patients' bad tolerance or therapeutic compliance. Another cause is an insufficient efficacy of current cholesterol lowering drugs including statins and ezetimibe. In addition, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 inhibitors are a new cholesterol lowering medications showing safety and high efficacy to reduce c-LDL in numerous already performed or underway clinical trials, potentially allowing an optimal control of hypercholesterolemia in most patients. Agents inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis and microsomal transfer protein are also providing a new potential to decrease cholesterol in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia and in particular in homozygote familial hypercholesterolemia. Last, cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have shown powerful effects on c-HDL and c-LDL, although their efficacy in cardiovascular prevention and safety has not been demonstrated yet. We provide in this article an overview of the main characteristics of therapeutic agents for hypercholesterolemia, which have been recently approved or in an advanced research stage. PMID:25817449

  15. Optical recognition of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Linder, Kim Dalton; Trujillo, Josh J.

    2008-04-01

    Differentiation between particulate biological agents and non-biological agents is typically performed via a time-consuming "wet chemistry" process or through the use of fluorescent and spectroscopic analysis. However, while these methods can provide definitive recognition of biological agents, many of them have to be performed in a laboratory environment, or are difficult to implement in the field. Optical recognition techniques offer an additional recognition approach that can provide rapid analysis of a material in-situ to identify those materials that may be biological in nature. One possible application is to use these techniques to "screen" suspicious materials and to identify those that are potentially biological in nature. Suspicious materials identified by this screening process can then be analyzed in greater detail using the other, more definitive (but time consuming) analysis techniques. This presentation will describe the results of a feasibility study to determine whether optical pattern recognition techniques can be used to differentiate biological related materials from non-biological materials. As part of this study, feature extraction algorithms were developed utilizing multiple contrast and texture based features to characterize the macroscopic properties of different materials. In addition, several pattern recognition approaches using these features were tested including cluster analysis and neural networks. Test materials included biological agent simulants, biological agent related materials, and non-biological materials (suspicious white powders). Results of a series of feasibility tests will be presented along with a discussion of the potential field applications for these techniques.

  16. Retrospective analysis of docetaxel, oxaliplatin plus fluorouracil compared with epirubicin, cisplatin and fluorouracil as first-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhihua; Guo, Hongqiang; Yuan, Yadong; Zhao, Yan; Yao, Shuna; Xu, Yingjun; Liu, Lei; Liu, Tao; Liu, Yanyan; Yang, Shujun

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of docetaxel, oxaliplatin plus fluorouracil (DOF) regimen in comparison with epirubicin, cisplatin and fluorouracil (ECF) regimen in treating AGC. A total of 88 AGC patients were treated with DOF regimen (N = 45) and ECF regimen (N = 43) respectively. The end points of this study were response rate, survival, and toxicity. The overall response rates for DOF and ECF were 42·2% and 37·3%, and the respective tumour control rates were 80% and 60·6%, respectively. While the median progression-free survival (PFS) approached 6·7 and 5·0 months for DOF and ECF, the overall survival (OS) was 11·4 and 9·8 months respectively. Although both groups showed acceptable level of toxicity, compared with ECF, DOF group was associated with less nausea/vomiting and alopecia but more peripheral neuropathy and neutropenia. Although DOF and ECF exhibit similar efficacy, DOF may broaden the spectrum of chemotherapeutically treatable patients and deserve further investigation. PMID:24090813

  17. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  18. Why Do Extension Agents Resign?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manton, Linda Nunes; van Es, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Past and current Illinois extension agents were surveyed via mail questionnaires as to reasons for staying or leaving extension programs. Reasons for leaving included family changes, family moves, opportunity to advance, better salary/benefits, dissatisfaction with administration, and too much time away from family. (CT)

  19. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  20. Mother ship and physical agents collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Budulas, Peter P.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that investigates the feasibility of developing a collaboration architecture between small physical agents and a mother ship. This incudes the distribution of planning, perception, mobility, processing and communications requirements between the mother ship and the agents. Small physical agents of the future will be virtually everywhere on the battlefield of the 21st century. A mother ship that is coupled to a team of small collaborating physical agents (conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); logistics; sentry; and communications relay) will be used to build a completely effective and mission capable intelligent system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the smaller agents. The mother ship also establishes a robust communications network between the agents and is the primary information disseminating and receiving point to the external world. Because of its global knowledge and processing power, the mother ship does the high-level control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. This high level control and interaction between the mother ship and its agents (including inter agent collaboration) will be software agent architecture based. The mother ship incorporates multi-resolution battlefield visualization and analysis technology, which aids in mission planning and sensor fusion.

  1. The EO-1 Autonomous Science Agent Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Lee, Rachel; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Hengemihle, Jerry; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Ungar, Stephen; Brakke, Thomas; Boyer, Darrell; Van Gaasbeck, Jim; Greeley, Ronald; Doggett, Thomas; Baker, Victor; Dohm, James; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent is currently flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and respond to science events occurring on the Earth. The package includes software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. Because of the deployment to a remote spacecraft, this Autonomous Science Agent has stringent constraints of autonomy, reliability, and limited computing resources. We describe these constraints and how they are reflected in our agent architecture.

  2. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  3. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  4. Next Generation Remote Agent Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Muscettola, Nicola; Morris, Paul H.; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    In May 1999, as part of a unique technology validation experiment onboard the Deep Space One spacecraft, the Remote Agent became the first complete autonomous spacecraft control architecture to run as flight software onboard an active spacecraft. As one of the three components of the architecture, the Remote Agent Planner had the task of laying out the course of action to be taken, which included activities such as turning, thrusting, data gathering, and communicating. Building on the successful approach developed for the Remote Agent Planner, the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner is a completely redesigned and reimplemented version of the planner. The new system provides all the key capabilities of the original planner, while adding functionality, improving performance and providing a modular and extendible implementation. The goal of this ongoing project is to develop a system that provides both a basis for future applications and a framework for further research in the area of autonomous planning for spacecraft. In this article, we present an introductory overview of the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner. We present a new and simplified definition of the planning problem, describe the basics of the planning process, lay out the new system design and examine the functionality of the core reasoning module.

  5. Investigational antimicrobial agents of 2013.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Michael J; Bush, Karen

    2013-10-01

    New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  6. Investigational Antimicrobial Agents of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  7. Erythropoietic agents and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Prchal, Josef T

    2008-10-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a peptide hormone that stimulates erythropoiesis. There are several agents in clinical use and in development that either act as ligands for the cell surface receptors of Epo or promote Epo production, which stimulates erythropoiesis. These are known as erythropoietic agents. The agents already in use include epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, and darbepoetin alfa. Newer agents under active investigation include continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) or proline hydroxylase inhibitors that increase hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), thereby stimulating Epo production and iron availability and supply. Erythropoietic agents have been shown to promote neuronal regeneration and to decrease post-stroke infarct size in mouse models. They have also been reported to shorten survival when used to treat anemia in many cancer patients and to increase thromboembolism. In contrast, rapid decrease of Epo levels as observed in astronauts and high-altitude dwellers upon rapid descent to sea level leads to the decrease of erythroid mass, a phenomenon known as "neocytolysis." The relative decrease in the serum Epo level is known to occur in some subjects with otherwise unexplained anemia of aging. Anemia by itself is a predictor of poor physical function in the elderly and is a significant economic burden on society. One out of every five persons in the United States will be elderly by 2050. Erythropoietic agents, by preventing and treating otherwise unexplained anemias of the elderly and anemia associated with other disease conditions of the elderly, have the potential to improve the functional capacity and to decrease the morbidity and mortality in the elderly, thereby alleviating the overall burden of medical care in society. PMID:18809098

  8. New antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Tomas, Elizabeth

    2003-07-01

    Currently, use of standard antifungal therapies can be limited because of toxicity, low efficacy rates, and drug resistance. New formulations are being prepared to improve absorption and efficacy of some of these standard therapies. Various new antifungals have demonstrated therapeutic potential. These new agents may provide additional options for the treatment of superficial fungal infections and they may help to overcome the limitations of current treatments. Liposomal formulations of AmB have a broad spectrum of activity against invasive fungi, such as Candida spp., C. neoformans, and Aspergillus spp., but not dermatophyte fungi. The liposomal AmB is associated with significantly less toxicity and good rates of efficacy, which compare or exceed that of standard AmB. These factors may provide enough of an advantage to patients to overcome the increased costs of these formulations. Three new azole drugs have been developed, and may be of use in both systemic and superficial fungal infections. Voriconazole, ravuconazole, and posaconazole are triazoles, with broad-spectrum activity. Voriconazole has a high bioavailability, and has been used with success in immunocompromised patients with invasive fungal infections. Ravuconazole has shown efficacy in candidiasis in immunocompromised patients, and onychomycosis in healthy patients. Preliminary in vivo studies with posaconazole indicated potential use in a variety of invasive fungal infections including oropharyngeal candidiasis. Echinocandins and pneumocandins are a new class of antifungals, which act as fungal cell wall beta-(1,3)-D-glucan synthase enzyme complex inhibitors. Caspofungin (MK-0991) is the first of the echinocandins to receive Food and Drug Administration approval for patients with invasive aspergillosis not responding or intolerant to other antifungal therapies, and has been effective in patients with oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis. Standardization of MIC value determination has improved the

  9. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  10. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wan-Ting; Dai, Ming-Xiang; Xue, Fang-Zheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all of the agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all of the agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups and that agents in the same group collaborate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203080 and 61473051) and the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City (Grant No. CSTC 2011BB0081).

  11. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials. PMID:23872337

  12. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  13. Agent Reward Shaping for Alleviating Traffic Congestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Traffic congestion problems provide a unique environment to study how multi-agent systems promote desired system level behavior. What is particularly interesting in this class of problems is that no individual action is intrinsically "bad" for the system but that combinations of actions among agents lead to undesirable outcomes, As a consequence, agents need to learn how to coordinate their actions with those of other agents, rather than learn a particular set of "good" actions. This problem is ubiquitous in various traffic problems, including selecting departure times for commuters, routes for airlines, and paths for data routers. In this paper we present a multi-agent approach to two traffic problems, where far each driver, an agent selects the most suitable action using reinforcement learning. The agent rewards are based on concepts from collectives and aim to provide the agents with rewards that are both easy to learn and that if learned, lead to good system level behavior. In the first problem, we study how agents learn the best departure times of drivers in a daily commuting environment and how following those departure times alleviates congestion. In the second problem, we study how agents learn to select desirable routes to improve traffic flow and minimize delays for. all drivers.. In both sets of experiments,. agents using collective-based rewards produced near optimal performance (93-96% of optimal) whereas agents using system rewards (63-68%) barely outperformed random action selection (62-64%) and agents using local rewards (48-72%) performed worse than random in some instances.

  14. JOHNSTON ATOLL CHEMICAL AGENT DISPOSAL SYSTEM (JACADS) CLOSURE PLAN DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The JACADS project consists of four incinerators including a liquid chemical agent waste processor, an explosives treatment incinerator and a batch metal parts treatment unit. Its mission was to disassemble and destroy chemcial weapons and bulk chemical agent. This prototypical...

  15. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  16. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  17. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  18. Erythropoietic Agents and the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Prchal, Josef T.

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin is a peptide hormone that stimulates erythropoiesis. There are several agents in clinical use and in development, which either act as ligands for the cell surface receptors of erythropoietin or promote erythropoietin production that stimulates erythropoiesis. These are known as erythropoietic agents. The agents already in use include epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, and darbepoetin alfa. Newer agents stimulating erythropoiesis (such as continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) or proline hydroxylase inhibitors that increase HIF-1 thereby stimulating erythropoietin production and iron availability and supply) are under active investigation. Erythropoietic agents have been shown to promote neuronal regeneration and to decrease post-stroke infarct size in mouse models. They have also been reported to shorten survival when used to treat anemia in many cancer patients and to increase thromboembolism. In contrast, rapid decrease of erythropoietin levels as observed in astronauts and high-altitude dwellers upon rapid descent to sea level leads to the decrease of erythroid mass, a phenomenon known as neocytolysis. The relative decrease in the serum erythropoietin level is known to occur in some subjects with otherwise unexplained anemia of aging. Anemia by itself is a predictor of poor physical function in the elderly and is a significant economic burden on society. One out of every five persons in the United States will be elderly by 2050. Erythropoietic agents, by preventing and treating otherwise unexplained anemias of the elderly and anemia associated with other disease conditions of the elderly, have the potential to improve the functional capacity and to decrease the morbidity and mortality in the elderly, thereby alleviating the overall burden of medical care in society. PMID:18809098

  19. Preoperative Radiotherapy of Advanced Rectal Cancer With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Phase I-II Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian; Arnold, Dirk; Dellas, Kathrin; Liersch, Torsten; Hipp, Matthias; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf; Hinke, Axel; Roedel, Claus

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: A pooled analysis of three prospective trials of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal cancer by using oxaliplatin and capecitabine with or without cetuximab was performed to evaluate the impact of additional cetuximab on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and tumor regression (TRG) grades. Methods and Materials: Of 202 patients, 172 patients met the inclusion criteria (primary tumor stage II/III, M0). All patients received concurrent RCT, and 46 patients received additional cetuximab therapy. A correlation of pretreatment clinicopathologic factors and cetuximab treatment with early pCR rates (TRG > 50%) was performed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Toxicity data were recorded for all patients. Results: Of 172 patients, 24 (14%) patients achieved a pCR, and 84 of 172 (71%) patients showed a TRG of >50% in the surgical specimen assessment after preoperative treatment. Age, gender, and T/N stages, as well as localization of the tumor, were not associated with pCR or good TRG. The pCR rate was 16% after preoperative RCT alone and 9% with concurrent cetuximab therapy (p = 0.32). A significantly reduced TRG of >50% was found after RCT with cetuximab compared to RCT alone (p = 0.0035). This was validated by a multivariate analysis with all available clinical factors (p = 0.0037). Acute toxicity and surgical complications were not increased with additional cetuximab. Conclusions: Triple therapy with RCT and cetuximab seems to be feasible, with no unexpected toxicity. Early response assessment (TRG), however, suggests subadditive interaction. A longer follow-up (and finally randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates.

  20. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin in Rectal Cancer: Is There Still a Place for Ecoendoscopic Ultrasound?

