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Sample records for agents including ultraviolet

  1. Light, Including Ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Bowen, Michael P.; Correa, Genevieve; Ono, Yoko; Goodarzi, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is intricately linked to the functional status of the cutaneous immune system. In susceptible individuals, UV radiation can ignite pathogenic inflammatory pathways leading to allergy or autoimmunity. In others, this same UV radiation can be used as a phototherapy to suppress pathogenic cutaneous immune responses. These vastly different properties are a direct result of UV light’s ability to ionize molecules in the skin and thereby chemically alter them. Sometimes these UV-induced chemical reactions are essential, the formation of pre-vitamin D3 from 7-dehydrocholesterol, for example. In other instances they can be potentially detrimental. UV radiation can ionize a cell’s DNA causing adjacent pyrimidine bases to chemically bond to each other. To prevent malignant transformation, a cell may respond to this UV-induced DNA damage by undergoing apoptosis. Although this pathway prevents skin cancer it also has the potential of inducing or exacerbating autoreactive immune responses by exposing the cell’s nuclear antigens. Ultaviolet-induced chemical reactions can activate the immune system by a variety of other mechanisms as well. In response to UV irradiation keratinocytes secrete cytokines and chemokines, which activate and recruit leukocytes to the skin. In some individuals UV-induced chemical reactions can synthesize novel antigens resulting in a photoallergy. Alternatively, photosensitizing molecules can damage cells by initiating sunburn-like phototoxic reactions. Herein we review all types of UV-induced skin reactions, especially those involving the immune system. PMID:20018479

  2. Future ultraviolet experiments, including FUSE/COLUMBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1984-01-01

    Several new facilities for ultraviolet astronomy are under construction or study for launch within the coming decade. These include the Hubble Space Telescope to be launched in 1986 with instruments for spectroscopy, imaging, and photopolarimetry in the ultraviolet; the ASTRO Spacelab payload, also to be launched in 1986 with a similar range of instrumentation; STARLAB, a combined Canadian, Australian and U.S. mission concentrating primarily on imagery; and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which was renamed COLUMBUS. COLUMBUS is currently under study by NASA and ESA as a future joint mission for spectroscopic studies of astrophysical plasmas covering a temperature range from approximately 10 to the 3rd power to approximately 10 to the 7th power k. In order to achieve this objective, the optics should be optimized for wavelengths below 1200 Angstroms, with a total wavelength range from approximately 2000 to approximately 100 Angstroms. The operational concept will be based on experience with IUE, but changes in communications techniques since IUE was designed suggest some interesting new approaches to observing.

  3. Ultraviolet Raman scattering from persistent chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Wästerby, Pär.; Landström, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Laser induced Raman scattering at excitation wavelengths in the middle ultraviolet was examined using a pulsed tunable laser based spectrometer system. Droplets of chemical warfare agents, with a volume of 2 μl, were placed on a silicon surface and irradiated with sequences of laser pulses. The Raman scattering from V-series nerve agents, Tabun (GA) and Mustard gas (HD) was studied with the aim of finding the optimum parameters and the requirements for a detection system. A particular emphasis was put on V-agents that have been previously shown to yield relatively weak Raman scattering in this excitation band.

  4. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for... Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. (a) Agents....

  5. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  6. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of...

  7. The 1997 North American Interagency Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Spectroradiometers Including Narrowband Filter Radiometers.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Kathleen; Disterhoft, Patrick; Early, Edward; Thompson, Ambler; DeLuisi, John; Berndt, Jerry; Harrison, Lee; Kiedron, Peter; Ehramjian, James; Bernhard, Germar; Cabasug, Lauriana; Robertson, James; Mou, Wanfeng; Taylor, Thomas; Slusser, James; Bigelow, David; Durham, Bill; Janson, George; Hayes, Douglass; Beaubien, Mark; Beaubien, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The fourth North American Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Monitoring Spectroradiometers was held September 15 to 25, 1997 at Table Mountain outside of Boulder, Colorado, USA. Concern over stratospheric ozone depletion has prompted several government agencies in North America to establish networks of spectroradiometers for monitoring solar ultraviolet irradiance at the surface of the Earth. The main purpose of the Intercomparison was to assess the ability of spectroradiometers to accurately measure solar ultraviolet irradiance, and to compare the results between instruments of different monitoring networks. This Intercomparison was coordinated by NIST and NOAA, and included participants from the ASRC, EPA, NIST, NSF, SERC, USDA, and YES. The UV measuring instruments included scanning spectroradiometers, spectrographs, narrow band multi-filter radiometers, and broadband radiometers. Instruments were characterized for wavelength accuracy, bandwidth, stray-light rejection, and spectral irradiance responsivity. The spectral irradiance responsivity was determined two to three times outdoors to assess temporal stability. Synchronized spectral scans of the solar irradiance were performed over several days. Using the spectral irradiance responsivities determined with the NIST traceable standard lamp, and a simple convolution technique with a Gaussian slit-scattering function to account for the different bandwidths of the instruments, the measured solar irradiance from the spectroradiometers excluding the filter radiometers at 16.5 h UTC had a relative standard deviation of ±4 % for wavelengths greater than 305 nm. The relative standard deviation for the solar irradiance at 16.5 h UTC including the filter radiometer was ±4 % for filter functions above 300 nm.

  8. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of agents... to: (i) Establish performance criteria for Poolers. (ii) Monitor and evaluate the financial...

  9. Stabilization and control of the International Ultraviolet Explorer including a summary of flight performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. V.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the International Ultraviolet Explorer Mission sequence, spacecraft equipment, and control laws. Flight data from the precision control modes are presented, to illustrate the performance achieved; the subarc second pointing at sources for 60 min periods is accomplished routinely. Two modes of precision control are available: one is of a bright guide star which is in the vicinity of the target source, so that the guidance mode includes a star tracker for position information and a gyro system for rate damping. When a guide star is not available, precision hold is accomplished solely on a well trimmed gyro reference with low frequency updates from a dim source. The three axis maneuvers, the maneuver angle, and the gyro data used are discussed, concluding that these data used in conjunction with star tracker data provide a good source of information for orbital performance evaluation.

  10. Ultraviolet Raman spectra and cross-sections of the G-series nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Christesen, Steven D; Pendell Jones, Jay; Lochner, Joseph M; Hyre, Aaron M

    2008-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy is being applied to the detection of chemical agent contamination of natural and man-made surfaces. In support of these efforts, we have measured the UV Raman signatures of the G-series nerve agents GA (tabun), GB (sarin), GD (soman), GF (cyclosarin), and the agent simulant diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) at 248 nm and 262 nm, as well as taking their UV Raman and UV absorption cross-sections. Of these chemicals, only GA exhibits any significant pre-resonance enhancement. We also show that reduction of the excitation wavelength from 262 nm to 248 nm effectively shifts the Raman spectrum away from a substantial sample fluorescence background, implying a significant improvement in detection capability. PMID:18926015

  11. A novel in vivo model for evaluating agents that protect against ultraviolet A-induced photoaging.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Uitto, J; Bernstein, E F

    1998-04-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that ultraviolet A radiation (UVA) contributes to photoaging, which results in the accumulation of massive amounts of abnormal elastic material in the dermis of photoaged skin. To study UVA-induced photoaging in an in vivo system, we utilized a line of transgenic mice containing the human elastin promoter linked to a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene. Our prior work demonstrates promoter activation in response to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB), UVA, and psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation in the skin of these mice. The addition of psoralen (8-MOP) prior to administration of UVA results in substantial increases in promoter activation, as compared with UVA alone. To demonstrate the utility of these mice as a model of UVA-induced photodamage, we administered four lotions to the skin of our transgenic mice that included: a sunscreen containing octyl methoxycinnamate and benzophenone-3 with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15, the UVA filter butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane, the SPF 15 sunscreen and the UVA filter together, and the lotion vehicle alone. Following sunscreen administration, mice received a single psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation treatment. All sunscreens decreased chloramphenicol acetyl transferase activity with the SPF 15 sunscreen, the UVA filter, and the combination SPF 15 sunscreen and UVA filter, resulting in increasing degrees of protection against psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation. These results demonstrate that this model functions as a rapid and sensitive model of UVA photodamage for the identification and comparison of compounds that protect against UVA-induced photoaging.

  12. Fine Forecasts: Encouraging the Media to Include Ultraviolet Radiation Information in Summertime Weather Forecasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, R.; Reeder, A. I.; Bulliard, J.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Melanoma and skin cancer are largely attributable to over-exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Reports of UVR levels within media weather forecasts appear to be well received by the public and have good potential to communicate the need for appropriate sun protection to a broad audience. This study describes provision of UVR messages by…

  13. Determination of seven sunscreen agents and two ultraviolet stabilizers in skin care products using ultra-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gowell, Aimee; Habel, John; Weiss, Caryn; Parkanzky, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a well-known environmental carcinogen. Protection against UVR exposure has resulted in an increasing number of sunscreen agents being incorporated into a greater variety of cosmetic formulations including moisturizing lotions, color cosmetics, and skin care creams. Meanwhile, global regulation of sun care products is changing. New guidelines for sunscreen efficacy have resulted in a shift in product formulation that requires sunscreen products to provide broad spectrum UV protection. Since not all sunscreen ingredients protect against both UVA and UVB radiation, most sun care products require a combination of sunscreen agents. This article describes a new method for simultaneous separation and quantitation of seven organic sunscreens and two UV stabilizers using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. This method is capable of resolving all nine analytes, and has been validated for selectivity, precision, and accuracy. Because of the use of core-shell column technology, the separation is also achieved at back pressures compatible with conventional high-performance liquid chromatography instrumentation.

  14. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  15. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  16. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  17. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  18. Measurements of Raman scattering in the middle ultraviolet band from persistent chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Landström, Lars; Lundén, Hampus; Mohammed, Abdesalam; Olofsson, Göran; Wästerby, Pär.

    2014-05-01

    The very low Raman scattering cross section and the fluorescence background limit the measuring range of Raman based instruments operating in the visible or infrared band. We are exploring if laser excitation in the middle ultraviolet (UV) band between 200 and 300 nm is useful and advantageous for detection of persistent chemical warfare agents (CWA) on various kinds of surfaces. The UV Raman scattering from tabun, mustard gas, VX and relevant simulants in the form of liquid surface contaminations has been measured using a laboratory experimental setup with a short standoff distance around 1 meter. Droplets having a volume of 1 μl were irradiated with a tunable pulsed laser swept within the middle UV band. A general trend is that the signal strength moves through an optimum when the laser excitation wavelength is swept between 240 and 300 nm. The signal from tabun reaches a maximum around 265 nm, the signal from mustard gas around 275 nm. The Raman signal from VX is comparably weak. Raman imaging by the use of a narrow bandpass UV filter is also demonstrated.

  19. Evaluation and study of advanced optical contamination, deposition, measurement, and removal techniques. [including computer programs and ultraviolet reflection analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linford, R. M. F.; Allen, T. H.; Dillow, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program is described to design, fabricate and install an experimental work chamber assembly (WCA) to provide a wide range of experimental capability. The WCA incorporates several techniques for studying the kinetics of contaminant films and their effect on optical surfaces. It incorporates the capability for depositing both optical and contaminant films on temperature-controlled samples, and for in-situ measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet reflectance. Ellipsometer optics are mounted on the chamber for film thickness determinations, and other features include access ports for radiation sources and instrumentation. Several supporting studies were conducted to define specific chamber requirements, to determine the sensitivity of the measurement techniques to be incorporated in the chamber, and to establish procedures for handling samples prior to their installation in the chamber. A bibliography and literature survey of contamination-related articles is included.

  20. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  1. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  2. The sensitization of near-ultraviolet radiation killing of mammalian cells by the sunscreen agent para-aminobenzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Osgood, P.J.; Moss, S.H.; Davies, D.J.

    1982-12-01

    The wavelengths of sunlight considered to be responsible for erythema and skin cancer formation are in the range 290-340 nm. Formulated sunscreens usually contain an agent that absorbs in this wavelength region, and one of the most widely used is para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). Previous work has demonstrated the sensitization by PABA of the lethal and mutagenic effects of near-ultraviolet (UV) radiation in a model bacterial system. Experiments with the mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell line have now demonstrated sensitization by PABA of the lethal effect of near-UV radiation, the extent of which, after correction for absorption of UV radiation by PABA, bears a direct relationship to PABA concentration. The limitations of these results in predicting the response of human skin to the presence of PABA during exposure to UV radiation is emphasized.

  3. New Agents for Prevention of Ultraviolet-Induced Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Camp, William L.; Turnham, Jennifer W.; Athar, Mohammad; Elmets, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    With the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer on the rise, current prevention methods, such as the use of sunscreens, have yet to prove adequate to reverse this trend. There has been considerable interest in identifying compounds that will inhibit or reverse the biochemical changes required for skin cancers to develop, either by pharmacologic intervention or by dietary manipulation. By targeting different pathways identified as important in the pathogenesis of nonmelanoma skin cancers, a combination approach with multiple agents or the addition of chemopreventative agents to topical sunscreens may offer the potential for novel and synergistic therapies in treating nonmelanoma skin cancer. PMID:21540016

  4. Devices useful for vacuum ultraviolet beam characterization including a movable stage with a transmission grating and image detector

    DOEpatents

    Gessner, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg A; Wilcox, Russell B

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides for a device comprising an apparatus comprising (a) a transmission grating capable of diffracting a photon beam into a diffracted photon output, and (b) an image detector capable of detecting the diffracted photon output. The device is useful for measuring the spatial profile and diffraction pattern of a photon beam, such as a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beam.

  5. Experimental examination of ultraviolet Raman cross sections of chemical warfare agent simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullander, F.; Landström, L.; Lundén, H.; Wästerby, Pär.

    2015-05-01

    Laser induced Raman scattering from the commonly used chemical warfare agent simulants dimethyl sulfoxide, tributyl phosphate, triethyl phosphonoacetate was measured at excitation wavelengths ranging from 210 to 410 nm using a pulsed laser based spectrometer system with a probing distance of 1.4 m and with a field of view on the target of less than 1mm. For the purpose of comparison with well explored reference liquids the Raman scattering from simulants was measured in the form of an extended liquid surface layer on top of a silicon wafer. This way of measuring enabled direct comparison to the Raman scattering strength from cyclohexane. The reference Raman spectra were used to validate the signal strength of the simulants and the calibration of the experimental set up. Measured UV absorbance functions were used to calculate Raman cross sections. Established Raman cross sections of the simulants make it possible to use them as reference samples when measuring on chemical warfare agents in droplet form.

  6. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  7. On-line high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-nuclear magnetic resonance method of the markers of nerve agents for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Avik; Gupta, Hemendra K; Garg, Prabhat; Jain, Rajeev; Dubey, Devendra K

    2009-07-01

    This paper details an on-flow liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-UV-NMR) method for the retrospective detection and identification of alkyl alkylphosphonic acids (AAPAs) and alkylphosphonic acids (APAs), the markers of the toxic nerve agents for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Initially, the LC-UV-NMR parameters were optimized for benzyl derivatives of the APAs and AAPAs. The optimized parameters include stationary phase C(18), mobile phase methanol:water 78:22 (v/v), UV detection at 268nm and (1)H NMR acquisition conditions. The protocol described herein allowed the detection of analytes through acquisition of high quality NMR spectra from the aqueous solution of the APAs and AAPAs with high concentrations of interfering background chemicals which have been removed by preceding sample preparation. The reported standard deviation for the quantification is related to the UV detector which showed relative standard deviations (RSDs) for quantification within +/-1.1%, while lower limit of detection upto 16mug (in mug absolute) for the NMR detector. Finally the developed LC-UV-NMR method was applied to identify the APAs and AAPAs in real water samples, consequent to solid phase extraction and derivatization. The method is fast (total experiment time approximately 2h), sensitive, rugged and efficient.

  8. Both near ultraviolet radiation and the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide induce a 32-kDa stress protein in normal human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Keyse, S.M.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    1987-10-25

    We have analyzed the pattern of protein synthesis in solar near ultraviolet (334 nm, 365 nm) and near visible (405 nm) irradiated normal human skin fibroblasts. Two hours after irradiation we find that one major stress protein of approximately 32 kDa is induced in irradiated cells. This protein is not induced by ultraviolet radiation at wavelengths shorter than 334 nm and is not inducible by heat shock treatment of these cells. Although sodium arsenite, diamide, and menadione all induced a 32-kDa protein, they also induced the major heat shock proteins. In contrast, the oxidizing agent, hydrogen peroxide, induced the low molecular weight stress protein without causing induction of the major heat shock proteins. A comparison of the 32-kDa proteins induced by sodium arsenite, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and solar near ultraviolet radiation using chemical peptide mapping shows that they are closely related. These results imply that the pathways for induction of the heat shock response and the 32-kDa protein are not identical and suggest that, at least in the case of radiation and treatment with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the 32-kDa protein might be induced in response to cellular oxidative stress. This conclusion is supported by the observation that depletion of endogenous cellular glutathione prior to solar near ultraviolet irradiation lowers the fluence threshold for induction of the 32-kDa stress protein.

  9. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a)...

  10. Identification and quantification of carotenoids including geometrical isomers in fruit and vegetable juices by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Clara; Esteve, María J; Frígola, Ana; Torregrosa, Francisco

    2004-04-21

    A method was established for the identification and quantification of carotenoids including geometrical isomers in fruit and vegetable juices by liquid chromatography with an ultraviolet-diode array detector, using a C(18) Vydac 201TP54 column. The mobile phase used was the ternary methanol mixture (0.1 M ammonium acetate), tert-butyl methyl ether and water, in a concentration gradient, and a temperature gradient was applied. Retinol palmitate was added as an internal standard. An extraction process (ethanol/hexane, 4:3, v/v) was performed, followed by saponification with diethyl ether/methanolic KOH (0.1%, w/v, BHT) (1:1, v/v) for 0.5 h at room temperature. Seventeen different (cis and trans) carotenoids were identified by UV-vis spectra and retention times in HPLC in the juices analyzed. The analytic parameters show that the method proposed is sensitive, reliable, accurate, and reproducible.

  11. Towards producing novel fish gelatin films by combination treatments of ultraviolet radiation and sugars (ribose and lactose) as cross-linking agents.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rajeev; Karim, A A

    2014-07-01

    Developing novel fish gelatin films with better mechanical properties than mammalian gelatin is a challenging but promising endeavor. Studies were undertaken to produce fish gelatin films by combining treatments with different sugars (ribose and lactose) followed 'by' 'and' ultraviolet (UV) radiation, as possible cross-linking agents. Increase in tensile strength and percent elongation at break was recorded, which was more significant in films without sugars that were exposed to UV radiation. Films with added ribose showed decreased solubility after UV treatment and exhibited higher swelling percentage than films with added lactose, which readily dissolved in water. FTIR spectra of all the films showed identical patterns, which indicated no major changes to have occurred in the functional groups as a result of interaction between gelatin, sugars and UV irradiation. The results of this study could be explored for commercial use, depending on industrial needs for either production of edible films or for food packaging purposes. PMID:24966426

  12. Aminodisilanes as silylating agents for dry-developed positive-tone resists for deep-ultraviolet (248-nm) and extreme ultraviolet (13.5-nm) microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, David R.; Hutton, Richard S.; Boyce, Craig H.; Stein, Susan M.; Cirelli, Raymond A.; Taylor, Gary N.

    1995-06-01

    Disilanes are used as silylating reagents for near-surface imaging with deep-UV (248 nm) and EUV (13.5 nm) lithography. A relatively thin imaging layer of a photo-cross-linking resist is spun over a thicker layer of hard-baked resist that functions as a planarizing layer and antireflective coating. Photoinduced acid generation and subsequent heating crosslinks render exposed areas impermeable to an aminodisilane that reacts with the unexposed regions. Subsequent silylation and reactive ion etching affords a positive-tone image. The use of disilanes introduces a higher concentration of silicon into the polymer than is possible with silicon reagents that incorporate only one silicon atom per reactive site. The higher silicon content in the silylated polymer increases etching selectivity between exposed and unexposed regions and thereby increases the contrast. The synthesis and reactivity of `smaller' disilanes, N,N-dimethylamino-1,2-dimethyldisilane, (DMADMDS), and N,N-diethylamino-1,2- dimethyldisilane also are described. Additional silylation improvements that minimize flow during silylation also are discussed including the addition of bifunctional disilanes to the monofunctional DMAPMDS. This causes the crosslinking to occur during silylation which minimizes flow. We have resolved high aspect ratio, very high quality 0.20 micrometers line and space patterns at 248 nm with a stepper having a numerical aperture (NA) equals 0.53 and have resolved

  13. Rural-urban migration including formal and informal workers in the urban sector: an agent-based numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Nilton; Oliveira, Tharnier; Silveira, Jaylson

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this work is to study rural-urban migration in the early stages of industrialization. We use an agent-based model and take into account the existence of informal and formal workers on the urban sector and possible migration movements, dependent on the agents' social and private utilities. Our agents are place on vertices of a square lattice, such that each vertex has only one agent. Rural, urban informal and urban formal workers are represented by different states of a three-state Ising model. At every step, a fraction a of the agents may change sectors or migrate. The total utility of a given agent is then calculated and compared to a random utility, in order to check if this agent turns into an actual migrant or changes sector. The dynamics is carried out until an equilibrium state is reached and equilibrium variables are then calculated and compared to available data. We find that a generalized Harris-Todaro condition is satisfied [1] on these equilibrium regimes, i.e, the ratio between expected wages between any pair of sectors reach a constant value. [4pt] [1] J. J. Silveira, A. L. Esp'indola and T. J. Penna, Physica A, 364, 445 (2006).

