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Sample records for agents including platinum

  1. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive ovarian carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kimiko; Zhu, Yong-Lian; Lin, Z. Ping; Penketh, Philip G.; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Zhu, Rui; Baumann, Raymond P.; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Ratner, Elena S.

    2016-01-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) are initially treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, EOCs vary in platinum responsiveness. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive EOC cell lines is valuable for development of therapeutic strategies to avoid platinum inefficacy and to exploit platinum sensitivity. TOV-21G devoid of FANCF expression, OV-90 and SKOV-3 were employed as examples of platinum-sensitive, platinum-intermediate and platinum-resistant cell lines, respectively. Antineoplastic agents examined included mitomycin C, doxorubicin, etoposide, gemcitabine, chlorambucil, paclitaxel, triapine and X-rays. Their effectiveness against cell lines was analyzed by clonogenic assays. Cytotoxic profiles of mitomycin C and carboplatin were similar, with mitomycin C exhibiting greater potency and selectivity against TOV-21G than carboplatin. Cytotoxic profiles of doxorubicin, etoposide and X-rays overlapped with that of carboplatin, while OV-90 overexpressing Rad51 was more resistant to chlorambucil than SKOV-3. The efficacy of paclitaxel and triapine was independent of platinum sensitivity or resistance. Consistent with these cytotoxic profiles, cisplatin/mitomycin C, triapine, and paclitaxel differed in the capacity to induce phosphorylation of H2AX, and produced unique inhibitory patterns of DNA/RNA syntheses in HL-60 human leukemia cells. Paclitaxel and triapine in combination produced additive antitumor effects in M109 murine lung carcinoma. In conclusion, mitomycin C is potentially more effective against Fanconi anemia pathway-deficient EOCs than carboplatin. Doxorubicin and etoposide, because of their overlapping cytotoxic properties with carboplatin, are unlikely to be efficacious against platinum-refractory EOCs. Paclitaxel and triapine are effective regardless of platinum sensitivity status, and promising in combination for both platinum-sensitive and platinum-refractory EOCs

  2. Monofunctional and Higher-Valent Platinum Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the serendipitous discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin by Rosenberg, a large number of cisplatin variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. These efforts continue today with increased realization that new strategies are needed to overcome issues of toxicity and resistance inherent to treatment by the approved platinum anticancer agents. One approach has been the use of so-called “non-traditional” platinum(II) and platinum(IV) compounds that violate the structure-activity relationships that governed platinum drug-development research for many years. Another is the use of specialized drug delivery strategies. Here we describe recent developments from our laboratory involving monofunctional platinum(II) complexes together with an historical account of the manner by which we came to investigate these compounds and their relationship to previously studied molecules. We also discuss work carried out using platinum(IV) prodrugs and the development of nanoconstructs designed to deliver them in vivo. PMID:23738524

  3. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer,, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing non-classical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore non-classical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry and with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-treat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanodelivery particles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also reflect our optimism that the next generation of platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  4. Mechanistic basis for overcoming platinum resistance using copper chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng D; Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Fu, Siqing; Kurzrock, Razelle; Gagea-Iurascu, Mihai; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Helen H W; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2012-11-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Drug resistance is a major obstacle to the successful use of these agents because once drug resistance develops, other effective treatment options are limited. Recently, we conducted a clinical trial using a copper-lowering agent to overcome platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients and the preliminary results are encouraging. In supporting this clinical study, using three pairs of cisplatin (cDDP)-resistant cell lines and two ovarian cancer cell lines derived from patients who had failed in platinum-based chemotherapy, we showed that cDDP resistance associated with reduced expression of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1), which is also a cDDP transporter, can be preferentially resensitized by copper-lowering agents because of enhanced hCtr1 expression, as compared with their drug-sensitive counterparts. Such a preferential induction of hCtr1 expression in cDDP-resistant variants by copper chelation can be explained by the mammalian copper homeostasis regulatory mechanism. Enhanced cell-killing efficacy by a copper-lowering agent was also observed in animal xenografts bearing cDDP-resistant cells. Finally, by analyzing a public gene expression dataset, we found that ovarian cancer patients with elevated levels of hCtr1 in their tumors, but not ATP7A and ATP7B, had more favorable outcomes after platinum drug treatment than those expressing low hCtr1 levels. This study reveals the mechanistic basis for using copper chelation to overcome cDDP resistance in clinical investigations.

  5. Coordination of platinum therapeutic agents to met-rich motifs of human copper transport protein1.

    PubMed

    Crider, Sarah E; Holbrook, Robert J; Franz, Katherine J

    2010-01-01

    Platinum therapeutic agents are widely used in the treatment of several forms of cancer. Various mechanisms for the transport of the drugs have been proposed including passive diffusion across the cellular membrane and active transport via proteins. The copper transport protein Ctr1 is responsible for high affinity copper uptake but has also been implicated in the transport of cisplatin into cells. Human hCtr1 contains two methionine-rich Mets motifs on its extracellular N-terminus that are potential platinum-binding sites: the first one encompasses residues 7-14 with amino acid sequence Met-Gly-Met-Ser-Tyr-Met-Asp-Ser and the second one spans residues 39-46 with sequence Met-Met-Met-Met-Pro-Met-Thr-Phe. In these studies, we use liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to compare the binding interactions between cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin with synthetic peptides corresponding to hCtr1 Mets motifs. The interactions of cisplatin and carboplatin with Met-rich motifs that contain three or more methionines result in removal of the carrier ligands of both platinum complexes. In contrast, oxaliplatin retains its cyclohexyldiamine ligand upon platinum coordination to the peptide.

  6. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for... Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. (a) Agents....

  7. Overcoming platinum resistance through the use of a copper-lowering agent.

    PubMed

    Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Fu, Caroline; Kuo, Macus Tien; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2012-06-01

    Low levels of human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) mRNA are associated with a shorter progression-free survival after platinum-based therapy. Pretreatment with a copper-lowering agent such as trientine enhanced hCtr1-mediated platinum uptake. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study (NCT01178112) of carboplatin and trientine with the goal of resensitizing patients with advanced cancer to platinum chemotherapy. This case report reviews the outcomes of 5 patients with platinum-resistant high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer enrolled on the study to date. Overall, they tolerated treatment well. Severe adverse events that occurred in 2 patients were myelosuppression, notably anemia requiring transfusion. Dose-limiting toxicity was not observed within the first 28 days (cycle 1). After 2 cycles of therapy, partial remission was achieved in 1 patient (10+ months), stable disease in 3 patients (2, 3.5+, and 5 months, respectively), and 1 patient had progressive disease. These cases provide preliminary clinical evidence that the role of decreasing copper levels in reversing platinum resistance merits additional clinical investigation. Evaluation of this novel strategy is warranted in larger studies to assess the efficacy of this approach for treating platinum-resistant advanced epithelial ovarian cancer in patients with high copper levels.

  8. Linker design for the modular assembly of multifunctional and targeted platinum(ii)-containing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ding, S; Bierbach, U

    2016-08-16

    A versatile and efficient modular synthetic platform was developed for assembling multifunctional conjugates and targeted forms of platinum-(benz)acridines, a class of highly cytotoxic DNA-targeted hybrid agents. The synthetic strategy involved amide coupling between succinyl ester-modified platinum compounds (P1, P2) and a set of 11 biologically relevant primary and secondary amines (N1-N11). To demonstrate the feasibility and versatility of the approach, a structurally and functionally diverse range of amines was introduced. These include biologically active molecules, such as rucaparib (a PARP inhibitor), E/Z-endoxifen (an estrogen receptor antagonist), and a quinazoline-based tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Micro-scale reactions in Eppendorf tubes or on 96-well plates were used to screen for optimal coupling conditions in DMF solution with carbodiimide-, uronium-, and phosphonium-based compounds, as well as other common coupling reagents. Reactions with the phosphonium-based coupling reagent PyBOP produced the highest yields and gave the cleanest conversions. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the chemistry can also be performed in aqueous media and is amenable to parallel synthesis based on multiple consecutive reactions in DMF in a "one-tube" format. In-line LC-MS was used to assess the stability of the conjugates in physiologically relevant buffers. Hydrolysis of the conjugates occurs at the ester moiety and is facilitated by the aquated metal moiety under low-chloride ion conditions. The rate of ester cleavage greatly depends on the nature of the amine component. Potential applications of the linker technology are discussed. PMID:27251881

  9. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  10. Nucleotide Binding Preference of the Monofunctional Platinum Anticancer-Agent Phenanthriplatin.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Imogen A; Johnstone, Timothy C; Park, Ga Young; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-05-23

    The monofunctional platinum anticancer agent phenanthriplatin generates covalent adducts with the purine bases guanine and adenine. Preferential nucleotide binding was investigated by using a polymerase stop assay and linear DNA amplification with a 163-base pair DNA double helix. Similarly to cisplatin, phenanthriplatin forms the majority of adducts at guanosine residues, but significant differences in both the number and position of platination sites emerge when comparing results for the two complexes. Notably, the monofunctional complex generates a greater number of polymerase-halting lesions at adenosine residues than does cisplatin. Studies with 9-methyladenine reveal that, under abiological conditions, phenanthriplatin binds to the N(1) or N(7) position of 9-methyladenine in approximately equimolar amounts. By contrast, comparable reactions with 9-methylguanine afforded only the N(7) -bound species. Both of the 9-methyladenine linkage isomers (N(1) and N(7) ) exist as two diastereomeric species, arising from hindered rotation of the aromatic ligands about their respective platinum-nitrogen bonds. Eyring analysis of rate constants extracted from variable-temperature NMR spectroscopic data revealed that the activation energies for ligand rotation in the N(1) -bound platinum complex and the N(7) -linkage isomers are comparable. Finally, a kinetic analysis indicated that phenanthriplatin reacts more rapidly, by a factor of eight, with 9-methylguanine than with 9-methyladenine, suggesting that the distribution of lesions formed on double-stranded DNA is kinetically controlled. In addition, implications for the potent anticancer activity of phenanthriplatin are discussed herein.

  11. Stereochemical control of nucleosome targeting by platinum-intercalator antitumor agents

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eugene Y.D.; Davey, Gabriela E.; Chin, Chee Fei; Dröge, Peter; Ang, Wee Han; Davey, Curt A.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs act therapeutically by forming DNA adducts, but suffer from severe toxicity and resistance problems, which have not been overcome in spite of decades of research. And yet defined chromatin targets have generally not been considered in the drug development process. Here we designed novel platinum-intercalator species to target a highly deformed DNA site near the nucleosome center. Between two seemingly similar structural isomers, we find a striking difference in DNA site selectivity in vitro, which comes about from stereochemical constraints that limit the reactivity of the trans isomer to special DNA sequence elements while still allowing the cis isomer to efficiently form adducts at internal sites in the nucleosome core. This gives the potential for controlling nucleosome site targeting in vivo, which would engender sensitivity to epigenetic distinctions and in particular cell type/status-dependent differences in nucleosome positioning. Moreover, while both compounds yield very similar DNA-adduct structures and display antitumor cell activity rivalling that of cisplatin, the cis isomer, relative to the trans, has a much more rapid cytotoxic effect and distinct impact on cell function. The novel stereochemical principles for controlling DNA site selectivity we discovered could aid in the design of improved site discriminating agents. PMID:25916851

  12. Phase Ib-IIa study to reverse platinum resistance by the use of a hypomethylating agent azacitidine in platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Siqing; Hu, Wei; Iyer, Revathy; Kavanagh, John J.; Coleman, Robert L.; Levenback, Charles F.; Sood, Anil K.; Wolf, Judith K.; Gershenson, David M.; Markman, Maurie; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Bast, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequential treatment with azacitidine can induce re-expression of epigenetically silenced genes through genomic DNA hypomethylation and reverse carboplatin resistance of epithelial ovarian cancer cells. We initiated a phase Ib-IIa clinical trial of this sequential combination of azacitidine and carboplatin in platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Patients with pathologically confirmed intermediate- or high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer who had disease progression within 6 months (resistant, n = 18) or during a platinum-based therapy (refractory, n = 12) were eligible. All patients had measurable disease. Results Thirty patients received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. This regimen produced 1 CR, 3 PR (ORR: 13.8%), and 10 SD among 29 evaluable patients. For those who achieved clinical benefits, the median duration of the treatment was 7.5 months. The median PFS and OS for all patients were 3.7 months and 14 months, respectively. Patients with platinum resistant disease achieved an ORR of 22%, with a median PFS of 5.6 months and a median OS of 23 months. The predominant toxicities were fatigue and myelosuppression. Correlative studies showed that DR4 methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes was decreased during treatment in 3 of 4 objective responders (75%), but in only 5 of 13 non-responders (38%). Conclusions To our knowledge, this study provides the first clinical evidence that a hypomethylating agent may partially reverse platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Further clinical evaluation of hypomethylating agents in combination with carboplatin is warranted. PMID:21472713

  13. Effects of monofunctional platinum agents on bacterial growth: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Alexander, Sarah M; Lin, Wei; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the novel and potent monofunctional platinum(II) agent phenanthriplatin on Escherichia coli and bacteriophage λ lysogens is reported. E. coli filamentation was observed by light microscopy when cells were grown in the presence of phenanthriplatin, cis-[Pt(NH3)2(Am)Cl](+) where Am is phenanthridine. Treatment of lysogenic bacteria with this compound resulted in lysis and the production of viral particles, as indicated by plaque formation in a bacterial lawn. The results obtained with phenanthriplatin are contextualized by comparison with those obtained using cisplatin as well as other, less active, monofunctional compounds such as [Pt(NH3)3Cl](+) and cis-[Pt(NH3)2(py)Cl](+), where py is pyridine. The ability of phenanthriplatin to induce bacterial filamentation and initiate lysis in lysogenic bacteria corroborates the hypothesis that the biological activity of this complex is mediated by its interaction with DNA. PMID:24364388

  14. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum-acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent.

  15. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of...

  16. DNA compaction by mononuclear platinum cancer drug cisplatin and the trisplatinum anticancer agent BBR3464: Differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T; Dubey, P; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2012-02-01

    Cisplatin, a mononuclear platinum compound, which is known as a cancer drug for long time, can exhibit considerable side effects and is also not effective in many types of cancer. Therefore, the alternative platinum anticancer agents that can act at a much lower dose limit compared to the dose relevant for cisplatin treatment have been searched for. BBR3464, a trinuclear platinum compound, is found to exhibit cytotoxic effects at 10 to 1000 times lower dose limit, even in cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. The primary cellular target for cisplatin and BBR3464 is thought to be DNA. Herein, we report the nature of DNA structural changes that are induced by cisplatin and BBR3464, considering the same DNA sequence and similar sample deposition methods for comparison purpose. We have applied high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to obtain an idea about the molecular basis of BBR3464's effectiveness at the lower dose limit. We show from the molecularly resolved AFM images that both the compounds can compact the whole dsDNA molecules, though the degree of compaction in case of BBR3464 treatment is significantly higher. Furthermore, local compaction in terms of loop structure formation could be induced by both BBR3464 and cisplatin, though BBR3464 generated microloops and macroloops both, whereas cisplatin could generate primarily the microloops. It is a significant observation that BBR3464 could induce relatively drastic DNA structural changes in terms of loop formation as well as overall DNA compaction at a molar ratio, which is 50 times less than that applied for cisplatin treatment. Implications of such structural changes in cytotoxic effects of the platinum anticancer agents will be mentioned.

  17. 78 FR 60270 - Platinum Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Platinum Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate...-referenced proceeding, of Platinum Energy, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  18. PAXIP1 Potentiates the Combination of WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 and Platinum Agents in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jhuraney, Ankita; Woods, Nicholas T; Wright, Gabriela; Rix, Lily; Kinose, Fumi; Kroeger, Jodi L; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth; Cress, W Douglas; Koomen, John M; Brantley, Stephen G; Gray, Jhanelle E; Haura, Eric B; Rix, Uwe; Monteiro, Alvaro N

    2016-07-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) involves a complex network of signaling events mediated by modular protein domains such as the BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain. Thus, proteins that interact with BRCT domains and are a part of the DDR constitute potential targets for sensitization to DNA-damaging chemotherapy agents. We performed a pharmacologic screen to evaluate 17 kinases, identified in a BRCT-mediated interaction network as targets to enhance platinum-based chemotherapy in lung cancer. Inhibition of mitotic kinase WEE1 was found to have the most effective response in combination with platinum compounds in lung cancer cell lines. In the BRCT-mediated interaction network, WEE1 was found in complex with PAXIP1, a protein containing six BRCT domains involved in transcription and in the cellular response to DNA damage. We show that PAXIP1 BRCT domains regulate WEE1-mediated phosphorylation of CDK1. Furthermore, ectopic expression of PAXIP1 promotes enhanced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in cells treated with WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 (formerly, MK-1775) and cisplatin compared with cells treated with AZD1775 alone. Cell lines and patient-derived xenograft models expressing both PAXIP1 and WEE1 exhibited synergistic effects of AZD1775 and cisplatin. In summary, PAXIP1 is involved in sensitizing lung cancer cells to the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 in combination with platinum-based treatment. We propose that WEE1 and PAXIP1 levels may be used as mechanism-based biomarkers of response when WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 is combined with DNA-damaging agents. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1669-81. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196765

  19. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of agents... to: (i) Establish performance criteria for Poolers. (ii) Monitor and evaluate the financial...

  20. Investigation on pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of a novel platinum anticancer agent in rats by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Wen, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Di; Fan, Ali; Zhang, Yongjie; Deng, Shuhua; Wang, Xin; Liu, Qingwang; Lu, Yang; Wang, Zhimei; Gou, Shaohua; Chen, Xijing

    2014-08-01

    1. DN604 is a new platinum agent with encouraging anticancer activity. The present study was to explore the pharmacokinetic profiles, distribution and excretion of platinum in Sprague-Dawley rats after intravenous administration of DN604. A sensitive and selective inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method was established for determination of platinum in biological specimens. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by a non-compartmental method. 2. The area under concentration-time curve AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ for platinum originating from DN604 at 10 mg/kg were 25.15 ± 1.29 and 28.72 ± 1.04 μg/hml, respectively. The mean residence time MRT was 36.59 ± 6.65 h. The volume of distribution Vz was 11.42 ± 2.49 l/kg and clearance CL was 0.18 ± 0.01 l/h/kg. In addition, the elimination half-life T1/2z was 44.83 ± 9.75 h. After intravenous administration of DN604, platinum was extensively distributed in most of tested tissues except brain. The majority of platinum excreted via urine, and its accumulative excretion ratio during the period of 120 h was 63.5% ± 7.7% for urine, but only 6.94% ± 0.11% for feces. 3. The satisfactory half-life, wide distribution and high excretion made this novel platinum agent worthy of further research and development.

  1. [Mechanism of Platinum Derivatives Induced Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Yan, Feifei; Duan, Jianchun; Wang, Jie

    2015-09-20

    Platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. Two major problems exist, however, in the clinic use of platinum derivatives. One is the development of tumor resistance to the drug during therapy, leading to treatment failure. The other is the drug's toxicity such as the cisplatin's nephrotoxicity, which limits the dose that can be administered. This paper describes the mechanism of platinum derivatives induced kidney injury.

  2. Photoactive platinum(ii) β-diketonates as dual action anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Raza, Md Kausar; Mitra, Koushambi; Shettar, Abhijith; Basu, Uttara; Kondaiah, Paturu; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2016-08-16

    Platinum(ii) complexes, viz. [Pt(L)(cur)] (1), [Pt(L)(py-acac)] (2) and [Pt(L)(an-acac)] (3), where HL is 4,4'-bis-dimethoxyazobenzene, Hcur is curcumin, Hpy-acac and Han-acac are pyrenyl and anthracenyl appended acetylacetone, were prepared, characterized and their anticancer activities were studied. Complex [Pt(L)(acac)] (4) was used as a control. Complex 1 showed an absorption band at 430 nm (ε = 8.8 × 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1)). The anthracenyl and pyrenyl complexes displayed bands near 390 nm (ε = 3.7 × 10(4) for 3 and 4.4 × 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1) for 2). Complex 1 showed an emission band at 525 nm (Φ = 0.017) in 10% DMSO-DPBS (pH, 7.2), while 2 and 3 were blue emissive (λem = 440 and 435, Φ = 0.058 and 0.045). There was an enhancement in emission intensity on glutathione (GSH) addition indicating diketonate release. The platinum(ii) species thus formed acted as a transcription inhibitor. The released β-diketonate base showed photo-chemotherapeutic activity. The complexes photocleaved plasmid DNA under blue light of 457 nm forming ∼75% nicked circular (NC) DNA with hydroxyl radicals and singlet oxygen as the ROS. Complexes 1-3 were photocytotoxic in skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells giving IC50 of 8-14 μM under visible light (400-700 nm, 10 J cm(-2)), while being non-toxic in the dark (IC50: ∼60 μM). Complex 4 was inactive. Complexes 1-3 generating cellular ROS caused apoptotic cell death under visible light as evidenced from DCFDA and annexin-V/FITC-PI assays. This work presents a novel way to deliver an active platinum(ii) species and a phototoxic β-diketone species to the cancer cells. PMID:27488950

  3. Intracellular glutathione and cytotoxicity of platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, L; Creaven, P J; Perez, R; Zdanowicz, J R; Raghavan, D

    1995-01-01

    Although there have been a number of reports correlating cellular GSH levels with cytotoxicity of platinum agents, none has examined the relationship between GSH concentrations and cytotoxicity. In this study, using a highly specific HPLC method for measuring GSH and expressing GSH as concentration and also per cell number, we evaluated the correlation between GSH levels and the cytotoxicity to five agents in ten human tumor cell lines. The five platinum agents included the platinum(II) complexes cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin and platinum(IV) complexes iproplatin and tetraplatin. The correlation between intracellular GSH concentration and cytotoxicity was highly significant only for iproplatin (P = 0.002) followed by tetraplatin, which demonstrated a trend toward statistical significance (P = 0.06). Cytotoxicity of the other platinum complexes showed no relation to GSH concentration, cisplatin itself showing a P-value of 0.09. In contrast, the GSH levels normalized to cell number showed a statistically significant correlation with the cytotoxicity of four of the five platinum agents, the exception being carboplatin; the strongest correlation observed was that for iproplatin and tetraplatin. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity in these cell lines showed no correlation with cytotoxicity of any of the platinum complexes. Our results, from the analyses of both GSH concentration as well as GSH per cell number, suggest a significantly higher interaction between GSH and iproplatin compared with the other platinum agents. Moreover, our data suggest that relationships between cytotoxicity and GSH levels on a per-cell basis may not persist when differences in cell volume are taken into account.

  4. Comparison of the Anti-tumor Effects of Two Platinum Agents (Miriplatin and Fine-Powder Cisplatin)

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shobu Nitta, Norihisa Ohta, Shinichi Sonoda, Akinaga Otani, Hideji Tomozawa, Yuki Nitta-Seko, Ayumi Tsuchiya, Keiko Tanka, Toyohiko Takahashi, Masashi Murata, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of miriplatin-lipidol and fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspensions. Methods: Assessment of the cytotoxicity of two drugs was performed: a soluble derivative of miriplatin (DPC) and fine-powder cisplatin. We randomly divided 15 rabbits with transplanted VX2 liver tumors into three equal groups. They were infused via the proper hepatic artery with a miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (ML), a fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspension (CL), or saline (control) and the tumor growth rate was determined on MR images acquired before and 7 days after treatment. The concentration of platinum (PCs) in blood was assayed immediately, and 10, 30, and 60 min, and 24 h and 7 days after drug administration. Its concentration in tumor and surrounding normal liver tissues was determined at 7 days postadministration. Results: At high concentrations, fine-powder cisplatin exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than DPC. At low concentrations, both agents manifested weak cytotoxicity. While there was no difference between the tumor growth rate of the ML and the CL groups, the difference between the controls and ML- and CL-treated rabbits was significant. The blood PCs peaked at 10 min and then gradually decreased over time. On the other hand, no platinum was detected at any point after the administration of ML. There was no difference between the ML and CL groups in the PCs in tumor tissues; however, in normal hepatic tissue, the PCs were higher in ML- than CL-treated rabbits. Conclusions: We confirmed the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL. There was no significant difference between the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL at 7 days postadministration.

  5. Potent and non-specific inhibition of cytochrome P450 by JM216, a new oral platinum agent.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Y.; Shimizu, T.; Nakamura, K.; Mushiroda, T.; Nakagawa, T.; Kodama, T.; Kamataki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Bis-acetato-ammine-dichloro-cyclohexylamine-platinum (IV), JM216, is the first antineoplastic platinum compound that can be given to patients orally. Several phase II clinical trials of JM216 monotherapy have already been reported. However, no information on the potential drug interactions caused by JM216 is available. In this study, the capacity of JM216 to inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP) in human liver microsomes was investigated by measuring the inhibition potential (IC50 and Ki) on prototype reactions. Specific substrates of CYP included testosterone (catalysed by CYP3A4), paclitaxel (CYP2C8), 7-ethoxyresorufin (CYP1A1, CYP1A2), coumarin (CYP2A6), aniline (CYP2E1) and (+/-)-bufuralol (CYP2D6). JM216 inhibited the catalytic activities of CYP isozymes. The IC50 values were between 0.3 microM and 10 microM, indicating strong and non-specific inhibitory effects of JM216. The inhibition occurred in a non-competitive manner, and the Ki value was 1.0 and 0.9 microM for metabolite formation of testosterone and paclitaxel respectively. Therefore, some in vivo studies should be conducted to determine whether or not there is a correlation between in vivo and in vitro results. PMID:9820175

  6. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide.

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of cis-Diphenyl Pyridineamine Platinum(II) Complexes as Potential Anti-Breast Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Priscilla; Ramirez, Verenice; Metta-Magaña, Alejandro J.; Villagrán, Dino; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Das, Siddhartha; Nuñez, Jose E.

    2015-01-01

    Although cisplatin is considered as an effective anti-cancer agent, it has shown limitations and may produce toxicity in patients. Therefore, we synthesized two cis-dichlorideplatinum(II) compounds (13 and 14) composed of meta- and para-N,N-diphenyl pyridineamine ligands through a reaction of the amine precursors and PtCl2 with respective yields of 16% and 47%. We hypothesized that compounds 13 and 14, with lipophilic ligands, should transport efficiently in cancer cells and demonstrate more effectiveness than cisplatin. When tested for biological activity, compounds 13 and 14 were found to inhibit the growth of MCF 7 and MDA-MB-231 cells (IC50s 1 ± 0.4 μM and 1 ± 0.2 μM for 13 and 14, respectively, and IC50 7.5 ± 1.3 μM for compound 13 and 1 ± 0.3 μM for compound 14). Incidentally, these doses were found to be lower than cisplatin doses (IC50 5 ± 0.7 μM for MCF 7 and 10 ± 1.1 μM for MDA-MB-231). Similar to cisplatin, 13 and 14 interacted with DNA and induced apoptosis. However, unlike cisplatin, they blocked the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells suggesting that in addition to apoptotic and DNA-binding capabilities, these compounds are useful in blocking the metastatic migration of breast cancer cells. To delineate the mechanism of action, computer-aided analyses (DFT calculations) were conducted for compound 13. Results indicate that in vivo, the pyridineamine ligands are likely to dissociate from the complex, forming a platinum DNA adduct with anti-proliferative activity. These results suggest that complexes 13 and 14 hold promise as potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:24737042

  8. HPLC and 31P NMR characterization of the reaction between antitumor platinum agents and the phosphorothioate chemoprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721).

    PubMed

    Thompson, D C; Wyrick, S D; Holbrook, D J; Chaney, S G

    1995-10-26

    In prior studies, we examined the effects of the radioprotective and chemoprotective agent WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] on the in vivo biotransformation of the cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)] analog ormaplatin [(d,I)trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetrachloroplatinum(IV), Pt(dach)Cl4, (formerly called tetraplatin)]. Those data suggested that a direct interaction between WR-2721 and ormaplatin and/or the corresponding Pt(II) drug, Pt(dach)Cl2, may be occurring in vivo. This would be in contrast to the generally accepted hypothesis that WR-2721 is a prodrug that must first be converted by alkaline phosphatase to a free thiol compound, WR-1065, before any appreciable reactivity would be evident. However, the major biotransformation product observed in the peritoneal fluid, plasma, and all tissues was Pt(dach)(WR-1065). We report here on further investigations into the in vitro reactivity of Pt(dach) compounds with WR-2721 and WR-1065. Separation of reaction products resulting from incubation of Pt(dach)(malonato) with either WR-2721 or WR-1065 under physiological conditions gave profiles that were indistinguishable by reverse phase HPLC and cation exchange HPLC at two different pHs. 31P NMR characterization of the dephosphorylation of WR-2721 revealed essentially no loss of inorganic phosphate for up to 24 hr when incubated in unbuffered water at 30 degrees. In contrast, when incubated with a 1:1 molar ratio of cisplatin under the same conditions, the WR-2721 signal was decreased markedly in the first 5 min, and had disappeared almost completely by 1 hr. The signal corresponding to inorganic phosphate increased in parallel to the decrease in the WR-2721 signal. No intermediate formation of a complex containing both platinum and phosphate could be detected at any time. These data suggest that the reaction between WR-2721 and platinum complexes results in rapid dephosphorylation of WR-2721, and, consequently, that the reaction

  9. Retained platinum uptake and indifference to p53 status make novel transplatinum agents active in platinum-resistant cells compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert F.; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Robey, Rob; Balis, Frank M.; Farrell, Nicholas P.; Fojo, Tito

    2012-01-01

    Despite the clinical success of platinum-containing drugs in the treatment of solid tumors, acquired resistance remains a major obstacle. We previously identified a group of novel transplanaramine or transplatinum compounds based on distinct activity profiles in the NCI-60 panel. In the present study, parental KB-3.1 cells with wild-type p53 and its cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant sublines harboring mutant p53 proteins were used to contrast several transplatinum compounds with cisplatin and oxaliplatin. The transplatinum compounds retained cytotoxic activity in the resistant cell lines. While intracellular accumulation and DNA platination of cisplatin and oxaliplatin was decreased in the resistant cells, the transplatinum compounds both accumulated intracellularly and platinated DNA at comparable levels in all cell lines. Cytoflow analysis confirmed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin alter the cell cycle distribution and result in apoptosis; however, at comparably toxic concentrations, the transplatinum compounds did not alter the cell cycle distribution. Analysis of the cytoplasmic fraction treated with acetone showed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin readily bound to macromolecules in the pellet, whereas a larger percentage of the transplatinum compounds remained in the supernatant. We concluded that, distinct from platinum compounds currently in use, transplatinum compounds accumulate intracellularly in resistant cells at levels comparable to those in drug-sensitive cells, do not affect the cell cycle and thus retain cytotoxicity independent of p53 status and likely have cytoplasmic targets that are important in their activity. PMID:22333583

  10. Shape and composition-controlled platinum alloy nanocrystals using carbon monoxide as reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Gross, Adam; Yang, Hong

    2011-02-01

    The shape of metal alloy nanocrystals plays an important role in catalytic performances. Many methods developed so far in controlling the morphologies of nanocrystals are however limited by the synthesis that is often material and shape specific. Here we show using a gas reducing agent in liquid solution (GRAILS) method, different Pt alloy (Pt-M, M = Co, Fe, Ni, Pd) nanocrystals with cubic and octahedral morphologies can be prepared under the same kind of reducing reaction condition. A broad range of compositions can also be obtained for these Pt alloy nanocrystals. Thus, this GRAILS method is a general approach to the preparation of uniform shape and composition-controlled Pt alloy nanocrystals. The area-specific oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of Pt(3)Ni catalysts at 0.9 V are 0.85 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanocubes, and 1.26 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanooctahedra. The ORR mass activity of the octahedral Pt(3)Ni catalyst reaches 0.44 A/mg(Pt).

  11. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  12. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  13. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  14. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  15. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  16. Novel combination of mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (mdivi-1) and platinum agents produces synergistic pro-apoptotic effect in drug resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Wang, Jingnan; Roginskaya, Vera; McDermott, Lee A; Edwards, Robert P; Stolz, Donna B; Llambi, Fabien; Green, Douglas R; Van Houten, Bennett

    2014-06-30

    Overcoming platinum drug resistance represents a major clinical challenge in cancer treatment. We discovered a novel drug combination using cisplatin and a class of thioquinazolinone derivatives including mdivi-1 (mitochondrial division inhibitor-1), that induces synergistic apoptosis in platinum resistant tumor cells, including those from cisplatin-refractory endstage ovarian cancer patients. However, through study of the combination effect on Drp1 (the reported target of mdivi-1) knockout MEF cells and the functional analysis of mdivi-1 analogs, we revealed that the synergism between mdivi-1 and cisplatin is Drp1-independent. Mdivi-1 impairs DNA replication and its combination with cisplatin induces a synergistic increase of replication stress and DNA damage, causing a preferential upregulation of a BH3-only protein Noxa. Mdivi-1 also represses mitochondrial respiration independent of Drp1, and the combination of mdivi-1 and cisplatin triggers substantial mitochondrial uncoupling and swelling. Upregulation of Noxa and simultaneous mitochondrial swelling causes synergistic induction of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), proceeding robust mitochondrial apoptotic signaling independent of Bax/Bak. Thus, the novel mode of MOMP induction by the combination through the "dual-targeting" potential of mdivi-1 on DNA replication and mitochondrial respiration suggests a novel class of compounds for platinum-based combination option in the treatment of platinum as well as multidrug resistant tumors.

  17. Treatment of recurrent and platinum-refractory stage IV non-small cell lung cancer with nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) as a single agent.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashish; Schneider, Bryan J; Christos, Paul J; Audibert, Lauren F; Cagney, Jennifer M; Scheff, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    The role of single-agent nab-paclitaxel in relapsed or platinum-refractory advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well reported in Western populations. We reviewed our own institution's experience using nab-paclitaxel in these settings. We analyzed the records of stage IV NSCLC patients with relapsed or platinum-refractory disease treated with single-agent nab-paclitaxel at Weill Cornell Medical College between October 2008 and December 2013. The primary endpoint of the study was treatment failure-free survival (TFFS), defined as the time from the start of nab-paclitaxel therapy to discontinuation of the drug for any reason. The best overall response was recorded for each patient, and overall response and disease control rates were calculated. Thirty-one stage IV NSCLC patients received a median of 4 cycles (range 1-40) of nab-paclitaxel. Dose reduction or drug discontinuation due to toxicity occurred in 10 patients, mainly because of grade 2/3 fatigue or peripheral neuropathy. The overall response rate was 16.1 %, and the disease control rate was 64.5 %. Median TFFS was 3.5 months (95 % CI 1.3-5.3 months). No statistically significant difference in TFFS based on line of therapy or prior taxane exposure was identified. There was a statistically significant decrease in TFFS for patients with non-adenocarcinoma histology, although there were only five patients in this group. There was a trend toward reduction in the risk of treatment failure with increasing age. One patient remained on nab-paclitaxel therapy for over 3 years. Single-agent nab-paclitaxel was well tolerated and demonstrated efficacy in advanced NSCLC patients with relapsed or platinum-refractory disease. Further prospective clinical trials with nab-paclitaxel in these settings are warranted.

  18. pH-dependent release of trace elements including platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucha, Veronika; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Strnad, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    The release of trace metals and platinum group elements (PGEs) from automobile exhaust catalysts represents a remarkable source of higly dispersed environmental contamination. Especially, PGEs have shown increasing research interest due to their possible bioaccessibility. In our research, we focused on leaching behaviour of trace metals from gasoline and diesel automobile catalysts. While catalysts for gasoline engines contain a mixture of Pt-Pd-Rh or Pd-Rh, catalysts for diesel engines are composed only of Pt. We used dust from two crushed gasoline and two crushed diesel catalysts (new and aged). The dust of gasoline catalysts contains significant concentrations of Pt (700 mg.kg-1), Pd (11 000 mg.kg-1) and Rh (700 mg.kg-1). And the dust of diesel catalysts are composed of Pt (3 900 mg.kg-1) and they contains negligible amounts of Pd dan Rh (< 0.5 mg.kg-1, < 0.1 mg.kg-1, respectively). To evaluate leaching of trace metals from dust we used pH-stat leaching test according to the European standard CEN/TS 14997. The concentrations of cations: PGEs (Pt, Pd a Rh), K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, La and Ce were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and anions: F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- by high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the dusts from catalysts were relatively stable to acid/base influence, the leaching of trace metals from catalysts showed a dependence on pH. Generally, the highest concentrations were released under acidic conditions. The leaching of PGEs was higher for Pt in diesel catalysts and for Pd and Rh in gasoline catalysts. The highest concentrations of Zn and Pb were observed in old catalysts. The rare earth metals were released more from gasoline catalysts. Catalysts particles represent health risk especially with respect to their PGEs contents.

  19. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  20. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  1. Recruitment of trimeric proliferating cell nuclear antigen by G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinases following DNA damage with platinum-based antitumour agents

    PubMed Central

    He, G; Kuang, J; Koomen, J; Kobayashi, R; Khokhar, A R; Siddik, Z H

    2013-01-01

    Background: In cycling tumour cells, the binary cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk4/cyclin D or Cdk2/cyclin E complex is inhibited by p21 following DNA damage to induce G1 cell-cycle arrest. However, it is not known whether other proteins are also recruited within Cdk complexes, or their role, and this was investigated. Methods: Ovarian A2780 tumour cells were exposed to the platinum-based antitumour agent 1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane(trans-diacetato)(dichloro)platinum(IV) (DAP), which preferentially induces G1 arrest in a p21-dependent manner. The Cdk complexes were analysed by gel filtration chromatography, immunoblot and mass spectrometry. Results: The active forms of Cdk4 and Cdk2 complexes in control tumour cells have a molecular size of ∼140 kDa, which increased to ∼290 kDa when inhibited following G1 checkpoint activation by DAP. Proteomic analysis identified Cdk, cyclin, p21 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the inhibited complex, and biochemical studies provided unequivocal evidence that the increase in ∼150 kDa of the inhibited complex is consistent with p21-dependent recruitment of PCNA as a trimer, likely bound to three molecules of p21. Although p21 alone was sufficient to inhibit the Cdk complex, PCNA was critical for stabilising p21. Conclusion: G1 Cdk complexes inhibited by p21 also recruit PCNA, which inhibits degradation and, thereby, prolongs activity of p21 within the complex. PMID:24104967

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Non-Platinum-Based Halogenated Compounds as Potent Antitumor Agents for Natural Targeted Chemotherapy of Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Qin-Rong; Ou, Ning; Wang, Chun-Rong; Warrington, Jenny

    2015-06-01

    Based on a molecular-mechanism-based anticancer drug discovery program enabled by an innovative femtomedicine approach, we have found a previously unknown class of non-platinum-based halogenated molecules (called FMD compounds) as potent antitumor agents for effective treatment of cancers. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo studies of the compounds for targeted chemotherapy of cervical, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Our results show that these FMD agents led to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest in the S phase, and apoptosis in cancer cells. We also observed that such a FMD compound caused an increase of reduced glutathione (GSH, an endogenous antioxidant) levels in human normal cells, while it largely depleted GSH in cancer cells. We correspondingly found that these FMD agents exhibited no or little toxicity toward normal cells/tissues, while causing significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, as well as suppression and delay in tumor growth in mouse xenograft models of cervical, ovarian, breast and lung cancers. These compounds are therefore a previously undiscovered class of potent antitumor agents that can be translated into clinical trials for natural targeted chemotherapy of multiple cancers.

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Non-Platinum-Based Halogenated Compounds as Potent Antitumor Agents for Natural Targeted Chemotherapy of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Qin-Rong; Ou, Ning; Wang, Chun-Rong; Warrington, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Based on a molecular-mechanism-based anticancer drug discovery program enabled by an innovative femtomedicine approach, we have found a previously unknown class of non-platinum-based halogenated molecules (called FMD compounds) as potent antitumor agents for effective treatment of cancers. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo studies of the compounds for targeted chemotherapy of cervical, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Our results show that these FMD agents led to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest in the S phase, and apoptosis in cancer cells. We also observed that such a FMD compound caused an increase of reduced glutathione (GSH, an endogenous antioxidant) levels in human normal cells, while it largely depleted GSH in cancer cells. We correspondingly found that these FMD agents exhibited no or little toxicity toward normal cells/tissues, while causing significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, as well as suppression and delay in tumor growth in mouse xenograft models of cervical, ovarian, breast and lung cancers. These compounds are therefore a previously undiscovered class of potent antitumor agents that can be translated into clinical trials for natural targeted chemotherapy of multiple cancers. PMID:26351651

  4. Chiral Platinum(II) Complexes Featuring Phosphine and Chloroquine Ligands as Cytotoxic and Monofunctional DNA-Binding Agents.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Wilmer; Colina-Vegas, Legna; Rodrigues de Oliveira, Clayton; Tenorio, Juan C; Ellena, Javier; Gozzo, Fábio C; Cominetti, Marcia Regina; Ferreira, Antonio G; Ferreira, Marco Antonio Barbosa; Navarro, Maribel; Batista, Alzir A

    2015-12-21

    Chiral molecules in nature are involved in many biological events; their selectivity and specificity make them of great interest for understanding the behavior of bioactive molecules, by providing information about the chiral discrimination. Inspired by these conformational properties, we present the design and synthesis of novel chiral platinum(II) complexes featuring phosphine and chloroquine ligands with the general formula [PtCl(P)2(CQ)]PF6 (where (P)2 = triphenylphosphine (PPh3) (5), 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphine)propane (dppp) (6), 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane (dppb) (7), 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphine)ferrocene (dppf) (8), and CQ = chloroquine] and their precursors of the type [PtCl2(P)2] are described. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, absorption spectroscopy in the infrared and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) regions, multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, (31)P, (15)N, and (195)Pt) NMR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and mass spectrometry (in the case of chloroquine complexes). The interactions of the new platinum-chloroquine complexes with both albumin (BSA), using fluorescence spectroscopy, and DNA, by four widely reported methods were also evaluated. These experiments showed that these Pt-CQ complexes interact strongly with DNA and have high affinities for BSA, in contrast to CQ and CQDP (chloroquine diphosphate), which interact weakly with these biomolecules. Additional assays were performed in order to investigate the cytotoxicity of the platinum complexes against two healthy cell lines (mouse fibroblasts (L929) and the Chinese hamster lung (V79-4)) and four tumor cell lines (human breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), human lung (A549), and human prostate (DU-145)). The results suggest that the Pt-CQ complexes are generally more cytotoxic than the free CQ, showing that they are promising as anticancer drugs. PMID:26606142

  5. Cis-Diammine(Pyridine)Chloroplatinum(II), a Monofunctional Platinum(II) Antitumor Agent: Uptake, Structure, Function, And Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, K.S.; Todd, R.C.; Zhang, S.; McCormick, M.S.; D'Aquino, J.A.; Reardon, J.T.; Sancar, A.; Giacomini, K.M.; Lippard, S.J.

    2009-05-19

    We have identified unique chemical and biological properties of a cationic monofunctional platinum(II) complex, cis-diammine(pyridine)chloroplatinum(II), cis-[Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(py)Cl]{sup +} or cDPCP, a coordination compound previously identified to have significant anticancer activity in a mouse tumor model. This compound is an excellent substrate for organic cation transporters 1 and 2, also designated SLC22A1 and SLC22A2, respectively. These transporters are abundantly expressed in human colorectal cancers, where they mediate uptake of oxaliplatin, cis-[Pt(DACH)(oxalate)] (DACH = trans-R,R-1,2-diaminocyclohexane), an FDA-approved first-line therapy for colorectal cancer. Unlike oxaliplatin, however, cDPCP binds DNA monofunctionally, as revealed by an x-ray crystal structure of cis-{l_brace}Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(py){r_brace}{sup 2+} bound to the N7 atom of a single guanosine residue in a DNA dodecamer duplex. Although the quaternary structure resembles that of B-form DNA, there is a base-pair step to the 5{prime} side of the Pt adduct with abnormally large shift and slide values, features characteristic of cisplatin intrastrand cross-links. cDPCP effectively blocks transcription from DNA templates carrying adducts of the complex, unlike DNA lesions of other monofunctional platinum(II) compounds like {l_brace}Pt(dien){r_brace}{sup 2+}. cDPCP-DNA adducts are removed by the nucleotide excision repair apparatus, albeit much less efficiently than bifunctional platinum-DNA intrastrand cross-links. These exceptional characteristics indicate that cDPCP and related complexes merit consideration as therapeutic options for treating colorectal and other cancers bearing appropriate cation transporters.

  6. Imino-phosphine palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes: synthesis, molecular structures and evaluation as antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Motswainyana, William M; Onani, Martin O; Madiehe, Abram M; Saibu, Morounke; Thovhogi, Ntevheleni; Lalancette, Roger A

    2013-12-01

    The imino-phosphine ligands L1 and L2 were prepared via condensation reaction of 2-(diphenylphosphino)benzaldehyde with substituted anilines and obtained in very good yields. An equimolar reaction of L1 and L2 with either PdCl2(cod) or PtCl2(cod) gave new palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes 1-4. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1)H and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. The molecular structures of 2, 3 and 4 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. All the three molecular structures crystallized in monoclinic C2/c space system. The coordination geometry around the palladium and platinum atoms in respective structures exhibited distorted square planar geometry at the metal centers. The complexes were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against human breast (MCF-7) and human colon (HT-29) cancer cells, and they exhibited growth inhibitory activities and selectivity that were superior to the standard compound cisplatin.

  7. Functionalization of Platinum Complexes for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Xiaohui; Guo, Zijian

    2015-09-15

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs are the mainstay of chemotherapy regimens in clinic. Nevertheless, the efficacy of platinum drugs is badly affected by serious systemic toxicities and drug resistance, and the pharmacokinetics of most platinum drugs is largely unknown. In recent years, a keen interest in functionalizing platinum complexes with bioactive molecules, targeting groups, photosensitizers, fluorophores, or nanomaterials has been sparked among chemical and biomedical researchers. The motivation for functionalization comes from some of the following demands: to improve the tumor selectivity or minimize the systemic toxicity of the drugs, to enhance the cellular accumulation of the drugs, to overcome the tumor resistance to the drugs, to visualize the drug molecules in vitro or in vivo, to achieve a synergistic anticancer effect between different therapeutic modalities, or to add extra functionality to the drugs. In this Account, we present different strategies being used for functionalizing platinum complexes, including conjugation with bisphosphonates, peptides, receptor-specific ligands, polymers, nanoparticles, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, metal chelators, or photosensitizers. Among them, bisphosphonates, peptides, and receptor-specific ligands are used for actively targeted drug delivery, polymers and nanoparticles are for passively targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents are for theranostic purposes, metal chelators are for the treatment or prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and photosensitizers are for photodynamic therapy of cancers. The rationales behind these designs are explained and justified at the molecular or cellular level, associating with the requirements for diagnosis, therapy, and visualization of biological processes. To illustrate the wide range of opportunities and challenges that are emerging in this realm, representative examples of targeted drug delivery systems, anticancer conjugates

  8. Monofunctional Platinum (PtII) Compounds - Shifting the Paradigm in Designing New Pt-based Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Chong, Shu Xian; Au-Yeung, Steve Chik Fun; To, Kenneth Kin Wah

    2016-01-01

    Platinum (Pt)-based anticancer drugs, exemplified by cisplatin, are key components in combination chemotherapy. However, their effective use is hindered by toxicity and emergence of drug resistance. They bind to DNA and mainly form the Pt-GG diadduct, subsequently leading to apoptosis to mediate cell death. On the other hand, the Pt drug -proteins and -metabolites interactions, which involve the reaction between Pt and sulfur sites located in protein side chains and important bionucleophiles (e.g., glutathione), are responsible for the toxicity and drug resistance problem. Therefore, carefully designed coordinating ligands may provide the means of fine tuning the electronic environment around the core Pt atom and allow the resulting Pt compounds to bind with the DNA in a different manner. This may produce alternative cell death mechanisms in cancer cells, thereby circumventing Pt resistance. This article reviewed the recent development in monofunctional Pt complexes and their prospects in becoming a new generation of anticancer drugs.