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Sola, Josu; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Moreno, Marta; Aristu, Javier

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: The main goals of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) in rectal cancer are to achieve pathological response and to ensure tumor control with functional surgery when possible. Assessment of the concordance between clinical and pathological responses is necessary to make decisions regarding alternative conservative procedures. The present study evaluates the patterns of response after a preoperative CHRT regimen, and the value of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in assessing response. Methods and Materials: A total of 51 EUS-staged T3 to T4 and/or N0 to N+ rectal cancer patients received preoperative CHRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy and capecitabine/oxaliplatin (XELOX) followed by radical resection. Clinical response was assesed by EUS. Rates of pathological tumor regression grade (TRG) and lymph node (LN) involvement were determined in the surgical specimen. Clinical and pathological responses were compared, and the accuracy of EUS in assessing response was calculated. Results: Twenty-four patients (45%) achieved a major pathological response (complete or >95% pathological response (TRG 3+/4)). Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of EUS in predicting pathological T response after preoperative CHRT were 77.8%, 37.5%, 60%, and 58%, respectively. The EUS sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for nodal staging were 44%, 88%, 88%, and 44%, respectively. Furthermore, EUS after CHRT accurately predicted the absence of LN involvement in 7 of 7 patients (100%) with major pathological response of the primary tumor. Conclusion: Preoperative IMRT with concomitant XELOX induces favorable rates of major pathological response. EUS has a limited ability to predict primary tumor response after preoperative CHRT, but it is useful for accurately determining LN status. EUS may have a potential value in identifying patients with a very low risk of LN involvement in association

  1. The drug efficacy and adverse reactions in a mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with oxaliplatin at different time points during a day

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Zhao, Ningbo; Zhao, Dan; Chen, Dan; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that the growth and proliferation of cancer cells in vivo exhibit circadian rhythm, and the efficacy and adverse reactions of platinum-based anticancer drugs administered at different times of the day vary significantly on colon cancer. However, since the circadian rhythms of growth and proliferation of various cancer cells often differ, the question of whether the administration of platinum anticancer drugs at different times of the day exerts significantly different efficacy and adverse effects on oral cancers remains to be elucidated. This study has compared the efficacy and adverse effects of oxaliplatin (L-OHP) administration at different times during a day on oral squamous cell carcinoma in mice and has analyzed cellular circadian rhythms. Methods The mouse model for oral squamous cell carcinoma was established in 75 nude mice, housed in a 12 hour light/12 hour dark cycle environment. The mice were randomly divided into five groups; four experimental groups were intravenously injected with L-OHP at four time points within a 24-hour period (4, 10, 16, and 22 hours after lights on [HALO]). The control group was intravenously injected with the same volume of saline. Treatment efficacy and adverse reactions were compared on the seventh day after the injection, at 22 HALO. The existence of circadian rhythms was determined by cosine analysis. Results Only injections of L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO significantly prolonged animal survival time. The adverse reactions in mice injected with L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO were significantly less than those observed in mice administered L-OHP at 4 and 10 HALO. The cosine fitting curve showed that the survival time and adverse reactions exhibited circadian rhythm. Conclusion The time factor should be considered when treating patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma with L-OHP in order to achieve better efficacy, reduce the adverse reactions, and improve the patients’ survival time and quality

  2. Phase I Study of Oxaliplatin in Combination With Capecitabine and Radiotherapy as Postoperative Treatment for Stage II and III Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of oxaliplatin (OXA) combined with capecitabine and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment in patients with operable rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 21 patients with Stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma after curative surgery were treated with radiotherapy to a total dose of 50 Gy in 5 weeks. OXA was administered at a dosage of 40 (n = 6), 50 (n = 3),60 (n = 3), 70 (n = 3), or 80 mg/m{sup 2} (n = 6) once a week for 2 weeks (first cycle) followed by a second cycle after a 7-day break. Capecitabine at a fixed dose of 1,300 mg/m{sup 2}/d was administered orally at the same schedule as for OXA. DLT was defined as Grade 3 or 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Grade 1-3 leukopenia, diarrhea, and nausea/vomiting were the most common toxic side effects, and most were Grade 1-2. A DLT was first observed in 1 of 3 patients at 40 mg/m{sup 2} (Grade 3 diarrhea) but was not observed in the next 3 patients at the same level or in patients who received a dose level of 50-70 mg/m{sup 2}. At 80 mg/m{sup 2}, DLT occurred in 3 of 6 patients (1 Grade 4 leukopenia and 2 Grade 3 diarrhea). Conclusions: OXA combined with a fixed dose of capecitabine at 625 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily by mouth plus radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting was tolerable and clinically feasible. The maximal tolerated dose of OXA in this setting was 80 mg/m{sup 2}, comparable to the maximal tolerated dose of OXA in the neoadjuvant setting.

  3. Polymorphisms of ERCC1 and XRCC1 predict the overall survival of advanced gastric cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijian; Yao, Ruyong; Fang, Shibao; Wang, Xiuwen; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of excision repair cross-complementing protein 1 (ERCC1) and X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms in 89 patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy as a first-line treatment regimen for advanced gastric cancer. ERCC1 codon 118C/T and XRCC1 codon 399A/G polymorphisms were identified using quantitative polymerase chain reactions, and the associations between disease control rate (DCR), median overall survival (mOS) and gene polymorphisms were analyzed. Following two cycles of chemotherapy, a complete response was observed in two patients, a partial response in 18 patients, stable disease in 38 patients and progressive disease in 31 patients. It was determined that ERCC1 and XRCC1 polymorphisms are not associated with DCR (P=0.662 and P=0.631, respectively). The mOS of patients exhibiting ERCC1 and XRCC1 polymorphisms was eight months, and although no significant association was identified between ERCC1 codon 118 genotypes and mOS (P>0.05), the combination of ERCC1 and XRCC1 polymorphisms, as well as the specific presence of the XRCC1 codon 399A/G polymorphism, was associated with mOS (P<0.05). Thus, the present study indicated that the XRCC1 polymorphism and the combination of XRCC1 and ERCC1 polymorphisms were independent predictors for mOS; however, the XRCC1 and ERCC1 genes were not able to predict the DCR. PMID:26770441

  4. Oxidative Stress-Related Genetic Polymorphisms Are Associated with the Prognosis of Metastatic Gastric Cancer Patients Treated with Epirubicin, Oxaliplatin and 5-Fluorouracil Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoying; Qiu, Lixin; Liu, Xin; Liu, Rujiao; Guo, Weijian; He, Guang; Li, Jin; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress genes are related to cancer development and treatment response. In this study, we aimed to determine the predictive and prognostic roles of oxidative stress-related genetic polymorphisms in metastatic gastric cancer (MGC) patients treated with chemotherapy. Methods In this retrospective study, we genotyped nine oxidative stress-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NQO1, SOD2, SOD3, PON1, GSTP1, GSTT1, and NOS3 (rs1800566, rs10517, rs4880, rs1799895, rs662, rs854560, rs1695, rs2266637, rs1799983, respectively) in 108 consecutive MGC patients treated with epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (EOF) regimen as the first-line chemotherapy and analyzed the association between the genotypes and the disease control rate (DCR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results We found that, in addition to a lower pathological grade (p = 0.017), NQO1 rs1800566 CT/TT genotype was an independent predictive factor of poor PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23–3.16; p = 0.005). PON1 rs662 AA/AG genotype was significantly associated with poor OS (HR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.07–3.54; p = 0.029). No associations were detected between the nine SNPs and DCR. Conclusions NQO1 rs1800566 is an independent predictive factor of PFS for MGC patients treated with EOF chemotherapy, and PON1 rs662 is a noteworthy prognostic factor of OS. Information on oxidative stress-related genetic variants may facilitate optimization of individualized chemotherapy in clinical practice. PMID:25545243

  5. Tax Examiners, Revenue Agents, and Collectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Kevin M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the nature of the work of tax examiners, revenue agents, and collectors. Includes employment outlook; benefits and drawbacks; qualifications, training, and advancement; and sources of additional information. (JOW)

  6. Biologic agents in juvenile spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Katsicas, María Martha; Russo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The juvenile spondyloarthropathies (JSpA) are a group of related rheumatic diseases characterized by involvement of peripheral large joints, axial joints, and entheses (enthesitis) that begin in the early years of life (prior to 16(th) birthday).The nomenclature and concept of spondyloarthropathies has changed during the last few decades. Although there is not any specific classification of JSpA, diseases under the spondyloarthropathy nomenclature umbrella in the younger patients include: the seronegative enthesitis and arthropathy (SEA) syndrome, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthritis. Moreover, the ILAR criteria for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis includes two categories closely related to spondyloarthritis: Enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.We review the pathophysiology and the use of biological agents in JSpA. JSpA are idiopathic inflammatory diseases driven by an altered balance in the proinflammatory cytokines. There is ample evidence on the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-17 in the physiopathology of these entities. Several non-biologic and biologic agents have been used with conflicting results in the treatment of these complex diseases. The efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents, such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab, have been analysed in controlled and uncontrolled trials, usually showing satisfactory outcomes. Other biologic agents, such as abatacept, tocilizumab and rituximab, have been insufficiently studied and their role in the therapy of SpA is uncertain. Interleukin-17-blocking agents are promising alternatives for the treatment of JSpA patients in the near future. Recommendations for the treatment of patients with JSpA have recently been proposed and are discussed in the present review. PMID:26968522

  7. Change Agent Survival Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Folwell L.

    2011-01-01

    Consulting is a rough racket. Only a tarantula hair above IRS agents, meter maids and used car sales people, the profession is a prickly burr for slings and arrows. Throw in education, focus on dysfunctional schools and call oneself a "change agent," and this bad rap all but disappears. Unfortunately, though, consulting/coaching/mentoring in…

  8. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  9. How do agents represent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Alex

    Representation is inherent to the concept of an agent, but its importance in complex systems has not yet been widely recognised. In this paper I introduce Peirce's theory of signs, which facilitates a definition of representation in general. In summary, representation means that for some agent, a model is used to stand in for another entity in a way that shapes the behaviour of the agent with respect to that entity. Representation in general is then related to the theories of representation that have developed within different disciplines. I compare theories of representation from metaphysics, military theory and systems theory. Additional complications arise in explaining the special case of mental representations, which is the focus of cognitive science. I consider the dominant theory of cognition — that the brain is a representational device — as well as the sceptical anti-representational response. Finally, I argue that representation distinguishes agents from non-representational objects: agents are objects capable of representation.

  10. Standard Agent Framework 1

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4)more » Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.« less

  11. Assurance in Agent-Based Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliom, Laura R.; Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-05-10

    Our vision of the future of information systems is one that includes engineered collectives of software agents which are situated in an environment over years and which increasingly improve the performance of the overall system of which they are a part. At a minimum, the movement of agent and multi-agent technology into National Security applications, including their use in information assurance, is apparent today. The use of deliberative, autonomous agents in high-consequence/high-security applications will require a commensurate level of protection and confidence in the predictability of system-level behavior. At Sandia National Laboratories, we have defined and are addressing a research agenda that integrates the surety (safety, security, and reliability) into agent-based systems at a deep level. Surety is addressed at multiple levels: The integrity of individual agents must be protected by addressing potential failure modes and vulnerabilities to malevolent threats. Providing for the surety of the collective requires attention to communications surety issues and mechanisms for identifying and working with trusted collaborators. At the highest level, using agent-based collectives within a large-scale distributed system requires the development of principled design methods to deliver the desired emergent performance or surety characteristics. This position paper will outline the research directions underway at Sandia, will discuss relevant work being performed elsewhere, and will report progress to date toward assurance in agent-based systems.

  12. Multi-agent autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  13. 78 FR 56234 - Multi-Agency Informational Meeting Concerning Compliance with the Select Agent Regulations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Compliance with the Select Agent Regulations; Public Webcast AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... guidance related to the select agent regulations established under the Public Health Security and... 11(Security) of the select agent regulations including information security, physical security,...

  14. Biological warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-01-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies. PMID:21829313

  15. Dioxin, agent orange

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: dioxin, a prevalent problem; nobody wanted dioxin; agent organe and Vietnam; what we know about and may learn about agent orange and Veterans' health; agent organe and birth defects; dioxin in Missouri; 2, 4, 5-T: the U.S.' disappearing herbicide; Seveso: high-level environmental exposure; the nitro explosion; industrial exposures to dioxin; company behavior in the face of dioxin exposures; dioxin and specific cancers; animal tests of dioxin toxicity; dioxin decions; the present and the future.

  16. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  17. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  18. Chemotherapy Agents: A Primer for the Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mihlon, Frank; Ray, Charles E.; Messersmith, Wells

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the basic principles of cancer chemotherapy and provide an overview of each of the general classes of chemotherapeutic agents with a target audience of interventional radiologists in mind. Special attention is paid to agents used in regional chemotherapy as well as agents commonly included in systemic chemotherapeutic regimens for patients who also require regional chemotherapy. PMID:22550380

  19. Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fuhua, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents" reports on the most recent advances in agent technologies for distributed learning. Chapters are devoted to the various aspects of intelligent software agents in distributed learning, including the methodological and technical issues on where and how intelligent agents…

  20. A Multi-Agent System for Intelligent Online Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riordan, Colm; Griffith, Josephine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the system architecture of an intelligent Web-based education system that includes user modeling agents, information filtering agents for automatic information gathering, and the multi-agent interaction. Discusses information management; user interaction; support for collaborative peer-peer learning; implementation; testing; and future…

  1. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  2. Riot Control Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly ... agent from your skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will ...

  3. Agent amplified communication

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.; Selman, B.; Milewski, A.

    1996-12-31

    We propose an agent-based framework for assisting and simplifying person-to-person communication for information gathering tasks. As an example, we focus on locating experts for any specified topic. In our approach, the informal person-to-person networks that exist within an organization are used to {open_quotes}referral chain{close_quotes} requests for expertise. User-agents help automate this process. The agents generate referrals by analyzing records of e-mail communication patterns. Simulation results show that the higher responsiveness of an agent-based system can be effectively traded for the higher accuracy of a completely manual approach. Furthermore, preliminary experience with a group of users on a prototype system has shown that useful automatic referrals can be found in practice. Our experience with actual users has also shown that privacy concerns are central to the successful deployment of personal agents: an advanced agent-based system will therefore need to reason about issues involving trust and authority.

  4. Neoadjuvant and conversion treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastasis: the potential role of bevacizumab and other antiangiogenic agents.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, Pilar; Ferrer, Ana; Gil, Silvia; Dueñas, Rosario; Pérez, María Teresa; Molina, Raquel; Capdevila, Jaume; Safont, María José; Castañón, Carmen; Cano, Juana María; Lara, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    More than 50 % of patients with colorectal cancer develop liver metastases. Surgical resection is the only available treatment that improves survival in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). New antiangiogenic targeted therapies, such as bevacizumab, aflibercept, and regorafenib, in combination with neoadjuvant and conversion chemotherapy may lead to improved response rates in this population of patients and increase the proportion of patients eligible for surgical resection. The present review discusses the available data for antiangiogenic targeted agents in this setting. One of these therapies, bevacizumab, which targets the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has demonstrated good results in this setting. In patients with initially unresectable CRLM, the combination of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab has led to high response and resection rates. This combination is also effective for patients with unresectable CRLM. Moreover, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting of liver metastasis has a higher impact on pathological response rate. This drug also has a manageable safety profile, and according to recent data, bevacizumab may protect against the sinusoidal dilation provoked in the liver by certain cytotoxic agents. In phase II trials, antiangiogenic therapy has demonstrated benefits in the presurgical treatment of CRLM and may represent a new treatment pathway for these patients. PMID:25752908

  5. Proceedings of the Agent 2002 Conference on Social Agents : Ecology, Exchange, and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C., ed.; Sallach, D., ed.

    2003-04-10

    Welcome to the ''Proceedings'' of the third in a series of agent simulation conferences cosponsored by Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago. The theme of this year's conference, ''Social Agents: Ecology, Exchange and Evolution'', was selected to foster the exchange of ideas on some of the most important social processes addressed by agent simulation models, namely: (1) The translation of ecology and ecological constraints into social dynamics; (2) The role of exchange processes, including the peer dependencies they create; and (3) The dynamics by which, and the attractor states toward which, social processes evolve. As stated in the ''Call for Papers'', throughout the social sciences, the simulation of social agents has emerged as an innovative and powerful research methodology. The promise of this approach, however, is accompanied by many challenges. First, modeling complexity in agents, environments, and interactions is non-trivial, and these representations must be explored and assessed systematically. Second, strategies used to represent complexities are differentially applicable to any particular problem space. Finally, to achieve sufficient generality, the design and experimentation inherent in agent simulation must be coupled with social and behavioral theory. Agent 2002 provides a forum for reviewing the current state of agent simulation scholarship, including research designed to address such outstanding issues. This year's conference introduces an extensive range of domains, models, and issues--from pre-literacy to future projections, from ecology to oligopolistic markets, and from design to validation. Four invited speakers highlighted major themes emerging from social agent simulation.