  14. Gas chromatographic method for the determination of residual monomers, 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate, as curing agents in an ultraviolet curable adhesive.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung-Hyoun; Kim, Nosun; Moon, Dong Cheul

    2014-02-01

    A gas chromatographic method is described for the determination of residual 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (AOI) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (MOI) as curing agents in an ultraviolet curable adhesive. Pre-column derivatization was employed in the determination of AOI and MOI as a means of enhancing the response of the flame ionization detector. Urethane derivatives of AOI and MOI were derived using methanol for 30 min at room temperature. The accuracies (n = 5, three concentration levels) were in the range of 113.4 to 126.7%, and precisions (n = 5, three concentration levels) were in the range of 0.8 to 4.3% for AOI-OMe. Furthermore, the accuracies were in the range of 79.5 to 108.6% and the precisions were in the range of 1.0 to 2.4% for MOI-OMe. The correlation coefficients of six calibration standards were all greater than 0.9999 for AOI-OMe and greater than 0.9998 for MOI-OMe over the range from 10 to 100 µg/mL.

  15. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  16. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  17. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  18. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  19. Ultraviolet Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molde, Trevor

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the discovery and nature of ultraviolet light, discusses some applications for these wavelengths, and describes a number of experiments with ultraviolet radiation suitable for secondary school science classes. (JR)

  20. Simultaneous determination of four anti-dandruff agents including octopirox in shampoo products by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, L

    2001-06-01

    A method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the simultaneous identification and quantitative determination of four anti-dandruff agents such as salicylic acid, ketoconazole, climbazole, octopirox in commercial anti-dandruff shampoo products. A symmetry C18 column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) was used at temperature of 35 degrees C, mobile phase with flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1) was acetonitrile: water (containing 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.0, adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) = 60 : 40 (V/V) and UV detection at 224 nm and 305 nm. Samples were extracted with mobile phase by stirring and ultrasonic method. The average recoveries of four anti-dandruff agents were 98.0-104.1%. The relative standard deviations for samples were 0.11-0.90%. The method is simple, rapid and reproducible. PMID:18498472

  1. ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT DISINFECTION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW (NEW ORLEANS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this state-of-the-art review is to examine the performance and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection for combined sewer overflow (CSO) applications. Topics presented include the use of UV light as a disinfecting agent, its practical applications, d...

  2. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  3. Improvement of III-nitride visible and ultraviolet light-emitting diode performance, including extraction efficiency, electrical efficiency, thermal management and efficiency maintenance at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vampola, Kenneth

    In this work, highly efficient broad-area LEDs on bulk GaN substrates were developed and the fabrication process and device layout were optimized. This optimization relied in part on electrical, optical, thermal and recombination models. The peak external quantum efficiency of the 450 nm LEDs was over 68% when biased at 20 mA. The efficiency characteristic showed a typical droop curve, decreasing at high current densities. The cause of this droop is unknown. An exploratory experiment was conducted to characterize electron overflow and its role in efficiency droop. Novel device structures were developed, allowing direct measurement of overflow electrons in LED-like structures under electrical injection. In these test structures, electrons were observed in the p-type region of the LED only at current densities where efficiency droop was active. The onset of efficiency droop was preceded by the onset of electron overflow. However, the magnitude of the overflow current could not be measured and it is undetermined whether the dominant cause of efficiency droop is electron overflow or some other process such as Auger recombination. Calibration structures allowing measurement of the magnitude of the overflow are proposed. Work on deep-ultraviolet, 275 nm, LEDs is also presented. Demonstration of direct-wafer bonded LEDs to beta-Ga2O3 is presented. A SiC substrate removal process is discussed. LEDs fabricated by this flip-chip process exhibited up to 1.8 times greater power compared to LEDs fabricated by a standard process but suffered from increased forward voltage and premature failure. Further process development leading to electrically efficient operation is proposed.

  4. Ecologic analysis of some immune-related disorders, including type 1 diabetes, in Australia: latitude, regional ultraviolet radiation, and disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Staples, Judith A; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lim, Lynette L-Y; McMichael, Anthony J

    2003-04-01

    The apparent immune-suppressive effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has suggested that this environmental exposure may influence the development of immune-related disorders. Self-reported prevalence rates of type 1 diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), eczema/dermatitis, and asthma, from the 1995 Australian National Health Survey, were therefore examined by latitude and ambient level of UVR. A positive association of type 1 diabetes mellitus prevalence was found with both increasing southern latitude of residence (r = 0.77; p = 0.026) and decreasing regional annual ambient UVR (r= -0.80; p = 0.018); a 3-fold increase in prevalence from the northernmost region to the southernmost region was evident. In contrast, asthma correlated negatively with latitude (r = -0.72; p = 0.046), although the change in asthma prevalence from the north to the south of Australia was only 0.7-fold. For both RA and eczema/dermatitis, there were no statistically significant associations between latitude/UVR and disease prevalence. These ecologic data provide some support for a previously proposed beneficial effect of UVR on T-helper 1-mediated autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. The inverse association of type 1 diabetes prevalence with UVR is consistent with that previously reported for another autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis, in Australia, and also with type 1 diabetes latitudinal gradients in the Northern Hemisphere. The finding also accords with photoimmunologic evidence of UVR-induced immunosuppression and may suggest a beneficial effect of UVR in reducing the incidence of such autoimmune conditions. In light of this study, analytic epidemiologic studies investigating risk of immune disorders in relation to personal UVR exposure in humans are required. PMID:12676609

  5. Ecologic analysis of some immune-related disorders, including type 1 diabetes, in Australia: latitude, regional ultraviolet radiation, and disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Staples, Judith A; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lim, Lynette L-Y; McMichael, Anthony J

    2003-04-01

    The apparent immune-suppressive effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has suggested that this environmental exposure may influence the development of immune-related disorders. Self-reported prevalence rates of type 1 diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), eczema/dermatitis, and asthma, from the 1995 Australian National Health Survey, were therefore examined by latitude and ambient level of UVR. A positive association of type 1 diabetes mellitus prevalence was found with both increasing southern latitude of residence (r = 0.77; p = 0.026) and decreasing regional annual ambient UVR (r= -0.80; p = 0.018); a 3-fold increase in prevalence from the northernmost region to the southernmost region was evident. In contrast, asthma correlated negatively with latitude (r = -0.72; p = 0.046), although the change in asthma prevalence from the north to the south of Australia was only 0.7-fold. For both RA and eczema/dermatitis, there were no statistically significant associations between latitude/UVR and disease prevalence. These ecologic data provide some support for a previously proposed beneficial effect of UVR on T-helper 1-mediated autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. The inverse association of type 1 diabetes prevalence with UVR is consistent with that previously reported for another autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis, in Australia, and also with type 1 diabetes latitudinal gradients in the Northern Hemisphere. The finding also accords with photoimmunologic evidence of UVR-induced immunosuppression and may suggest a beneficial effect of UVR in reducing the incidence of such autoimmune conditions. In light of this study, analytic epidemiologic studies investigating risk of immune disorders in relation to personal UVR exposure in humans are required.

  6. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  7. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  8. Zirconia coated stir bar sorptive extraction combined with large volume sample stacking capillary electrophoresis-indirect ultraviolet detection for the determination of chemical warfare agent degradation products in water samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingjing; Hu, Bin; Li, Xiaoyong

    2012-07-20

    In this study, a sensitive, selective and reliable analytical method by combining zirconia (ZrO₂) coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) with large volume sample stacking capillary electrophoresis-indirect ultraviolet (LVSS-CE/indirect UV) was developed for the direct analysis of chemical warfare agent degradation products of alkyl alkylphosphonic acids (AAPAs) (including ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMPA)) and methylphosphonic acid (MPA) in environmental waters. ZrO₂ coated stir bar was prepared by adhering nanometer-sized ZrO₂ particles onto the surface of stir bar with commercial PDMS sol as adhesion agent. Due to the high affinity of ZrO₂ to the electronegative phosphonate group, ZrO₂ coated stir bars could selectively extract the strongly polar AAPAs and MPA. After systematically optimizing the extraction conditions of ZrO₂-SBSE, the analytical performance of ZrO₂-SBSE-CE/indirect UV and ZrO₂-SBSE-LVSS-CE/indirect UV was assessed. The limits of detection (LODs, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) obtained by ZrO₂-SBSE-CE/indirect UV were 13.4-15.9 μg/L for PMPA, EMPA and MPA. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=7, c=200 μg/L) of the corrected peak area for the target analytes were in the range of 6.4-8.8%. Enhancement factors (EFs) in terms of LODs were found to be from 112- to 145-fold. By combining ZrO₂ coating SBSE with LVSS as a dual preconcentration strategy, the EFs were magnified up to 1583-fold, and the LODs of ZrO₂-SBSE-LVSS-CE/indirect UV were 1.4, 1.2 and 3.1 μg/L for PMPA, EMPA, and MPA, respectively. The RSDs (n=7, c=20 μg/L) were found to be in the range of 9.0-11.8%. The developed ZrO₂-SBSE-LVSS-CE/indirect UV method has been successfully applied to the analysis of PMPA, EMPA, and MPA in different environmental water samples, and the recoveries for the spiked water samples were found to be in the range of 93.8-105.3%. PMID:22673812

  9. Ultraviolet Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Side-by-Side Comparison Click on image for larger view

    This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, also know as Messier 83 or M83. It is located 15 million light-years away in the southern constellation Hydra.

    Ultraviolet light traces young populations of stars; in this image, young stars can be seen way beyond the main spiral disk of M83 up to 140,000 light-years from its center. Could life exist around one of these far-flung stars? Scientists say it's unlikely because the outlying regions of a galaxy are lacking in the metals required for planets to form.

    The image was taken at scheduled intervals between March 15 and May 20, 2007. It is one of the longest-exposure, or deepest, images ever taken of a nearby galaxy in ultraviolet light. Near-ultraviolet light (or longer-wavelength ultraviolet light) is colored yellow, and far-ultraviolet light is blue.

    What Lies Beyond the Edge of a Galaxy The side-by-side comparison shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, or M83, as seen in ultraviolet light (right) and at both ultraviolet and radio wavelengths (left). While the radio data highlight the galaxy's long, octopus-like arms stretching far beyond its main spiral disk (red), the ultraviolet data reveal clusters of baby stars (blue) within the extended arms.

    The ultraviolet image was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer between March 15 and May 20, 2007, at scheduled intervals. Back in 2005, the telescope first photographed M83 over a shorter period of time. That picture was the first to reveal far-flung baby stars forming up to 63,000 light-years from the edge of the main spiral disk. This came as a surprise to astronomers because a galaxy's outer territory typically lacks high densities of star-forming materials.

    The newest picture of M83 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer is shown at the right, and was taken over a longer period of

  10. The alkaline single cell electrophoresis assay with eight mouse organs: results with 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Matsusaka, N; Madarame, H; Miyamae, Y; Ishida, K; Satoh, M; Sekihashi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-04-13

    The genotoxicity of 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers selected from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) groups 1, 2A, and 2B was evaluated in eight mouse organs with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) (comet) assay. Groups of four mice were treated once intraperitoneally at the dose at which micronucleus tests had been conducted, and the stomach, colon, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, brain, and bone marrow were sampled 3, 8, and/or 24 h later. All chemicals were positive in the SCGE assay in at least one organ. Of the 22 mono-functional alkylating agents, over 50% were positive in all organs except the brain and bone marrow. The two subsets of mono-functional alkylating agents differed in their bone marrow genotoxicity: only 1 of the 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines was positive in bone marrow as opposed to 8 of the 13 other alkylating agents, reflecting the fact that dialkyl N-nitrosoamines are poor micronucleus inducers in hematopoietic cells. The two groups of mono-functional alkylating agents also differ in hepatic carcinogenicity in spite of the fact that they are similar in hepatic genotoxicity. While dialkyl N-nitrosoamines produce tumors primarily in mouse liver, only one (styrene-7,8-oxide) out of 10 of the other type of mono-functional alkylating agents is a mouse hepatic carcinogen. Taking into consideration our previous results showing high concordance between hepatic genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for aromatic amines and azo compounds, a possible explanation for the discrepancy might be that chemicals that require metabolic activation show high concordance between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the liver. A high percent of the 10 DNA crosslinkers were positive in the SCGE assay in the gastrointestinal mucosa, but less than 50% were positive in the liver and lung. In this study, we allowed 10 min alkali-unwinding to obtain low and stable control values

  11. Clinical evaluation of a frozen commercially prepared microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents, including the new triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Huynh, H; Hollis, R J

    2002-05-01

    A commercially prepared frozen broth microdilution panel (Trek Diagnostic Systems, Westlake, Ohio) was compared with a reference microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of two quality control (QC) strains and 99 clinical isolates of Candida spp. The antifungal agents tested included amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole. Microdilution testing was performed according to NCCLS recommendations. MIC endpoints were read visually after 48 h of incubation and were assessed independently for each microdilution panel. The MICs for the QC strains were within published limits for both the reference and Trek microdilution panels. Discrepancies among MIC endpoints of no more than 2 dilutions were used to calculate the percent agreement. Acceptable levels of agreement between the Trek and reference panels were observed for all antifungal agents tested against the 99 clinical isolates. The overall agreement for each antifungal agent ranged from 96% for ravuconazole to 100% for amphotericin B. The Trek microdilution panel appears to be a viable alternative to frozen microdilution panels prepared in-house. PMID:11980944

  12. Clear Film Protects Against Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Yavrouian, A.

    1983-01-01

    Acrylic film contains screeing agent filtering ultraviolet radiation up to 380 nanometers in wavelength but passes other components of Sunlight. Film used to protect such materials as rubber and plastics degraded by ultraviolet light. Used as protective cover on outdoor sheets or pipes made of such materials as polyethylene or polypropylene and on solar cells.

  13. Investigation of ultraviolet interstellar extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, C.; Haramundanis, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results concerning interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet are reported. These results were initially obtained by using data from main-sequence stars and were extended to include supergiants and emission stars. The principal finding of the analysis of ultraviolet extinction is not only that it is wavelength dependent, but that if changes with galactic longitude in the U3 passband (lambda sub eff = 1621 A); it does not change significantly in the U2 passband (lambda sub eff = 2308 A). Where data are available in the U4 passband (lambda sub eff = 1537 A), they confirm the rapid rise of extinction in the ultraviolet found by other investigators. However, in all cases, emission stars must be used with great caution. It is important to realize that while extinction continues to rise toward shorter wavelengths in the ultraviolet, including the shortest ultraviolet wavelengths measured (1100 A), it no longer plays an important role in the X-ray region (50 A).

  14. Ultraviolet radiation changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Richard L.; Frederick, John E.; Ilyas, Mohammad; Filyushkin, V.; Wahner, Andreas; Stamnes, K.; Muthusubramanian, P.; Blumthaler, M.; Roy, Colin E.; Madronich, Sasha

    1991-01-01

    A major consequence of ozone depletion is an increase in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the Earth's surface. This chapter discusses advances that were made since the previous assessment (World Meteorological Organization (WMO)) to our understanding of UV radiation. The impacts of these changes in UV on the biosphere are not included, because they are discussed in the effects assessment.

  15. Labelling of living mammalian spermatozoa with the fluorescent thiol alkylating agent, monobromobimane (MB): immobilization upon exposure to ultraviolet light and analysis of acrosomal status

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, J.M.; Fleming, A.D.; Crozet, N.; Kuehl, T.J.; Kosower, N.S.; Yanagimachi, R.

    1986-03-01

    Living spermatozoa of seven mammalian species were treated with the thiol-alkylating fluorescent labelling compound, monobromobimane (MBBR). MB-labelling alone had no effect on sperm motility, nor on the time course or ability of golden hamster spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction when capacitated in vitro. Exposure of MB-labelled spermatozoa to ultraviolet (UV) light and excitation of the MB fluorochrome resulted in virtually immediate immobilization of the spermatozoa without affecting acrosomal status. UV exposure of unlabelled spermatozoa for up to 30 sec had no effect upon motility. Immobilization of MB-labelled spermatozoa depended on the midpiece being irradiated, as irradiation of the head alone, or of the more distal parts of the principal piece, had little or no effect upon motility. Labelling with MB followed by immobilization of individually selected spermatozoa was most useful for detailing the course and site of occurrence of the acrosome reaction during penetration of the cumulus oophorus by golden hamster spermatozoa in vitro. In these often hyperactivated spermatozoa, precise determination of the acrosomal status could not often otherwise be made due to the difficulty in visualizing the acrosomal region of a vigorously thrashing, hyperactivated spermatozoon. This technique should prove valuable in a variety of studies on sperm motility, capacitation and fertilization, and could also be extended to other cell systems.

  16. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  17. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  18. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    SciTech Connect

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  19. Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R. C.; Murthy, J.

    1993-12-01

    The UVX experiment was carried on the Space Shuttle Columbia between 1986 January 12 and 19 (STS-61C). Several ultraviolet spectrometers were used to obtain measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet background at 8 locations in the sky. We have reanalysed the UVX measurements of the surface brightness of the diffuse ultraviolet background above b = 40 using the dust-scattering model of Onaka & Kodaira (1991), which explicitly takes into account the variation of the source function with galactic longitude. The range of allowed values of interstellar grain albedoJa, and scattering asymmetry parameter g, is considerably expanded over those of a previous analysis. The new chi square probability contours come close to, but do not include, the values of a and g found for the interstellar grains by Witt et al. (1992) using the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) on the Astro mission. If we hypothesize in additon to the dust-scattered light an extragalactic component, of 300 1 100 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1, attenuated by a cosecant b law, the new reduction of the UVX data gives complete consistency with the Witt et al. determination of the optical parameters of the grains in the ultraviolet. This work was supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004, and by National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant NASA NAG5-619. We are grateful for the encouragement of Dr. Stephan Price, and we thank Dr. L. Danly for information. Onaka, T., & Kodaira, K. 1991, ApJ, 379, 532 Witt, A. N., Petersohn, J. K., Bohlin, R. C., O'Connell, R. W., Roberts, M. S., Smith, A. M., & Stecher, T. P. 1992, ApJ, 395, L5

  20. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  1. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Deevya L; Saladi, Rao N; Fox, Joshua L

    2010-09-01

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned populations in many parts of the world. The incidence, morbidity and mortality rates of skin cancers are increasing and, therefore, pose a significant public health concern. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major etiologic agent in the development of skin cancers. UVR causes DNA damage and genetic mutations, which subsequently lead to skin cancer. A clearer understanding of UVR is crucial in the prevention of skin cancer. This article reviews UVR, its damaging effects on the skin and its relationship to UV immunosuppression and skin cancer. Several factors influence the amount of UVR reaching the earth's surface, including ozone depletion, UV light elevation, latitude, altitude, and weather conditions. The current treatment modalities utilizing UVR (i.e. phototherapy) can also predispose to skin cancers. Unnecessary exposure to the sun and artificial UVR (tanning lamps) are important personal attributable risks. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of skin cancer with an emphasis on carefully evaluated statistics, the epidemiology of UVR-induced skin cancers, incidence rates, risk factors, and preventative behaviors & strategies, including personal behavioral modifications and public educational initiatives.

  2. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates.

  3. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  4. Destruction of hazardous compounds by ultraviolet-catalyzed oxidation with hydrogen peroxide. Technical completion report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, D.W.; Klei, H.E.

    1986-10-01

    Toxic and hazardous compounds are often present in water supplies at low concentrations, which can make their removal difficult and costly by conventional treatment processes. The project investigated the destruction of hazardous compounds in water by ultraviolet-catalyzed oxidation using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent. The effectiveness of this process was determined with a variety of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, including trichloroethylene, chloroform, dichloromethane, benzene, chlorobenzene, chlorophenol, and diethyl phthalate. The reactions were conducted in batch and flow reactors equipped with low-pressure ultraviolet lamps.

  5. Far ultraviolet astronomy using the FAUST telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Space Telescope (FAUST) a compact, wide field-of-view, far ultraviolet instrument designed for astronomical observations of extended and point sources is discussed. The design and application of the instrument are described. The prime objective is to observe faint astronomical sources with sensitivities higher than previously available. Scientific programs will include: (1) a search for ultraviolet stars which are predicted to exist at the stage of evolution prior to the final death of a star; (2) observations of galaxies and quasars; and (3) joint programs with other Spacelab 1 experiments. The secondary objective is to verify the suitability of the Spacelab as a platform for far ultraviolet astronomy: data will be provided on the ultraviolet background levels due to astronomical, terrestrial, and spacecraft generated sources; the levels of contaminants which affect ultraviolet instruments; and the capability of the Orbiter for stable pointing at celestial sources for useful periods of time.

  6. A transmitting and reflecting diffuser for ultraviolet light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.; Burcher, E. E.; Kopia, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    Fabrication of ultraviolet radiation diffusing layer in configuration that uses ultraviolet properties of fused silica condensate is discussed. Construction and operation of the device are described. Diagram of reflecting diffuser to show construction and method of operation is included.

  7. Microbial ultraviolet sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qunjie; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2011-11-01

    Exposure to the shortest wavelengths in sunlight, ultraviolet light, constitutes a deleterious ecological factor for many microorganisms. The use of secondary metabolites as sunscreens has emerged as an important photoprotective mechanism in certain groups of large-celled microorganisms, such as cyanobacteria, fungi and many protists. In this Review, we describe our current understanding of microbial 'sunscreen' compounds, including scytonemin, the mycosporines and the naphthalene-based melanins. Study of these sunscreens has led to the discovery of new classes of compounds, new metabolic pathways, a deeper understanding of microbial photobiology and the potential for dermatological or biomedical applications.

  8. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  9. Harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-21

    Tanning for cosmetic purposes by sunbathing or by using artificial tanning devices is widespread. The hazards associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation are of concern to the medical profession. Depending on the amount and form of the radiation, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed, ultraviolet radiation causes erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancers most commonly produced by ultraviolet radiation are basal and squamous cell carcinomas. There also is much circumstantial evidence that the increase in the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma during the past half century is related to increased sun exposure, but this has not been proved. Effective and cosmetically acceptable sunscreen preparations have been developed that can do much to prevent or reduce most harmful effects to ultraviolet radiation if they are applied properly and consistently. Other safety measures include (1) minimizing exposure to ultraviolet radiation, (2) being aware of reflective surfaces while in the sun, (3) wearing protective clothing, (4) avoiding use of artificial tanning devices, and (5) protecting infants and children.