  9. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, C D; Higgins, M J; Sullivan, R P; Jamali, S S; Moulton, S E; Wallace, G G

    2013-12-20

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

  10. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, C D; Higgins, M J; Sullivan, R P; Jamali, S S; Moulton, S E; Wallace, G G

    2013-12-20

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). PMID:24270681

  11. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, C. D.; Higgins, M. J.; Sullivan, R. P.; Jamali, S. S.; Moulton, S. E.; Wallace, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

  12. Trans- and cis-2-phenylindole platinum(II) complexes as cytotoxic agents against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomé, Maria; López, Concepción; González, Asensio; Ozay, Bahadir; Quirante, Josefina; Font-Bardía, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Calvis, Carme; Messeguer, Ramon; Baldomá, Laura; Badía, Josefa

    2013-09-01

    The synthesis and characterization of the new 2-phenylindole derivative: C8H3N-2-C6H5-3NOMe-5OMe (3c) and the trans- and cis-isomers of [Pt(3c)Cl2(DMSO)] complexes (4c and 5c, respectively) are described. The crystal structures of 4c·CH2Cl2 and 5c confirm: (a) the existence of a Pt-Nindole bond, (b) the relative arrangement of the Cl- ligands [trans- (in 4c) or cis- (in 5c)] and (c) the anti-(E) configuration of the oxime. The cytotoxic assessment of C8H3N-2-(C6H4-4‧R1)-3NOMe-5R2 [with R1 = R2 = H (3a); R1 = Cl, R2 = H (3b) and R1 = H, R2 = OMe (3c)] and the geometrical isomers of [Pt(L)Cl2(DMSO)] with L = 3a-3c [trans- (4a-4c) and cis- (5a-5c), respectively] against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) is also reported and reveals that all the platinum(II) complexes (except 4a) are more cytotoxic than cisplatin in front of the MCF7 cell line. Electrophoretic DNA migration studies of the synthesized compounds in the absence and in the presence of topoisomerase-I have been performed, in order to get further insights into their mechanism of action.

  13. [Platinum antitumor complexes].

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Giuliani, Jacopo; Muggia, Franco

    2015-12-01

    In the last 50 years the oncology has experienced remarkable changes resulting in transforming malignant germ-cell testicular tumors from highly fatal to nearly uniformly cured neoplasms. This clinical landmark was justly attributed to the identification of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg in his experiments dating to 1965. On this 50th anniversary of this discovery, one is reminded of the following key aspects in cancer therapeutics: 1) the life-story of Barnett Rosenberg and his legacy that included organizing nearly quadrennial "platinum" meetings incorporating advances in cancer biology into evolving therapeutic strategies; 2) the search for less toxic analogs of cisplatin leading to the development of carboplatin; 3) clinical research into attenuation of cisplatin toxicities; 4) oxaliplatin and the expansion of the therapeutic spectrum of platinum compounds; and 5) the ongoing multifaceted investigations into the problem of "platinum resistance".

  14. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  15. Method for forming porous platinum films

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming a platinum film includes providing a substrate, sputtering a crystalline platinum oxide layer over at least a portion of the substrate, and reducing the crystalline platinum oxide layer to form the platinum film. A device includes a non-conductive substrate and a platinum layer having a density of between about 2 and 5 g/cm.sup.3 formed over at least a portion of the non-conductive substrate. The platinum films produced in accordance with the present invention provide porous films suitable for use as electrodes, yet require few processing steps. Thus, such films are less costly. Such films may be formed on both conductive and non-conductive substrates. While the invention has been illustrated with platinum, other metals, such as noble metals, that form a low density oxide when reactively sputtered may also be used.

  16. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a)...

  17. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of novel platinum containing anticancer agent BP‐C1 studied in rabbits using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Navolotskii, Denis V.; Ivanenko, Natalya B.; Fedoros, Elena I.; Panchenko, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    A method of platinum quantification in whole blood samples after microwave digestion using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. The following analytical figures of merit have been established: limit of detection 1.1 µg/L for blood samples, dynamic range 3.6–200 µg/L, intra‐day precision (relative standard deviation, n = 9) did not exceed 5%. Spiked samples were analyzed for method validation. The method was used for pharmacokinetics studies of a novel anti‐cancer drug BP‐С1, a complex of cis‐configured platinum and benzene‐poly‐carboxylic acids. Main pharmacokinetic parameters (area under curve, maximum concentration, clearance, half‐life times for α‐ and β‐phase) were estimated for two dosage forms of BP‐C1 0.05 and 0.125 mass %. Pharmacokinetic curves were assessed for single and course administration. Studies were performed using rabbits (n = 6) as a model. BP‐C1 was injected intramuscularly. The study established dose proportionality of the tested dosage forms and suggested clinical dosing schedule: 5 days of injections followed by 2 days’ break. Platinum tissue distribution was studied in tissue samples collected 20 days after the last injection. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed in kidneys, liver, and muscles near injection site. ‘Slow’ phase of platinum excretion kinetics may be related to the muscles at the injection site. © 2015 The Authors. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26061351

  18. Failure mechanism characterization of platinum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Mcfarlen, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes procedures and results of testing performed on a platinum/10-percent rhodium, thin-wall tubular product. The purpose of the testing was to develop exemplar SEM fractographs to be used to characterize failures under various environmental conditions. Conditions evaluated for the platinum alloys included high temperature, hydrogen environment, braze metal contamination, and cyclic loading.

  19. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  20. Mineral resource of the month: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The precious metals commonly referred to as platinum-group metals (PGM) include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium and ruthenium. PGM are among the rarest of elements, and their market values — particularly for palladium, platinum and rhodium — are the highest of all precious metals.

  1. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  2. Platinum recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry E.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, catalytic converters are the major source of secondary platinum for recycling. Other sources of platinum scrap include reforming and chemical process catalysts. The glass industry is a small but significant source of platinum scrap. In North America, it has been estimated that in 1998 more than 20,000 kilograms per year of platinum-group metals from automobile catalysts were available for recycling. In 1998, an estimated 7,690 kilograms of platinum were recycled in the United States. U.S. recycling efficiency was calculated to have been 76 percent in 1998; the recycling rate was estimated at 16 percent.

  3. PLATINUM HEXAFLUORIDE AND METHOD OF FLUORINATING PLUTONIUM CONTAINING MIXTURES THERE-WITH

    DOEpatents

    Malm, J.G.; Weinstock, B.; Claassen, H.H.

    1959-07-01

    The preparation of platinum hexafluoride and its use as a fluorinating agent in a process for separating plutonium from fission products is presented. According to the invention, platinum is reacted with fluorine gas at from 900 to 1100 deg C to form platinum hexafluoride. The platinum hexafluoride is then contacted with the plutonium containing mixture at room temperature to form plutonium hexafluoride which is more volatile than the fission products fluorides and therefore can be isolated by distillation.

  4. Intraliposomal chemical activation patterns of liposomal cis-bis-neodecanoato-trans-R,R-1,2-diaminocyclohexane platinum (II) (L-NDDP)-a potential antitumour agent.

    PubMed

    Maclean, D S; Khokhar, A R; Tyle, P; Perez-Soler, R

    2000-01-01

    L-NDDP is a liposome-entrapped platinum compound currently in phase 2 clinical trials that has been shown to undergo intraliposomal activation. The degradation/activation kinetics of liposome entrapped cis-bis-neodecanoato-trans-R,R-1,2-diamminocyclohexane platinum (II) [L-NDDP] at different conditions of pH, and temperature is presented. Liposomes were reconstituted in a solution of 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) in water (pH 5) at room temperature (formulation conditions currently used in the ongoing clinical trials). In the temperature experiments, L-NDDP 0.9% sodium chloride liposomes were incubated in a water-bath at 40, 60, and 80 degrees C. In the pH experiments, these solutions were compared to water, phosphate with and without chloride ion present, phosphate buffer without chloride ion at pH 3.1, 5.0, and 7.4, and glycine buffer with and without chloride ion. In 0.9% sodium chloride at room temperature, the chemical degradation/activation of liposome-bound NDDP was biphasic, with most of the degradation (approximately 45% conversion) occurring during the first hour after formation of the liposome suspension. NDDP degradation was pH dependent: when using pH 3 phosphate buffer as a reconstituting solution, liposome-bound NDDP degraded rapidly, whereas in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer it was stable for > 72 h. NDDP degradation was also temperature-dependent, the 50% point decreasing from 12 h at 25 degrees C to 9.5 h at 40 degrees C, 3.8 h at 60 degrees C, and 0.3 h at 80 degrees C when using 0.9% NaCl in water as a reconstituting solution. Using glycine buffer solution with and without NaCl at room temperature, no NDDP degradation over a 72 h period was observed at 25 degrees C; however, at 40 degrees C, only 68% NDDP remained intact at 72 h. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) analysis of the eluting fractions after injection of L-NDDP samples reconstituted in chloride-containing and non chloride-containing solutions clearly indicated that the formation of

  5. Rural-urban migration including formal and informal workers in the urban sector: an agent-based numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Nilton; Oliveira, Tharnier; Silveira, Jaylson

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this work is to study rural-urban migration in the early stages of industrialization. We use an agent-based model and take into account the existence of informal and formal workers on the urban sector and possible migration movements, dependent on the agents' social and private utilities. Our agents are place on vertices of a square lattice, such that each vertex has only one agent. Rural, urban informal and urban formal workers are represented by different states of a three-state Ising model. At every step, a fraction a of the agents may change sectors or migrate. The total utility of a given agent is then calculated and compared to a random utility, in order to check if this agent turns into an actual migrant or changes sector. The dynamics is carried out until an equilibrium state is reached and equilibrium variables are then calculated and compared to available data. We find that a generalized Harris-Todaro condition is satisfied [1] on these equilibrium regimes, i.e, the ratio between expected wages between any pair of sectors reach a constant value. [4pt] [1] J. J. Silveira, A. L. Esp'indola and T. J. Penna, Physica A, 364, 445 (2006).

  6. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  7. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  8. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  9. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  10. Inhibition of transcription by platinum antitumor compounds

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ryan C.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin are three FDA-approved members of the platinum anticancer drug family. These compounds induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming a variety of structural adducts and triggering cellular responses, one of which is the inhibition of transcription. In this report we present (i) a detailed review of the structural investigations of various Pt-DNA adducts and the effects of these lesions on global DNA geometry; (ii) research detailing inhibition of cellular transcription by Pt-DNA adducts; and (iii) a mechanistic analysis of how DNA structural distortions induced by platinum damage may inhibit RNA synthesis in vivo. A thorough understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of platinum antitumor agents will aid in the development of new compounds in the family. PMID:20046924

  11. Platinum-containing compound platinum pyrithione is stronger and safer than cisplatin in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong; Chen, Xin; Zang, Dan; Lan, Xiaoying; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Zhang, Peiquan; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Yuning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Xiuhua; He, Zhimin; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2016-09-15

    DNA is the well-known molecular target of current platinum-based anticancer drugs; consequently, their clinical use is severely restricted by their systemic toxicities and drug resistance originating from non-selective DNA damage. Various strategies have been developed to circumvent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy but the inherent problem remains unsolved. Here we report that platinum pyrithione (PtPT), a chemically well-characterized synthetic complex of platinum, inhibits proteasome function and thereby exhibits greater and more selective cytotoxicity to multiple cancer cells than cisplatin, without showing discernible DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, unlike the classical proteasome inhibitor bortezomib/Velcade which inhibits the proteasome via blocking the peptidase activity of 20S proteasomes, PtPT primarily deactivates 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases USP14 and UCHL5. Furthermore, PtPT can selectively induce cytotoxicity and proteasome inhibition in cancer cells from leukemia patients but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans. In nude mice, PtPT also remarkably inhibited tumor xenograft growth, without showing the adverse effects that were induced by cisplatin. Hence, we have discovered a new platinum-based anti-tumor agent PtPT which targets 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases rather than DNA in the cell and thereby exerts safer and more potent anti-tumor effects, identifying a highly translatable new platinum-based anti-cancer strategy. PMID:27381943

  12. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  13. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2012-08-07

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  14. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2011-12-06

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  15. Controlled synthesis of porous platinum nanostructures for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanqin; Zhang, Junwei; Yang, Yong; Huang, Zhengren; Long, Nguyen Viet; Nogami, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Porous platinum, that has outstanding catalytic and electrical properties and superior resistant characteristics to corrosion, has been widely applied in chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, electronic, and automotive industries. As the catalytic activity and selectivity depend on the size, shape and structure of nanomaterials, the strategies for controlling these factors of platinum nanomaterials to get excellent catalytic properties are discussed. Here, recent advances in the design and preparation of various porous platinum nanostructures are reviewed, including wet-chemical synthesis, electro-deposition, galvanic replacement reaction and de-alloying technology. The applications of various platinum nanostructures are also discussed, especially in fuel cells. PMID:24749422

  16. Simultaneous determination of four anti-dandruff agents including octopirox in shampoo products by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, L

    2001-06-01

    A method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the simultaneous identification and quantitative determination of four anti-dandruff agents such as salicylic acid, ketoconazole, climbazole, octopirox in commercial anti-dandruff shampoo products. A symmetry C18 column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) was used at temperature of 35 degrees C, mobile phase with flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1) was acetonitrile: water (containing 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.0, adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) = 60 : 40 (V/V) and UV detection at 224 nm and 305 nm. Samples were extracted with mobile phase by stirring and ultrasonic method. The average recoveries of four anti-dandruff agents were 98.0-104.1%. The relative standard deviations for samples were 0.11-0.90%. The method is simple, rapid and reproducible. PMID:18498472

  17. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  18. Internalization of Ineffective Platinum Complex in Nanocapsules Renders It Cytotoxic.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Oldrich; Novohradsky, Vojtech; Medrikova, Zdenka; Burdikova, Jana; Stuchlikova, Olga; Kasparkova, Jana; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-02-18

    Anticancer therapy by platinum complexes, based on nanocarrier-based delivery, may offer a new approach to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the platinum family of anticancer drugs. The original rules for the design of new anticancer platinum drugs were affected by the fact that, although cisplatin (cis-[PtCl2 (NH3)2) was an anticancer drug, its isomer transplatin was not cytotoxic. For the first time, it is demonstrated that simple encapsulation of an inactive platinum compound in phospholipid bilayers transforms it into an efficient cytotoxic agent. Notably, the encapsulation of transplatin makes it possible to overcome the resistance mechanisms operating in cancer cells treated with cisplatin and prevents inactivation of transplatin in the extracellular environment. It is also shown that transplatin delivered to the cells in nanocapsules, in contrast to free (nonencapsulated) complex, forms cytotoxic cross-links on DNA.

  19. Development and Validation of an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) Method for Quantitative Analysis of Platinum in Plasma, Urine, and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ti; Cai, Shuang; Forrest, Wai Chee; Mohr, Eva; Yang, Qiuhong; Forrest, M Laird

    2016-09-01

    Cisplatin, a platinum chemotherapeutic, is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for many solid tumors. In this work, we developed and validated an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method for quantitative determination of platinum levels in rat urine, plasma, and tissue matrices including liver, brain, lungs, kidney, muscle, heart, spleen, bladder, and lymph nodes. The tissues were processed using a microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) system prior to analysis on an Agilent 7500 ICP-MS. According to the Food and Drug Administration guidance for industry, bioanalytical validation parameters of the method, such as selectivity, accuracy, precision, recovery, and stability were evaluated in rat biological samples. Our data suggested that the method was selective for platinum without interferences caused by other presenting elements, and the lower limit of quantification was 0.5 ppb. The accuracy and precision of the method were within 15% variation and the recoveries of platinum for all tissue matrices examined were determined to be 85-115% of the theoretical values. The stability of the platinum-containing solutions, including calibration standards, stock solutions, and processed samples in rat biological matrices was investigated. Results indicated that the samples were stable after three cycles of freeze-thaw and for up to three months. PMID:27527103

  20. The alkaline single cell electrophoresis assay with eight mouse organs: results with 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Matsusaka, N; Madarame, H; Miyamae, Y; Ishida, K; Satoh, M; Sekihashi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-04-13

    The genotoxicity of 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers selected from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) groups 1, 2A, and 2B was evaluated in eight mouse organs with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) (comet) assay. Groups of four mice were treated once intraperitoneally at the dose at which micronucleus tests had been conducted, and the stomach, colon, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, brain, and bone marrow were sampled 3, 8, and/or 24 h later. All chemicals were positive in the SCGE assay in at least one organ. Of the 22 mono-functional alkylating agents, over 50% were positive in all organs except the brain and bone marrow. The two subsets of mono-functional alkylating agents differed in their bone marrow genotoxicity: only 1 of the 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines was positive in bone marrow as opposed to 8 of the 13 other alkylating agents, reflecting the fact that dialkyl N-nitrosoamines are poor micronucleus inducers in hematopoietic cells. The two groups of mono-functional alkylating agents also differ in hepatic carcinogenicity in spite of the fact that they are similar in hepatic genotoxicity. While dialkyl N-nitrosoamines produce tumors primarily in mouse liver, only one (styrene-7,8-oxide) out of 10 of the other type of mono-functional alkylating agents is a mouse hepatic carcinogen. Taking into consideration our previous results showing high concordance between hepatic genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for aromatic amines and azo compounds, a possible explanation for the discrepancy might be that chemicals that require metabolic activation show high concordance between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the liver. A high percent of the 10 DNA crosslinkers were positive in the SCGE assay in the gastrointestinal mucosa, but less than 50% were positive in the liver and lung. In this study, we allowed 10 min alkali-unwinding to obtain low and stable control values

  1. The molecular shape and the field similarities as criteria to interpret SAR studies for fragment-based design of platinum(IV) anticancer agents. Correlation of physicochemical properties with cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Julia; Montaña, Ángel M

    2016-09-01

    Molecular shape similarity and field similarity have been used to interpret, in a qualitative way, the structure-activity relationships in a selected series of platinum(IV) complexes with anticancer activity. MM and QM calculations have been used to estimate the electron density, electrostatic potential maps, partial charges, dipolar moments and other parameters to correlate the stereo-electronic properties with the differential biological activity of complexes. Extended Electron Distribution (XED) field similarity has been also evaluated for the free 1,4-diamino carrier ligands, in a fragment-based drug design approach, comparing Connolly solvent excluded surface, hydrophobicity field surface, Van der Waals field surface, nucleophilicity field surface, electrophilicity field surface and the extended electron-distribution maxima field points. A consistency has been found when comparing the stereo-electronic properties of the studied series of platinum(IV) complexes and/or the free ligands evaluated and their in vitro anticancer activity. PMID:27567201

  2. The molecular shape and the field similarities as criteria to interpret SAR studies for fragment-based design of platinum(IV) anticancer agents. Correlation of physicochemical properties with cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Julia; Montaña, Ángel M

    2016-09-01

    Molecular shape similarity and field similarity have been used to interpret, in a qualitative way, the structure-activity relationships in a selected series of platinum(IV) complexes with anticancer activity. MM and QM calculations have been used to estimate the electron density, electrostatic potential maps, partial charges, dipolar moments and other parameters to correlate the stereo-electronic properties with the differential biological activity of complexes. Extended Electron Distribution (XED) field similarity has been also evaluated for the free 1,4-diamino carrier ligands, in a fragment-based drug design approach, comparing Connolly solvent excluded surface, hydrophobicity field surface, Van der Waals field surface, nucleophilicity field surface, electrophilicity field surface and the extended electron-distribution maxima field points. A consistency has been found when comparing the stereo-electronic properties of the studied series of platinum(IV) complexes and/or the free ligands evaluated and their in vitro anticancer activity.

  3. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  4. Clinical evaluation of a frozen commercially prepared microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents, including the new triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Huynh, H; Hollis, R J

    2002-05-01

    A commercially prepared frozen broth microdilution panel (Trek Diagnostic Systems, Westlake, Ohio) was compared with a reference microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of two quality control (QC) strains and 99 clinical isolates of Candida spp. The antifungal agents tested included amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole. Microdilution testing was performed according to NCCLS recommendations. MIC endpoints were read visually after 48 h of incubation and were assessed independently for each microdilution panel. The MICs for the QC strains were within published limits for both the reference and Trek microdilution panels. Discrepancies among MIC endpoints of no more than 2 dilutions were used to calculate the percent agreement. Acceptable levels of agreement between the Trek and reference panels were observed for all antifungal agents tested against the 99 clinical isolates. The overall agreement for each antifungal agent ranged from 96% for ravuconazole to 100% for amphotericin B. The Trek microdilution panel appears to be a viable alternative to frozen microdilution panels prepared in-house. PMID:11980944

  5. Mineral resource of the month: platinum group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on platinum group metals (PGMs) and their properties. According to the author, PGMs, which include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium, and ruthenium, are among the rarest mineral commodities in the Earth's crust. PGMs are primarily used as catalytic converters that clean harmful exhaust from vehicle engines. They are also used in the chemical industry as catalysts in the production of nitric acid and in the petroleum refining industry.

  6. Development of Platinum(iv) Complexes as Anticancer Prodrugs: the Story so Far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Ang, Wee Han

    2012-06-01

    The serendipitous discovery of the antitumor properties of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg some forty years ago brought about a paradigm shift in the field of medicinal chemistry and challenged conventional thinking regarding the role of potentially toxic heavy metals in drugs. Platinum(II)-based anticancer drugs have since become some of the most effective and widely-used drugs in a clinician's arsenal and have saved countless lives. However, they are limited by high toxicity, severe side-effects and the incidence of drug resistance. In recent years, attention has shifted to stable platinum(IV) complexes as anticancer prodrugs. By exploiting the unique chemical and structural attributes of their scaffolds, these platinum(IV) prodrugs offer new strategies of targeting and killing cancer cells. This review summarizes the development of anticancer platinum(IV) prodrugs to date and some of the exciting strategies that utilise the platinum(IV) construct as targeted chemotherapeutic agents against cancer.

  7. Flow injection analysis with electrochemical detection for rapid identification of platinum-based cytostatics and platinum chlorides in water.

    PubMed

    Kominkova, Marketa; Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Kynicky, Jindrich; Pohanka, Miroslav; Beklova, Miroslava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-02-04

    Platinum-based cytostatics, such as cisplatin, carboplatin or oxaliplatin are widely used agents in the treatment of various types of tumors. Large amounts of these drugs are excreted through the urine of patients into wastewaters in unmetabolised forms. This phenomenon leads to increased amounts of platinum ions in the water environment. The impacts of these pollutants on the water ecosystem are not sufficiently investigated as well as their content in water sources. In order to facilitate the detection of various types of platinum, we have developed a new, rapid, screening flow injection analysis method with electrochemical detection (FIA-ED). Our method, based on monitoring of the changes in electrochemical behavior of analytes, maintained by various pH buffers (Britton-Robinson and phosphate buffer) and potential changes (1,000, 1,100 and 1,200 mV) offers rapid and cheap selective determination of platinum-based cytostatics and platinum chlorides, which can also be present as contaminants in water environments.

  8. Computer simulation on the water/platinum interface

    SciTech Connect

    Spohr, E. )

    1989-08-10

    A molecular model for the water/platinum interface has been devised. It includes the surface corrugation of the metal and orientationally anisotropic water-metal interactions obtained from quantum chemical cluster calculations. Barriers for the surface diffusion and for the reorientation of a single water molecule on the quadratic (100) face of the face-centered-cubic platinum crystal are discussed. The flexible Bopp-Jancso-Heinzinger water model describes the water-water interactions, and the platinum-platinum interactions are described by a single force constant. Molecular dynamics simulations of a water lamina confined by (100) platinum surfaces have been performed using these interaction potentials. The structure is discussed on the basis of one-particle density profiles and solvent pair correlation functions. The surface-induced structural inhomogeneity ranges up to distances of 10 {angstrom}. In the center of the lamina water properties are bulklike. Hydrogen bonding in the vicinity of the interface is only slightly reduced relative to the bulk. The orientational structure of water is strongly influenced by water-water interactions and is considerably different from the preferential orientation according to the water-platinum interaction potential. It leads to a dipolar potential drop across the interface of 1.1 V.

  9. Platinum recycling going green via induced surface potential alteration enabling fast and efficient dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Hodnik, Nejc; Baldizzone, Claudio; Polymeros, George; Geiger, Simon; Grote, Jan-Philipp; Cherevko, Serhiy; Mingers, Andrea; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.

    2016-01-01

    The recycling of precious metals, for example, platinum, is an essential aspect of sustainability for the modern industry and energy sectors. However, due to its resistance to corrosion, platinum-leaching techniques rely on high reagent consumption and hazardous processes, for example, boiling aqua regia; a mixture of concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acid. Here we demonstrate that complete dissolution of metallic platinum can be achieved by induced surface potential alteration, an ‘electrode-less' process utilizing alternatively oxidative and reductive gases. This concept for platinum recycling exploits the so-called transient dissolution mechanism, triggered by a repetitive change in platinum surface oxidation state, without using any external electric current or electrodes. The effective performance in non-toxic low-concentrated acid and at room temperature is a strong benefit of this approach, potentially rendering recycling of industrial catalysts, including but not limited to platinum-based systems, more sustainable. PMID:27767178

  10. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  11. Influence of Dose on Particle Size and Optical Properties of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gharibshahi, Elham; Saion, Elias

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to produce colloidal platinum nanoparticles by using steady absorption spectra with various chemical-based reduction methods often resulted in the fast disappearance of the absorption maxima leaving reduced platinum nanoparticles with little information on their optical properties. We synthesized colloidal platinum nanoparticles in an aqueous solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone by gamma radiolytic reduction method, which produced steady absorption spectra of fully reduced and highly pure platinum nanoparticles free from by-product impurities or reducing agent contamination. The average particle size was found to be in the range of 3.4–5.3 nm and decreased with increasing dose due to the domination of nucleation over ion association in the formation of metal nanoparticles by the gamma radiolytic reduction method. The platinum nanoparticles exhibit optical absorption spectra with two absorption peaks centered at about 216 and 264 nm and the peaks blue shifted to lower wavelengths with decreasing particle size. The absorption spectra of platinum nanoparticles were also calculated using quantum mechanical treatment and coincidently a good agreement was obtained between the calculated and measured absorption peaks at various particle sizes. This indicates that the 216 and 264-nm absorption peaks of platinum nanoparticles conceivably originated from the intra-band transitions of conduction electrons of (n = 5, l = 2) and (n = 6, l = 0) energy states respectively to higher energy states. The absorption energies, i.e., conduction band energies of platinum nanoparticles derived from the absorption peaks increased with increasing dose and decreased with increasing particle size. PMID:23203091

  12. Near-UV phosphorescent emitters: N-heterocyclic platinum(ii) tetracarbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Unger, Yvonne; Zeller, Alexander; Taige, Maria A; Strassner, Thomas

    2009-06-28

    Although examples of nickel(ii), palladium(ii) and platinum(ii) N-heterocyclic tetracarbene complexes are known in the literature, particularly platinum(ii) tetracarbene complexes are rare. We developed a new synthetic route via biscarbene acetate complexes, which make homoleptic as well as heteroleptic platinum(ii) tetracarbene complexes accessible. The reported photoluminescence data show that these complexes have good quantum yields and photostability and are a promising class of emitters for PhOLEDs. Characterization of the compounds includes a solid-state structure of the homoleptic complex bis(1,1'-diisopropyl-3,3'-methylenediimidazoline-2,2'-diylidene)platinum(ii) dibromide. PMID:19513490

  13. A Photoactivatable Platinum(IV) Complex Targeting Genomic DNA and Histone Deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Kasparkova, Jana; Kostrhunova, Hana; Novakova, Olga; Křikavová, Radka; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-11-23

    We report toxic effects of a photoactivatable platinum(IV) complex conjugated with suberoyl-bis-hydroxamic acid in tumor cells. The conjugate exerts, after photoactivation, two functions: activity as both a platinum(II) anticancer drug and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor in cancer cells. This approach relies on the use of a Pt(IV) pro-drug, acting by two independent mechanisms of biological action in a cooperative manner, which can be selectively photoactivated to a cytotoxic species in and around a tumor, thereby increasing selectivity towards cancer cells. These results suggest that this strategy is a valuable route to design new platinum agents with higher efficacy for photodynamic anticancer chemotherapy.

  14. Rationale and design of LUX-Head & Neck 1: a randomised, Phase III trial of afatinib versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who progressed after platinum-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving platinum-based chemotherapy as their first-line treatment have a dismal prognosis, with a median overall survival (OS) of ~7 months. Methotrexate is sometimes used following platinum failure or in patients not fit enough for platinum therapy, but this agent has not demonstrated any OS improvement. Targeted therapies are a novel approach, with the EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibody cetuximab (plus platinum-based chemotherapy) approved in the US and Europe in the first-line R/M setting, and as monotherapy following platinum failure in the US. However, there is still a high unmet medical need for new treatments that improve outcomes in the second-line R/M setting following failure on first-line platinum-containing regimens. Afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family blocker, was recently approved for the first-line treatment of EGFR mutation-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Afatinib has also shown clinical activity similar to cetuximab in a Phase II proof-of-concept HNSCC trial. Based on these observations, the Phase III, LUX-Head & Neck 1 study is evaluating afatinib versus methotrexate in R/M HNSCC patients following progression on platinum-based chemotherapy in the R/M setting. Methods/Design Patients with progressive disease after one first-line platinum-based chemotherapy are randomised 2:1 to oral afatinib (starting dose 40 mg once daily) or IV methotrexate (starting dose 40 mg/m2 once weekly) administered as monotherapy with best supportive care until progression or intolerable adverse events. Efficacy of afatinib versus methotrexate will be assessed in terms of progression-free survival (primary endpoint). Disease progression will be evaluated according to RECIST v1.1 by investigator and independent central review. Secondary endpoints include OS, tumour response and safety. Health-related quality of life and biomarker assessments will

  15. Thermophysical Properties of Platinum-Copper Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Shahid; Klotz, Ulrich E.; Pottlacher, Gernot

    2012-12-01

    Platinum and copper along with their alloys have been used in a broad range of applications including jewelry, coinage, electrical and electronic devices, and many others. Their thermophysical properties play an important role in casting processes and are required as input data for casting simulation. The focus of this work was to investigate these properties by different methods. Platinum, copper, and four platinum-copper alloys, namely, Pt96Cu04, Pt68Cu32, Pt50Cu50, and Pt25Cu75, were investigated within this work. The melting range and thermal expansion were measured at fem by differential scanning calorimetry and dilatometry, respectively. At TU Graz, wire-shaped samples were investigated by an ohmic pulse heating technique. This technique delivers thermophysical properties of electrically conducting materials far into the liquid phase. These measurements allow the calculation of specific heat capacity and the temperature dependencies of electrical resistivity, enthalpy, and density of these alloys in the solid and liquid phases. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature are estimated from resistivity data using the Wiedemann-Franz law at the end of the solid phase and at the beginning of the liquid phase. The results are compared with the available literature values.

  16. Platinum in Earth surface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, F.; Campbell, S. G.; Ball, A. S.; Pring, A.; Southam, G.

    2014-04-01

    Platinum (Pt) is a rare precious metal that is a strategic commodity for industries in many countries. The demand for Pt has more than doubled in the last 30 years due to its role in the catalytic conversion of CO, hydrocarbons and NOx in modern automobiles. To explore for new Pt deposits, process ores and deal with ecotoxicological effects of Pt mining and usage, the fundamental processes and pathways of Pt dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments need to be understood. Hence, the aim of this review is to develop a synergistic model for the cycling of Pt in Earth surface environments. This is achieved by integrating the geological/(biogeo)chemical literature, which focuses on naturally occurring Pt mobility around ore deposits, with the environmental/ecotoxicological literature dealing with anthropogenic Pt dispersion. In Pt deposits, Pt occurs as sulfide-, telluride- and arsenide, native metal and alloyed to other PGEs and iron (Fe). Increased mining and utilization of Pt combined with the burning of fossil fuels have led to the dispersion of Pt-containing nano- and micro-particles. Hence, soils and sediments in industrialized areas, urban environments and along major roads are now commonly Pt enriched. Platinum minerals, nuggets and anthropogenic particles are transformed by physical and (bio)geochemical processes. Complexation of Pt ions with chloride, thiosulfate, ammonium, cyanide, low- and high molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs and HMWOAs) and siderophores can facilitate Pt mobilization. Iron-oxides, clays, organic matter and (micro)biota are known to sequester Pt-complexes and -particles. Microbes and plants are capable of bioaccumulating and reductively precipitating mobile Pt complexes. Bioaccumulation can lead to toxic effects on plants and animals, including humans. (Bio)mineralization in organic matter-rich sediments can lead to the formation of secondary Pt particles and -grains. Ultimately, Pt is enriched in oceanic sediments

  17. Smoking and occupational allergy in workers in a platinum refinery.

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K. M.; Dally, M. B.; Nunn, A. J.; Stevens, J. F.; Stephens, R.; Farrer, N.; Hunter, J. V.; Stewart, M.; Hughes, E. G.; Newman Taylor, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that smoking increases the risk of sensitisation by occupational allergens. DESIGN--Historical prospective cohort study. SETTING--Platinum refinery. SUBJECTS--91 Workers (86 men) who started work between 1 January 1973 and 31 December 1974 and whose smoking habit and atopic state (on skin prick testing with common allergens) had been noted at joining. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of skin prick tests with platinum salts carried out routinely every three to six months and records of any respiratory symptoms noted by the refinery's occupational health service. Follow up was until 1980 or until leaving refinery work, whichever was earlier. RESULTS--57 Workers smoked and 29 were atopic; 22 developed a positive result on skin testing with platinum salts and 49 developed symptoms, including all 22 whose skin test result was positive. Smoking was the only significant predictor of a positive result on skin testing with platinum salts and its effect was greater than that of atopy; the estimated relative risks (95% confidence interval) when both were included in the regression model were: smokers versus non-smokers 5.05 (1.68 to 15.2) and atopic versus non-atopic 2.29 (0.88 to 5.99). Number of cigarettes smoked per day was the only significant predictor of respiratory symptoms. CONCLUSION--Smokers are at increased risk of sensitisation by platinum salts. PMID:2508944

  18. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  19. Nanocarriers for delivery of platinum anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Hardeep S; Nukolova, Natalia V; Kabanov, Alexander V; Bronich, Tatiana K

    2013-11-01

    Platinum based anticancer drugs have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy, and continue to be in widespread clinical use especially for management of tumors of the ovary, testes, and the head and neck. However, several dose limiting toxicities associated with platinum drug use, partial anti-tumor response in most patients, development of drug resistance, tumor relapse, and many other challenges have severely limited the patient quality of life. These limitations have motivated an extensive research effort towards development of new strategies for improving platinum therapy. Nanocarrier-based delivery of platinum compounds is one such area of intense research effort beginning to provide encouraging preclinical and clinical results and may allow the development of the next generation of platinum chemotherapy. This review highlights current understanding on the pharmacology and limitations of platinum compounds in clinical use, and provides a comprehensive analysis of various platinum-polymer complexes, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes and other nanoparticles currently under investigation for delivery of platinum drugs.

  20. Platinum and platinum based nanoalloys synthesized by wet chemistry.

    PubMed

    Salzemann, Caroline; Kameche, Farid; Ngo, Anh-Tu; Andreazza, Pascal; Calatayud, Monica; Petit, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Platinum nanocrystals and their derivatives with palladium and cobalt are of fundamental interest due to their wide field of application in chemistry and physics. Their properties are strongly dependent on their shape and composition. However the chemical route is far from allowing control of both shape and composition. In this paper, we show both experimentally and theoretically the important role of the interaction of small adsorbed molecules on the shape but also on the composition. This has been studied by comparing the case of pure palladium and platinum nanocrystals and the case of PtPd and PtCo nanoalloys synthesized by the liquid-liquid phase transfer method.

  1. Role of copper transporters in platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kilari, Deepak; Guancial, Elizabeth; Kim, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents are effective in the treatment of many solid malignancies. However, their efficacy is limited by toxicity and drug resistance. Reduced intracellular Pt accumulation has been consistently shown to correlate with resistance in tumors. Proteins involved in copper homeostasis have been identified as Pt transporters. In particular, copper transporter receptor 1 (CTR1), the major copper influx transporter, has been shown to play a significant role in Pt resistance. Clinical studies demonstrated that expression of CTR1 correlated with intratumoral Pt concentration and outcomes following Pt-based therapy. Other CTRs such as CTR2, ATP7A and ATP7B, may also play a role in Pt resistance. Recent clinical studies attempting to modulate CTR1 to overcome Pt resistance may provide novel strategies. This review discusses the role of CTR1 as a potential predictive biomarker of Pt sensitivity and a therapeutic target for overcoming Pt resistance. PMID:26862494

  2. Chitosan sorbents for platinum sorption from dilute solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Guibal, E.; Larkin, A.; Vincent, T.; Tobin, J.M.

    1999-10-01

    Chitosan has proved efficient at removing platinum in dilute effluents. The maximum uptake capacity reaches 300 mg/g (almost 1.5 mmol/g). The optimum pH for sorption is pH 2. A glutaraldehyde cross-linking pretreatment is necessary to stabilize the biopolymer in acidic solutions. Sorption isotherms have been studied as a function of pH, sorbent particle size, and the cross-linking ratio. Surprisingly, the extent of the cross-linking (determined by the concentration of the cross-linking agent in the treatment bath) has no significant influence on uptake capacity. Competitor anions such as chloride or nitrate induce a large decrease in the sorption efficiency. Sorption kinetics show also that uptake rate is not significantly changed by increasing either the cross-linking ratio or the particle size of the sorbent. Mass transfer rates are significantly affected by the initial platinum concentration and by the conditioning of the biopolymer. Gel-bead conditioning appears to reduce the sorption rate. While for molybdate and vanadate ions, mass transfer was governed by intraparticle mass transfer, for platinum, both external and intraparticle diffusion control the uptake rate. In contrast with the former ions, platinum does not form polynuclear hydrolyzed species, which are responsible for steric hindrance of diffusion into the polymer network.

  3. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates.

  4. Preparation of low-sulfur platinum and platinum aluminide layers in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Walston, William S. (Inventor); Schaeffer, Jon C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for preparing a coated nickel-base superalloy article reduces the sulfur content of the surface region of the metallic coating layers to low levels, thereby improving the adhesion of the coating layers to the article. The method includes depositing a first layer of platinum overlying the surface of a substrate, depositing a second layer of aluminum over the platinum, and final desulfurizing the article by heating the article to elevated temperature, preferably in hydrogen, and removing a small amount of material from the surface that was exposed during the step of heating. A ceramic layer may be deposited over the desulfurized article. The article may also be similarly desulfurized at other points in the fabrication procedure.

  5. [Platinum compounds in cancer therapy--past, present, and future].

    PubMed

    Akaza, H; Saijo, N; Aiba, K; Isonishi, S; Ohashi, Y; Kawai, K; Konishi, T; Saeki, T; Sone, S; Tsukagoshi, S; Tsuruo, T; Noguchi, S; Miki, T; Mikami, O; Smith, M; Hoctin-Boes, G; Stribling, D

    2001-05-01

    Platinum cytotoxics play an important role globally in the management of solid tumours. Cisplatin sets the standard for efficacy in both regions with careful administration to reduce nephrotoxicity. Carboplatin is associated with neurotoxicity, but has become the leading product in the US due largely to the easier to manage toxicity profile. Both agents have been widely used in both registered and non registered indications and are frequently combined with other cytotoxics. In Japan, cisplatin has been used successfully at low doses in combination with 5-FU based regimens and appears to achieve a synergistic effect, but controlled data are not yet available. More recently oxaliplatin (Europe) and nedaplatin (in Japan) have been introduced, but their clinical roles in therapy have yet to be established. One of the limiting features of the first generation of platinum compounds is that a significant proportion of tumours develop cross resistance to platins due to either changes in uptake or excretion, intracellular detoxification or accelerated DNA repair. The forum discussed the possibility for the development of better new platinum compounds, A new platin agent which had lower toxicity and higher efficacy across a wide range of cancers without the development of resistance would be a significant step forward. If the tolerability profile was suitable, an oral formulation may improve the quality of life for patients but this must not be at the expense of efficacy. Even after the introduction of new target based drugs, platinum cytotoxics are likely to be used to reduce the tumour mass and in some cases can be expected to potentiate the effects of the new agents. In preclinical studies, ZD0473 has been shown to by-pass some major mechanisms of resistance and has the potential to achieve these objectives and is now being evaluated in clinical studies in both Japan and the West. PMID:11383210

  6. Photoresponsive peptide azobenzene conjugates that specifically interact with platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinçer, S.; Tamerler, C.; Sarıkaya, M.; Pişkin, E.

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare photoresponsive peptide-azobenzene compounds which interacts with platinum surfaces specifically, in order to create smart surfaces for further novel applications in design of smart biosensors and array platforms. Here, a water-soluble azobenzene molecule, 4-hydroxyazo benzene,4-sulfonic acid was synthesized by diazo coupling reaction. A platinum-specific peptide, originally selected by a phage display technique was chemically synthesized/purchased, and conjugated with the azobenzene compound activated with carbonyldiimidazole. Both azobenzene and its conjugate were characterized (including photoresponsive properties) by FTIR, NMR, and UV-spectrophotometer. The yield of conjugation reaction estimated by ninhydrin assay was about 65%. Peptide incorporation did not restrict the light-sensitivity of azobenzene. Adsorption of both the peptide and its azobenzene conjugate was followed by Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) system. The kinetic evaluations exhibited that both molecules interact platinum surfaces, quite rapidly and strongly.

  7. Upper eyelid platinum chain placement for treating paralytic lagophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, B; Ferri, A; Leporati, M; Ferrari, S; Lanfranco, D; Ferri, T; Sesenna, E

    2014-12-01

    For the definitive treatment of lagophthalmos and satisfactory rehabilitation of the affected eye, different surgical strategies have been proposed, including static or dynamic procedures. Although some of these can have good results, lid loading is now the most common technique for treating paralytic long-term lagophthalmos. Among the different types of loading, the use of a platinum chain is preferred to the use of a standard gold weight because platinum has a higher density than gold and is also more biocompatible. In this paper authors retrospectively analyzed 43 patients with regards to functional and cosmetic results. Questionnaires were also employed to assess changes and improvements in the patients' quality of life. Analysis of the excellent results achieved confirmed that platinum chain lid loading should be considered as a first-line treatment for paralytic lagophthalmos rehabilitation. It is a simple, reliable, and effective technique that significantly improves the health-related quality of life of patients.

  8. Discovery of the calcium, indium, tin, and platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, S.; Gross, J.L.; Thoennessen, M.

    2011-07-15

    Currently, twenty-four calcium, thirty-eight indium, thirty-eight tin, and thirty-nine platinum isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented. - Highlights: Documentation of the discovery of all calcium, indium, tin and platinum isotopes. {yields} Summary of author, journal, year, place and country of discovery for each isotope. {yields} Brief description of discovery history of each isotope.

  9. Quantum chemical topology study of the water-platinum(II) interaction.

    PubMed

    Bergès, Jacqueline; Fourré, Isabelle; Pilmé, Julien; Kozelka, Jiri

    2013-02-01

    The "inverse hydration" of neutral complexes of Pt(II) by an axial water molecule, whose one OH-bond is oriented toward Pt, has been the subject of recent works, theoretical as well as experimental. To study the influence of the ligands on this non-conventional H-bond, we extend here our previous energy calculations, using the second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) method together with the Dolg-Pélissier pseudopotential for platinum, to various neutral complexes including the well-known chemotherapeutic agent "cisplatin". The stabilization energy, depending on the nature and the configuration of platinum ligands, is dominated by the same important dispersive component, for all the investigated complexes. For a further characterization of this particular H-bond, we used the atoms in molecules theory (AIM) and the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF). The charge transfer occurring from the complex to the water molecule and the Laplacian of the density at the bond critical point between water and Pt are identified as interesting AIM descriptors of this non-conventional H-bond. Beyond this AIM analysis, we show that the polarization of the ELF bonding O-H basin involved in the non-conventional H-bond is enhanced during the approach of the water molecule to the Pt complexes. When the water medium, treated in an implicit solvation model, is taken into account, the interaction energies become independent on the nature and configuration of platinum ligands. However, the topological descriptors remain qualitatively unchanged. PMID:23347164

  10. Quantum chemical topology study of the water-platinum(II) interaction.

    PubMed

    Bergès, Jacqueline; Fourré, Isabelle; Pilmé, Julien; Kozelka, Jiri

    2013-02-01

    The "inverse hydration" of neutral complexes of Pt(II) by an axial water molecule, whose one OH-bond is oriented toward Pt, has been the subject of recent works, theoretical as well as experimental. To study the influence of the ligands on this non-conventional H-bond, we extend here our previous energy calculations, using the second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) method together with the Dolg-Pélissier pseudopotential for platinum, to various neutral complexes including the well-known chemotherapeutic agent "cisplatin". The stabilization energy, depending on the nature and the configuration of platinum ligands, is dominated by the same important dispersive component, for all the investigated complexes. For a further characterization of this particular H-bond, we used the atoms in molecules theory (AIM) and the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF). The charge transfer occurring from the complex to the water molecule and the Laplacian of the density at the bond critical point between water and Pt are identified as interesting AIM descriptors of this non-conventional H-bond. Beyond this AIM analysis, we show that the polarization of the ELF bonding O-H basin involved in the non-conventional H-bond is enhanced during the approach of the water molecule to the Pt complexes. When the water medium, treated in an implicit solvation model, is taken into account, the interaction energies become independent on the nature and configuration of platinum ligands. However, the topological descriptors remain qualitatively unchanged.

  11. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  12. Fluorometric imaging methods for palladium and platinum and the use of palladium for imaging biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Matthew P; Pham, Dianne; Koide, Kazunori

    2015-07-21

    Neither palladium nor platinum is an endogenous biological metal. Imaging palladium in biological samples, however, is becoming increasingly important because bioorthogonal organometallic chemistry involves palladium catalysis. In addition to being an imaging target, palladium has been used to fluorometrically image biomolecules. In these cases, palladium species are used as imaging-enabling reagents. This review article discusses these fluorometric methods. Platinum-based drugs are widely used as anticancer drugs, yet their mechanism of action remains largely unknown. We discuss fluorometric methods for imaging or quantifying platinum in cells or biofluids. These methods include the use of chemosensors to directly detect platinum, fluorescently tagging platinum-based drugs, and utilizing post-labeling to elucidate distribution and mode of action.

  13. Nanocarriers for delivery of platinum anticancer drugs☆

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Nukolova, Natalia V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum based anticancer drugs have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy, and continue to be in widespread clinical use especially for management of tumors of the ovary, testes, and the head and neck. However, several dose limiting toxicities associated with platinum drug use, partial anti-tumor response in most patients, development of drug resistance, tumor relapse, and many other challenges have severely limited the patient quality of life. These limitations have motivated an extensive research effort towards development of new strategies for improving platinum therapy. Nanocarrier-based delivery of platinum compounds is one such area of intense research effort beginning to provide encouraging preclinical and clinical results and may allow the development of the next generation of platinum chemotherapy. This review highlights current understanding on the pharmacology and limitations of platinum compounds in clinical use, and provides a comprehensive analysis of various platinum–polymer complexes, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes and other nanoparticles currently under investigation for delivery of platinum drugs. PMID:24113520

  14. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  15. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action. PMID:24955838

  16. Article having an improved platinum-aluminum-hafnium protective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore Aswatha (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An article protected by a protective coating has a substrate and a protective coating having an outer layer deposited upon the substrate surface and a diffusion zone formed by interdiffusion of the outer layer and the substrate. The protective coating includes platinum, aluminum, no more than about 2 weight percent hafnium, and substantially no silicon. The outer layer is substantially a single phase.

  17. Synthesis of nanoscaled platinum particles (NSPP): their role in performance improvement of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang J.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2001-07-01

    In this work the synthesis of nano-scaled platinum particles by a chemical reducing technique within an ion-exchange membrane has been performed. It is desirable to gain a fundamental knowledge and understanding of the properties of small nano-scaled platinum particles within ion-exchange membranes, which can affect the performance of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) artificial muscles. In IPMC artificial muscle applications, the finite size of platinum particles is believed to strongly influence their properties. This might be related to a platinum surface effect originating from the electronic surface states of platinum particles that differ from the bulk states. In order to address this issue, we have attempted to synthesize small platinum particles having different size distributions by using protective agents. Further, we have characterized them as well. For IPMC artificial muscles, the presence of such nano-scale platinum particles minimizes the solvent- leakage from the surface electrodes. This in turn improves their performance dramatically. A successfully fabricated IPMC artificial muscle with nano-Platinum particles has shown a significantly improved force density as much as 100% than that of the conventional IPMC.

  18. Active targeting of cancer cells using folic acid-conjugated platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teow, Yiwei; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with human cells is an interesting topic for understanding toxicity and developing potential drug candidates. Water soluble platinum nanoparticles were synthesized viareduction of hexachloroplatinic acid using sodium borohydride in the presence of capping agents. The bioactivity of folic acid and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) capped platinum nanoparticles (Pt-nps) has been investigated using commercially available cell lines. In the cell viability experiments, PVP-capped nanoparticles were found to be less toxic (>80% viability), whereas, folic acid-capped platinum nanoparticles showed a reduced viability down to 24% after 72 h of exposure at a concentration of 100 μg ml-1 for MCF7 breast cancer cells. Such toxicity, combined with the possibility to incorporate functional organic molecules as capping agents, can be used for developing new drug candidates.

  19. Active targeting of cancer cells using folic acid-conjugated platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Teow, Yiwei; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with human cells is an interesting topic for understanding toxicity and developing potential drug candidates. Water soluble platinum nanoparticles were synthesized via reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid using sodium borohydride in the presence of capping agents. The bioactivity of folic acid and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) capped platinum nanoparticles (Pt-nps) has been investigated using commercially available cell lines. In the cell viability experiments, PVP-capped nanoparticles were found to be less toxic (>80% viability), whereas, folic acid-capped platinum nanoparticles showed a reduced viability down to 24% after 72 h of exposure at a concentration of 100 μg ml(-1) for MCF7 breast cancer cells. Such toxicity, combined with the possibility to incorporate functional organic molecules as capping agents, can be used for developing new drug candidates.