  6. "Poker" association of weekly alternating 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, bevacizumab and oxaliplatin (FIr-B/FOx) in first line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This phase II study investigated efficacy and safety of weekly alternating Bevacizumab (BEV)/Irinotecan (CPT-11) or Oxaliplatin (OHP) associated to weekly 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) in first line treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma (MCRC). Methods Simon two-step design: delta 20% (p0 50%, p1 70%), power 80%, α 5%, β 20%. Projected objective responses (ORR): I step, 8/15 patients (pts); II step 26/43 pts. Schedule: weekly 12 h-timed-flat-infusion/5-FU 900 mg/m2, days 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23; CPT-11 160 mg/m2 plus BEV 5 mg/kg, days 1,15; OHP at three dose-levels, 60-70-80 mg/m2, days 8, 22; every 4 weeks. Results Fifty consecutive, unselected pts < 75 years were enrolled: median age 63; young-elderly (yE) 24 (48%); liver metastases (LM) 33 pts, 66% Achieved OHP recommended dose, 80 mg/m2. ORR 82% intent-to-treat and 84% as-treated analysis. Median progression-free survival 12 months. Equivalent efficacy was obtained in yE pts. Liver metastasectomies were performed in 26% of all pts and in 39% of pts with LM. After a median follow-up of 21 months, median overall survival was 28 months. Cumulative G3-4 toxicities per patient: diarrhea 28%, mucositis 6%, neutropenia 10%, hypertension 2%. They were equivalent in yE pts. Limiting toxicity syndromes (LTS), consisting of the dose-limiting toxicity, associated or not to G2 or limiting toxicities: 44% overall, 46% in yE. Multiple versus single site LTS, respectively: overall, 24% versus 20%; yE pts, 37.5% versus 8%. Conclusion Poker combination shows high activity and efficacy in first line treatment of MCRC. It increases liver metastasectomies rate and can be safely administered. Trial registration Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Sperimentazione Clinica dei Medicinali (OsSC) Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco (AIFA) Numero EudraCT 2007-004946-34 PMID:20958992

  7. Who's your neighbor? neighbor identification for agent-based modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; Howe, T. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation, based on the cellular automata paradigm, is an approach to modeling complex systems comprised of interacting autonomous agents. Open questions in agent-based simulation focus on scale-up issues encountered in simulating large numbers of agents. Specifically, how many agents can be included in a workable agent-based simulation? One of the basic tenets of agent-based modeling and simulation is that agents only interact and exchange locally available information with other agents located in their immediate proximity or neighborhood of the space in which the agents are situated. Generally, an agent's set of neighbors changes rapidly as a simulation proceeds through time and as the agents move through space. Depending on the topology defined for agent interactions, proximity may be defined by spatial distance for continuous space, adjacency for grid cells (as in cellular automata), or by connectivity in social networks. Identifying an agent's neighbors is a particularly time-consuming computational task and can dominate the computational effort in a simulation. Two challenges in agent simulation are (1) efficiently representing an agent's neighborhood and the neighbors in it and (2) efficiently identifying an agent's neighbors at any time in the simulation. These problems are addressed differently for different agent interaction topologies. While efficient approaches have been identified for agent neighborhood representation and neighbor identification for agents on a lattice with general neighborhood configurations, other techniques must be used when agents are able to move freely in space. Techniques for the analysis and representation of spatial data are applicable to the agent neighbor identification problem. This paper extends agent neighborhood simulation techniques from the lattice topology to continuous space, specifically R2. Algorithms based on hierarchical (quad trees) or non-hierarchical data structures (grid cells) are

  8. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  9. VOLTTRON: An Agent Execution Platform for the Electric Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.; Ciraci, Selim; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Tews, Cody W.

    2012-06-05

    Volttron is an agent execution platform that is engineered for use in the electric power system. Volttron provides resource guarantees for agents and the platform including memory and processor utilization; authentication and authorization services; directory services for agent and resource location; and agent mobility. Unlike most other agent platforms, Volttron does not depend on a single agent authoring language. Instead, we chose to design and implement Volttron as a platform service and framework that is decoupled from the agent execution environment. A prototype implementation of Volttron has been written in Python (using Python v2.7.2) and we have executed agents written in Python and Java and as shell scripts. The intended use of Volttron is in the power distribution system for managing distributed generation, demand-response, and plug-in electric vehicles.

  10. MpcAgent

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of the building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.

  11. MpcAgent

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of themore » building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.« less

  12. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  13. Anticancer agents from marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianjun; Zhou, Feng; Al-Kareef, Ammar M Q; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of anticancer active compounds found in the marine ecosystems. More than 5300 different known metabolites are from sponges and their associated microorganisms. To survive in the complicated marine environment, most of the sponge species have evolved chemical means to defend against predation. Such chemical adaptation produces many biologically active secondary metabolites including anticancer agents. This review highlights novel secondary metabolites in sponges which inhibited diverse cancer species in the recent 5 years. These natural products of marine sponges are categorized based on various chemical characteristics. PMID:25402340

  14. Method For Detecting Biological Agents

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan W.; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Whitten, David G.

    2005-12-27

    A sensor is provided including a polymer capable of having an alterable measurable property from the group of luminescence and electrical conductivity, the polymer having an intermediate combination of a recognition element, a tethering element and a property-altering element bound thereto and capable of altering the measurable property, the intermediate combination adapted for subsequent separation from the polymer upon exposure to an agent having an affinity for binding to the recognition element whereupon the separation of the intermediate combination from the polymer results in a detectable change in the alterable measurable property, and, detecting said detectable change in the alterable measurable property.

  15. [Decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination].

    PubMed

    Ohmachi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    When radionuclides are accidentally ingested or inhaled, blood circulation or tissue/organ deposition of the radionuclides causes systemic or local radiation effects. In such cases, decorporation therapy is used to reduce the health risks due to their intake. Decorporation therapy includes reduction and/or inhibition of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, isotopic dilution, and the use of diuretics, adsorbents, and chelating agents. For example, penicillamine is recommended as a chelating agent for copper contamination, and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid is approved for the treatment of internal contamination with plutonium. During chelation therapy, the removal effect of the drugs should be monitored using a whole-body counter and/or bioassay. Some authorities, such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and International Atomic Energy Agency, have reported recommended decorporation agents for each radionuclide. However, few drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and many are off-label-use agents. Because many decontamination agents are drugs that have been available for a long time and have limited efficacy, the development of new, higher-efficacy drugs has been carried out mainly in the USA and France. In this article, in addition to an outline of decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination, an outline of our research on decorporation agents for actinide (uranium and plutonium) contamination and for radio-cesium contamination is also presented. PMID:25832835

  16. Guest-Service Agent. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Harake, Mounzer

    This teacher's guide for the hospitality and tourism industry is designed to include the entry-level competencies students will need to enter any of the occupational areas identified in the front-desk section of the lodging occupations cluster. These occupations include front-desk clerk, cashier, telephone operator, guest-service agent,…

  17. Agent Persuasion Mechanism of Acquaintance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinghua, Wu; Wenguang, Lu; Hailiang, Meng

    Agent persuasion can improve negotiation efficiency in dynamic environment based on its initiative and autonomy, and etc., which is being affected much more by acquaintance. Classification of acquaintance on agent persuasion is illustrated, and the agent persuasion model of acquaintance is also illustrated. Then the concept of agent persuasion degree of acquaintance is given. Finally, relative interactive mechanism is elaborated.

  18. Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Smart, N.G.; Wai, C.M.; Lin, Y.; Kwang, Y.H.

    1998-11-24

    Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO{sub 2} and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process. 1 fig.

  19. Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Smart, Neil G.; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Kwang, Yak Hwa

    1998-01-01

    Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO.sub.2, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO.sub.2 and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process.

  20. Can Subscription Agents Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Marcia

    1985-01-01

    With the saturation of traditional markets for their services, subscription agents have evolved from orders and invoices to serving customers by communicating with librarians and publishers and making automated and paper products available. Magazine fulfillment centers, publisher discounts, and electronic publishing will influence the subscription…

  1. Remote Agent Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benard, Doug; Dorais, Gregory A.; Gamble, Ed; Kanefsky, Bob; Kurien, James; Millar, William; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, Pandu; Rouquette, Nicolas; Rajan, Kanna; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Remote Agent (RA) is a model-based, reusable artificial intelligence (At) software system that enables goal-based spacecraft commanding and robust fault recovery. RA was flight validated during an experiment on board of DS1 between May 17th and May 21th, 1999.

  2. E-Learning Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Dawn G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the advantages of using intelligent agents to facilitate the location and customization of appropriate e-learning resources and to foster collaboration in e-learning environments. Design/methodology/approach: This paper proposes an e-learning environment that can be used to provide customized…

  3. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  4. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  5. Camouflaging Agents for Vitiligo Patients.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Claudia; Porto, Dennis A; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Lim, Henry W

    2016-04-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired condition resulting in patches of depigmented skin that is cosmetically disfiguring and can subsequently be psychologically disturbing. For patients seeking to mask their vitiligo, camouflage options have historically been limited and been designated as a cosmetic, rather than a medical, concern. As research has indicated that proper concealment of vitiligo lesions can vastly improve quality of life, we believe it is essential that dermatologists become aware of all the options available to their patients and that discussions of camouflage options be broached from the first visit. Methods for concealment include cosmetic tattoos, dihydroxyacetone, general cosmetics, and various topical camouflage agents, including the newest product, Microskin™. We conducted a literature review of all of the available options for vitiligo concealment and evaluated their advantages and disadvantages. Ultimately, temporary methods of concealment are recommended; but the particular agent used can come from discussion with the patient based on the location of the lesions, degree of concealment desired, cost, and availability. PMID:27050692

  6. Do Low Molecular Weight Agents Cause More Severe Asthma than High Molecular Weight Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Meca, Olga; Cruz, María-Jesús; Sánchez-Ortiz, Mónica; González-Barcala, Francisco-Javier; Ojanguren, Iñigo; Munoz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to analyse whether patients with occupational asthma (OA) caused by low molecular weight (LMW) agents differed from patients with OA caused by high molecular weight (HMW) with regard to risk factors, asthma presentation and severity, and response to various diagnostic tests. Methods Seventy-eight patients with OA diagnosed by positive specific inhalation challenge (SIC) were included. Anthropometric characteristics, atopic status, occupation, latency periods, asthma severity according to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) control classification, lung function tests and SIC results were analysed. Results OA was induced by an HMW agent in 23 patients (29%) and by an LMW agent in 55 (71%). A logistic regression analysis confirmed that patients with OA caused by LMW agents had a significantly higher risk of severity according to the GINA classification after adjusting for potential confounders (OR = 3.579, 95% CI 1.136–11.280; p = 0.029). During the SIC, most patients with OA caused by HMW agents presented an early reaction (82%), while in patients with OA caused by LMW agents the response was mainly late (73%) (p = 0.0001). Similarly, patients with OA caused by LMW agents experienced a greater degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, measured as the difference in the methacholine dose-response ratio (DRR) before and after SIC (1.77, range 0–16), compared with patients with OA caused by HMW agents (0.87, range 0–72), (p = 0.024). Conclusions OA caused by LMW agents may be more severe than that caused by HMW agents. The severity of the condition may be determined by the different mechanisms of action of these agents. PMID:27280473

  7. Joint chemical agent detector (JCAD): the future of chemical agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laljer, Charles E.

    2003-08-01

    The Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD) has continued development through 2002. The JCAD has completed Contractor Validation Testing (CVT) that included chemical warfare agent testing, environmental testing, electromagnetic interferent testing, and platform integration validation. The JCAD provides state of the art chemical warfare agent detection capability to military and homeland security operators. Intelligence sources estimate that over twenty countries have active chemical weapons programs. The spread of weapons of mass destruction (and the industrial capability for manufacture of these weapons) to third world nations and terrorist organizations has greatly increased the chemical agent threat to U.S. interests. Coupled with the potential for U.S. involvement in localized conflicts in an operational or support capacity, increases the probability that the military Joint Services may encounter chemical agents anywhere in the world. The JCAD is a small (45 in3), lightweight (2 lb.) chemical agent detector for vehicle interiors, aircraft, individual personnel, shipboard, and fixed site locations. The system provides a common detection component across multi-service platforms. This common detector system will allow the Joint Services to use the same operational and support concept for more efficient utilization of resources. The JCAD detects, identifies, quantifies, and warns of the presence of chemical agents prior to onset of miosis. Upon detection of chemical agents, the detector provides local and remote audible and visual alarms to the operators. Advance warning will provide the vehicle crew and other personnel in the local area with the time necessary to protect themselves from the lethal effects of chemical agents. The JCAD is capable of being upgraded to protect against future chemical agent threats. The JCAD provides the operator with the warning necessary to survive and fight in a chemical warfare agent threat environment.

  8. Nondestructive Intervention to Multi-Agent Systems through an Intelligent Agent

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    For a given multi-agent system where the local interaction rule of the existing agents can not be re-designed, one way to intervene the collective behavior of the system is to add one or a few special agents into the group which are still treated as normal agents by the existing ones. We study how to lead a Vicsek-like flocking model to reach synchronization by adding special agents. A popular method is to add some simple leaders (fixed-headings agents). However, we add one intelligent agent, called ‘shill’, which uses online feedback information of the group to decide the shill's moving direction at each step. A novel strategy for the shill to coordinate the group is proposed. It is strictly proved that a shill with this strategy and a limited speed can synchronize every agent in the group. The computer simulations show the effectiveness of this strategy in different scenarios, including different group sizes, shill speed, and with or without noise. Compared to the method of adding some fixed-heading leaders, our method can guarantee synchronization for any initial configuration in the deterministic scenario and improve the synchronization level significantly in low density groups, or model with noise. This suggests the advantage and power of feedback information in intervention of collective behavior. PMID:23658695

  9. The highly intelligent virtual agents for modeling financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Chen, Y.; Huang, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Researchers have borrowed many theories from statistical physics, like ensemble, Ising model, etc., to study complex adaptive systems through agent-based modeling. However, one fundamental difference between entities (such as spins) in physics and micro-units in complex adaptive systems is that the latter are usually with high intelligence, such as investors in financial markets. Although highly intelligent virtual agents are essential for agent-based modeling to play a full role in the study of complex adaptive systems, how to create such agents is still an open question. Hence, we propose three principles for designing high artificial intelligence in financial markets and then build a specific class of agents called iAgents based on these three principles. Finally, we evaluate the intelligence of iAgents through virtual index trading in two different stock markets. For comparison, we also include three other types of agents in this contest, namely, random traders, agents from the wealth game (modified on the famous minority game), and agents from an upgraded wealth game. As a result, iAgents perform the best, which gives a well support for the three principles. This work offers a general framework for the further development of agent-based modeling for various kinds of complex adaptive systems.

  10. Real-time monitoring of matrix acidizing including the effects of diverting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A.D.; Zhu, D.

    1996-05-01

    Real-time monitoring of the injection rate and pressure during matrix acidizing provides operators with a way to determine the changing skin factor as stimulation proceeds. Current methods are based either on the assumption of steady-state flow in the region around the wellbore affected by acid injection or on computer solution of the transient flow equations describing the unsteady reservoir flow process occurring during acidizing. In this paper, a new method for real-time monitoring of matrix acidizing, the inverse injectivity vs. superposition time function plot, is presented. This new method can be applied with a spreadsheet computer program or a programmable calculator and accounts for the transient flow effects occurring during matrix acidizing at multiple rates and injection pressures. The evolving skin factor during a matrix treatment is readily obtained from the diagnostic plot. Hypothetical examples show how the inverse injectivity plot can be used to assess the efficiency of stimulation and diversion. Comparisons with previously presented field cases show the new method to be a simple and accurate means of monitoring the evolving skin factor during matrix acidizing.