  10. Ultraviolet corona detection sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R. J.; MATHERN

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting electrical corona discharge phenomena in a space simulation chamber via emission of ultraviolet light was evaluated. A corona simulator, with a hemispherically capped point to plane electrode geometry, was used to generate corona glows over a wide range of pressure, voltage, current, electrode gap length and electrode point radius. Several ultraviolet detectors, including a copper cathode gas discharge tube and a UV enhanced silicon photodiode detector, were evaluated in the course of the spectral intensity measurements. The performance of both silicon target vidicons and silicon intensified target vidicons was evaluated analytically using the data generated by the spectroradiometer scans and the performance data supplied by the manufacturers.

  11. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  12. Results from the Far Ultraviolet Space Telescope (FAUST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasseen, T. P.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.; Wu, X.

    1993-01-01

    We present early results from the Far Ultraviolet Space Telescope (FAUST), which flew in March 1992 with the ATLAS space shuttle mission. The telescope provides wide-field images in the far ultraviolet (1400-1800 A). Studies underway using the data obtained on this mission include establishing the brightness and distribution of far ultraviolet stars in the halo of our Galaxy, establishing the far ultraviolet properties of nearby galaxies and nearby clusters of galaxies, analyzing the diffuse galactic light, and searching for the origin of the extragalactic ultraviolet light. We discuss the instrument performance, and early results from these observations.

  13. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  14. Air monitoring and detection of chemical and biological agents

    SciTech Connect

    Leonelli, J.; Althouse, M.L.

    1999-06-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of SPIE`s remote sensing symposium which was held November 2--3, 1998 in Boston, Massachusetts. Topics of discussion include the following: system simulations, atmospheric modeling, and performance prediction studies of chemical warfare remote sensing technologies; ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence and aerosol detection methods for remote sensing of biological warfare agents; passive detection methods for remote detection of chemical warfare agents; and lidar-based system performance assessments, demonstrations, and new concepts for chemical warfare/biological warfare detection.

  15. Ultraviolet radiation and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek Kyun; Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Häder, Donat-Peter; Han, Taejun

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are the dominant photosynthetic prokaryotes from an ecological, economical, or evolutionary perspective, and depend on solar energy to conduct their normal life processes. However, the marked increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) caused by the continuous depletion of the stratospheric ozone shield has fueled serious concerns about the ecological consequences for all living organisms, including cyanobacteria. UV-B radiation can damage cellular DNA and several physiological and biochemical processes in cyanobacterial cells, either directly, through its interaction with certain biomolecules that absorb in the UV range, or indirectly, with the oxidative stress exerted by reactive oxygen species. However, cyanobacteria have a long history of survival on Earth, and they predate the existence of the present ozone shield. To withstand the detrimental effects of solar UVR, these prokaryotes have evolved several lines of defense and various tolerance mechanisms, including avoidance, antioxidant production, DNA repair, protein resynthesis, programmed cell death, and the synthesis of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. This study critically reviews the current information on the effects of UVR on several physiological and biochemical processes of cyanobacteria and the various tolerance mechanisms they have developed. Genomic insights into the biosynthesis of MAAs and scytonemin and recent advances in our understanding of the roles of exopolysaccharides and heat shock proteins in photoprotection are also discussed.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Haney, S.J.; Sweeney, D.W.

    2000-02-29

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system is disclosed for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10--14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  18. Ultraviolet radiation and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek Kyun; Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Häder, Donat-Peter; Han, Taejun

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are the dominant photosynthetic prokaryotes from an ecological, economical, or evolutionary perspective, and depend on solar energy to conduct their normal life processes. However, the marked increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) caused by the continuous depletion of the stratospheric ozone shield has fueled serious concerns about the ecological consequences for all living organisms, including cyanobacteria. UV-B radiation can damage cellular DNA and several physiological and biochemical processes in cyanobacterial cells, either directly, through its interaction with certain biomolecules that absorb in the UV range, or indirectly, with the oxidative stress exerted by reactive oxygen species. However, cyanobacteria have a long history of survival on Earth, and they predate the existence of the present ozone shield. To withstand the detrimental effects of solar UVR, these prokaryotes have evolved several lines of defense and various tolerance mechanisms, including avoidance, antioxidant production, DNA repair, protein resynthesis, programmed cell death, and the synthesis of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. This study critically reviews the current information on the effects of UVR on several physiological and biochemical processes of cyanobacteria and the various tolerance mechanisms they have developed. Genomic insights into the biosynthesis of MAAs and scytonemin and recent advances in our understanding of the roles of exopolysaccharides and heat shock proteins in photoprotection are also discussed. PMID:25463663

  19. International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains the final report for the International Ultraviolet Explorer IUE Observatory Operations contract. The fundamental operational objective of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) program is to translate competitively selected observing programs into IUE observations, to reduce these observations into meaningful scientific data, and then to present these data to the Guest Observer in a form amenable to the pursuit of scientific research. The IUE Observatory is the key to this objective since it is the central control and support facility for all science operations functions within the IUE Project. In carrying out the operation of this facility, a number of complex functions were provided beginning with telescope scheduling and operation, proceeding to data processing, and ending with data distribution and scientific data analysis. In support of these critical-path functions, a number of other significant activities were also provided, including scientific instrument calibration, systems analysis, and software support. Routine activities have been summarized briefly whenever possible.

  20. Ultraviolet photofragmentation of biomolecular ions

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric identification of all types of molecules relies on the observation and interpretation of ion fragmentation patterns. Peptides, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids that are often found as components of complex biological samples represent particularly important challenges. The most common strategies for fragmenting biomolecular ions include low- and high-energy collisional activation, post-source decay, and electron capture or transfer dissociation. Each of these methods has its own idiosyncrasies and advantages but encounters problems with some types of samples. Novel fragmentation methods that can offer improvements are always desirable. One approach that has been under study for years but is not yet incorporated into a commercial instrument is ultraviolet photofragmentation. This review discusses experimental results on various biological molecules that have been generated by several research groups using different light wavelengths and mass analyzers. Work involving short-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet light is particularly emphasized. The characteristics of photofragmentation are examined and its advantages summarized. PMID:19241462

  1. Astronomy and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, S

    1994-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet wave band (100 to 912 angstroms) was thought until recently to be useless to astronomy, primarily because the opacity of the interstellar medium would prevent observations at these wavelengths. However, the interstellar medium has been found to be markedly inhomogeneous in both density and ionization state and the sun is fortunately located in a region of low extreme ultraviolet opacity. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, launched in June 1992, has surveyed the sky in this wave band and has detected a wide variety of astronomical sources at considerable distances, including some extragalactic objects. Studies in the extreme ultraviolet band have already begun to increase our understanding of the contents of the universe.

  2. Astronomy and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.

    1994-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet wave band (100 to 912 angstroms) was thought until recently to be useless to astronomy, primarily because the opacity of the interstellar medium would prevent observations at these wavelengths. However, the interstellar medium has been found to be markedly inhomogeneous in both density and ionization state and the sun is fortunately located in a region of low extreme ultraviolet opacity. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, launched in June 1992, has surveyed the sky in this wave band and has detected a wide variety of astronomical sources at considerable distances, including some extragalactic objects. Studies in the extreme ultraviolet band have already begun to increase our understanding of the contents of the universe.

  3. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  4. Antiinflammatory drug effects on ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase and DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1980-06-01

    Epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity is greatly elevated in response to tumor promoting agents and ultraviolet light. The purpose of this paper is to report modification of ultraviolet-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity by antiinflammatory agents. Topical triamoinolone acetonide and indomethacin were found to significantly inhibit the UV-B induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase in hairless mice when applied following ultraviolet light irradiation. The corticosteroid also showed inhibition of ultraviolet light increased epidermal DNA synthesis. Indomethacin failed to show any inhibition of DNA synthesis.

  5. Ultraviolet A in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    El-Mofty, Medhat; Mostafa, Wedad; Youssef, Randa; El-Fangary, Mona; Elramly, Amany Z; Mahgoub, Doaa; Fawzy, Marwa

    2006-08-01

    Both types of Ultraviolet (UV), UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm), produce increased pigmentation or tanning. However, no evaluation of UVA alone in the treatment of vitiligo has been reported. Therefore, it was the purpose of this work to study the pigmentogenic effect of UVA (5 and 15 J/cm(2)) in vitiligo. The study included 20 randomly selected patients with vitiligo involving more than 30% of the body surface area with a bilateral/symmetrical distribution. They were equally divided into two groups each of 10 patients. All patients received three weekly sessions of UVA, 15 J/cm(2) in group I and 5 J/cm(2) in group II, a total of 48 sessions over 16 weeks. Overall pigmentation of 60% and above was recorded in 50% and 10% of patients in groups I and II, respectively. We conclude that broadband UVA alone, without psoralens, and in appropriate doses may be of important therapeutic value in vitiligo.

  6. Sunscreening agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Latha, M S; Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B R

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents.

  7. High ultraviolet C resistance of marine Planctomycetes.

    PubMed

    Viana, Flávia; Lage, Olga Maria; Oliveira, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Planctomycetes are bacteria with particular characteristics such as internal membrane systems encompassing intracellular compartments, proteinaceous cell walls, cell division by yeast-like budding and large genomes. These bacteria inhabit a wide range of habitats, including marine ecosystems, in which ultra-violet radiation has a potential harmful impact in living organisms. To evaluate the effect of ultra-violet C on the genome of several marine strains of Planctomycetes, we developed an easy and fast DNA diffusion assay in which the cell wall was degraded with papain, the wall-free cells were embedded in an agarose microgel and lysed. The presence of double strand breaks and unwinding by single strand breaks allow DNA diffusion, which is visible as a halo upon DNA staining. The number of cells presenting DNA diffusion correlated with the dose of ultra-violet C or hydrogen peroxide. From DNA damage and viability experiments, we found evidence indicating that some strains of Planctomycetes are significantly resistant to ultra-violet C radiation, showing lower sensitivity than the known resistant Arthrobacter sp. The more resistant strains were those phylogenetically closer to Rhodopirellula baltica, suggesting that these species are adapted to habitats under the influence of ultra-violet radiation. Our results provide evidence indicating that the mechanism of resistance involves DNA damage repair and/or other DNA ultra-violet C-protective mechanism. PMID:24052365

  8. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  9. Far Ultraviolet Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) is studying a wide range of astronomical problems in the 905-1187 Angstrom wavelength region through the use of high resolution spectroscopy. The FUSE bandpass forms a nearly optimal complement to the spectral coverage provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which extends down to approximately 1170 Angstroms. The photoionization threshold of atomic hydrogen (911 Angstroms) sets a natural short-wavelength limit for the FUV. FUSE was launched in June 1999 from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a Delta II rocket into a 768 km circular orbit. Scientific observations started later that year. This spectral region is extremely rich in spectral diagnostics of astrophysical gases over a wide range of temperatures (100 K to over 10 million K). Important strong spectral lines in this wavelength range include those of neutral hydrogen, deuterium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon (H I, D I, N I, O I, and Ar I), molecular hydrogen (H2), five-times ionized oxygen (O VI), and several ionization states of sulfur (S III - S VI). These elements are essential for understanding the origin and evolution of the chemical elements, the formation of stars and our Solar System, and the structure of galaxies, including our Milky Way. FUSE is one of NASA's Explorer missions and a cooperative project of NASA and the space agencies of Canada and France. These missions are smaller, more scientifically focused missions than the larger observatories, like Hubble and Chandra. FUSE was designed, built and operated for NASA by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. Hundreds of astronomers world-wide are using FUSE for a wide range of scientific research. Some of the important scientific discoveries from the first two years of the mission are described.

  10. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Karl-Heinz

    1992-01-01

    The observation, data reduction, and interpretation of ultraviolet spectra (obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer) of Herbig-Haro objects, stellar jets, and (in a few cases) reflection nebulae in star-forming regions is discussed. Intermediate results have been reported in the required semi-annual reports. The observations for this research were obtained in 23 (US1) IUE shifts. The spectra were taken in the low resolution mode with the large aperture. The following topics were investigated: (1) detection of UV spectra of high excitation Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, identification of emission lines, and a preliminary study of the energy distribution of the ultraviolet continuum; (2) details of the continuum energy distribution of these spectra and their possible interpretation; (3) the properties of the reddening (extinction) of HH objects; (4) the possible time variation of strong emission lines in high excitation HH objects; (5) the ultraviolet emission of low excitation HH objects, especially in the fluorescent lines of the H2 molecule; (6) the ultraviolet emission in the peculiar object HH24; (7) the spatial emission distribution of different lines and different parts of the continuum in different HH objects; and (8) some properties of reflection nebula, in the environment of Herbig-Haro objects. Each topic is discussed.

  11. [Solar activity, dynamics of the ozone layer and possible role of ultraviolet radiation in heliobiology].

    PubMed

    Vladimirskiĭ, B M

    1982-01-01

    Solar activity influences the ozonosphere thickness, thus changing the intensity of the near-Earth ultraviolet radiation in the B band. In certain regions the radiation may change by 10--15%, with solar activity varying from its maximum to minimum. The variations in the ultraviolet intensity are very likely to be environmentally important. Thus, solar ultraviolet radiation at lambda = 290 -- 340 nm acts as one more physical agent transferring the effect of solar activity into the biosphere.

  12. New Standards for Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines covering safe levels for exposure to ultraviolet radiation in an occupational environment are reported. The guidelines clarify the spectral radiant exposure doses and relative spectral effectiveness of ultraviolet radiation required to elicit adverse biologic effects.

  13. Ultraviolet Mars Reveals Cloud Formation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Images from MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph were used to make this movie of rapid cloud formation on Mars on July 9-10, 2016. The ultraviolet colors of the planet have been rendered in fal...

  14. Ultraviolet lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reports cited from the international literature describe various aspects of ultraviolet lasers including laser output, far ultraviolet radiation, electron pumping, optical pumping, and laser materials. Gas lasers, pulsed lasers, dye lasers, CO2 lasers, xenon fluoride lasers, and transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) lasers are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 66 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  15. International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is the November 6, 1996 - October 9, 1997, IUE Final Report for the International Ultraviolet Explorer Final Archive contract. The ultimate objective of this contract is the completion of the archival reprocessing of all IUE data obtained at GSFC between 1978 and 1995.

  16. Line Tunable Ultraviolet Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet laser is demonstrated using a dual wavelength Nd:YAG oscillator, sum frequency and second harmonic process. Synchronous pulses at 1.052 and 1.319 micrometers are amplified, mixed and subsequently doubled, producing pulses at 0.293 micrometers.

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The authors report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182 A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and read out with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 836 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of sub-micron particles were recorded.

  18. Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. )

    1993-09-01

    Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

  19. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantopoulou, E. Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Cefalas, A. C.; Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Kakabakos, S.; Velentzas, A. D.

    2014-09-14

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm⁻²) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110–180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, μ-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  20. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantopoulou, E.; Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Velentzas, A. D.; Kakabakos, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm-2) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110-180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, μ-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  1. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  2. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  3. ULTRAVIOLET DISINFECTION STUDIES WITH CCL LISTED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance to ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. The U.S. drinking water industry is interested in including UV light treatment as an amendment to conventional treatment for disinfecting water supplies. UV disi...

  4. Ultraviolet Radiation: Human Exposure and Health Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenkate, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation and associated health effects as well as risk estimates for acute and chronic conditions resulting from such exposure. Demonstrates substantial reductions in health risk that can be achieved through preventive actions. Also includes a risk assessment model for skin cancer. Contains 36…

  5. CHALLENGES OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW DISINFECTION BY ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article examines the performance and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation for disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO). Due to the negative impact of conventional water disinfectants on aquatic life, new agents (e.g., UV light) are being investigated for ...

  6. Viability and virulence of entomopathogenic nematodes exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure environmental stress such as from ultraviolet radiation. Our objective was to compare UV tolerance among a broad array of nematode species. We compared 9 different EPN species and ...

  7. Modelling and Display of the Ultraviolet Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, J.; Henry, R.; Murthy, J.; Allen, M.; McGlynn, T. A.; Scollick, K.

    1994-12-01

    A computer program is currently under development to model in 3D - one dimension of which is wavelength - all the known and major speculated sources of ultraviolet (900 A - 3100 A ) radiation over the celestial sphere. The software is being written in Fortran 77 and IDL and currently operates under IRIX (the operating system of the Silicon Graphics Iris Machine); all output models are in FITS format. Models along with display software will become available to the astronomical community. The Ultraviolet Sky Model currently includes the Zodiacal Light, Point Sources of Emission, and the Diffuse Galactic Light. The Ultraviolet Sky Model is currently displayed using SkyView: a package under development at NASA/ GSFC, which allows users to retrieve and display publically available all-sky astronomical survey data (covering many wavebands) over the Internet. We present a demonstration of the SkyView display of the Ultraviolet Model. The modelling is a five year development project: the work illustrated here represents product output at the end of year one. Future work includes enhancements to the current models and incorporation of the following models: Galactic Molecular Hydrogen Fluorescence; Galactic Highly Ionized Atomic Line Emission; Integrated Extragalactic Light; and speculated sources in the intergalactic medium such as Ionized Plasma and radiation from Non-Baryonic Particle Decay. We also present a poster which summarizes the components of the Ultraviolet Sky Model and outlines a further package that will be used to display the Ultraviolet Model. This work is supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004. Dr J. Daniels is supported with a post-doctoral Fellowship from the Leverhulme Foundation, London, United Kingdom. We are also grateful for the encouragement of Dr Stephen Price (Phillips Laboratory, Hanscomb Air Force Base, MA)

  8. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Narrow CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Li, J.; Ciaravella, A.

    2002-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are commonly described as new, discrete, bright features appearing in the field of view of a white light coronagraph and moving outward over a period of minutes to hours. Apparent angular widths of the CMEs cover a wide range, from few to 360°. The very narrow structures (narrower than ~15-20°) form only a small subset of all the observed CMEs and are usually referred to as rays, spikes, fans, etc. Recently, Gilbert et al. (2001, ApJ, 550, 1093) reported LASCO white light observations of 15 selected narrow CMEs. We extended the study and analyzed ultraviolet spectroscopy of narrow ejections, including several events listed by Gilbert et al. The data were obtained by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS/SOHO). We present comparison of narrow and large CMEs and discuss the relation of the narrow CMEs to coronal jets and/or other narrow transient events. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  9. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  10. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  11. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  12. Research in extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labov, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Instruments designed to explore different aspects of far and extreme ultraviolet cosmic radiation were studied. The far ultraviolet imager (FUVI) was flown on the Aries sounding rocket. Its unique large format 75mm detector mapped out the far ultraviolet background radiation with a resolution of only a few arc minutes. Analysis of this data indicates to what extent the FUVI background is extra galactic in origin. A power spectrum of the spatial fluctuations will have direct consequences for galactic evolution.

  13. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOEpatents

    McCann, Michael P.; Chen, Chung H.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  14. Good Afternoon, Sunshine! Protecting Children from Ultraviolet Rays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Certo, Delaine

    1996-01-01

    Notes caregivers' responsibility to protect children from too much exposure to ultraviolet radiation and the potential for melanoma. Provides suggestions on how to prevent children from sunburn and skin cancer, including the proper way to apply sunscreen. (MOK)

  15. Ultraviolet Radiation Induction of Mutation in Penicillium Claviforme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, June; Jolley, Ray

    1986-01-01

    Cites reasons why Penicillium claviforme is an exceptionally good species for ultraviolet induced mutation experiments. Provides a set of laboratory instructions for teachers and students. Includes a discussion section. (ML)

  16. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  17. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of cometary comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    During the past decade, vacuum ultraviolet spectra of over 30 comets have been obtained with the IUE satellite observatory. With few exceptions, the spectra of these comets appear to be similar, with OH and H produced by the photodissociation of water being the dominant species and emissions of C, O, S, CS and CO2(+) usually present. Although signs of variabiity of many kinds in comet spectra appear, the evidence from the UV observations suggests that all comets have the same basic chemical composition and that observed differences are due to evolution and ageing processes. During the 1985-86 apparition of Comet Halley, spectra were also obtained by other spacecraft and by sounding rocket instruments, including a long-slit imaging spectrograph.

  18. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future. PMID:26872163

  19. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  20. Ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds in marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Chalker, B.E.; Dunlap, W.C. )

    1990-01-09

    Studies on the biological effects of solar ultraviolet radiations are becoming increasingly common, in part due to recent interest in the Antarctic ozone hole and in the perceived potential for global climate change. Marine organisms possess many strategies for ameliorating the potentially damaging effects of UV-B (280-320 nm) and the shorter wavelengths of UV-A (320-400nm). One mechanism is the synthesis of bioaccumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds. Several investigators have noted the presence of absorbing compounds in spectrophotometer scans of extracts from a variety of marine organisms, particularly algae and coelenterates containing endosymbiotic algae. The absorbing compounds are often mycosporine-like amino acids. Thirteen mycosporine-like amino acids have already been described, and several others have recently been detected. Although, the mycosporine-like amino acids are widely distributed. these compounds are by no means the only type of UV-B absorbing compounds which has been identified. Coumarins from green algae, quinones from sponges, and indoles from a variety of sources are laternative examples which are documented in the natural products literature. When the biological impact of solar ultraviolet radiation is assessed, adequate attention must be devoted to the process of photoadaptation, including the accumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds.

  1. STS-35 ASTRO-1 cruciform with ultraviolet telescopes - UIT, HUT, WUPPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-35 Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) cruciform with ultraviolet telescopes awaits integration with the instrument pointing system (IPS) in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Operations and Checkout Building cleanroom. The Astro observatory includes three ultraviolet telescopes - the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT), Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) - and support equipment - star tracker (STRK), optical sensor package (OSP), and integrated radiator system (IRS). The ASTRO-1 payload is in onorbit operating configuration. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-415.