  20. A novel charged trinuclear platinum complex effective against cisplatin-resistant tumours: hypersensitivity of p53-mutant human tumour xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Pratesi, G; Perego, P; Polizzi, D; Righetti, S C; Supino, R; Caserini, C; Manzotti, C; Giuliani, F C; Pezzoni, G; Tognella, S; Spinelli, S; Farrell, N; Zunino, F

    1999-01-01

    Multinuclear platinum compounds were rationally designed to bind to DNA in a different manner from that of cisplatin and its mononuclear analogues. A triplatinum compound of the series (BBR 3464) was selected for preclinical development, since, in spite of its charged nature, it was very potent as cytotoxic agent and effective against cisplatin-resistant tumour cells. Anti-tumour efficacy studies were performed in a panel of human tumour xenografts refractory or poorly responsive to cisplatin. The novel platinum compound exhibited efficacy in all tested tumours and an impressive efficacy (including complete tumour regressions) was displayed in two lung carcinoma models, CaLu-3 and POCS. Surprisingly, BBR 3464 showed a superior activity against p53-mutant tumours as compared to those carrying the wild-type gene. The involvement of p53 in tumour response was investigated in an osteosarcoma cell line, SAOS, which is null for p53 and is highly sensitive to BBR 3464, and in the same cells following introduction of the wild-type p53 gene. Thus the pattern of cellular response was investigated in a panel of human tumour cells with a different p53 gene status. The results showed that the transfer of functional p53 resulted in a marked (tenfold) reduction of cellular chemosensitivity to the multinuclear platinum complex but in a moderate sensitization to cisplatin. In addition, in contrast to cisplatin, the triplatinum complex was very effective as an inducer of apoptosis in a lung carcinoma cell line carrying mutant p53. The peculiar pattern of anti-tumour activity of the triplatinum complex and its ability to induce p53-independent cell death may have relevant pharmacological implications, since p53, a critical protein involved in DNA repair and induction of apoptosis by conventional DNA-damaging agents, is defective in several human tumours. We suggest that the peculiar DNA binding properties of the triplatinum complex may contribute to the striking profile of anti

  1. In vitro permeation of platinum through African and Caucasian skin.

    PubMed

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Du Plessis, J L

    2015-02-01

    The majority of the South African workforce are Africans, therefore potential racial differences should be considered in risk and exposure assessments in the workplace. Literature suggests African skin to be a superior barrier against permeation and irritants. Previous in vitro studies on metals only included skin from Caucasian donors, whereas this study compared the permeation of platinum through African and Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3 mg/ml of potassium tetrachloroplatinate (K₂PtCl₄) dissolved in synthetic sweat was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. Skin from three female African and three female Caucasian donors were included (n=21). The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24 h experiment, and analysed with high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Skin was digested and analysed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Significantly higher permeation of platinum through intact African skin (p=0.044), as well as a significantly higher mass of platinum retention in African skin in comparison with Caucasian skin (p=0.002) occurred. Significant inter-donor variation was found in both racial groups (p<0.02). Results indicate that African workers have increased risk of dermal permeation and therefore possible sensitisation caused by dermal exposure to platinum salts. These results are contradictory to limited literature suggesting a superior barrier in African skin and further investigation is necessary to explain the higher permeation through African skin.

  2. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  3. Surface characterization of platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Solla-Gullón, José; Rodríguez, Paramaconi; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio; Feliu, Juan M

    2008-03-14

    The quantitative analysis of the different surface sites on platinum samples is attempted from pure voltammetric data. This analysis requires independent knowledge of the fraction of two-dimensional (111) and (100) domains. Specific site-probe reactions are employed to achieve this goal. Irreversibly-adsorbed bismuth and tellurium have been revealed to be sensitive to the presence of (111) terrace domains of different width whereas almost all sites involved in (100) ordered domains have been characterized through germanium adatoms. The experimental protocol follows that used with well-defined single-crystal electrodes and, therefore, requires careful control of the surface cleanliness. Platinum basal planes and their vicinal stepped surfaces have been employed to obtain calibration plots between the charge density measured under the adatom redox peak, specific for the type of surface site, and the corresponding terrace size. The evaluation of the (100) bidimensional domains can also be achieved using the voltammetric profiles, once the fraction of (111) ordered domains present in the polyoriented platinum has been determined and their featureless contribution has been subtracted from the whole voltammetric response. Using that curve, it is possible to perform a deconvolution of the adsorption states of the polycrystalline sample different from those related to (111) domains. The fraction of (100)-related states in the deconvoluted voltammogram can then be compared to that expected from the independent estimation coming from the charge involved in the redox process undergone by the irreversibly-adsorbed germanium and thus check the result of the deconvolution. The information about the surface-site distribution can also be applied to analyze the voltammetric profile of nanocrystalline platinum electrodes. PMID:18309392

  4. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  5. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  6. Acute and chronic nephrotoxicity of platinum nanoparticles in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Watari, Akihiro; Hayata, Yuya; Li, Xiangru; Kondoh, Masuo; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2013-09-01

    Platinum nanoparticles are being utilized in various industrial applications, including in catalysis, cosmetics, and dietary supplements. Although reducing the size of the nanoparticles improves the physicochemical properties and provides useful performance characteristics, the safety of the material remains a major concern. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects of platinum particles less than 1 nm in size (snPt1). In mice administered with a single intravenous dose of snPt1, histological analysis revealed necrosis of tubular epithelial cells and urinary casts in the kidney, without obvious toxic effects in the lung, spleen, and heart. These mice exhibited dose-dependent elevation of blood urea nitrogen, an indicator of kidney damage. Direct application of snPt1 to in vitro cultures of renal cells induced significant cytotoxicity. In mice administered for 4 weeks with twice-weekly intraperitoneal snPt1, histological analysis of the kidney revealed urinary casts, tubular atrophy, and inflammatory cell accumulation. Notably, these toxic effects were not observed in mice injected with 8-nm platinum particles, either by single- or multiple-dose administration. Our findings suggest that exposure to platinum particles of less than 1 nm in size may induce nephrotoxicity and disrupt some kidney functions. However, this toxicity may be reduced by increasing the nanoparticle size.

  7. Platinum- and platinum alloy-coated palladium and palladium alloy particles and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir Branko

    2010-04-06

    The present invention relates to particle and nanoparticle composites useful as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts. The particle composites are composed of a palladium or palladium-alloy particle or nanoparticle substrate coated with an atomic submonolayer, monolayer, bilayer, or trilayer of zerovalent platinum atoms. The invention also relates to a catalyst and a fuel cell containing the particle or nanoparticle composites of the invention. The invention additionally includes methods for oxygen reduction and production of electrical energy by using the particle and nanoparticle composites of the invention.

  8. A nanohybrid of platinum nanoparticles-porous ZnO-hemin with electrocatalytic activity to construct an amplified immunosensor for detection of influenza.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe-Han; Zhuo, Ying; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Ya-Qin

    2016-04-15

    In this work, a nanohybrid of platinum nanoparticles-porous ZnO spheres-hemin (Pt-pZnO-hemin) was synthesized for construction of alkaline phosphatase-based immunosensor for detection of influenza. Briefly, porous ZnO spheres (pZnO) were prepared using soluble starches as the capping agent, followed by surface functionalization of platinum nanoparticles via a hydrothermal method (Pt-pZnO). Then, hemin with carboxylic functionality was spontaneously adsorbed onto Pt-pZnO by ester-like binding between carboxylic group of hemin and ZnO. Compared with platinum nanoparticles and hemin, the resulting Pt-pZnO-hemin nanohybrid showed more excellent electrocatalysis activity toward 1-naphthol (1-NP). Taking advantage of the Pt-pZnO-hemin, we have developed an amplified electrochemical immunosensor based on in situ generation of redox probe by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Pt-pZnO-hemin as signal enhancer. Herein, electrochemically active 1-NP was generated by enzymatic hydrolysis of inactive 1-naphthyl phosphate by ALP, then Pt-pZnO-hemin was used as catalyst to catalytically oxidize 1-NP, resulting in electrochemical signal amplification. Furthermore, in comparison with other nanomaterials including Au-pZnO, Pt-pZnO and Au-pZnO-hemin, the excellent catalytical property of Pt-pZnO-hemin make it a promising nanohybrid material for ALP-based immunosensor for signal amplification.

  9. Inhibition of constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation by novel platinum complexes with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Turkson, James; Zhang, Shumin; Palmer, Jay; Kay, Heidi; Stanko, Joseph; Mora, Linda B; Sebti, Said; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2004-12-01

    DNA-alkylating agents that are platinum complexes induce apoptotic responses and have wide application in cancer therapy. The potential for platinum compounds to modulate signal transduction events that contribute to their therapeutic outcome has not been extensively examined. Among the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins, Stat3 activity is frequently up-regulated in many human tumors. Various lines of evidence have established a causal role for aberrant Stat3 activity in malignant transformation and provided validation for its targeting in the development of small-molecule inhibitors as novel cancer therapeutics. We report here that platinum-containing compounds disrupt Stat3 signaling and suppress its biological functions. The novel platinum (IV) compounds, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride block Stat3 activity in vitro at low micromolar concentrations. In malignant cells that harbor constitutively activated Stat3, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in a manner that reflects the attenuation of persistent Stat3 activity. By contrast, cells that do not contain persistent Stat3 activity are marginally affected or are not affected by these compounds. Moreover, CPA-7 induces the regression of mouse CT26 colon tumor, which correlates with the abrogation of persistent Stat3 activity in tumors. Thus, the modulation of oncogenic signal transduction pathways, such as Stat3, may be one of the key molecular mechanisms for the antitumor effects of platinum (IV)-containing complexes.

  10. Platinum electrodes for electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Bacteria is detected electro-chemically by measuring evolution of hydrogen in test system with platinum and reference electrode. Using system, electrodes of platinum are used to detect and enumerate varieties of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms compared in different media.

  11. Guanidine complexes of platinum: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Marin-Luna, Marta; Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Rozas, Isabel

    2014-07-24

    We have studied theoretically the complexes of model N-phenylguanidine/ium derivatives with PtCl3(-) and PtCl2 in different coordinating modes (mono- and bidentate) with different N atoms of the guanidine/ium moiety using the B3LYP/6-31+G** and LANL2DZ mixed basis set. This will aid the understanding of the complexation between platinum and the guanidine or guanidinium moiety in order to design dual anticancer agents that combine a guanidine-based DNA minor groove binder and a cisplatin-like moiety. Calculated interaction and relative energies, analysis of the electron density, and examination of the orbital interactions indicate that the most stable type of complex is that with a monodentate interaction between PtCl3(-) and guanidinium established through one of the NH2 groups. Next, we optimized the structure of three bis-guanidinium diaromatic systems developed in our group as DNA minor groove binders and their complexation with PtCl3(-), finding that the formation of Pt complexes of these minor groove binders is favorable and would produce stable monodentate coordinated systems. PMID:24988181

  12. Preparation of Carbon-Platinum-Ceria and Carbon-Platinum-Cerium catalysts and its application in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell: Hydrogen, Methanol, and Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Blas, Rolando Pedro

    This thesis is focused on fuel cells using hydrogen, methanol and ethanol as fuel. Also, in the method of preparation of catalytic material for the anode: Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD) and impregnation method using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a chelating agent. The first part of the thesis describes the general knowledge about Hydrogen Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HPEMFC),Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) and Direct Ethanol Fuel Cell (DEFC), as well as the properties of Cerium and CeO2 (Ceria). The second part of the thesis describes the preparation of catalytic material by Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD). SFD was utilized to deposit Pt and ceria simultaneously onto gas diffusion layers. The Pt-ceria catalyst deposited by SFD exhibited higher methanol oxidation activity compared to the platinum catalyst alone. The linear sweep traces of the cathode made for the methanol cross over study indicate that Pt-Ceria/C as the anode catalyst, due to its better activity for methanol, improves the fuel utilization, minimizing the methanol permeation from anode to cathode compartment. The third and fourth parts of the thesis describe the preparation of material catalytic material Carbon-Platinum-Cerium by a simple and cheap impregnation method using EDTA as a chelating agent to form a complex with cerium (III). This preparation method allows the mass production of the material catalysts without additional significant cost. Fuel cell polarization and power curves experiments showed that the Carbon-Platinum-Cerium anode materials exhibited better catalytic activity than the only Vulcan-Pt catalysts for DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. In the case of Vulcan-20%Pt-5%w Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-20%Pt in DMFC. In the case of Vulcan-40% Pt-doped Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-40% Pt in DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. Finally, I propose a theory that explains the reason why the

  13. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  14. A Photoactivatable Platinum(IV) Complex Targeting Genomic DNA and Histone Deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Kasparkova, Jana; Kostrhunova, Hana; Novakova, Olga; Křikavová, Radka; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-11-23

    We report toxic effects of a photoactivatable platinum(IV) complex conjugated with suberoyl-bis-hydroxamic acid in tumor cells. The conjugate exerts, after photoactivation, two functions: activity as both a platinum(II) anticancer drug and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor in cancer cells. This approach relies on the use of a Pt(IV) pro-drug, acting by two independent mechanisms of biological action in a cooperative manner, which can be selectively photoactivated to a cytotoxic species in and around a tumor, thereby increasing selectivity towards cancer cells. These results suggest that this strategy is a valuable route to design new platinum agents with higher efficacy for photodynamic anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:26458068

  15. Fabrication of iron-platinum ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, Kevin Eugene

    Fabrication of chemically disordered FePt particles ranging from 2--9 nm with a precision of 1 nm has been achieved through modification of key process variables including surfactant concentration, heating rates and the type of iron precursor. In addition, the shape evolution of the FePt nanoparticles during particle growth can be manipulated to give cubic or rod geometries through changes to the surfactant injection sequence and solvent system. The primary method for synthesis of the disordered FePt nanoparticles is the polyol reduction reported by Fievet et al., which has been modified and used extensively for synthesis of differing nanoparticle systems. Our procedures use platinum acetylacetonate, iron pentacarbonyl or ferric acetylacetonate as precursors for the FePt alloy, oleic acid and oleyl amine for the surfactants, 1,2-hexadecanediol to assist with the reduction of the precursors and either dioctyl ether or phenyl ether for the solvent system. For iron pentacarbonyl based reactions, adjustment of heating rates to reflux temperatures from 1--15°C per minute allows control of FePt particle diameters from 3--8 nm. Substitution of iron pentacarbonyl with ferric acetylacetonate as the iron source results in 2 nm particles. A high platinum to surfactant ratio of 10 to 1 will yield 9 nm FePt particles when iron pentacarbonyl is used as the precursor. For use of these particles in advanced applications, the synthesized particles must be transformed to the L1o phase through annealing at temperatures above 500°C. Inhibition of particle sintering can be avoided through dispersion in a NaCl matrix at a weight ratio of 400 to 1 salt to fcc FePt particles. Production of L1o FePt nanoparticles with high magnetic anisotropy with this process has been successful, allowing the original size and size distribution of the particles.

  16. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  17. Antitumor effect of arabinogalactan and platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Starkov, A K; Zamay, T N; Savchenko, A A; Ingevatkin, E V; Titova, N M; Kolovskaya, O S; Luzan, N A; Silkin, P P; Kuznetsova, S A

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of antitumor properties of platinum-arabinogalactan complex. We showed the ability of the complex to inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. It is found that the distribution of the platinum-arabinogalactan complex is not specific only for tumor cells in mice. The complex was found in all tissues and organs examined (ascites cells, embryonic cells, kidney, and liver). The mechanism of action of the arabinogalactan-platinum complex may be similar to cisplatin as the complex is able to accumulate in tumor cells. PMID:27193706

  18. Aberrant DNA damage response pathways may predict the outcome of platinum chemotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Stefanou, Dimitra T; Bamias, Aristotelis; Episkopou, Hara; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Likka, Maria; Kalampokas, Theodore; Photiou, Stylianos; Gavalas, Nikos; Sfikakis, Petros P; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Souliotis, Vassilis L

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780) and one resistant (A2780/C30) to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7) or resistant (n = 4) to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9) were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05). Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03). Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05). We conclude that

  19. Innovative use of platinum compounds to selectively detect live microorganisms by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Minami, Jun-Ichi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-02-01

    PCR cannot distinguish live microorganisms from dead ones. To circumvent this disadvantage, ethidium/propidium-monoazide (EMA/PMA) and psoralen to discriminate live from dead bacteria have been used for 2 decades. These methods require the use of numerous laborious procedures. We introduce an innovative method that uses platinum compounds, which are primarily used as catalysts in organic chemistry and partly used as anti-cancer drugs. Microorganisms are briefly exposed to platinum compounds in vivo, and these compounds penetrate dead (compromised) microorganisms but not live ones and are chelated by chromosomal DNA. The use of platinum compounds permits clear discrimination between live and dead microorganisms in water and milk (including Cronobacter sakazakii and Escherichia coli) via PCR compared with typically used PMA. This platinum-PCR method could enable the specific detection of viable coliforms in milk at a concentration of 5-10 CFU mL(-1) specified by EU/USA regulations after a 4-h process. For sample components, environmental water contains lower levels of PCR inhibitors than milk does, and milk is similar to infant formula, skim milk and blood; thus, the use of the platinum-PCR method could also prevent food poisoning due to the presence of C. sakazakii in dairy products. This method could provide outstanding rapidity for use in environmental/food/clinical tests. Platinum-PCR could also be a substitute for the typical culture-based methods currently used.

  20. Teaching the Chemistry of Platinum.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert G W

    2015-01-01

    Following colonisation of South America by the Spanish, many new naturally occurring substances were sent to Europe. One of these was the silvery, unreactive metal, platinum, discovered in New Grenada in the mid-eighteenth century. It was often found in granular form, associated with gold, and the challenge to chemists was to refine it, produce it as wire or sheet, and determine its chemical properties. This interested the professor of chemistry at the University of Edinburgh, Joseph Black, who was able to obtain samples from London-based Spanish contacts, particularly Ignacio Luzuriaga. This paper examines how Black transmitted his knowledge of the metal to large numbers of students attending his annual course. PMID:26924332

  1. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  2. Evaluation of platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation procedure for the characterization of industrial platinum resistance thermometers (PRTs) for use in the temperature range -120 to 160 C was investigated. This evaluation procedure consisted of calibration, thermal stability and hysteresis testing of four surface measuring PRTs. Five different calibration schemes were investigated for these sensors. The IPTS-68 formulation produced the most accurate result, yielding average sensor systematic error of 0.02 C and random error of 0.1 C. The sensors were checked for thermal stability by successive and thermal cycling between room temperature, 160 C, and boiling point of nitrogen. All the PRTs suffered from instability and hysteresis. The applicability of the self-heating technique as an in situ method for checking the calibration of PRTs located inside wind tunnels was investigated.

  3. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  4. Porous platinum-based catalysts for oxygen reduction

    DOEpatents

    Erlebacher, Jonah D; Snyder, Joshua D

    2014-11-25

    A porous metal that comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A fuel cell includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and an electrolyte arranged between the first and the second electrodes. At least one of the first and second electrodes is coated with a porous metal catalyst for oxygen reduction, and the porous metal catalyst comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A method of producing a porous metal according to an embodiment of the current invention includes producing an alloy consisting essentially of platinum and nickel according to the formula Pt.sub.xNi.sub.1-x, where x is at least 0.01 and less than 0.3; and dealloying the alloy in a substantially pH neutral solution to reduce an amount of nickel in the alloy to produce the porous metal.

  5. Cholesterol reduces the sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy via upregulating ABCG2 in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufeng; Si, Ruirui; Tang, Hong; He, Zhen; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Lili; Fan, Yingchao; Xia, Suhua; He, Zelai; Wang, Qiming

    2015-02-20

    Inoperable lung adenocarcinoma is currently treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness of these chemotherapeutic agents is not the same for all patients. Patients either show quick chemoresistance (QCR) or delayed chemoresistance (DCR), which are defined by 87 and 242 days of progression-free survival (PFS) after initial platinum-based treatment, respectively. We found that QCR patients displayed an elevated level of serum cholesterol and that their tumors showed upregulated ABCG2 expression. We propose that chemoresistance may be attributed to cholesterol-induced ABCG2 expression and hypothesize that blocking ABCG2 may increase the efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents. Using the MTT cell viability assay, we observed that cotreatment with ABCG2 blocker Nicardipine and platinum-based drugs Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin or Carboplatin significantly decreased cell viability of tumor cells. Importantly, our results also showed that incubating cells with cholesterol prior to chemotherapy treatment or cotreatment increased cell viability of tumor cells relative to the controls.

  6. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Rachel E.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; McKenzie, Luke K.; Stasheuski, Alexander S.; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A.; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1–1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm‑2) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin.

  7. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Rachel E.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; McKenzie, Luke K.; Stasheuski, Alexander S.; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A.; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1–1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm−2) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin. PMID:26940077

  8. Platinum-ruthenium-nickel fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2005-07-26

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum, ruthenium, and nickel, wherein the nickel is at a concentration that is less than about 10 atomic percent.

  9. Platinum-aluminide coating enhances durability

    SciTech Connect

    Punola, D.; Sikkenga, D.; Sutton, M.

    1995-12-01

    Severe demands on coatings for gas turbine engines that must operate at significantly higher temperatures than previously required have led to the development of an advanced two-step platinum-modified-aluminide diffusion coating. The conventional system consists of platinum electroplating followed by a traditional pack cementation aluminizing process. This coating greatly extends the durability of hot-section components in environments characterized by high-temperature oxidation and corrosion. Conventionally deposited platinum aluminides, such as Howmet`s LDC2E, demonstrated that a change in material could deliver higher levels of durability. However, the next challenge was to develop a more controllable, faster, cleaner process with improved yield and quality levels. The challenge was met by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This method is now used to apply aluminum to the part after platinum electroplating. It replaces the traditional pack cementation or above-the-pack techniques, and bypasses all the shortcomings associated with those processes.

  10. Platinum-Resistor Differential Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.; Britcliffe, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Platinum resistance elements used in bridge circuit for measuring temperature difference between two flowing liquids. Temperature errors with circuit are less than 0.01 degrees C over range of 100 degrees C.

  11. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst supported on a carbon substrate. During operation, the small platinum crystallites sinter, causing loss in cell performance. A support was developed that stabilizes platinum in the high surface area condition by retarding or preventing the sintering process. The approach is to form etch pits in the carbon by oxidizing the carbon in the presence of a metal oxide catalyst, remove the metal oxide by an acid wash, and then deposit platinum in these pits. Results confirm the formation of etch pits in each of the three supports chosen for investigation: Vulcan XC-72R, Vulcan XC-72 that was graphized at 2500 C, and Shawinigan Acetylene Black.

  12. Fate of platinum metals in the environment.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Justyna; Łodyga-Chruścińska, Elżbieta; Chrustowicz, Jakub

    2014-07-01

    For many years now automotive exhaust catalysts have been used to reduce the significant amounts of harmful chemical substances generated by car engines, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Although they considerably decrease environmental contamination with the above-mentioned compounds, it is known that catalysts contribute to the environmental load of platinum metals (essential components of catalysts), which are released with exhaust fumes. Contamination with platinum metals stems mainly from automotive exhaust converters, but other major sources also exist. Since platinum group elements (PGEs): platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru) and iridium (Ir) seem to spread in the environment and accumulate in living organisms, they may pose a threat to animals and humans. This paper discusses the modes and forms of PGE emission as well as their impact on the environment and living organisms.

  13. Platinum-ruthenium-palladium fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2006-02-07

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having an atomic ratio of platinum to ruthenium that is between about 0.7 and about 1.2. Alternatively, the catalyst may contain platinum at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 50 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 55 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having a difference between the concentrations of ruthenium and platinum that is no greater than about 20 atomic percent.

  14. Platinum analogues in preclinical and clinical development.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, T C; O'Dwyer, P J; Ozols, R F

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cisplatin on chemotherapy for solid tumors has led to the synthesis of many molecules with platinum as their central building block. These so-called platinum analogues have been developed with the obvious goals of improving the antitumor activity of cisplatin and hopefully, at the same time, altering the dose-limiting side effects of the prototype drug. At least 10 such molecules are in clinical development, whereas several others are at various stages of preclinical testing. PMID:8305533

  15. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Platinum sintering on phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes is discussed. The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst dispersed on a conductive carbon support to minimize both cathode polarization and fabrication costs. During operation, however, the active surface area of these electrodes decreases, which in turn leads to decreased cell performance. This loss of active surface area is a major factor in the degradation of fuel cell performance over time.

  16. Root bark extracts of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa protect salivary gland acinar cells from apoptotic cell death induced by cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride.

    PubMed

    Mukudai, Yoshiki; Kondo, Seiji; Shiogama, Sunao; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Li, Chunnan; Yazawa, Kazunaga; Shintani, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    Cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride (CDDP) is a platinum-based anticancer agent, and is often used for chemotherapy for malignant tumors, albeit CDDP has serious side-effects, including xerostomia (dry mouth). Since patients with xerostomia have reduced quality of life, it is urgent and important to identify nontoxic and natural agents capable of reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy on salivary gland function. Therefore, we commenced an institutional collaborative project in which candidates of herbal extracts were selected from more than 400 bioactive herbal products for their potential therapeutic effects not only on xerostomia, but also on oral diseases. In the present study, we report on two Chinese medical herbal extracts from the root barks of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa. The two extracts showed a protective effect in NS-SV-Ac cells from the cytotoxicity and apoptosis caused by CDDP. The effect was dependent on the p53 pathway, protein kinase B/Akt 1 and mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins (i.e. Bcl-2 and Bax), but was not dependent on nuclear factor κB. Notably, the apoptosis-protective effect of the extracts was not observed in adenocystic carcinoma cell lines. Although these extracts have been utilized in traditional Chinese medicine for hundreds of years, there are no reports to our knowledge, on their therapeutic effects on xerostomia. Thus, in the present study, we elucidated the potency of these herbal extracts as novel candidates for xerostomia to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  17. Decitabine reactivated pathways in platinum resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Zuo, Qingyao; Pilrose, Jay; Wang, Yinu; Shen, Changyu; Li, Meng; Wulfridge, Phillip; Matei, Daniela; Nephew, Kenneth P

    2014-06-15

    Combination therapy with decitabine, a DNMTi and carboplatin resensitized chemoresistant ovarian cancer (OC) to platinum inducing promising clinical activity. We investigated gene-expression profiles in tumor biopsies to identify decitabine-reactivated pathways associated with clinical response. Gene-expression profiling was performed using RNA from paired tumor biopsies before and 8 days after decitabine from 17 patients with platinum resistant OC. Bioinformatic analysis included unsupervised hierarchical-clustering, pathway and GSEA distinguishing profiles of "responders" (progression-free survival, PFS>6 months) and "non-responders" (PFS< 6 months). Functional validation of selected results was performed in OC cells/tumors. Pre-treatment tumors from responders expressed genes associated with enhanced glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, translational misregulation, decreased ABC transporter expression, TGF-β signaling, and numerous metabolic pathways. Analysis of post-treatment biopsies from responders revealed overexpression of genes associated with reduced Hedgehog pathway signaling, reduced DNA repair/replication, and cancer-associated metabolism. GO and GSEA analyses revealed upregulation of genes associated with glycosaminoglycan binding, cell-matrix adhesion, and cell-substrate adhesion. Computational findings were substantiated by experimental validation of expression of key genes involved in two critical pathways affected by decitabine (TGF-β and Hh). Gene-expression profiling identified specific pathways altered by decitabine and associated with platinum-resensitization and clinical benefit in OC. Our data could influence patient stratification for future studies using epigenetic therapies.

  18. Compatability of dispersion-strengthened platinum with resistojet propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Margaret V.; Nathal, Michael V.

    1987-01-01

    Resistojets for the Space Station require long life and multipropellant capability. The choice of available materials to meet these requirements is limited. Dispersion-strengthened platinum was selected. Past results indicated that it should be suffieiently inert in candidate propellant environments and should be capable of operating at moderate temperatures for extended periods. A series of propellant compatibility tests was done with platinum strengthened with either yttria or zirconia. Data presented included the results of 1000-hr tests in CO2, H2, ammonia (NH3), N2, steam, hydrazine (N2H4), and methane (CH4); and 2000-hr tests in H2 and NH3. The platinum samples were tested at 1400 C in CO2, H2, NH3, N2, steam, and N2H4; at 500 C in CH4; and at 800 C in N2H4. The mass-loss results indicated material life, exptrapolated from experimental mass-loss data, in excess of 100 000 hr in all environments except steam and N2H4, where it was greater than or =45000 hr. Generally, on the basis of mass loss, there were no compatibility concerns in any of the environments considered. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to determine the effect of propellants on the material surface and to evaluate material stability.

  19. Electrical neurostimulation with imbalanced waveform mitigates dissolution of platinum electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumsa, Doe; Hudak, Eric M.; Montague, Fred W.; Kelley, Shawn C.; Untereker, Darrel F.; Hahn, Benjamin P.; Condit, Chris; Cholette, Martin; Lee, Hyowon; Bardot, Dawn; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrical neurostimulation has traditionally been limited to the use of charge-balanced waveforms. Charge-imbalanced and monophasic waveforms are not used to deliver clinical therapy, because it is believed that these stimulation paradigms may generate noxious electrochemical species that cause tissue damage. Approach. In this study, we investigated the dissolution of platinum as one of such irreversible reactions over a range of charge densities up to 160 μC cm‑2 with current-controlled first phase, capacitive discharge second phase waveforms of both cathodic-first and anodic-first polarity. We monitored the concentration of platinum in solution under different stimulation delivery conditions including charge-balanced, charge-imbalanced, and monophasic pulses. Main results. We observed that platinum dissolution decreased during charge-imbalanced and monophasic stimulation when compared to charge-balanced waveforms. Significance. This observation provides an opportunity to re-evaluate the charge-balanced waveform as the primary option for sustainable neural stimulation.

  20. Novel platinum(II) compounds with O,S bidentate ligands: synthesis, characterization, antiproliferative properties and biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Mügge, Carolin; Liu, Ruiqi; Görls, Helmar; Gabbiani, Chiara; Michelucci, Elena; Rüdiger, Nadine; Clement, Joachim H; Messori, Luigi; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2014-02-28

    Cisplatin and its analogues are first-line chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of numerous human cancers. A major inconvenience in their clinical use is their strong tendency to link to sulfur compounds, especially in kidney, ultimately leading to severe nephrotoxicity. To overcome this drawback we prepared a variety of platinum complexes with sulfur ligands and analyzed their biological profiles. Here, a series of six platinum(II) compounds bearing a conserved O,S binding moiety have been synthesized and characterized as experimental anticancer agents. The six compounds differ in the nature of the O,S bidentate β-hydroxydithiocinnamic alkyl ester ligand where both the substituents on the aromatic ring and the length of the alkyl chain may be varied. The two remaining coordination positions at the square-planar platinum(II) center are occupied by a chloride ion and a DMSO molecule. These novel platinum compounds showed an acceptable solubility profile in mixed DMSO-buffer solutions and an appreciable stability at physiological pH as judged from analysis of their time-course UV-visible absorption spectra. Their anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities were tested against the cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cell line A549. Assays revealed significant effects of the sample drugs at low concentrations (in the μmolar range); initial structure-activity-relationships are proposed. The activity of the apoptosis-promoting protein caspase 3/7 was determined; results proved that these novel platinum compounds, under the chosen experimental conditions, preferentially induce apoptosis over necrosis. Reactions with the model proteins cytochrome c, lysozyme and albumin were studied by ESI MS and ICP-OES to gain preliminary mechanistic information. The tested compounds turned out to metalate the mentioned proteins to a large extent. In view of the obtained results these novel platinum complexes qualify themselves as promising cytotoxic agents and merit, in our

  1. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  2. HEPARAN SULFATE PROTEOGLYCAN-MEDIATED ENTRY PATHWAY FOR CHARGED TRI-PLATINUM COMPOUNDS. DIFFERENTIAL CELLULAR ACCUMULATION MECHANISMS FOR PLATINUM

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Heveline; Frézard, Frédéric; Peterson, Erica J.; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Ryan, John J.; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of accumulation of charged polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs), based on analogy of polyarginine interactions with the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) family of protein-linked glycosoaminoglycan polysaccharides (GAGs). GAGS such as heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) mediate the cellular entry of many charged molecules. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that PPCs, but not the neutral cisplatin or oxaliplatin, blocked the cellular entry of TAMRA-R9 (a nonarginine peptide, R9) coupled to the TAMRA fluorescent label 5-(and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine) in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), human colon carcinoma (HCT116), and osteosarcoma (SAOS-2) cells. Furthermore, detection of platinum accumulation in wt CHO, mutant CHO-pgsD-677 (lacking HS), and CHO-pgsA (lacking HS/CS) cells confirms that HSPG-mediated interactions are an important mechanism for PPC internalization, but not so for uncharged cisplatin and oxaliplatin. Endocytosis inhibitor studies show that macropinocytosis, a mechanism of cell entry for heparan sulfate GAGs and arginine-rich peptides, is important in the cellular accumulation of “non-covalent” TriplatinNC, and to a lesser degree, the covalently-binding BBR3464. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, however, was not involved in either case. Overall the results suggest a new proteoglycan-mediated mechanism for cellular accumulation of PPCs not shared by cisplatin or oxaliplatin. The results have significant implications for rational design of platinum antitumor drugs with distinct biological profiles in comparison to the clinically-used agents as well as expanding the chemotypes for HS proteoglycan-dependent receptors. PMID:22494465

  3. L-methionine antagonism of cis-platinum nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Basinger, M A; Jones, M M; Holscher, M A

    1990-03-15

    L-Methionine administered simultaneously with cis-platinum (CDDP) iv results in a significant reduction of the nephrotoxicity normally associated with CDDP without any apparent effect on the antineoplastic activity for rats bearing the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma. CDDP given with L-methionine at a 1:20 mole ratio can be administered to rats at doses up to 35 mg/kg iv with the survival of all treated animals (3/3) and up to 56 mg/kg iv (bolus injection) with the survival of 3/6 animals, while CDDP administered alone at these levels is lethal. A reduced level of protection against the nephrotoxicity was also achieved at lower mole ratios of L-methionine to CDDP. Renal function was monitored using BUN and serum creatinine levels, and gastrointestinal toxicity by weight changes during the course of the experiments. A histopathological examination of the kidneys was also performed to evaluate the protection provided by L-methionine. Under the conditions used, the reaction between L-methionine and CDDP does not appear to proceed so rapidly as to interfere with the antitumor activity of the CDDP. The examination of structural analogs as agents for the control of CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity revealed that the C-S-C-group is the essential group for the protective action in these structures. Although L-methionine can provide renal protection in rats given high doses of CDDP, it does not prevent the accumulation of platinum in the kidney.

  4. Studies of n-butane conversion over silica-supported platinum, platinum-silver and platinum-copper catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Junhua.

    1992-06-09

    The present work was undertaken to elucidate effect of adding silver and copper to silica-supported platinum catalyst on the activity and selectivity in the n-butane reactions. At the conditions of this study n-butane underwent both hydrogenolysis and structural isomerization. The catalytic activity and selectivities between hydrogenolysis and isomerization and within hydrogenolysis were measured at temperature varying from 330 C to 370 C. For platinum-silver catalysts, at lower temperatures studied the catalytic activity per surface platinum atom (turnover frequency) remained constant at lower silver content (between 0 at. % and 30 at. %) and decreased with further increased silver loading, suggesting that low- index planes could be dominant in the hydrogenolysis of n-butane. Moreover, increasing silver content resulted in an enhancement of the selectivity of isomerization products relative to hydrogenolysis products. At the higher temperature studied, no suppression in catalytic activity was observed. It is postulated that surface structure could change due to the mobility of surface silver atoms, leading to surface silver atoms forming islands or going to the bulk, and leaving large portions of basal planes exposed with active platinum atoms. It is also suggested that the presence of inert silver atoms results in weakening of the H-surface bond. This results in increased mobility of hydrogen atoms on the surface and hence, higher reactivity with other adsorbed species. For platinum copper catalysts, the mixed ensembles could play an active role in the hydrogenolysis of n-butane.

  5. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. PMID:17796685

  6. Electronic transitions of platinum monofluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, K. F.; Southam, A. M.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of platinum monofluoride (PtF) between 431 and 560 nm has been investigated using the technique of laser vaporization/reaction with free jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Eight vibrational bands had been observed but only six of them were analyzed, they were grouped into four electronic transitions: the [18.9]2Π3/2 - X2Π3/2, the [18.9]2Π3/2 - [0.04]2Δ5/2, the [19.9]2Δ5/2 - X2Π3/2 and the [23.2]2Δ5/2 - X2Π3/2 transitions. Accurate molecular constants have been determined for the [23.2]2Δ5/2, [19.9]2Δ5/2, [18.9]2Π3/2 and [0.04]2Δ5/2 electronic states. The agreement between experimental determined molecular constants and those from ab initio calculations incorporating the spin-orbit coupling is generally good.

  7. Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-08-01

    Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  8. Novel platinum black electroplating technique improving mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Raeyoung; Nam, Yoonkey

    2013-01-01

    Platinum black microelectrodes are widely used as an effective neural signal recording sensor. The simple fabrication process, high quality signal recording and proper biocompatibility are the main advantages of platinum black microelectrodes. When microelectrodes are exposed to actual biological system, various physical stimuli are applied. However, the porous structure of platinum black is vulnerable to external stimuli and destroyed easily. The impedance level of the microelectrode increases when the microelectrodes are damaged resulting in decreased recording performance. In this study, we developed mechanically stable platinum black microelectrodes by adding polydopamine. The polydopamine layer was added between the platinum black structures by electrodeposition method. The initial impedance level of platinum black only microelectrodes and polydopamine added microelectrodes were similar but after applying ultrasonication the impedance value dramatically increased for platinum black only microelectrodes, whereas polydopamine added microelectrodes showed little increase which were nearly retained initial values. Polydopamine added platinum black microelectrodes are expected to extend the availability as neural sensors.

  9. Nanoscale investigation of platinum nanoparticles on strontium titanium oxide grown via physical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Steven Thomas

    This dissertation examines growth of platinum nanoparticles from vapor deposition on SrTiO3 using a characterization approach that combines imaging techniques and X-ray methods. The primary suite of characterization probes includes atomic force microscopy (AFM), grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The vapor deposition techniques include physical vapor deposition (PVD) by evaporation and atomic layer deposition (ALD). For the PVD platinum study, AFM/XRF showed ˜10 nm nanoparticles separated by an average of 100 nm. The combination of AFM, GISAXS, and XRF indicated that the nanoparticles observed with AFM were actually comprised of closely spaced, smaller nanoparticles. These conclusions were supported by high-resolution SEM. The unusual behavior of platinum nanoparticles to aggregate without coalescence or sintering was observed previously by other researchers using transmissision electron microscopy (TEM). Platinum nanoparticle growth was also investigated on SrTiO3 (001) single crystals using ALD to nucleate nanoparticles that subsequently grew and coalesced into granular films as the ALD progresses. The expected growth rate for the early stages of ALD showed a two-fold increase which was attributed to the platinum deposition occurring faster on the bare substrate. Once the nanoparticles had coalesced into a film, steady state ALD growth proceeded. The formation of nanoparticles was attributed to the atomic diffusion of platinum atoms on the surface in addition to direct growth from the ALD precursor gases. The platinum ALD nanoparticles were also studied on SrTiO3 nanocube powders. The SrTiO3 nanocubes average 60 nm on a side and the cube faces have a {001} orientation. The ALD proceeded in a similar fashion as on the single crystal substrates where the deposition rate was twice as fast as the steady state growth rate. The Pt nanoparticle

  10. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, C; Silwana, B; Iwuoha, E; Somerset, V

    2012-01-01

    Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent assessments of aquatic samples have shown increased levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in aquatic ecosystems, caused by automobile exhaust emissions and mining activities. The development of an analytical sensor for the detection and characterisation of PGMs were investigated, since there is an ongoing need to find new sensing materials with suitable recognition elements that can respond selectively and reversibly to specific metal ions in environmental samples. The work reported shows the successful application of another mercury-free sensor electrode for the determination of platinum group metals in environmental samples. The work reported in this study entails the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bismuth film for the determination of platinum (Pt(2+)), palladium (Pd(2+)) or rhodium (Rh(2+)) by means of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Optimised experimental conditions included composition of the supporting electrolyte, complexing agent concentration, deposition potential, deposition time and instrumental voltammetry parameters for Pt(2+), Pd(2+) and Rh(2+) determination. Adsorptive differential pulse stripping voltammetric measurements for PGMs were performed in the presence of dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as complexing agent. The glassy carbon bismuth film electrode (GC/BiFE) employed in this study exhibit good and reproducible sensor characteristics. Application of GC/BiFE sensor exhibited well-defined peaks and highly linear behaviour for the stripping analysis of the PGMs in the concentration range between 0 and 3.5 μg/L. The detection limit of Pd, Pt and Rh was found to be 0.12 μg/L, 0.04 μg/L and 0.23 μg/L, respectively for the deposition times of 90 s (Pd) and 150 s (for both Pt and Rh). Good

  11. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, C; Silwana, B; Iwuoha, E; Somerset, V

    2012-01-01

    Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent assessments of aquatic samples have shown increased levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in aquatic ecosystems, caused by automobile exhaust emissions and mining activities. The development of an analytical sensor for the detection and characterisation of PGMs were investigated, since there is an ongoing need to find new sensing materials with suitable recognition elements that can respond selectively and reversibly to specific metal ions in environmental samples. The work reported shows the successful application of another mercury-free sensor electrode for the determination of platinum group metals in environmental samples. The work reported in this study entails the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bismuth film for the determination of platinum (Pt(2+)), palladium (Pd(2+)) or rhodium (Rh(2+)) by means of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Optimised experimental conditions included composition of the supporting electrolyte, complexing agent concentration, deposition potential, deposition time and instrumental voltammetry parameters for Pt(2+), Pd(2+) and Rh(2+) determination. Adsorptive differential pulse stripping voltammetric measurements for PGMs were performed in the presence of dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as complexing agent. The glassy carbon bismuth film electrode (GC/BiFE) employed in this study exhibit good and reproducible sensor characteristics. Application of GC/BiFE sensor exhibited well-defined peaks and highly linear behaviour for the stripping analysis of the PGMs in the concentration range between 0 and 3.5 μg/L. The detection limit of Pd, Pt and Rh was found to be 0.12 μg/L, 0.04 μg/L and 0.23 μg/L, respectively for the deposition times of 90 s (Pd) and 150 s (for both Pt and Rh). Good

  12. Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Hydrogenation Reactions on Platinum Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Krier, James M.

    2013-08-31

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to characterize intermediate species of hydrogenation reactions on the surface of platinum nanoparticle catalysts. In contrast to other spectroscopy techniques which operate in ultra-high vacuum or probe surface species after reaction, SFG collects information under normal conditions as the reaction is taking place. Several systems have been studied previously using SFG on single crystals, notably alkene hydrogenation on Pt(111). In this thesis, many aspects of SFG experiments on colloidal nanoparticles are explored for the first time. To address spectral interference by the capping agent (PVP), three procedures are proposed: UV cleaning, H2 induced disordering and calcination (core-shell nanoparticles). UV cleaning and calcination physically destroy organic capping while disordering reduces SFG signal through a reversible structural change by PVP.

  13. Platinum(II)-Oligonucleotide Coordination Based Aptasensor for Simple and Selective Detection of Platinum Compounds.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Tian, Xueke; Sun, Lianli; Hu, Haihong; Zheng, Shirui; Jiang, Huidi; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2015-10-20

    Wide use of platinum-based chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment for carcinoma calls for a simple and selective detection of platinum compound in biological samples. On the basis of the platinum(II)-base pair coordination, a novel type of aptameric platform for platinum detection has been introduced. This chemiluminescence (CL) aptasensor consists of a designed streptavidin (SA) aptamer sequence in which several base pairs were replaced by G-G mismatches. Only in the presence of platinum, coordination occurs between the platinum and G-G base pairs as opposed to the hydrogen-bonded G-C base pairs, which leads to SA aptamer sequence activation, resulting in their binding to SA coated magnetic beads. These Pt-DNA coordination events were monitored by a simple and direct luminol-peroxide CL reaction through horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalysis with a strong chemiluminescence emission. The validated ranges of quantification were 0.12-240 μM with a limit of detection of 60 nM and selectivity over other metal ions. This assay was also successfully used in urine sample determination. It will be a promising candidate for the detection of platinum in biomedical and environmental samples.

  14. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-12-17

    We report the catalytic activity of colloid platinum nanoparticles synthesized with different organic capping layers. On the molecular scale, the porous organic layers have open spaces that permit the reactant and product molecules to reach the metal surface. We carried out CO oxidation on several platinum nanoparticle systems capped with various organic molecules to investigate the role of the capping agent on catalytic activity. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layer have been used: TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). The reactivity of the Pt nanoparticles varied by 30%, with higher activity on TTAB coated nanoparticles and lower activity on HDT, while the activation energy remained between 27-28 kcal/mol. In separate experiments, the organic capping layers were partially removed using ultraviolet light-ozone generation techniques, which resulted in increased catalytic activity due to the removal of some of the organic layers. These results indicate that the nature of chemical bonding between organic capping layers and nanoparticle surfaces plays a role in determining the catalytic activity of platinum colloid nanoparticles for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  15. Cholesterol-tethered platinum II-based supramolecular nanoparticle increases antitumor efficacy and reduces nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Poulomi; Basu, Sudipta; Soni, Shivani; Pandey, Ambarish; Roy, Bhaskar; Oh, Michael S; Chin, Kenneth T; Paraskar, Abhimanyu S; Sarangi, Sasmit; Connor, Yamicia; Sabbisetti, Venkata S; Kopparam, Jawahar; Kulkarni, Ashish; Muto, Katherine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Jayawardene, Innocent; Lupoli, Nicola; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Bonventre, Joseph V; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2012-07-10

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles have been harnessed extensively as carriers for cancer chemotherapeutics. However, traditional pharmaceutical approaches for nanoformulation have been a challenge with molecules that exhibit incompatible physicochemical properties, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Here we propose a paradigm based on rational design of active molecules that facilitate supramolecular assembly in the nanoscale dimension. Using cisplatin as a template, we describe the synthesis of a unique platinum (II) tethered to a cholesterol backbone via a unique monocarboxylato and O→Pt coordination environment that facilitates nanoparticle assembly with a fixed ratio of phosphatidylcholine and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino (polyethylene glycol)-2000]. The nanoparticles formed exhibit lower IC(50) values compared with carboplatin or cisplatin in vitro, and are active in cisplatin-resistant conditions. Additionally, the nanoparticles exhibit significantly enhanced in vivo antitumor efficacy in murine 4T1 breast cancer and in K-Ras(LSL/+)/Pten(fl/fl) ovarian cancer models with decreased systemic- and nephro-toxicity. Our results indicate that integrating rational drug design and supramolecular nanochemistry can emerge as a powerful strategy for drug development. Furthermore, given that platinum-based chemotherapeutics form the frontline therapy for a broad range of cancers, the increased efficacy and toxicity profile indicate the constructed nanostructure could translate into a next-generation platinum-based agent in the clinics.

  16. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  17. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  18. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Daniela A.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity).