  11. Distributed Agents for Autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Rick; Amigoni, Francesco; Brambilla, Andrea; de la Rosa Steinz, Sonia; Lavagna, Michele; le Duc, Ian; Page, Jonathan; Page, Oliver; Steel, Robin; Wijnands, Quirien

    2010-08-01

    The Distributed Agents for Autonomy (DAFA) Study has been performed for ESA by SciSys UK Ltd, Vega GmbH and Politecnico di Milano. An analysis of past, present and future space missions has been conducted, structured around a set of three pre-defined mission scenarios: Formation Flying, Earth Observation and Planetary Exploration. This analysis led to the definition of a framework of use cases where the application of distributed autonomy seems necessary or appropriate, and a set of metrics that may be used to assess such deployments. Agent technology and architectures were extensively surveyed and the results used to elaborate each of the mission scenarios to the point where a software prototype could be constructed. Such a prototype was developed for a scenario based on the ExoMars mission and this has been used to highlight the advantages of a DAFA approach to the mission architecture.

  12. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo›2.2.2! octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo›2.2.1! heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  13. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, Mark P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    2000-02-08

    Bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  14. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  15. Rigid bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Sweet, M.P.; Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1998-07-21

    Bicyclo[2.2.2] octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1] heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

  16. [Clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents. (Part 1) Introduction, alkylating agents and platinum compounds].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H

    1991-11-01

    Pharmacokinetic concepts as to absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of anticancer agents, and how drugs reach to the site of action were reviewed. Then, roles of the liver and kidney to the excretion and metabolism, intracellular pharmacokinetics, and relationships between drug response and cell proliferation kinetics or cell cycle phase were explained. Drug development, mode of action and pharmacokinetics of alkylating agents and platinum compounds were reviewed. This includes: alkylating agents: nitrogen mustard, phenylalanine mustard, estracyte, cyclophosphamide, carboquone, busulfan, nitrosourea, etc., and platinum compounds: cisplatin, carboplatin, 254-S, DWA-2114 R, NK-121. PMID:1952967

  17. Environmental mimics of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Claborn, David M

    2004-12-01

    There are several natural and artificial factors that mimic the effects of chemical warfare agents, thereby causing unwarranted alarm and confusion on the battlefield. Symptoms associated with chemical warfare include paralysis, muscle tremors, heavy salivation, severe burns, blistering, and corrosive skin injuries among others. Similar symptoms can be produced from a variety of environmental sources, artificial and natural. This article reviews several published and unpublished examples of environmental factors that produce syndromes similar to those caused by these agents. Examples of such mimics include pesticides, blistering exudates from insects and plants, various types of bites, and naturally occurring diseases. The potential for confusion caused by these factors is discussed and means of discriminating between warfare agents and naturally occurring events are identified. Recommendations for the use of this information and for needed research are also discussed. PMID:15646185

  18. A Descriptive Analysis of the Del Mod System's Field Agent Component, Final Report, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golts, Uldis R.

    This monograph describes the field agent of the Delaware Del Mod System. The following sections are included in the report: (1) The Duties and Activities of the Del Mod System Field Agents; (2) The Field Agents' Mode of Operation; (3) The Conduct of Projects; (4) The Hiring and Training of Del Mod Field Agents; (5) The Administration of Del Mod…

  19. Multi-Agent Design and Implementation for an Online Peer Help System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Anbo

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid advance of e-learning, the online peer help is playing increasingly important role. This paper explores the application of MAS to an online peer help system (MAPS). In the design phase, the architecture of MAPS is proposed, which consists of a set of agents including the personal agent, the course agent, the diagnosis agent, the DF…

  20. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  1. Families classification including multiopposition asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Andrea; Spoto, Federica; Knežević, Zoran; Novaković, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of our new classification of asteroid families, upgraded by using catalog with > 500,000 asteroids. We discuss the outcome of the most recent update of the family list and of their membership. We found enough evidence to perform 9 mergers of the previously independent families. By introducing an improved method of estimation of the expected family growth in the less populous regions (e.g. at high inclination) we were able to reliably decide on rejection of one tiny group as a probable statistical fluke. Thus we reduced our current list to 115 families. We also present newly determined ages for 6 families, including complex 135 and 221, improving also our understanding of the dynamical vs. collisional families relationship. We conclude with some recommendations for the future work and for the family name problem.

  2. Liposome encapsulation of chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh Erh

    1976-01-13

    A method for transferring a chelating agent across a cellular membrane by encapsulating the charged chelating agent within liposomes and carrying the liposome-encapsulated chelating agent to the cellular membrane where the liposomes containing the chelating agent will be taken up by the cells, thereby transferring the chelating agent across the cellular membrane. A chelating agent can be introduced into the interior of a cell of a living organism wherein the liposomes will be decomposed, releasing the chelating agent to the interior of the cell. The released chelating agent will complex intracellularly deposited toxic heavy metals, permitting the more soluble metal complex to transfer across the cellular membrane from the cell and subsequently be removed from the living organism.

  3. Agent Based Modeling Applications for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Agent-based modeling techniques have successfully been applied to systems in which complex behaviors or outcomes arise from varied interactions between individuals in the system. Each individual interacts with its environment, as well as with other individuals, by following a set of relatively simple rules. Traditionally this "bottom-up" modeling approach has been applied to problems in the fields of economics and sociology, but more recently has been introduced to various disciplines in the geosciences. This technique can help explain the origin of complex processes from a relatively simple set of rules, incorporate large and detailed datasets when they exist, and simulate the effects of extreme events on system-wide behavior. Some of the challenges associated with this modeling method include: significant computational requirements in order to keep track of thousands to millions of agents, methods and strategies of model validation are lacking, as is a formal methodology for evaluating model uncertainty. Challenges specific to the geosciences, include how to define agents that control water, contaminant fluxes, climate forcing and other physical processes and how to link these "geo-agents" into larger agent-based simulations that include social systems such as demographics economics and regulations. Effective management of limited natural resources (such as water, hydrocarbons, or land) requires an understanding of what factors influence the demand for these resources on a regional and temporal scale. Agent-based models can be used to simulate this demand across a variety of sectors under a range of conditions and determine effective and robust management policies and monitoring strategies. The recent focus on the role of biological processes in the geosciences is another example of an area that could benefit from agent-based applications. A typical approach to modeling the effect of biological processes in geologic media has been to represent these processes in

  4. Eukaryotic transposable elements as mutagenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.E. . Banbury Center); McDonald, J.F. ); Weinstein, I.B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on eukaryotic transposable elements as mutagenic agents. Topics covered include: overview of prokaryotic transposable elements, mutational effects of transposable element insertions, inducers/regulators of transposable element expression and transposition, genomic stress and environmental effects, and inducers/regulators of retroviral element expression.

  5. Multiple medical problems following agent orange exposure.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Islam, A; Akhter, S; Dembinski, W; Kulaylat, M; Ambrus, C M

    2004-01-01

    A patient exposed to agent orange and a gunshot wound during the Vietnam War has developed multiple medical problems including nocardiosis, onychomycosis (Trichophyton rubrum), multiple thromboembolic episodes, hemochromatosis, diabetes mellitus type 2, diabetic neuropathy, activated protein C resistance (without Leyden V 1st mutation), degree A-V block, lung cancer (metastatic adenocarcinoma), carpal tunnel syndrome and arthritis. PMID:18084883

  6. Hydroxypyridonate and hydroxypyrimidinone chelating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Doble, Daniel M.; Sunderland, Christopher J.; Thompson, Marlon

    2005-01-25

    The present invention provides hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrimidone chelating agents. Also provides are Gd(III) complexes of these agents, which are useful as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The invention also provides methods of preparing the compounds of the invention, as well as methods of using the compounds in magnetic resonance imaging applications.

  7. Collaborating with Autonomous Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Cross, Charles D.; Fan, Henry; Hempley, Lucas E.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc D.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated increase of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) entering into the National Airspace System, it is highly likely that vehicle operators will be teaming with fleets of small autonomous vehicles. The small vehicles may consist of sUAS, which are 55 pounds or less that typically will y at altitudes 400 feet and below, and small ground vehicles typically operating in buildings or defined small campuses. Typically, the vehicle operators are not concerned with manual control of the vehicle; instead they are concerned with the overall mission. In order for this vision of high-level mission operators working with fleets of vehicles to come to fruition, many human factors related challenges must be investigated and solved. First, the interface between the human operator and the autonomous agent must be at a level that the operator needs and the agents can understand. This paper details the natural language human factors e orts that NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator is focusing on. In particular these e orts focus on allowing the operator to interact with the system using speech and gestures rather than a mouse and keyboard. With this ability of the system to understand both speech and gestures, operators not familiar with the vehicle dynamics will be able to easily plan, initiate, and change missions using a language familiar to them rather than having to learn and converse in the vehicle's language. This will foster better teaming between the operator and the autonomous agent which will help lower workload, increase situation awareness, and improve performance of the system as a whole.

  8. Chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, K; Raza, S K; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2010-07-01

    Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW) is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided. PMID:21829312

  9. Pharmacologic agents targeting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Xia, Hong-guang; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular catabolic mechanism critically involved in regulating tissue homeostasis. The implication of autophagy in human diseases and the need to understand its regulatory mechanisms in mammalian cells have stimulated research efforts that led to the development of high-throughput screening protocols and small-molecule modulators that can activate or inhibit autophagy. Herein we review the current landscape in the development of screening technology as well as the molecules and pharmacologic agents targeting the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy. We also evaluate the potential therapeutic application of these compounds in different human pathologies. PMID:25654545

  10. Chemical warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, K.; Raza, S. K.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    2010-01-01

    Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW) is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided. PMID:21829312

  11. Sec61β Controls Sensitivity to Platinum-Containing Chemotherapeutic Agents through Modulation of the Copper-Transporting ATPase ATP7A

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher A.; Manorek, Gerald; Adams, Preston; Howell, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    The Sec61 protein translocon is a multimeric complex that transports proteins across lipid bilayers. We discovered that the Sec61β subunit modulates cellular sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, particularly the platinum drugs. To investigate the mechanism, expression of Sec61β was constitutively knocked down in 2008 ovarian cancer cells. Sec61β knockdown (KD) resulted in 8-, 16.8-, and 9-fold resistance to cisplatin (cDDP), carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, respectively. Sec61β KD reduced the cellular accumulation of cDDP to 67% of that in parental cells. Baseline copper levels, copper uptake, and copper cytotoxicity were also reduced. Because copper transporters and chaperones regulate platinum drug accumulation and efflux, their expression in 2008 Sec61β-KD cells was analyzed; ATP7A was found to be 2- to 3-fold overexpressed, whereas there was no change in ATP7B, ATOX1, CTR1, or CTR2 levels. Cells lacking ATP7A did not exhibit increased cDDP resistance upon knockdown of Sec61β. Sec61β-KD cells also exhibited altered ATP7A cellular distribution. We conclude that Sec61β modulates the cytotoxicity of many chemotherapeutic agents, with the largest effect being on the platinum drugs. This modulation occurs through effects of Sec61β on the expression and distribution of ATP7A, which was shown previously to control platinum drug sequestration and cytotoxicity. PMID:22710939

  12. Drug therapy reviews: antirheumatic agents.

    PubMed

    Evens, R P

    1979-05-01

    The pathophysiology, symptoms and drug treatment of rheumatic disease are reviewed. Antirheumatic drugs reviewed are salicylates (including aspirin, sodium salicylate, choline salicylate, choline magnesium salicylate, salsalate), phenylpropionic acid derivatives (fenoprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen), indole derivatives (sulindac, tolmetin and indomethacin), pyrazolone derivatives (phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone), gold compounds, penicillamine, antimalarials mefenamic acid, corticosteroids and immunosuppressives. Simple analgesic therapy (acetaminophen, aspirin, propoxyphene) is used in the early stage of the disease. As the disease progresses, aspirin remains the drug of choice for antiinflammatory activity but the phenylpropionic acid or indole derivatives may be preferred in patients unable to tolerate salicylates. If such nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents are not effective, parenteral therapy with gold compounds or oral penicillamine usually is indicated. Indomethacin or phenylbutazone, then antimalarials, are resorted to next. Corticosteroids or immunosuppressives are reserved for patients who are unsuccessfully controlled or who have major side effects with the other drugs. Mefenamic acid occupies a very secondary place in rheumatoid arthritis treatment. PMID:377958

  13. [Anticonvulsant agents in neuralgic pain.].

    PubMed

    Jurna, I; Zenz, M

    1992-06-01

    The anticonvulsants, carbamazepine, clonazepam, phenytoin, and valproic acid are capable of depressing attacks of shooting pain in neuralgia. Shooting pain is perceived in trigeminal, intercostal, and other neuralgias, as a consequence of infectious diseases such as herpes zoster, and in the course of polyneuropathies of various causes. It is due to injury of nociceptive afferents, which generate bursts of activity in response to appropriate environmental changes. The anticonvulsant agents have no analgesic property per se, so that background pain remains unchanged. The depression of shooting pain results from the anticonvulsant action of the compounds. Both carbamazepine and phenytoin block synaptic transmission of neuronal hyperactivity by a direct depressant action that includes reduction of sodium conductance and by activation of inhibitory control. Clonazepam and valproic acid act by enhancing GABA-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission. Carbamazepine is by far the most widely used compound; phenytoin, clonazepam, and valproic acid are not so popular because of their side effects. PMID:18415623

  14. Biotherapeutic agents and vaginal health.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazzewi, F H; Tester, R F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of vaginal infection requires different drugs although the recurrence rate post treatment remains high due to adverse effects on the beneficial microbiota. Thus, there are clear clinical advantages for the use of biotherapeutic agents (prebiotics and/or probiotics) for treating these infections. Pre- and probiotic beneficial effects can be delivered topically or systemically. In general, both approaches have the potential to optimize, maintain and restore the ecology of the vaginal ecosystem. Specific carbohydrates provide a therapeutic approach for controlling infections by stimulating the growth of the indigenous lactobacilli but inhibiting the growth and adhesion of pathogens to the vaginal epithelial cells. Overall, little evidence exists to promote the prevention or treatment of vaginal disease with prebiotic carbohydrates in formulations such as pessaries, creams or douches. However, recent reports have promoted prebiotic applications in ecosystems other than the gut and include the mouth, skin and vagina. This review focuses on the utilization of pre- and probiotics for vaginal health. PMID:26757173

  15. Development of polyimide foams with blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of preparing a polyimide foam which includes the steps of: preparing, foaming, and curing a precursor containing at least one alkyl ester of 3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid; a meta- or para-substituted aromatic diamine; a heterocyclic diamine; an aliphatic diamine; and a solid blowing agent. The blowing agent is added to said precursor in a concentration which is sufficient to effect at least one of the following attributes of the foam: cell size, proportion of open cells, cell density, and indentation load deflection.