  2. Borescope Inspects With Visible Or Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Orlando G.

    1989-01-01

    Quartz optical fibers improve performance at ultraviolet wavelengths. Borescope used to inspect interior of small-diameter tubing by visible light and ultraviolet light. Employs quartz fibers to conduct ultraviolet light and visible light with high efficiency.

  3. The Ultraviolet Behavior of N

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J.J.; Dixon, L.J.; Johansson, H.; Roiban, R.

    2009-05-15

    We describe the construction of the complete four-loop four-particle amplitude of N = 8 supergravity. The amplitude is ultraviolet finite, not only in four dimensions, but in five dimensions as well. The observed extra cancellations provide additional non-trivial evidence that N = 8 supergravity in four dimensions may be ultraviolet finite to all orders of perturbation theory.

  4. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded. PMID:27377245

  5. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded.

  6. Ultraviolet observations of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Code, A. D.; Houck, T. E.; Lillie, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    The first observations of a comet in the vacuum ultraviolet were obtained on January 14, 1970, when OAO-2 recorded the spectrum of the bright comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969g). The observations revealed, among other things, the predicted extensive hydrogen Lyman alpha halo. OAO-2 continued to collect spectrophotometric measurements of this comet throughout January of that year; a photograph of the nucleus in Lyman alpha revealed finer scale structures. In February of 1970, the bright comet Bennet (1969i) became favorable for space observations. On the basis of the OAO discovery, OGO-V made several measurements of comet Bennet with low spatial resolution photometers. Comet Enke was detected by OGO in January of 1971 at a large heliocentric distance from its Lyman alpha emission.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.

    1989-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet testing was not developed which will provide highly accelerated (20 to 50X) exposures that correlate to flight test data. Additional studies are required to develop an exposure methodology which will assure that accelerated testing can be used for qualification of materials and coatings for long duration space flight. Some conclusions are listed: Solar UV radiation is present in all orbital environments; Solar UV does not change in flux with orbital altitude; UV radiation can degrade most coatings and polymeric films; Laboratory UV simulation methodology is needed for accelerated testing to 20 UV solar constants; Simulation of extreme UV (below 200 nm) is needed to evaluate requirements for EUV in solar simulation.

  8. Tunable ultraviolet lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSha, Michael S.; Dolash, Thomas M.; Ross, Brad B.

    2000-07-01

    Here we describe the development of a tunable ultraviolet LIDAR we use as an exploratory tool for fluorescence data acquisition and performance modeling of standoff bio- sensors. The system was developed around a Continuum model ND 6000 dye laser. The laser has a pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hertz and is tunable from 276 to 292 nanometers with a peak fluence of 75 milliJoules per pulse. The receiver consists of a 16-inch Dall-Kirkham telescope optically coupled, in free space mode, to two photomultipliers. The photomultipliers detect direct laser scatter and the resulting fluorescence. We will also describe the results of field trials conducted at Battelle's West Jefferson facility and chamber trials conducted at Aberdeen Proving Grounds.

  9. ANS ultraviolet observations of dwarf Cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturch, C. R.; Wu, C.-C.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of three dwarf Cepheids (VZ Cnc, SX Phe, and AI Vel) are presented. The UV light curves are consistent with those in the visual region. When compared to standard stars, all three dwarf Cepheids exhibit flux deficiencies at the shortest observed wavelengths. The most extreme deficiencies appear for SX Phe; these may be related to the other properties previously noted for this star, including low metallicity, high space motion, and low luminosity.

  10. Polyethylene bags and solar ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Holm-Hansen, O.; Helbling, E.W. )

    1993-01-22

    This technical comment questions the use of polyethylene bags to collect and store samples in a previously reported study on the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on natural phytoplankton assemblages in Antarctic waters. A significant difference in the photosynthetic rates was noted for samples in glassware as opposed to bags, although the overall conclusions remained similar. A response by the original authors is included. 1 tab.

  11. Spatial positioning of all 24 chromosomes in the lymphocytes of six subjects: evidence of reproducible positioning and spatial repositioning following DNA damage with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Kandukuri, Lakshmi; Quadri, Ameer; Becerra, Victor; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Tempest, Helen G

    2015-01-01

    The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1) More peripheral radial organization; 2) Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3) More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively). Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:25756782

  12. Spatial Positioning of All 24 Chromosomes in the Lymphocytes of Six Subjects: Evidence of Reproducible Positioning and Spatial Repositioning following DNA Damage with Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultraviolet B

    PubMed Central

    Kandukuri, Lakshmi; Quadri, Ameer; Becerra, Victor; Simpson, Joe Leigh

    2015-01-01

    The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1) More peripheral radial organization; 2) Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3) More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively). Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:25756782

  13. Effects of exposure to ultraviolet light on the development of Rana pipiens, the northern leopard frog

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.J.; Wofford, H.W.

    1996-10-01

    The increase in ultraviolet light intensity levels due to ozone depletion recently has been linked to the decline in amphibian population. In this experiment, eggs and larvae of Rana pipiens were subjected to differing amounts of ultraviolet radiation to determine the effects of ultraviolet light on the development of amphibian tadpoles. The total length, length of body without tail, and maximum width of each specimen was recorded for a month of the tadpoles` development, including several measurements after the ultraviolet exposures were concluded. It was found that ultraviolet exposure significantly reduced the size of the organisms in comparison with the control group in all three measured areas. Ultraviolet radiation altered the health and appearance of the exposed organisms and was lethal at large amounts. This experiment showed that ultraviolet radiation could cause many problems in developing amphibians. By slowing their development and physically weakening predation, thus contributing to a decline in overall population levels.

  14. ULTRAVIOLET PROTECTIVE COMPOUNDS AS A RESPONSE TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life on Earth has evolved adaptations to many environmental stresses over the epochs. One consistent stress has been exposure to ultraviolet radiation. In response to UVR organisms have adapted myriad responses; behavioral, morphological and physiological. Behaviorally, some orga...

  15. Rhodium Nanoparticles for Ultraviolet Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Anne M.; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Sanz, Juan Marcos; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O.

    2015-02-01

    The non-oxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photo-damage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 minutes. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically-enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  16. Rhodium nanoparticles for ultraviolet plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne M; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Marcos Sanz, Juan; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O

    2015-02-11

    The nonoxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photodamage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 min. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  18. Research in extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet imager (FUVI) was flown on the Aries class sounding rocket 24.015, producing outstanding results. The diffuse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) background spectrometer which is under construction is described. It will be launched on the Black Brant sounding rocket flight number 27.086. Ongoing design studies of a high resolution spectrometer are discussed. This instrument incorporates a one meter normal incidence mirror and will be suitable for an advanced Spartan mission.

  19. An Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Esposito, L. W.; Pryor, W. R.; Stewart, A. I. F.; McClintock, W. E.; Hansen, C. J.

    2003-01-01

    It is vital to include an ultraviolet spectrograph as part of the JIMO payload to Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Ultraviolet measurements are key for understanding the atmospheres, auroral activity and surfaces of these icy satellites, and a UV imaging spectrograph will also complement a visible camera and near-IR spectrometer, to achieve full wavelength coverage in remote sensing of the icy satellites. The UV instrument proposed for JIMO will be similar to that currently on board the Cassini spacecraft. The design draws on the experience of building UV spectrometers for Mariner, Pioneer, Galileo and Cassini. It will have three spectrographic channels that provide images and spectra of the atmosphere, aurorae and surface: An EUV channel (800-110 nm), an FUV channel (110 to 190 nm) range, and an NUV channel (180 to 350 nm).

  20. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is used... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section...

  1. Transmitting and reflecting diffuser. [for ultraviolet light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.; Burcher, E. E.; Kopia, L. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A near-Lambertian diffuser is described which transmits and reflects ultraviolet light. An ultraviolet grade fused silica substrate is coated with vaporized fuse silica. The coating thickness is controlled, one thickness causing ultraviolet light to diffuse and another thickness causing ultraviolet light to reflect a near Lambertian pattern.

  2. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is used... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is used... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is used... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is used... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section...

  6. Ultraviolet studies of Cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    We discuss whether with new evolutionary tracks we still have a problem fitting the Cepheids and their evolved companions on the appropriate evolutionary tracks. We find that with the Bertelli et al. tracks with convective overshoot by one pressure scale height the problem is essentially removed, though somewhat more mixing would give a better fit. By using the results of recent nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations, we find that we also have no problem matching the observed pulsation periods of the Cepheids with those expected from their new evolutionary masses, provided that Cepheids with periods less than 9 days are overtone pulsators. We investigate possible mass loss of Cepheids from UV studies of the companion spectrum of S Mus and from the ultraviolet spectra of the long period Cepheid l Carinae. For S Mus with a period of 9.6 days we derive an upper limit for the mass loss of M less than 10(exp -9) solar mass, if a standard velocity law is assumed for the wind. For l Carinae with a period of 35.5 days we find a probable mass loss of M is approximately 10(exp -5+/-2) solar mass.

  7. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  8. The SPARTAN Ultraviolet Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. D.; Esser, R.; Habbal, S. R.; Hassler, D. M.; Raymond, J. C.; Strachan, L.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Kohl, J. L.; Fineschi, S.

    1992-05-01

    An ultraviolet coronagraph (UVC) is being prepared for a series of orbital flights on NASA's Spartan 201 which is deployed and retrieved by Shuttle. The Spartan 201 payload consists of the UVC and a white light coronagraph developed by the High Altitude Observatory. Spartan is expected to provide 26 orbits of solar observations per flight. The first flight is scheduled for May 1993 and subsequent flights are planned to occur at each polar passage of Ulysses (1994 and 1995). The UVC measures the intensity and spectral line profile of resonantly scattered H I Ly-alpha and the intensities of O VI lambda 1032 and lambda 1037 at heliocentric heights between 1.3 and 3.5 solar radii. A description of the UVC instrument, its characteristics, and the observing program for the first flight will be presented. The initial scientific objective is to determine the random velocity distribution and bulk outflow velocity of coronal protons and the density and outflow velocity of O(5+) in polar coronal holes and adjoining high latitude streamers. This work is supported by NASA under Grant No. NAG5-613 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  9. Ultraviolet investigations for lunar missions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemphill, William R.; Fischer, William A.; Dornbach, J.E.; Narin, Francis

    1966-01-01

    Preliminary field tests of an active ultraviolet imaging system have shown that it is possible to produce linages of the terrain from distances as great as 75 feet by means of reflected ultraviolet light at wavelengths longer than 3300 A. Minerals that luminesce when exposed to ultraviolet energy have been detected from distances as great as 200 feet. With appropriate design modifications, it may be possible to utilize a similar system in detecting luminescing minerals from greater distances. Also, with a similar system and appropriate auxiliary equipment such as image intensifiers, it may be possible to discriminate between naturally occurring materials on the basis of reflected ultraviolet energy at wavelengths shorter than 3000 A. In this part of the spectrum image contrast for some rock types may exceed that from visible light. Information from these and related ultraviolet spectralanalysis studies may be useful in evaluating data obtained from passive ultraviolet systems in lunar orbit as well as from active systems on the lunar surface.

  10. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation cataract: dose dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Per G.; Loefgren, Stefan

    1994-07-01

    Current safety limits for cataract development after acute exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are based on experiments analyzing experimental data with a quantal, effect-no effect, dose-response model. The present study showed that intensity of forward light scattering is better described with a continuous dose-response model. It was found that 3, 30 and 300 kJ/m2UVR300nm induces increased light scattering within 6 h. For all three doses the intensity of forward light scattering was constant after 6 h. The intensity of forward light scattering was proportional to the log dose of UVR300nm. There was a slight increase of the intensity of forward light scattering on the contralateral side in animals that received 300 kJ/m2. Altogether 72 Sprague-Dawley male rats were included. Half of the rats were exposed in vivo on one side to UVR300nm. The other half was kept as a control group, receiving the same treatment as exposed rats but without delivery of UVR300nm to the eye. Subgroups of the rats received either of the three doses. Rats were sacrificed at varying intervals after the exposure. The lenses were extracted and the forward light scattering was estimated. It is concluded that intensity of forward light scattering in the lens after exposure to UVR300nm should be described with a continuous dose-reponse model.

  12. The Apollo 17 far ultraviolet spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 17 command service module in lunar orbit will carry a far ultraviolet scanning spectrometer whose prime mission will be to measure the composition of the lunar atmosphere. Additional observations will include the spectral lunar albedo, the temporary atmosphere injected by the engines of the lunar exploration module, the solar system atmosphere, the galactic atmosphere and the spectra of astronomical sources, including the earth. A detailed description of the experimental equipment which observes the spectral range 1180 to 1680 A, the observing program and broad speculation about the possible results of the experiment, are presented.

  13. Experimental limits of the extreme ultraviolet background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulf-Mathies, C.; Grewing, M.; Kraemer, G.; Schulz-Luepertz, E.; Kimble, R.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Photometric observations of the diffuse extreme ultraviolet background with two photometers having bandpasses of 750-940 A and 1040-1080 A are reported. The payload, which was flown aboard an ARIES sounding rocket in June 1982, is described, including the electron detectors, filters, and calibration. The operation of the probe during the experiment, including its motions, are described. The primary experiment involved spectroscopic observation of the hot white dwarf HZ43. The photometer count rate is shown and the measurements of the diffuse background are compared with theoretical predictions. Despite the lower limits obtained using a narrowband detector, the measurements are not sensitive enough to draw any relevant astrophysical conclusions.

  14. Agent oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1994-01-01

    The goal of our research is a methodology for creating robust software in distributed and dynamic environments. The approach taken is to endow software objects with explicit information about one another, to have them interact through a commitment mechanism, and to equip them with a speech-acty communication language. System-level applications include software interoperation and compositionality. A government application of specific interest is an infrastructure for coordination among multiple planners. Daily activity applications include personal software assistants, such as programmable email, scheduling, and new group agents. Research topics include definition of mental state of agents, design of agent languages as well as interpreters for those languages, and mechanisms for coordination within agent societies such as artificial social laws and conventions.

  15. Cosmic Ultraviolet Polarimetric Imaging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgh, Eric B.; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.; Jaehnig, Kurt P.; Harris, Walter M.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    The Cosmic Ultraviolet Polarimetric Imaging Device (CUPID) is a suborbital sounding rocket payload designed to perform wide-field, polarimetric imaging of the extragalactic ultraviolet background. In doing so, it will also measure the contribution to the UV background from the diffuse Galactic light (DGL), starlight from the Milky Way scattered off of dust. Current uncertanties in the contribution of the DGL to the UV background are due almost entirely to a poor knowledge of the optical properties of the dust in the diffuse ISM at ultraviolet wavelengths. The polarization of the scattered light is sensitive to scattering angle and thus CUPID imaging may help to constrain the spatial distribution and scattering properties of Galactic dust.

  16. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of three LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, R. W.; Keel, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Three galaxies known to be LINERs were observed spectroscopically in the ultraviolet in an attempt to detect the presumed nonthermal continuum source thought to be the source of photoionization in the nuclei. NGC 4501 was found to be too faint for study with the IUE spectrographs, while NGC 5005 had an extended ultraviolet light profile. Comparison with the optical light profile of NGC 5005 indicates that the ultraviolet source is distributed spatially in the same manner as the optical starlight, probably indicating that the ultraviolet excess is due to a component of hot stars in the nucleus. These stars contribute detectable absorption features longward of 2500 A; together with optical data, the IUE spectra suggest a burst of star formation about 1 billion yr ago, with a lower rate continuing to produce a few OB stars. In NGC 4579, a point source contributing most of the ultraviolet excess is found that is much different than the optical light distribution. Furthermore, the ultraviolet to X-ray spectral index in NGC 4579 is 1.4, compatible with the UV to X-ray indices found for samples of Seyfert galaxies. This provides compelling evidence for the detection of the photoionizing continuum in NGC 4579 and draws the research fields of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei closer together. The emission-line spectrum of NGC 4579 is compared with calculations from a photoionization code, CLOUDY, and several shock models. The photoionization code is found to give superior results, adding to the increasing weight of evidence that the LINER phenomenon is essentially a scaled-down version of the Seyfert phenomenon.

  17. NASA's ultraviolet astrophysics branch - The next decade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Kaplan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    We review some of the mission concepts currently being considered by NASA's Astrophysics Division to carry out future observations in the 100-3000 Angstrom region. Examples of possible future missions include UV and visible interferometric experiments, a next generation Space Telescope and lunar-based UV instrumentation. In order to match the science objectives of these future missions with new observational techniques, critical technology needs in the ultraviolet regime have been identified. Here we describe how NASA's Astrophysics Division Advanced Programs Branch is attempting to formulate an integrated technology plan called the 'Astrotech 21' program in order to provide the technology base for these astrophysics missions of the 21st century.

  18. Ultraviolet and thermally stable polymer compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, R. F.; Gloria, H. R.; Goldsberry, R. E.; Adamson, M. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A new class of polymers is provided, namely, poly (diarylsiloxy) arylazines. These novel polymers have a basic chemical composition which has the property of stabilizing the optical and physical properties of the polymer against the degradative effect of ultraviolet light and high temperatures. This stabilization occurs at wavelengths including those shorter than found on the surface of the earth and in the absence or presence of oxygen, making the polymers useful for high performance coating applications in extraterrestrial space as well as similar applications in terrestrial service. The invention also provides novel aromatic azines which are useful in the preparation of polymers such as those described.

  19. Ultraviolet and thermally stable polymer compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, R. F.; Gloria, H. R.; Goldsberry, R. E.; Adamson, M. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A class of polymers is provided, namely, poly(diarylsiloxy) arylazines. These polymers have a basic chemical composition which has the property of stabilizing the optical and physical properties of the polymer against the degradative effect of ultraviolet light and high temperatures. This stabilization occurs at wavelengths including those shorter than found on the surface of the earth and in the absence or presence of oxygen, making the polymers of the present invention useful for high performance coating applications in extraterrestrial space as well as similar applications in terrestrial service. The invention also provides aromatic azines which are useful in the preparation of polymers such as those of the present invention.

  20. Rocket ultraviolet observations of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Mccoy, Robert P.; Woods, Thomas N.; Feldman, Paul D.; Opal, Chet B.

    1987-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of Comet Halley have been obtained in February and March, 1986 with two instrument payloads, one with the Faint Object Telescope and one with a direct imaging electrographic Schmidt camera and an objective grating spectrograph. The observations include spectroscopic imagery in the 1200-200 A wavelength range and imagery of the comet in hydrogen Lyman-alpha (1216 A) radiation. The present observations have been reduced to intensity contour plots in the different emission wavelengths, and production rates are given for the emitting species H, C, O, S, and CO.

  1. Ultraviolet resources over Northern Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Chubarova, Natalia; Zhdanova, Yekaterina

    2013-10-01

    We propose a new climatology of UV resources over Northern Eurasia, which includes the assessments of both detrimental (erythema) and positive (vitamin D synthesis) effects of ultraviolet radiation on human health. The UV resources are defined by using several classes and subclasses - UV deficiency, UV optimum, and UV excess - for 6 different skin types. To better quantifying the vitamin D irradiance threshold we accounted for an open body fraction S as a function of effective air temperature. The spatial and temporal distribution of UV resources was estimated by radiative transfer (RT) modeling (8 stream DISORT RT code) with 1×1° grid and monthly resolution. For this purpose special datasets of main input geophysical parameters (total ozone content, aerosol characteristics, surface UV albedo, UV cloud modification factor) have been created over the territory of Northern Eurasia. The new approaches were used to retrieve aerosol parameters and cloud modification factor in the UV spectral region. As a result, the UV resources were obtained for clear-sky and mean cloudy conditions for different skin types. We show that the distribution of UV deficiency, UV optimum and UV excess is regulated by various geophysical parameters (mainly, total ozone, cloudiness and open body fraction) and can significantly deviate from latitudinal dependence. We also show that the UV optimum conditions can be simultaneously observed for people with different skin types (for example, for 4-5 skin types at the same time in spring over Western Europe). These UV optimum conditions for different skin types occupy a much larger territory over Europe than that over Asia.

  2. WUVS spectrographs of World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, Igor; Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris M.; Shugarov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    WSO-UV (World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet) project is an international space observatory designed for observations in the UV (115 - 320 nm). It includes a 170 cm aperture telescope capable of high-resolution spectroscopy, long slit low-resolution spectroscopy and deep UV and optical imaging. WUVS - the set of three ultraviolet spectrographs are regarded as the main instrument of «Spektr -UF» space mission. The spectrographs unit includes three channels and is intended for acquisition of spectrums of high (R=50000) and low (R=1000) resolution of the observed objects in the electromagnetic radiation's ultraviolet range (115-310 nm). We present the design philosophy of WUVS and summarize its key characteristics. We shall present the main properties of WUVS new structure and current status of its mockups and prototypes manufacturing.

  3. Coordinated ultraviolet and radio observations of selected nearby stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    All of the US2 shifts assigned were successfully completed with simultaneous International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and the Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the proposed target stars. The target stars included dwarf M flare stars and RS CVn stars. The combined ultraviolet (IUE) and microwave (VLA) observations have provided important new insights to the radiation mechanisms at these two widely-separated regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The VLA results included the discovery of narrow-band microwave radiation and rapid time variations in the microwave radiation of dwarf M flare stars. The results indicate that conventional radiation mechanisms cannot explain the microwave emission from these stars. In general, ultraviolet variations and bursts occur when no similar variations are detected at microwave wavelengths and vice versa. Although these is some overlap, the variations in these two spectral regions are usually uncorrelated, suggesting that there is little interaction between the activity centers at the two associated atmospheric levels.

  4. Condenser for ring-field deep ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated or converging beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a flat or curved plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  5. Condenser for ring-field deep-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2001-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation and coral bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Daniel F.; Wellington, Gerard M.