  19. Effects triggered by platinum nanoparticles on primary keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Konieczny, Piotr; Goralczyk, Anna Grazyna; Szmyd, Radoslaw; Skalniak, Lukasz; Koziel, Joanna; Filon, Francesca Larese; Crosera, Matteo; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Borowczyk, Julia; Laczna, Eliza; Drukala, Justyna; Pyza, Elzbieta; Semik, Danuta; Woznicka, Olga; Klein, Andrzej; Jura, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    The platinum (Pt)-group elements (PGEs) represent a new kind of environmental pollutant and a new hazard for human health. Since their introduction as vehicle-exhaust catalysts, their emissions into the environment have grown considerably compared with their low natural concentration in the earth crust. PGE emissions from vehicle catalysts can be also in the form of nanometer-sized particles (Pt nanoparticles [PtNPs]). These elements, both in their metallic form or as ions solubilized in biological media, are now recognized as potent allergens and sensitizers. Human skin is always exposed to toxic particles; therefore, in the present study we addressed the question of whether polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated PtNPs may have any negative effects on skin cells, including predominantly epidermal keratinocytes. In this study, PtNPs of two sizes were used: 5.8 nm and 57 nm, in concentrations of 6.25, 12.5, and 25 μg/mL. Both types of NPs were protected with polyvinylpyrrolidone. Primary keratinocytes were treated for 24 and 48 hours, then cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, morphology, metabolic activity, and changes in the activation of signaling pathways were investigated in PtNP-treated cells. We found that PtNPs trigger toxic effects on primary keratinocytes, decreasing cell metabolism, but these changes have no effects on cell viability or migration. Moreover, smaller NPs exhibited more deleterious effect on DNA stability than the big ones. Analyzing activation of caspases, we found changes in activity of caspase 9 and caspase 3/7 triggered mainly by smaller NPs. Changes were not so significant in the case of larger nanoparticles. Importantly, we found that PtNPs have antibacterial properties, as is the case with silver NPs (AgNPs). In comparison to our previous study regarding the effects of AgNPs on cell biology, we found that PtNPs do not exhibit such deleterious effects on primary keratinocytes as AgNPs and that they also can be used as potential antibacterial agents

  20. Effects triggered by platinum nanoparticles on primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Piotr; Goralczyk, Anna Grazyna; Szmyd, Radoslaw; Skalniak, Lukasz; Koziel, Joanna; Filon, Francesca Larese; Crosera, Matteo; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Borowczyk, Julia; Laczna, Eliza; Drukala, Justyna; Pyza, Elzbieta; Semik, Danuta; Woznicka, Olga; Klein, Andrzej; Jura, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    The platinum (Pt)-group elements (PGEs) represent a new kind of environmental pollutant and a new hazard for human health. Since their introduction as vehicle-exhaust catalysts, their emissions into the environment have grown considerably compared with their low natural concentration in the earth crust. PGE emissions from vehicle catalysts can be also in the form of nanometer-sized particles (Pt nanoparticles [PtNPs]). These elements, both in their metallic form or as ions solubilized in biological media, are now recognized as potent allergens and sensitizers. Human skin is always exposed to toxic particles; therefore, in the present study we addressed the question of whether polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated PtNPs may have any negative effects on skin cells, including predominantly epidermal keratinocytes. In this study, PtNPs of two sizes were used: 5.8 nm and 57 nm, in concentrations of 6.25, 12.5, and 25 μg/mL. Both types of NPs were protected with polyvinylpyrrolidone. Primary keratinocytes were treated for 24 and 48 hours, then cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, morphology, metabolic activity, and changes in the activation of signaling pathways were investigated in PtNP-treated cells. We found that PtNPs trigger toxic effects on primary keratinocytes, decreasing cell metabolism, but these changes have no effects on cell viability or migration. Moreover, smaller NPs exhibited more deleterious effect on DNA stability than the big ones. Analyzing activation of caspases, we found changes in activity of caspase 9 and caspase 3/7 triggered mainly by smaller NPs. Changes were not so significant in the case of larger nanoparticles. Importantly, we found that PtNPs have antibacterial properties, as is the case with silver NPs (AgNPs). In comparison to our previous study regarding the effects of AgNPs on cell biology, we found that PtNPs do not exhibit such deleterious effects on primary keratinocytes as AgNPs and that they also can be used as potential antibacterial agents

  1. Platinum Publications, July 31–September 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  2. Platinum Publications, November 27, 2014 – February 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  3. Platinum Publications as of September 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  4. Platinum Publications, October 30–December 31, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  5. Platinum Publications, October 1–29, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  6. Platinum Publications as of April 30, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  7. Platinum Publications, May 1 – June 25, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  8. Platinum Publications as of June 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  9. Platinum Publications, January 1–March 31, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  10. Platinum Publications, June 26–July 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  11. Platinum Publications, September 26 – October 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  12. Platinum Publications as of December 3, 2013 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  13. Platinum Publications, July 29–September 29, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  14. Platinum Publications, March 27 – April 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  15. Platinum Publications as of May 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  16. Platinum Publications, July 1–July 28, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  17. Platinum Publications as of March 6, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  18. Platinum Publications, June 1–June 30, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  19. Platinum Publications, February 27 – March 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  20. Platinum Publications, October 30 – November 26, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  1. Interaction of hyperthermia and cytotoxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Roizin-Towle, R.; Hall, E.J.; Capuano, L.

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells in culture were used to investigate the temperature dependence of the cytotoxic action of 4 widely used chemotherapy agents, i.e., adriamycin, bleomycin, cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride, and N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate. Cells were exposed to graded doses of each drug for 1 hour at a range of temperatures. Bleomycin showed the largest temperature dependence and N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate the least, with adriamycin and cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride between the two extremes. The results presented demonstrated significant differences in the cytotoxicities of chemotherapy agents and their interactions with heat. The idea of combining localized hyperthermia with some chemotherapy agents allowed a targeting of the chemotherapy not otherwise possible.

  2. Luminescent Cyclometalated Platinum and Palladium Complexes with Novel Photophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Eric

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is a rapidly emerging technology based on organic thin film semiconductors. Recently, there has been substantial investment in their use in displays. In less than a decade, OLEDs have grown from a promising academic curiosity into a multi-billion dollar global industry. At the heart of an OLED are emissive molecules that generate light in response to electrical stimulation. Ideal emitters are efficient, compatible with existing materials, long lived, and produce light predominantly at useful wavelengths. Developing an understanding of the photophysical processes that dictate the luminescent properties of emissive materials is vital to their continued development. Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 provide an introduction to the topics presented and the laboratory methods used to explore them. Chapter 3 discusses a series of tridentate platinum complexes. A synthetic method utilizing microwave irradiation was explored, as well as a study of the effects ligand structure had on the excited state properties. Results and techniques developed in this endeavor were used as a foundation for the work undertaken in later chapters. Chapter 4 introduces a series of tetradentate platinum complexes that share a phenoxy-pyridyl (popy) motif. The new molecular design improved efficiency through increased rigidity and modification of the excited state properties. This class of platinum complexes were markedly more efficient than those presented in Chapter 3, and devices employing a green emitting complex of the series achieved nearly 100% electron-to-photon conversion efficiency in an OLED device. Chapter 5 adapts the ligand structure developed in Chapter 4 to palladium. The resulting complexes exceed reported efficiencies of palladium complexes by an order of magnitude. This chapter also provides the first report of a palladium complex as an emitter in an OLED device. Chapter 6 discusses the continuation of development efforts to include carbazolyl

  3. Method for in-situ restoration of platinum resistance thermometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.M.

    1989-01-03

    A method is described for the in situ restoration of a platinum resistance thermometer, which has become decalibrated due to oxide surface film formation and/or strain-related damage, to a stress-free calibration condition wherein the thermometer includes a platinum resistor sensing element whose resistance varies with the temperature of the element in accordance with a known relationship. The method consists of: passing a controlled dc current through the platinum resistor sensing element, the current having a magnitude sufficient to raise the temperature of the element to its oxide decomposition and annealing temperature. The current is maintained for a heating period sufficient to restore the element to an oxide free surface and stress-free calibration condition.

  4. Say No to DMSO: Dimethylsulfoxide Inactivates Cisplatin, Carboplatin and Other Platinum Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Telma, Katherine A.; Chang, Ki-Eun; Lee, Tobie D.; Madigan, James P.; Lloyd, John R.; Goldlust, Ian S.; Hoeschele, James D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum drugs cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are highly utilized in the clinic and as a consequence are extensively studied in the laboratory setting. In this study, we examined the literature and found a significant number of studies (11 - 34%) in prominent cancer journals utilizing cisplatin dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). However, dissolving cisplatin in DMSO for laboratory-based studies results in ligand displacement and changes the structure of the complex. We examined the effect of DMSO on platinum complexes, including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, finding that DMSO reacted with the complexes, inhibited their cytotoxicity and their ability to initiate cell death. These results render a substantial portion of the literature on cisplatin uninterpretable. Raising awareness of this significant issue in the cancer biology community is critical, and we make recommendations on appropriate solvation of platinum drugs for research. PMID:24812268

  5. Carbon monoxide tolerant electrocatalyst with low platinum loading and a process for its preparation

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Brankovic, Stanko; Wang, Jia

    2003-12-30

    An electrocatalyst is provided for use in a fuel cell that has low platinum loading and a high tolerance to carbon monoxide poisoning. The fuel cell anode includes an electrocatalyst that has a conductive support material, ruthenium nanoparticles reduced in H.sub.2 and a Group VIII noble metal in an amount of between about 0.1 and 25 wt % of the ruthenium nanoparticles, preferably between about 0.5 and 15 wt %. The preferred Group VIII noble metal is platinum. In one embodiment, the anode can also have a perfluorinated polymer membrane on its surface.

  6. Research Update: Platinum-elastomer mesocomposite as neural electrode coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Wenger, Nikolaus; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum is electrochemically stable and biocompatible, and remains the preferred material for the fabrication of implantable neural electrodes. In a foil or film format, platinum is mechanically stiff compared to interfaced biological tissue. We report a soft, highly stable platinum-elastomer composite that offers both mechanical compliance and the electrochemical properties of platinum. We demonstrate the high-performance of the novel mesocomposite printed on stretchable microelectrodes both in vitro and in vivo. The platinum-elastomer composite is a new promising coating for chronic neural interfaces.

  7. Use of platinum electrodes for the electrochemical detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, J R

    1978-11-01

    Platinum electrodes with surface area ratios of four to one were used to detect and enumerate a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Linear relationships were established between inoculum size and detection time. End points for platinum electrodes were similar to those obtained with a platinum-reference electrode combination. Shape of the overall response curves and length of detection times for gram-positive organisms were markedly different than those for the majority of gram-negative species. Platinum electrodes are better than the platinum-reference electrode combination because of cost, ease of handling, and clearer definition of the end point.

  8. Use of platinum electrodes for the electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Platinum electrodes with surface area ratios of four to one were used to detect and enumerate a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Linear relationships were established between inoculum size and detection time. End points for platinum electrodes were similar to those obtained with a platinum-reference electrode combination. Shape of the overall response curves and length of detection times for gram-positive organisms were markedly different than those for the majority of gram-negative species. Platinum electrodes are better than the platinum-reference electrode combination because of cost, ease of handling, and clearer definition of the end point.

  9. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Vinh, Nguyen Quoc; Naka, Shigeyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Murayama, Hiroyuki; Kaida, Sachiko; Kataoka, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt)] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or saline controls. Our results suggest that Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles are a promising approach for effective diagnosis and treatment of advanced HCC. PMID:26203241

  10. Primary malignant mediastinal germ cell tumours: improved prognosis with platinum-based chemotherapy and surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, W. J.; Goldstraw, P.; Nicholls, J. E.; Dearnaley, D. P.; Horwich, A.

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 18 patients with primary malignant germ cell tumours of the mediastinum treated with platinum-based chemotherapy between 1977 and 1990. All seven patients with pure seminoma were treated initially with chemotherapy and four of these patients received additional mediastinal radiotherapy. Only one patient relapsed; his initial therapy had included radiotherapy and single-agent carboplatin and he was successfully salvaged with combination chemotherapy. With a follow-up of 11 to 117 months (median 41 months) all seven patients with seminoma remain alive and disease free giving an overall survival of 100%. Eleven patients had malignant non seminoma; following chemotherapy eight of these had elective surgical resection of residual mediastinal masses. Complete remission was achieved in nine (82%) patients, however, one of these patients died from bleomycin pneumonitis. With a follow-up of 12 to 113 months (median 55 months) eight of 11 (73%) patients with malignant mediastinal teratoma remain alive and disease free. PMID:8494705

  11. DNA polymerase η modulates replication fork progression and DNA damage responses in platinum-treated human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Anna M.; Cruet-Hennequart, Séverine; Pasero, Philippe; Carty, Michael P.

    2013-11-01

    Human cells lacking DNA polymerase η (polη) are sensitive to platinum-based cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Using DNA combing to directly investigate the role of polη in bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions in vivo, we demonstrate that nascent DNA strands are up to 39% shorter in human cells lacking polη than in cells expressing polη. This provides the first direct evidence that polη modulates replication fork progression in vivo following cisplatin and carboplatin treatment. Severe replication inhibition in individual platinum-treated polη-deficient cells correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the RPA2 subunit of replication protein A on serines 4 and 8, as determined using EdU labelling and immunofluorescence, consistent with formation of DNA strand breaks at arrested forks in the absence of polη. Polη-mediated bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions may therefore represent one mechanism by which cancer cells can tolerate platinum-based chemotherapy.

  12. DNA polymerase η modulates replication fork progression and DNA damage responses in platinum-treated human cells.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Anna M; Cruet-Hennequart, Séverine; Pasero, Philippe; Carty, Michael P

    2013-11-20

    Human cells lacking DNA polymerase η (polη) are sensitive to platinum-based cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Using DNA combing to directly investigate the role of polη in bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions in vivo, we demonstrate that nascent DNA strands are up to 39% shorter in human cells lacking polη than in cells expressing polη. This provides the first direct evidence that polη modulates replication fork progression in vivo following cisplatin and carboplatin treatment. Severe replication inhibition in individual platinum-treated polη-deficient cells correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the RPA2 subunit of replication protein A on serines 4 and 8, as determined using EdU labelling and immunofluorescence, consistent with formation of DNA strand breaks at arrested forks in the absence of polη. Polη-mediated bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions may therefore represent one mechanism by which cancer cells can tolerate platinum-based chemotherapy.

  13. Spectrometric determination of platinum with methoxypromazine maleate

    SciTech Connect

    Thimmegowda, A.; Sankegowda, H.; Gowda, N.M.M.

    1984-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of platinum in solution. The chromogenic reagent, methoxypromazine maleate, reacts with platinum(IV) almost instantaneously in phosphoric acid medium containing copper(II) catalyst to form a bluish pink 1:1 complex with an absorption maximum at 562 nm. The complexation is complete within 1 min. A 30-fold molar excess of the reagent over metal ion is necessary for completion of the reaction. Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range of 0.4-9.8 ppm of platinum(IV) with an optimal range of 1.5-8.6 ppm. The molar absorptivity is 1.71 x 10/sub 4/ L mol/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ and the Sandell sensitivity is 11.4 ng cm/sup -2/. The apparent stability constant of the complex is log K = 5.58 +/- 0.1 at 27/sup 0/C. The effects of acid concentration, time, temperature, concentration of the reagent and copper, order of addition of reagents, and the interferences from various ions are investigated. The method has been used for the determination of platinum in synthetic solutions that approximate the composition of some alloys and minerals. 25 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  14. Skin Sensitizing Potency of Halogenated Platinum Salts.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between occupational exposure to halogenated platinum (Pt) salts and Pt-specific allergic sensitization is well-established. Although human case reports and clinical studies demonstrate that Pt salts are potent skin sensitizers, no studies have been published tha...

  15. Evaluation of industrial platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillontownes, Lawrence A.; Alderfer, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration and stability of four surface temperature measuring industrial platinum resistance thermometers for use in the temperature range -120 C to 160 C was investigated. It was found that the calibration formulation of the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 provided the most accurate calibration. It was also found that all the resistance thermometers suffered from varying degrees of instability and hysteresis.

  16. Undoped and boron doped diamond nanoparticles as platinum and platinum-ruthenium catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre Riveros, Lyda

    Nanoparticular diamond is a promising material that can be used as a robust and chemically stable catalytic support. It has been studied and characterized physically and electrochemically, in its powder and thin film forms. This thesis work intends to demonstrate that undoped diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) and boron-doped diamond nanoparticles (BDDNPs) can be used as an electrode and a catalytic support material for platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The electrochemical properties of diamond nanoparticle electrodes, fabricated using the ink paste method, were investigated. As an initial step, we carried out chemical purification of commercially available undoped DNPs by refluxing in aqueous HNO3 as well as of BDDNPs which were doped through a collaborative work with the University of Missouri. The purified material was characterized by spectroscopic and surface science techniques. The reversibility of reactions such as ferricyanide/ferrocyanide (Fe(CN) 63-/Fe(CN)64-) and hexaamineruthenium (III) chloride complexes as redox probes were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry at the undoped DNPs and BDDNPs surface. These redox probes showed limited peak currents and presented linear relationships between current (i) and the square root of the potential scan rate (v1/2). However, compared to conventional electrodes, the peak currents were smaller. BDDNPs show an improvement in charge transfer currents when compared to undoped DNPs. Platinum and ruthenium nanoparticles were chemically deposited on undoped DNPs and BDDNPs through the use of the excess of a mild reducing agent such NaBH4. In order to improve the nanoparticle dispersion sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), a surfactant agent, was used. Percentages of platinum and ruthenium metals were varied as well as the stoichiometric amount of the reducing agent to determine adequate parameters for optimum performance in methanol oxidation. Both before and after the reducing process the samples were characterized by scanning

  17. Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes Implementing Platinum Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecton, Jeremy Exton

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising approach for display and solid state lighting applications. However, further work is needed in establishing the availability of efficient and stable materials for OLEDs with high external quantum efficiency's (EQE) and high operational lifetimes. Recently, significant improvements in the internal quantum efficiency or ratio of generated photons to injected electrons have been achieved with the advent of phosphorescent complexes with the ability to harvest both singlet and triplet excitons. Since then, a variety of phosphorescent complexes containing heavy metal centers including Os, Ni, Ir, Pd, and Pt have been developed. Thus far, the majority of the work in the field has focused on iridium based complexes. Platinum based complexes, however, have received considerably less attention despite demonstrating efficiency's equal to or better than their iridium analogs. In this study, a series of OLEDs implementing newly developed platinum based complexes were demonstrated with efficiency's or operational lifetimes equal to or better than their iridium analogs for select cases. In addition to demonstrating excellent device performance in OLEDs, platinum based complexes exhibit unique photophysical properties including the ability to form excimer emission capable of generating broad white light emission from a single emitter and the ability to form narrow band emission from a rigid, tetradentate molecular structure for select cases. These unique photophysical properties were exploited and their optical and electrical properties in a device setting were elucidated. Utilizing the unique properties of a tridentate Pt complex, Pt-16, a highly efficient white device employing a single emissive layer exhibited a peak EQE of over 20% and high color quality with a CRI of 80 and color coordinates CIE(x=0.33, y=0.33). Furthermore, by employing a rigid, tetradentate platinum complex, PtN1N, with a narrow band emission into a

  18. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  19. Preclinical toxicology and tissue platinum distribution of novel oral antitumour platinum complexes: ammine/amine platinum(IV) dicarboxylates.

    PubMed

    McKeage, M J; Morgan, S E; Boxall, F E; Murrer, B A; Hard, G C; Harrap, K R

    1994-01-01

    The preclinical toxicology and tissue platinum distribution of a series of six orally given antitumour platinum complexes [ammine/amine platinum(IV) dicarboxylates] with structural variations of their alicyclic amine (c-C5, c-C6 or c-C7), axial dicarboxylate (CH3, C3H7 or NHC2H5) or leaving substituents (Cl2 or OCOOCO) was studied in the mouse. Platinum tissue levels measured at 48 h after a single oral dose at 0.5 of the MTD were highest in the liver (6.0-19 micrograms/g) and second highest in the kidney (2.8-12 micrograms/g), and these levels were up to 5 times higher than those reported with equi-toxic doses of i.v. cisplatin and i.v. carboplatin. Platinum levels in the lung, heart, spleen, skin, skeletal muscle and brain were all < or = 3.1 micrograms/g at this dose level. Liver platinum levels measured at 2 h, 2 days, 6 days and 10 days after a single oral dose at the MTD ranged widely (from 15 to 109 micrograms platinum/g), were related to the number of carbon atoms in the axial dicarboxylate and alicyclic amine groups (r = 0.9389) and showed a diversity of time-course profiles. Elevations of plasma ALT activity were recorded with single oral doses of JM225 and JM256 at the MTD. Accumulation of platinum in the liver with repeated oral dosing weekly for 4 consecutive weeks at 0.5 of the MTD occurred with JM269 (3.3-fold increase, P < 0.05) and JM225 (2.4-fold increase, P < 0.05), and elevated plasma ALT activity (44 +/- 33 IU/l) was recorded with repeated oral doses of JM269. JM216 was selected from this series of analogues for further study on the basis of the elevated plasma ALT activity (JM225, JM256 and JM269), liver platinum accumulation (JM269 and JM225), poor activity against human ovarian carcinoma xenografts (JM291) or severe emetogenesis (JM221) of other examples. Following a single oral dose of JM216 at the MTD, transient reductions in the WBC (nadir, 1.6 x 10(9)/l, 2 days, 74% reduction), platelet count (nadir, 613 x 10(9)/l, 10 days, 33% reduction

  20. Activity of weekly irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer pretreated with platinum and taxanes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rosa; Esteban, Emilio; Palacio, Isabel; Fernández, Yolanda; Muñiz, Isabel; Vieitez, Jose M; Fra, Joaquin; Blay, Pilar; Villanueva, Noemí; Uña, Esther; Mareque, Beatriz; Estrada, Enrique; Buesa, Jose M; Lacave, Angel J

    2003-11-01

    Irinotecan (CPT-11), a semisynthetic derivative of camptothecin, is active in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this report we describe our experience with this drug when used as a single agent in patients with advanced NSCLC refractory to chemotherapy with platinum and taxanes. Nineteen NSCLC patients (thirteen males and six females; 53% adenocarcinoma and 26% squamous cell carcinoma) with a median age of 52 years (range 34-71) and a Karnofsky performance status of 60% (60-80%) were included in the study. At baseline, the patients had a median of two disease sites and had been treated with a median of two prior regimens. Irinotecan was given at a dose of 100 mg/m(2) i.v.) weekly for 4 weeks followed by 1 week of rest. A total of 123 weekly infusions were administered, and each patient received a median of 4 weeks of treatment (range 1-32). All patients were evaluated by intention-to-treat analysis for efficacy and safety. Main toxicities reported were grade 3 neutropenia (10% of patients), diarrhea (10% of patients), and grade 4 thrombocytopenia (5% of patients). The overall clinical response rate was 16% (95% CI: 8-24) with three partial responses and 9 (47%) patients with stable disease. The median time to progression and the median survival time were 7 and 15 weeks, respectively. In conclusion, weekly irinotecan showed antitumoral activity and minimum toxicity in NSCLC patients refractory to platinum and taxanes.

  1. Optimising the treatment of the partially platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoletta

    2014-12-01

    The choice of second-line chemotherapy in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC) is complex, with several factors to be considered, the most important of which is the length of the platinum-free treatment interval (PFI). Recently ROC patients have been further stratified into platinum sensitive (PS), partially platinum sensitive (PPS) and platinum resistant (PR) subgroups depending on the length of the PFI. Response to second-line therapy, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) are linked to the PFI, all of them improving as the PFI increases. Consequently, there is increasing interest in PFI extension strategies with platinum-free therapeutic options. Such strategies are currently being studied in patients with partially platinum-sensitive disease (PFI 6-12 months), as the treatment of these patients remains clinically challenging. A non-platinum option, trabectedin + pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) combination, has been evaluated in ROC patients in the pivotal phase III OVA-301 study. The OVA-301 study differed from previous trials in the same setting as it included only patients who were not expected to benefit from or who were ineligible for or who were unwilling to receive re-treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy, including those with PPS and PR disease. Subset analysis of patients with PPS disease in OVA-301 showed that the trabectedin + PLD combination significantly improved PFS compared with PLD alone; median PFS 7.4 versus 5.5 months, p=0.0152. Final survival data from the same subset of patients, showed that trabectedin + PLD also achieved a significant 36% decrease in the risk of death compared with PLD alone (HR=0.64; 95% CI, 0.47-0.88; p=0.0027). Median overall survival (OS) was 22.4 months in the trabectedin + PLD arm versus 16.4 months in the PLD arm. This represents a statistically significant 6-month improvement in median OS in patients treated with trabectedin + PLD compared to those treated with PLD alone.

  2. Chemically modified electrodes by nucleophilic substitution of chlorosilylated platinum oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Hsien; Hutchison, James H.; Postlethwaite, Timothy A.; Richardson, John N.; Murray, R. W.

    1994-07-01

    Chlorosilylated platinum oxide electrode surfaces can be generated by reaction of SiCl4 vapor with an electrochemically prepared monolayer of platinum oxide. A variety of nucleophilic agents (such as alcohols, amines, thiols, and Grignard reagents) can be used to displace chloride and thereby functionalize the metal surface. Electroactive surfaces prepared with ferrocene methanol as the nucleophile show that derivatization by small molecules can achieve coverages on the order of a full monolayer. Surfaces modified with long-chain alkyl groups efficiently block electrode reactions of redox probes dissolved in the contacting solution, but other electrochemical (double layer capacitance and surface coverage) and contact angle measurements suggest that these molecule films are not highly ordered, self-assembled monolayers.

  3. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on platinum resistance in stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanlin; Lee, Maria; Kim, Hee Seung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It remains controversial whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking surgery (IDS) induces chemoresistance in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) compared with primary debulking surgery (PDS). The aim of this study was to compare platinum-resistant recurrence following treatment with NACT-IDS or PDS in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 341 patients who underwent PDS or NACT-IDS for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIC or IV EOC between March 1990 and December 2010. Risk factors of platinum resistance, including NACT, postoperative residual tumor size, and various clinicopathological factors, were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure overall survival (OS). Of 341 patients, 58 (17.0%) underwent NACT-IDS and 283 (83.0%) were treated with PDS. Twenty-nine (50.0%) patients developed platinum-resistant disease at first relapse after NACT-IDS and 99 (35.0%) patients recurred after PDS (P = 0.033). In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, NACT-IDS and postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm were risk factors for platinum-resistant recurrence (adjusted odds ratios 2.950 and 2.915; 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 1.572–5.537 and 1.780–4.771, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively). Postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm and platinum-resistant disease were significantly correlated with shorter OS (adjusted hazard ratios 1.579 and 4.078; 95% CI 1.193–2.089 and 3.074–5.412, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively), whereas NACT-IDS did not extend OS. NACT-IDS increases the risk of platinum-resistant recurrence in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC. PMID:27603388

  4. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on platinum resistance in stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanlin; Lee, Maria; Kim, Hee Seung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-09-01

    It remains controversial whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking surgery (IDS) induces chemoresistance in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) compared with primary debulking surgery (PDS). The aim of this study was to compare platinum-resistant recurrence following treatment with NACT-IDS or PDS in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 341 patients who underwent PDS or NACT-IDS for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIC or IV EOC between March 1990 and December 2010. Risk factors of platinum resistance, including NACT, postoperative residual tumor size, and various clinicopathological factors, were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure overall survival (OS).Of 341 patients, 58 (17.0%) underwent NACT-IDS and 283 (83.0%) were treated with PDS. Twenty-nine (50.0%) patients developed platinum-resistant disease at first relapse after NACT-IDS and 99 (35.0%) patients recurred after PDS (P = 0.033). In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, NACT-IDS and postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm were risk factors for platinum-resistant recurrence (adjusted odds ratios 2.950 and 2.915; 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 1.572-5.537 and 1.780-4.771, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively). Postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm and platinum-resistant disease were significantly correlated with shorter OS (adjusted hazard ratios 1.579 and 4.078; 95% CI 1.193-2.089 and 3.074-5.412, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively), whereas NACT-IDS did not extend OS.NACT-IDS increases the risk of platinum-resistant recurrence in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC. PMID:27603388

  5. Platinum anticancer drugs. From serendipity to rational design.

    PubMed

    Monneret, C

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of cis-platin was serendipitous. In 1965, Rosenberg was looking into the effects of an electric field on the growth of Escherichia coli bacteria. He noticed that bacteria ceased to divide when placed in an electric field but what Rosenberg also observed was a 300-fold increase in the size of the bacteria. He attributed this to the fact that somehow the platinum-conducting plates were inducing cell growth but inhibiting cell division. It was later deduced that the platinum species responsible for this was cis-platin. Rosenberg hypothesized that if cis-platin could inhibit bacterial cell division it could also stop tumor cell growth. This conjecture has proven correct and has led to the introduction of cis-platin in cancer therapy. Indeed, in 1978, six years after clinical trials conducted by the NCI and Bristol-Myers-Squibb, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved cis-platin under the name of Platinol(®) for treating patients with metastatic testicular or ovarian cancer in combination with other drugs but also for treating bladder cancer. Bristol-Myers Squibb also licensed carboplatin, a second-generation platinum drug with fewer side effects, in 1979. Carboplatin entered the U.S. market as Paraplatin(®) in 1989 for initial treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in established combination with other approved chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous platin derivatives have been further developed with more or less success and the third derivative to be approved in 1994 was oxaliplatin under the name of Eloxatin(®). It was the first platin-based drug to be active against metastatic colorectal cancer in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid. The two others platin-based drugs to be approved were nedaplatin (Aqupla(®)) in Japan and lobaplatin in China, respectively. More recently, a strategy to overcome resistance due to interaction with thiol-containing molecules led to the synthesis of picoplatin in which one of the amines linked to Pt

  6. Epitaxial Overgrowth of Platinum on Palladium Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M.; Zhu, Y.; Lim, B.; Tao, J.; Camargo, P.H.C.; Ma, C.; Xia, Y.

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes a systematic study on the epitaxial overgrowth of Pt on well-defined Pdnanocrystals with different shapes (and exposed facets), including regular octahedrons, truncated octahedrons, and cubes. Two different reducing agents, i.e., citric acid and L-ascorbic acid, were evaluated and compared for the reduction of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} in an aqueous solution in the presence of Pdnanocrystal seeds. When citric acid was used as a reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of octahedral Pt shells on regular and truncated octahedrons of Pd led to the formation of Pd-Pt core-shell octahedrons, while non-conformal overgrowth of Pt on cubic Pd seeds resulted in the formation of an incomplete octahedral Pt shell. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Pt branches was observed when L-ascorbic acid was used as a reducing agent regardless of the facets expressed on the surface of Pdnanocrystal seeds. This work shows that both the binding affinity of a reducing agent to the Pt surface and the reduction kinetics for a Pt precursor play important roles in determining the mode of Pt overgrowth on Pdnanocrystal surface.

  7. Platinum stable isotopes in ferromanganese crust and nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Loretta; Seward, Terry; Handler, Monica R.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crust and nodules are slow-growing chemical sediments that form by direct precipitation from seawater, resulting in a record of changing seawater chemistry. These sediments are the primary sink for platinum in the modern oxic marine environment, hosting well-documented enrichments over other platinum-group elements (PGEs): the Pt anomaly [1]. Platinum is a non-bio-essential, highly siderophile, transition metal with six stable isotopes (190Pt, 192Pt, 194Pt, 195Pt, 196Pt, and 198Pt) with several oxidation states (Pt0, Pt2+ and Pt4+). Platinum is generally considered to exist in the hydrosphere as Pt2+ although its behaviour in the marine environment is poorly constrained, and Pt4+may also be present. Variations in ocean redox state, together with changes in source fluxes to the oceans, may therefore lead to small variations (< ±1) in the stable isotopic composition of marine platinum, raising the potential of adding platinum to the growing arsenal of paleoceanographic tracers. A method has been developed to measure the platinum isotopic composition using double spike MC-ICPMS analysis [2]and applied to a global suite of modern Fe-Mn crust and nodules. Combining synchrotron XAFS analyses of platinum adsorbed onto Fe-Mn oxide and oxyhydroxide surfaces to determine oxidation state and bonding environment, with platinum stable isotopic measurements allowing us to evaluate both platinum incorporation onto these sediments and the associated degree of platinum isotopic fractionation. Leaching experiments conducted on platinum rich terrestrial materials underwent platinum stable isotopic measurement as an analogue for the Pt isotopic fractionation associated with continental weathering. [1] Hodge, V.F. et al. (1985) Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 72, 158-162. [2] Creech, J. et al. (2013) Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 28. 853-865.

  8. A common polymorphism in the 5' UTR of ERCC5 creates an upstream ORF that confers resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Somers, Joanna; Wilson, Lindsay A; Kilday, John-Paul; Horvilleur, Emilie; Cannell, Ian G; Pöyry, Tuija A A; Cobbold, Laura C; Kondrashov, Alexander; Knight, John R P; Puget, Stéphanie; Grill, Jacques; Grundy, Richard G; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E

    2015-09-15

    We show that a common polymorphic variant in the ERCC5 5' untranslated region (UTR) generates an upstream ORF (uORF) that affects both the background expression of this protein and its ability to be synthesized following exposure to agents that cause bulky adduct DNA damage. Individuals that harbor uORF1 have a marked resistance to platinum-based agents, illustrated by the significantly reduced progression-free survival of pediatric ependymoma patients treated with such compounds. Importantly, inhibition of DNA-PKcs restores sensitivity to platinum-based compounds by preventing uORF1-dependent ERCC5 expression. Our data support a model in which a heritable 5' noncoding mRNA element influences individuals' responses to platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26338418

  9. Platinum-group elements: so many excellent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum-group elements (PGE) include platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium. These metals have similar physical and chemical properties and occur together in nature. The properties of PGE, such as high melting points, corrosion resistance, and catalytic qualities, make them indispensable to many industrial applications. PGE are strategic and critical materials for many nations because they are essential for important industrial applications but are mined in a limited number of places and have no adequate substitutes. Exploration and mining companies have found approximately 104,000 metric tons of PGE (with minor gold) in mineral deposits around the world that could be developed. For PGE, almost all known production and resources are associated with three geologic features: the Bushveld Complex, a layered mafic-to-ultramafic intrusion in South Africa; the Great Dyke, a layered mafic-to-ultramafic intrusion in Zimbabwe; and sill-like intrusions associated with flood basalts in the Noril’sk-Talnakh area, Russia. To help predict where PGE supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where PGE resources are concentrated in the Earth's crust and use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered PGE deposits may exist. Techniques used for assessing mineral resources were developed by the USGS to support the stewardship of Federal lands and evaluate mineral resource availability in a global context. The USGS also compiles statistics and information on the worldwide supply, demand, and flow of PGE. These data are all used to inform U.S. national policymakers.

  10. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  11. Carbon monoxide adsorption on platinum-osmium and platinum-ruthenium-osmium mixed nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Navarro, Nestor E; Smotkin, Eugene S

    2013-05-01

    Density functional calculations (DFT) on carbon monoxide (CO) adsorbed on platinum, platinum-osmium, and platinum-ruthenium-osmium nanoclusters are used to elucidate changes on the adsorbate internal bond and the carbon-metal bond, as platinum is alloyed with osmium and ruthenium atoms. The relative strengths of the adsorbate internal bond and the carbon-metal bond upon alloying, which are related to the DFT calculated C-O and C-Pt stretching frequencies, respectively, cannot be explained by the traditional 5σ-donation/2π*-back-donation theoretical model. Using a modified π-attraction σ-repulsion mechanism, we ascribe the strength of the CO adsorbate internal bond to changes in the polarization of the adsorbate-substrate hybrid orbitals towards carbon. The strength of the carbon-metal bond is quantitatively related to the CO contribution to the adsorbate-substrate hybrid orbitals and the sp and d populations of adsorbing platinum atom. This work complements prior work on corresponding slabs using periodic DFT. Similarities and differences between cluster and periodic DFT calculations are discussed. PMID:23656149

  12. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  13. Nuclear microprobe determination of platinum quantitative distribution in rat brain tumors after cisplatin or carboplatin injection for PAT treatment of glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Biston, M.-C.; Devès, G.; Bohic, S.; Carmona, A.

    2005-04-01

    Conventional radiotherapy of high-grade glioma is unsuccessful since less than 50% of patients survive at 6 months, therefore glioma treatment is still challenging. A new radiotherapy procedure has been recently proposed, the photoactivation therapy (PAT), associating synchrotron radiation with a chemotherapy agent, such as cisplatin. PAT aims at using the monochromaticity and the very high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation for selective excitation of a high-Z compound introduced in tumor cell DNA to maximize the photoelectric effect probability, thus increasing local toxicity. Synchrotron irradiation of cisplatin at the platinum absorption K-edge resulted in a dramatic increase in life span relative to median survival time in the F98 glioma model in Fisher rat. In the purpose to optimize the platinum concentration into the tumor, the platinum content of irradiated target needs to be quantified. These results will enable to correlate injected dose to cellular platinum content in the tumor at the time of irradiation, and to study the spatial diffusion and distribution of the platinum into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues from the point of injection. Male Fisher 344 rats were inoculated with 103 F98 glioma cells. Thirteen days after stereotactic inoculation, intracerebral injection at the tumor site of 40 μg of carboplatin and 3 or 5 μg of cisplatin was performed. Platinum quantitative distribution in tumors and adjacent brain tissues was determined using μ-PIXE and μ-RBS analysis.

  14. Synthesis of Bimetallic Platinum Nanoparticles for Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Leteba, Gerard M.; Lang, Candace I.

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnetic nanomaterials in biosensing applications is growing as a consequence of their remarkable properties; but controlling the composition and shape of metallic nanoalloys is problematic when more than one precursor is required for wet chemistry synthesis. We have developed a successful simultaneous reduction method for preparation of near-spherical platinum-based nanoalloys containing magnetic solutes. We avoided particular difficulties in preparing platinum nanoalloys containing Ni, Co and Fe by the identification of appropriate synthesis temperatures and chemistry. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to show that our particles have a narrow size distribution, uniform size and morphology, and good crystallinity in the as-synthesized condition. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the coexistence of Pt with the magnetic solute in a face-centered cubic (FCC) solid solution. PMID:23941910

  15. Raman characterization of platinum diselenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Motta, Carlo; Zheng, Jian-Yao; Berner, Nina C.; Kotakoski, Jani; Elibol, Kenan; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Meyer, Jannik C.; Yim, Chanyoung; Abid, Mohamed; Hallam, Toby; Donegan, John F.; Sanvito, Stefano; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2016-06-01

    Platinum diselenide (PtSe2) is a newly discovered 2D material which is of great interest for applications in electronics and catalysis. PtSe2 films were synthesized by thermally assisted selenization of predeposited platinum films and scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed the crystal structure of these films to be 1T. Raman scattering of these films was studied as a function of film thickness, laser wavelength and laser polarization. E g and A 1g Raman active modes were identified using polarization measurements in the Raman setup. These modes were found to display a clear position and intensity dependence with film thickness, for multiple excitation wavelengths, and their peak positions agree with simulated phonon dispersion curves for PtSe2. These results highlight the practicality of using Raman spectroscopy as a prime characterization technique for newly synthesized 2D materials.

  16. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-alumina-supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3-supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. The overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.

  17. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    DOE PAGES

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-alumina-supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3-supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms aremore » as active as fully formed platinum particles. The overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.« less

  18. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms.

    PubMed

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Allard, Lawrence F; Stocks, G M; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. Thus, the overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.

  19. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    PubMed Central

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. Thus, the overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms. PMID:25429995

  20. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  1. A gold/platinum thermocouple reference table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, M.; Hill, K. D.; Murdock, E. G.

    1991-11-01

    The thermoelectric voltage of the gold/platinum thermocouple has been measured over the range 0-962 °C by comparison with calibrated platinum resistance thermometers. From 0 to 500 °C, the measurements were carried out in stirred liquid baths; from 660 to 964 °C, they were carried out in a pressure-controlled sodium-filled heat pipe furnace that provided an isothermal intercomparison environment. Measurements were also made in the metal freezing points of indium, tin, zinc, antimony, and silver, at the melting point of gallium, and at the liquidus point of the silver-copper eutectic. By fitting the measured thermoelectric voltages to a single eighth-degree polynomial in temperature by the method of least squares, a reference function is obtained for the Au/Pt thermocouple that provides emf as a function of temperature (ITS-90) to within ±10 mK from 0 to 962 °C. The Au/Pt thermocouple merits serious consideration for precise temperature measurements as its stability approaches that of the high-temperature platinum resistance thermometer.

  2. The cis-Diammineplatinum(II) Complex of Curcumin: A Dual Action DNA Crosslinking and Photochemotherapeutic Agent.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Koushambi; Gautam, Srishti; Kondaiah, Paturu; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2015-11-16

    [Pt(cur)(NH3)2](NO3) (1), a curcumin-bound cis-diammineplatinum(II) complex, nicknamed Platicur, as a novel photoactivated chemotherapeutic agent releases photoactive curcumin and an active platinum(II) species upon irradiation with visible light. The hydrolytic instability of free curcumin reduces upon binding to platinum(II). Interactions of 1 with 5'-GMP and ct-DNA indicated formation of platinum-bound DNA adducts upon exposure to visible light (λ=400-700 nm). It showed apoptotic photocytotoxicity in cancer cells (IC50 ≈ 15 μM), thus forming (⋅)OH, while remaining passive in the darkness (IC50 >200 μM). A comet assay and platinum estimation suggest Pt-DNA crosslink formation. The fluorescence microscopic images showed cytosolic localization of curcumin, thus implying possibility of dual action as a chemo- and phototherapeutic agent.

  3. Dendrimer-Templated Ultrasmall and Multifunctional Photothermal Agents for Efficient Tumor Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengjie; Wang, Yitong; Yan, Yang; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-04-26

    Ultrasmall and multifunctional nanoparticles are highly desirable for photothermal cancer therapy, but the synthesis of these nanoparticles remains a huge challenge. Here, we used a dendrimer as a template to synthesize ultrasmall photothermal agents and further modified them with multifunctional groups. Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENPs) including copper sulfide, platinum, and palladium nanoparticles possessed a sub-5 nm size and exhibited an excellent photothermal effect. DENPs were further modified with TAT or RGD peptides to facilitate their cellular uptake and targeting delivery to tumors. They were also decorated with fluorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of the particles' distribution. The in vivo study revealed RGD-modified DENPs efficiently reduced the tumor growth upon near-infrared irradiation. In all, our study provides a facile and flexible scaffold to prepare ultrasmall and multifunctional photothermal agents. PMID:27054555

  4. Strategies for the fabrication of porous platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kloke, Arne; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2011-11-16

    Porous platinum is of high technological importance due to its various applications in fuel cells, sensors, stimulation electrodes, mechanical actuators and catalysis in general. Based on a discussion of the general principles behind the reduction of platinum salts and corresponding deposition processes this article discusses techniques available for platinum electrode fabrication. The numerous, different strategies available to fabricate platinum electrodes are reviewed and discussed in the context of their tuning parameters, strengths and weaknesses. These strategies comprise bottom-up approaches as well as top-down approaches. In bottom-up approaches nanoparticles are synthesized in a fi rst step by chemical, photochemical or sonochemical means followed by an electrode formation step by e.g. thin fi lm technology or network formation to create a contiguous and conducting solid electrode structure. In top-down approaches fabrication starts with an already conductive electrode substrate. Corresponding strategies enable the fabrication of substrate-based electrodes by e.g. electrodeposition or the fabrication of self-supporting electrodes by dealloying. As a further top-down strategy, this review describes methods to decorate porous metals other than platinum with a surface layer of platinum. This way, fabrication methods not performable with platinum can be applied to the fabrication of platinum electrodes with the special benefit of low platinum consumption. PMID:22180890

  5. RF magnetron sputtering of thick platinum coatings on glass microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, S.F.; Hsieh, E.J.; Burt, R.J.

    1980-05-28

    Thick platinum coatings on glass microspheres are needed for proposed Laser Fusion targets. The spherical nature of these substrates coupled with the small dimensions (approx. 100 ..mu..m OD) make it difficult to achieve a smooth and uniform coating. Coating problems encountered include a rough surface and porous microstructure from the oblique incidence and lack of temperature and bias control, clumping of the microspheres causing non-uniformities, and particle accumulation causing cone defects. Sputtering parameters significantly affecting the coatings include total pressure, DC substrate bias, and the addition of doping gases. Using an ultrasonic vibrating screened cage and RF magnetron Sputtergun, we have successfully batch coated microspheres with up to 6 ..mu..m of Pt, with a surface roughness of 200 nm, thickness non-concentricity of 300 nm, and density greater than 98% of bulk Pt.

  6. GREEN AND CONTROLLED SYNTHESIS OF GOLD AND PLATINUM NANOMATERIALS USING VITAMIN B2: DENSITY-ASSISTED SELF-ASSEMBLY OF NANOSPHERES, WIRES AND RODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the first time, we report density-assisted self-assembly and efficient synthesis of gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) nanospheres, nanowires and nanorods using vitamin B2 (riboflavin) without employing any special capping or dispersing agent at room temperature; this env...

  7. Study of bactericidal properties of carbohydrate-stabilized platinum oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Imani, Saber; mohammad Zand, Ali; Saadati, Mojtaba; Zaghari, Zahra

    2012-09-01

    Platinum oxide nanoparticles were prepared by a simple hydrothermal route and chemical reduction using carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose) as the reducing and stabilizing agents. In comparison with other metals, platinum oxide has less environmental pollution. Therefore, Pt is considered an appropriate candidate to deal with environmental pathogens. The crystallite size of these nanoparticles was evaluated from X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and was found to be 10 nm, which is the demonstration of EM bright field and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of carbohydrates on the morphology of the nanoparticles was studied using TEM. The nanoparticles were administered to the Pseudomonas stutzeri and Lactobacillus cultures, and the incubation was done at 37°C for 24 h. The nanocomposites exhibited interesting inhibitory as well as bactericidal activity against P. stutzeri and Lactobacillus species. Incorporation of nanoparticles also increased the thermal stability of the carbohydrates. The results of this paper showed that carbohydrates can serve as a carrier for platinum oxide nanoparticles, and nanocomposites can have potential biological applications.

  8. Platinum(II) Metallomesogens: New External-Stimuli-Responsive Photoluminescence Materials.

    PubMed

    Cuerva, Cristián; Campo, José A; Cano, Mercedes; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2016-07-11

    New dicatenar isoquinoline-functionalized pyrazoles, [Hpz(R(n,n)iq) ] (R(n,n)=C6 H3 (OCn H2n+1 )2 ; n=4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18), have been strategically designed and synthesized to induce mesomorphic and luminescence properties into the corresponding bis(isoquinolinylpyrazolate)platinum(II) complexes [Pt(pz(R(n,n)iq) )2 ]. Thermal studies reveal that all platinum(II) compounds exhibit columnar mesophases over an exceptionally wide temperature range, above 300 °C in most cases. The photophysical behavior was also investigated in solution and in the solid state. As a consequence of the formation of Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt interactions, the weak greenish emission of the platinum derivatives turns bright orange in the mesophase. Additionally, the complexes are sensitive to a great variety of external inputs, such as temperature, mechanical grinding, pressure, solvents, and vapors. On this basis, they are used as dopant agents of a polyvinylpyrrolidone or poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer matrix to achieve stimuli-responsive thin films. PMID:27273696

  9. Polymer-albumin conjugate for the facilitated delivery of macromolecular platinum drugs.

    PubMed

    Dag, Aydan; Jiang, Yanyan; Karim, Khairil Juhanni Abd; Hart-Smith, Gene; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H

    2015-05-01

    The delivery of macromolecular platinum drugs into cancerous cells is enhanced by conjugating the polymer to albumin. The monomers N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) and Boc protected 1,3-diaminopropan-2-yl acrylate (Ac-DAP-Boc) are copolymerized in the presence of a furan protected maleimide functionalized reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent. The resulting polymer with a composition of P(HPMA14 -co-(Ac-DAP-Boc)9 ) and a molecular weight of Mn = 7600 g mol(-1) (Đ = 1.24) is used as a macromolecular ligand for the conjugation to the platinum drug. Thermogravimetric analysis reveals full conjugation. After deprotection of the maleimide functionality of the polymer, the reactive polymer is conjugated to albumin using the Cys34 functionality. The conjugation is monitored using size exclusion chromatography, MALDI-TOF (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight), and SDS Page (sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). The polymer-albumin conjugates self-assemble in water into nanoparticles of sizes of around 80 nm thanks to the hydrophobic nature of the platinum drugs. The albumin coated nanoparticles are readily taken up by ovarian cancer cell lines and they show superior toxicity compared to a control sample without protein coating. PMID:25790077

  10. A shotgun approach for the identification of platinum-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Moraleja, Irene; Moreno-Gordaliza, Estefanía; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Mena, M Luz; Linscheid, Michael W; Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros

    2015-03-01

    A shotgun approach including peptide-based OFFGEL-isoelectric focusing (IEF) fractionation has been developed with the aim of improving the identification of platinum-binding proteins in biological samples. The method is based on a filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) tryptic digestion under denaturing and reducing conditions of cisplatin-, oxaliplatin-, and carboplatin-protein complexes, followed by OFFGEL-IEF separation of the peptides. Any risk of platinum loss is minimized throughout the procedure due to the removal of the reagents used after each stage of the FASP method and the absence of thiol-based reagents in the focusing buffer employed in the IEF separation. The platinum-peptide complexes stability after the FASP digestion and the IEF separation was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS). The suitability of peptide-based OFFGEL-IEF fractionation for reducing the sample complexity for further nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis has been demonstrated, allowing the detection of platinum-containing peptides, with significantly lower abundance and ionization efficiency than unmodified peptides. nLC-MS/MS analysis of selected OFFGEL-IEF fractions from tryptic digests with different complexity degrees: standard human serum albumin (HSA), a mixture of five proteins (albumin, transferrin, carbonic anhydrase, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c) and human blood serum allowed the identification of several platinum-peptides from cisplatin-HSA. Cisplatin-binding sites in HSA were elucidated from the MS/MS spectra and assessed considering the protein three-dimensional structure. Most of the potential superficial binding sites available on HSA were identified for all the samples, including a biologically relevant cisplatin-cross-link of two protein domains, demonstrating the capabilities of the methodology.