  16. Cleaning agents and asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Barranco, P

    2010-01-01

    Although cleaners represent a significant part of the working population worldwide, they remain a relatively understudied occupational group. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between cleaning work and asthma, but the risk factors are uncertain. Cleaning workers are exposed to a large variety of cleaning products containing both irritants and sensitizers, as well as to common indoor allergens and pollutants. Thus, the onset or aggravation of asthma in this group could be related to an irritant-induced mechanism or to specific sensitization. The main sensitizers contained in cleaning products are disinfectants, quaternary ammonium compounds (such as benzalkonium chloride), amine compounds, and fragrances.The strongest airway irritants in cleaning products are bleach (sodium hypochlorite), hydrochloric acid, and alkaline agents (ammonia and sodium hydroxide), which are commonly mixed together. Exposure to the ingredients of cleaning products may give rise to both new-onset asthma, with or without a latency period, and work-exacerbated asthma. High-level exposure to irritants may induce reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Cleaning workers may also have a greater relative risk of developing asthma due to prolonged low-to-moderate exposure to respiratory irritants. In addition, asthma-like symptoms without confirmed asthma are also common after exposure to cleaning agents. In many cleaners, airway symptoms induced by chemicals and odors cannot be explained by allergic or asthmatic reactions. These patients may have increased sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin, which is known to reflect sensory reactivity, and this condition is termed airway sensory hyperreactivity. PMID:21313993

  17. Holograms as Teaching Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robin A.

    2013-02-01

    Hungarian physicist Dennis Gabor won the Pulitzer Prize for his 1947 introduction of basic holographic principles, but it was not until the invention of the laser in 1960 that research scientists, physicians, technologists and the general public began to seriously consider the interdisciplinary potentiality of holography. Questions around whether and when Three-Dimensional (3-D) images and systems would impact American entertainment and the arts would be answered before educators, instructional designers and students would discover how much Three-Dimensional Hologram Technology (3DHT) would affect teaching practices and learning environments. In the following International Symposium on Display Holograms (ISDH) poster presentation, the author features a traditional board game as well as a reflection hologram to illustrate conventional and evolving Three-Dimensional representations and technology for education. Using elements from the American children's toy Operation® (Hasbro, 2005) as well as a reflection hologram of a human brain (Ko, 1998), this poster design highlights the pedagogical effects of 3-D images, games and systems on learning science. As teaching agents, holograms can be considered substitutes for real objects, (human beings, organs, and animated characters) as well as agents (pedagogical, avatars, reflective) in various learning environments using many systems (direct, emergent, augmented reality) and electronic tools (cellphones, computers, tablets, television). In order to understand the particular importance of utilizing holography in school, clinical and public settings, the author identifies advantages and benefits of using 3-D images and technology as instructional tools.

  18. Learning models of intelligent agents

    SciTech Connect

    Carmel, D.; Markovitch, S.

    1996-12-31

    Agents that operate in a multi-agent system need an efficient strategy to handle their encounters with other agents involved. Searching for an optimal interactive strategy is a hard problem because it depends mostly on the behavior of the others. In this work, interaction among agents is represented as a repeated two-player game, where the agents` objective is to look for a strategy that maximizes their expected sum of rewards in the game. We assume that agents` strategies can be modeled as finite automata. A model-based approach is presented as a possible method for learning an effective interactive strategy. First, we describe how an agent should find an optimal strategy against a given model. Second, we present an unsupervised algorithm that infers a model of the opponent`s automaton from its input/output behavior. A set of experiments that show the potential merit of the algorithm is reported as well.

  19. Flexible, secure agent development framework

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith; Steven Y.

    2009-04-07

    While an agent generator is generating an intelligent agent, it can also evaluate the data processing platform on which it is executing, in order to assess a risk factor associated with operation of the agent generator on the data processing platform. The agent generator can retrieve from a location external to the data processing platform an open site that is configurable by the user, and load the open site into an agent substrate, thereby creating a development agent with code development capabilities. While an intelligent agent is executing a functional program on a data processing platform, it can also evaluate the data processing platform to assess a risk factor associated with performing the data processing function on the data processing platform.

  20. Radioprotective agents for radiation therapy: future trends.

    PubMed

    Johnke, Roberta M; Sattler, Jennifer A; Allison, Ron R

    2014-12-01

    Only two radioprotective compounds, amifostine and palifermin, currently have the US FDA approval for use in radiation therapy. However, several agents have been reported that show therapeutic promise. Many of these agents are free radical scavengers/antioxidants. Superoxide dismutase and superoxide dismutase mimetics, nitroxides and dietary antioxidants are all being investigated. Recently, alternative strategies of drug development have been evolving, which focus on targeting the series of cellular insult recognition/repair responses initiated following radiation. These agents, which include cytokines/growth factors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and apoptotic modulators, show promise of having significant impact on the mitigation of radiation injury. Herein, we review current literature on the development of radioprotectors with emphasis on compounds with proven or potential usefulness in radiation therapy. PMID:25525844

  1. Physical Agents for Soft Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The clinical management of soft tissue injuries of the lower limb commonly includes physical agents such as electrotherapy or ultrasound. However, the evidence about the effectiveness of physical agents varies, and their use remains controversial. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), published in the July 2016 issue of JOSPT, examined the benefits and safety risks of various physical agents for soft tissue injuries of the lower limb. Importantly, the review looked closely at the quality of the RCTs and focused on studies with low risk of bias. In this Perspectives for Practice, the authors explain the impact of their findings for clinicians treating patients with such musculoskeletal conditions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):555. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0503. PMID:27363571

  2. Autonomous Formations of Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhali, Sanjana; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous formation control of multi-agent dynamic systems has a number of applications that include ground-based and aerial robots and satellite formations. For air vehicles, formation flight ("flocking") has the potential to significantly increase airspace utilization as well as fuel efficiency. This presentation addresses two main problems in multi-agent formations: optimal role assignment to minimize the total cost (e.g., combined distance traveled by all agents); and maintaining formation geometry during flock motion. The Kuhn-Munkres ("Hungarian") algorithm is used for optimal assignment, and consensus-based leader-follower type control architecture is used to maintain formation shape despite the leader s independent movements. The methods are demonstrated by animated simulations.

  3. Constructing Agent Model for Virtual Training Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yohei; Sugimoto, Yuki; Ishida, Toru

    Constructing highly realistic agents is essential if agents are to be employed in virtual training systems. In training for collaboration based on face-to-face interaction, the generation of emotional expressions is one key. In training for guidance based on one-to-many interaction such as direction giving for evacuations, emotional expressions must be supplemented by diverse agent behaviors to make the training realistic. To reproduce diverse behavior, we characterize agents by using a various combinations of operation rules instantiated by the user operating the agent. To accomplish this goal, we introduce a user modeling method based on participatory simulations. These simulations enable us to acquire information observed by each user in the simulation and the operating history. Using these data and the domain knowledge including known operation rules, we can generate an explanation for each behavior. Moreover, the application of hypothetical reasoning, which offers consistent selection of hypotheses, to the generation of explanations allows us to use otherwise incompatible operation rules as domain knowledge. In order to validate the proposed modeling method, we apply it to the acquisition of an evacuee's model in a fire-drill experiment. We successfully acquire a subject's model corresponding to the results of an interview with the subject.

  4. Agents: An approach for dynamic process modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, Axel; Kopetzky, Roland; Lurk, Alexander

    1999-03-01

    With the growing amount of distributed and heterogeneous information and services, conventional information systems have come to their limits. This gave rise to the development of a Multi-Agent System (the "Logical Client") which can be used in complex information systems as well as in other advanced software systems. Computer agents are proactive, reactive and social. They form a community of independent software components that can communicate and co-operate in order to accomplish complex tasks. Thus the agent-oriented paradigm provides a new and powerful approach to programming distributed systems. The communication framework developed is based on standards like CORBA, KQML and KIF. It provides an embedded rule based system to find adequate reactions to incoming messages. The macro-architecture of the Logical Client consists of independent agents and uses artificial intelligence to cope with complex patterns of communication and actions. A set of system agents is also provided, including the Strategy Service as a core component for modelling processes at runtime, the Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) Component for supporting remote co-operation between human users and the Repository for managing and hiding the file based data flow in heterogeneous networks. This architecture seems to be capable of managing complexity in information systems. It is also being implemented in a complex simulation system that monitors and simulates the environmental radioactivity in the country Baden-Württemberg.

  5. Direct anti-HCV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the "cure HCV" goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others. PMID:26904396

  6. Direct anti-HCV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2015-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the “cure HCV” goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others. PMID:26904396

  7. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  8. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  9. 42 CFR 422.2274 - Broker and agent requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broker and agent requirements. 422.2274 Section 422.2274 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Broker and agent requirements. For purposes of this section “compensation” includes pecuniary or...

  10. 42 CFR 423.2274 - Broker and agent requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broker and agent requirements. 423.2274 Section 423.2274 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....2274 Broker and agent requirements. For purposes of this section “compensation” includes pecuniary...

  11. Colleges and Universities as Agents of Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, W., John, Ed.; Thompason, Ian M., Ed.

    Papers of the Tenth Annual College Self-Study Institute, held in 1968, are presented. They include: "Colleges and Universities as Agents of Social Change: An Introduction," by T.R. McConnell; "Agent of Whom?" by Harris L. Wofford, Jr.; "The University as an Instrument of Social Action," by Roger W. Heyns; "The Tightening Tension: The University's…

  12. Agent Assignment for Process Management: Pattern Based Agent Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Stefan; Talib, Ramzan

    In almost all workflow management system the role concept is determined once at the introduction of workflow application and is not reevaluated to observe how successfully certain processes are performed by the authorized agents. This paper describes an approach which evaluates how agents are working successfully and feed this information back for future agent assignment to achieve maximum business benefit for the enterprise. The approach is called Pattern based Agent Performance Evaluation (PAPE) and is based on machine learning technique combined with post processing technique. We report on the result of our experiments and discuss issues and improvement of our approach.

  13. Research Recommendations for Selected IARC-Classified Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Elizabeth M.; Schulte, Paul A.; Straif, Kurt; Hopf, Nancy B.; Caldwell, Jane C.; Carreón, Tania; DeMarini, David M.; Fowler, Bruce A.; Goldstein, Bernard D.; Hemminki, Kari; Hines, Cynthia J.; Pursiainen, Kirsti Husgafvel; Kuempel, Eileen; Lewtas, Joellen; Lunn, Ruth M.; Lynge, Elsebeth; McElvenny, Damien M.; Muhle, Hartwig; Nakajima, Tamie; Robertson, Larry W.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Martyn T.; Sorahan, Tom; Steenland, Kyle; Stevens, Richard G.; Vineis, Paolo; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Zeise, Lauren; Cogliano, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives There are some common occupational agents and exposure circumstances for which evidence of carcinogenicity is substantial but not yet conclusive for humans. Our objectives were to identify research gaps and needs for 20 agents prioritized for review based on evidence of widespread human exposures and potential carcinogenicity in animals or humans. Data sources For each chemical agent (or category of agents), a systematic review was conducted of new data published since the most recent pertinent International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph meeting on that agent. Data extraction Reviewers were charged with identifying data gaps and general and specific approaches to address them, focusing on research that would be important in resolving classification uncertainties. An expert meeting brought reviewers together to discuss each agent and the identified data gaps and approaches. Data synthesis Several overarching issues were identified that pertained to multiple agents; these included the importance of recognizing that carcinogenic agents can act through multiple toxicity pathways and mechanisms, including epigenetic mechanisms, oxidative stress, and immuno- and hormonal modulation. Conclusions Studies in occupational populations provide important opportunities to understand the mechanisms through which exogenous agents cause cancer and intervene to prevent human exposure and/or prevent or detect cancer among those already exposed. Scientific developments are likely to increase the challenges and complexities of carcinogen testing and evaluation in the future, and epidemiologic studies will be particularly critical to inform carcinogen classification and risk assessment processes. PMID:20562050

  14. A New Approach To Secure Federated Information Bases Using Agent Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weippi, Edgar; Klug, Ludwig; Essmayr, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Discusses database agents which can be used to establish federated information bases by integrating heterogeneous databases. Highlights include characteristics of federated information bases, including incompatible database management systems, schemata, and frequently changing context; software agent technology; Java agents; system architecture;…

  15. FOXFIRE protocol: an open-label, randomised, phase III trial of 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and folinic acid (OxMdG) with or without interventional Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) as first-line treatment for patients with unresectable liver-only or liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in Europe and a leading cause of cancer-related death. Almost 50% of patients with CRC develop liver metastases, which heralds a poor prognosis unless metastases can be downsized to surgical resection or ablation. The FOXFIRE trial examines the hypothesis that combining radiosensitising chemotherapy (OxMdG: oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folic acid) with Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT or radioembolisation) using yttrium-90 resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres®; Sirtex Medical Limited, North Sydney, Australia) as a first-line treatment for liver-dominant metastatic CRC will improve clinical outcomes when compared to OxMdG chemotherapy alone. Methods/Design FOXFIRE is an open-label, multicentre, randomised controlled trial of OxMdG with or without the addition of SIRT (1:1 randomisation). Eligible adult patients have histologically confirmed colorectal adenocarcinoma, liver metastases measurable on computed tomography scan and untreatable by either surgical resection or local ablation, and they may have limited extra-hepatic disease, defined as ≤5 nodules in the lung and/or one other metastatic site which is amenable to future definitive treatment. Eligible patients may have received adjuvant chemotherapy following resection of the primary tumour, but are not permitted to have previously received chemotherapy for metastatic disease, and must have a life expectancy of ≥3 months and a WHO performance status of 0–1. The primary outcome is overall survival. Secondary outcomes include progression free survival (PFS), liver-specific PFS, patient-reported outcomes, safety, response rate, resection rate and cost-effectiveness. FOXFIRE shares a combined statistical analysis plan with an international sister trial called SIRFLOX. Discussion This trial is establishing a network of SIRT centres and ‘feeder’ chemotherapy-only centres to standardise the delivery of SIRT across the whole of

  16. Agent-based enterprise integration

    SciTech Connect

    N. M. Berry; C. M. Pancerella

    1998-12-01

    The authors are developing and deploying software agents in an enterprise information architecture such that the agents manage enterprise resources and facilitate user interaction with these resources. The enterprise agents are built on top of a robust software architecture for data exchange and tool integration across heterogeneous hardware and software. The resulting distributed multi-agent system serves as a method of enhancing enterprises in the following ways: providing users with knowledge about enterprise resources and applications; accessing the dynamically changing enterprise; locating enterprise applications and services; and improving search capabilities for applications and data. Furthermore, agents can access non-agents (i.e., databases and tools) through the enterprise framework. The ultimate target of the effort is the user; they are attempting to increase user productivity in the enterprise. This paper describes their design and early implementation and discusses the planned future work.

  17. Collaborating Fuzzy Reinforcement Learning Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier, we introduced GARIC-Q, a new method for doing incremental Dynamic Programming using a society of intelligent agents which are controlled at the top level by Fuzzy Relearning and at the local level, each agent learns and operates based on ANTARCTIC, a technique for fuzzy reinforcement learning. In this paper, we show that it is possible for these agents to compete in order to affect the selected control policy but at the same time, they can collaborate while investigating the state space. In this model, the evaluator or the critic learns by observing all the agents behaviors but the control policy changes only based on the behavior of the winning agent also known as the super agent.

  18. Environmental chemistry of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    MacNaughton, M.G.; Brewer, J.H.; Ledbetter-Ferrill, J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper summarizes the approach used in the preparation of a Handbook for the Corps of Engineers, Huntsville Division, on the environmental chemistry of chemical warfare agents. The agents GB and HD will be used to illustrate the type of information in the report. Those readers interested in the full report should contact Mr. Arkie Fanning, Huntsville Corps of Engineers at (505) 955-5256. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) has identified approximately 7,200 formerly used defense sites (FUDS) in the United States, some of which are suspected to be contaminated with chemical warfare agents (CWA). The ACE has responsibility for environmental clean-up of FUDS, including site characterization, evaluation and remediation of the site. Thirty-four FUDS and 48 active DOD installations that may contain CWA were identified in an Interim Survey and Analysis Report by the USACMDA Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Material (NSCM). The chemical agents listed include sulfur mustard (H), lewisite (L), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), VX, hydrogen cyanide (AC), cyanogen chloride (CK), phosgene (CG), BZ, and CS.