    1993-10-01

    EPISODES of coral bleaching resulting from dissociation of endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) from host coral tissues have occurred with increasing frequency over the past decade on reefs throughout the tropics1,2. These episodes have usually been attributed to increases in sea water temperatures3-10, but the mass bleaching events that occurred throughout the Caribbean during 1987 and 1990 were not readily explained by temperature alone11,12. An additional factor that may have contributed to these bleaching episodes is ultraviolet radiation in the 280-400-nm band. At many localities where bleaching occurred in 1987 and 1990, sea conditions were described as extremely calm with exceptionally clear water13. In the absence of suspended organic and inorganic matter in the water column, higher than average intensities of ultraviolet radiation probably reached all depths within the photic zone for several consecutive months. Evidence for a possible link between ultraviolet radiation and coral bleaching has not been forthcoming2. Here we report results of a field experiment showing that, irrespective of high water temperatures, short-term (three weeks) increases in ultraviolet radiation of a magnitude possible under calm, clear water column conditions can readily induce bleaching in reef-building corals.

  7. An agent-oriented approach to automated mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Odubiyi, Jide

    1994-01-01

    As we plan for the next generation of Mission Operations Control Center (MOCC) systems, there are many opportunities for the increased utilization of innovative knowledge-based technologies. The innovative technology discussed is an advanced use of agent-oriented approaches to the automation of mission operations. The paper presents an overview of this technology and discusses applied operational scenarios currently being investigated and prototyped. A major focus of the current work is the development of a simple user mechanism that would empower operations staff members to create, in real time, software agents to assist them in common, labor intensive operations tasks. These operational tasks would include: handling routine data and information management functions; amplifying the capabilities of a spacecraft analyst/operator to rapidly identify, analyze, and correct spacecraft anomalies by correlating complex data/information sets and filtering error messages; improving routine monitoring and trend analysis by detecting common failure signatures; and serving as a sentinel for spacecraft changes during critical maneuvers enhancing the system's capabilities to support nonroutine operational conditions with minimum additional staff. An agent-based testbed is under development. This testbed will allow us to: (1) more clearly understand the intricacies of applying agent-based technology in support of the advanced automation of mission operations and (2) access the full set of benefits that can be realized by the proper application of agent-oriented technology in a mission operations environment. The testbed under development addresses some of the data management and report generation functions for the Explorer Platform (EP)/Extreme UltraViolet Explorer (EUVE) Flight Operations Team (FOT). We present an overview of agent-oriented technology and a detailed report on the operation's concept for the testbed.

  8. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light. PMID:11886503

  9. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light.

  10. [Health effects of ultraviolet radiation].

    PubMed

    Ohnaka, T

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) occurs from both natural and artificial sources. The main natural source is the sun. On the other hand, artificial UVR sources are widely used in industry and also used in hospitals, laboratories, etc. because of their germicidal properties. They are even used for cosmetic purposes. UVR can be classified into three regions according to its wavelength: as UVA (320-400nm), UVB (320-280nm) and UVC (280-200nm). The UVC has the greatest health effect on humans among the three. The sun radiates a wide range of spectrum of electromagnetic radiation including the UVR, however the radiation below 290 nm in wavelength does not reach the surface of the earth for effective absorption by the stratospheric ozone layer. As a result, UVR from a natural source consists of only UVA and a part of UVB. On the other hand, artificial UVR sources include UVC region and have serious effects on the human body, especially on the skin and eyes. The health effects of UVR on humans can be beneficial or detrimental, depending on the amount and form of UVR, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed. It has been acknowledged that a long period of UVR deficiency may have harmful effects on the human body, such as the development of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children due to a disturbance in the phosphorus and calcium metabolism. Appropriate measures to increase the amount of exposure to UVR, especially to UVB radiation by the use of sun bathing, the exposure to artificial UVR sources, etc. have shown to prevent disease states caused by UVR deficiency. The harmful effects of UVR consist of erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancer is commonly produced by UVR. In this review, various states of UV from solar radiation and the degree of exposure to UVR are introduced. The benefits and harmful health effects of

  11. Corona And Ultraviolet Equipment For Testing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.

    1993-01-01

    Two assemblies of laboratory equipment developed for use in testing abilities of polymers, paints, and other materials to withstand ultraviolet radiation and charged particles. One is vacuum ultraviolet source built around commercial deuterium lamp. Other exposes specimen in partial vacuum to both ultraviolet radiation and brush corona discharge. Either or both assemblies used separately or together to simulate approximately combination of solar radiation and charged particles encountered by materials aboard spacecraft in orbit around Earth. Also used to provide rigorous environmental tests of materials exposed to artificial ultraviolet radiation and charged particles in industrial and scientific settings or to natural ultraviolet radiation and charged particles aboard aircraft at high altitudes.

  12. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) ultraviolet spectral atlas of selected astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chi-Chao; Reichert, Gail A.; Ake, Thomas B.; Boggess, Albert; Holm, Albert V.; Imhoff, Catherine L.; Kondo, Yoji; Mead, Jaylee M.; Shore, Steven N.

    1992-01-01

    The IUE Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas of Selected Astronomical Objects (or 'the Atlas'), is based on the data that were available in the IUE archive in 1986, and is intended to be a quick reference for the ultraviolet spectra of many categories of astronomical objects. It shows reflected sunlight from the Moon, planets, and asteroids, and also shows emission from comets. Comprehensive compilations of UV spectra for main sequence, subgiant, giant, bright giant, and supergiant stars are published elsewhere. This Atlas contains the spectra for objects occupying other areas of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: pre-main sequence stars, chemically peculiar stars, pulsating variables, subluminous stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. This Atlas also presents phenomena such as the chromospheric and transition region emissions from late-type stars; composite spectra of stars, gas streams, accretion disks and gas envelopes of binary systems; the behavior of gas ejecta shortly after the outburst of novac and supernovac; and the H II regions, planetary nebulae, and supernova remnants. Population 2 stars, globular clusters, and luminous stars in the Magellanic Clouds, M31, and M33, are also included in this publication. Finally, the Atlas gives the ultraviolet spectra of galaxies of different Hubble types and of active galaxies.

  13. Observations of stars with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, R. A.; Davidsen, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia as part of the Astron-1 mission during December 1990. During the nine-day flight, HUT carried out 3 A resolution spectrophotometry of a wide variety of astronomical objects, including a number of stellar targets, in the 912-1860 A range of the far ultraviolet. A few nearby stars were observed in the 415-912 A range of the extreme ultraviolet as well. For nearly all of these targets, the spectra obtained by HUT are the first ever obtained in the spectroscopically rich region between Lyman-alpha (1216 A) and the Lyman limit (912 A). Here, we present highlights of the results obtained by HUT in a variety of areas of stellar astronomy.

  14. Internal Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) study program. Volume 1: Technology discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. S., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a simulation study to predict the IUE imaging chain performance are presented, including simulation photographs and transparencies of ultraviolet echelle spectra. Errors in wavelength determination and radiometric measurements due to system degradation are indicated to be minor. Some order overlap is predicted at the bottom of the echelle format.

  15. Ferroelectric Thin-Film Capacitors As Ultraviolet Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita

    1995-01-01

    Advantages include rapid response, solar blindness, and relative invulnerability to ionizing radiation. Ferroelectric capacitor made to function as photovoltaic detector of ultraviolet photons by making one of its electrodes semitransparent. Photovoltaic effect exploited more fully by making Schottky barrier at illuminated semitransparent-electrode/ferroelectric interface taller than Schottky barrier at other electrode/ferroelectric interface.

  16. Indirect Ultraviolet-Reactivation of Phage λ

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacqueline; Devoret, Raymond; Radman, Miroslav

    1974-01-01

    When an F- recipient Escherichia coli K12 bacterium receives Hfr or F-lac+ DNA from an ultraviolet-irradiated donor, its capacity to promote DNA repair and mutagenesis of ultraviolet-damaged phage λ is substantially increased. We call this phenomenon indirect ultraviolet-reactivation, since its features are essentially the same as those of ultraviolet-reactivation; this repair process occurs in pyrimidine dimer excision-deficient strains and produces clear plaque mutations of the restored phage. Moreover, this process is similar to indirect ultraviolet-induction of prophage λ, since it is promoted by conjugation. However, contrarily to indirect induction, it is produced by Hfr donors and occurs in recipients restricting the incoming ultraviolet-damaged donor DNA. The occurrence of indirect ultraviolet-reactivation provides evidence for the existence in E. coli of an inducible error-prone mechanism for the repair of DNA. PMID:4589889

  17. Ultraviolet cometary spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    During the 13 shifts dedicated to observations of Comet Bradfield (including the two European shifts), five high dispersion exposures were obtained with the LWR camera, 27 low dispersion images with the LWR camera, and 36 low dispersion images with the SWP camera of which 5 were observations of the geocoronal background and 4 were taken in a serendipity mode while the nucleus of the comet was centered on the large aperture of the LWR camera.

  18. Inactivation of avirulent Yersinia pestis on food and food contact surfaces by ultraviolet light and freezing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, can occasionally be contracted as a naso-pharangeal or gastrointestinal illness through consumption of contaminated meat. In this study, the use of 254 nm ultraviolet light (UV-C) to inactivate a multi-isolate cocktail of avirulent Y. pestis on food an...

  19. Multi-Agent Information Classification Using Dynamic Acquaintance Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Peng, Shengquan; Raje, Rajeev; Palakal, Mathew; Mostafa, Javed

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of automated information services focuses on information classification and collaborative agents, i.e. intelligent computer programs. Highlights include multi-agent systems; distributed artificial intelligence; thesauri; document representation and classification; agent modeling; acquaintances, or remote agents discovered through…

  20. Tolerance of entomopathogenic fungi to ultraviolet radiation: a review on screening of strains and their formulation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Éverton K K; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto U L; Roberts, Donald W

    2015-08-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from sunlight is probably the most detrimental environmental factor affecting the viability of entomopathogenic fungi applied to solar-exposed sites (e.g., leaves) for pest control. Most entomopathogenic fungi are sensitive to UV radiation, but there is great inter- and intraspecies variability in susceptibility to UV. This variability may reflect natural adaptations of isolates to their different environmental conditions. Selecting strains with outstanding natural tolerance to UV is considered as an important step to identify promising biological control agents. However, reports on tolerance among the isolates used to date must be analyzed carefully due to considerable variations in the methods used to garner the data. The current review presents tables listing many studies in which different methods were applied to check natural and enhanced tolerance to UV stress of numerous entomopathogenic fungi, including several well-known isolates of these fungi. The assessment of UV tolerance is usually conducted with conidia using dose-response methods, wherein the UV dose is calculated simply by multiplying the total irradiance by the period (time) of exposure. Although irradiation from lamps seldom presents an environmentally realistic spectral distribution, laboratory tests circumvent the uncontrollable circumstances associated with field assays. Most attempts to increase field persistence of microbial agents have included formulating conidia with UV protectants; however, in many cases, field efficacy of formulated fungi is still not fully adequate for dependable pest control.

  1. Interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Savage, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Interstellar extinction curves over the region 3600-1100 A for 17 stars are presented. The observations were made by the two Wisconsin spectrometers onboard the OAO-2 with spectral resolutions of 10 A and 20 A. The extinction curves generally show a pronounced maximum at 2175 plus or minus 25 A, a broad minimum in the region 1800-1350 A, and finally a rapid rise to the far ultraviolet. Large extinction variations from star to star are found, especially in the far ultraviolet; however, with only two possible exceptions in this sample, the wavelength at the maximum of the extinction bump is essentially constant. These data are combined with visual and infrared observations to display the extinction behavior over a range in wavelength of about a factor of 20.

  2. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  3. HUBBLE REVEALS ULTRAVIOLET GALACTIC RING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The appearance of a galaxy can depend strongly on the color of the light with which it is viewed. The Hubble Heritage image of NGC 6782 illustrates a pronounced example of this effect. This spiral galaxy, when seen in visible light, exhibits tightly wound spiral arms that give it a pinwheel shape similar to that of many other spirals. However, when the galaxy is viewed in ultraviolet light with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, its shape is startlingly different. Ultraviolet light has a shorter wavelength than ordinary visible light, and is emitted from stars that are much hotter than the Sun. At ultraviolet wavelengths, which are rendered as blue in the Hubble image, NGC 6782 shows a spectacular, nearly circular bright ring surrounding its nucleus. The ring marks the presence of many recently formed hot stars. Two faint, dusty spiral arms emerge from the outer edge of the blue ring and are seen silhouetted against the golden light of older and fainter stars. A scattering of blue stars at the outer edge of NGC 6782 in the shape of two dim spiral arms shows that some star formation is occurring there too. The inner ring surrounds a small central bulge and a bar of stars, dust, and gas. This ring is itself part of a larger dim bar that ends in these two outer spiral arms. Astronomers are trying to understand the relationship between the star formation seen in the ultraviolet light and how the bars may help localize the star formation into a ring. NGC 6782 is a relatively nearby galaxy, residing about 183 million light-years from Earth. The light from galaxies at much larger distances is stretched to longer, redder wavelengths ['redshifted'], due to the expansion of the universe. This means that if astronomers want to compare visible-light images of very distant galaxies with galaxies in our own neighborhood, they should use ultraviolet images of the nearby ones. Astronomers find that the distant galaxies tend to have different structures than nearby ones, even when they

  4. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  5. Anaesthetic agents and the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Westhorpe, R; Blutstein, H

    1990-02-01

    There is an important relationship between the stratospheric ozone layer and the absorption of potentially harmful ultraviolet-B radiation from the sun. Chlorofluorocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons are commonly used chemicals which are implicated in the depletion of the ozone layer. Of the anaesthetic agents, halothane has the greatest potential for depleting ozone although, when compared with the global use of other chlorofluorocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons, its current contribution to the problem is relatively small.

  6. Ultraviolet-Resistant Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Newcombe, David; LaDuc, Myron T.; Osman, Shariff R.

    2007-01-01

    A document summarizes a study in which it was found that spores of the SAFR-032 strain of Bacillus pumilus can survive doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, radiation, and hydrogen peroxide in proportions much greater than those of other bacteria. The study was part of a continuing effort to understand the survivability of bacteria under harsh conditions and develop means of sterilizing spacecraft to prevent biocontamination of Mars that could interfere with the search for life there.

  7. Far-Ultraviolet Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E. G.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1993-12-01

    During a shuttle flight in May, 1991, wide field images were obtained for 12 star fields with the NRL far-ultraviolet cameras. These cameras provide sensitivity bands with effective wavelengths of lambda eff = 1367 Angstroms and lambda eff = 1702 Angstroms. The properties of the resulting magnitude system will be described and compared with previous photometry from the OAO2, ANS and TD1 satellites. Results from several fields in the vicinity of the galactic center will be discussed.

  8. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.

    1991-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) is a NASA astronomy mission which will operate in the 70-760A spectral band. The science payload consists of three grazing incidence scanning telescopes and an EUV spectrometer/deep survey instrument. An overview of the planned mission profile is given, and the instrumentation which comprises the science payload is discussed. The EUVE is scheduled for launch in late August 1991.

  9. Search for ultraviolet Shuttle glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, P. D.; Feldman, P. D.; Henry, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986, the Space Shuttle Columbia carried two ultraviolet experiments (UVX) in an attempt to observe very weak diffuse emission from various astronomical sources at wavelengths below 3200 A with moderate spectral resolution. The experiment attested to the feasibility of low cost astronomy from the Space Shuttle using Get Away Special canisters. Emissions from O2, O, and NO were detected and shown to be consistent with an atmospheric origin.

  10. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mahmoud R

    2005-03-01

    Every living organism on the surface of the earth is exposed to the ultraviolet (UV) fraction of the sunlight. This electromagnetic energy has both life-giving and life-endangering effects. UV radiation can damage DNA and thus mutagenize several genes involved in the development of the skin cancer. The presence of typical signature of UV-induced mutations on these genes indicates that the ultraviolet-B part of sunlight is responsible for the evolution of cutaneous carcinogenesis. During this process, variable alterations of the oncogenic, tumor-suppressive, and cell-cycle control signaling pathways occur. These pathways include (a) mutated PTCH (in the mitogenic Sonic Hedgehog pathway) and mutated p53 tumor-suppressor gene in basal cell carcinomas, (b) an activated mitogenic ras pathway and mutated p53 in squamous cell carcinomas, and (c) an activated ras pathway, inactive p16, and p53 tumor suppressors in melanomas. This review presents background information about the skin optics, UV radiation, and molecular events involved in photocarcinogenesis.

  11. Surface force measurement of ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Amemiya, Hironao; Kobayashi, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) has advantages such as room-temperature operation, high through-put, and high resolution. In the UV-NIL process, the mold needs a release coating material to prevent adhesion of the transfer resin. Usually, fluorinated silane coupling agents are used as release coating materials. To evaluate the release property, surface force analyzer equipment was used. This equipment can measure the surface forces between release-coated or noncoated mold material surfaces and UV-cured resin surfaces in the solid state. Lower surface forces were measured when a release coating was used on the mold material surface.

  12. Ultraviolet observations of astronomical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Joel A.

    1994-01-01

    The final report on 'Ultraviolet Observations of Astronomical Sources,' which ran for a total of three years, roughly between 1 July 1988 and 14 Feb. 1993 is presented. During the first year, I worked at Indiana University; since October, 1989, I have been at Tennessee State University. This grant has supported my studies of archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of zeta Aur binaries, cool stars that are paired with hot stars in binary systems. Such systems are important as a source of detailed knowledge about the structures of chromospheres and winds in cool giant and supergiant stars, since the hot star serves as a probe of many lines of sight through the cool supergiant star's outer atmosphere. By determining the physical conditions along many such lines of sight, a detailed two-dimensional map of the chromosphere and wind may be constructed. The grant grew out of my analysis of archival IUE observations of 31 Cyg in which I analyzed five epochs of an atmospheric eclipse that occurred in 1982. I fit the attenuation spectra of atmospheric eclipse throughout the ultraviolet (lambda(lambda)1175-1950 and lambda(lambda)2500-3100) with theoretically calculated spectra, thereby determining the physical properties of gas (mass column density of absorbers, temperature, and velocity spread) along each observed line of sight. A similar analysis for other such zeta Aur binaries was accomplished and theoretical models for the chromospheres of these stars based on my observations were constructed.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet reflector

    DOEpatents

    Newnam, Brian E.

    1990-01-01

    A multi-faceted mirror forms a retroreflector for a resonator loop in a free electron laser (FEL) operating in the XUV (.lambda.=10-100 nm). The number of facets is determined by the angle-of-incidence needed to obtain total external reflectance (TER) from the facet surface and the angle through which the FEL beam is to be turned. Angles-of-incidence greater than the angle for TER may be used to increase the area of the beam incident on the surface and reduce energy absorption density. Suitable surface films having TER in the 10-100 nm range may be formed from a variety of materials, including Al, single-crystal Si, Ag, and Rh. One of the facets is formed as an off-axis conic section to collimate the output beam with minimum astigmatism.

  14. Solar maximum ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Hyder, C. L.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Shine, R. A.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of the UVSP experiment are to study solar ultraviolet radiations, particularly from flares and active regions, and to measure constituents in the terrestrial atmosphere by the extinction of sunlight at satellite dawn and dusk. The instrument is designed to observe the Sun at a variety of spectral and spatial resolutions in the range from 1150 to 3600 A. A Gregorian telescope with effective focal length of 1.8 m is used to feed a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter containing rotatable magnesium fluoride waveplates is included behind the spectrometer entrance slit and will allow all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Velocities on the Sun can also be measured. The instrument is controlled by a computer which can interact with the data stream to modify the observing program. The observing modes, including rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry, are also described along with plans for mission operations, data handling, and analysis of the observations.

  15. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  16. Ultraviolet stellar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.; Kondo, Y.; Ocallaghan, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During all three Skylab missions, prism-on observations were obtained in 188 starfields and prism-off observations in 31 starfields. In general, the fields are concentrated in the Milky Way where the frequency of hot stars is highest. These fields cover an area approximately 3660 degrees and include roughly 24 percent of a band 30 deg wide centered on the plane of the Milky Way. A census of stars in the prism-on fields shows that nearly 6,000 stars have measurable flux data at a wavelength of 2600A, that 1,600 have measurable data at 2000A, and that 400 show useful data at 1500A. Obvious absorption or emission features shortward of 2000A are visible in approximately 120 stars. This represents a bonanza of data useful for statistical studies of stellar classification and of interstellar reddening as well as for studies of various types of peculiar stars.

  17. Biological sensors for solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Yagura, Teiti; Makita, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Menck, Carlos F M; Schuch, André P

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is widely known as a genotoxic environmental agent that affects Earth ecosystems and the human population. As a primary consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion observed over the last decades, the increasing UV incidence levels have heightened the concern regarding deleterious consequences affecting both the biosphere and humans, thereby leading to an increase in scientific efforts to understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cell death. In fact, the various UV-wavelengths evoke characteristic biological impacts that greatly depend on light absorption of biomolecules, especially DNA, in living organisms, thereby justifying the increasing importance of developing biological sensors for monitoring the harmful impact of solar UV radiation under various environmental conditions. In this review, several types of biosensors proposed for laboratory and field application, that measure the biological effects of the UV component of sunlight, are described. Basically, the applicability of sensors based on DNA, bacteria or even mammalian cells are presented and compared. Data are also presented showing that on using DNA-based sensors, the various types of damage produced differ when this molecule is exposed in either an aqueous buffer or a dry solution. Apart from the data thus generated, the development of novel biosensors could help in evaluating the biological effects of sunlight on the environment. They also emerge as alternative tools for using live animals in the search for protective sunscreen products.