  11. Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles: targeted detection of human prostate cancer cells using both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S.; Bisoffi, Marco; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2011-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most common type of contrast agents used in contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Still, there is a great deal of room for improvement, and nanoparticles with increased MRI relaxivities are needed to increase the contrast enhancement in MRI applied to various medical conditions including cancer. We report the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and subsequent encapsulation using PEGylated phospholipids to create stealth immunomicelles (DSPE-SIPPs) that can be specifically targeted to human prostate cancer cell lines and detected using both MRI and fluorescence imaging. SIPP cores and DSPE-SIPPs were 8.5 ± 1.6 nm and 42.9 ± 8.2 nm in diameter, respectively, and the SIPPs had a magnetic moment of 120 A m2/kg iron. J591, a monoclonal antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was conjugated to the DSPE-SIPPs (J591-DSPE-SIPPs), and specific targeting of J591-DSPE-SIPPs to PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines was demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. The transverse relaxivity of the DSPE-SIPPs, measured at 4.7 Tesla, was 300.6 ± 8.5 s−1 mM−1, which is 13-fold better than commercially available SPIONs (23.8 ± 6.9 s−1 mM−1) and ~3-fold better than reported relaxivities for Feridex® and Resovist®. Our data suggest that J591-DSPE-SIPPs specifically target human prostate cancer cells in vitro, are superior contrast agents in T2-weighted MRI, and can be detected using fluorescence imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of multifunctional SIPP micelles and using SIPPs for the specific detection of prostate cancer. PMID:22121333

  12. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  13. Bimetallic alloy electrocatalysts with multilayered platinum-skin surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Wang, Chao; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2016-01-26

    Compositions and methods of preparing a bimetallic alloy having enhanced electrocatalytic properties are provided. The composition comprises a PtNi substrate having a surface layer, a near-surface layer, and an inner layer, where the surface layer comprises a nickel-depleted composition, such that the surface layer comprises a platinum skin having at least one atomic layer of platinum.

  14. Vapor-deposited platinum as a fuel-cell catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, W. J.; Batzold, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Electrodes are prepared by vacuum deposition of platinum on nickel substrate with conventional vapor-deposition apparatus. Amount of platinum loaded on substrate can be veried by changing exposure time during deposition. These electrodes are significantly more effective than conventional oxygen electrodes.

  15. Determination of platinum in blood by adsorptive voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Nygren, O; Vaughan, G T; Florence, T M; Morrison, G M; Warner, I M; Dale, L S

    1990-08-01

    This work describes a sensitive method for the determination of platinum in blood, which can be used for determining the natural levels of platinum in human blood, for monitoring patients treated with platinum cytotoxic drugs, and for monitoring occupational exposure to these drugs and other platinum compounds. The method involves dry ashing of blood samples in a muffle furnace and determination of platinum by adsorptive voltammetric (AV) measurement of the catalytic reduction of protons by the platinum-formazone complex. The detection limit for a 100-microL sample of blood is 0.017 micrograms/L, with a recovery of 94% and a relative standard deviation of 7% at a platinum level of 1 microgram/L. By using this method, the natural levels of platinum in human blood were found to be in the range 0.1-2.8 micrograms/L (median = 0.6 micrograms/L). These results were verified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with blood prepared by wet ashing and using gold as an internal standard. PMID:2400106

  16. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 'plunge method' recommended by ASTM has been used to determine the time constant of 100-ohm platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) considered for use in the National Transonic Facility. It is shown that the response time of ventilated PRT can be correlated with the reciprocal of the heat transfer coefficient in a given field. Universal correlations are established for the 100- and 1000-ohm PRT with uncertainties of 20 and 30 percent, respectively. The correlations are found to be consistent with the uncertainty involved in heat transfer correlations available in the literature and are recommended for use in flowing liquids and gases.

  17. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:27289447

  18. Platinum adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles, method for preparing, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tong, YuYe; Du, Bingchen

    2015-08-11

    A superior, industrially scalable one-pot ethylene glycol-based wet chemistry method to prepare platinum-adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles has been developed that offers an exquisite control of the platinum packing density of the adlayers and effectively prevents sintering of the nanoparticles during the deposition process. The wet chemistry based method for the controlled deposition of submonolayer platinum is advantageous in terms of processing and maximizing the use of platinum and can, in principle, be scaled up straightforwardly to an industrial level. The reactivity of the Pt(31)-Ru sample was about 150% higher than that of the industrial benchmark PtRu (1:1) alloy sample but with 3.5 times less platinum loading. Using the Pt(31)-Ru nanoparticles would lower the electrode material cost compared to using the industrial benchmark alloy nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  19. Simultaneous determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in crude platinum samples by activation analysis and high-resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Turkstra, J; de Wet, W J

    1969-08-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation analysis using a Ge(Li) detector has been investigated for the simultaneous determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in crude platinum samples contained in lead cupels. This technique proved feasible and appears promising for extension to the determination of most of the noble metals.

  20. Squalamine treatment of human tumors in nu/nu mice enhances platinum-based chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Williams, J I; Weitman, S; Gonzalez, C M; Jundt, C H; Marty, J; Stringer, S D; Holroyd, K J; Mclane, M P; Chen, Q; Zasloff, M; Von Hoff, D D

    2001-03-01

    Squalamine, an antiangiogenic aminosterol, is presently undergoing Phase II clinical trials in cancer patients. To broaden our understanding of the clinical potential for squalamine, this agent was evaluated in nu/nu mouse xenograft models using the chemoresistant MV-522 human non-small cell lung carcinoma and the SD human neuroblastoma lines. Squalamine was studied alone and in combination with either cisplatin or paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Squalamine alone produced a modest MV-522 tumor growth inhibition (TGI) and yielded a TGI with cisplatin that was better than cisplatin alone. Squalamine also significantly enhanced the activity of paclitaxel/carboplatin combination therapy in the MV-522 tumor model. Squalamine similarly improved the effectiveness of cisplatin in producing TGI when screened against the SD human neuroblastoma xenograft. Xenograft tumor shrinkage was seen for the MV-522 tumor in combination treatments including squalamine, whereas no tumor shrinkage was seen when squalamine was omitted from the treatment regimen. To gain a greater understanding of the mechanism by which squalamine inhibited tumor growth in the xenograft studies, in vitro experiments were carried out with vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture exposed to squalamine. Squalamine treatment was found to retard two cellular events necessary for angiogenesis, inducing disorganization of F-actin stress fibers and causing a concomitant reduction of detectable cell the surface molecular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We propose that the augmentation by squalamine of cytotoxicity from platinum-based therapies is attributable to interference by squalamine with the ability of stimuli to promote endothelial cell movement and cell-cell communication necessary for growth of new blood vessels in xenografts after chemotherapeutic injury to the tumor. PMID:11297269

  1. HIPEC ROC I: a phase I study of cisplatin administered as hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemoperfusion followed by postoperative intravenous platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Oliver; Abramian, Alina; Kullmann, Maximilian; Fuhrmann, Christine; Coch, Christoph; Hoeller, Tobias; Ruehs, Hauke; Keyver-Paik, Mignon Denise; Rudlowski, Christian; Weber, Stefan; Kiefer, Nicholas; Poelcher, Martin L; Thiesler, Thore; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Mallmann, Michael; Schaefer, Nico; Permantier, Maryse; Latten, Sandra; Kalff, Joerg; Thomale, Juergen; Jaehde, Ulrich; Kuhn, Walther C

    2015-02-01

    This phase I study tested the safety, feasibility, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cisplatin administered as hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) undergoing secondary cytoreductive surgery followed by postoperative platinum-based intravenous chemotherapy. Twelve patients with operable, recurrent platinum-sensitive EOC (recurrence ≥6 months after first-line therapy) were included according to the classical 3+3 dose-escalation design at three dose levels-60, 80 and 100 mg/m(2). After surgical cytoreduction, a single dose of cisplatin was administered via HIPEC for 90 min at 41-43°C. Postoperatively, all patients were treated with standard intravenous platinum-based combination chemotherapy. One of six patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (grade 3 renal toxicity) at a dose of 100 mg/m(2). The remaining five patients treated with 100 mg/m(2) tolerated their treatment well. The recommended phase II dose was established at 100 mg/m(2). The mean peritoneal-to-plasma AUC ratio was 19·5 at the highest dose level. Cisplatin-induced DNA adducts were confirmed in tumor samples. Common postoperative grade 1-3 toxicities included fatigue, postoperative pain, nausea, and surgical site infection. The ability to administer standard intravenous platinum-based chemotherapy after HIPEC was uncompromised. Cisplatin administered as HIPEC at a dose of 100 mg/m(2) has an acceptable safety profile in selected patients undergoing secondary cytoreductive surgery for platinum-sensitive recurrent EOC. Favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of HIPEC with cisplatin were confirmed at all dose levels, especially at 100 mg/m(2). The results are encouraging to determine the efficacy of HIPEC as a complementary treatment in patients with EOC. PMID:24895230

  2. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems.

  3. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems. PMID:25521618

  4. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, R.R.; Sasaki, K.; Naohara, H.; Cai, Y.; Choi, Y.M.; Liu, P.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Wang, J.X.

    2010-11-08

    More than skin deep: Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200?000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  5. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; H Naohara; Y Cai; Y Choi; P Liu; M Vukmirovic; J Wang; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200,000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  6. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  7. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  8. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  9. Gemcitabine-oxaliplatin combination for ovarian cancer resistant to taxane-platinum treatment: a phase II study from the GINECO group.

    PubMed

    Ray-Coquard, I; Weber, B; Cretin, J; Haddad-Guichard, Z; Lévy, E; Hardy-Bessard, A C; Gouttebel, M C; Geay, J-F; Aleba, A; Orfeuvre, H; Agostini, C; Provencal, J; Ferrero, J M; Fric, D; Dohollou, N; Paraiso, D; Salvat, J; Pujade-Lauraine, E

    2009-02-24

    Advanced ovarian carcinoma in early progression (<6 months) (AOCEP) is considered resistant to most cytotoxic drugs. Gemcitabine (GE) and oxaliplatin (OXA) have shown single-agent activity in relapsed ovarian cancer. Their combination was tested in patients with AOCEP in phase II study. Fifty patients pre-treated with platinum-taxane received q3w administration of OXA (100 mg m(-2), d1) and GE (1000 mg m(-2), d1, d8, 100-min infusion). Patient characteristics were a : median age 64 years (range 46-79),and 1 (84%) or 2 (16%) earlier lines of treatment. Haematological toxicity included grade 3-4 neutropaenia (33%), anaemia (8%), and thrombocytopaenia (19%). Febrile neutropaenia occurred in 3%. Non-haematological toxicity included grade 2-3 nausea or vomiting (34%), grade 3 fatigue (25%),and grade 2 alopecia (24%). Eighteen (37%) patients experienced response. Median progression-free (PF) and overall survivals (OS) were 4.6 and 11.4 months, respectively. The OXA-GE combination has high activity and acceptable toxicity in AOCEP patients. A comparison of the doublet OXA-GE with single-agent treatment is warranted.

  10. Evaluation tests of platinum resistance thermometers for a cryogenic wind tunnel application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, E. F.; Compton, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-one commercially designed platinum resistance thermometers were evaluated for applicability to stagnation temperature measurements between -190 C and +65 C in the Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility. Evaluation tests included X-ray shadowgraphs, calibrations before and after aging, and time constant measurements. Two wire-wound low thermal mass probes of a conventional design were chosen as most suitable for this cryogenic wind tunnel application.

  11. Platinum-Tin Nano-Catalysts Supported on Alumina for Direct Dehydrogenation of n-Butane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Hyun; Hong, Ung Gi; Park, Gle; Yoo, Yeonshick; Lee, Jinsuk; Chang, Hosik; Song, In Kyu

    2015-10-01

    Al2O3 supports were prepared by a precipitation method using various basic solutions (NaOH, KOH, NH4OH, and Na2CO3) as precipitation agents, and Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts were then prepared by a sequential impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were applied to the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane to n-butenes and 1,3-butadiene. The effect of precipitation agents on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts in the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane was investigated. Catalytic performance of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts decreased in order of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NaOH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (KOH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NH4OH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (Na2CO3). Among the catalysts tested, Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NaOH) nano-catalyst showed the best catalytic performance in terms of yield for total dehydrogenation products (TDP, n-butenes and 1,3-butadiene). Hydrogen chemisorption experiments revealed that platinum surface area of the catalyst was closely related to the catalytic performance. Yield for TDP increased with increasing platinum surface area of the catalyst.

  12. Platinum-Tin Nano-Catalysts Supported on Alumina for Direct Dehydrogenation of n-Butane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Hyun; Hong, Ung Gi; Park, Gle; Yoo, Yeonshick; Lee, Jinsuk; Chang, Hosik; Song, In Kyu

    2015-10-01

    Al2O3 supports were prepared by a precipitation method using various basic solutions (NaOH, KOH, NH4OH, and Na2CO3) as precipitation agents, and Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts were then prepared by a sequential impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were applied to the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane to n-butenes and 1,3-butadiene. The effect of precipitation agents on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts in the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane was investigated. Catalytic performance of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts decreased in order of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NaOH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (KOH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NH4OH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (Na2CO3). Among the catalysts tested, Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NaOH) nano-catalyst showed the best catalytic performance in terms of yield for total dehydrogenation products (TDP, n-butenes and 1,3-butadiene). Hydrogen chemisorption experiments revealed that platinum surface area of the catalyst was closely related to the catalytic performance. Yield for TDP increased with increasing platinum surface area of the catalyst. PMID:26726508

  13. A novel electroless method to prepare a platinum electrocatalyst on diamond for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Xiao; Hu, Jingping; Foord, John S.; Wang, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    A novel electroless deposition method was demonstrated to prepare a platinum electrocatalyst on boron doped diamond (BDD) substrates without the need for pre-activation. This green method addresses the uniformity and particle size issues associated with electrodeposition and circumvents the pre-activation procedure which is necessary for conventional electroless deposition. The inert BDD substrate formed a galvanic couple with an iron wire, to overcome the activation barrier associated with conventional electroless deposition on diamond, leading to the formation of Pt nanoparticles on the electrode surface in a galvanic process coupled to a chemical process. When sodium hypophosphite was employed as the reducing agent to drive the electroless reaction Pt deposits which were contaminated with iron and phosphorus resulted. In contrast, the reducing agent ascorbic acid gave rise to high purity Pt nanoparticles. Optimal deposition conditions with respect to bath temperature, pH value and stabilizing additives are identified. Using this approach, high purity and uniformly distributed platinum nanoparticles are obtained on the diamond electrode surface, which demonstrate a high electrochemical activity towards methanol oxidation.

  14. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes. PMID:27385031

  15. Neuropilin-1-targeted gold nanoparticles enhance therapeutic efficacy of platinum(IV) drug for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Juan; Tan, Aaron; Li, Shengliang; Jin, Shubin; Xue, Xiangdong; Zhao, YuanYuan; Ji, Tianjiao; Han, Lu; Liu, Hong; Zhang, XiaoNing; Zhang, Jinchao; Zou, Guozhang; Wang, Tianyou; Tang, Suoqin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-05-27

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin are some of the most potent chemotherapeutic agents but have limited applications due to severe dose-limiting side effects and a tendency for cancer cells to rapidly develop resistance. The therapeutic index can be improved through use of nanocarrier systems to target cancer cells efficiently. We developed a unique strategy to deliver a platinum(IV) drug to prostate cancer cells by constructing glutathione-stabilized (Au@GSH) gold nanoparticles. Glutathione (GSH) has well-known antioxidant properties, which lead to cancer regression. Here, we exploit the advantages of both the antioxidant properties and high surface-area-to-volume ratio of Au@GSH NPs to demonstrate their potential for delivery of a platinum(IV) drug by targeting the neuropilin-1 receptor (Nrp-1). A lethal dose of a platinum(IV) drug functionalized with the Nrp-1-targeting peptide (CRGDK) was delivered specifically to prostate cancer cells in vitro. Targeted peptide ensures specific binding to the Nrp-1 receptor, leading to enhanced cellular uptake level and cell toxicity. The nanocarriers were themselves nontoxic, but exhibited high cytotoxicity and increased efficacy when functionalized with the targeting peptide and drug. The uptake of drug-loaded nanocarriers is dependent on the interaction with Nrp-1 in cell lines expressing high (PC-3) and low (DU-145) levels of Nrp-1, as confirmed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and confocal microscopy. The nanocarriers have effective anticancer activity, through upregulation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) protein (p50 and p65) expression and activation of NF-κB-DNA-binding activity. Our preliminary investigations with platinum(IV)-functionalized gold nanoparticles along with a targeting peptide hold significant promise for future cancer treatment.

  16. Neuropilin-1-targeted gold nanoparticles enhance therapeutic efficacy of platinum(IV) drug for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Juan; Tan, Aaron; Li, Shengliang; Jin, Shubin; Xue, Xiangdong; Zhao, YuanYuan; Ji, Tianjiao; Han, Lu; Liu, Hong; Zhang, XiaoNing; Zhang, Jinchao; Zou, Guozhang; Wang, Tianyou; Tang, Suoqin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-05-27

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin are some of the most potent chemotherapeutic agents but have limited applications due to severe dose-limiting side effects and a tendency for cancer cells to rapidly develop resistance. The therapeutic index can be improved through use of nanocarrier systems to target cancer cells efficiently. We developed a unique strategy to deliver a platinum(IV) drug to prostate cancer cells by constructing glutathione-stabilized (Au@GSH) gold nanoparticles. Glutathione (GSH) has well-known antioxidant properties, which lead to cancer regression. Here, we exploit the advantages of both the antioxidant properties and high surface-area-to-volume ratio of Au@GSH NPs to demonstrate their potential for delivery of a platinum(IV) drug by targeting the neuropilin-1 receptor (Nrp-1). A lethal dose of a platinum(IV) drug functionalized with the Nrp-1-targeting peptide (CRGDK) was delivered specifically to prostate cancer cells in vitro. Targeted peptide ensures specific binding to the Nrp-1 receptor, leading to enhanced cellular uptake level and cell toxicity. The nanocarriers were themselves nontoxic, but exhibited high cytotoxicity and increased efficacy when functionalized with the targeting peptide and drug. The uptake of drug-loaded nanocarriers is dependent on the interaction with Nrp-1 in cell lines expressing high (PC-3) and low (DU-145) levels of Nrp-1, as confirmed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and confocal microscopy. The nanocarriers have effective anticancer activity, through upregulation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) protein (p50 and p65) expression and activation of NF-κB-DNA-binding activity. Our preliminary investigations with platinum(IV)-functionalized gold nanoparticles along with a targeting peptide hold significant promise for future cancer treatment. PMID:24730557

  17. Plane polarized x-ray fluorescence system for the in vivo measurement of platinum in head and neck tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, P. A.; Al-Hussany, A. F.; Bennett, C. A.; Hancock, D. A.; El-Sharkawi, A. M.

    1998-08-01

    A plane polarized x-ray fluorescence system based on an orthovoltage radiotherapy treatment unit, the Pantak DXT-300, has been developed and optimized to measure tumour platinum concentration. The platinum derives from platinum based chemotherapy agents, such as cisplatin and carboplatin used to treat tumours in the head and neck region. Photons from an x-ray tube are polarized by scattering through , and used to stimulate the emission of characteristic platinum x-rays from the tumour. Information about the drug in the tumour could be of use in establishing dose-response relationships, in order to optimize the treatment and reduce the toxicity of the drug. The performance of the system was optimized with respect to the applied x-ray tube voltage, the current and the filter material; the effect on the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the thickness of the overlying tissue surrounding the tumour was investigated in detail. The lowest MDL is achieved using 0.25 mm of tin filter and x-ray tube voltage of 220 kV. This is 5.6 ppm for a tumour surrounded with 20 mm of overlying tissue, a measurement time of 2000 s and an estimated skin dose of 3.0 mGy. This represents the most sensitive in vivo XRF system to date. We have embarked on a clinical pilot study to measure the platinum concentration in tumours of the head and neck, and expect initial results to be available in the near future.

  18. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Burblies, Niklas; Schulze, Jennifer; Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes. PMID:27385031

  19. Electron Beam Welder Used to Braze Sapphire to Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsgren, Roger C.; Vannuyen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A new use for electron beam brazing was recently developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Manufacturing Engineering Division. This work was done to fabricate a fiberoptic probe (developed by Sentec Corporation) that could measure high temperatures less than 600 deg C of vibrating machinery, such as in jet engine combustion research. Under normal circumstances, a sapphire fiber would be attached to platinum by a ceramic epoxy. However, no epoxies can adhere ceramic fibers to platinum under such high temperatures and vibration. Also, since sapphire and platinum have different thermal properties, the epoxy bond is subjected to creep over time. Therefore, a new method had to be developed that would permanently and reliably attach a sapphire fiber to platinum. Brazing a sapphire fiber to a platinum shell. The fiber-optic probe assembly consists of a 0.015-in.-diameter sapphire fiber attached to a 0.25-in.-long, 0.059-in.-diameter platinum shell. Because of the small size of this assembly, electron beam brazing was chosen instead of conventional vacuum brazing. The advantage of the electron beam is that it can generate a localized heat source in a vacuum. Gold reactive braze was used to join the sapphire fiber and the platinum. Consequently, the sapphire fiber was not affected by the total heat needed to braze the components together.

  20. Surface Analysis of 4-Aminothiophenol Adsorption at Polycrystalline Platinum Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Fachini, Estevao R.; Contes, Enid J.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been studied by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Raman spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments give an idea about the packing quality of the monolayer. RAIR and Raman spectra for 4-ATP modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for neat 4-ATP indicating the adsorption of 4-ATP molecules on platinum surface. The adsorption on platinum was also evidenced by the presence of sulfur and nitrogen peaks by XPS survey spectra of the modified platinum electrodes. High resolution XPS studies and RAIR spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption gives up an amino terminated SAM. Thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses. Derivatization of 4-ATP SAM was performed using 16-Br hexadecanoic acid.

  1. Glioblastoma Treatment: Bypassing the Toxicity of Platinum Compounds by Using Liposomal Formulation and Increasing Treatment Efficiency With Concomitant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, Gabriel; Sanche, Leon; Fortin, David; Mathieu, David; Paquette, Benoit

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Treatments of glioblastoma with cisplatin or oxaliplatin only marginally improve the overall survival of patients and cause important side effects. To prevent adverse effects, improve delivery, and optimize the tumor response to treatment in combination with radiotherapy, a potential approach consists of incorporating the platinum agent in a liposome. Methods and Materials: In this study, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, carboplatin, Lipoplatin (the liposomal formulation of cisplatin), and Lipoxal (the liposomal formulation of oxaliplatin) were tested on F98 glioma orthotopically implanted in Fischer rats. The platinum compounds were administered by intracarotid infusion and were assessed for the ability to reduce toxicity, improve cancer cell uptake, and increase survival of animals when combined or not combined with radiotherapy. Results: The tumor uptake was 2.4-fold more important for Lipoxal than the liposome-free oxaliplatin. Lipoxal also improved the specificity of oxaliplatin as shown by a higher ratio of tumor to right hemisphere uptake. Surprisingly, Lipoplatin led to lower tumor uptake compared with cisplatin. However, Lipoplatin had the advantage of largely reducing the toxicity of cisplatin and allowed us to capitalize on the anticancer activity of this agent. Conclusion: Among the five platinum compounds tested, carboplatin showed the best increase in survival when combined with radiation for treatment of glioma implanted in Fischer rats.

  2. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype.

  3. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype. PMID:3611714

  4. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jennifer N.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely

  5. Oxidation performance of platinum-clad Mo-47Re alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1994-01-01

    The alloy Mo-47Re has favorable mechanical properties at temperatures above 1400 C, but it undergoes severe oxidation when used in air with no protective coating. To shield the alloy from oxidation, platinum cladding has been evaluated. The unprotected alloy undergoes catastrophic oxidation under static and dynamic oxidation conditions. The platinum cladding provides good protection from static and dynamic oxidation for moderate times at 1260 C. Samples tested for longer times under static oxidation conditions experienced severe oxidation. The data suggest that oxidation results from the transport of oxygen through the grain boundaries and through the pinhole defects of the platinum cladding.

  6. State-of-the-Art Treatment and Novel Agents in Local and Distant Recurrences of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tempfer, Clemens B; Beckmann, Matthias W

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the stage at initial presentation, cervical cancer will recur in 25-61% of women. Typical manifestations of recurrent cervical cancer include the central pelvis and the pelvic side walls as well as retroperitoneal lymph node basins in the pelvis and the para-aortic region, and - more rarely - supraclavicular lymph nodes. There are no typical symptoms of recurrent cervical cancer. Women with suspected recurrence after cervical cancer based on gynecological examination or organ-specific symptoms must undergo imaging studies and - if technically feasible - biopsy with histological verification, especially in cases of distant metastases, in order to rule out a second primary. Radiotherapy-naïve women should be treated with salvage radiochemotherapy with curative intention. For women with previous radiotherapy, surgery in the form of hysterectomy, local resection, or pelvic exenteration is the treatment of choice. Pelvic exenteration can lead to cure in selected patients, but at the price of a high rate of complications and significant morbidity and mortality. If complete surgical resection is not feasible or if the woman is not a candidate for surgery, chemotherapy with palliative intent should be offered. Patients with recurrent disease outside the pelvis are candidates for systemic chemotherapy. Several agents have shown to be active in this situation, either in single-agent or combination regimens. Platinum-containing regimens have a superior efficacy over non-platinum regimens and bevacizumab may be added to chemotherapy. PMID:27614445

  7. Unusual delayed hydrocephalus after bare platinum coil embolization of an unruptured aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Mohri, Masanao; Hirota, Yuichi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman developed hydrocephalus after the embolization of an incidentally detected unruptured large internal carotid artery aneurysm with bare platinum coils. Endovascular embolization resulted in near-total aneurysm occlusion. She complained of mild headache 18 hours after the procedure and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed on the 6(th) post-treatment day revealed wall enhancement and perianeurysmal brain edema. Follow-up MR imaging showed recanalization of the aneurysm and gradual ventricular enlargement. She presented with typical symptoms of hydrocephalus including disorientation, gait disturbance, and urine incontinence at 7 months post-embolization. We removed 30 ml of cerebrospinal fluid by lumbar tap, which improved her condition without symptom recurrence for 2 months. She did not require shunt placement. Post-interventional hydrocephalus is known in patients with unruptured aneurysms embolized with bioactive second-generation coils. This case shows that hydrocephalus can occur after aneurysm embolization with bare platinum coils without intracranial hemorrhage.

  8. Electrooxidation of saccharides at platinum electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Chung, Taek Dong

    2012-10-01

    Saccharides have been emerging as promising fuels for future energy industry because they possess high energy density and tremendous amount of them can be obtained from abundant biomass. Direct electrochemical oxidation of saccharides to generate electricity is a potentially competitive approach in terms of the demand for small, handy, and cost-effective electric power sources. To develop efficient sugar fuel cell, it is necessary to understand mechanism of electrooxidation of saccharide at electrode surface. Although glucose oxidation at platinum surface has been well known, fundamental mechanism study on electrooxidation of other sugars is still in its infancy. Based on research of glucose oxidation, we will predict the electrooxidation of other saccharides such as fructose.

  9. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activity 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.

  10. Thermodynamic ground states of platinum metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, D; Sadigh, B; Crowhurst, J; Goncharov, A

    2007-10-09

    We have systematically studied the thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum metal elements using density functional theory. We show that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability can extend up to 17 GPa for PtN{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that according to calculations using the local density approximation, these new compounds are also thermodynamically stable at ambient pressure and thus may be the ground state phases for these materials. We further discuss the fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures.

  11. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activitymore » 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.« less

  12. Platinum group nuggets in deep sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Bates, B. A.; Wheelock, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of iron meteor oblation spheres in deep sea sediments was known for over a century. These spheres generally were believed to be composed of either pure magnetite and wustite or an oxide shell surrounding a NiFe metal core. A large number of 300 micron to 600 micron spheres found were pure oxide spheres, usually containing a solitary 10 micron platinum group nugget (pgn) composed almost entirely of group VIII metals. Twelve PGN's were analyzed and most had chondritic abundances with some depletions that correlate with element volatility. PGN formation by oxidation of a molten metal sphere entering the atmosphere cannot occur if the oxygen abundance in the atmosphere is less than half of its present value. The first appearance of PGN's in the geological record should mark when, in the Earth's history, oxygen rose to this level.

  13. Superconductivity observed in platinum-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Pai-Chia; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lee, Ku-Pin; Shiue, Jessie

    2014-05-26

    We report the discovery of superconductivity with an onset temperature of ∼0.6 K in a platinum-silicon interface. The interface was formed by using a unique focused ion beam sputtering micro-deposition method in which the energies of most sputtered Pt atoms are ∼2.5 eV. Structural and elemental analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal a ∼ 7 nm interface layer with abundant Pt, which is the layer likely responsible for the superconducting transport behavior. Similar transport behavior was also observed in a gold-silicon interface prepared by the same technique, indicating the possible generality of this phenomenon.

  14. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  15. On the kinetics of platinum silicide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Erik J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-02-01

    In this work, the kinetics of platinum silicide formation for thin Pt films (50 nm) on monocrystalline ⟨100⟩ silicon is investigated via in situ resistance measurements under isothermal (197-275 °C) conditions. For Pt2Si diffusion limited growth was observed. For PtSi formation, however, no linear relation between silicide thickness and √t was found. PtSi growth over time could be described using the Avrami relation rendering Avrami exponent n =1.4±0.1. Additionally, an effective activation energy EA=1.7±0.1 eV was derived using the Avrami k values. The findings are important for obtaining well defined silicide films and silicide-to-silicon contacts.

  16. Gallium a unique anti-resorptive agent in bone: Preclinical studies on its mechanisms of action

    SciTech Connect

    Bockman, R.; Adelman, R.; Donnelly, R.; Brody, L.; Warrell, R. ); Jones, K.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of gallium as a new and unique agent for the treatment of metabolic bone disorders was in part fortuitous. Gallium is an exciting new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pathologic states characterized by accelerated bone resorption. Compared to other therapeutic metal compounds containing platinum or germanium, gallium affects its antiresorptive action without any evidence of a cytotoxic effect on bone cells. Gallium is unique amongst all therapeutically available antiresorptive agents in that it favors bone formation. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of platinum decorated iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika

    This dissertation focuses on the development of a bifunctional nanoparticle system that can potentially offer simultaneous imaging and therapy in the future. Recently, small platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (< 5 nm) have shown great potential in therapeutic applications, such as DNA dissociation, radiation therapy, and oxidative stress treatment. Therefore, the small Pt nanoparticles of size comparable to DNA grooves are chosen as potential therapeutic components in this research. However, such small sized Pt nanoparticles tends to aggregate, and are difficult to target. Therefore, this research reports the synthesis, characterization, and DNA interaction of small Pt decorated iron oxide nanoparticles. The iron oxide carriers provide stability to the small Pt nanoparticles, and can potentially serve as MRI contrast agents. The hypothesis of this research is that the Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces can effectively interact with DNA molecules similar to the free Pt nanoparticles. A reproducible synthetic technique was first developed to prepare iron oxide nanoparticles with excellent size control and narrow size distribution. Subsequently, two different approaches were utilized to produce multiple small Pt nanoparticle attached iron oxide nanoparticles. The first route involved attachment of Pt nanoparticles onto iron oxide seeds of various shapes in an organic solvent, followed by an aqueous phase transfer. Here, the shape of the nanoparticles was controlled to facilitate heterogeneous nucleation of Pt nanoparticles. The protective biocompatible polymer coating (polyacrylic acid) in this method could prevent interaction of the Pt nanoparticles with undesirable biomolecules. Several non-spherical iron oxide nanoparticles were explored, including whiskers, worms, plates, and flowers. In the second method, an aqueous phase ligand exchange process was performed first, prior to the deposition of multiple Pt nanoparticles. This facile method

  18. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  19. Water dissociation on silica in the presence of atomic platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klett, Joachim; Elger, Benjamin; Krähling, Stephan; Kaiser, Bernhard; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of water on well-defined silica and silica/Pt interfaces by synchrotron X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (SXPS). For that purpose silica surfaces grown on Si have been covered with atomic platinum in order to facilitate water dissociation. Water was adsorbed from the gas phase at cryogenic temperatures and its dissociation was observed on clean and platinum coated surfaces. After desorption the adsorbed hydroxides decompose on the blank surface, whereas the hydroxides remain stable if the surface was modified with platinum. The principal reversibility of the hydroxylation process implies the necessity of point defects in order to stabilize hydroxides on well-ordered silica surfaces. Deposited platinum atoms are able to stabilize hydroxides in their proximity and act as an acceptor state on the silica surface.

  20. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  1. Physical Character and Morphology of Platinum Nanocrystals on Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gild, Joshua; Pierce, Michael; Komanicky, Vladimir; Barbour, Andi; You, Hoydoo

    2015-03-01

    The physical characteristics of platinum nanocrystals on single crystal strontium titanate, SrTiO3 , can effect the chemical properties of this important model catalyst. The morphology, epitaxy, distribution, and size of the Pt nano-crystals can all be controlled through different growth and processing mechanisms. Nanometer scale platinum thin films are deposited on strontium titanate at ambient temperatures then annealed at range of temperatures and in various oxidizing environments. The process of how these conditions influence the formation of uniformly epitaxial platinum crystals on the sample surface has been investigated using basic materials characterization techniques. Single crystal x-ray diffraction is the primary tool for these experiments, coupled with atomic force microscopy for morphology and x-ray and electron spectroscopy to determine chemical bonding between the particles and gases introduced into the system. These substrate supported nanoparticle samples will then be utilized in experiments to test their catalytic activity compared to an amorphous platinum film.

  2. Platinum blue staining of cells grown in electrospun scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Mohammed; Millas, Ana Luiza G; Estandarte, Ana Katrina C; Bhella, Gurdeep K; McKean, Robert; Bittencourt, Edison; Robinson, Ian K

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast cells grown in electrospun polymer scaffolds were stained with platinum blue, a heavy metal stain, and imaged using scanning electron microscopy. Good contrast on the cells was achieved compared with samples that were gold sputter coated. The cell morphology could be clearly observed, and the cells could be distinguished from the scaffold fibers. Here we optimized the required concentration of platinum blue for imaging cells grown in scaffolds and show that a higher concentration causes platinum aggregation. Overall, platinum blue is a useful stain for imaging cells because of its enhanced contrast using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the future it would be useful to investigate cell growth and morphology using three-dimensional imaging methods.

  3. Platinum Publications, April 1–May 27, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed.

  4. Platinum nanostructures formed by femtosecond laser irradiation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Haibin; Shen Mengyan

    2012-11-15

    Platinum nanostructures with various morphologies, such as spike-like, ripple-like and array-like structures, have been fabricated by 400 nm and 800 nm femtosecond laser irradiation in water. Different structures can be formed on the surfaces as a function of the laser wavelength, the fluence and scan methods. The reflectance measurements of these structures show much larger absorption on the irradiated surfaces than untreated platinum surfaces.

  5. Controlled synthesis of novel octapod platinum nanocrystals under microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lei; Chi, Quan; Zhao, Yanxi; Liu, Hanfan; Zhou, Zhongqiang; Li, Jinlin; Huang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Under microwave irradiation, novel octapod Pt nanocrystals were synthesized by reducing H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} in TEG with PVP as a stabilizer. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center. The use of KI was crucial to the formation of novel Pt octapods. Novel Octapod Platinum Nanocrystals. - Highlights: • A novel octapod Pt nanocrystals different from the common octapod were obtained. • The use of KI was crucial to the formation of the novel Pt octapods. • Microwave was readily employed in controlled synthesis of the novel Pt octapods. - Abstract: Microwave was employed in the shape-controlled synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. Novel octapod Pt nanocrystals enclosed with (1 1 1) facets were readily synthesized with H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} as a precursor, tetraethylene glycol (TEG) as both a solvent and a reducing agent, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer in the presence of an appropriate amount of KI under microwave irradiation for 140 s. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center and exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity than commercial Pt black in the electro-oxidations of methanol and formic acid. The results demonstrated that the use of KI was crucial to the formation of Pt octapods. KI determined the formation of the novel octapod Pt nanocrystals by tuning up the reduction kinetics and adsorbing on the surfaces of growing Pt nanoparticles. The optimum molar ratio of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}/KI/PVP was 1/30/45.

  6. In vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through Caucasian skin.

    PubMed

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; Du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Jordaan, A; Du Plessis, J L

    2014-12-01

    During platinum group metals (PGMs) refining the possibility exists for dermal exposure to PGM salts. The dermal route has been questioned as an alternative route of exposure that could contribute to employee sensitisation, even though literature has been focused on respiratory exposure. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through intact Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3mg/ml of metal, K2PtCl4 and RhCl3 respectively, was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24h experiment, and analysed with high resolution ICP-MS. Skin was digested and analysed by ICP-OES. Results indicated cumulative permeation with prolonged exposure, with a significantly higher mass of platinum permeating after 24h when compared to rhodium. The mass of platinum retained inside the skin and the flux of platinum across the skin was significantly higher than that of rhodium. Permeated and skin retained platinum and rhodium may therefore contribute to sensitisation and indicates a health risk associated with dermal exposure in the workplace.

  7. Electrical transport and breakdown in graphene multilayers loaded with electron beam induced deposited platinum.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Neha; Misra, Abhishek; Koratkar, Nikhil; Misra, D S

    2013-04-24

    We demonstrate here the effect of electron beam induced deposited platinum on the electrical transport through multilayer graphene sheets. Platinum metal is deposited at different positions on the graphene multilayers, i.e., including as well as excluding the bottom contact sites and the change in electrical conductance of the same multilayer graphene sheets before and after platinum deposition is segregated. An improvement in electrical conductance is observed even if the metal is deposited at the part of the graphene sheets that does not touch the bottom gold electrodes, and hence this experimental approach directly demonstrates that the contact improvement is not the sole reason for the improved electrical conduction. The improvement in electrical performance of the graphene sheets is explained in terms of the doping of graphene sheets caused by the charge transfer between the deposited metal and the graphene and thereby modified density of states for electrical conduction. Metal deposition also leads to the increased interlayer interaction of the graphene sheets as revealed by the transmission electron microscopy analysis. Further, two types of breakdown behaviors viz. sharp and stepped breakdowns observed for these graphene devices are explained in terms of the effective graphene-metal contact area. These studies reveal the implications of top metal contact fabrication on graphene for electronic devices.

  8. Agent oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1994-01-01

    The goal of our research is a methodology for creating robust software in distributed and dynamic environments. The approach taken is to endow software objects with explicit information about one another, to have them interact through a commitment mechanism, and to equip them with a speech-acty communication language. System-level applications include software interoperation and compositionality. A government application of specific interest is an infrastructure for coordination among multiple planners. Daily activity applications include personal software assistants, such as programmable email, scheduling, and new group agents. Research topics include definition of mental state of agents, design of agent languages as well as interpreters for those languages, and mechanisms for coordination within agent societies such as artificial social laws and conventions.

  9. A Single-Site Platinum CO Oxidation Catalyst in Zeolite KLTL: Microscopic and Spectroscopic Determination of the Locations of the Platinum Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Joseph D.; Chotigkrai, Nutchapon; Xu, Pinghong; Enderle, Bryan; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-07-01

    A stable site-isolated mononuclear platinum catalyst with a well-defined structure is presented. Platinum complexes supported in zeolite KLTL were synthesized from [Pt(NH3)4](NO3)2, oxidized at 633 K, and used to catalyze CO oxidation. Finally, IR and X-ray absorption spectra and electron micrographs determine the structures and locations of the platinum complexes in the zeolite pores, demonstrate the platinum-support bonding, and show that the platinum remained site isolated after oxidation and catalysis.

  10. Paclitaxel in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients. Argentine Multicenter Taxol Group.

    PubMed

    Ezcurdia, L; Jovtis, S L; Mickiewicz, E; Temperley, G; Rondinón, M; Blajman, C; Cóppola, F S; Lewi, D; Cazap, E; Breier, S; Fasce, H; Fein, L; Polera, J; Triguboff, E; Uranga, G; Pasccón, G; Luchina, A M; Martínez, C A; Politi, P M; Rubio, G; Alvarez, A M

    1997-10-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company; Princeton, NJ) is an antineoplastic agent that inhibits microtubular function and has shown efficacy in several solid tumors, mainly ovarian tumors, in which 20% to 40% response rates in previously treated patients were observed. We conducted a study to assess survival, response rate, and toxicity associated with paclitaxel treatment in patients with advanced ovarian cancer resistant to platinum therapy. Between September 1994 and November 1996, 38 patients were admitted for study and 37 were evaluable. All had disease progression or relapse within 1 year of receiving platinum-containing first-line chemotherapy. Mean age was 59 years (range, 30 to 75 years), all had bulky disease, and 18 showed increased carbohydrate antigen-125 at admission. They were treated every 3 weeks with paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 as a 3-hour infusion, preceded by standard premedication. Response rate was 51.3%, with a median response duration of 10.0 months and a median survival rate of 16.8 months. Mild to moderate hematologic toxicity was observed with only one episode of grade 4 neutropenia, without fever. Gastrointestinal toxicity was moderate and peripheral neuropathy was mild, except for two patients who had concomitant pathologies or previous treatment, which might have caused some neuropathy. We concluded that paclitaxel given as a 3-hour infusion was easily administered for ambulatory treatment, with mild to moderate toxicity and promising results based on rate and duration of response as well as survival. PMID:9346223

  11. A monofunctional trinuclear platinum complex with steric hindrance demonstrates strong cytotoxicity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shangnong; Wang, Xiaoyong; He, Yafeng; Zhu, Zhenzhu; Zhu, Chengcheng; Guo, Zijian

    2014-10-01

    Polynuclear platinum complexes constitute a special class of hopeful antitumor agents. In this study, a Y-type monofunctional trinuclear platinum complex (MTPC) with 1,3,5-tris(pyridin-2-ylmethoxy)benzene, ammine and chloride as ligands was synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The DNA binding mode of MTPC was investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis, and the reactivity of MTPC towards glutathione was studied by (1)H NMR and ESI-MS. The results show that MTPC can affect the conformation of calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) significantly and tends to form 1,4-GG rather than 1,2-GG intrastrand crosslinks, which are different from the instance of cisplatin. MTPC reacts with glutathione quite slowly in comparison with cisplatin because of the steric hindrance. The cytotoxicity of MTPC was tested on the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, the human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549, and the human ovarian cancer cell line Skov-3 by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. MTPC is more potent than or comparable to cisplatin. The cellular inhibition mode of MTPC was examined by flow cytometry using MCF-7 cells. MTPC arrests the cell cycle mainly in G2 or M phase, while cisplatin arrests the cell cycle in S phase. Similar to cisplatin, MTPC kills the cells predominantly through an apoptotic pathway.

  12. Pemetrexed With Platinum Combination as a Backbone for Targeted Therapy in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Borghaei, Hossein; Barker, Scott S; Treat, Joseph Anthony; Obasaju, Coleman

    2016-01-01

    Standard platinum-based chemotherapy combinations for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have reached a plateau in terms of the survival benefit they offer for patients. In addition, the emerging clinical trend of tailored treatment based on patient characteristics has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that target specific cancer-related molecular pathways, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), angiogenesis, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors. Current research is focused on combining targeted therapy with platinum-based chemotherapy in an endeavor to achieve an additional benefit in specific patient populations. Currently, pemetrexed is indicated for use in the first-line, maintenance, and second-line settings for the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC. The combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin is well tolerated and is the approved standard first-line therapy. Thus, the pemetrexed-platinum backbone provides an attractive option for combination with targeted therapies. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and future prospects of the use of pemetrexed-platinum as a backbone for combination with targeted therapies for NSCLC.

  13. A Modified Solid-State Reduction Method to Prepare Supported Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts for Low Temperature Fuel Cell Application

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2009-01-01

    A modified solid state reduction (SSR) method, by which the platinum salt is reduced into platinum nanoparticles by sodium formate in solid state and under low temperature (below 180 C) conditions, is introduced here. The high performance catalysts based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported platinum and platinum promoted by Mo (VI) and Si (IV) were prepared successfully by this method. The catalysts, with small particle size and uniform distribution were active toward the electrooxidation reaction of methanol. Among a few catalysts promoted by silicon, molybdenum and tungsten elements, catalysts co-promoted by silicon and molybdenum elements shows best performance. The particle size of promoted Pt/CNTs, calculated from XRD patterns, is small as 3.0 1.5 nm, and the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the distribution of particle size is uniform. In comparison with the liquid-state synthesis, the advantages of SSR method include its environmental benefits due to less water usage and significantly reduced pollutants generation, as well as its suitability for large scale preparation.

  14. Epigenetic inactivation of the putative DNA/RNA helicase SLFN11 in human cancer confers resistance to platinum drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Vanesa; Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Martinez-Cardus, Anna; Moutinho, Catia; Moran, Sebastian; Heyn, Holger; Sebio, Ana; Barnadas, Agusti; Pommier, Yves; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-derived drugs such as cisplatin and carboplatin are among the most commonly used cancer chemotherapy drugs, but very few specific molecular and cellular markers predicting differential sensitivity to these agents in a given tumor type have been clearly identified. Epigenetic gene silencing is increasingly being recognized as a factor conferring distinct tumoral drug sensitivity, so we have used a comprehensive DNA methylation microarray platform to interrogate the widely characterized NCI60 panel of human cancer cell lines with respect to CpG methylation status and cisplatin/carboplatin sensitivity. Using this approach, we have found promoter CpG island hypermethylation-associated silencing of the putative DNA/RNA helicase Schlafen-11 (SLFN11) to be associated with increased resistance to platinum compounds. We have also experimentally validated these findings in vitro. In this setting, we also identified the BRCA1 interacting DHX9 RNA helicase (also known as RHA) as a protein partner for SLFN11, suggesting a mechanistic pathway for the observed chemoresistance effect. Most importantly, we have been able to extend these findings clinically, following the observation that those patients with ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer carrying SLFN11 hypermethylation had a poor response to both cisplatin and carboplatin treatments. Overall, these results identify SLFN11 epigenetic inactivation as a predictor of resistance to platinum drugs in human cancer. PMID:26625211

  15. Superlattices of platinum and palladium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN,JAMES E.; WILCOXON,JESS P.; ODINEK,JUDY G.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.

    2000-04-06

    The authors have used a nonionic inverse micelle synthesis technique to form nanoclusters of platinum and palladium. These nanoclusters can be rendered hydrophobic or hydrophilic by the appropriate choice of capping ligand. Unlike Au nanoclusters, Pt nanoclusters show great stability with thiol ligands in aqueous media. Alkane thiols, with alkane chains ranging from C{sub 6} to C{sub 18} were used as hydrophobic ligands, and with some of these they were able to form 2-D and/or 3-D superlattices of Pt nanoclusters as small as 2.7 nm in diameter. Image processing techniques were developed to reliably extract from transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) the particle size distribution, and information about the superlattice domains and their boundaries. The latter permits one to compute the intradomain vector pair correlation function of the particle centers, from which they can accurately determine the lattice spacing and the coherent domain size. From these data the gap between the particles in the coherent domains can be determined as a function of the thiol chain length. It is found that as the thiol chain length increases, the gaps between particles within superlattice domains increases, but more slowly than one might expect, possibly indicating thiol chain interdigitation.