  19. Lithium Modulates Autophagy in Esophageal and Colorectal Cancer Cells and Enhances the Efficacy of Therapeutic Agents In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    O’Donovan, Tracey R.; Rajendran, Simon; O’Reilly, Seamus; McKenna, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Many epithelial cancers, particularly gastrointestinal tract cancers, remain poor prognosis diseases, due to resistance to cytotoxic therapy and local or metastatic recurrence. We have previously shown that apoptosis incompetent esophageal cancer cells induce autophagy in response to chemotherapeutic agents and this can facilitate their recovery. However, known pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy could not enhance cytotoxicity. In this study, we have examined two well known, clinically approved autophagy inducers, rapamycin and lithium, for their effects on chemosensitivity in apoptosis incompetent cancer cells. Both lithium and rapamycin were shown to induce autophagosomes in esophageal and colorectal cancer cells by western blot analysis of LC3 isoforms, morphology and FACS quantitation of Cyto-ID or mCherry-GFP-LC3. Analysis of autophagic flux indicates inefficient autophagosome processing in lithium treated cells, whereas rapamycin treated cells showed efficient flux. Viability and recovery was assessed by clonogenic assays. When combined with the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil, rapamycin was protective. In contrast, lithium showed strong enhancement of non-apoptotic cell death. The combination of lithium with 5-fluorouracil or oxaliplatin was then tested in the syngenic mouse (balb/c) colorectal cancer model—CT26. When either chemotherapeutic agent was combined with lithium a significant reduction in tumor volume was achieved. In addition, survival was dramatically increased in the combination group (p < 0.0001), with > 50% of animals achieving long term cure without re-occurrence (> 1 year tumor free). Thus, combination treatment with lithium can substantially improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in apoptosis deficient cancer cells. Induction of compromised autophagy may contribute to this cytotoxicity. PMID:26248051

  20. Current and investigational antiobesity agents and obesity therapeutic treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E

    2004-08-01

    Public health efforts and current antiobesity agents have not controlled the increasing epidemic of obesity. Investigational antiobesity agents consist of 1) central nervous system agents that affect neurotransmitters or neural ion channels, including antidepressants (bupropion), selective serotonin 2c receptor agonists, antiseizure agents (topiramate, zonisamide), some dopamine antagonists, and cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonists (rimonabant); 2) leptin/insulin/central nervous system pathway agents, including leptin analogues, leptin transport and/or leptin receptor promoters, ciliary neurotrophic factor (Axokine), neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide antagonists, proopiomelanocortin and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript promoters, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues, melanocortin-4 receptor agonists, and agents that affect insulin metabolism/activity, which include protein-tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma receptor antagonists, short-acting bromocriptine (ergoset), somatostatin agonists (octreotide), and adiponectin; 3) gastrointestinal-neural pathway agents, including those that increase cholecystokinin activity, increase glucagon-like peptide-1 activity (extendin 4, liraglutide, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors), and increase protein YY3-36 activity and those that decrease ghrelin activity, as well as amylin analogues (pramlintide); 4) agents that may increase resting metabolic rate ("selective" beta-3 stimulators/agonist, uncoupling protein homologues, and thyroid receptor agonists); and 5) other more diverse agents, including melanin concentrating hormone antagonists, phytostanol analogues, functional oils, P57, amylase inhibitors, growth hormone fragments, synthetic analogues of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, antagonists of adipocyte 11B-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity, corticotropin-releasing hormone agonists, inhibitors of fatty acid synthesis, carboxypeptidase

  1. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  2. Radiation recall with anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Burris, Howard A; Hurtig, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Radiation recall is an acute inflammatory reaction confined to previously irradiated areas that can be triggered when chemotherapy agents are administered after radiotherapy. It remains a poorly understood phenomenon, but increased awareness may aid early diagnosis and appropriate management. A diverse range of drugs used in the treatment of cancer has been associated with radiation recall. As most data come from case reports, it is not possible to determine the true incidence, but to date the antineoplastic drugs for which radiation recall reactions have been most commonly reported include the anthracycline doxorubicin, the taxanes docetaxel and paclitaxel, and the antimetabolites gemcitabine and capecitabine. Radiation recall is drug-specific for any individual patient; it is not possible to predict which patients will react to which drugs, and rechallenge does not uniformly induce a reaction. There are no identifiable characteristics of drugs that cause radiation recall, and thus, it is a possibility that must be kept in mind with use of any drug after radiotherapy, including those from new drug classes. Although it is not yet possible to design treatment regimens to eliminate the risk of radiation recall, it seems likely that risks can be minimized by prolonging the interval between completion of radiotherapy and initiation of chemotherapy. PMID:21045191

  3. The Agent of Change: The Agent of Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, C. R., Jr.

    This speech examines the role of change agents in third world societies and indicates that the change agent must, to some extent, manipulate the social situation, even if his view of society is a more optimistic one than he finds in reality. If he considers strains and stresses to be the lubricants of change, then his focus on conflict as a…

  4. Incorporating BDI Agents into Human-Agent Decision Making Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphorst, Bart; van Wissen, Arlette; Dignum, Virginia

    Artificial agents, people, institutes and societies all have the ability to make decisions. Decision making as a research area therefore involves a broad spectrum of sciences, ranging from Artificial Intelligence to economics to psychology. The Colored Trails (CT) framework is designed to aid researchers in all fields in examining decision making processes. It is developed both to study interaction between multiple actors (humans or software agents) in a dynamic environment, and to study and model the decision making of these actors. However, agents in the current implementation of CT lack the explanatory power to help understand the reasoning processes involved in decision making. The BDI paradigm that has been proposed in the agent research area to describe rational agents, enables the specification of agents that reason in abstract concepts such as beliefs, goals, plans and events. In this paper, we present CTAPL: an extension to CT that allows BDI software agents that are written in the practical agent programming language 2APL to reason about and interact with a CT environment.

  5. Comparison of gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and L-asparaginase and etoposide, vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and prednisone as first-line chemotherapy in patients with stage IE to IIE extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma: a multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wuxiao, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Jiayu; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Ke-Feng; Li, Su; Chen, Xiaoqin; Lu, Yue; Xia, Zhong-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Optimal chemotherapy regimen for Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) has not yet been defined. We retrospectively compared the outcome of 93 patients newly diagnosed with stage IE to IIE ENKTL who received gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and L-asparaginase (GELOX) (n = 40) or etoposide, vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and prednisone (EPOCH) (n = 53) as induction chemotherapy. After induction chemotherapy, the complete response (CR) rate and overall response rate (ORR) for the GELOX group were higher than those for the EPOCH group (70.0% vs. 41.5%, p = 0.007 for CR; 87.5% vs. 67.9%, p = 0.047 for ORR). The GELOX regimen resulted in significantly superior 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) (79.0% vs. 46.5%, p = 0.005) and overall survival (OS) rates (78.9% vs. 50.4%, p = 0.003). Toxicity of both regimens was acceptable. The GELOX regimen produces a better long outcome with less toxicity than the EPOCH regimen for patients with early stage ENKTL. PMID:24991715

  6. TACtic- A Multi Behavioral Agent for Trading Agent Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Hassan; Shiri, Mohammad E.; Khosravi, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Ehsan; Davoodi, Alireza

    Software agents are increasingly being used to represent humans in online auctions. Such agents have the advantages of being able to systematically monitor a wide variety of auctions and then make rapid decisions about what bids to place in what auctions. They can do this continuously and repetitively without losing concentration. To provide a means of evaluating and comparing (benchmarking) research methods in this area the trading agent competition (TAC) was established. This paper describes the design, of TACtic. Our agent uses multi behavioral techniques at the heart of its decision making to make bidding decisions in the face of uncertainty, to make predictions about the likely outcomes of auctions, and to alter the agent's bidding strategy in response to the prevailing market conditions.

  7. Intelligent Software Agents: Sensor Integration and Response

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesz, James J; Lee, Ronald W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In a post Macondo world the buzzwords are Integrity Management and Incident Response Management. The twin processes are not new but the opportunity to link the two is novel. Intelligent software agents can be used with sensor networks in distributed and centralized computing systems to enhance real-time monitoring of system integrity as well as manage the follow-on incident response to changing, and potentially hazardous, environmental conditions. The software components are embedded at the sensor network nodes in surveillance systems used for monitoring unusual events. When an event occurs, the software agents establish a new concept of operation at the sensing node, post the event status to a blackboard for software agents at other nodes to see , and then react quickly and efficiently to monitor the scale of the event. The technology addresses a current challenge in sensor networks that prevents a rapid and efficient response when a sensor measurement indicates that an event has occurred. By using intelligent software agents - which can be stationary or mobile, interact socially, and adapt to changing situations - the technology offers features that are particularly important when systems need to adapt to active circumstances. For example, when a release is detected, the local software agent collaborates with other agents at the node to exercise the appropriate operation, such as: targeted detection, increased detection frequency, decreased detection frequency for other non-alarming sensors, and determination of environmental conditions so that adjacent nodes can be informed that an event is occurring and when it will arrive. The software agents at the nodes can also post the data in a targeted manner, so that agents at other nodes and the command center can exercise appropriate operations to recalibrate the overall sensor network and associated intelligence systems. The paper describes the concepts and provides examples of real-world implementations

  8. Agent-Based Literacy Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEneaney, John E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this theoretical essay is to explore the limits of traditional conceptualizations of reader and text and to propose a more general theory based on the concept of a literacy agent. The proposed theoretical perspective subsumes concepts from traditional theory and aims to account for literacy online. The agent-based literacy theory…

  9. A Methodology to Evaluate Agent Oriented Software Engineering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chia-En; Kavi, Krishna M.; Sheldon, Frederick T; Daley, Kristopher M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    Systems using software agents (or multi-agent systems, MAS) are becoming more popular within the development mainstream because, as the name suggests, an agent aims to handle tasks autonomously with intelligence. To benefit from autonomous control and reduced running costs, system functions are performed automatically. Agent-oriented considerations are being steadily accepted into the various software design paradigms. Agents may work alone, but most commonly, they cooperate toward achieving some application goal(s). MAS's are components in systems that are viewed as many individuals living in a society working together. From a SE perspective, solving a problem should encompass problem realization, requirements analysis, architecture design and implementation. These steps should be implemented within a life-cycle process including testing, verification, and reengineering to proving the built system is sound. In this paper, we explore the various applications of agent-based systems categorized into different application domains. A baseline is developed herein to help us focus on the core of agent concepts throughout the comparative study and to investigate both the object-oriented and agent-oriented techniques that are available for constructing agent-based systems. In each respect, we address the conceptual background associated with these methodologies and how available tools can be applied within specific domains.

  10. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  11. Markov Tracking for Agent Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) axe an attractive representation for representing agent behavior, since they capture uncertainty in both the agent's state and its actions. However, finding an optimal policy for POMDPs in general is computationally difficult. In this paper we present Markov Tracking, a restricted problem of coordinating actions with an agent or process represented as a POMDP Because the actions coordinate with the agent rather than influence its behavior, the optimal solution to this problem can be computed locally and quickly. We also demonstrate the use of the technique on sequential POMDPs, which can be used to model a behavior that follows a linear, acyclic trajectory through a series of states. By imposing a "windowing" restriction that restricts the number of possible alternatives considered at any moment to a fixed size, a coordinating action can be calculated in constant time, making this amenable to coordination with complex agents.

  12. Incretin agents in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stuart A.; Ekoé, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the emerging classes of antihyperglycemic agents that target the incretin pathway, including their therapeutic efficacy and side effect profiles, in order to help identify their place among the treatment options for patients with type 2 diabetes. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Most evidence is level I and II. MAIN MESSAGE Two classes of incretin agents are currently available: glucagonlike peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors, both of which lower hyperglycemia considerably without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. The GLP1 receptor agonists have a greater effect on patients’ glycated hemoglobin A1c levels and cause sustained weight loss, whereas the DPP4 inhibitors are weight-neutral. CONCLUSION The GLP1 and DPP4 incretin agents, promising and versatile antihyperglycemic agents, are finding their way into the therapeutic algorithm for treating type 2 diabetes. They can be used in patients not adequately controlled by metformin monotherapy or as initial therapy in those for whom metformin is contraindicated. PMID:20631270

  13. Clinical effectiveness of contemporary dentin bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the clinical effectiveness of contemporary resin-based dentin bonding agents primarily focussing on the longevity of restoration. Materials and Methods: The literature published from June 2004 up to September 2010 was reviewed for clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of dentin bonding agents in the longevity of noncarious class V restoration. Results of each study reported using the USPHS criteria for clinical assessment of restoration were included and tabulated. The American Dental Association guidelines for dentin and enamel adhesives were used as a reference to compare the performance of individual bonding agents. Kruskal–Wallis followed by Mann–Whitney U was done to compare the mean Alfa score percentage for the three categories of bonding systems [etch-and-rinse (ER), self-etch primer (SEP), and self-etch-adhesive (SEA)]. Results: A comparison of the mean Alfa score percentages revealed no difference between the ER, SEP, and SEA categories of bonding systems except for marginal adaptation where ER was found to be superior to SEA. Conclusion: The clinical effectiveness of resin-based bonding agents is comparable among the three categories. PMID:21217944

  14. Overview of Agents Used for Emergency Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Khoshmohabat, Hadi; Paydar, Shahram; Kazemi, Hossein Mohammad; Dalfardi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Context: In today’s modern world, despite the multiple advances made in the field of medicine, hemorrhagic shock is still the main cause of battlefield mortality and the second most prevalent cause of mortality in civilian trauma. Hemostatic agents can play a key role in establishing hemostasis in prehospital situations and preventing hemorrhage-associated death. In this respect, this article aims to review different aspects of known hemostatic agents. Evidence Acquisition: A comprehensive search of the academic scientific databases for relevant keywords was conducted; relevant articles were compiled and assessed. Results: Hemostatic agents can establish hemostasis by means of different mechanisms, including concentrating coagulation factors, adhesion to the tissues, in which traumatic hemorrhage occurred, and delivering procoagulant factors to the hemorrhage site. Presently, these hemostatics have been significantly improved with regard to efficacy and in adverse consequences, resulting from their use. Several hemostatic dressings have been developed to the degree that they have received FDA approval and are being used practically on the battlefield. In addition, there are currently several case reports on the use of such hemostatics in the hospital setting, in conditions where commonly known approaches fail to stop life-threatening bleeding. Conclusions: The use of hemostatic dressings and agents is one of the main advancements achieved in recent decades. However, it can be claimed that the ideal hemostatic has not been recognized yet; therefore, this topic needs to be brought into focus and further addressed. PMID:27218055

  15. Knowledge focus via software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henager, Donald E.

    2001-09-01

    The essence of military Command and Control (C2) is making knowledge intensive decisions in a limited amount of time using uncertain, incorrect, or outdated information. It is essential to provide tools to decision-makers that provide: * Management of friendly forces by treating the "friendly resources as a system". * Rapid assessment of effects of military actions againt the "enemy as a system". * Assessment of how an enemy should, can, and could react to friendly military activities. Software agents in the form of mission agents, target agents, maintenance agents, and logistics agents can meet this information challenge. The role of each agent is to know all the details about its assigned mission, target, maintenance, or logistics entity. The Mission Agent would fight for mission resources based on the mission priority and analyze the effect that a proposed mission's results would have on the enemy. The Target Agent (TA) communicates with other targets to determine its role in the system of targets. A system of TAs would be able to inform a planner or analyst of the status of a system of targets, the effect of that status, adn the effect of attacks on that system. The system of TAs would also be able to analyze possible enemy reactions to attack by determining ways to minimize the effect of attack, such as rerouting traffic or using deception. The Maintenance Agent would scheudle maintenance events and notify the maintenance unit. The Logistics Agent would manage shipment and delivery of supplies to maintain appropriate levels of weapons, fuel and spare parts. The central idea underlying this case of software agents is knowledge focus. Software agents are createad automatically to focus their attention on individual real-world entities (e.g., missions, targets) and view the world from that entities perspective. The agent autonomously monitors the entity, identifies problems/opportunities, formulates solutions, and informs the decision-maker. The agent must be

  16. New therapeutic agents for hypertension

    PubMed Central

    REID, JOHN L.