  18. Biological sensors for solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Yagura, Teiti; Makita, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Menck, Carlos F M; Schuch, André P

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is widely known as a genotoxic environmental agent that affects Earth ecosystems and the human population. As a primary consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion observed over the last decades, the increasing UV incidence levels have heightened the concern regarding deleterious consequences affecting both the biosphere and humans, thereby leading to an increase in scientific efforts to understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cell death. In fact, the various UV-wavelengths evoke characteristic biological impacts that greatly depend on light absorption of biomolecules, especially DNA, in living organisms, thereby justifying the increasing importance of developing biological sensors for monitoring the harmful impact of solar UV radiation under various environmental conditions. In this review, several types of biosensors proposed for laboratory and field application, that measure the biological effects of the UV component of sunlight, are described. Basically, the applicability of sensors based on DNA, bacteria or even mammalian cells are presented and compared. Data are also presented showing that on using DNA-based sensors, the various types of damage produced differ when this molecule is exposed in either an aqueous buffer or a dry solution. Apart from the data thus generated, the development of novel biosensors could help in evaluating the biological effects of sunlight on the environment. They also emerge as alternative tools for using live animals in the search for protective sunscreen products. PMID:22163847

  19. The diffuse component of erythemal ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Abel A

    2015-11-01

    The diffuse (Dif) component of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) plays an important role in the daily exposure of humans to solar radiation. This study proposes a semi-empirical method to obtain the Dif component of the erythemal dose rate, or the erythemally weighted irradiance, (EDRDif) calculated from synchronized measurements of the Dif component of UVR (UVDif) and the global (G) irradiances of both UVR (UVG) and the erythemal dose rate (EDRG). Since the study was conducted in the tropics, results involve a wide range of solar zenith angles to which EDRDif is seasonally dependent. Clouds are the main atmospheric agent affecting Dif radiation. The ratio between Dif and G (Dif/G) showed a quadratic dependence on cloud cover with a coefficient of determination r(2) = 0.79. The maxima of EDRDif were mainly above the moderate range (>137.5 mW m(-2)) of the UV-Index and reached the extreme range (>262.5 mW m(-2)) for the spring-summer period. The fraction of the global daily erythemal dose (daily EDG) corresponding to Dif radiation (daily EDDif) ranged from 936 J m(-2) to 5053 J m(-2) and averaged 2673 J m(-2). Daily EDDif corresponded to at least 48% of daily EDG for a practically cloudless sky. Therefore, Dif radiation is a real threat. Lighter skin people (types I and II) can get sunburnt in a couple of minutes under such an incidence of radiation. Moreover, accumulative harm can affect all skin types.

  20. Enhanced inflammation and immunosuppression by ultraviolet radiation in xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) model mice.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi-Hashimoto, H; Tanaka, K; Horio, T

    1996-09-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) gene-deficient mice were developed by gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells. To examine whether these XPA-model mice display photodermatologic abnormalities similar to those in human xeroderma pigmentosum, we investigated the effects of acute ultraviolet radiation on the homozygous (-/-) mice compared to the wild type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/-) mice. A single irradiation with ultraviolet B or topical psoralen plus ultraviolet A treatment induced stronger and longer lasting ear swelling in the (-/-) mice than in the (+/+) and (+/-) mice. Histologic changes including epidermal necrosis, cell infiltration, and sunburn cell formation after ultraviolet B radiation were more prominent in the (-/-) model mice than in the control mice. The (-/-) model mice showed damage of ADPase(+)Langerhans cells at a lower ultraviolet B dose than did the control mice. Moreover, the reappearance of ADPase(+)Langerhans cells after ultraviolet B radiation was delayed in the (-/-) mice compared to the control mice. Although contact hypersensitivity was induced equally in all mice, ultraviolet B-induced local and systemic immunosuppression were greatly enhanced in the (-/-) model mice. The data suggest that the XPA gene-deficient mice may be a useful model of human XPA, because the responses to UV radiation in the mice were very similar to those in the patients with XPA. Moreover, it is possible that enhanced ultraviolet immunosuppression is involved in the development of skin cancers in xeroderma pigmentosum. PMID:8751968

  1. Far ultraviolet wide field imaging and photometry - Spartan-202 Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Opal, Chet B.; Witt, Adolf N.; Henize, Karl G.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory' Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera, which is expected to be a primary scientific instrument aboard the Spartan-202 Space Shuttle mission, is described. This camera is intended to obtain FUV wide-field imagery of stars and extended celestial objects, including diffuse nebulae and nearby galaxies. The observations will support the HST by providing FUV photometry of calibration objects. The Mark II camera is an electrographic Schmidt camera with an aperture of 15 cm, a focal length of 30.5 cm, and sensitivity in the 1230-1600 A wavelength range.

  2. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, < 400 nm), where significant opportunity exists for both fundamental and application research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50

  3. The application of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to control transmission of airborne disease: bioterrorism countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Brickner, Philip W; Vincent, Richard L; First, Melvin; Nardell, Edward; Murray, Megan; Kaufman, Will

    2003-01-01

    Bioterrorism is an area of increasing public health concern. The intent of this article is to review the air cleansing technologies available to protect building occupants from the intentional release of bioterror agents into congregate spaces (such as offices, schools, auditoriums, and transportation centers), as well as through outside air intakes and by way of recirculation air ducts. Current available technologies include increased ventilation, filtration, and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) UVGI is a common tool in laboratories and health care facilities, but is not familiar to the public, or to some heating, ventilation, and air conditioning engineers. Interest in UVGI is increasing as concern about a possible malicious release of bioterror agents mounts. Recent applications of UVGI have focused on control of tuberculosis transmission, but a wide range of airborne respiratory pathogens are susceptible to deactivation by UVGI. In this article, the authors provide an overview of air disinfection technologies, and an in-depth analysis of UVGI-its history, applications, and effectiveness. PMID:12690064

  4. The application of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to control transmission of airborne disease: bioterrorism countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Brickner, Philip W; Vincent, Richard L; First, Melvin; Nardell, Edward; Murray, Megan; Kaufman, Will

    2003-01-01

    Bioterrorism is an area of increasing public health concern. The intent of this article is to review the air cleansing technologies available to protect building occupants from the intentional release of bioterror agents into congregate spaces (such as offices, schools, auditoriums, and transportation centers), as well as through outside air intakes and by way of recirculation air ducts. Current available technologies include increased ventilation, filtration, and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) UVGI is a common tool in laboratories and health care facilities, but is not familiar to the public, or to some heating, ventilation, and air conditioning engineers. Interest in UVGI is increasing as concern about a possible malicious release of bioterror agents mounts. Recent applications of UVGI have focused on control of tuberculosis transmission, but a wide range of airborne respiratory pathogens are susceptible to deactivation by UVGI. In this article, the authors provide an overview of air disinfection technologies, and an in-depth analysis of UVGI-its history, applications, and effectiveness.

  5. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  6. Polymerizable ultraviolet stabilizers for outdoor use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogl, O.

    1982-01-01

    Polymeric materials that are stable enough to use outdoors without changes in excess of 20 years are investigated. Ultraviolet stabilizers or plastic materials were synthesized, polymerizable ultraviolet stabilizers, particularly of the 2(2-hydroxyphenyl)2H-benzotriazole family were prepared their polymerization, copolymerization and grafting onto other polymers were demonstrated, and ultraviolet stabilizing systems were devised. These materials were evaluated from the photophysical point of view.

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CAV-OX ULTRAVIOLET OXIDATION PROCESS MAGNUM WATER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CAV-OX® technology (see Fig- ure 1) destroys organic contaminants, including chlorinated hy- drocarbons, in water. The process uses hydrogen peroxide, hy- drodynamic cavitation, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation to photolyze and oxidize organic compounds present in water at ...

  8. Ozonation followed by ultraviolet irradiation provides effective bacteria inactivation in a freshwater recirculating system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recirculating aquaculture systems may require an internal disinfection process to control population growth of pathogens and heterotrophic bacteria. Ozonation and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are two technologies that have been used to treat relatively large aquaculture flows, including flows withi...

  9. KGB agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    A short story is reported in which the activity of Communist Party of the USSR and secret KGB agents, which were payed by the State, in view of controlling of the conscience of population. The story reffers to the Physics Department of the Moscow University, Planing Institute of the Gosplan of Moldavian S.S.R. and Chishinau Technical University (actually: Technical University of Moldova), where the author has worked during Soviet times. Almost every 6-th citizen in the USSR was engaged in this activity, while actually the former communists rule in the Republic of Moldova.

  10. A review of ultraviolet astronomical research with the Copernicus satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Results of ultraviolet spectrophotometric observations with the satellite Copernicus (OAO-3) are summarized, and are intended to be completely covered through January 1, 1976. Interstellar research recently reviewed elsewhere is not included, although some newer interstellar results are described. A large fraction of the research covered in this review has been carried out by Guest Investigators with Copernicus. A brief description of the spacecraft and its operation is included.

  11. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  12. A high resolution ultraviolet Shuttle glow spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Resolution Shuttle Glow Spectrograph-B (HRSGS-B) is a small payload being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory. It is intended for study of shuttle surface glow in the 180-400 nm near- and middle-ultraviolet wavelength range, with a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm. It will search for, among other possible features, the band systems of excited NO which result from surface-catalyzed combination of N and O. It may also detect O2 Hertzberg bands and N2 Vegard-Kaplan bands resulting from surface recombination. This wavelength range also includes possible N2+ and OH emissions. The HRSGS-B will be housed in a Get Away Special canister, mounted in the shuttle orbiter payload bay, and will observe the glow on the tail of the orbiter.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation and health: friend and foe.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise

    While excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a significant cause of disease burden in Australia and the Western Pacific region, there are well documented beneficial as well as adverse effects of UVR exposure. Ambient UVR levels do not translate directly to personal UVR dose and thus to biological effect - each person's sun-exposure behaviour and pigmentation also play a role. Exposure in childhood may be more important than exposure in adulthood for both beneficial and adverse effects. Stratospheric ozone depletion increases ambient UVR in the UVB wavelength, possibly the most important wavelength for both beneficial and deleterious health effects. There is ongoing research examining the effects of UVR exposure on immune function, including an examination of the possible role of lack of UVR exposure in the aetiology of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:12463975

  14. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection. 38 refs.

  15. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  16. Microgap ultra-violet detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse.

  17. Microgap ultra-violet detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.

    1994-09-20

    A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4,000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap is disclosed. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse. 2 figs.

  18. A standard for ultraviolet radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, G. B.; Spicer, W. E.; Mckernan, P. C.; Pereskok, V. F.; Wanner, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Photoemission diode standards for accurately measuring monochromatic ultraviolet light intensity (3000 A-1100 A) are described that are also blind to visible light. The standard uses an opaque photocathode of Cs2Te and is unique because of its combination of thinness (19 mm), high sensitivity, time stability, and uniformity of response. Design criteria, construction methods, and difficulties overcome in obtaining a stable, uniform, high yield photocathode responses are discussed. Cs2Te is discussed in terms of a model for high yield photoemitters.

  19. JPL Fourier transform ultraviolet spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R. P.; Friedl, R. R.; Sander, Stanley P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Ultraviolet Spectrometer (FTUVS) is a new high resolution interferometric spectrometer for multiple-species detection in the UV, visible and near-IR. As an OH sensor, measurements can be carried out by remote sensing (limb emission and column absorption), or in-situ sensing (long-path absorption or laser-induced fluorescence). As a high resolution detector in a high repetition rate (greater than 10 kHz) LIF system, OH fluorescence can be discriminated against non-resonant background emission and laser scatter, permitting (0, 0) excitation.

  20. Ultraviolet divergences and supersymmetric theories

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnotti, A.

    1984-09-01

    This article is closely related to the one by Ferrara in these same Proceedings. It deals with what is perhaps the most fascinating property of supersymmetric theories, their improved ultraviolet behavior. My aim here is to present a survey of the state of the art as of August, 1984, and a somewhat more detailed discussion of the breakdown of the superspace power-counting beyond N = 2 superfields. A method is also described for simplifying divergence calculations that uses the locality of subtracted Feynman integrals. 74 references.

  1. The far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific objectives and performance characteristics of a new astronomy mission referred to as the far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer, or FUSE are being defined by a team involving people experienced instrumental requirements that best meet the scientific needs. The team is intended to have a lifetime of about one year, ending with the submission of a report to NASA which could be used as the basis for an engineering design study. The principal objective of FUSE is to obtain astronomical spectra at wavelengths shorter than is possible with the Space Telescope.

  2. LYMAN - The far ultraviolet explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, Warren; Osantowski, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The LYMAN FUSE mission concept for far ultraviolet astronomy is presented. The wavelength window from 100 to 1200 A provides access to a wide range of important scientific problems in cosmology, galactic structure, stellar evolution, and planetary magnetospheres, which cannot be studied in any other way. The LYMAN FUSE Phase A study is examining in detail mission operations, instrumentation technology, the construction of the instrument module, and the interfaces between the Instrument Module and the Explorer Platform Mission. Most of the mission observing time will be allotted through a competitive Guest Observer program analogous to that in operation for the IUE.

  3. COMPARING ULTRAVIOLET- AND INFRARED-SELECTED STARBURST GALAXIES IN DUST OBSCURATION AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, Lusine A.; Weedman, Daniel W.; Houck, James R. E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.ed

    2010-06-01

    We present samples of starburst galaxies that represent the extremes discovered with infrared and ultraviolet observations, including 25 Markarian galaxies, 23 ultraviolet-luminous galaxies discovered with GALEX, and the 50 starburst galaxies having the largest infrared/ultraviolet ratios. These sources have z < 0.5 and cover a luminosity range of {approx}10{sup 4}. Comparisons between infrared luminosities determined with the 7.7 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature and ultraviolet luminosities from the stellar continuum at 153 nm are used to determine obscuration in starbursts and dependence of this obscuration on infrared or ultraviolet luminosity. A strong selection effect arises for the ultraviolet-selected samples: the brightest sources appear bright because they have the least obscuration. Obscuration correction for the ultraviolet-selected Markarian+GALEX sample has the form log[UV(intrinsic)/UV(observed)] = 0.07({+-}0.04)M(UV) + 2.09 {+-} 0.69 but for the full infrared-selected Spitzer sample is log[UV(intrinsic)/UV(observed)] = 0.17({+-}0.02)M(UV) + 4.55 {+-} 0.4. The relation of total bolometric luminosity L {sub ir} to M(UV) is also determined for infrared-selected and ultraviolet-selected samples. For ultraviolet-selected galaxies, log L {sub ir} = -(0.33 {+-} 0.04)M(UV) + 4.52 {+-} 0.69. For the full infrared-selected sample, log L {sub ir} = -(0.23 {+-} 0.02)M(UV) + 6.99 {+-} 0.41, all for L {sub ir} in L{sub sun} and M(UV) the AB magnitude at rest frame 153 nm. These results imply that obscuration corrections by factors of 2-3 determined from reddening of the ultraviolet continuum for Lyman break galaxies with z>2 are insufficient, and should be at least a factor of 10 for M(UV) {approx} -17, with decreasing correction for more luminous sources.

  4. Corongraphic Observations and Analyses of The Ultraviolet Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, John L.

    2000-01-01

    The activities supported under NASA Grant NAG5-613 included the following: 1) reduction and scientific analysis of data from three sounding rocket flights of the Rocket Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, 2) development of ultraviolet spectroscopic diagnostic techniques to provide a detailed empirical description of the extended solar corona, 3) extensive upgrade of the rocket instrument to become the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) for Spartan 201,4) instrument scientific calibration and characterization, 5) observation planning and mission support for a series of five Spartan 201 missions (fully successful except for STS 87 where the Spartan spacecraft was not successfully deployed and the instruments were not activated), and 6) reduction and scientific analysis of the UVCS/Spartan 201 observational data. The Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer for Spartan 201 was one unit of a joint payload and the other unit was a White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by the High Altitude Observatory and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The two instruments were used in concert to determine plasma parameters describing structures in the extended solar corona. They provided data that could be used individually or jointly in scientific analyses. The WLC provided electron column densities in high spatial resolution and high time resolution. UVCS/Spartan provided hydrogen velocity distributions, and line of sight hydrogen velocities. The hydrogen intensities from UVCS together with the electron densities from WLC were used to determine hydrogen outflow velocities. The UVCS also provided O VI intensities which were used to develop diagnostics for velocity distributions and outflow velocities of minor ions.

  5. Vehicle/Atmosphere Interaction Glows: Far Ultraviolet, Visible, and Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G.

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft glow information has been gathered from a number of spacecraft including Atmospheric and Dynamic satellites, and Space Shuttles (numerous flights) with dedicated pallet flow observations on STS-39 (DOD) and STS-62 (NASA). In addition, a larger number of laboratory experiments with low energy oxygen beam studies have made important contributions to glow understanding. The following report provides information on three engineering models developed for spacecraft glow including the far ultraviolet to ultraviolet (1400-4000 A), and infrared (0.9-40 microns) spectral regions. The models include effects resulting from atmospheric density/altitude, spacecraft temperature, spacecraft material, and ram angle. Glow brightness would be predicted as a function of distance from surfaces for all wavelengths.

  6. Reflection modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; Martin, Colin J.; Phanco, Graeme; Hare, Neil John O'

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is a widely used treatment which has exceptional success with a variety of skin conditions. Over-exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can however be detrimental and cause side effects such as erythema, photokeratisis, and even skin cancer. Quantifying patient dose is therefore imperative to ensure biologically effective treatment while minimizing negative repercussions. A dose model for treatment would be valuable in achieving these ends. Methods: Prior work by the authors concentrated on modeling the output of the lamps used in treatment and it was found a line source model described the output from the sources to a high degree. In practice, these lamps are surrounded by reflective anodized aluminum in patient treatment cabins and this work extends the model to quantify specular reflections from these planes on patient dose. Results: The extension of the model to allow for reflected images in addition to tube output shows a remarkably good fit to the actual data measured. Conclusions: The reflection model yields impressive accuracy and is a good basis for full UVR cabin modeling.

  7. [The eye and ultraviolet radiation].

    PubMed

    Mihail, S

    1989-01-01

    The latest investigations show that the ultraviolet radiations are more dangerous for the eye than appreciated up to now. There exist 3 types of UV rays: 1. UV with wavelengths between 100 and 280 nm, absorbed by the ozone layer of the stratosphere and which have no impact; 2. UV with wavelengths between 280 and 315 nm, noxious for the cornea; 3. UV with wavelengths between 315 and 400, noxious both for the cornea and for the lens. When the lens is removed, the UV rays penetrate into the retina, where they provoke cystoid macular edema and then detachment of retina of the anterior pole (A ultraviolet with wavelengths between 315 and 400 nm). Up to the age of 10, the cornea and the lens permit UV penetration. After this age, a cumulative effect is produced, by the appearance in the cornea and the lens of fluorescein "chromatophores", a pigmentation, a change of the soluble proteins into insoluble ones, with high molecular weight and appearance of free radicals. The final results of these changes is the formation of a cataract. Aphakia permits the penetration of the UV rays into the retina, where their phototoxic effect works and therefore the implantation of the lens for retaining the UV with 400 nm wavelength is necessary.

  8. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  9. ULTRAVIOLET DISCOVERIES AT ASTEROID (21) LUTETIA BY THE ROSETTA ALICE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. Wm.; Steffl, A.; Birath, E.; Graps, A.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feaga, L.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Cunningham, N.

    2011-06-15

    The NASA Alice ultraviolet (UV) imaging spectrograph on board the ESA Rosetta comet orbiter successfully conducted a series of flyby observations of the large asteroid (21) Lutetia in the days surrounding Rosetta's closest approach on 2010 July 10. Observations included a search for emission lines from gas, and spectral observations of the Lutetia's surface reflectance. No emissions from gas around Lutetia were observed. Regarding the surface reflectance, we found that Lutetia has a distinctly different albedo and slope than both the asteroid (2867) Steins and Earth's moon, the two most analogous objects studied in the far ultraviolet (FUV). Further, Lutetia's {approx}10% geometric albedo near 1800 A is significantly lower than its 16%-19% albedo near 5500 A. Moreover, the FUV albedo shows a precipitous drop (to {approx}4%) between 1800 A and 1600 A, representing the strongest spectral absorption feature observed in Lutetia's spectrum at any observed wavelength. Our surface reflectance fits are not unique but are consistent with a surface dominated by an EH5 chondrite, combined with multiple other possible surface constituents, including anorthite, water frost, and SO{sub 2} frost or a similar mid-UV absorber. The water frost identification is consistent with some data sets but inconsistent with others. The anorthite (feldspar) identification suggests that Lutetia is a differentiated body.

  10. Filling agents.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ioannis P

    2005-06-01

    Injectable fillers have become an important component of minimally invasive facial rejuvenation modalities. Their ease of use, effectiveness, low morbidity, and fast results with minimal downtime are factors that have made them popular among patients. Soft tissue augmentation has evolved to a unique combination of medicine and art. A wide selection of available agents and new products, each one with unique properties, may be used alone or in combination. The physician acquires the tools to rebalance facial characteristics not only by filling wrinkles but also by having the ability to shape the face and restore bony contours and lines. Careful selection of candidates, realistic expectations, and an understanding of the limitations of fillers are crucial for a successful result.

  11. Comparison of the efficacy of narrow band ultraviolet B and narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical catalase-superoxide dismutase treatment in vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Esra Pancar; Aydin, Fatma; Senturk, Nilgun; Canturk, Tayyar; Turanli, Ahmet Yasar

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of free radicals in the epidermis and the role of oxidative stress have been demonstrated in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. So, new treatment modalities that support antioxidant systems may be a choice for treatment. We sought to determine the clinical efficacy of narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical formulation including Cucumis melo superoxide dismutase and catalase (Vitix), over the narrow band ultraviolet B treatment alone. Thirty vitiligo patients (18 female, 12 male; mean age 34 +/- 13 years) were included in this study. 15 patients in Group 1 were treated only with narrow band ultraviolet B whereas 15 patients in Group 2 were treated with narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical Vitix for 6 months. Areas of 21 lesions from each group were measured by point counting methods at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Efficacy of treatment was graded as perfect, good, moderate and poor according to healing percentages of measured areas and both groups were compared statistically. In Group 1 two moderate; in Group 2 one perfect, four moderate healings were observed at the end of the treatment. There was no statistically significant difference according to healing percentages between the two groups (p > 0.05). No adverse effect was reported in either group. The superiority of narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical Vitix treatment over narrow band ultraviolet B treatment could not be demonstrated statistically. There is a need for further studies involving large case series to clarify the results of our preliminary study. PMID:19467974

  12. Gelled Anti-icing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O. F.; Sperber, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Pectin added to antifreeze/water mixture. Formulations include water with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as deicer and pectin as gel former. Without gelling agent, deicer runs off vertical surfaces. Without pectin solution will completely evaporate in far less time. Agents developed have wide potential for ice prevention on runways, highways, bridges and sidewalks.