  16. Platinum and Gold Complexes for OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man-Chung; Chan, Alan Kwun-Wa; Chan, Mei-Yee; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2016-08-01

    Encouraging efforts on the design of high-performance organic materials and smart architecture during the past two decades have made organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology an important competitor for the existing liquid crystal displays. Particularly, the development of phosphorescent materials based on transition metals plays a crucial role for this success. Apart from the extensively studied iridium(III) complexes with d(6) electronic configuration and octahedral geometry, the coordination-unsaturated nature of d(8) transition metal complexes with square-planar structures has been found to provide intriguing spectroscopic and luminescence properties. This article briefly summarizes the development of d(8) platinum(II) and gold(III) complexes and their application studies in the fabrication of phosphorescent OLEDs. An in-depth understanding of the nature of the excited states has offered a great opportunity to fine-tune the emission colors covering the entire visible spectrum as well as to improve their photophysical properties. With good device engineering, high performance vacuum-deposited OLEDs with external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of up to 30 % and solution-processable OLEDs with EQEs of up to 10 % have been realized by modifying the cyclometalated or pincer ligands of these metal complexes. These impressive demonstrations reveal that d(8) metal complexes are promising candidates as phosphorescent materials for OLED applications in displays as well as in solid-state lighting in the future. PMID:27573398

  17. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  18. Targeting drug transport mechanisms for improving platinum-based cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen HW; Chen, Wen-Chung; Liang, Zhang-Dong; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Long, Yan; Aiba, Isamu; Fu, Siqing; Broaddus, Russell; Liu, Jinsong; Feun, Lynn G; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents remain important chemotherapeutic agents for treating many human malignancies. Elevated expression of the human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1), resulting in enhanced Pt drug transport into cells, has been shown to be associated with improved treatment efficacy. Thus, targeting hCtr1 upregulation is an attractive strategy for improving the treatment efficacy of Pt-based cancer chemotherapy. Area covered Regulation of hCtr1 expression by cellular copper homeostasis is discussed. Association of elevated hCtr1 expression with intrinsic sensitivity of ovarian cancer to Pt drugs is presented. Mechanism of copper-lowering agents in enhancing hCtr1-mediated cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin, cDDP) transport is reviewed. Applications of copper chelation strategy in overcoming cDDP resistance through enhanced hCtr1 expression are evaluated. Expert opinion While both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms of hCtr1 regulation by cellular copper bioavailability have been proposed, detailed molecular insights into hCtr1 regulation by copper homeostasis remain needed. Recent clinical study using a copper-lowering agent in enhancing hCtr1-mediated drug transport has achieved incremental improvement in overcoming Pt drug resistance. Further improvements in identifying predictive measures in the subpopulation of patients that can benefit from the treatment are needed. PMID:26004625

  19. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  20. Dynamics of Single Hydrogen Bubbles at a Platinum Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuegeng; Karnbach, Franziska; Uhlemann, Margitta; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2015-07-28

    Bubble dynamics, including the formation, growth, and detachment, of single H2 bubbles was studied at a platinum microelectrode during the electrolysis of 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte. The bubbles were visualized through a microscope by a high-speed camera. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in parallel to measure the transient current. The periodic current oscillations, resulting from the periodic formation and detachment of single bubbles, allow the bubble lifetime and size to be predicted from the transient current. A comparison of the bubble volume calculated from the current and from the recorded bubble image shows a gas evolution efficiency increasing continuously with the growth of the bubble until it reaches 100%. Two different substrates, glass and epoxy, were used to embed the Pt wire. While nearly no difference was found with respect to the growth law for the bubble radius, the contact angle differs strongly for the two types of cell. Data provided for the contact point evolution further complete the image of single hydrogen bubble growth. Finally, the velocity field driven by the detached bubble was measured by means of PIV, and the effects of the convection on the subsequent bubble were evaluated.

  1. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-03-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts.

  2. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-01-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts. PMID:26952517

  3. Dynamics of Single Hydrogen Bubbles at a Platinum Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuegeng; Karnbach, Franziska; Uhlemann, Margitta; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2015-07-28

    Bubble dynamics, including the formation, growth, and detachment, of single H2 bubbles was studied at a platinum microelectrode during the electrolysis of 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte. The bubbles were visualized through a microscope by a high-speed camera. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in parallel to measure the transient current. The periodic current oscillations, resulting from the periodic formation and detachment of single bubbles, allow the bubble lifetime and size to be predicted from the transient current. A comparison of the bubble volume calculated from the current and from the recorded bubble image shows a gas evolution efficiency increasing continuously with the growth of the bubble until it reaches 100%. Two different substrates, glass and epoxy, were used to embed the Pt wire. While nearly no difference was found with respect to the growth law for the bubble radius, the contact angle differs strongly for the two types of cell. Data provided for the contact point evolution further complete the image of single hydrogen bubble growth. Finally, the velocity field driven by the detached bubble was measured by means of PIV, and the effects of the convection on the subsequent bubble were evaluated. PMID:26133052

  4. Characterization of Platinum and Iridium Oxyhydrate Surface Layers from Platinum and Iridium Foils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin; Ranjan, Chinmoy; Greiner, Mark; Arrigo, Rosa; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Höpfner, Britta; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Lauermann, Iver; Willinger, Marc; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Platinum and iridium polycrystalline foils were oxidized electrochemically through anodization to create thin platinum and iridium hydrous oxide layers, which were analyzed through laboratory photoelectron spectroscopy during heating and time series (temperature-programmed spectroscopy). The films contain oxygen in the form of bound oxides, water, and hydroxides and were investigated by depth profiling with high-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The Pt films are unstable and begin to degrade immediately after removal from the electrolyte to form core-shell structures with a metallic inner core and a hydrous oxide outer shell almost devoid of Pt. However, evidence was found for metastable intermediate states of degradation; therefore, it may be possible to manufacture PtOx phases with increased stability. Heating the film to even 100 °C causes accelerated degradation, which shows that stoichiometric oxides such as PtO2 or PtO are not the active species in the electrolyte. The Ir films exhibit increased stability and higher surface Ir content, and gentle heating at low temperatures leads to a decrease in defect density. Although both layers are based on noble metals, their surface structures are markedly different. The complexity of such hydrous oxide systems is discussed in detail with the goal of identifying the film composition more precisely. PMID:27226255

  5. BOWIEITE: A NEW RHODIUM-IRIDIUM-PLATINUM SULFIDE IN PLATINUM-ALLOY NUGGETS, GOODNEWS BAY, ALASKA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Criddle, Alan J.

    1984-01-01

    Bowieite (Rh,Ir,Pt)//2S//3, a new mineral species, is found in three nuggets of platinum from Goodnews Bay, Alaska. In linearly polarized reflected light, and compared to the host, higher reflecting white platinum-iridium alloy, bowieite is pale gray to pale gray-brown; neither bireflectance nor reflectance pleochroism is apparent. With polars crossed, its anisotropic rotation tints vary from gray to dark brown. Luminance values (relative to the CIE illuminant C) for R//1 and R//2, computed from full spectral data for the most bireflectant grain, are 45. 8% and 48. 2% in air, and 30. 5% and 33. 0% in oil, respectively. VHN//1//0//0 1288 (858 to 1635). Bowieite is orthorhombic, space group Pnca, with a 8. 454(7) -8. 473(8), b 5. 995(1)-6. 002(7), c 6. 143(1)-6. 121(8) A, Z equals 4. Some grains that are 2. 6 to 3. 8 atomic % metal-deficient occur as an optically coherent rim on bowieite; the rim and the bowieite grain are not optically continuous.

  6. Microcalorimetric study of silica- and zeolite-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.B.; Dumesic, J.A. ); Miller, J.T. )

    1994-07-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of the differential heats of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption versus adsorbate coverate were made at 403 K for platinum supported on silica, magnesia/alumina, L-zeolite, Y-zeolite, and ZSM-5. The differential heats at zero coverage for hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption were 90 and 140 kJ/mol, respectively, for platinum supported on silica and nonacidic zeolites. The differential heats were large by approximately 20 kJ/mol for hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on platinum particles supported on basis supports such as potassium/silica, magnesia/alumina, and zeolites containing basic cations (K[sup +], Ba[sup 2+]) exchanged in excess of the zeolite framework aluminum content. The microcalorimetric results suggest that the high paraffin aromatization activity and selectivity observed for L-zeolite-supported platinum catalysts do not appear to be caused solely by changes in the adsorptive properties of the cluster-size platinum particles located within the zeolite. 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Structures of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Bimetallic nanoclusters, such as gold-platinum nanoclusters, are nanomaterials promising wide range of applications. We perform a numerical study of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters, Au{sub n}Pt{sub 38−n} (0 ≤ n ≤ 38), to elucidate the geometrical structures of these clusters. The lowest-energy structures of these bimetallic nanoclusters at the semi-empirical level are obtained via a global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering multi-canonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), in which empirical Gupta many-body potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the constituent atoms. The structures of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters are predicted to be core-shell segregated nanoclusters. Gold atoms are observed to preferentially occupy the surface of the clusters, while platinum atoms tend to occupy the core due to the slightly smaller atomic radius of platinum as compared to gold’s. The evolution of the geometrical structure of 38-atom Au-Pt clusters displays striking similarity with that of 38-atom Au-Cu nanoalloy clusters as reported in the literature.

  8. Biomonitoring of traffic police officers exposed to airborne platinum

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, I; Bocca, B; Petrucci, F; Senofonte, O; Carelli, G; Alimonti, A; Caroli, S

    2004-01-01

    Background: Over the past two decades there has been a substantial increase in environmental levels of palladium, platinum, and rhodium, the platinum group elements (PGEs), due to the widespread use of catalytic converters for automotive traction. Aim: To evaluate urinary platinum levels in occupationally exposed subjects. Methods: A total of 161 employees from the Rome City Police Force were studied; 103 were traffic police involved in controlling streets with an average flow of vehicles, while the remaining 58 were control subjects engaged only in office work. Platinum quantification in the urine samples of these subjects was carried out by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between platinum levels in the group of subjects engaged in traffic control and the control group (4.45 (2.42) ng/l v 4.56 (2.84) ng/l, respectively). Conclusions: Urinary levels were found to be higher than those reported for other urban populations, thus showing a progressive increase in human exposure to Pt. PMID:15208381

  9. Oxidation-induced structural changes in sub-nanometer platinum supported on alumina

    DOE PAGES

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Blom, Douglas Allen; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2015-06-26

    Platinum supported on alumina is an essential component of emission treatment catalysts used in transportation. Theoretical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of platinum particles supported on a variety of supports have been extensively studied; however, available experimental information on the behavior of single vs. sub-nanometer platinum is extremely limited. To bridge the knowledge gap between single supported platinum and well-formed supported platinum nanoparticles, we have carried out synthesis, characterization, and CO and NO oxidation studies of sub-nanometer platinum supported on α, θ, and γ-Al2O3 and monitored changes in structure upon exposure to CO and NO oxidation conditions. Furthermore, we find thatmore » sub-nanometer Pt is highly effective for CO oxidation due to high platinum dispersion but is not very efficient as NO oxidation catalyst. Lastly, sub-nanometer platinum agglomerates rapidly under CO or NO oxidation conditions to form nanoparticles.« less

  10. Oxidation-induced structural changes in sub-nanometer platinum supported on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Blom, Douglas Allen; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2015-06-26

    Platinum supported on alumina is an essential component of emission treatment catalysts used in transportation. Theoretical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of platinum particles supported on a variety of supports have been extensively studied; however, available experimental information on the behavior of single vs. sub-nanometer platinum is extremely limited. To bridge the knowledge gap between single supported platinum and well-formed supported platinum nanoparticles, we have carried out synthesis, characterization, and CO and NO oxidation studies of sub-nanometer platinum supported on α, θ, and γ-Al2O3 and monitored changes in structure upon exposure to CO and NO oxidation conditions. Furthermore, we find that sub-nanometer Pt is highly effective for CO oxidation due to high platinum dispersion but is not very efficient as NO oxidation catalyst. Lastly, sub-nanometer platinum agglomerates rapidly under CO or NO oxidation conditions to form nanoparticles.

  11. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  12. Dimethylformamide-mediated synthesis of water-soluble platinum nanodendrites for ethanol oxidation electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Chirea, Mariana; Altantzis, Thomas; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Silva, Fernando; Bals, Sara; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2013-06-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis of water-soluble platinum nanodendrites in dimethylformamide (DMF), in the presence of polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a stabilizing agent. The average size of the dendrites is in the range of 20-25 nm while their porosity can be tuned by modifying the concentration of the metal precursor. Electron tomography revealed different crystalline orientations of nanocrystallites in the nanodendrites and allowed a better understanding of their peculiar branching and porosity. The high surface area of the dendrites (up to 22 m(2) g(-1)) was confirmed by BET measurements, while X-ray diffraction confirmed the abundance of high-index facets in the face-centered-cubic crystal structure of Pt. The prepared nanodendrites exhibit excellent performance in the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution. Sensing, selectivity, cycleability and great tolerance toward poisoning were demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry measurements.

  13. BRCA1 epigenetic inactivation predicts sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefansson, Olafur A.; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Martí, Lola; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer development. Both genes are involved in DNA repair, and tumors harboring genetic defects in them are thought to be more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents used in chemotherapy. However, as only a minority of breast and ovarian cancer patients carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, few patients are likely to benefit from these pharmacogenetic biomarkers. Herein, we show that, in cancer cell lines and xenografted tumors, BRCA1 CpG island promoter hypermethylation-associated silencing also predicts enhanced sensitivity to platinum-derived drugs to the same extent as BRCA1 mutations. Most importantly, BRCA1 hypermethylation proves to be a predictor of longer time to relapse and improved overall survival in ovarian cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with cisplatin. PMID:23069641

  14. The prediction of Raman spectra of platinum(II) anticancer drugs by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, Danuta; Wysokiński, Rafał

    2005-02-01

    We present the method of theoretical calculations of the Raman intensities and the simulated Raman spectra of platinum(II) complexes. Theoretical Raman spectra of the anticancer agents: cisplatin ( 1), carboplatin ( 2), cis-[Pt(orotato)(NH 3) 2] ( 3), cis-[PtCl 2(NH 3)(2-picoline)], ZD0473 ( 4), and the two transient species of 4 (the hydrolysis products) were calculated by density functional mPW1PW method with several basis sets. For comparison, the experimental Raman spectra of compounds 1- 3 were measured. The clear-cut assignment of the Pt-ligand vibrations in the Raman spectra of the investigated compounds has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution.

  15. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  16. Electron Field Emission Properties of Textured Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.

    2002-01-01

    During ground tests of electric microthrusters and space tests of electrodynamic tethers the electron emitters must successfully operate at environmental pressures possibly as high as 1x10(exp -4) Pa. High partial pressures of oxygen, nitrogen, and water vapor are expected in such environments. A textured platinum surface was used in this work for field emission cathode assessments because platinum does not form oxide films at low temperatures. Although a reproducible cathode conditioning process did not evolve from this work, some short term tests for periods of 1 to 4 hours showed no degradation of emission current at an electric field of 8 V/mm and background pressures of about 1x10(exp -6) Pa. Increases of background pressure by air flow to about 3x10(exp -4) Pa yield a hostile environment for the textured platinum field emission cathode.

  17. One-dimensional Magnus-type platinum double salts

    PubMed Central

    Hendon, Christopher H.; Walsh, Aron; Akiyama, Norinobu; Konno, Yosuke; Kajiwara, Takashi; Ito, Tasuku; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Interest in platinum-chain complexes arose from their unusual oxidation states and physical properties. Despite their compositional diversity, isolation of crystalline chains has remained challenging. Here we report a simple crystallization technique that yields a series of dimer-based 1D platinum chains. The colour of the Pt2+ compounds can be switched between yellow, orange and blue. Spontaneous oxidation in air is used to form black Pt2.33+ needles. The loss of one electron per double salt results in a metallic state, as supported by quantum chemical calculations, and displays conductivity of 11 S cm−1 at room temperature. This behaviour may open up a new avenue for controllable platinum chemistry. PMID:27320502

  18. Dissolution of Platinum in the Operational Range of Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keeley, Gareth P.; Geiger, Simon; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar R.; Hodnik, Nejc; Kulyk, Nadiia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the most important practical issues in low‐temperature fuel‐cell catalyst degradation is platinum dissolution. According to the literature, it initiates at 0.6–0.9 VRHE, whereas previous time‐ and potential‐resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP–MS) experiments, however, revealed dissolution onset at only 1.05 VRHE. In this manuscript, the apparent discrepancy is addressed by investigating bulk and nanoparticulated catalysts. It is shown that, given enough time for accumulation, traces of platinum can be detected at potentials as low as 0.85 VRHE. At these low potentials, anodic dissolution is the dominant process, whereas, at more positive potentials, more platinum dissolves during the oxide reduction after accumulation. Interestingly, the potential and time dissolution dependence is similar for both types of electrode. Dissolution processes are discussed with relevance to fuel‐cell operation and plausible dissolution mechanisms are considered. PMID:27525206

  19. Dimethylformamide-mediated synthesis of water-soluble platinum nanodendrites for ethanol oxidation electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Chirea, Mariana; Altantzis, Thomas; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Silva, Fernando; Bals, Sara; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2013-05-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis of water-soluble platinum nanodendrites in dimethylformamide (DMF), in the presence of polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a stabilizing agent. The average size of the dendrites is in the range of 20-25 nm while their porosity can be tuned by modifying the concentration of the metal precursor. Electron tomography revealed different crystalline orientations of nanocrystallites in the nanodendrites and allowed a better understanding of their peculiar branching and porosity. The high surface area of the dendrites (up to 22 m2 g-1) was confirmed by BET measurements, while X-ray diffraction confirmed the abundance of high-index facets in the face-centered-cubic crystal structure of Pt. The prepared nanodendrites exhibit excellent performance in the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution. Sensing, selectivity, cycleability and great tolerance toward poisoning were demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry measurements.Herein we describe the synthesis of water-soluble platinum nanodendrites in dimethylformamide (DMF), in the presence of polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a stabilizing agent. The average size of the dendrites is in the range of 20-25 nm while their porosity can be tuned by modifying the concentration of the metal precursor. Electron tomography revealed different crystalline orientations of nanocrystallites in the nanodendrites and allowed a better understanding of their peculiar branching and porosity. The high surface area of the dendrites (up to 22 m2 g-1) was confirmed by BET measurements, while X-ray diffraction confirmed the abundance of high-index facets in the face-centered-cubic crystal structure of Pt. The prepared nanodendrites exhibit excellent performance in the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution. Sensing, selectivity, cycleability and great tolerance toward poisoning were demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry measurements. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  20. The effects of platinum on nickel electrodes in the nickel hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions of platinum and platinum compounds with the nickel electrode that are possible in the nickel hydrogen cell, where both the nickel electrode and a platinum catalyst hydrogen electrode are in intimate contact with the alkaline electrolyte, are examined. Additionally, a mechanism of nickel cobalt oxyhydroxide formation in NiH2 cells is presented.

  1. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  2. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  3. Comparison of platinum/MWCNTs Nanocatalysts Synthesis Processes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan

    Due to the growing concerns on the depletion of petroleum based energy resources and climate change; fuel cell technologies have received much attention in recent years. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFCs) features high energy conversion efficiency and nearly zero greenhouse gas emissions, because of its combination of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) at anode side and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathode side. Synthesis of Pt nanoparticles supported on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) possess a highly durable electrochemical surface area (ESA) and show good power output on proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance. Platinum on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) support were synthesized by two different processes to transfer PtCl62- from aqueous to organic phase. While the first method of Pt/MWCNTs synthesis involved dodecane thiol (DDT) and octadecane thiol (ODT) as anchoring agent, the second method used ammonium lauryl sulfate (ALS) as the dispersion/anchoring agent. The particle size and distribution of platinum were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The TEM images showed homogenous distribution and uniform particle size of platinum deposited on the surface of MWCNTs. The single cell fuel cell performance of the Pt/MWCNTs synthesized thiols and ALS based electrode containing 0.2 (anode) and 0.4 mg (cathode) Pt.cm-2 were evaluated using Nafion-212 electrolyte with H2 and O2 gases at 80 °C and ambient pressure. The catalyst synthesis with ALS is relatively simple compared to that with thiols and also showed higher performance (power density reaches about 1070 mW.cm -2). The Electrodes with Pt/MWCNTs nanocatalysts synthesized using ALS were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for durability evaluation using humidified H2 and N2 gases at room temperature (21 °C) along with commercial Pt/C for comparison. The ESA measured by cyclic voltammetry between 0.15 and 1.2 V showed significant

  4. Modeling the cathode in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using density functional theory How the carbon support can affect durability and activity of a platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Michael Nelson

    The current global energy and environmental challenges need to be addressed by developing a new portfolio of clean power producing devices. The proton exchange membrane fuel cell has the potential to be included and can fit into a variety of niches ranging from portable electronics to stationary residential applications. One of the many barriers to commercial viability is the cost of the cathode layer which requires too much platinum metal to achieve a comparable power output as well as would need to be replaced more frequently when compared to conventional sources for most applications. Using density functional theory, an ab initio modeling technique, these durability and activity issues are examined for platinum catalysts on graphene and carbon nanotube supports. The carbon supports were also doped by replacing individual carbon atoms with other second row elements (beryllium, boron, nitrogen, and oxygen) and the effect on the platinum-surface interaction along with the interaction between the platinum and the oxygen reduction reaction intermediates are discussed. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cell, density functional theory, platinum catalyst, oxygen reduction reaction, doped carbon surfaces

  5. Second EPA evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver Device under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act (updated). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The report announces the conclusions of the EPA evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver Device under the provisions of Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. The second evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver device was conducted upon the request of the Federal Trade Commission. The unit is a vapor bleed device. It functions by bleeding a mixture of air and 'platinum concentrate' through a 'T' connection that is installed in the Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) line. It is claimed to reduce emissions, improve fuel economy, raise the octane of gasoline, and extend engine line. Three typical vehicles were tested at the EPA's Motor Vehicle Emission Laboratory. The basic test sequence included 2,000 miles of mileage accumulation, replicate Federal Test Procedures (FTP) and replicate Highway Fuel Economy Tests (HFET). The test sequence was conducted both without and with the Platinum Gasaver installed. The overall conclusion from these tests is that the Platinum Gasaver device did not significantly change vehicle emissions or fuel economy for either the FTP or the HFET.

  6. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms. PMID:17625621

  7. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms.

  8. Synthesis of platinum nanoparticle electrocatalysts by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubers, Alia Marie

    Demand for energy continues to increase, and without alternatives to fossil fuel combustion the effects on our environment will become increasingly severe. Fuel cells offer a promising improvement on current methods of energy generation; they are able to convert hydrogen fuel into electricity with a theoretical efficiency of up to 83% and interface smoothly with renewable hydrogen production. Fuel cells can replace internal combustion engines in vehicles and are used in stationary applications to power homes and businesses. The efficiency of a fuel cell is maximized by its catalyst, which is often composed of platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon. Economical production of fuel cell catalysts will promote adoption of this technology. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a possible method for producing catalysts at a large scale when employed in a fluidized bed. ALD relies on sequential dosing of gas-phase precursors to grow a material layer by layer. We have synthesized platinum nanoparticles on a carbon particle support (Pt/C) by ALD for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and electrochemical hydrogen pumps. Platinum nanoparticles with different characteristics were deposited by changing two chemistries: the carbon substrate through functionalization; and the deposition process by use of either oxygen or hydrogen as ligand removing reactants. The metal depositing reactant was trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV). Functionalizing the carbon substrate increased nucleation during deposition resulting in smaller and more dispersed nanoparticles. Use of hydrogen produced smaller nanoparticles than oxygen, due to a gentler hydrogenation reaction compared to using oxygen's destructive combustion reaction. Synthesized Pt/C materials were used as catalysts in an electrochemical hydrogen pump, a device used to separate hydrogen fuel from contaminants. Catalysts deposited by ALD on functionalized carbon using a hydrogen chemistry were the most

  9. Addition of platinum and silver nanoparticles to toughen dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Tokushi; Uno, Mitsunori; Ishigami, Hajime; Kurachi, Masakazu; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have investigated toughening porcelain that is layered over a frame or a core. The introduction of residual compressive stress to the surface of porcelain has been shown to be effective to strengthen it. In the present study, nanoparticles of precious metals of silver and platinum (rather than non-precious metals) were used to evaluate if they could increase the fracture resistance of porcelain. The addition of silver and platinum nanoparticles was found to improve the mechanical properties of porcelain since it increased both the Young's modulus and the fracture toughness of commercial porcelain.

  10. Determination of palladium and platinum by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Palladium and platinum are determined by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. The limit of determination is ~0??06 ppm in a 20-g sample. Serious depressive interelement interferences are removed by buffering the solutions with a mixture of cadmium and copper sulphates with cadmium and copper concentrations each at 0??5%. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and the platinum metals do not interfere in the atomic-absorption determination. ?? 1969.

  11. Amphiphilic Cyanine-Platinum Conjugates as Fluorescent Nanodrugs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tingting; Li, Zhensheng; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin

    2016-01-01

    Two fluorescent nanomedicines based on small molecular cyanine-platinum conjugates have been prepared via a nanoprecipitation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as dynamic light scattering (DLS). The conjugates exhibited an enhanced fluorescence in their nanoparticle formulation compared to that in solution. The nanomedicines could be endocytosed by cancer cells as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and showed high cellular proliferation inhibition. Fluorescent platinum nanomedicines prepared directly from small molecules could be an alternative strategy for developing new drugs with simultaneous cellular imaging and cancer therapy functions.

  12. Multi-Agent Information Classification Using Dynamic Acquaintance Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Peng, Shengquan; Raje, Rajeev; Palakal, Mathew; Mostafa, Javed

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of automated information services focuses on information classification and collaborative agents, i.e. intelligent computer programs. Highlights include multi-agent systems; distributed artificial intelligence; thesauri; document representation and classification; agent modeling; acquaintances, or remote agents discovered through…

  13. Cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone for recurrent platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer (SOCceR trial): a multicenter randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improvement in treatment for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer is needed. Standard therapy in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer consists of platinum-based chemotherapy. Median overall survival is reported between 18 and 35 months. Currently, the role of surgery in recurrent ovarian cancer is not clear. In selective patients a survival benefit up to 62 months is reported for patients undergoing complete secondary cytoreductive surgery. Whether cytoreductive surgery in recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer is beneficial remains questionable due to the lack of level I-II evidence. Methods/Design Multicentre randomized controlled trial, including all nine gynecologic oncologic centres in the Netherlands and their affiliated hospitals. Eligible patients are women, with first recurrence of FIGO stage Ic-IV platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer or fallopian tube cancer, who meet the inclusion criteria. Participants are randomized between the standard treatment consisting of at least six cycles of intravenous platinum based chemotherapy and the experimental treatment which consists of secondary cytoreductive surgery followed by at least six cycles of intravenous platinum based chemotherapy. Primary outcome measure is progression free survival. In total 230 patients will be randomized. Data will be analysed according to intention to treat. Discussion Where the role of cytoreductive surgery is widely accepted in the initial treatment of ovarian cancer, its value in recurrent platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer has not been established so far. A better understanding of the benefits and patients selection criteria for secondary cytoreductive surgery has to be obtained. Therefore the 4th ovarian cancer consensus conference in 2010 stated that randomized controlled phase 3 trials evaluating the role of surgery in platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer are urgently needed. We

  14. Recent strikes in South Africa’s platinum-group metal mines: effects upon world platinum-group metal supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Thomas R.; Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Barry, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The recent labor disputes over wages and working conditions that have affected South Africa’s three leading platinum-group metal (PGM) producers have affected an industry already plagued by market pressures and labor unrest and raised the specter of constraints in the world’s supply of these metals. Although low demand for these metals in 2011 and 2012 helped to offset production losses of recent years, and particularly those losses caused by the strikes in 2012, a prolonged resumption of strikes could cause severe shortages of iridium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, and, to a lesser extent, palladium.

  15. Mus308 Mutants of Drosophila Exhibit Hypersensitivity to DNA Cross-Linking Agents and Are Defective in a Deoxyribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, J. B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Harris, P. V.

    1990-01-01

    Mutagen-sensitive strains that identify 16 different Drosophila genes have been screened for alterations in DNA metabolic enzymes. A characteristic defect in an acid-active deoxyribonuclease was observed in strains carrying the six available mutant alleles of the mus308 gene. Since that enzyme is detected at normal levels in a mutant strain that is deficient in the previously identified enzymes DNase 1 and DNase 2, it represents a new Drosophila nuclease that is designated Nuclease 3. The mus308 mutants were originally distinguished from all other mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila because they exhibit hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent nitrogen mustard without expressing a concurrent sensitivity to the monofunctional agent methyl methanesulfonate. Further observations of hypersensitivity to the mutagens trimethylpsoralen, diepoxybutane and cis-platinum now establish a more general sensitivity of these mutants to agents capable of generating DNA cross-links. In spite of the hypersensitivity of the mus308 mutants to DNA cross-linking agents, the initial incision step of DNA cross-link repair is normal in mus308 cells as assayed by the alkaline elution procedure. The Drosophila mus308 mutants show promise of providing a useful model for analogous defects in other organisms including man. PMID:2397884

  16. Optimization of carbon-supported platinum cathode catalysts for DMFC operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Brosha, E. L.; Zelenay, P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe performance and optimization of carbon-supported cathode catalysts at low platinum loading. We find that at a loading below 0.6 mg cm-2 carbon-supported platinum outperforms platinum black as a DMFC cathode catalyst. A catalyst with a 1:1 volume ratio of the dry NafionTM to the electronically conducting phase (platinum plus carbon support) provides the best performance in oxygen reduction reaction. Thanks to improved catalyst utilization, carbon-supported catalysts with a platinum content varying from 40 wt% to 80 wt% deliver very good DMFC performance, even at relatively modest precious metal loadings investigated in this work.

  17. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  18. Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Daniela D; Medeiros, Lídia RF; Edelweiss, Maria I; Pohlmann, Paula R; Stein, Airton T

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3. Most women with early cervical cancer (stages I to IIA) are cured with surgery or radiotherapy, or both. We performed this review originally because it was unclear whether cisplatin-based chemotherapy after surgery, radiotherapy or both, in women with early stage disease with risk factors for recurrence, was associated with additional survival benefits or risks. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of platinum-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy, radiotherapy, or both in the treatment of early stage cervical cancer. Search methods For the original 2009 review, we searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS and CancerLit, the National Research Register and Clinical Trials register, with no language restriction. We handsearched abstracts of scientific meetings and other relevant publications. We extended the database searches to November 2011 for this update. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy (after radical surgery, radiotherapy or both) with no adjuvant chemotherapy, in women with early stage cervical cancer (stage IA2-IIA) with at least one risk factor for recurrence. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data independently. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model, with death and disease progression as outcomes. Main results For this updated version, we identified three additional ongoing trials but no new studies for inclusion. Three trials including 368 evaluable women with early cervical cancer were included in the meta-analyses. The median follow-up period in these trials ranged from 29 to 42 months. All women had undergone surgery first. Two trials

  19. Biological role in the transformation of platinum-group mineral grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, Frank; Zammit, Carla M.; Shar, Sahar S.; Etschmann, Barbara; Bottrill, Ralph; Southam, Gordon; Ta, Christine; Kilburn, Matthew; Oberthür, Thomas; Ball, Andrew S.; Brugger, Joël

    2016-04-01

    Platinum-group elements are strategically important metals. Finding new deposits is becoming increasingly difficult owing to our limited understanding of the processes that affect their mobility in surface environments. Microorganisms have been shown to promote the mobility of metals around ore deposits. Here we show that microorganisms influence the mobility of platinum-group elements in mineral grains collected from Brazil, Australia and Colombia. Scanning electron microscopy showed biofilms covering the platinum-group mineral grains. The biofilms contained abundant platinum-group element nanoparticles and microcrystalline aggregates, and were dominated by Proteobacteria, many of which were closely related to known metal-resistant species. Some platinum-group mineral grains contained carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, selenium and iodine, suggesting the grains may be biogenic in origin. Molecular analyses show that Brazilian platinum-palladium grains hosted specific bacterial communities, which were different in composition from communities associated with gold grains, or communities in surrounding soils and sediments. Nano-phase metallic platinum accumulated when a metallophillic bacterium was incubated with a percolating platinum-containing medium, suggesting that biofilms can cause the precipitation of mobile platinum complexes. We conclude that biofilms are capable of forming or transforming platinum-group mineral grains, and may play an important role for platinum-group element dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments.

  20. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-01

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. PMID:26710326

  1. Density Functional Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity of Ultrathin Platinum Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2013-03-14

    We used density functional theory to study the difference in the structure, stability and catalytic reactivity between ultrathin, 0.5–1.0 nm diameter, platinum nanotubes and nanowires. Model nanowires were formed by inserting an inner chain of platinum atoms in small diameter nanotubes. In this way more stable, non-hollow structures were formed. The difference in the electronic structure of platinum nanotubes and nanowires was examined by inspecting the density of surface states and band structure. Furthermore, reactivity toward the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum nanowires was assessed by studying the change in the chemisorption energies of oxygen, hydroxyl, and hydroperoxyl groups, induced by converting the nanotube models to nanowires. Both ultrathin platinum nanotubes and nanowires show distinct properties compared to bulk platinum. Single-wall nanotubes and platinum nanowires with diameters larger than 1 nm show promise for use as oxygen reduction catalysts.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Novel Single-Site and Nanosized Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bonati, Matteo L.M.; Douglas, Thomas M.; Gaemers, Sander; Guo, Neng

    2013-01-10

    Novel single-site platinum catalysts have been synthesized by reacting platinum(II) organometallics with partially dehydroxylated silica. The resulting materials have been characterized by various methods such as IR, MAS NMR, and EXAFS. Further, the single-site platinum catalysts were calcined in air to remove the ligand and produce nanosized platinum particles, that were characterized by TEM and H{sub 2} chemisorption. All catalysts were tested for the hydrogenation of toluene. The single-site platinum catalysts were less active than a commercial Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst with comparable platinum loading, and this has been ascribed to ligand effects. Conversely, the nanosized platinum catalysts were more active than the commercial Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst due to their high dispersion and small particle sizes.

  3. Theoretical Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity of Ultrathin Platinum Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2012-10-10

    We use density functional theory to study the difference in the structure, stability and catalytic reactivity between ultrathin, 0.5- 1.0 nm diameter, platinum nanotubes and nanowires. Model nanowires were formed by inserting an inner chain of platinum atoms in small diameter nanotubes. In this way more stable, nonhollow structures were formed. The difference in the electronic structure of platinum nanotubes and nanowires was examined by inspecting the density of surface states and band structure. Furthermore, reactivity towards the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum nanowires was addressed by studying the change in the chemisorption energies of oxygen and hydroxyl groups, induced by inserting the inner chain of platinum atoms into the hollow nanotubes. Both ultrathin platinum nanotubes and nanowires show distinct properties compared to bulk platinum. Nanotubes with diameters larger than 1 nm show promise for use as oxygen reduction catalysts.

  4. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-01

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity.

  5. Operation of platinum-palladium catalysts with leaded gasoline.

    PubMed

    Teague, D M; Clougherty, L B; Speca, A N

    1975-04-01

    The effect of various fuel additives on the ability of platinum-palladium catalytic converters to remove the carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon components of automotive exhaust has been examined. Engine dynamometer studies suggest that these catalysts may be successfully used in conjunction with fuels of relatively high tetraethyllead concentrations, provided the ethylene dibromide portion of the scavenger is excluded. PMID:50929

  6. Concentration of some platinum-group metals in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    New data on some platinum group metals in coal indicate that the concentration of Pt is generally less than about 5 ppb, that of Pd is generally less than 1 ppb, and that of Rh is generally less than 0.5 ppb. No conclusive evidence was obtained concerning the mode of occurrence of these elements in coal. ?? 1981.

  7. Platinum Recovery from Synthetic Extreme Environments by Halophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maes, Synthia; Props, Ruben; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Smet, Rebecca De; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Metal recycling based on urban mining needs to be established to tackle the increasing supply risk of critical metals such as platinum. Presently, efficient strategies are missing for the recovery of platinum from diluted industrial process streams, often characterized by extremely low pHs and high salt concentrations. In this research, halophilic mixed cultures were employed for the biological recovery of platinum (Pt). Halophilic bacteria were enriched from Artemia cysts, living in salt lakes, in different salt matrices (sea salt mixture and NH4Cl; 20-210 g L(-1) salts) and at low to neutral pH (pH 3-7). The main taxonomic families present in the halophilic cultures were Halomonadaceae, Bacillaceae, and Idiomarinaceae. The halophilic cultures were able to recover >98% Pt(II) and >97% Pt(IV) at pH 2 within 3-21 h (4-453 mg Ptrecovered h(-1) g(-1) biomass). X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the reduction to Pt(0) and transmission electron microscopy revealed both intra- and extracellular Pt precipitates, with median diameters of 9-30 nm and 11-13 nm, for Pt(II) and Pt(IV), respectively. Flow cytometric membrane integrity staining demonstrated the preservation of cell viability during platinum recovery. This study demonstrates the Pt recovery potential of halophilic mixed cultures in acidic saline conditions.

  8. 76 FR 8627 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Class E airspace at Platinum AK (75 FR 77572). Interested parties were invited to participate in this... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec....

  9. Operation of platinum-palladium catalysts with leaded gasoline.

    PubMed Central

    Teague, D M; Clougherty, L B; Speca, A N

    1975-01-01

    The effect of various fuel additives on the ability of platinum-palladium catalytic converters to remove the carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon components of automotive exhaust has been examined. Engine dynamometer studies suggest that these catalysts may be successfully used in conjunction with fuels of relatively high tetraethyllead concentrations, provided the ethylene dibromide portion of the scavenger is excluded. PMID:50929

  10. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  11. Preparation of low-platinum-content platinum-nickel, platinum-cobalt binary alloy and platinum-nickel-cobalt ternary alloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mu; Lei, Yanhua; Sheng, Nan; Ohtsuka, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    A series of low-platinum-content platinum-nickel (Pt-Ni), platinum-cobalt (Pt-Co) binary alloys and platinum-nickel-cobalt (Pt-Ni-Co) ternary alloys electrocatalysts were successfully prepared by a three-step process based on electrodeposition technique and studied as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells. Kinetics of ORR was studied in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution on the Pt-Ni, Pt-Co and Pt-Ni-Co alloys catalysts using rotating disk electrode technique. Both the series of Pt-Ni, Pt-Co binary alloys and the Pt-Ni-Co ternary alloys catalysts exhibited an obvious enhancement of ORR activity in comparison with pure Pt. The significant promotion of ORR activities of Pt-Ni and Pt-Co binary alloys was attributed to the enhancement of the first electron-transfer step, whereas, Pt-Ni-Co ternary alloys presented a more complicated mechanism during the electrocatalysis process but a much more efficient ORR activities than the binary alloys.

  12. Platinum Recovery from Synthetic Extreme Environments by Halophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maes, Synthia; Props, Ruben; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Smet, Rebecca De; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Metal recycling based on urban mining needs to be established to tackle the increasing supply risk of critical metals such as platinum. Presently, efficient strategies are missing for the recovery of platinum from diluted industrial process streams, often characterized by extremely low pHs and high salt concentrations. In this research, halophilic mixed cultures were employed for the biological recovery of platinum (Pt). Halophilic bacteria were enriched from Artemia cysts, living in salt lakes, in different salt matrices (sea salt mixture and NH4Cl; 20-210 g L(-1) salts) and at low to neutral pH (pH 3-7). The main taxonomic families present in the halophilic cultures were Halomonadaceae, Bacillaceae, and Idiomarinaceae. The halophilic cultures were able to recover >98% Pt(II) and >97% Pt(IV) at pH 2 within 3-21 h (4-453 mg Ptrecovered h(-1) g(-1) biomass). X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the reduction to Pt(0) and transmission electron microscopy revealed both intra- and extracellular Pt precipitates, with median diameters of 9-30 nm and 11-13 nm, for Pt(II) and Pt(IV), respectively. Flow cytometric membrane integrity staining demonstrated the preservation of cell viability during platinum recovery. This study demonstrates the Pt recovery potential of halophilic mixed cultures in acidic saline conditions. PMID:26854514

  13. Operation of platinum-palladium catalysts with leaded gasoline.

    PubMed

    Teague, D M; Clougherty, L B; Speca, A N

    1975-04-01

    The effect of various fuel additives on the ability of platinum-palladium catalytic converters to remove the carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon components of automotive exhaust has been examined. Engine dynamometer studies suggest that these catalysts may be successfully used in conjunction with fuels of relatively high tetraethyllead concentrations, provided the ethylene dibromide portion of the scavenger is excluded.

  14. Enhancement of Platinum Cathode Catalysis by Addition of Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duong, Hung Tuan

    2009-01-01

    The sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) contributes significantly to the loss of cathode overpotential in fuel cells, thus requiring high loadings of platinum (Pt), which is an expensive metal with limited supply. However, Pt and Pt-based alloys are still the best available electrocatalysts for ORR thus far. The research presented…

  15. Molybdenum-platinum-oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1990-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a solid electrolyte carrying a thin film comprising molybdenum-platinum-oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  16. Rapid epitaxy-free graphene synthesis on silicidated polycrystalline platinum

    PubMed Central

    Babenko, Vitaliy; Murdock, Adrian T.; Koós, Antal A.; Britton, Jude; Crossley, Alison; Holdway, Philip; Moffat, Jonathan; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Grobert, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Large-area synthesis of high-quality graphene by chemical vapour deposition on metallic substrates requires polishing or substrate grain enlargement followed by a lengthy growth period. Here we demonstrate a novel substrate processing method for facile synthesis of mm-sized, single-crystal graphene by coating polycrystalline platinum foils with a silicon-containing film. The film reacts with platinum on heating, resulting in the formation of a liquid platinum silicide layer that screens the platinum lattice and fills topographic defects. This reduces the dependence on the surface properties of the catalytic substrate, improving the crystallinity, uniformity and size of graphene domains. At elevated temperatures growth rates of more than an order of magnitude higher (120 μm min−1) than typically reported are achieved, allowing savings in costs for consumable materials, energy and time. This generic technique paves the way for using a whole new range of eutectic substrates for the large-area synthesis of 2D materials. PMID:26175062

  17. Predictive value of BRCA1 expression on the efficacy of chemotherapy based on anti-microtubule agents: a pooled analysis across different malignancies and agents

    PubMed Central

    He, Qihua; Zhang, Mingzhe; Zhang, Jianrong; Zhong, Shengyi; Liu, Yang; Shen, Jianfei; He, Jiaxi; Jiang, Long; Yang, Chenglin; Zeng, Yuan; Guo, Minzhang; Chen, Xuewei

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) expression has been suggested as a predictor in anti-neoplastic treatment with anti-microtubule agents. However, the existing evidence is conflicting. Consulting the literature, we sought to examine the true impact of BRCA1 expression on the efficacy of anti-microtubule agents. Methods Medline by PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible studies. The primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) and progression free survival (PFS). Additional subgroup analyses stratified for detection methods, regimen, and patient origin were also performed. Results A total of 13 relevant studies involving a total of 1,490 cases were enrolled. Involved agents included paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinorelbine; Malignancies included non-small cell lung cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, malignant pleural mesothelioma, breast cancer, and small cell lung cancer. Through meta-analyses, we observed a potentially greater ORR in the population with high BRCA1 expression vs. low BRCA1 expression (OR 1.63, 95% CI: 0.92 to 2.88, P=0.09) but the heterogeneity is severe (P=0.01; I2=61%). Similar results were observed in PFS (high vs. low expression, HR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75 to 1.15, P=0.49; heterogeneity, P<0.01, I2=75%). After stratification by testing methods, a significantly higher ORR in the population with high BRCA1 expression was shown in the subgroup using mRNA as a quantitative method (OR 2.90, 95% CI: 1.92 to 4.39, P<0.01; I2=0) whereas the difference in the subgroup using immunohistochemistry (IHC) was not significant (OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.33 to 1.10, P=0.10; I2=0). Stratification by regimen (platinum-based vs. non platinum-based) and patient origin (Asian vs. Caucasian) did not reduce the heterogeneity. Conclusions Although the predictive value of BRCA1 expression on the anti-microtubule chemotherapy remained uncertain based on overall results, our exploratory analyses suggested that

  18. Aligned platinum nanowire networks from surface-oriented lipid cubic phase templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, S. J.; Burton, M. R.; Staniec, P. A.; Nandhakumar, I. S.; Terrill, N. J.; Elliott, J. M.; Squires, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous metal structures featuring a bicontinuous cubic morphology have a wide range of potential applications and novel opto-electronic properties, often orientation-dependent. We describe the production of nanostructured metal films 1-2 microns thick featuring 3D-periodic `single diamond' morphology that show high out-of-plane alignment, with the (111) plane oriented parallel to the substrate. These are produced by electrodeposition of platinum through a lipid cubic phase (QII) template. Further investigation into the mechanism for the orientation revealed the surprising result that the QII template, which is tens of microns thick, is polydomain with no overall orientation. When thicker platinum films are grown, they also show increased orientational disorder. These results suggest that polydomain QII samples display a region of uniaxial orientation at the lipid/substrate interface up to approximately 2.8 +/- 0.3 μm away from the solid surface. Our approach gives previously unavailable information on the arrangement of cubic phases at solid interfaces, which is important for many applications of QII phases. Most significantly, we have produced a previously unreported class of oriented nanomaterial, with potential applications including metamaterials and lithographic masks.Mesoporous metal structures featuring a bicontinuous cubic morphology have a wide range of potential applications and novel opto-electronic properties, often orientation-dependent. We describe the production of nanostructured metal films 1-2 microns thick featuring 3D-periodic `single diamond' morphology that show high out-of-plane alignment, with the (111) plane oriented parallel to the substrate. These are produced by electrodeposition of platinum through a lipid cubic phase (QII) template. Further investigation into the mechanism for the orientation revealed the surprising result that the QII template, which is tens of microns thick, is polydomain with no overall orientation. When thicker

  19. Platinum mineralization in the Kapalagulu Intrusion, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmij, Harry R.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    . Impersistent, stratiform PGE mineralized horizons occur within the MCSS harzburgite from which drill core samples were taken for platinum-group mineral (PGM) characterization from two drill holes. Where the PGE reefs reach the surface there is residual PGE mineralization within the laterite regolith from which drill core samples were taken from various laterite lithological units for PGM characterization. As the harzburgite PGE reefs contain significant concentrations of both sulfide and chromite (including chromitite seams) they resemble the PGE-rich chromitite seams of the Bushveld Complex rather than the PGE-bearing Main Sulfide Zone of the Great Dyke and Main Sulfide Layer of the Munni Munni Complex. The dominant Pd PGM in three PGE reef samples varies, ranging ( n = 164, relative wt%) from bismuthides (63 %), bismuthtellurides (19 %), and tellurides (6 %), to tellurides (39 %), bismuthtellurides (24 %), stannides (14 %), and alloys (13 %), and to antimon-arsenides (33 %), stannides (21 %), bismuthides (17 %), tellurides (13 %), and alloys (10 %). From 13.5 % to 21.0 % of the total Pd occurs as a solid solution in pentlandite. The three samples have similar Pt PGM modal distributions ( n = 172, relative wt%); the dominant Pt mineral is sperrylite (79, 58, and 47 %) followed by tellurides (15, 17, 21 %), alloys (2, 1, 1 %), and sulfides (2, 1, 0 %). Comparison of Pd/Pt ratios from assays to those calculated from minerals show that the data for the Pt and Pd PGM are very robust, confirming the concentration methodology and characterization. Study of samples from a shallow drill hole penetrating the laterite regolith shows that the primary Pd mineralization has not survived oxidation, is mainly dispersed, but some was reconstituted to form secondary minerals: cabriite, unnamed tellurides, a selenide, a Pd-Te-Hg mineral, alloys and Pd-bearing secondary sulfides (millerite and heazlewoodite). The primary Pt minerals are more resistant to oxidation and dissolution, especially

  20. Platinum mineralization in the Kapalagulu Intrusion, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmij, Harry R.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    . Impersistent, stratiform PGE mineralized horizons occur within the MCSS harzburgite from which drill core samples were taken for platinum-group mineral (PGM) characterization from two drill holes. Where the PGE reefs reach the surface there is residual PGE mineralization within the laterite regolith from which drill core samples were taken from various laterite lithological units for PGM characterization. As the harzburgite PGE reefs contain significant concentrations of both sulfide and chromite (including chromitite seams) they resemble the PGE-rich chromitite seams of the Bushveld Complex rather than the PGE-bearing Main Sulfide Zone of the Great Dyke and Main Sulfide Layer of the Munni Munni Complex. The dominant Pd PGM in three PGE reef samples varies, ranging ( n = 164, relative wt%) from bismuthides (63 %), bismuthtellurides (19 %), and tellurides (6 %), to tellurides (39 %), bismuthtellurides (24 %), stannides (14 %), and alloys (13 %), and to antimon-arsenides (33 %), stannides (21 %), bismuthides (17 %), tellurides (13 %), and alloys (10 %). From 13.5 % to 21.0 % of the total Pd occurs as a solid solution in pentlandite. The three samples have similar Pt PGM modal distributions ( n = 172, relative wt%); the dominant Pt mineral is sperrylite (79, 58, and 47 %) followed by tellurides (15, 17, 21 %), alloys (2, 1, 1 %), and sulfides (2, 1, 0 %). Comparison of Pd/Pt ratios from assays to those calculated from minerals show that the data for the Pt and Pd PGM are very robust, confirming the concentration methodology and characterization. Study of samples from a shallow drill hole penetrating the laterite regolith shows that the primary Pd mineralization has not survived oxidation, is mainly dispersed, but some was reconstituted to form secondary minerals: cabriite, unnamed tellurides, a selenide, a Pd-Te-Hg mineral, alloys and Pd-bearing secondary sulfides (millerite and heazlewoodite). The primary Pt minerals are more resistant to oxidation and dissolution, especially

  1. Assembly of acid and sintering resistant honeycomb washcoat and catalytically active phase using sols of silica, zirconia, and platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Felthouse, T.R. |; Berkel, D.A.; Jost, S.R.