    1996-01-01

    1Over the last 40 years a range of therapeutic strategies has been introduced for the long term treatment of hypertension. 2Although safe effective agents are available a significant number of patients are unable or unwilling to take these drugs as long term treatment. 3Both insufficient efficacy and adverse effects justify the search for new antihypertensive strategies. 4Recent developments include orally active angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonists (ARA) which appear to offer the benefits of prevention of angiotensin II effects without the adverse effects of bradykinin potentiation, such as cough, which limit the usefulness of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. 5Imidazoline receptor agonists offer the potential of centrally active antihypertensives without the adverse effects of sedation and dry mouth. Further clinical experience is necessary to confirm whether the clinical efficacy and good tolerability are confirmed with long term use. 6Both ARA and imidazoline preferring substances offer the bonus of a desirable haemodynamic profile in patients with heart failure and may open new therapeutic avenues in the management of cardiac failure. PMID:8807142

  17. Agent Communications using Distributed Metaobjects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.; Spires, Shannon V.

    1999-06-10

    There are currently two proposed standards for agent communication languages, namely, KQML (Finin, Lobrou, and Mayfield 1994) and the FIPA ACL. Neither standard has yet achieved primacy, and neither has been evaluated extensively in an open environment such as the Internet. It seems prudent therefore to design a general-purpose agent communications facility for new agent architectures that is flexible yet provides an architecture that accepts many different specializations. In this paper we exhibit the salient features of an agent communications architecture based on distributed metaobjects. This architecture captures design commitments at a metaobject level, leaving the base-level design and implementation up to the agent developer. The scope of the metamodel is broad enough to accommodate many different communication protocols, interaction protocols, and knowledge sharing regimes through extensions to the metaobject framework. We conclude that with a powerful distributed object substrate that supports metaobject communications, a general framework can be developed that will effectively enable different approaches to agent communications in the same agent system. We have implemented a KQML-based communications protocol and have several special-purpose interaction protocols under development.

  18. EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The planned interagency National Children's Study (NCS) will be studying a number of exposure issues in the context of health and well-being of infants and young children from pre-conception to age 21. Some of the important environmental exposure questions for NCS, include: how c...

  19. Validation of the 12-Gene Colon Cancer Recurrence Score in NSABP C-07 As a Predictor of Recurrence in Patients With Stage II and III Colon Cancer Treated With Fluorouracil and Leucovorin (FU/LV) and FU/LV Plus Oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J.; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Clark-Langone, Kim M.; Millward, Carl; Paik, Soonmyung; Sharif, Saima; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Accurate assessments of recurrence risk and absolute treatment benefit are needed to inform colon cancer adjuvant therapy. The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay has been validated in patients with stage II colon cancer from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9581 and Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) trials. We conducted an independent, prospectively designed clinical validation study of Recurrence Score, with prespecified end points and analysis plan, in archival specimens from patients with stage II and III colon cancer randomly assigned to fluorouracil (FU) or FU plus oxaliplatin in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-07. Methods Recurrence Score was assessed in 892 fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens (randomly selected 50% of patients with tissue). Data were analyzed by Cox regression adjusting for stage and treatment. Results Continuous Recurrence Score predicted recurrence (hazard ratio for a 25-unit increase in score, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.55; P < .001), as well as disease-free and overall survival (both P < .001). Recurrence Score predicted recurrence risk (P = .001) after adjustment for stage, mismatch repair, nodes examined, grade, and treatment. Recurrence Score did not have significant interaction with stage (P = .90) or age (P = .76). Relative benefit of oxaliplatin was similar across the range of Recurrence Score (interaction P = .48); accordingly, absolute benefit of oxaliplatin increased with higher scores, most notably in patients with stage II and IIIA/B disease. Conclusion The 12-gene Recurrence Score predicts recurrence risk in stage II and stage III colon cancer and provides additional information beyond conventional clinical and pathologic factors. Incorporating Recurrence Score into the clinical context may better inform adjuvant therapy decisions in stage III as well as stage II colon cancer. PMID:24220557

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  2. Effects of a Pedagogical Agent's Emotional Expressiveness on Learner Perceptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Enilda J.; Watson, Ginger S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of animated pedagogical agents or avatars in instruction has lagged behind their use in entertainment. This is due in part to the cost and complexity of development and implementation of agents in educational settings, but also results from a lack of research to understand how emotions from animated agents influence instructional effectiveness. The phenomenological study presented here assesses the perceptions of eight learners interacting with low and high intensity emotionally expressive pedagogical agents in a computer-mediated environment. Research methods include maximum variation and snowball sampling with random assignment to treatment. The resulting themes incorporate perceptions of importance, agent humanness, enjoyment, implementation barriers, and suggested improvements. Design recommendations and implications for future research are presented.

  3. Molecular modeling of organophosphorous agents and their aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Neimark, Alexander V

    2011-05-26

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled solvation and diffusion in aqueous solutions of organophosphorous compounds, including nerve G-agents sarin and soman (methylphosphonofluoridates) and their common simulants DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate) and DIFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate). The aqueous solutions of the organophosphorous compounds were found to display complex molecular scale structures and dynamic properties due to competing interactions between strongly hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. The mixing of agents with water was proved to be exothermic with negative excess mixing volume, indicating a strongly hydrophilic solvation. This effect was confirmed in a specially performed experiment. We discuss to what extent DMMP and DIFP are suitable simulants for G-agents in experimental studies, as far as their interactions with water are concerned. We also focus on the relevance of the structural features and mobilities of agents in water to their interactions with permselective polyelectrolyte membranes that may be employed as protective barriers against chemical warfare agents. PMID:21542641

  4. AFECS. multi-agent framework for experiment control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyurjyan, V.; Abbott, D.; Heyes, G.; Jastrzembski, E.; Timmer, C.; Wolin, E.

    2008-07-01

    AFECS is a pure Java based software framework for designing and implementing distributed control systems. AFECS creates a control system environment as a collection of software agents behaving as finite state machines. These agents can represent real entities, such as hardware devices, software tasks, or control subsystems. A special control oriented ontology language (COOL), based on RDFS (Resource Definition Framework Schema) is provided for control system description as well as for agent communication. AFECS agents can be distributed over a variety of platforms. Agents communicate with their associated physical components using range of communication protocols, including tcl-DP, cMsg (publish-subscribe communication system developed at Jefferson Lab), SNMP (simple network management protocol), EPICS channel access protocol and JDBC.

  5. AFECS. Multi-Agent Framework for Experiment Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vardan Gyurjyan; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; Carl Timmer; Elliott Wolin

    2008-01-23

    AFECS is a pure Java based software framework for designing and implementing distributed control systems. AFECS creates a control system environment as a collection of software agents behaving as finite state machines. These agents can represent real entities, such as hardware devices, software tasks, or control subsystems. A special control oriented ontology language (COOL), based on RDFS (Resource Definition Framework Schema) is provided for control system description as well as for agent communication. AFECS agents can be distributed over a variety of platforms. Agents communicate with their associated physical components using range of communication protocols, including tcl-DP, cMsg (publish-subscribe communication system developed at Jefferson Lab), SNMP (simple network management protocol), EPICS channel access protocol and JDBC.

  6. Ivermectin as an antiparasitic agent in horses.

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Swan, G E

    1982-06-01

    Ivermectin, described as 22,23-dihydroavermectin B1, was the compound chosen from the avermectin group of compounds for development as an antiparasitic agent in horses. A review of the literature indicates that parenteral administration in horses at 200 microgram/kg body mass is highly effective against the strongyles Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus and triodontophorus spp., and adult and immature cyathostomes, including strains resistant to benzimidazole anthelmintics. Other nematodes controlled in horses include Oxyuris equi, Parascaris equorum, Trichostrongylus axei, and Habronema spp. Ivermectin is also highly effective against stomach bots (Gastrophilus spp.). PMID:6750120

  7. Agent Communication for Dynamic Belief Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Mikito; Tojo, Satoshi

    Thus far, various formalizations of rational / logical agent model have been proposed. In this paper, we include the notion of communication channel and belief modality into update logic, and introduce Belief Update Logic (BUL). First, we discuss that how we can reformalize the inform action of FIPA-ACL into communication channel, which represents a connection between agents. Thus, our agents can send a message only when they believe, and also there actually is, a channel between him / her and a receiver. Then, we present a static belief logic (BL) and show its soundness and completeness. Next, we develop the logic to BUL, which can update Kripke model by the inform action; in which we show that in the updated model the belief operator also satisfies K45. Thereafter, we show that every sentence in BUL can be translated into BL; thus, we can contend that BUL is also sound and complete. Furthermore, we discuss the features of CUL, including the case of inconsistent information, as well as channel transmission. Finally, we summarize our contribution and discuss some future issues.

  8. Emerging haemostatic agents and patient blood management.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi A; Kor, Daryl J

    2013-03-01

    The transfusion of allogeneic blood products has been considered as a life-saving procedure for patients suffering from major traumatic injury and those who are undergoing major surgery. The safety of blood products has improved in terms of infectious complications over the last three decades due to advanced donor screening procedures and tests. Nevertheless, non-infectious complications including a blood-type mismatch, volume overload and immunologic and non-immunologic reactions to blood products can adversely affect clinical outcomes. It is thus important to implement a patient-specific strategy in diagnosing bleeding cause(s) and optimising haemostatic therapy. This strategy is an integral part of patient blood management applicable to many perioperative patients. Recent advances in the haemostatic management and transfusion include better understanding of the pathomechanisms of coagulopathy, availability of point-of-care coagulation monitoring and introductions of pathogen-inactivated plasma and factor concentrates as well as recombinant coagulation factors. Understanding the indications and limitations of conventional haemostatic therapy, and potential indications and complications relating to emerging haemostatic agents, is important for perioperative physicians. In this article, we discuss current issues related to allogeneic plasma products and emerging biological haemostatic agents and techniques. Further, we review the mechanisms of action and available preclinical or clinical data for each therapeutic agent. PMID:23590923

  9. MMP-14 Triggered Fluorescence Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai-Dung; Kang, Kyung A

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) is involved in cancer invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Therefore, it is considered to be a biomarker for aggressive cancer types, including some of the triple-negative breast cancer. Accurate (i.e., specific) and sensitive detection of MMP-14 can, thus, be important for the early diagnosis of and accurate prognosis for aggressive cancer, including the breast cancer caused by cell line MDA-MB 231. Fluorophore-mediated molecular sensing has been used for detecting biomarkers, for a long time. One way to increase the specificity of the sensing is designing the fluorophore to emit its fluorescence only when it encounters the biomarker of interest. When a fluorophore is placed on the surface of, or very close to a gold nanoparticle (GNP), its fluorescence is quenched. Applying this relationship between the GNP and fluorophore, we have developed a GNP-based, near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent that is highly specific for MMP-14. This agent normally emits only 14-17 % fluorescence of the free fluorophore. When the agent encounters MMP-14, its fluorescence gets fully restored, allowing MMP-14 specific optical signal emission. PMID:27526171

  10. 77 FR 56845 - Multi-Agency Informational Meeting Concerning Compliance With the Federal Select Agent Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Compliance With the Federal Select Agent Program; Public Webcast AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... (HHS) announces the notice of a public webcast concerning compliance with the Federal Select Agent... Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Issues to be discussed include changes to the select agent...

  11. Directory of Bargaining Agents and Contracts in Higher Education. April 1, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY. Bernard Baruch Coll. National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions.

    This directory of contracts and bargaining agents in higher educational institutions summarizes the available data as of April 1977. Included in the 343 institutions with bargaining agents are over 500 campuses, or approximately one-sixth of the nation's campuses. The directory lists the bargaining agent for each institution, the year the agent…

  12. The future of new oral antibiotics including the quinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M G

    1988-01-01

    It is estimated that more than 110 million dollars' worth of oral antibiotics will have been sold in Canada in 1987. In the next few years several new oral antimicrobial agents will reach the market, including beta-lactamase inhibitors, cephalosporins, monobactams, erythromycins and quinolones. Most of these new agents have a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity than the presently available oral antibiotics. A few have a longer half-life and can be administered once a day. The new oral drugs, especially the quinolones and possibly beta-lactams, will now be used to treat infections that in the past could be treated only parenterally. Exacerbations of pulmonary infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis can now be successfully treated at home with the new quinolones. Osteomyelitis, arthritis, pneumonia and pyelonephritis will most likely be treated at home in the future. In severe infections patients will be admitted to hospital for short courses of parenteral therapy, followed by oral treatment. If used appropriately the new oral agents may lead to new approaches to the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:3275479

  13. Introducing Infectious Agents and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buonaguro, Franco M; Lewis, George K; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Infectious Agents and Cancer is a new open access, peer-reviewed, online journal, which encompasses all aspects of basic, clinical and translational research that provide an insight into the association between chronic infections and cancer. PMID:23509916

  14. Diamine curing agents for polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Three aromatic diamines have properties that make them promising candidates as curing agents for converting isocyanates to polyurethanes with higher adhesive strengths, higher softening temperatures, better toughness, and improved abrasion resistance.

  15. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  16. Tissue Penetration of Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Timothy; Troke, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the tissue penetration of systemically administered antifungal agents is critical for a proper appreciation of their antifungal efficacy in animals and humans. Both the time course of an antifungal drug and its absolute concentrations within tissues may differ significantly from those observed in the bloodstream. In addition, tissue concentrations must also be interpreted within the context of the pathogenesis of the various invasive fungal infections, which differ significantly. There are major technical obstacles to the estimation of concentrations of antifungal agents in various tissue subcompartments, yet these agents, even those within the same class, may exhibit markedly different tissue distributions. This review explores these issues and provides a summary of tissue concentrations of 11 currently licensed systemic antifungal agents. It also explores the therapeutic implications of their distribution at various sites of infection. PMID:24396137

  17. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  18. Agent-based forward analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kerekes, Ryan A.; Jiao, Yu; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Potok, Thomas E.; Lusk, Rick M.

    2008-01-01

    We propose software agent-based "forward analysis" for efficient information retrieval in a network of sensing devices. In our approach, processing is pushed to the data at the edge of the network via intelligent software agents rather than pulling data to a central facility for processing. The agents are deployed with a specific query and perform varying levels of analysis of the data, communicating with each other and sending only relevant information back across the network. We demonstrate our concept in the context of face recognition using a wireless test bed comprised of PDA cell phones and laptops. We show that agent-based forward analysis can provide a significant increase in retrieval speed while decreasing bandwidth usage and information overload at the central facility. n

  19. Launch Commit Criteria Monitoring Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Dan A.; Kelly, Andrew O.; Boeloeni, Ladislau

    2005-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has developed and deployed a software agent to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The application, the Launch Commit Criteria Monitoring Agent, increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during Shuttle launch countdown. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream, automatically alerts system engineers when predefined criteria have been met, identifies limit warnings and violations of launch commit criteria, aids Shuttle engineers through troubleshooting procedures, and provides additional insight to verify appropriate troubleshooting of problems by contractors. The agent has successfully detected launch commit criteria warnings and violations on a simulated playback data stream. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation.