  13. Pen Ink as an Ultraviolet Dosimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Nathan; Turner, Joanna; Parisi, Alfio; Spence, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    A technique for using highlighter ink as an ultraviolet dosimeter has been developed for use by secondary school students. The technique requires the students to measure the percentage of colour fading in ink drawn onto strips of paper that have been exposed to sunlight, which can be calibrated to measurements of the ultraviolet irradiance using…

  14. Ultraviolet light-an FDA approved technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet Light (254 nm) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved nonthermal intervention technology that can be used for decontamination of food and food contact surfaces. Ultraviolet light is a green technology that leaves no chemical residues. Results from our laboratory indicate that ex...

  15. Far Ultraviolet Imaging from the Image Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U.; Lampton, M.; Geller, S. P.; Stock, J. M.; Abiad, R.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Habraken, S.

    2000-01-01

    Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora. The IMAGE satellite instrument complement includes three Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instruments. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) will provide broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora for maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the LBH N2 bands of the aurora. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a novel form of monochromatic imager, will image the aurora, filtered by wavelength. The proton-induced component of the aurora will be imaged separately by measuring the Doppler-shifted Lyman-a. Finally, the GEO instrument will observe the distribution of the geocoronal emission to obtain the neutral background density source for charge exchange in the magnetosphere. The FUV instrument complement looks radially outward from the rotating IMAGE satellite and, therefore, it spends only a short time observing the aurora and the Earth during each spin. To maximize photon collection efficiency and use efficiently the short time available for exposures the FUV auroral imagers WIC and SI both have wide fields of view and take data continuously as the auroral region proceeds through the field of view. To minimize data volume, the set of multiple images are electronically co-added by suitably shifting each image to compensate for the spacecraft rotation. In order to minimize resolution loss, the images have to be distort ion-corrected in real time. The distortion correction is accomplished using high speed look up tables that are pre-generated by least square fitting to polynomial functions by the on-orbit processor. The instruments were calibrated individually while on stationary platforms, mostly in vacuum chambers. Extensive ground-based testing was performed with visible and near UV simulators mounted on a rotating platform to emulate their performance on a rotating spacecraft.

  16. Psoralen-ultraviolet A treatment with Psoralen-ultraviolet B therapy in the treatment of psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Asim, Sadaf; Ahmed, Sitwat; us-Sehar, Najam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the conventional psoralen-ultraviolet A treatment with psoralen-ultraviolet B therapy in the treatment of psoriasis. Methodology: We studied 50 patients of plaque type psoriasis who were selected to receive either conventional psoralen-ultraviolet A or psoralen-ultraviolet B treatment. Results: There was no significant difference between the two treatment groups in the number of patients whose skin cleared of psoriasis or the number of exposures required for clearance. Profile of side effects and disease status was also similar after three months of follow up. Conclusion: Psoralen-ultraviolet B treatment is as effective as conventional psoralen-ultraviolet A in the treatment of psoriasis. Further long term studies are needed to assess the safety of psoralen-ultraviolet B. PMID:24353623

  17. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps.

    PubMed

    Sliney, David H; Gilbert, David W; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315-400 nm), "black-light," electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV "Black-light" ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products. PMID:27043058

  18. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps

    PubMed Central

    Sliney, David H.; Gilbert, David W.; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315–400 nm), “black-light,” electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV “Black-light” ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products. PMID:27043058

  19. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps.

    PubMed

    Sliney, David H; Gilbert, David W; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315-400 nm), "black-light," electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV "Black-light" ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products.

  20. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  1. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  2. The infrared/ultraviolet connection in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumbas, Nicolaos K.

    In conventional (20th century) physics, high energy or high momentum came to be associated with short distances. The physics of the 21st century is likely to be dominated by a very different perspective. According to the infrared/ultraviolet connection which underlies much of our new understanding of string theory and its connection to gravity, physics of increasing energy or momentum is governed by increasingly large distances. In this thesis, we investigate thoroughly several such examples of infrared/ultraviolet mixing that occur in string theory and analyze their consequences and implications for gravity. Examples include the growth of particle size with momentum, giant gravitons, the infrared/ultraviolet connection in the holographic description of AdS spaces, space/time non commutativity in the context of open string theories and the spacetime uncertainty principle of string theory DxDt~l2s . We also study the consequences of similar uncertainty principles that occur in non-commutative geometry where the coordinates of space do not commute. An important consequence of the non-commutativity is the fact that the particles described by non-commutative field theories have a spatial extension which is proportional to their momentum. This in turn leads to unfamiliar violations of the conventional decoupling of infrared and ultraviolet degrees of freedom in these theories. A final chapter is concerned with the description of large brane configurations in type IIA string theory whose low energy dynamics is described by the Quantum Hall effect. An interesting interplay of infrared/ultraviolet mixing phenomena occurs in the description.

  3. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  4. Detection of latent fingerprints by ultraviolet spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Xiaojing; Wang, Guiqiang

    2013-12-01

    Spectral imaging technology research is becoming more popular in the field of forensic science. Ultraviolet spectral imaging technology is an especial part of the full spectrum of imaging technology. This paper finished the experiment contents of the ultraviolet spectrum imaging method and image acquisition system based on ultraviolet spectral imaging technology. Ultraviolet spectral imaging experiments explores a wide variety of ultraviolet reflectance spectra of the object material curve and its ultraviolet spectrum of imaging modalities, can not only gives a reference for choosing ultraviolet wavelength to show the object surface potential traces of substances, but also gives important data for the ultraviolet spectrum of imaging technology development.

  5. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. . In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  6. Detecting agents.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews a recent set of behavioural studies that examine the scope and nature of the representational system underlying theory-of-mind development. Studies with typically developing infants, adults and children with autism all converge on the claim that there is a specialized input system that uses not only morphological cues, but also behavioural cues to categorize novel objects as agents. Evidence is reviewed in which 12- to 15-month-old infants treat certain non-human objects as if they have perceptual/attentional abilities, communicative abilities and goal-directed behaviour. They will follow the attentional orientation of an amorphously shaped novel object if it interacts contingently with them or with another person. They also seem to use a novel object's environmentally directed behaviour to determine its perceptual/attentional orientation and object-oriented goals. Results from adults and children with autism are strikingly similar, despite adults' contradictory beliefs about the objects in question and the failure of children with autism to ultimately develop more advanced theory-of-mind reasoning. The implications for a general theory-of-mind development are discussed. PMID:12689380

  7. International ultraviolet explorer observatory operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains the Final Report for the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Observatory Operations contract, NAS5-28787. The report summarizes the activities of the IUE Observatory over the 13-month period from November 1985 through November 1986 and is arranged in sections according to the functions specified in the Statement of Work (SOW) of the contract. In order to preserve numerical correspondence between the technical SOW elements specified by the contract and the sections of this report, project management activities (SOW element 0.0.) are reported here in Section 7, following the reports of technical SOW elements 1.0 through 6.0. Routine activities have been summarized briefly whenever possible; statistical compilations, reports, and more lengthy supplementary material are contained in the Appendices.

  8. Extreme ultraviolet Talbot interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Marconi, Mario C

    2015-10-01

    Periodic nanopatterns can be generated using lithography based on the Talbot effect or optical interference. However, these techniques have restrictions that limit their performance. High resolution Talbot lithography is limited by the very small depth of focus and the demanding requirements in the fabrication of the master mask. Interference lithography, with large DOF and high resolution, is limited to simple periodic patterns. This paper describes a hybrid extreme ultraviolet lithography approach that combines Talbot lithography and interference lithography to render an interference pattern with a lattice determined by a Talbot image. As a result, the method enables filling the arbitrary shaped cells produced by the Talbot image with interference patterns. Detailed modeling, system design and experimental results using a tabletop EUV laser are presented. PMID:26480070

  9. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  10. Computational modeling of ultraviolet disinfection.

    PubMed

    Younis, B A; Yang, T H

    2010-01-01

    The efficient design of ultraviolet light (UV) systems for water and wastewater treatment requires detailed knowledge of the patterns of fluid motion that occur in the disinfection channel. This knowledge is increasingly being obtained using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software packages that solve the equations governing turbulent fluid-flow motion. In this work, we present predictions of the patterns of flow and the extent of disinfection in a conventional reactor consisting of an open channel with an array of UV lamps placed with their axes perpendicular to the direction of flow. It is shown that the resulting flow is inherently unsteady due to the regular shedding of vortices from the submerged lamps. It is also shown that the accurate prediction of the hydraulic residence time and, consequently, the extent of disinfection is strongly dependent on the ability of the CFD method to capture the occurrence and strength of the vortex shedding, and its effects on the turbulent mixing processes.

  11. The ultraviolet astronomy mission: Columbus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R.

    1984-01-01

    An ultraviolet astronomy mission (Columbus) is described. It exploits the spectral region between 900 and 1200A, which is extremely rich in containing the Lyman lines of hydrogen and deuterium and the Lyman band of their molecules, together with the resonance lines of many important ions. High resolving power and high sensitivity provide a unique capability for studying the brightest members of neighboring galaxies, the HeI and HeII absorption systems in quasars out to a red shift of 2, and the halos of intervening galaxies. Complementary focal plane instruments are planned in order to allow observations to longer (2000A) and shorter (100A) wavelengths. This wide coverage embraces the resonance lines of all the cosmically abundant elements and a wide range of temperature zones up to 100 million K.

  12. Ultraviolet divergences in cosmological correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Steven

    2011-03-15

    A method is developed for dealing with ultraviolet divergences in calculations of cosmological correlations, which does not depend on dimensional regularization. An extended version of the WKB approximation is used to analyze the divergences in these calculations, and these divergences are controlled by the introduction of Pauli-Villars regulator fields. This approach is illustrated in the theory of a scalar field with arbitrary self-interactions in a fixed flat-space Robertson-Walker metric with arbitrary scale factor a(t). Explicit formulas are given for the counterterms needed to cancel all dependence on the regulator properties, and an explicit prescription is given for calculating finite regulator-independent correlation functions. The possibility of infrared divergences in this theory is briefly considered.

  13. Ultraviolet index: a light in atopic dermatitis and vitamin D research?*

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Kleyton de Carvalho; Igreja, Ana Carolina de Souza Machado; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role played by vitamin D in atopic dermatitis is controversial and has been the focus of many studies. The ultraviolet index has not been considered in this type of research. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study were to assess 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] serum level in atopic dermatitis patients and control group, to investigate the association between atopic dermatitis clinical severity (using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index - SCORAD) and 25(OH)D serum levels, and to evaluate the independent predictors, including Ultraviolet index, SCORAD and 25(OH)D. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 106 atopic dermatitis patients. A control group was matched with a subsample of 54 participants with atopic dermatitis. SCORAD index, laboratory tests, and local Ultraviolet index were assessed. RESULTS: The atopic dermatitis patients had serum 25(OH)D levels and mean UVI significantly higher than the control group. Immunoglobulin E and Ultraviolet index were associated with the SCORAD index. Skin type, age and Ultraviolet index were independent predictors of 25(OH)D. CONCLUSIONS: Although statistically significant, the different levels of 25(OH)D between the paired groups may be attributed to the higher mean Ultraviolet index in atopic dermatitis patients. Since Ultraviolet index is an independent predictor of SCORAD index and of 25(OH)D level, it may work as a confounding factor in studies involving atopic dermatitis and 25(OH)D and must be considered in this kind of research. PMID:26982776

  14. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  15. Ultraviolet spectrometer observations of uranus.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, A L; Herbert, F; Holberg, J B; Hunten, D M; Kumar, S; Sandel, B R; Shemansky, D E; Smith, G R; Yelle, R V; Strobel, D F; Moos, H W; Donahue, T M; Atreya, S K; Bertaux, J L; Blamont, J E; McConnell, J C; Dessler, A J; Linick, S; Springer, R

    1986-07-01

    Data from solar and stellar occultations of Uranus indicate a temperature of about 750 kelvins in the upper levels of the atmosphere (composed mostly of atomic and molecular hydrogen) and define the distributions of methane and acetylene in the lower levels. The ultraviolet spectrum of the sunlit hemisphere is dominated by emissions from atomic and molecular hydrogen, which are kmown as electroglow emissions. The energy source for these emissions is unknown, but the spectrum implies excitation by low-energy electrons (modeled with a 3-electron-volt Maxwellian energy distribution). The major energy sink for the electrons is dissociation of molecular hydrogen, producing hydrogen atoms at a rate of 10(29) per second. Approximately half the atoms have energies higher than the escape energy. The high temperature of the atmosphere, the small size of Uranus, and the number density of hydrogen atoms in the thermosphere imply an extensive thermal hydrogen corona that reduces the orbital lifetime of ring particles and biases the size distribution toward larger particles. This corona is augmented by the nonthermal hydrogen atoms associated with the electroglow. An aurora near the magnetic pole in the dark hemisphere arises from excitation of molecular hydrogen at the level where its vertical column abundance is about 10(20) per square centimeter with input power comparable to that of the sunlit electroglow (approximately 2x10(11) watts). An initial estimate of the acetylene volume mixing ratio, as judged from measurements of the far ultraviolet albedo, is about 2 x 10(-7) at a vertical column abundance of molecular hydrogen of 10(23) per square centimeter (pressure, approximately 0.3 millibar). Carbon emissions from the Uranian atmosphere were also detected. PMID:17812892

  16. The extreme ultraviolet explorer mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, S.; Malina, R. F.

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) mission, currently scheduled for launch in September 1991, is described. The primary purpose of the mission is to survey the celestial sphere for astronomical sources of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. The survey will be accomplished with the use of three EUV telescopes, each sensitive to a different segment of the EUV band. A fourth telescope will perform a high sensitivity search of a limited sample of the sky in the shortest wavelength bands. The all-sky survey will be carried out in the first six months of the mission and will be made in four bands, or colors, λλ70-180 Å, 170-250 Å, 400-600 Å, and 500-700 Å. The second phase of the mission, conducted entirely by Guest Observers selected by NASA, will be devoted to spectroscopic observations of EUV sources. The performance of the instrument components is described. The mirrors meet the requirements of the mission, with the best mirror having a full width half energy spread of 4'' and a surface finish of 20 Å. Prototype thin film bandpass filters have been flown on the Space Shuttle and their performance optimized. Prototype detectors have been developed which have 1680 × 1680 pixel imaging capability (RMS) and up to 80% quantum efficiency. A newly invented, high efficiency grazing incidence spectrometer using variable line-space gratings will provide spectral data with ~1 Å resolution. An end-to-end model of the mission, from a stellar source to the resulting scientific data, has been constructed. Hypothetical data from astronomical sources have been processed through this model and are shown.

  17. Ultraviolet spectrometer observations of uranus.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, A L; Herbert, F; Holberg, J B; Hunten, D M; Kumar, S; Sandel, B R; Shemansky, D E; Smith, G R; Yelle, R V; Strobel, D F; Moos, H W; Donahue, T M; Atreya, S K; Bertaux, J L; Blamont, J E; McConnell, J C; Dessler, A J; Linick, S; Springer, R

    1986-07-01

    Data from solar and stellar occultations of Uranus indicate a temperature of about 750 kelvins in the upper levels of the atmosphere (composed mostly of atomic and molecular hydrogen) and define the distributions of methane and acetylene in the lower levels. The ultraviolet spectrum of the sunlit hemisphere is dominated by emissions from atomic and molecular hydrogen, which are kmown as electroglow emissions. The energy source for these emissions is unknown, but the spectrum implies excitation by low-energy electrons (modeled with a 3-electron-volt Maxwellian energy distribution). The major energy sink for the electrons is dissociation of molecular hydrogen, producing hydrogen atoms at a rate of 10(29) per second. Approximately half the atoms have energies higher than the escape energy. The high temperature of the atmosphere, the small size of Uranus, and the number density of hydrogen atoms in the thermosphere imply an extensive thermal hydrogen corona that reduces the orbital lifetime of ring particles and biases the size distribution toward larger particles. This corona is augmented by the nonthermal hydrogen atoms associated with the electroglow. An aurora near the magnetic pole in the dark hemisphere arises from excitation of molecular hydrogen at the level where its vertical column abundance is about 10(20) per square centimeter with input power comparable to that of the sunlit electroglow (approximately 2x10(11) watts). An initial estimate of the acetylene volume mixing ratio, as judged from measurements of the far ultraviolet albedo, is about 2 x 10(-7) at a vertical column abundance of molecular hydrogen of 10(23) per square centimeter (pressure, approximately 0.3 millibar). Carbon emissions from the Uranian atmosphere were also detected.

  18. Thin film solar cell inflatable ultraviolet rigidizable deployment hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simburger, Edward J. (Inventor); Matsumoto, James H. (Inventor); Giants, Thomas W. (Inventor); Garcia, III, Alec (Inventor); Perry, Alan R. (Inventor); Rawal, Suraj (Inventor); Marshall, Craig H. (Inventor); Lin, John K. H. (Inventor); Day, Jonathan Robert (Inventor); Kerslake, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A flexible inflatable hinge includes curable resin for rigidly positioning panels of solar cells about the hinge in which wrap around contacts and flex circuits are disposed for routing power from the solar cells to the power bus further used for grounding the hinge. An indium tin oxide and magnesium fluoride coating is used to prevent static discharge while being transparent to ultraviolet light that cures the embedded resin after deployment for rigidizing the inflatable hinge.

  19. The Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Legacy of HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope has been a spectacularly successful platform for spectroscopy in the diagnostic-rich far-ultraviolet (FUV: 120-170 nm) and near-ultraviolet (NUV: 170-310 nm) regions. HST has hosted four generations of UV instruments, beginning with Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) and Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) in the original 1990 payload, followed by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in 1997, and more recently Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) as part of Servicing Mission 4 in 2009. The latter two instruments have contributed by far the lion's share of HST's spectroscopic archive: STIS, because of its longevity (thirteen years in operation so far, although with a hiatus between 2004-2009); and COS because of its high sensitivity, which allows efficient observations, and thus many more targets in a typical GO program. STIS benefits from a compact echelle design, and the sharp stable imaging of HST, to provide high-resolution (3-7 km s-1) spectra of bright objects, including stars, nebulae, quasars, novae, and so forth. COS achieves astounding sensitivity in the FUV by a sophisticated design that compensates for the spherical abberation of HST's primary mirror, disperses the target's light, and focuses the spectral image all with just a single optical element. While the spectral resolution of COS (about 18 km s-1) is not as high as that of STIS, it is adequate for diverse investigations, including faint broad-lined AGN at the edge of the Universe, hot stars in nearby galaxies, and magnetically active planet-hosting red dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. Thanks in part to the "UV Initiative" in recent HST proposal cycles, there have been several large efforts involving both STIS and COS, to assemble important spectral collections, including full UV atlases of representative hot and cool stars at high resolution with STIS; long time series of archetype AGN ("reverberation mapping") with COS; and hundreds of sightlines to distant

  20. STEREO's Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    At a pixel resolution of 2048x2048, the STEREO EUVI instrument provides views of the Sun in ultraviolet light that rivals the full-disk views of SOHO/EIT. This image is through the 171 Angstrom (ultraviolet) filter which is characteristic of iron ions (missing eight and nine electrons) at 1 million degrees. There is a short data gap in the latter half of the movie that creates a freeze and then jump in the data view. This is a movie of the Sun in 171 Angstrom ultraviolet light. The time frame is late January, 2007

  1. Measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.; Craven, John D.; Frank, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite has been used to measure the intensity of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation on two great circles about the sky. It is found that the isotropic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation (possibly of extragalactic origin) has an intensity of 530 + or - 80 units (a unit is 1 photon per sq cm s A sr) at a wavelength of 150 nm. The Galactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has a dependence on Galactic latitude which requires strongly forward scattering particles if it is produced by dust above the Galactic plane.

  2. Green tea protects against psoralen plus ultraviolet A-induced photochemical damage to skin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J F; Zhang, Y J; Jin, X H; Athar, M; Santella, R M; Bickers, D R; Wang, Z Y

    1999-12-01

    .7%) in psoralen plus ultraviolet A-treated skin. Oral administration of 0.4% or 0.8% standardized green tea extract 1 d after psoralen plus ultraviolet A treatment was effective in reducing psoralen plus ultraviolet A-induced inflammatory responses including erythema and edema formation. When standardized green tea extract was applied to EpiDerm, a reconstituted human skin equivalent, psoralen plus ultraviolet A-induced 8-methoxypsoralen-DNA adduct formation and p53 protein accumulation were inhibited. Topical application of 0.2 mg 8-methoxypsoralen per cm2 followed by exposure to ultraviolet A (2.5 J per cm2) resulted in delayed erythema formation in human subjects. Pretreatment of human skin with topical application of 0.2 mg standardized green tea extract per cm2 30 min prior to psoralen plus ultraviolet A treatment resulted in an almost complete abrogation of psoralen plus ultraviolet A-induced erythema. In summary, these data demonstrate that standardized green tea extract protects against psoralen plus ultraviolet A-induced phototoxicity by inhibiting DNA damage and diminishing the inflammatory effects of this modality.