    1995-12-01

    Development of high performance honeycomb catalysts containing platinum active phase for gas phase air oxidation of sulfur dioxide is described. Stepwise assembly of these washcoated honeycombs consists of: (1) selection of honeycomb composition (mullite substrate) and cell density based on pressure drop requirements; (2) identification of washcoat slurry composition (silica-precursor sol, silica powder, and surfactants if needed); (3) processing of the washcoat-substrate by dip coating, drying, and calcining; (4) loading of the platinum active phase through a facilitated adsorption technique followed by drying and activation steps; and (5) reactor loading and evaluation. Details of these steps will be presented that include thermal and chemical stability tests. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy of the final Pt/(ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2}) composite attached to the mullite substrate will be reported.

  2. Chromatin folding and DNA replication inhibition mediated by a highly antitumor-active tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complex

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Ryosuke; Komeda, Seiji; Shimura, Mari; Tamura, Sachiko; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nishimura, Kohei; Rogge, Ryan; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Hiratani, Ichiro; Takata, Hideaki; Uemura, Masako; Iida, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Hansen, Jeffrey C.; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Kanemaki, Masato T.; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin DNA must be read out for various cellular functions, and copied for the next cell division. These processes are targets of many anticancer agents. Platinum-based drugs, such as cisplatin, have been used extensively in cancer chemotherapy. The drug–DNA interaction causes DNA crosslinks and subsequent cytotoxicity. Recently, it was reported that an azolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complex, 5-H-Y, exhibits a different anticancer spectrum from cisplatin. Here, using an interdisciplinary approach, we reveal that the cytotoxic mechanism of 5-H-Y is distinct from that of cisplatin. 5-H-Y inhibits DNA replication and also RNA transcription, arresting cells in the S/G2 phase, and are effective against cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. Moreover, it causes much less DNA crosslinking than cisplatin, and induces chromatin folding. 5-H-Y will expand the clinical applications for the treatment of chemotherapy-insensitive cancers. PMID:27094881

  3. KGB agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    A short story is reported in which the activity of Communist Party of the USSR and secret KGB agents, which were payed by the State, in view of controlling of the conscience of population. The story reffers to the Physics Department of the Moscow University, Planing Institute of the Gosplan of Moldavian S.S.R. and Chishinau Technical University (actually: Technical University of Moldova), where the author has worked during Soviet times. Almost every 6-th citizen in the USSR was engaged in this activity, while actually the former communists rule in the Republic of Moldova.

  4. Geochemical behaviour of palladium in soils and Pd/PdO model substances in the presence of the organic complexing agents L-methionine and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Vang, My; Albers, Peter; Schneider, Wolfgang; Schindl, Roland; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessments of platinum group metal (PGE) emissions, notably those of platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh), have been mostly based on data regarding the metallic forms used in vehicular exhaust converters, known to be virtually biologically inert and immobile. To adequately assess the potential impacts of PGE, however, data on the chemical behaviour of these metals under ambient conditions post-emission is needed. Complexing agents with a high affinity for metals in the environment are hypothesized to contribute to an increased bioaccessibility of PGE. The purpose of this study is to examine the modulating effects of the organic complexing agents, L-methionine and citric acid, on the geochemical behavior of Pd in soils and model substances (Pd black and PdO). Batch experimental tests were conducted with soils and model substances to examine the impacts of the concentration of complexing agents, pH and length of extraction period on Pd solubility and its chemical transformation. Particle surface chemistry was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on samples treated with solutions under various conditions, including low and high O2 levels. Pd was observed to be more soluble in the presence of organic complexing agents, compared to Pt and Rh. Pd in soils was more readily solubilized with organic complexing agents compared to the model substances. After 7 days of extraction, L-methionine (0.1 M) treated soil and Pd black samples, for instance, had mean soluble Pd fractions of 12.4 ± 5.9% and 0.554 ± 0.024%, respectively. Surface chemistry analyses (XPS) confirmed the oxidation of metallic Pd surfaces when treated with organic complexing agents. The type of organic complexing agent used for experimental purposes was observed to be the most important factor influencing solubility, followed by solution pH and time of extraction. The results demonstrate that metallic Pd can be transformed into more bioaccessible species in the presence of

  5. Anomalously high retention of radiogenic helium in native platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubovich, O. V.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.; Mochalov, A. G.; Kotov, A. B.; Korneev, S. I.

    2012-04-01

    Relatively quick migration of helium from crystal structures has been known for a long time. However there is a group of minerals - native metals - where stability of radiogenic helium is essentially high [1]. Helium, due to its very low solubility in metals, assembles in atomic clusters - "bubbles" of nanometer size. Migration of helium "bubbles" as a whole from the crystal structures needs relatively high temperature near the melting point of metals. On that ground of special interest are platinoids with melting points (and, consequently, temperatures of "explosion-like" release of radiogenic helium) of more than 1550 oC In this respect we believe that the method based on natural radioactivity of platinum is promising. To verify the idea of anomalously high retention of radiogenic helium in native platinum and to check the efficiency of the proposed 190Pt-4He method of isotope geochronology, we studied independent mineral aggregates of native platinum from chromite-bearing dunites of Galmoenan plutonic complex (10 individual samples) (Koryak-Kamchatka belt, Russia) and Konder massif (5 individual samples) (Khabarovsk district,Russia). Because native platinum always has admixture of Fe, Cu etc. for reliable determination of concentration of platinum in the samples in our study we used electron microscope JSM-6510LA with JED 2200 add-on. Amount of 4He in native platinum was determinate on mass-spectrometer complex MSU-G-01-M. Native platinum consists of 6 isotopes. Among them two isotopes are α-radioactive and decay according to following schemes: 190Pt →4He+186Os→4He+182W 192Pt →4He+188Os Presumably, in native platinum there is always a certain amount of uranium and thorium, absorbed in the process of crystallization. However influence of helium generation from uranium becomes more marked at growing of 238U/Pt ratio and beginning with 238U/Pt ≈ 10-5 should be taken into consideration. For the same reason helium produced by the decay of 192Pt and 186Os can

  6. Iron(III)-Salophene: An Organometallic Compound with Selective Cytotoxic and Anti-Proliferative Properties in Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh K.; Strongin, Robert M.; McCourt, Carolyn K.; Brard, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Background In this pioneer study to the biological activity of organometallic compound Iron(III)-salophene (Fe-SP) the specific effects of Fe-SP on viability, morphology, proliferation, and cell-cycle progression on platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines were investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Fe-SP displayed selective cytotoxicity against SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 (ovarian epithelial adenocarcinoma) cell lines at concentrations between 100 nM and 1 µM, while the viability of HeLa cells (epithelial cervix adenocarcinoma) or primary lung or skin fibroblasts was not affected. SKOV-3 cells in contrast to fibroblasts after treatment with Fe-SP revealed apparent hallmarks of apoptosis including densely stained nuclear granular bodies within fragmented nuclei, highly condensed chromatin and chromatin fragmentation. Fe-SP treatment led to the activation of markers of the extrinsic (Caspase-8) and intrinsic (Caspase-9) pathway of apoptosis as well as of executioner Caspase-3 while PARP-1 was deactivated. Fe-SP exerted effects as an anti-proliferative agent with an IC50 value of 300 nM and caused delayed progression of cells through S-phase phase of the cell cycle resulting in a complete S-phase arrest. When intra-peritoneally applied to rats Fe-SP did not show any systemic toxicity at concentrations that in preliminary trials were determined to be chemotherapeutic relevant doses in a rat ovarian cancer cell model. Conclusion/Significance The present report suggests that Fe-SP is a potent growth-suppressing agent in vitro for cell lines derived from ovarian cancer and a potential therapeutic drug to treat such tumors in vivo. PMID:18509533

  7. Investigation of the Inertness to Hydrolysis of Platinum(IV) Prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Ida; Mazzone, Gloria; Russo, Nino; Sicilia, Emilia

    2016-02-15

    Platinum(IV) complexes are an important class of compounds that can act as prodrugs, and due to their inertness, if correctly designed, they could have low toxicity outside the cancer cell and improve the pharmacological properties of the platinum(II) anticancer agents that are currently used in the clinic. Because of the efforts that are concentrated on the use of axial ligands able to control the reduction potentials, lipophilicity, charge, selectivity, targeting, and cell uptake of the Pt(IV) complexes, we considered to be of interest to probe the inertness of such complexes that is assumed to be a fulfilled prerequisite. To this aim, a density functional theory computational analysis of the hydrolysis mechanism and the corresponding energy profiles for a series of Pt(IV) derivatives of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin with acetato, haloacetato, and chlorido ligands was performed to probe their stability in biological fluids. The heights of the barriers calculated along the hydrolysis pathways for the associative displacement of ligands both in axial and equatorial positions confirm that Pt(IV) complexes are, in general, more inert than the corresponding Pt(II) drugs even if inertness is lower than expected. Some exceptions exist, such as derivatives of oxaliplatin for the hydrolysis in equatorial position. The nature of the axial ligands influences the course of the hydrolysis reaction even if a decisive role is played by the ligands in equatorial positions. The mechanism of the aquation in axial position of cisplatin Pt(IV) derivative with two chlorido axial ligands assisted by Pt(II) cisplatin was elucidated, and the calculated activation energy confirms the catalytic role played by the Pt(II) complex.

  8. Nanomechanical properties of platinum thin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, M.A.; Gu, D.; Baumgart, H.; Elmustafa, A.A.

    2015-03-01

    The nanomechanical properties of Pt thin films grown on Si (100) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated using nanoindentation. Recently, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has successfully demonstrated the capability to deposit ultra-thin films of platinum (Pt). Using (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe3) as chemical platinum precursor and oxygen (O2) as the oxidizing agent, the ALD synthesis of Pt can be achieved with high conformity and excellent film uniformity. The ALD process window for Pt films was experimentally established in the temperature range between 270 °C and 320 °C, where the sheet conductance was constant over that temperature range, indicating stable ALD Pt film growth rate. ALD growth of Pt films exhibits very poor nucleation and adhesion characteristics on bare Si surfaces when the native oxide was removed by 2% HF etch. Pt adhesion improves for thermally oxidized Si wafers and for Si wafers covered with native oxide. Three ALD Pt films deposited at 800, 900, and 1000 ALD deposition cycles were tested for the structural and mechanical properties. Additionally, the sample with 900 ALD deposition cycles was further annealed in forming gas (95% N2 and 5% H2) at 450 °C for 30 min in order to passivate dangling bonds in the grain boundaries of the polycrystalline Pt film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were employed to characterize the films' surface structure and morphology. Nanoindentation technique was used to evaluate the hardness and modulus of the ALD Pt films of various film thicknesses. The results indicate that the films depict comparable hardness and modulus results; however, the 800 and 1000 ALD deposition cycles films without forming gas annealing experienced significant amount of pileup, whereas the 900 ALD deposition cycles sample annealed in forming gas resulted in a smaller pileup.

  9. The Hydrodynamic Effect of Bare Platinum Coils versus Hydrogel-Coated Platinum Coils

    PubMed Central

    Sorteberg, A.; Bakke, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary HydroCoils (HES) were designed to obtain a better initial aneurysm occlusion and increased durability of endovascular treatment. We compared the immediate hydrodynamic effects of HES versus bare platinum coils (Guglielmi detachable coils, GDC). Intra-aneurysmal pressure and flow were measured with a 0.014 inch guide-wire mounted transducer in silicone aneurysms mounted onto a pulsatile flow phantom before and after consecutively coiling with GDC and HES. We evaluated flow using the thermodilution technique along with changes in steady pressure and sudden increases in pressure. We also considered the effect of the coils on the transmission of pressure from the parent artery to the dome of the aneurysm. Intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchan-ged after maximal packing with either GDC or HES. Sudden increases in pressure were less attenuated within the aneurysm after coiling with HES. In spite of HES obtaining a much higher percentage filling volume in the aneurysms, GDC equivalently virtually abolished intra-ane-urysmal flow apart from in one instance where there was significant persistent flow after coiling with GDC. The effects of HES in terms of pressure and flow attenuation within the aneur-ysm could hence not be proven superior to GDC. PMID:20557740

  10. Optimizing treatment of the partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoletta

    2013-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecological cancer deaths worldwide. Despite primary treatment with platinum-containing regimens, the majority of women will experience recurrent disease and subsequent death. Recurrent ovarian cancer remains a challenge for successful management, and the choice of second-line chemotherapy is complex due to the range of different factors that need to be considered. One of the main considerations is the platinum-free interval and, specifically, the optimal treatment for patients who are partially platinum-sensitive (platinum-free interval: 6-12 months). Data from the large, multicenter, randomized OVA-301 study have shown that combined trabectedin-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) significantly prolonged median overall survival compared with PLD alone (p = 0.0027) in 214 patients with partially platinum-sensitive advanced relapsed ovarian cancer. Furthermore, in OVA-301 patients with partially platinum-sensitive disease who received platinum therapy immediately after disease progression (n = 94), final median overall survival was improved by 9 months (p = 0.0153) in trabectedin-PLD patients compared with PLD alone. In addition to demonstrating a survival advantage, trabectedin-PLD may also allow the treatment of patients having not yet recovered from previous platinum toxicity. In summary, the data suggest the use of combined trabectedin-PLD as a second-line treatment option in patients with partially platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, followed by a third-line platinum-containing regimen.

  11. Copper Transporter CTR1 Expression and Tissue Platinum Concentration in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Tang, XiMing; Peterson, Derick R.; Kilari, Deepak; Chow, Chi-Wan; Fujimoto, Junya; Kalhor, Neda; Swisher, Stephen G.; Stewart, David J.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Platinum resistance is a major limitation in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We previously demonstrated that low tissue platinum concentration in NSCLC specimens was significantly associated with reduced tumor response. Furthermore, low expression of the copper transporter CTR1, a transporter of platinum uptake was associated with poor clinical outcome following platinum-based therapy in NSCLC patients. We investigated the relationship between tissue platinum concentrations and CTR1 expression in NSCLC specimens. Methods We identified paraffin-embedded NSCLC tissue blocks of known tissue platinum concentrations from 30 patients who underwent neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Expression of CTR1 in tumors and normal adjacent lung specimens was determined by immunohistochemistry with adequate controls. Results Tissue platinum concentration significantly correlated with tumor response in 30 patients who received neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy (P<0.001). CTR1 was differentially expressed in NSCLC tumors. A subset of patients with undetectable CTR1 expression in their tumors had reduced platinum concentrations (P=0.058) and tumor response (P=0.016) compared to those with any level of CTR1 expression. We also observed that African Americans had significantly reduced CTR1 expression scores (P=0.001), tissue platinum concentrations (P=0.009) and tumor shrinkage (P=0.016) compared to Caucasians. Conclusions To our best knowledge this is the first study investigating the function of CTR1 in clinical specimens. CTR1 expression may be necessary for therapeutic efficacy of platinum drugs, consistent with previous preclinical studies. A prospective clinical trial is necessary to develop CTR1 into a potential biomarker for platinum drugs. PMID:24792335

  12. Facile Fabrication of Platinum Nanodots Assembly Core-Silica Shell Nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyukova, Diana; Yoo, Hyojong

    2016-05-01

    Nanosystems using a platinum (Pt) nanodots assembly (multi-Pt nanoparticles, m-Pt) as the core and silica (SiO2) shells were successfully synthesized as m-Pt@SiO2 spherical nanoparticles (NPs) and m-Pt@SiO2 nanochains (NChs) by a reverse microemulsion (water-in-oil)-based method. The kinetically controlled reduction of K2PtCl4 by the Brij35 surfactant within reverse micelles, followed by condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate, led to the formation of multi-Pt nanodots core-silica shell systems. The reduction kinetics for the growth of core-shell systems was studied in both the presence of reducing agents such as ascorbic acid, glucose, and ethylene glycol and in the absence of supplementary agents, as well as the variation of water-to-surfactant ratio. To assemble Pt NPs within a one-dimensional SiO2 matrix, we attempted to grow Pt NPs in situ while the SiO2 materials grew one-dimensionally in a modified microemulsion system. By changing the pH of the reaction media or using highly concentrated ethylene glycol in the synthetic approach, we successfully synthesized m-Pt@SiO2 NChs.

  13. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  14. Filling agents.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ioannis P

    2005-06-01

    Injectable fillers have become an important component of minimally invasive facial rejuvenation modalities. Their ease of use, effectiveness, low morbidity, and fast results with minimal downtime are factors that have made them popular among patients. Soft tissue augmentation has evolved to a unique combination of medicine and art. A wide selection of available agents and new products, each one with unique properties, may be used alone or in combination. The physician acquires the tools to rebalance facial characteristics not only by filling wrinkles but also by having the ability to shape the face and restore bony contours and lines. Careful selection of candidates, realistic expectations, and an understanding of the limitations of fillers are crucial for a successful result.

  15. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  16. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  17. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  18. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  19. Identification of cisplatin-binding proteins using agarose conjugates of platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  20. Antibody fragment-conjugated polymeric micelles incorporating platinum drugs for targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jooyeon; Miura, Yutaka; Yamada, Naoki; Chida, Tsukasa; Liu, Xueying; Kim, Ahram; Sato, Ryuta; Tsumura, Ryo; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated therapies including antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have shown much potential in cancer treatment by tumor-targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs. However, there is a limitation of payloads that can be delivered by ADCs. Integration of antibodies to drug-loaded nanocarriers broadens the applicability of antibodies to a wide range of therapeutics. Herein, we developed antibody fragment-installed polymeric micelles via maleimide-thiol conjugation for selectively delivering platinum drugs to pancreatic tumors. By tailoring the surface density of maleimide on the micelles, one tissue factor (TF)-targeting Fab' was conjugated to each carrier. Fab'-installed platinum-loaded micelles exhibited more than 15-fold increased cellular binding within 1 h and rapid cellular internalization compared to non-targeted micelles, leading to superior in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo, Fab'-installed micelles significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts for more than 40 days, outperforming non-targeted micelles and free drugs. These results indicate the potential of Fab'-installed polymeric micelles for efficient drug delivery to solid tumors.

  1. Antibody fragment-conjugated polymeric micelles incorporating platinum drugs for targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jooyeon; Miura, Yutaka; Yamada, Naoki; Chida, Tsukasa; Liu, Xueying; Kim, Ahram; Sato, Ryuta; Tsumura, Ryo; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated therapies including antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have shown much potential in cancer treatment by tumor-targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs. However, there is a limitation of payloads that can be delivered by ADCs. Integration of antibodies to drug-loaded nanocarriers broadens the applicability of antibodies to a wide range of therapeutics. Herein, we developed antibody fragment-installed polymeric micelles via maleimide-thiol conjugation for selectively delivering platinum drugs to pancreatic tumors. By tailoring the surface density of maleimide on the micelles, one tissue factor (TF)-targeting Fab' was conjugated to each carrier. Fab'-installed platinum-loaded micelles exhibited more than 15-fold increased cellular binding within 1 h and rapid cellular internalization compared to non-targeted micelles, leading to superior in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo, Fab'-installed micelles significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts for more than 40 days, outperforming non-targeted micelles and free drugs. These results indicate the potential of Fab'-installed polymeric micelles for efficient drug delivery to solid tumors. PMID:25477168

  2. Gelled Anti-icing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O. F.; Sperber, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Pectin added to antifreeze/water mixture. Formulations include water with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as deicer and pectin as gel former. Without gelling agent, deicer runs off vertical surfaces. Without pectin solution will completely evaporate in far less time. Agents developed have wide potential for ice prevention on runways, highways, bridges and sidewalks.

  3. Mechanisms of Endothelial Cell Attachment, Proliferation, and Differentiation on 4 Types of Platinum-Based Endovascular Coils

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Aditya S.; San Antonio, James D.; Addya, Sankar; Surrey, Saul; Fortina, Paolo; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.; Veznedaroglu, Erol

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A subarachnoid hemorrhage is neurologically devastating, with 50% of patients becoming disabled or deceased. Advent of Guglielmi detachable coils in 1995 permitted endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Coiling is efficacious and safe, but durability needs improvement, as nearly 20% of patients require further invasive intervention secondary to aneurysm recurrence. The aim of this study is to develop an in vitro model of endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and differentiation on four types of platinum-based coils, using gene expression profiling to understand EC biology as they colonize and differentiate on coils. METHODS Human umbilical vein ECs were grown in vitro on platinum coil segments. Growth patterns were assessed as a function of coil type. Gene expression profiles for coil attached versus coil unattached ECs were determined using immunohistochemistry and gene array analysis. RESULTS ECs showed rapid, robust attachment to all coil types. Some detachment occurred within 24–48 hours. Significant growth of remaining attached cells occurred during the next week, creating a confluence on coils and within coil grooves. Similar growth curve results were obtained with human brain ECs on platinum-based coil surfaces. Differentiation markers in attached cells (α1, α2, β1 integrins) were expressed on immunostaining, whereas microarray gene expression revealed 48 up-regulated and 68 down-regulated genes after 24-hour growth on coils. Major pathways affected as a function of time of colonization on coils and coil type included those involved in regulation of cell cycle and cell signaling. CONCLUSIONS We developed an in vitro model for evaluating endothelialization of platinum coils to optimize coil design to support robust EC colonization and differentiation. PMID:23994074

  4. Performance and durability of electrodes with platinum catalysts in polymer electrolyte cells prepared by ultrasonic spray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigdon, William A.

    The development of stable platinum electrocatalysts for durable electrode performance has been a goal of this research. Cost of these materials is a major barrier to commercialization of technology such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Catalysts need to be supported on inexpensive materials that use a minimal amount of platinum while maintaining a high activity over the life of the device. Carbon support corrosion is the origin of many problems plaguing electrocatalyst longevity. Instead of replacing carbon with a ceramic or another single phase material, this dissertation has explored a composite consisting of both carbon nanotubes and titania to support platinum catalysts. Graphitized carbons and stable metal oxides have become a popular material selection for catalyst supports in many recent publications, but their design lacks a fundamental understanding. High performance and durability have been reported, although successful application in working electrodes is necessary to validate these advantages. Titania and carbon nanotube supports for platinum were able to better preserve catalyst performance than a control without titania in the cathode. Choice of a niobium donor dopant in titania was used in an approach to modify the structure and electronic properties of the metal oxide phase when integrated into the anode. When included into electrocatalysts, semiconductor oxides promote bifunctional mechanisms through junctions formed with the catalyst. Strong metal-support interactions enhanced catalyst bonding characteristics extended from the support. An ultrasonic spray deposition process was used to prepare membrane electrode assemblies from the synthesized electrocatalysts. A synergy between both performance and durability of electrodes can be realized by design of better composite supports used in fuel cells and potentially other related electrochemical devices.

  5. A Radiosonde Using a Humidity Sensor Array with a Platinum Resistance Heater and Multi-Sensor Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yunbo; Luo, Yi; Zhao, Wenjie; Shang, Chunxue; Wang, Yadong; Chen, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a radiosonde which can measure the meteorological temperature, humidity, pressure, and other atmospheric data. The system is composed of a CPU, microwave module, temperature sensor, pressure sensor and humidity sensor array. In order to effectively solve the humidity sensor condensation problem due to the low temperatures in the high altitude environment, a capacitive humidity sensor including four humidity sensors to collect meteorological humidity and a platinum resistance heater was developed using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) technology. A platinum resistance wire with 99.999% purity and 0.023 mm in diameter was used to obtain the meteorological temperature. A multi-sensor data fusion technique was applied to process the atmospheric data. Static and dynamic experimental results show that the designed humidity sensor with platinum resistance heater can effectively tackle the sensor condensation problem, shorten response times and enhance sensitivity. The humidity sensor array can improve measurement accuracy and obtain a reliable initial meteorological humidity data, while the multi-sensor data fusion technique eliminates the uncertainty in the measurement. The radiosonde can accurately reflect the meteorological changes. PMID:23857263

  6. Simultaneous nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticles using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Haidi D; Drinkel, Emma E; Orzechovicz, Beatriz; Leopoldino, Elder C; Souza, Franciane D; Almerindo, Gizelle I; Perdona, Cristian; Nome, Faruk

    2013-11-01

    A selective method is proposed for the determination of palladium, gold, and sulfur in catalytic systems, by direct liquid analysis using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), under an atmosphere of helium or air. This method allows a nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticulate catalysts stabilized by imidazolium propane sulfonate based zwitterionic surfactants, allowing the samples to be reused for catalytic studies. The signals from palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold samples in the presence of imidazolium propane sulfonate-based zwitterionic surfactants obtained using EDXRF before (Pd(2+), Rh(2+), Pt(2+), and Au(3+)) and after (Pd(0), Rh(0), Pt(0), and Au(0)) formation of nanoparticles are essentially identical. The results show that the EDXRF method is nondestructive and allows detection and quantification of the main components of platinum, gold, rhodium, and palladium NPs, including the surfactant concentration, with detection and quantification limits in the range of 0.4-3 mg L(-1). The matrices used in such samples present no problems, even allowing the detection and quantification of interfering elements.

  7. Quantitative imaging of platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to investigate toxic side effects of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Köppen, C; Reifschneider, O; Castanheira, I; Sperling, M; Karst, U; Ciarimboli, G

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a quantitative bioimaging method for platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and its application for a biomedical study concerning toxic side effects of cisplatin. To trace the histopathology back to cisplatin, platinum was localized and quantified in major functional units of testicle, cochlea, kidney, nerve and brain sections from cisplatin treated mice. The direct consideration of the histology enables precise interpretation of the Pt images and the novel quantitative evaluation approach allows significantly more precise investigations than the pure image. For the first time, platinum was detected and quantified in all major injured structures including organ of Corti of cochlea and seminiferous tubule of testicle. In this way, proximal tubule in kidney, Leydig cells in testicle, stria vascularis and organ of Corti in cochlea and nerve fibers in sciatic nerves are confirmed as targets of cisplatin in these organs. However, the accumulation of platinum in almost all investigated structures also raises questions about more complex pathogenesis including direct and indirect interruption of several biological processes.

  8. Induction of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase mRNA by platinum complexes in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    el-akawi, Z; Zdanowicz, J; Creaven, P J; Abu-hadid, M; Perez, R; Pendyala, L

    1996-01-01

    Elevation of glutathione (GSH) is widely observed in cellular resistance to platinum agents. Our previous studies have shown that sublines of human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780, which exhibited low levels of resistance to oxaliplatin, showed elevated steady state levels of mRNA and activity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT, EC 2.3.2.2), but not of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS, EC 6.3.2.2) [El-akawi et al., Cancer Lett. 105:5-14; 1966]. To understand this phenomenon better, we have studied the effect of single exposures of oxaliplatin or cisplatin on the mRNA expression of gamma-GT and gamma-GCS in A2780 cells. The mRNAs of gamma-GT and gamma-GCS were measured by reverse transcriptase PCR, with quantitation of the PCR product by HPLC; mRNA levels are expressed as ratios to beta-actin mRNA, used as an endogenous standard. GSH was measured by HPLC. The gamma-GT activity was measured by a colorimetric assay. Single exposures of cells to oxaliplatin induced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the mRNA of gamma-GT, but not of gamma-GCS. Cisplatin also induced an elevation in gamma-GT mRNA, but to a lower degree. The gamma-GT enzyme activity increased corresponding to the elevation in mRNA expression. The gamma-GT-induced cells showed an increase in cellular GSH when incubated in medium containing GSH. The data suggest that a) single, brief exposures to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of platinum complexes induce elevation in mRNA of gamma-GT, b) elevation in gamma-GT mRNA translates into elevated gamma-GT activity and increase in GSH salvage, and c) the degree of induction of gamma-GT mRNA differs between platinum complexes.

  9. International strategic minerals inventory summary report: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, David M.; Page, Norman J

    1986-01-01

    Major world resources of platinum-group metals are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of platinum-group metals on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  10. Nanostructured gold and platinum electrodes on silicon structures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogurtsov, V. I.; Sheehan, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Gold and platinum metal electrodes on Si/SiO2 having undergone anisotropic potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch treatment are considered. This treatment etches at different rates and directions in the material resulting in creation of numerous pyramid shaped holes in the silicon substrate. This surface is used to make metal electrodes with increased electrode efficiency. The electrodes can serve as the sensors or as the sensor substrates (for surface polymer modification) and because both gold and platinum are inert they have applications for food safety biosensing. Wine, an economically significant food product, was chosen as a matrix, and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was selected as a method of investigation of electrode behaviour. Based on results of EIS, different complexity equivalent circuits were determined by applying fitting mean square root optimisation of sensor complex impedance measurements.

  11. Direct potentiometric determination of starch using a platinum redox sensor.

    PubMed

    Sakač, Nikola; Sak-Bosnar, Milan; Horvat, Marija

    2013-05-01

    Here, we describe the development of a platinum redox sensor for the direct potentiometric quantification of starch in solution. The sensor measures the decrease in free triiodide ion after it complexes with starch to form a starch-triiodide complex. This decrease was, therefore, correlated with starch concentration, and the composition and stability of the potassium triiodide solution were optimised. The starch-triiodide complex was characterized potentiometrically at variable starch and triiodide concentrations. We also propose a response mechanism for the platinum redox sensor towards starch and an appropriate theoretical model. The optimised method exhibited satisfactory accuracy and precision and was in good agreement with a standard spectrophotometric method. The sensor was tested over a range of 0.4-9 mg starch, with recoveries ranging from 97.8% to 103.4% and a detection limit of 0.01 mg starch.

  12. Platinum(IV)-chlorotoxin (CTX) conjugates for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Graf, Nora; Mokhtari, Tara E; Papayannopoulos, Ioannis A; Lippard, Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anticancer drugs. Its side effects, however, have motivated researchers to search for equally effective analogs that are better tolerated. Selectively targeting cancer tissue is one promising strategy. For this purpose, a platinum(IV) complex was conjugated to the cancer-targeting peptide chlorotoxin (CTX, TM601) in order to deliver cisplatin selectively to cancer cells. The 1:1 Pt-CTX conjugate was characterized by mass spectrometry and gel electrophoresis. Like most platinum(IV) derivatives, the cytotoxicity of the conjugate was lower in cell culture than that of cisplatin, but greater than those of its Pt(IV) precursor and CTX in several cancer cell lines.

  13. Joining lead wires to thin platinum alloy films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S.; Claing, R. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A two step process of joining a lead wire to .000002 m thick platinum alloy film which rests upon an equally thin alumina insulating layer which is adhered to a metal substrate is described. Typically the platinum alloy film forms part of a thermocouple for measuring the surface temperature of a gas turbine airfoil. In the first step the lead wire is deformed 30 to 60% at room temperature while the characteristic one million ohm resistance of the alumina insulating layer is monitored for degradation. In the second step the cold pressed assembly is heated at 865 to 1025 C for 4 to 75 hr in air. During the heating step any degradation of insulating layer resistance may be reversed, provided the resistance was not decreased below 100 ohm in the cold pressing.

  14. Platinum resistance in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancers are among the 10 leading cancer types in females with mortalities of 15% and 6%, respectively. Despite tremendous efforts to conquer malignant diseases, the war on cancer declared by Richard Nixon four decades ago seems to be lost. Approximately 21,800 women in the US will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2011. Therefore, its incidence is relatively low compared to breast cancer with 207.090 prognosed cases in 2011. However, overall survival unmasks ovarian cancer as the most deadly gynecological neoplasia. Platinum-based chemotherapy is emerging as an upcoming treatment modality especially in triple negative breast cancer. However, in ovarian cancer Platinum-complexes for a long time are established as first line treatment. Emergence of a resistant phenotype is a major hurdle in curative cancer therapy approaches and many scientists around the world are focussing on this issue. This review covers new findings in this field during the past decade. PMID:21967738

  15. A platinum-chromium steel for cardiovascular stents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Barry J; Stinson, Jon S; Larsen, Steve R; Eppihimer, Michael J; Carroll, William M

    2010-05-01

    The desire to reduce the strut thickness of cardiovascular stents has driven the development of a new high strength radiopaque alloy, based on additions of platinum to a chromium-rich iron based matrix. This paper reports on initial development of the alloy and the rationale for selection of the composition. Data is presented for tensile and microstructural characterization, surface oxide analysis, corrosion resistance and endothelial cell response of the alloy. The results demonstrate the solid solution strengthening effect of the platinum, with an average yield strength of 480 MPa achieved. The material surface consists of primarily chromium oxide which contributes to the high corrosion resistance observed. The cell assay result suggests that surfaces of this Pt-enhanced alloy endothelialize in a manner comparable to stainless steel.

  16. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method. PMID:27619092

  17. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method.

  18. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  19. Molecularly Rigid Microporous Polyamine Captures and Stabilizes Conducting Platinum Nanoparticle Networks.

    PubMed

    He, Daping; He, Dong Sheng; Yang, Jinlong; Low, Ze-Xian; Malpass-Evans, Richard; Carta, Mariolino; McKeown, Neil B; Marken, Frank

    2016-08-31

    A molecularly rigid polyamine based on a polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-EA-TB) is shown to capture and stabilize platinum nanoparticles during colloid synthesis in the rigid framework. Stabilization here refers to avoiding aggregation without loss of surface reactivity. In the resulting rigid framework with embedded platinum nanoparticles, the volume ratio of platinum to PIM-EA-TB in starting materials is varied systematically from approximately 1.0 to 0.1 with the resulting platinum nanoparticle diameter varying from approximately 4.2 to 3.1 nm, respectively. Elemental analysis suggests that only a fraction of the polymer is "captured" to give nanocomposites rich in platinum. A transition occurs from electrically conducting and electrochemically active (with shorter average interparticle distance) to nonconducting and only partially electrochemically active (with longer average interparticle distance) polymer-platinum composites. The conducting nanoparticle network in the porous rigid macromolecular framework could be beneficial in electrocatalysis and in sensing applications. PMID:27509837

  20. Platinum uptake by the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus in urban rivers.

    PubMed

    Rauch, S; Morrison, G M

    1999-09-01

    Platinum has been increasing in the environment as a result of emissions from catalytic converters. The platinum emitted is principally located in the vicinity of roads but might be transported to urban rivers through highway and urban run-off water. Platinum concentrations in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus were measured for two urban rivers and a stormwater detention pond. Concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 12.4 micrograms g-1 for direct analysis and from 0.16 to 4.5 micrograms g-1 after depuration. Analyses of water, pore water and sediments indicate that platinum in urban rivers is mostly found in the sediments and these provide the major contribution of platinum to Asellus aquaticus. Exposure experiments showed the importance of platinum speciation for uptake.

  1. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  2. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  3. Double-Stranded Water on Stepped Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Manuel J.; Farber, Rachael G.; Derouin, Jonathan; Badan, Cansin; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Juurlink, Ludo B. F.; Killelea, Daniel R.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of platinum with water plays a key role in (electro)catalysis. Herein, we describe a combined theoretical and experimental study that resolves the preferred adsorption structure of water wetting the Pt(111)-step type with adjacent (111) terraces. Double stranded lines wet the step edge forming water tetragons with dissimilar hydrogen bonds within and between the lines. Our results qualitatively explain experimental observations of water desorption and impact our thinking of solvation at the Pt electrochemical interface.

  4. Nucleolar damage correlates with neurotoxicity induced by different platinum drugs

    PubMed Central

    McKeage, M J; Hsu, T; Screnci, D; Haddad, G; Baguley, B C

    2001-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs are very useful in cancer therapy but are associated with neurotoxicity in the clinic. To investigate the mechanism of neurotoxicity, dorsal root ganglia of rats treated with various platinum drugs were studied. Cell body, nuclear and nucleolar dimensions of dorsal root ganglia sensory nerve cells were measured to determine morphological toxicity. Sensory nerve conduction velocity was measured to determine functional toxicity. After a single dose of oxaliplatin (10 mg kg−1), no significant change in nuclear and cell body diameter was seen but decreased nucleolar size was apparent within a few hours of treatment. Changes in nucleolar size were maximal at 24 hours, recovered very slowly and showed a non-linear dependence on oxaliplatin dose (r2= 0.99). Functional toxicity was delayed in onset until 14 days after a single dose of oxaliplatin but eventually recovered 3 months after treatment. Multiple doses of cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin, R, R -ormaplatin and S, S -ormaplatin were also associated with time-dependent reduction in nucleolar size. A linear correlation was obtained between the rate of change in nucleolar size during multiple dose treatment with the series of platinum drugs and the time taken for the development of altered sensory nerve conduction velocity (r2= 0.86;P< 0.024). Damage to the nucleolus of ganglionic sensory neurons is therefore linked to the neurotoxicity of platinum-based drugs, possibly through mechanisms resulting in the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710838

  5. Platinum and palladium oxalates: positive-tone extreme ultraviolet resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortland, Miriam; Hotalen, Jodi; Re, Ryan Del; Passarelli, James; Murphy, Michael; Kulmala, Tero S.; Ekinci, Yasin; Neisser, Mark; Freedman, Daniel A.; Brainard, Robert L.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present platinum and palladium mononuclear complexes with EUV photosensitivity and lithographic performance. Many platinum and palladium complexes show little or no EUV sensitivity; however, we have found that metal carbonates and metal oxalates (L2M(CO3) and L2M(C2O4); M=Pt or Pd) are sensitive to EUV. The metal carbonates give negative-tone behavior. The most interesting result is that the metal oxalates give the first positive-tone EUV resists based on mononuclear organometallic compounds. In particular, (dppm)Pd(C2O4) (dppm=1,1-bis(diphenylphosphino)methane) (23) prints 30-nm dense lines with E of 50 mJ/cm2. Derivatives of (23) were synthesized to explore the relationship between the core metal and the resist sensitivity. The study showed that palladium-based resists are more sensitive than platinum-based resists. The photoreaction has been investigated for two of our most promising resists, (dppm)Pd(C2O4) (23) and EtPPdC2O4 (27). Our experiments suggest the loss of CO2 and the formation of a zerovalent L4Pd complex upon exposure to light. We have identified dppm2Pd(δ(P)23.6) as the main photoproduct for (23) and EtPPd (δ(P)32.7) as the main photoproduct for (27).

  6. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tripković, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-03-01

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO(2), SnO(2), NbO(2), ZrO(2), SiO(2), Ta(2)O(5) and Nb(2)O(5)) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum dissolution at high potentials and the interference of redispersion with normal working potential of the PEMFC cathode. We have calculated the PtO(x) (x = 0, 1, 2) adsorption energies on different metal oxides' surface terminations as well as inside the metal oxides' bulk, and we have concluded that NbO(2) might be a good support for platinum redispersion at PEMFC cathodes. PMID:23358311

  7. In vitro free radical scavenging activity of platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Aki; Kajita, Masashi; Kim, Juewon; Kanayama, Atsuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Mashino, Tadahiko; Miyamoto, Yusei

    2009-11-01

    A polyacrylic acid (PAA)-protected platinum nanoparticle species (PAA-Pt) was prepared by alcohol reduction of hexachloroplatinate. The PAA-Pt nanoparticles were well dispersed and homogeneous in size with an average diameter of 2.0 ± 0.4 nm (n = 200). We used electron spin resonance to quantify the residual peroxyl radical (\\mathrm {AOO}^{\\bullet } ) generated from 2,2-azobis (2-aminopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) by thermal decomposition in the presence of O2 and a spectrophotometric method to quantify the residual 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. PAA-Pt scavenged these two radicals in a dose-dependent manner. Platinum was the functional component. PAA-Pt reduced the rate of oxygen consumption required for linoleic acid peroxidation initiated by \\mathrm {AOO}^{\\bullet } generated from AAPH, indicating inhibition of the propagation of linolate peroxidation. A thiobarbituric acid test also revealed dose-dependent inhibition of the linolate peroxidation by PAA-Pt. Fifty micromolar platinum, as PAA-Pt, completely quenched 250 µM DPPH radical for 5 min. Even when twice diluted in half, the PAA-Pt still quenched 100% of the 250 µM DPPH radical. The scavenging activity of PAA-Pt is durable. These observations suggest that PAA-Pt is an efficient scavenger of free radicals.

  8. Platinum-induced structural collapse in layered oxide polycrystalline films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianlin; Liu, Changhui; Huang, Haoliang; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhai, Xiaofang; Lu, Yalin E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-30

    Effect of a platinum bottom electrode on the SrBi{sub 5}Fe{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 18} layered oxide polycrystalline films was systematically studied. The doped cobalt ions react with the platinum to form a secondary phase of PtCoO{sub 2}, which has a typical Delafossite structure with a weak antiferromagnetism and an exceptionally high in-plane electrical conductivity. Formation of PtCoO{sub 2} at the interface partially consumes the cobalt dopant and leads to the structural collapsing from 5 to 4 layers, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Considering the weak magnetic contribution from PtCoO{sub 2}, the observed ferromagnetism should be intrinsic of the Aurivillius compounds. Ferroelectric properties were also indicated by the piezoresponse force microscopy. In this work, the platinum induced secondary phase at the interface was observed, which has a strong impact on Aurivillius structural configuration and thus the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties.

  9. Electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction with reduced platinum oxidation and dissolution rates

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2011-11-22

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen.

  10. Optimum Platinum Loading In Pt/SnO2 CO-Oxidizing Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Davis, Patricia P.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Schryer, Jacqueline

    1991-01-01

    Platinum on tin oxide (Pt/SnO2) good catalyst for oxidation of carbon monoxide at or near room temperature. Catalytic activity peaks at about 17 weight percent Pt. Catalysts with platinum loadings as high as 46 percent fabricated by technique developed at Langley Research Center. Work conducted to determine optimum platinum loading for this type of catalyst. Major application is removal of unwanted CO and O2 in CO2 lasers.

  11. Platinum-group element resources in podiform chromitites from California and Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Singer, D.A.; Moring, B.C.; Carlson, C.A.; McDade, J.M.; Wilson, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Assays of Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir from approx 280 podiform chromite deposits in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic ophiolites are statistically analysed to estimate their possible by-product value from mining the chromite. The platinum-group elements occur in discrete platinum-group minerals, and in solid solution in Cu-Ni-Fe sulphides. Low grades and small amounts of total platinum-group elements in podiform chromite deposits imply a small resource. -G.J.N.

  12. Electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction with reduced platinum oxidation and dissolution rates

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2012-11-13

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen.

  13. Evaluation of novel trans-sulfonamide platinum complexes against tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Carlos; Díaz-García, C Vanesa; Agudo-López, Alba; del Solar, Virginia; Cabrera, Silvia; Agulló-Ortuño, M Teresa; Navarro-Ranninger, Carmen; Alemán, José; López-Martín, José A

    2014-04-01

    Platinum-based drugs, mainly cisplatin, are employed for the treatment of solid malignancies. However, cisplatin treatment often results in the development of chemoresistance, leading to therapeutic failure. Here, the antitumor activity of different trans-sulfonamide platinum complexes in a panel of human cell lines is presented. The cytotoxicity profiles and cell cycle analyses of these platinum sulfonamide complexes were different from those of cisplatin. These studies showed that complex 2b with cyclohexyldiamine and dansyl moieties had the best antitumoral activities.

  14. Detecting agents.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews a recent set of behavioural studies that examine the scope and nature of the representational system underlying theory-of-mind development. Studies with typically developing infants, adults and children with autism all converge on the claim that there is a specialized input system that uses not only morphological cues, but also behavioural cues to categorize novel objects as agents. Evidence is reviewed in which 12- to 15-month-old infants treat certain non-human objects as if they have perceptual/attentional abilities, communicative abilities and goal-directed behaviour. They will follow the attentional orientation of an amorphously shaped novel object if it interacts contingently with them or with another person. They also seem to use a novel object's environmentally directed behaviour to determine its perceptual/attentional orientation and object-oriented goals. Results from adults and children with autism are strikingly similar, despite adults' contradictory beliefs about the objects in question and the failure of children with autism to ultimately develop more advanced theory-of-mind reasoning. The implications for a general theory-of-mind development are discussed. PMID:12689380

  15. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  16. Electrochemical oxygen reduction behavior of selectively deposited platinum atoms on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, A; Kerr, J B; Cairns, E J

    2013-07-22

    Carbon-supported Pt@Au "core-shell" nanoparticles with varying surface concentration of platinum atoms have been synthesized using a novel redox-mediated synthesis approach. The synthesis technique allows for a selective deposition of platinum atoms on the surface of prefabricated gold nanoparticles. Energy dispersive spectroscopic analyses in a scanning electron microscope reveal that the platinum to gold atomic ratios are close to the nominal values, validating the synthesis scheme. X-ray diffraction data indicate an un-alloyed structure. The platinum to gold surface atomic ratio determined from cyclic voltammetry and copper under-potential deposition experiments reveal good agreement with the calculated values at low platinum concentration. However, there is an increase in non-uniformity in the deposition process upon increasing the platinum concentration. Koutecky-Levich analysis of the samples indicates a transition of the total number of electrons transferred (n) in the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction from two to four electrons upon increasing the surface concentration of platinum atoms. Furthermore, the data indicate that isolated platinum atoms can reduce molecular oxygen but via a two-electron route. Moreover, successful four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen requires clusters of platinum atoms.

  17. Testing the metal of ERCC2 in predicting the response to platinum-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Turchi, John J; Woods, Derek S; VanderVere-Carozza, Pamela

    2014-10-01

    DNA repair has been shown to affect the cellular response to platinum-based therapy in a variety of cancers; however, translating this knowledge to the clinic has proven difficult and yielded mixed results. In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Van Allen and colleagues have analyzed responders and nonresponders to neoadjuvant platinum-based therapy with locally advanced urothelial cancer and identified a series of mutations in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC2 that correlate with the response to platinum-based therapy. This work provides evidence that defects in NER can be exploited to maximize the efficacy of conventional platinum-based chemotherapy.

  18. Platinum and Gold Mining in South Africa: The Context of the Marikana Massacre.

    PubMed

    Cairncross, Eugene; Kisting, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    Mining is a source of extraordinary wealth, but its benefits often do not accrue to the workers and communities most involved. This paper presents two case studies of mining in South Africa to reflect on the history and legacy of mining both through observation and through the voices of affected communities. Interviews and observations on field visits to the platinum and gold mining areas of South Africa in the immediate aftermath of the Marikana massacre highlight this legacy--including vast quantities of tailings dumps and waste rock, lakes of polluted water and a devastated physical and social environment, high unemployment, high rates of occupational injury and disease including silicosis with co-morbidities, absent social security, and disrupted rural and agricultural communities. Exploitative conditions of work and the externalization of the health and environmental costs of mining will require international solidarity, robust independent trade unions, and a commitment to human rights.

  19. Platinum and Gold Mining in South Africa: The Context of the Marikana Massacre.

    PubMed

    Cairncross, Eugene; Kisting, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    Mining is a source of extraordinary wealth, but its benefits often do not accrue to the workers and communities most involved. This paper presents two case studies of mining in South Africa to reflect on the history and legacy of mining both through observation and through the voices of affected communities. Interviews and observations on field visits to the platinum and gold mining areas of South Africa in the immediate aftermath of the Marikana massacre highlight this legacy--including vast quantities of tailings dumps and waste rock, lakes of polluted water and a devastated physical and social environment, high unemployment, high rates of occupational injury and disease including silicosis with co-morbidities, absent social security, and disrupted rural and agricultural communities. Exploitative conditions of work and the externalization of the health and environmental costs of mining will require international solidarity, robust independent trade unions, and a commitment to human rights. PMID:26721787

  20. [Recovery of platinum with immobilized Citrobacter freudii XP05 biomass].