  20. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-01-01

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents. PMID:23235326

  1. The Fate of Chemical Warfare Agents in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith; Munro, Nancy B; Watson, Annetta Paule; King, J.; Hauschild, Veronique

    2007-05-01

    Chemical Warfare Agents, Second Edition has been totally revised since the successful first edition and expanded to about three times the length, with many new chapters and much more in-depth consideration of all the topics. The chapters have been written by distinguished international experts in various aspects of chemical warfare agents and edited by an experienced team to produce a clear review of the field. The book now contains a wealth of material on the mechanisms of action of the major chemical warfare agents, including the nerve agent cyclosarin, formally considered to be of secondary importance, as well as ricin and abrin. Chemical Warfare Agents, Second Edition discusses the physico-chemical properties of chemical warfare agents, their dispersion and fate in the environment, their toxicology and management of their effects on humans, decontamination and protective equipment. New chapters cover the experience gained after the use of sarin to attack travelers on the Tokyo subway and how to deal with the outcome of the deployment of riot control agents such as CS gas. This book provides a comprehensive review of chemical warfare agents, assessing all available evidence regarding the medical, technical and legal aspects of their use. It is an invaluable reference work for physicians, public health planners, regulators and any other professionals involved in this field.

  2. Demethylating Agents in the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Paul M.; Liu, Zixing; Khong, Hung T.

    2010-01-01

    Gene silencing resulting from aberrant DNA methylation can lead to tumorigenesis. Therefore, drugs that inhibit or interfere with DNA methylation have been used to reactivate and induce silenced gene re-expression in malignancies. Two demethylating agents, azacitidine and decitabine, are approved for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and are now considered the standard of care in MDS. In this review, we discuss clinical data, including clinical benefits and toxicities, which led to the approval of azacitidine and decitabine. We also summarize findings from clinical trials that used these two demethylating agents in the treatment of solid tumors. Lastly, we discuss some limitations in the use of azacitidine and decitabine in cancer therapy.

  3. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action. PMID:24955838

  4. Sapronosis: a distinctive type of infectious agent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Sokolow, Susanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Sapronotic disease agents have evolutionary and epidemiological properties unlike other infectious organisms. Their essential saprophagic existence prevents coevolution, and no host–parasite virulence trade-off can evolve. However, the host may evolve defenses. Models of pathogens show that sapronoses, lacking a threshold of transmission, cannot regulate host populations, although they can reduce host abundance and even extirpate their hosts. Immunocompromised hosts are relatively susceptible to sapronoses. Some particularly important sapronoses, such as cholera and anthrax, can sustain an epidemic in a host population. However, these microbes ultimately persist as saprophages. One-third of human infectious disease agents are sapronotic, including nearly all fungal diseases. Recognition that an infectious disease is sapronotic illuminates a need for effective environmental control strategies.

  5. Tracking the actions and possessions of agents

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Noles, Nicholaus S.; Stilwell, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We propose that there is a powerful human disposition to track the actions and possessions of agents. In two experiments, 3-year-olds and adults viewed sets of objects, learned a new fact about one of the objects in each set (either that it belonged to the participant, or that it possessed a particular label), and were queried about either the taught fact or an unrelated dimension (preference) immediately after a spatiotemporal transformation, and after a delay. Adults uniformly tracked object identity under all conditions, whereas children tracked identity more when taught ownership versus labeling information, and only regarding the taught fact (not the unrelated dimension). These findings suggest that the special attention that children and adults pay to agents readily extends to include inanimate objects. That young children track an object’s history, despite their reliance on surface features on many cognitive tasks, suggests that unobservable historical features are foundational in human cognition. PMID:25111732

  6. Macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Meares, Claude F.; DeNardo, Sally J.; Cole, William C.; Mol, Min K.

    1987-01-01

    A copper chelate conjugate which is stable in human serum. The conjugate includes the copper chelate of a cyclic tetraaza di-, tri-, or tetra-acetic acid, a linker attached at one linker end to a ring carbon of the chelate, and a biomolecule joined at the other end of the linker. The conjugate, or the linker-copper chelate compound used in forming the conjugate, are designed for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications which involve Cu(II) localization via the systemic route.

  7. What makes virtual agents believable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovych, Anton; Trescak, Tomas; Simoff, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the concept of believability and make an attempt to isolate individual characteristics (features) that contribute to making virtual characters believable. As the result of this investigation we have produced a formalisation of believability and based on this formalisation built a computational framework focused on simulation of believable virtual agents that possess the identified features. In order to test whether the identified features are, in fact, responsible for agents being perceived as more believable, we have conducted a user study. In this study we tested user reactions towards the virtual characters that were created for a simulation of aboriginal inhabitants of a particular area of Sydney, Australia in 1770 A.D. The participants of our user study were exposed to short simulated scenes, in which virtual agents performed some behaviour in two different ways (while possessing a certain aspect of believability vs. not possessing it). The results of the study indicate that virtual agents that appear resource bounded, are aware of their environment, own interaction capabilities and their state in the world, agents that can adapt to changes in the environment and exist in correct social context are those that are being perceived as more believable. Further in the paper we discuss these and other believability features and provide a quantitative analysis of the level of contribution for each such feature to the overall perceived believability of a virtual agent.

  8. Predictability of antitumor efficacy of cetuximab plus irinotecan based on skin rash severity according to observation period in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer following failure of fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    HORIE, YOSHIKI; YAMAZAKI, KENTARO; FUNAKOSHI, TARO; HAMAUCHI, SATOSHI; TANIGUCHI, HIROYA; TSUSHIMA, TAKAHIRO; TODAKA, AKIKO; MACHIDA, NOZOMU; TAKU, KEISEI; FUKUTOMI, AKIRA; ONOZAWA, YUSUKE; YASUI, HIROFUMI; MIZUKAMI, TAKURO; IZAWA, NAOKI; HIRAKAWA, MAMI; TSUDA, TAKASHI; NAKAJIMA, TAKAKO; BOKU, NARIKAZU

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of cetuximab correlates with the severity of skin toxicity, although its onset may vary. The AIM of this retrospective study was to investigate the optimal observation period for skin rash as a predictor of the efficacy of cetuximab plus irinotecan. The subjects comprised 33 patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who had received prior chemotherapy with fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin. The response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared according to the presence or absence of ≥grade 2 skin rash within 2, 4, 6, or 8 weeks following cetuximab initiation. The overall RR was 45% (15/33) and the median PFS and OS were 188 and 383 days, respectively. A total of 26 patients experienced ≥grade 2 skin rash within 8 weeks. The proportion of responders among patients who developed ≥grade 2 skin rash (severe group) decreased depending on the duration of the observation period (50% within 8 weeks), whereas the proportion of non-responders among patients with

  9. Influence of mRNA expression of epiregulin and amphiregulin on outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with 5-FU/LV plus irinotecan or irinotecan plus oxaliplatin as first-line treatment (FIRE 1-trial).

    PubMed

    Stahler, A; Heinemann, V; Giessen-Jung, C; Crispin, A; Schalhorn, A; Stintzing, S; Fischer von Weikersthal, L; Vehling-Kaiser, U; Stauch, M; Quietzsch, D; Held, S; von Einem, J C; Holch, J; Neumann, J; Kirchner, T; Jung, A; Modest, D P

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the impact of EREG and AREG mRNA expression (by RT-qPCR) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (by immunohistochemistry) as well as RAS-and PIK3CA-mutations (by pyrosequencing) were assessed. Tumors of 208 mCRC patients receiving 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin plus irinotecan (FUFIRI) or irinotecan plus oxaliplatin (mIROX) within the FIRE-1 trial were analyzed for mutations. Molecular characteristics were correlated with response, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS). mRNA expression was evaluated using ROC-analysis in 192 tumors (AREG high n = 31 vs. low n = 161; EREG high n = 89 vs. low n = 103). High versus low AREG expression was associated with PFS of 10.0 versus 8.0 months (HR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.402-0.940, p = 0.03) and OS of 24.6 versus 18.7 months (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.476-1.078, p = 0.11). High versus low EREG expression correlated with prolonged PFS (9.4 vs. 6.8 months, HR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.460-0.846, p = 0.002) and OS (25.8 vs. 15.5 months, HR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.351-0.657, p < 0.001). The positive prognostic effect of high EREG expression was confirmed in a multivariate analysis and was neither affected by EGFR expression nor by mutations of RAS- and PIK3CA-genes. EREG expression appears as an independent prognostic marker in patients with mCRC receiving first-line irinotecan-based chemotherapy. PMID:26284333

  10. Novel agents in the management of Mycobacterium tuberculosis disease.

    PubMed

    Barry, P J; O'Connor, T M

    2007-01-01

    The goals of tuberculosis control are to cure active disease, prevent relapse, reduce transmission and avert the emergence of drug resistance. However, since the 1960s, there have been few developments in available therapies. Currently available agents are complicated by numerous side-effects, drug interactions and the need for a long duration of therapy. Rifampicin-containing regimes lead to hepatic enzyme induction which can complicate or preclude the use of protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Furthermore, emerging drug resistance has complicated management for many patients and clinicians. Therefore, new chemotherapeutic agents are urgently needed. Existing antimicrobials are emerging as potent antituberculous agents. Recent studies have demonstrated the antituberculous activity of newer fluoroquinolones including levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin. Their use as first line antituberculous agents is currently under investigation. Furthermore, the oxazolidinones linezolid and PNU-100480 have been shown to have antituberculous activity in addition to their antibacterial effects. Several other agents are currently being developed for the treatment of tuberculosis. These agents include diarylquinolones (R207910), nitroimidazopyrans (PA-824, OPC-67683), ethambutol analogues (SQ109), cerulenin, trans-cinnamic acid, macrolides, pyrroles (LL3858), long-acting rifamycins and inhaled interferon-gamma. Furthermore, vaccines are being explored for pre-exposure and post-exposure use. This review will describe therapeutic developments in the management of tuberculosis, highlighting mechanisms of action of new pharmacological agents and their potential for clinical use. PMID:17691942

  11. Allergic rhinitis: meaningful and less meaningful combination treatments including reminiscences.

    PubMed

    Szelenyi, I

    2014-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) results from a complex allergen-driven mucosal inflammation in the nasal cavity. Current guideline-based therapy for allergic rhinitis include oral and nasal antihistamines, topical and systemic glucocorticoids, decongestants, antimuscarinic agents, mast cell stabilizing drugs, leukotriene-receptor antagonists, and others. In spite of guideline recommendations, most patients are using multiple therapies in an attempt to achieve symptom control. Therefore, more effective therapies for the management of AR are clearly required. Recently, a novel fixed dose combination containing azelastine and fluticasone propionate has successfully been introduced. At present, it represents the only meaningful topical drug combination. Perhaps, it will be followed by others. PMID:24974572

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - General Agents' authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESPONSIBILITY OF GENERAL AGENTS TO UNDERTAKE EMERGENCY REPAIRS IN FOREIGN PORTS Sec. 2 General Agents' authority. The General Agents are hereby delegated authority to undertake for the account of the...

  13. Novel antiproliferative antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Mader, Mary M

    2005-09-01

    Small molecules with potent and selective antitumor activity continue to be identified by screening in cellular assays and to be entered into clinical development, and in some cases small molecules are progressed despite the fact that the mechanism of action is unknown. Current examples of drugs with unknown mechanism of action include LY-573636 (Eli Lilly & Co), CHS-828 and SPC-595 (Sunesis Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). Early discovery and the elucidation of structure-activity relationships may be in part facilitated by the fact that the compounds must be relatively soluble and permeable to cells to demonstrate activity, although the challenges of optimizing absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion/pharmacokinetic properties, toxicity and clinical activity remain similar to compounds developed under the 'targeted therapy' paradigm. PMID:16159023

  14. [Current status of oral immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents].

    PubMed

    Meller, S; Baran, A M; Braun, S A; Klossowski, N; Homey, B

    2014-02-01

    Various dermatological disorders require treatments with immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory agents. Nevertheless, several studies demonstrate low prescription rates for systemic treatments. This low usage may be a result of physicians' low levels of confidence in administering systemic treatments. However, immunosuppressive treatments represent safe options when potential side effects as well as pharmacological interactions are considered. This review overviews the most important oral immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory agents and summarizes their mode of actions, indications, and adverse effects. Biologics that require intravenous or subcutaneous application are not included, but novel and new agents likely to be released soon are considered. PMID:24549480

  15. Evaluation of carrier agents for hyperpolarized xenon MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, A. K.; Zhao, L.; Balamore, D.; Jolesz, F. A.; Albert, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    Several biocompatible carrier agents, in which xenon is highly soluble and has a long T(1), were tested, and injected in living rats. These included saline, Intralipid suspension, perfluorocarbon emulsion and (129)Xe gas-filled liposomes. The T(1) of (129)Xe in these compounds ranged from 47 to 116 s. Vascular injection of these carrier agents was tolerated well, encouraging their use for further experiments in live animals. In vivo spectra, obtained from gas-filled liposomes and perfluorocarbon solutions, suggest that these carrier agents have potential for use in angiography and perfusion imaging. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Biosecurity reference : CFR-listed agent and toxin summaries.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Natalie Beth

    2003-09-01

    This reference document provides summary information on the animal, plant, zoonotic, and human pathogens and toxins regulated and categorized by 9 CFR 331 and 7 CFR 121, 'Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002; Possession, Use and Transfer of Biological Agents and Toxins,' and 42 CFR 73, 'Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins.' Summary information includes, at a minimum, a description of the agent and its associated symptoms; often additional information is provided on the diagnosis, treatment, geographic distribution, transmission, control and eradication, and impacts on public health.

  17. Method and apparatus for enhanced detection of toxic agents

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Wu, Jie Jayne; Qi, Hairong

    2013-10-01

    A biosensor based detection of toxins includes enhancing a fluorescence signal by concentrating a plurality of photosynthetic organisms in a fluid into a concentrated region using biased AC electro-osmosis. A measured photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms is obtained in the concentrated region, where chemical, biological or radiological agents reduce a nominal photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms. A presence of the chemical, biological and/or radiological agents or precursors thereof, is determined in the fluid based on the measured photosynthetic activity of the concentrated plurality of photosynthetic organisms. A lab-on-a-chip system is used for the concentrating step. The presence of agents is determined from feature vectors, obtained from processing a time dependent signal using amplitude statistics and/or time-frequency analysis, relative to a control signal. A linear discriminant method including support vector machine classification (SVM) is used to identify the agents.

  18. Biological agent detection and identification using pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jerome J.; Glina, Yan; Judson, Nicholas; Transue, Kevin D.

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach for the automatic identification of biological agents. The essence of the approach is a combination of gene expression, microarray-based sensing, information fusion, machine learning and pattern recognition. Integration of these elements is a distinguishing aspect of the approach, leading to a number of significant advantages. Amongst them are the applicability to various agent types including bacteria, viruses, toxins, and other, ability to operate without the knowledge of a pathogen's genome sequence and without the need for bioagent-speciific materials or reagents, and a high level of extensibility. Furthermore, the approach allows detection of uncatalogued agents, including emerging pathogens. The approach offers a promising avenue for automatic identification of biological agents for applicati