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong-Bo; Liu, Yue-Ying; Fu, Jin-Kun; Xue, Ru; Gu, Ping-Ying

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a valuable adsorbent for recovery of platinum by studying the properties of Pt4+ -adsorption with immobilized Citrobacter freudii XP05 biomass. Five methods for immobilization of Citrobacter freudii XP05 biomass were compared. The method with gelatin-alginate sodium as entrapment matrix was considered to be the optimal. Spherical and uniform beads were produced and the SEM micrograph indicated that the cell of strain XP08 were uniformly dispersed within the matrix. The adsorption of Pt4+ by immobilized XP05 biomass was affected with adsorptive time, pH value of the solution, immobilized biomass concentration, Pt4+ initial concentration The adsorption was a rapid process. The optimal pH value for Pt4+ adsorption was 1.5, and its adsorptive capacity increased linearly with increasing Pt4+ initial concentrations in the range of 50 - 250 mg/L. The experimental data could be fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption isotherm. The adsorptive capacity reached 35.2 mg/g under the conditions of 250 Pt4+ mg/L, 2.0 g/L immobilized biomass, pH 1.5 and 30 degrees C for 60 min. 98.7% of Pt4+ adsorbed on immobilized biomass could be desorbed with 0.5 mol HC1/L. The characteristics of dynamic adsorption and desorption of immobilized XP05 biomass in packed-bed reactor were investigated. The saturation uptake was 24.66 mg Pt4+ /g under the conditions of flow rate 1.2 mL/min, pH 1.5, 50 mg Pt4+/L and 1.85 g biomass(dry weight) . Adsorptive efficiency of Pt4 + by the immobilized XP05 biomass was above 78% for 4 cycles of adsorption and desorption. The recovery of platinum from waste platinum catalyst was studied. The adsorptive capacity was 20.94 mg Pt4+/g immobilized biomass under the conditions of 4.0 g/L immobilized XP05 biomass, 117.76 mg Pt4+/L and pH 1.5 for 60 min. The immobilized XP05 biomass is potentially applicable to the recovery of platinum from waste and wastewater containing platinum. PMID:15969064

  1. X-ray structure and mechanism of RNA polymerase II stalled at an antineoplastic monofunctional platinum-DNA adduct

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Zhu, Guangyu; Huang, Xuhui; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is a major target of anticancer drugs. The resulting adducts interfere with key cellular processes, such as transcription, to trigger downstream events responsible for drug activity. cis-Diammine(pyridine)chloroplatinum(II), cDPCP or pyriplatin, is a monofunctional platinum(II) analogue of the widely used anticancer drug cisplatin having significant anticancer properties with a different spectrum of activity. Its novel structure-activity properties hold promise for overcoming drug resistance and improving the spectrum of treatable cancers over those responsive to cisplatin. However, the detailed molecular mechanism by which cells process DNA modified by pyriplatin and related monofunctional complexes is not at all understood. Here we report the structure of a transcribing RNA polymerase II (pol II) complex stalled at a site-specific monofunctional pyriplatin-DNA adduct in the active site. The results reveal a molecular mechanism of pol II transcription inhibition and drug action that is dramatically different from transcription inhibition by cisplatin and UV-induced 1,2-intrastrand cross-links. Our findings provide insight into structure-activity relationships that may apply to the entire family of monofunctional DNA-damaging agents and pave the way for rational improvement of monofunctional platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:20448203

  2. Platinum(II) complexes with antitumoral/antiviral aromatic heterocycles: effect of glutathione upon in vitro cell growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Papadia, Paride; Margiotta, Nicola; Bergamo, Alberta; Sava, Gianni; Natile, Giovanni

    2005-05-01

    The compounds [Pt(Me(2)phen)(acy)(2)](NO(3))(2) (1), [Pt(Me(2)phen)(pen)(2)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(phen)(acy)(2)](NO(3))(2) (2), and [Pt(phen)(pen)(2)](NO(3))(2), containing the bidentate 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me(2)phen, neocuproine) and the antiviral agents acyclovir (acy) or penciclovir (pen), show different in vitro toxicity, the Me(2)phen complexes being appreciably more toxic than the phen complexes. To explain the different behavior, we investigated the reaction of complexes 1 and 2 with glutathione (gamma-glutamylcysteinylglycine, GSH), a peptide believed to play an important role in driving the cellular effects of platinum drugs. The reaction led to different products, the phen complexes forming a stable binuclear mu-thiol-bridged species still containing the phenanthroline and the Me(2)phen complexes releasing the neocuproine ligand and forming an insoluble material. In vitro tests confirmed that the greater cell toxicity of complex 1 is due to the displacement of the neocuproine ligand by GSH. The results highlight the great dependence of the glutathione reactivity upon relatively small changes in the platinum coordination sphere.

  3. Effect of the support properties on the preparation and performance of platinum catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvillo, L.; Gangeri, M.; Perathoner, S.; Centi, G.; Moliner, R.; Lázaro, M. J.

    Platinum nanoparticles were supported on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) for their use as electrocatalyst for PEM fuel cells. Before platinum deposition, CNFs were oxidized using concentrated HNO 3 or a HNO 3-H 2SO 4 mixture as oxidizing agents. During these treatments, new surface oxygen groups were created. Moreover, the most severe treatments resulted in the shortening of CNFs. Both effects allow to study the influence of both the morphology and the surface chemistry of CNFs on the preparation and performance of Pt electrocatalysts. Catalysts were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method. CNFs and electrocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N 2-physisorption. Furthermore, the performance of Pt/CNF based electrodes was compared with that of a commercial Pt/carbon black electrode (E-TEK) in a 1-cm 2 PEM fuel cell. The results showed that both the surface chemistry and the morphology of the support have an important effect on the dispersion, particle size and activity of Pt catalysts. An increase in the agglomeration degree of Pt particles as the severity of oxidation treatments increased was observed. However, the performance of Pt/CNF electrodes was better than that of the commercial one. This was attributed to the CNF porous structure and to the better Pt-support interaction through the surface oxygen groups of the support.

  4. A new platinum complex with tryptophan: Synthesis, structural characterization, DFT studies and biological assays in vitro over human tumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Marcos A.; Shishido, Silvia M.; Souza, Bárbara C.; de Paiva, Raphael E. F.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio C.; Formiga, André L. B.; Corbi, Pedro P.

    2014-03-01

    A new platinum(II) complex with the amino acid L-tryptophan (trp), named Pt-trp, was synthesized and characterized. Elemental, thermogravimetric and ESI-QTOF mass spectrometric analyses led to the composition [Pt(C11H11N2O2)2]ṡ6H2O. Infrared spectroscopic data indicate the coordination of trp to Pt(II) through the oxygen of the carboxylate group and also through the nitrogen atom of the amino group. The 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopic data confirm coordination through the oxygen atom of the carboxylate group, while the 15N CP/MAS NMR data confirm coordination of the nitrogen of the NH2 group to the metal. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were applied to evaluate the cis and trans coordination modes of trp to platinum(II). The trans isomer was shown to be energetically more stable than the cis one. The Pt-trp complex was evaluated as a cytotoxic agent against SK-Mel 103 (human melanoma) and Panc-1 (human pancreatic carcinoma) cell lines. The complex was shown to be cytotoxic over the considered cells.

  5. Enzyme-mimetic effects of gold@platinum nanorods on the antioxidant activity of ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Ting; He, Weiwei; Wamer, Wayne G.; Hu, Xiaona; Wu, Xiaochun; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge DPPH radicals and superoxide radicals. These results demonstrate that Au@Pt nanorods can reduce the antioxidant activity of AA. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effects of using Pt nanoparticles together with other reducing agents or antioxidants such as AA due to the oxidase-like property of Au@Pt nanorods.Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge

  6. Antitumor effects of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water are enhanced by coexistent platinum colloid and the combined hyperthermia with apoptosis-like cell death.

    PubMed

    Asada, Ryoko; Kageyama, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hisakazu; Kimura, Masatsugu; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2010-12-01

    In order to erase reactive oxygen species (ROS) related with the proliferation of tumor cells by reducing activity of hydrogen, we developed functional water containing nano-bubbles (diameters: <900 nm for 71%/population) hydrogen of 1.1-1.5 ppm (the theoretical maximum: 1.6 ppm) with a reducing ability (an oxidation-reduction potential -650 mV, normal water: +100-200 mV) using a microporous-filter hydrogen-jetting device. We showed that hydrogen water erased ROS indispensable for tumor cell growth by ESR/spin trap, the redox indicator CDCFH-DA assay, and was cytotoxic to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells as assessed by WST-8 assay, crystal violet dye stain and scanning electron microscopy, after 24-h or 48-h incubation sequent to warming at 37°C or 42°C. Hydrogen water supplemented with platinum colloid (0.3 ppm Pt in 4% polyvinylpyrrolidone) had more antitumor activity than hydrogen water alone, mineral water alone (15.6%), hydrogen water plus mineral water, or platinum colloid alone as observed by decreased cell numbers, cell shrinkage and pycnosis (nuclear condensation)/karyorrhexis (nuclear fragmentation) indicative of apoptosis, together with cell deformation and disappearance of microvilli on the membrane surface. These antitumor effects were promoted by combination with hyperthermia at 42°C. Thus, the nano-bubble hydrogen water with platinum colloid is potent as an anti-tumor agent.

  7. Antitumor effects of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water are enhanced by coexistent platinum colloid and the combined hyperthermia with apoptosis-like cell death.

    PubMed

    Asada, Ryoko; Kageyama, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hisakazu; Kimura, Masatsugu; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2010-12-01

    In order to erase reactive oxygen species (ROS) related with the proliferation of tumor cells by reducing activity of hydrogen, we developed functional water containing nano-bubbles (diameters: <900 nm for 71%/population) hydrogen of 1.1-1.5 ppm (the theoretical maximum: 1.6 ppm) with a reducing ability (an oxidation-reduction potential -650 mV, normal water: +100-200 mV) using a microporous-filter hydrogen-jetting device. We showed that hydrogen water erased ROS indispensable for tumor cell growth by ESR/spin trap, the redox indicator CDCFH-DA assay, and was cytotoxic to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells as assessed by WST-8 assay, crystal violet dye stain and scanning electron microscopy, after 24-h or 48-h incubation sequent to warming at 37°C or 42°C. Hydrogen water supplemented with platinum colloid (0.3 ppm Pt in 4% polyvinylpyrrolidone) had more antitumor activity than hydrogen water alone, mineral water alone (15.6%), hydrogen water plus mineral water, or platinum colloid alone as observed by decreased cell numbers, cell shrinkage and pycnosis (nuclear condensation)/karyorrhexis (nuclear fragmentation) indicative of apoptosis, together with cell deformation and disappearance of microvilli on the membrane surface. These antitumor effects were promoted by combination with hyperthermia at 42°C. Thus, the nano-bubble hydrogen water with platinum colloid is potent as an anti-tumor agent. PMID:21042740

  8. The preparation of well-defined dendrimer-encapsulated palladium and platinum nanoparticles and their catalytic evaluation in the oxidation of morin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ncube, Phendukani; Hlabathe, Thaane; Meijboom, Reinout

    2015-12-01

    The preparation of dendrimer-encapsulated platinum (Pt-DENs) and palladium (Pd-DENs) nanoparticles using generation 6-hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as a templating agent is described. These nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The UV-vis spectra of palladium and platinum dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles gave a clear proof that nanoparticles were formed. It was found from FTIR spectra that there are shifts of peaks from higher wave numbers to lower wave numbers after reduction with sodium borohydride and these confirm the encapsulation of nanoparticles inside the voids of the dendrimer. The particle diameters were found to be 1.4 ± 0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.2 nm in diameter for palladium and platinum respectively from HRTEM. These nanoparticles were evaluated as catalysts in the oxidation of morin by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetic data was modeled to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation. The model allows relating apparent rate constant to the total surface area (S) of the nanoparticle. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood model also allows a direct relationship between the kinetic constant (k) and Kmorin and KH2O2 . The Arrhenius and Eyring equations were used to determine thermodynamic parameters for the oxidation of morin.

  9. Activity of topotecan given intravenously for 5 days every three weeks in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer pretreated with platinum and taxanes: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Emilio Esteban; Villanueva, Noemi; Fra, Joaquin; Berros, Jose Pablo; Jimenez, Paula; Luque, María; Muñiz, Isabel; Blay, Pilar; Fernandez, Yolanda; Vieitez, José María; Muriel, Carolina; Sanmamed, Miguel; Coto, Pablo Pardo; Izquierdo, Marta; Estrada, Enrique; Lacave, Angel J

    2011-12-01

    Topotecan, a semi-synthetic camptothecin analogue with topoisomerase I interaction, has shown to be an active agent in the treatment of advanced refractory lung cancer. This paper describes the authors' experience with this drug when used as a single agent in patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) refractory to platinum- and taxane-containing chemotherapy regimens. Thirty-five patients with NSCLC refractory to previous chemotherapy and KI ≥ 60% were included in the study. Their characteristics are as follows: median age of 52 years (range 43-69) and Karnofsky PS of 70 (60-80); 27 were male and 8 were female. Twenty-one (60%) patients had adenocarcinoma; eleven (31.4%), squamous cell, and three (8.5%), undifferentiated carcinoma. There was a median of two disease sites and two prior chemotherapy regimens. Topotecan was administered at a dose of 1.25 mg/m(2) I.V. daily for 5 days, repeated every 21 days until disease progression, maximal response, or intolerable toxicity. After 73 cycles, patients received a median of 2 treatment cycles (1-9). All patients except one were considered evaluable for toxicity; eight episodes (24%) of nausea/vomiting and two episodes (6%) of grade 1-2 asthenia, respectively, were reported. Four (12%) patients developed grade 1-2 anemia and two (6%) subjects suffered grade 3 anemia. Seven (21%) patients had grade 1-2 neutropenia and one (3%) presented grade 5 neutropenia. In 33 patients evaluable for activity of the 35 subjects included in the study; one (2.8%) presented a partial response; nine (25.7%) had stable disease, and 23 (65.7%) exhibited disease progression. Median time to progression and overall survival were 54 (12-210) and 70 (12-324) days, respectively. Intravenous topotecan at that dose and administration schedule displays scant activity in terms of response rate in individuals with advanced NSCLC previously treated with platinum and taxanes. The role and usefulness of chemotherapy in this setting

  10. [Molecular targeting agents for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Nozomu

    2012-10-01

    The combination of fluoropyrimidine and platinum with or without epirubicin or docetaxel has been regarded as standard chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. Recently, trastuzumab with conventional chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor(HER)2 positive gastric cancer patients was proved to be effective in terms of survival benefit and has become one of standard treatment options. Other molecular target agents, such as HER1, HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met, fibroblast growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors were and are being evaluated in clinical trials. However, no agents other than trastuzumab have shown clear survival benefit. The predictive biomarker seems to be necessary for developing new molecular targeting agents for gastric cancer with heterogeneity.

  11. Aldehyde insertion into a platinum hydride and subsequent nucleophilic attack of the alkoxide at phosphorus: Platinum-alkoxide/phosphorus-aryl metathesis

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, P.W.N.M.; Roobeek, C.F. ); Orpen, A.G. )

    1990-08-01

    Pt(Ph{sub 2}PO)(Ph{sub 2}POH){sub 2}H (1) was treated with o-(diphenylphosphino)benzaldehyde to give a cyclic platinum alkoxide (2). The latter rearranges to the new product 3 (Scheme I), containing 1-phenyl-3H-2,1-benzoxaphosphole and a phenyl group coordinated to platinum, via a nucleophilic attack at the coordinated phosphorus center by the alkoxy group, followed by a shift of a phenyl group from phosphorus to platinum. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined.

  12. Structure and Chemistry of Nickel Oxide-Nickel Platinum-Platinum Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Judith Chun-Hsu

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that interfacial reactions can be used to modify the mechanical strength of metal-ceramic interfaces. To better understand this phenomena, the structure and chemistry of model metal-ceramic interfaces, formed by diffusion bonding single crystals of NiO and Pt together, were studied using electron microscopy techniques. Lattice imaging shows that the interface structure between NiO and Pt may facet depending on the relative twist geometry between them. As suggested by Ni-Pt phase diagrams and previous work, suitable choice of annealing temperature, time and oxygen partial pressure allows the formation of the intermetallic compound NiPt. Conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) studies reveal the presence of a 0-20 nm thick NiPt interlayer after heat treatment at low oxygen activities. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) investigations showed that the nickel diffuses into the platinum for 100nm. Some thermodynamic and kinetic information of the NiPt formation at the NiO -Pt interface, based on the CTEM and EELS studies, is presented. The influence of crystallography, impurities and oxygen activity on the interfacial reactions were investigated. In the (100)_{NiO}//(100)_ {Pt} system, a NiPt layer forms along the interface. Whereas in the (100)_{NiO }//(111)_{Pt} system, NiPt particles appear within the Pt matrix. The growth of the intermetallic interlayer is also sensitive to impurities. The presence of silicon impurities in the heat treatment furnace reduces the thickness of the NiPt interlayer by nearly a factor of ten. The NiPt interlayer may or may not form due to slight changes in the oxygen activity of the heat treatment. A simple bonding model was previously proposed to explain why NiPt improves the interfacial shear strength. That is, the NiPt layer prevents the formation of weak Pt-O bonds. In order to experimentally check this model, NiPt -NiO interface planes, produced by internal oxidation in order

  13. High specific activity platinum-195m

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-10-12

    A new composition of matter includes .sup.195m Pt characterized by a specific activity of at least 30 mCi/mg Pt, generally made by method that includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  14. Sodium Arsenite ± Hyperthermia Sensitizes p53-Expressing Human Ovarian Cancer Cells to Cisplatin by Modulating Platinum-DNA Damage Responses

    PubMed Central

    Muenyi, Clarisse S.; Pinhas, Allan R.; Fan, Teresa W.; Brock, Guy N.; Helm, C. William; States, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of gynecological cancer death in the United States. Cisplatin is a DNA damaging agent initially effective against EOC but limited by resistance. P53 plays a critical role in cellular response to DNA damage and has been implicated in EOC response to platinum chemotherapy. In this study, we examined the role of p53 status in EOC response to a novel combination of cisplatin, sodium arsenite, and hyperthermia. Human EOC cells were treated with cisplatin ± 20μM sodium arsenite at 37°C or 39°C for 1 h. Sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia sensitized wild-type p53-expressing (A2780, A2780/CP70, OVCA 420, OVCA 429, and OVCA 433) EOC cells to cisplatin. Hyperthermia sensitized p53-null SKOV-3 and p53-mutant (OVCA 432 and OVCAR-3) cells to cisplatin. P53 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection abrogated sodium arsenite sensitization effect. XPC, a critical DNA damage recognition protein in global genome repair pathway, was induced by cisplatin only in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Cotreatment with sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia attenuated cisplatin-induced XPC in wild-type p53-expressing cells. XPC siRNA transfection sensitized wild-type p53-expressing cells to cisplatin, suggesting that sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia attenuation of XPC is a mechanism by which wild-type p53-expressing cells are sensitized to cisplatin. Hyperthermia ± sodium arsenite enhanced cellular and DNA accumulation of platinum in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Only hyperthermia enhanced platinum accumulation in p53-null cells. In conclusion, sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia sensitizes wild-type p53-expressing EOC cells to cisplatin by suppressing DNA repair protein XPC and increasing cellular and DNA platinum accumulation. PMID:22331493

  15. Phase 1b safety study of farletuzumab, carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in patients with platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kenneth H.; Jelovac, Danijela; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Schwartz, Benjamin; Weil, Susan C.; Schweizer, Charles; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Farletuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to folate receptor alpha, over-expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) but largely absent in normal tissue. Previously, carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin showed superior progression-free survival and an improved therapeutic index compared with carboplatin/paclitaxel in relapsed platinum-sensitive EOC. This study assessed safety of farletuzumab/carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in women with platinum-sensitive recurrent EOC. Methods This multicenter, single-arm study enrolled patients with platinum-sensitive EOC in first or second relapse for treatment with weekly farletuzumab 2.5 mg/kg plus carboplatin AUC5–6 and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin 30 mg/m2 every 4 weeks for 6 cycles. Subsequently, maintenance with single-agent farletuzumab 2.5 mg/kg once weekly or farletuzumab 7.5 mg/kg once every three weeks continued until progression. The primary objective was to assess the safety of farletuzumab/carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. Results Fifteen patients received a median of 12.0 cycles (range, 3–26) of farletuzumab as combination therapy or maintenance, for a median of 45.0 weeks (range 9–95). Farletuzumab/carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin was generally well tolerated, with no farletuzumab-related grades 3–4 adverse events. The most commonly reported adverse events were associated with combination chemotherapy: fatigue (73.3%), nausea (46.7%), and neutropenia (40%). Ten patients had grade ≥3 adverse events, most frequently neutropenia and fatigue. No cardiac toxicity was seen. Best overall responses (RECIST) were a complete response for one patient, partial responses for 10 patients, and stable disease for four patients. Conclusions Farletuzumab plus carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in women with platinum-sensitive EOC demonstrated a safety profile consistent with that of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. PMID

  16. PLATINUM, FUEL CELLS, AND FUTURE ROAD TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A vehicle powered by a fuel cell will emit virtually no air polution and, depending on fuel choice, can substantially improve fuel economy above that of current technology. Those attributes are complementary to issues of increasing national importance including the effects of tra...

  17. Monochloramine-sensitive amperometric microelectrode: optimization of gold, platinum, and carbon fiber sensing materials for removal of dissolved oxygen interference

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amperometric monochloramine detection using newly fabricated gold, platinum, and carbon-fiber microsensors was investigated to optimize sensor operation and eliminate oxygen interference. Gold and platinum microsensors exhibited no oxygen interference during monochloramine measu...

  18. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum-copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum-copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C-C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  19. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum-copper alloys at the single-atom limit.

    PubMed

    Lucci, Felicia R; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum-copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C-C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions. PMID:26449766

  20. Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Catherine R; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2015-08-21

    The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action. Early studies on simple cobalt coordination complexes, Schiff base complexes, and cobalt-carbonyl clusters will be documented. The physiologically relevant redox properties of cobalt will be highlighted and the role this plays in the preparation of hypoxia selective prodrugs and imaging agents will be discussed. The use of cobalt-containing cobalamin as a cancer specific delivery agent for cytotoxins will also be described. The work summarised in this perspective shows that the biochemical and biophysical properties of cobalt-containing compounds can be fine-tuned to produce new generations of anticancer agents with clinically relevant efficacies.

  1. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  2. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  3. Web Search Agents: "One-Stop Shopping" for Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Explains Web search agents as tools that apply intelligent agent software technology for the purpose of automating, improving, and speeding up online search operations. Topics include intelligent desktop agents; search agent marketplace; comparing Web search agents; subjective evaluations; and use by researchers. (LRW)

  4. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future.

  5. Dramatic increase in the oxygen reduction reaction for platinum cathodes from tuning the solvent dielectric constant.

    PubMed

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Goddard, William A; Sha, Yao; Yu, Ted H; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Andreussi, Oliviero

    2014-06-23

    Hydrogen fuel cells (FC) are considered essential for a sustainable economy based on carbon-free energy sources, but a major impediment are the costs. First-principles quantum mechanics (density functional theory including solvation) is used to predict how the energies and barriers for the mechanistic steps of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over the fcc(111) platinum surface depend on the dielectric constant of the solvent. The ORR kinetics can be strongly accelerated by decreasing the effective medium polarizability from the high value it has in water. Possible ways to realize this experimentally are suggested. The calculated volcano structure for the dependence of rate on solvent polarization is considered to be general, and should be observed in other electrochemical systems.

  6. Successful Transcatheter Embolotherapy with a New Platinum Microcoil: The Berenstein Liquid Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Ha-Kawa, Sang Kil; Kariya, Hideji; Murata, Takashi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the usefulness of a new platinum microcoil, the Berenstein Liquid Coil for vascular embolization. Methods: Nine patients underwent transcatheter arterial embolization with liquid coils. The occluded vessels included the splenic artery in four patients, gastroduodenal artery in two, arteriovenous malformation or fistula in two, and middle hepatic artery in one. All coils were delivered with a saline flush through a Tracker-18 catheter. Results: All arteries except one were successfully occluded in a one-stage procedure using liquid coils. No friction was observed between the liquid coils and the microcatheter regardless of the tortuosity of the artery. Platelet counts in all patients had increased after splenic embolization. In two patients with liver tumors, perfusion to the inappropriate area during intraarterial chemotherapy was prevented by selective embolization. Life-threatening bleeding was successfully treated by gastroduodenal artery occlusion. No complications were encountered. Conclusion: The Berenstein Liquid Coil provides easy, safe, and rapid vascular occlusion.

  7. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future. PMID:27268136

  8. Evaluation of synthesized platinum nanoparticles on the MCF-7 and HepG-2 cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Abedi, Anita; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Mokhtari, Mohammad Javad; Shahmabadi, Hasan Ebrahimi; Mehrabi, Mohamad Reza; Javadian, Saifuddin; Chiani, Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    Platinum nanoparticles (PNPs) were synthesized by chemical reduction of potassium hexachloroplatinate (IV) with trisodium citrate under vigorous stirring and addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate as stabilizer reagent. Reducing agent was chosen depending on the oxidation reactions and potential values of the chemical materials used in the experiment. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of PNPs on the different cancer cell lines and cytotoxicity study of this nanomaterial. The morphology of PNPs was investigated by scanning electron microscope (XL30, Philips Electronics, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) with the ability to perform elemental analysis by EDX. Malvern Zetasizer 3000 HSA (Malvern Instruments, Worcestershire, UK) was used to determine the distribution of particle size and zeta potential of PNPs. The cytotoxicity property of the nanoparticles was evaluated by MTT assay on MCF-7 and HepG-2 cell lines, and the cytotoxic concentration 50% values were determined for 24 h.

  9. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  10. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Scarrow, R.C.; White, D.L.

    1985-11-12

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided. 4 tabs.

  11. Using Intelligent Agents To Assist Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knode, Steve; Knode, Jon-David W.

    This paper begins with background on intelligent agents (software programs built to perform certain specific tasks for the user). A taxonomy that categorizes intelligent agents by the degree of intelligence embedded in the software is presented. Applications of today's intelligent agents are discussed, including specific examples of the following:…

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, HVLP COATING EQUIPMENT, SHARPE MANUFACTURING COMPANY PLATINUM 2012 HVLP SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the verification test of the Sharpe Platinum 2013 high-volume, low-pressure gravity-feed spray gun, hereafter referred to as the Sharpe Platinum, which is designed for use in automotive refinishing. The test coating chosen by Sharpe Manufacturi...

  13. Annexin A4 induces platinum resistance in a chloride-and calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Akiko; Serada, Satoshi; Enomoto, Takayuki; Kim, Ayako; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Yutaka; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Masami; Fujimoto, Minoru; Kimura, Tadashi; Naka, Tetsuji

    2014-09-15

    Platinum resistance has long been a major issue in the treatment of various cancers. We previously reported that enhanced annexin A4 (ANXA4) expression, a Ca2+-regulated phospholipid-binding protein, induces chemoresistance to platinum-based drugs. In this study, we investigated the role of annexin repeats, a conserved structure of all the annexin family, responsible for platinum-resistance as well as the effect of knockdown of ANXA4. ANXA4 knockdown increased sensitivity to platinum-based drugs both in vitro and in vivo. To identify the domain responsible for chemoresistance, ANXA4 deletion mutants were constructed by deleting annexin repeats one by one from the C terminus. Platinum resistance was induced both in vitro and in vivo in cells expressing either full-length ANXA4 or the deletion mutants, containing at least one intact annexin repeat. However, cells expressing the mutant without any calcium-binding sites in the annexin repeated sequence, which is essential for ANXA4 translocation from the cytosol to plasma membrane, failed to acquire platinum resistance. After cisplatin treatment, the intracellular chloride ion concentration, whose channel is partly regulated by ANXA4, significantly increased in the platinum-resistant cells. These findings indicate that the calcium-binding site in the annexin repeat induces chemoresistance to the platinum-based drug by elevating the intracellular chloride concentration.

  14. Emerging treatment strategies in recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer: focus on trabectedin.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Andrés; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Romero, Ignacio; Lopez-Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Colombo, Nicoletta

    2014-04-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. In spite of high response rates to the standard front-line treatment for advanced disease with cytoreductive surgical debulking, followed by platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy, most patients eventually relapse developing drug-resistant disease. Owing to the molecular heterogeneity, genetic instability and mutagenicity of OC, increases in survival might be achieved by translating recent insights at the morpho-molecular levels to individual therapeutic strategies. Several emerging treatments have been shown to be active in platinum-sensitive (PS) recurrent OC (ROC), but an optimal strategy still has not been established. Based on the recent results, it is likely that the introduction of novel non-platinum based chemotherapies and molecular targeted therapies will have a major impact on the management of ROC. Some current strategies are focused on the extension of platinum-free interval (PFI) in patients with PS, particularly in those with partially PS disease. Apparently, the PFI extension by an effective non-platinum intervention, such as trabectedin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), may reduce cumulative platinum-induced toxicities leading to longer survival after the reintroduction of subsequent platinum. The introduction of novel therapies, such as the antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, opens a new field of targeted therapies in this indication. In this review, we aim to outline the therapeutic potential of new emerging approaches, particularly the role of non-platinum therapy with trabectedin in combination with PLD in patients with PS ROC.

  15. 76 FR 67793 - Notification of Expanded Pricing Grid for Precious Metals Products Containing Platinum and Gold...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... and Gold--Excluding Commemorative Gold Coins AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury..., 2009, outlining the new pricing methodology for numismatic products containing platinum and gold. Since that time, the price of platinum and gold has increased considerably, and is approaching the...

  16. 78 FR 11954 - Revised Pricing Grid for Gold and Platinum Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Revised Pricing Grid for Gold and Platinum Products AGENCY: United States Mint... grid for 2013 gold and platinum products. Please see the grid following signature. DATES: This...

  17. Preparing Change Agents for Change Agent Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, James R.

    Seventy-seven Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking agricultural change agents from developing Central and South American countries responded to a questionnaire which sought perceptions of the roles in which the change agents felt they were involved and the roles for which they felt they were being trained. The agents were participating in training…

  18. Rumpling phenomenon in platinum modified Ni-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Benjamin Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Surface undulations known as rumpling have been shown to develop at the surface of bond coats used in advanced thermal barrier coating systems. Rumpling can result in cracking and eventual spallation of the top coat. Many mechanisms to explain rumpling have been proposed, and among them is a martensitic transformation. High-temperature x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and potentiometry were used to investigate the nature of the martensitic transformation in bulk platinum-modified nickel aluminides. It was found that the martensitic transformation has strong time dependence and can form over a range of temperatures. Cyclic oxidation experiments were performed on the bulk alloys to investigate the effect of the martensitic transformation on surface rumpling. It was found that the occurrence of rumpling was associated with the martensitic transformation. The degree of rumpling was found to increase with an increasing number of cycles and was independent of the heating and cooling rates used. The thickness of the oxide layer at the surface of the samples had a significant impact on the amplitude of the resulting undulations, with amplitude increasing with increasing oxide-layer thickness. Rumpling was also observed in an alloy based on the γ-γ' region of the nickel-aluminum-platinum phase diagram. Rumpling in this alloy was found to occur during isothermal oxidation and is associated with a subsurface layer containing a platinum-rich phase known as a. Rumpling in both alloy systems may be explained by creep deformation of a weakened subsurface layer in response to the compressive stresses in the thermally grown oxide layer.

  19. Ligand modulation of a dinuclear platinum compound leads to mechanistic differences in cell cycle progression and arrest

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vijay R.; Peterson, Erica J.; Valerie, Kristoffer; Farrell, Nicholas P.; Povirk, Lawrence F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite similar structures and DNA binding profiles, two recently synthesized dinuclear platinum compounds are shown to elicit highly divergent effects on cell cycle progression. In colorectal HCT116 cells, BBR3610 shows a classical G2/M arrest with initial accumulation in S phase, but the derivative compound BBR3610-DACH, formed by introduction of the 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH) as carrier ligand, results in severe G1/S as well as G2/M phase arrest, with nearly complete S phase depletion. The origin of this unique effect was studied. Cellular interstrand crosslinking as assayed by comet analysis was similar for both compounds, confirming previous in vitro results obtained on plasmid DNA. Immunoblotting revealed a stabilization of p53 and concomitant transient increases in p21 and p27 proteins after treatment with BBR3610-DACH. Cell viability assays and cytometric analysis of p53 and p21 null cells indicated that BBR3610-DACH-induced cell cycle arrest was p21-dependent and partially p53-dependent. However, an increase in the levels of cyclin E was observed with steady state levels of CDK2 and Cdc25A, suggesting that the G1 block occurs downstream of CDK/cyclin complex formation. The G2/M block was corroborated with decreased levels of cyclin A and cyclin B1. Surprisingly, BBR3610-DACH-induced G1 block was independent of ATM and ATR. Finally, both compounds induced apoptosis, with BBR3610-DACH showing a robust PARP-1 cleavage that was not associated with caspase-3/7 cleavage. In summary, BBR3610-DACH is a DNA binding platinum agent with unique inhibitory effects on cell cycle progression that could be further developed as a chemotherapeutic agent complementary to cisplatin and oxaliplatin. PMID:24161784

  20. Chemotherapeutic agents for GI tumor chemoradiotherapy overview of chemotherapeutic agents to be combined with radiotherapy in the GI tract and their potential as radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Klautke, G; Müller, K

    2016-08-01

    In the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors, simultaneous radiochemotherapy plays an important role. It is one of the principles of simultaneous radiochemotherapy, applying only chemotherapeutic agents simultaneously to radiation, which are primarily effective in the treated tumor entity, therefore a lot of different agents, like antimetabolites, mostly 5-fluorouracil, platinum derivates (mostly cisplatinum and oxaliplatin), mitomycin C and taxanes are used in simultaneous radiochemotherapy. Most of these have also radiation-intensifying effects. The mechanisms and interactions with ionizing radiation are presented in the article. PMID:27644902

  1. Controlling the Growth and Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanoparticles Using Peptide and Polymer Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Lauren Marie

    Heterogeneous catalysts have widespread industrial applications. Platinum nanomaterials in particular, due to their particularly high electrocatalytic activity and durability, are used to catalyze a wide variety of reactions, including oxygen reduction, which is frequently used as the cathode reaction in fuel cells. As platinum is a very expensive material, a high priority in fuel cell research is the exploration of less expensive, more efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We demonstrate here the use of phage display to identify peptides that bind to Pt (100) which were then used to synthesize platinum cubes in solution. However, while the peptides were able to control particle growth, the bio-synthesized Pt particles showed extremely poor activity when tested for ORR. This could be attributed to peptide coverage on the surface or strong interactions between particular amino acids and the metal that are detrimental for catalysis. To investigate this further, we decided to investigate the role of individual amino acids on Pt nanocrystal synthesis and catalysis. For this, we conjugated the R-groups of single amino acids to polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains. Through this work we have determined that the identity of the amino acid R-group is important in both the synthesis and the catalytic activity of the particles. For Pt nanoparticle synthesis, we found that the hydrophobicity of the functional groups affected their ability to interact well with the particles during nucleation and growth, and thus only the hydrophilic functional groups were capable of mediating the synthesis to produce well-defined faceted particles. With respect to ORR, we found distinct trends that showed that the inclusion of certain amino acids could significantly enhance catalysis---even at high polymer loadings. This work presents evidence that counters the common conception that organic capping ligands decrease catalytic activity; in fact activity may actually be

  2. Shape coexistence and phase transitions in the platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Irving O.; Frank, Alejandro; Vargas, Carlos E.; Isacker, P. Van

    2008-08-15

    The matrix coherent-state approach of the interacting boson model with configuration mixing is used to study the geometry of the platinum isotopes. With a parameter set determined in previous studies, it is found that the absolute minimum of the potential for the Pt isotopes evolves from spherical to oblate and finally to prolate shapes when the neutron number decreases from N=126 (semi-magic) to N=104 (mid-shell). Shape coexistence is found in the isotopes {sup 182,184,186,188}Pt. A phase diagram is constructed that shows the coexistence region as a function of the number of bosons and the strength of the mixing parameter.

  3. Adriamycin and cis-platinum in advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    de Gramont, A; Drolet, Y; Lavoie, A; Painchaud, M; Blouin, R; Tessier, C; Ouellet, P

    1985-06-01

    Forty-eight patients with stage III and IV ovarian epithelial carcinoma were treated with single doses of adriamycin (ADM) 50 mg/m2 and cis-platinum (DDP) 50 mg/m2 every month for nine courses. The pathologically proven response rate was 52.2%, with 22.7% complete response and 29.5% partial response. Median survival was 22 months for all patients, 25 months in stage III and 15 months in stage IV. This study confirms that ADM-DDP is a valuable drug regimen in advanced ovarian carcinoma but further progress is needed to improve the cure rate, which remains low.

  4. Separation of platinum group metal ions by Donnan dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brajter, K.; Slonawska, K.; Cox, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    Separations of metal ions on the basis of Donnan dialysis across anion-exchange membranes should be possible if the receiver electrolyte composition favors the formation of selected anionic complexes of the sample metal ions. Moreover, such a separation has the possibility of being better suited from some applications than batch or column experiments with anion-exchange resins. The above hypothesis are tested on the platinum-group metal ions, Pt(IV), Rh(III), Pd(II), Ir(III), and Ir(IV). 13 references, 4 tables.

  5. Platinum solder core wire: Development and industrial implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, R. J.; Koursaris, A.

    1996-06-01

    Jewelry neck chain is joined by age-old techniques, the most popular being the rather involved solder powder method. The solder core method of chain manufacture is a simpler process and offers the possibility of higher productivity. Neat narrow joints are formed, and a color match between the solder and parent alloy may be approached. This is particularly important in the case of platinum alloys that have a high melting point, necessitating the use of solders with compositions substantially different from those of the parent alloy. The solder core method also lends itself to the possibility of higher levels of automation.

  6. Pretreatment of Platinum/Tin Oxide-Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.; Paulin, Patricia A.; Miller, Irvin M.; Schryer, David R.; Sidney, Barry D.; Wood, George M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Addition of CO to He pretreatment doubles catalytic activity. In sealed, high-energy, pulsed CO2 laser, CO and O2 form as decomposition products of CO2 in laser discharge zone. Products must be recombined, because oxygen concentration of more than few tenths of percent causes rapid deterioration of power, ending in unstable operation. Promising low-temperature catalyst for combining CO and O2 is platinum on tin oxide. New development increases activity of catalyst so less needed for recombination process.

  7. Extraterrestrial platinum group nuggets in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Bates, B. A.; Wheelock, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    A previously unrecognized property of iron cosmic spheres is reported. The most common spheres larger than 300 microns do not, in fact, contain FeNi metal cores, but instead contain a micrometer-sized nugget composed almost entirely of platinum group elements. These elements appear to have been concentrated by the oxidation of molten meteoritic metal during atmospheric entry. This process is critically dependent on the relative abundance of oxygen in the atmosphere, and the first appearance of the nuggets in the geological record may provide a marker indicating when the oxygen abundance attained half of its present level.

  8. Platinum/Tin Oxide/Silica Gel Catalyst Oxidizes CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Davis, Patricia P.; Schryer, David R.; Miller, Irvin M.; Brown, David; Van Norman, John D.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1991-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst of platinum, tin oxide, and silica gel combines small concentrations of laser dissociation products, CO and O2, to form CO22 during long times at ambient temperature. Developed as means to prevent accumulation of these products in sealed CO2 lasers. Effective at ambient operating temperatures and installs directly in laser envelope. Formulated to have very high surface area and to chemisorb controlled quantities of moisture: chemisorbed water contained within and upon its structure, makes it highly active and very longlived so only small quantity needed for long times.

  9. Oxidation-reduction induced roughening of platinum (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    You, H.; Nagy, Z.

    1993-06-01

    Platinum (111) single crystal surface was roughened by repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction to study dynamic evolution of surface roughening. The interface roughens progressively upon repeated cycles. The measured width of the interface was fit to an assumed pow law, W {approximately}t{sup {beta}}, with {beta} = 0.38(1). The results are compared with a simulation based on a random growth model. The fraction of the singly stepped surface apparently saturates to 0. 25 monolayer, which explains the apparent saturation to a steady roughness observed in previous studies.

  10. Bulk synthesis of nanoporous palladium and platinum powders

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, David B.; Fares, Stephen J.; Tran, Kim L.; Langham, Mary E.

    2012-04-17

    Disclosed is a method for providing nanoporous palladium and platinum powders. These materials were synthesized on milligram to gram scales by chemical reduction of tetrahalo-complexes with ascorbate in a concentrated aqueous surfactant at temperatures between -20.degree. C. and 30.degree. C. The prepared particles have diameters of approximately 50 nm, wherein each particle is perforated by pores having diameters of approximately 3 nm, as determined by electron tomography. These materials are of potential value for hydrogen and electrical charge storage applications.

  11. Bulk synthesis of nanoporous palladium and platinum powders

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, David B; Fares, Stephen J; Tran, Kim L; Langham, Mary E

    2014-04-15

    Disclosed is a method for providing nanoporous palladium and platinum powders. These materials were synthesized on milligram to gram scales by chemical reduction of tetrahalo-complexes with ascorbate in a concentrated aqueous surfactant at temperatures between -20.degree. C. and 30.degree. C. The prepared particles have diameters of approximately 50 nm, wherein each particle is perforated by pores having diameters of approximately 3 nm, as determined by electron tomography. These materials are of potential value for hydrogen and electrical charge storage applications.

  12. Electrokinetic effects in catalytic platinum-insulator Janus swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbens, S.; Gregory, D. A.; Dunderdale, G.; Howse, J. R.; Ibrahim, Y.; Liverpool, T. B.; Golestanian, R.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of added salt on the propulsion of Janus platinum-polystyrene colloids in hydrogen peroxide solution is studied experimentally. It is found that micromolar quantities of potassium and silver nitrate salts reduce the swimming velocity by similar amounts, while leading to significantly different effects on the overall rate of catalytic breakdown of hydrogen peroxide. It is argued that the seemingly paradoxical experimental observations could be theoretically explained by using a generalised reaction scheme that involves charged intermediates and has the topology of two nested loops.

  13. Finding Platinum-Coating Gaps On Titanium Anodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodemeijer, Ronnald; Flowers, Cecil E.

    1990-01-01

    Simple procedure makes gaps visible to eye. New gap-detection method consists of plating thin layer of non-silver-colored metal like copper or gold on anode. Contrast in color between plated metal and bare anode material makes gaps stand out. If anode passes inspection, copper or gold plate removable by reversal of test-plating current. Remains to be determined whether test plating and removal damages anode. New method simpler and more economical than previous attempts to identify gaps in platinum.

  14. Platinum electrodeposition at unsupported electrochemically reduced nanographene oxide for enhanced ammonia oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cunci, Lisandro; Velez, Carlos A; Perez, Ivan; Suleiman, Amal; Larios, Eduardo; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Watkins, James J; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2014-02-12

    The electrochemical reduction of highly oxidized unsupported graphene oxide nanosheets and its platinum electrodeposition was done by the rotating disk slurry electrode technique. Avoiding the use of a solid electrode, graphene oxide was electrochemically reduced in a slurry solution with a scalable process without the use of a reducing agent. Graphene oxide nanosheets were synthesized from carbon platelet nanofibers to obtain highly hydrophilic layers of less than 250 nm in width. The graphene oxide and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide/Pt (erGOx/Pt) hybrid materials were characterized through different spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. Pt nanoparticles with 100 facets, clusters, and atoms at erGOx were identified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the electrocatalytic activity of the highly dispersed erGOx/Pt hybrid material toward the oxidation of ammonia, which showed a 5-fold current density increase when compared with commercially available Vulcan/Pt 20%. This is in agreement with having Pt (100) facets present in the HRTEM images of the erGOx/Pt material.

  15. Celecoxib enhances [sorafenib + sildenafil] lethality in cancer cells and reverts platinum chemotherapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Webb, Timothy; Carter, Jori; Roberts, Jane L; Poklepovic, Andrew; McGuire, William P; Booth, Laurence; Dent, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The present studies sought to determine whether the lethality of the drug combination [sorafenib + sildenafil] could be enhanced by the anti-inflammatory agent celecoxib, using ovarian cancer and other tumor cell lines as models. Also, in a dose dependent fashion celecoxib enhanced [sorafenib + sildenafil] lethality in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. In a dose dependent fashion celecoxib enhanced the ability of [sorafenib + sildenafil] to reduce expression of multiple chaperone proteins in parallel with lower levels of the drug efflux pumps ABCB1 and ABCG2. Over-expression of GRP78 and HSP27 maintained pump expression in the presence of drugs. Cell killing by the 3 drug combination was mediated by mitochondrial / caspase 9 -dependent apoptotic signaling and by RIP-1 / caspases 2 and 4 / AIF -dependent necroptotic signaling. Pre-treatment of intrinsically resistant primary ovarian cancer cells with [celecoxib + sorafenib + sildenafil] significantly enhanced tumor cell killing by a subsequent cisplatin exposure. Similar data were obtained in some cancer cell lines, but not all, using the related platinum containing drugs, oxaliplatin and carboplatin. As our prior publications have also validated in vivo the combinations of [celecoxib + sildenafil] and [sorafenib + sildenafil] as cytotoxic to multiple tumor cell types, combined with the present findings, we would argue that the combination of celecoxib/sorafenib/sildenafil should be explored in a new phase I trial in ovarian cancer. PMID:26417912

  16. Size Characterization of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticles by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Navin, Jason K.; Grass, Michael E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Marsh, Anderson L.

    2009-08-15

    In this work, matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been utilized to characterize colloidal platinum nanoparticles synthesized in the 1-4 nm size range. The nanoparticles were prepared via a solution-based method in which the size could be controlled by varying reaction conditions, such as the alcohol used as the reductant. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone), or PVP, (MW = 29,000 g/mol) was employed as a capping agent to stabilize the synthesized nanoparticles in solution. A model for determining the size of the metallic nanoparticle core from MALDI-TOF mass spectra has been developed and verified through correlation with particle sizes from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In this model it was assumed that 1.85 nm nanoparticles are capped by one PVP chain, which was verified through experiments performed with capped and uncapped nanoparticles. Larger nanoparticles are capped by either two (2.60 and 2.94 nm) or three (3.69 nm) PVP chains. These findings clearly indicate the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS as a technique for fully characterizing nanoscale materials in order to elucidate structure-property relationships.

  17. Polymeric micelles loaded with platinum anticancer drugs target preangiogenic micrometastatic niches associated with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hailiang; Cabral, Horacio; Toh, Kazuko; Mi, Peng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Matsumoto, Yu; Yamada, Naoki; Liu, Xueying; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Miura, Yutaka; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-09-10

    Nanocarriers have been used for specific delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors based on the enhanced permeability and retention in cancerous tissues. Despite metastasis is the main reason of cancer-related death and a priority for nanocarrier-based therapies, the targeting ability of nanocarriers to the metastatic disease is poorly understood, especially for preangiogenic micrometastases as nanocarriers usually use the malignant neovasculature for enhancing their accumulation. Thus, herein, we studied the ability of micellar nanocarriers incorporating (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt) for treating liver metastases of bioluminescent murine colon adenocarcinoma C-26, during overt and preangiogenic metastatic stages. After intravenous injection, DACHPt-loaded micelles (DACHPt/m) effectively inhibited the tumor growth in both metastatic tumor models. While the anticancer activity of the micelles against overt metastases was associated with their selective accumulation in cancerous tissues having neovasculature, the ability of DACHPt/m to target preangiogenic metastases was correlated with the inflammatory microenvironment of the niche. This targeting capability of polymeric micelles to preangiogenic metastasis may provide a novel approach for early diagnosis and treatment of metastases. PMID:24956488

  18. Aged nano-structured platinum based catalyst: effect of chemical treatment on adsorption and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Shim, Wang Geun; Nahm, Seung Won; Park, Hyuk Ryeol; Yun, Hyung Sun; Seo, Seong Gyu; Kim, Sang Chai

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effect of chemical treatment on the adsorption and catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum based catalyst, the aged commercial Pt/AC catalyst was pretreated with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a cleaning agent (Hexane). Several reliable methods such as nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were employed to characterize the aged Pt/AC catalyst and its chemically pretreated Pt/AC catalysts. The catalytic and adsorption activities of nano-structured heterogeneous Pt/AC catalyst were investigated on the basis of toluene oxidation and adsorption isotherm data. In addition, the adsorption isotherms of toluene were used to calculate the adsorption energy distribution functions for the parent catalyst and its pre-treated nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts. It was found that sulfuric acid aqueous treatment can enhance the catalytic performance of aged Pt/AC catalyst toward catalytic oxidation of toluene. It was also shown that a comparative analysis of the energy distribution functions for nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts as well as the pore size distribution provides valuable information about their structural and energetic heterogeneity.

  19. Platinum Electrodeposition at Unsupported Electrochemically Reduced Nanographene Oxide for Enhanced Ammonia Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of highly oxidized unsupported graphene oxide nanosheets and its platinum electrodeposition was done by the rotating disk slurry electrode technique. Avoiding the use of a solid electrode, graphene oxide was electrochemically reduced in a slurry solution with a scalable process without the use of a reducing agent. Graphene oxide nanosheets were synthesized from carbon platelet nanofibers to obtain highly hydrophilic layers of less than 250 nm in width. The graphene oxide and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide/Pt (erGOx/Pt) hybrid materials were characterized through different spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. Pt nanoparticles with 100 facets, clusters, and atoms at erGOx were identified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the electrocatalytic activity of the highly dispersed erGOx/Pt hybrid material toward the oxidation of ammonia, which showed a 5-fold current density increase when compared with commercially available Vulcan/Pt 20%. This is in agreement with having Pt (100) facets present in the HRTEM images of the erGOx/Pt material. PMID:24417177

  20. [Research progress of the drug delivery system of antitumor platinum drugs with macrocyclic compounds].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuan-zhu; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Ji; Fei, Fan; Wang, Tian-shuai; Yang, Bo; Dong, Peng; Zhang, Ying-jie

    2015-06-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs have been becoming one of the most effective drugs for clinical treatment of malignant tumors for its unique mechanism of action and broad range of anticancer spectrum. But, there are still several problems such as side effects, drug resistance/cross resistance and no-specific targeting, becoming obstacles to restrict its expanding of clinical application. In recent years, supramolecular chemistry drug delivery systems have been gradually concerned for their favorable safety and low toxicity. Supramolecular macrocycles-platinum complexes increased the water solubility, stability and safety of traditional platinum drugs, and have become hot focus of developing novel platinum-based anticancer drugs because of its potential targeting of tumor tissues/organs. This article concentrates in the research progress of the new drug delivery system between platinum-based anticancer drugs with three generations of macrocycles: crown ether, cyclodextrin, cucurbituril and calixarene. PMID:26521433