  3. Amphibian defenses against ultraviolet-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, Andrew R; Belden, Lisa K

    2003-01-01

    As part of an overall decline in biodiversity, amphibian populations throughout the world are disappearing. There are a number of potential causes for these declines, including those related to environmental changes such as increasing ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation due to stratospheric ozone depletion. UV-B radiation can kill amphibian embryos or can cause sublethal effects that can harm amphibians in later life stages. However, amphibians have defenses against UV-B damage that can limit damage or repair it after exposure to UV-B radiation. These include behavioral, physiological, and molecular defenses. These defenses differ interspecifically, with some species more able to cope with exposure to UV-B than others. Unfortunately, the defense mechanisms of many species may not be effective against increasing persistent levels of UV-B radiation that have only been present for the past several decades due to human-induced environmental damage. Moreover, we predict that persistent UV-B-induced mortality and sublethal damage in species without adequate defenses could lead to changes in community structure. In this article we review the effects of UV-B radiation on amphibians and the defenses they use to avoid solar radiation and make some predictions regarding community structure in light of interspecific differences in UV-B tolerance. PMID:12492415

  4. Melanoma induction by ultraviolet A but not ultraviolet B radiation requires melanin pigment.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Frances P; Zaidi, M Raza; Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Anver, Miriam R; Bahn, Jesse; Wielgus, Albert; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mouret, Stephane; Tucker, Margaret A; Popratiloff, Anastas; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C

    2012-06-06

    Malignant melanoma of the skin (CMM) is associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure, but the mechanisms and even the wavelengths responsible are unclear. Here we use a mammalian model to investigate melanoma formed in response to precise spectrally defined ultraviolet wavelengths and biologically relevant doses. We show that melanoma induction by ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) requires the presence of melanin pigment and is associated with oxidative DNA damage within melanocytes. In contrast, ultraviolet B radiation (280-320 nm) initiates melanoma in a pigment-independent manner associated with direct ultraviolet B DNA damage. Thus, we identified two ultraviolet wavelength-dependent pathways for the induction of CMM and describe an unexpected and significant role for melanin within the melanocyte in melanomagenesis.

  5. HD 219150 - A star with a remarkable ultraviolet excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, J. D.; Bolton, C. T.

    1980-06-01

    HD 219150, an F0 V star with a one-quarter magnitude excess in (U-B) as shown by UBVRI and four-color-H beta observations, is discussed. An attempt is made to explain this excess by examining metal deficiency in HD 219150 and by seeking an extremely hot subdwarf companion. Spectrograms at both classification and higher dispersions discounted the first possibility, while far ultraviolet data and radial-velocity measurements eliminated the second. Computation of the fluxes expected from free-bound Balmer emission and free-free emission from an optically thin gas also proved unsuccessful in explaining the ultraviolet data. Also considered was variability on a long time scale, but the star was found constant in light, including U, to better than 0.01 m over four months of observation.

  6. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Xinbing; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-01

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer-Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  7. The Ultraviolet Spectral Morphology of a Sample of B Supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, R. C.; Borchers, A. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Fahey, R. P.

    1995-05-01

    A study of the ultraviolet spectra of a sample of B supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud is being undertaken as a means of addressing some questions about the nature and evolution of massive stars. All spectra are new or archival low-dispersion SWP spectra (1200Ultraviolet Explorer. As a first step in this study, the ultraviolet spectral morphology of approximately 50 program stars is being examined for consistency with their published spectral classifications. Analysis includes a tabulation of ultraviolet spectral features, evaluation of their variation with spectral type and luminosity class, and comparison with IUE spectral sequences of standard stars. The data analysis was performed at the IUE Data Analysis Center at Goddard Space Flight Center. Partial support of this work by NASA and Northern Kentucky University through the Joint Ventures (JOVE) program, and support of the Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics at GSFC, is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Wang, Xinbing Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-21

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer–Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  10. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  12. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  14. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  15. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Craig E.; Zepp, Richard G.; Lucas, Robyn M.; Madronich, Sasha; Austin, Amy T.; Ballaré, Carlos L.; Norval, Mary; Sulzberger, Barbara; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; McKenzie, Richard L.; Robinson, Sharon A.; Häder, Donat-P.; Paul, Nigel D.; Bornman, Janet F.

    2014-06-01

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex interactions between the drivers of climate change and those of stratospheric ozone depletion, and the positive and negative feedbacks among climate, ozone and ultraviolet radiation. These will result in both risks and benefits of exposure to ultraviolet radiation for the environment and human welfare. This Review synthesizes these new insights and their relevance in a world where changes in climate as well as in stratospheric ozone are altering exposure to ultraviolet radiation with largely unknown consequences for the biosphere.

  16. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-05-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation.

  17. Web Search Agents: "One-Stop Shopping" for Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Explains Web search agents as tools that apply intelligent agent software technology for the purpose of automating, improving, and speeding up online search operations. Topics include intelligent desktop agents; search agent marketplace; comparing Web search agents; subjective evaluations; and use by researchers. (LRW)

  18. Ultraviolet radiation as disinfection for fish surgical tools

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Geist, David R.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-04-04

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelomic cavity of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When fish are implanted consecutively, as in large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. To determine the efficacy for this application, ultraviolet (UV) radiation was used to disinfect surgical tools exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica, causative agents of furunculosis, coldwater disease, bacterial kidney disease, and saprolegniasis (water mold), respectively. Four experiments were conducted to address the question of UV efficacy. In the first experiment, forceps were exposed to the three bacteria at three varying concentrations. After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods – 2, 5, or 15 min. UV radiation exposures at all durations were effective at killing all three bacteria on forceps at the highest bacteria concentrations. In the second experiment, stab scalpels, sutures, and needle holders were exposed to A. salmonicida using the same methodology as used in Experiment 1. UV radiation exposure at 5 and 15 min was effective at killing A. salmonicida on stab scalpels and sutures but not needle holders. In the third experiment, S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV radiation was effective at killing the water mold at all three exposure durations. Collectively, this study shows that UV

  19. The Diffuse Extreme Ultraviolet Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John; Slavin, Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the diffuse EUV background towards 138 different directions using the spectrometers aboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite (EUVE) have been combined into a spectrum from 150A to 730A and represent an effective exposure of 18 million seconds. There is no significant evidence of any non-local line flux in the resultant spectrum such as that from a hot coronal plasma. These results are inconsistent with the Wisconsin C and B broad-band surveys assuming the source is a logT = 5.8 - 6.1 hot plasma in ionization equilibrium with solar abundances, confirming the previous result of Jelinksy, Vallerga and Edelstein) (hereafter Paper 1) using an observation along the ecliptic with the same instrument. To make these results consistent with the previous broad-band surveys, the plasma responsible for the emission must either be depleted in Fe by a factor of approximately 6, be behind an absorbing slab of neutral H with a column of 2 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, or not be in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE). One such non-CIE model (Breitswerdt and Schmutzier) that explains the soft x-ray results is also inconsistent with this EUV data.

  20. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes research activities related to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sky survey. About 745 luminous stars were examined for the presence of interstellar dust heated by a nearby star. The 'cirrus' discovered by IRAS is thermal radiation from interstellar dust at moderate and high galactic latitudes. The IRAS locates the dust which must (at some level) scatter ultraviolet starlight, although it was expected that thermal emission would be found around virtually every star, most stars shown no detectable emission. And the emission found is not uniform. It is not that the star is embedded in 'an interstellar medium', but rather what is found are discrete clouds that are heated by starlight. An exception is the dearth of clouds near the very hottest stars, implying that the very hottest stars play an active role with respect to destroying or substantially modifying the dust clouds over time. The other possibility is simply that the hottest stars are located in regions lacking in dust, which is counter-intuitive. A bibliography of related journal articles is attached.

  1. Ultraviolet disinfection of contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Harris, M G; Fluss, L; Lem, A; Leong, H

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions, we contaminated soft lenses (Bausch & Lomb Optima 38), rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses (Oxyflow F-30), and their storage solutions with three common bacteria. Escherichia coli (E.c.), Staphylococcus epidermis (S.e.), and Serratia marcescens (S.m.). The storage solutions used were saline solution and RGP conditioning solution. We determined the exposure times to 253.7-nm wavelength UV radiation necessary to disinfect the contact lenses and solutions. The decimal reduction values (D values) found for UV radiation were 10 to 200 hundred times shorter than reported for currently available disinfection systems. For E.c., sterilization was attained after 100 s of exposure. For S.e. and S.m., sterilization occurred after 300 s of exposure. Different contact lens solutions transmit UV radiation to various degrees, with saline solution passing more than 90% of the UV radiation. Thus, our results indicate that UV radiation is an effective and rapid method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions. PMID:8247487

  2. Ultraviolet disinfection of contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Harris, M G; Fluss, L; Lem, A; Leong, H

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions, we contaminated soft lenses (Bausch & Lomb Optima 38), rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses (Oxyflow F-30), and their storage solutions with three common bacteria. Escherichia coli (E.c.), Staphylococcus epidermis (S.e.), and Serratia marcescens (S.m.). The storage solutions used were saline solution and RGP conditioning solution. We determined the exposure times to 253.7-nm wavelength UV radiation necessary to disinfect the contact lenses and solutions. The decimal reduction values (D values) found for UV radiation were 10 to 200 hundred times shorter than reported for currently available disinfection systems. For E.c., sterilization was attained after 100 s of exposure. For S.e. and S.m., sterilization occurred after 300 s of exposure. Different contact lens solutions transmit UV radiation to various degrees, with saline solution passing more than 90% of the UV radiation. Thus, our results indicate that UV radiation is an effective and rapid method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions.

  3. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  4. Ultraviolet Behavior of N = 8 supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    In these lectures the author describes the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of N = 8 supergravity, which through four loops is no worse than that of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory (a finite theory). I also explain the computational tools that allow multi-loop amplitudes to be evaluated in this theory - the KLT relations and the unitarity method - and sketch how ultraviolet divergences are extracted from the amplitudes.

  5. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, K.N.; Scarrow, R.C.; White, D.L.

    1985-11-12

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided. 4 tabs.

  6. Using Intelligent Agents To Assist Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knode, Steve; Knode, Jon-David W.

    This paper begins with background on intelligent agents (software programs built to perform certain specific tasks for the user). A taxonomy that categorizes intelligent agents by the degree of intelligence embedded in the software is presented. Applications of today's intelligent agents are discussed, including specific examples of the following:…

  7. Preparing Change Agents for Change Agent Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, James R.

    Seventy-seven Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking agricultural change agents from developing Central and South American countries responded to a questionnaire which sought perceptions of the roles in which the change agents felt they were involved and the roles for which they felt they were being trained. The agents were participating in training…

  8. Melanocyte photobiology, ultraviolet radiation and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Seo, S-J; Fisher, D E

    2010-10-01

    Of all the organs of the human body, the skin is most commonly affected by malignancy, and ultraviolet radiation has long been implicated as the primary mutagenic exposure leading to the development of many cutaneous cancers. However, as research in this field has continued, it has become clear that the effect of ultraviolet radiation on the skin is quite complex. Distinct cell types within the skin exhibit differing responses to ultraviolet radiation, and even within the same cell type, divergent effects may be observed; depending on the dose or wavelength of the radiation, or the maturational state of the affected cell, unique responses can be elicited. Melanocytes form a minor component of the outermost layer of skin, but they have an enormous impact on not only the appearance of the skin, but also the ability of the skin to withstand exposure to ultraviolet radiation. In addition, melanocytes give rise to melanoma, one of the most deadly types of skin cancer. Clearly, it is critical that we achieve a better understanding of the effect of ultraviolet radiation on melanocytes, and that we clarify its role in the oncogenesis of melanoma. Although the picture is far from complete, the mechanisms by which melanocytes respond to ultraviolet radiation are beginning to be elucidated, and, as these pathways emerge, they offer new targets for chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic intervention.

  9. Ultraviolet disinfection of water for small water supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. A.; Seabloom, R. W.; Dewalle, F. B.; Wetzler, T. F.; Engeset, J.

    1985-07-01

    In the study ultraviolet radiation was considered as an alternative means of disinfection of small drinking water supplies. A major impetus for the study was the large increase in waterborne disease episodes in the United States whose etiologic agent, Giardia lamblia, was found to be highly resistant to conventional chlorination. While the germicidal effect of sunlight has long been known, it has been found that artificial UV radiation with a wavelength of 253.7 nm, can be produced by low pressure mercury vapor lamps. The inactivation of microorganisms by UV radiation is based upon photochemical reactions in DNA which result in errors in the coding system. Inactivation of microorganisms due to exposure to UV is proportional to the intensity multiplied by the time of exposure.

  10. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  11. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity.

  12. Sources and measurement of ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian L

    2002-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The biological effects of UV radiation vary enormously with wavelength and for this reason the UV spectrum is further subdivided into three regions: UVA, UVB, and UVC. Quantities of UV radiation are expressed using radiometric terminology. A particularly important term in clinical photobiology is the standard erythema dose (SED), which is a measure of the erythemal effectiveness of a UV exposure. UV radiation is produced either by heating a body to an incandescent temperature, as is the case with solar UV, or by passing an electric current through a gas, usually vaporized mercury. The latter process is the mechanism whereby UV radiation is produced artificially. Both the quality (spectrum) and quantity (intensity) of terrestrial UV radiation vary with factors including the elevation of the sun above the horizon and absorption and scattering by molecules in the atmosphere, notably ozone, and by clouds. For many experimental studies in photobiology it is simply not practicable to use natural sunlight and so artificial sources of UV radiation designed to simulate the UV component of sunlight are employed; these are based on either optically filtered xenon arc lamps or fluorescent lamps. The complete way to characterize an UV source is by spectroradiometry, although for most practical purposes a detector optically filtered to respond to a limited portion of the UV spectrum normally suffices.

  13. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Robert Grimes, David

    2016-08-21

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity.

  14. Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopic Biofilm Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet-absorption spectrometer system has been developed as a prototype instrument to be used in continuous, real-time monitoring to detect the growth of biofilms. Such monitoring is desirable because biofilms are often harmful. For example, biofilms in potable-water and hydroponic systems act as both sources of pathogenic bacteria that resist biocides and as a mechanism for deterioration (including corrosion) of pipes. Biofilms formed from several types of hazardous bacteria can thrive in both plant-growth solutions and low-nutrient media like distilled water. Biofilms can also form in condensate tanks in air-conditioning systems and in industrial heat exchangers. At present, bacteria in potable-water and plant-growth systems aboard the space shuttle (and previously on the Mir space station) are monitored by culture-plate counting, which entails an incubation period of 24 to 48 hours for each sample. At present, there are no commercially available instruments for continuous monitoring of biofilms in terrestrial or spaceborne settings.

  15. Chemical origins of the Mars ultraviolet dayglow.

    PubMed

    Huestis, David L; Slanger, Tom G; Sharpee, Brian D; Fox, Jane L

    2010-01-01

    Airglow optical emissions from planetary atmospheres provide remotely observable signatures of atmospheric composition, energy deposition processes, and the resulting chemical reactions. We may one day be able to detect airglow emissions from extrasolar planets. Reliable interpretation requires quantitative understanding of the energy sources and chemical mechanisms that produce them. The ultraviolet dayglow observations by the Mariner 6 and 7 (1969) and Mariner 9 (1971-72) motivated numerous modeling studies and laboratory experiments. The most obvious source reaction is photodissociation and photoionization of ambient CO2, which is known in the laboratory to produce the four strong dayglow emitting states: hv + CO2 --> O(1S), CO(a3pi), CO2(+)(A2pi(u) & B2sigma u(+)). (1) If this simplest of models were sufficient, then the high altitude dayglow emissions would all share the same scale height, which would be that of CO2. The few Mariner dayglow observations provide weak statistics. Addition of 4 months of Mars Express dayglow data, and including radio occultation and mass spectrometry data from other missions, have made the analyses and conclusions more robust. The CO(a3pi) and CO2+(B2sigma u(+)) dayglow altitude profiles are consistent with Reaction (1). In contrast, the O(1S) dayglow scale heights are much larger and are consistent with source Reaction (2): O2(+) + e(-) --> O(1S) (2). Both sets of scale heights change with respect to solar activity roughly as suggested by modeling studies. PMID:21302553

  16. Sources and measurement of ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian L

    2002-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The biological effects of UV radiation vary enormously with wavelength and for this reason the UV spectrum is further subdivided into three regions: UVA, UVB, and UVC. Quantities of UV radiation are expressed using radiometric terminology. A particularly important term in clinical photobiology is the standard erythema dose (SED), which is a measure of the erythemal effectiveness of a UV exposure. UV radiation is produced either by heating a body to an incandescent temperature, as is the case with solar UV, or by passing an electric current through a gas, usually vaporized mercury. The latter process is the mechanism whereby UV radiation is produced artificially. Both the quality (spectrum) and quantity (intensity) of terrestrial UV radiation vary with factors including the elevation of the sun above the horizon and absorption and scattering by molecules in the atmosphere, notably ozone, and by clouds. For many experimental studies in photobiology it is simply not practicable to use natural sunlight and so artificial sources of UV radiation designed to simulate the UV component of sunlight are employed; these are based on either optically filtered xenon arc lamps or fluorescent lamps. The complete way to characterize an UV source is by spectroradiometry, although for most practical purposes a detector optically filtered to respond to a limited portion of the UV spectrum normally suffices. PMID:12231182

  17. Ultraviolet Radiation on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, D. C.; Cockell, C. S.; McKay, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    An evaluation of the ultraviolet (UV) flux incident on the Martian surface is important for a number of issues. UV-induced photolysis of water changes the chemistry of the soil and atmosphere, inducing its oxidizing nature. Alternatively, UV may directly affect surface chemistry by generating silicate defects. UV also rapidly degrades organic material delivered by meteoritic infall. Consequently, UV affects the overall chemistry of the Martian surface and atmosphere. The extent of UV breakdown of organic molecules is also relevant to concerns regarding contaminants on lander or rover surfaces that could interfere with life-detection experiments causing "false positives". The radiation flux at a point on the surface of Mars depends on factors such as cloud cover, atmospheric dust loading, season, local time, and latitude. Previously, the UV spectrum incident on the surface of Mars has been calculated from a simple radiative transfer model. Limitations of this earlier model include no accounting for the effect of dust, which may be a perennial constituent of the atmosphere, and also the use of gas absorption data measured at room temperature that overestimate absorption for lower Martian temperatures. We present an updated model for UV radiation (200-400 nm) that incorporates dust and more recent data for the solar spectrum, gas absorption, and UV surface albedo. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Initial results from the extreme ultraviolet explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.; Malina, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained during the first five months of calibration and science operation of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) are presented. Spectra of an extragalactic object were obtained; the object is detectable to wavelenghts longer than 100 A, demonstrating that extragalactic EUV astronomy is possible. Spectra of a hot white dwarf, and a late-type star in quiescence and flaring are shown as examples of the type of spectrographic data obtainable with EUVE. Other objects for which broad band photometric mode data have been obtained and analyzed include an RS CVn star and several late-type stars. The backgrounds in the EUVE detectors are quite low and the character of the diffuse astronomical EUV background has been investigated using these very low rates. Evidence is presented showing that, contrary to previously published reports, EUVE is about three times more sensitive than the English Wide Field Camera in the short wavelength bandpass covered by both instruments. Only limited information has been extracted from the longer bandpasses coered only by EUVE. Nonetheless, the brightest EUV source in the sky, a B star, has been discovered and is detected only in these longer bandpasses.

  19. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Robert Grimes, David

    2016-08-21

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity. PMID:27445095

  20. Control of zebra mussels with ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.P.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the effects of low and medium pressure ultraviolet (UV) radiation on zebra mussel mortality carried out between 1992 and 1995. An initial 1992 study, carried out by Aquatic Sciences (ASI), showed that flow-through UV systems have the ability to kill zebra mussels and prevent them from attaching to downstream surfaces. However, this work did not include expanded testing to determine the limitations of UV radiation at higher flow rates or to further define effective working parameters. The 1994 study was carried out at the Lennox Thermal Generating Station (TGS) of Ontario Hydro in Kingston, Ontario. This study involved the testing of two open channel UV systems (medium and low pressure) in an effort to determine flow rates and volumes for which UV disinfection would be effective and practical for the prevention of zebra mussel infestation. It was recommended that medium pressure (MP) and low pressure (LP) UV systems be tested for their ability to control downstream settlement of zebra mussels, in flow-through trials.

  1. Antibacterial agents in the cinema.

    PubMed

    García Sánchez, J E; García Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2006-12-01

    Numerous procedures used as antibacterial therapy are present in many films and include strategies ranging from different antimicrobial drugs to surgery and supporting measures. Films also explore the correct use and misuse of antimicrobial agents. Side effects and other aspects related to antibacterial therapy have also been reflected in some films. This article refers to the presence of antibacterial agents in different popular movies. There are movies in which antibacterial agents form part of the central plot, while in others it is merely an important part of the plot. In still others, its presence is isolated, and in these it plays an ambient or anecdotal role.

  2. Understanding the Early Evolution of M dwarf Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Sarah; Barman, Travis; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2015-11-01

    The chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres depends on the evolution of high-energy radiation emitted by its host star. High levels of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation can drastically alter the atmospheres of terrestrial planets through ionizing, heating, expanding, chemically modifying and eroding them during the first few billion years of a planetary lifetime. While there is evidence that stars emit their highest levels of far and near ultraviolet (FUV; NUV) radiation in the earliest stages of their evolution, we are currently unable to directly measure the EUV radiation. Most previous stellar atmosphere models under-predict FUV and EUV emission from M dwarfs; here we present new models for M stars that include prescriptions for the hot, lowest density atmospheric layers (chromosphere, transition region and corona), from which this radiation is emitted. By comparing our model spectra to GALEX near and far ultraviolet fluxes, we are able to predict the evolution of EUV radiation for M dwarfs from 10 Myr to a few Gyr. This research is the next major step in the HAZMAT (HAbitable Zones and M dwarf Activity across Time) project to analyze how the habitable zone evolves with the evolving properties of stellar and planetary atmospheres.

  3. Ultraviolet Observations of Phoebe from the Cassini UVIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of Saturn's distant moon Phoebe were made at far-ultraviolet (FUV) (1100-1900 A) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) (600-1100 A) wavelengths by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) during the Cassini spacecraft flyby on June 11, 2004. These are the first UV spectra of Phoebe and the first detection of water ice on a Solar System surface using FUV wavelengths. The characteristics of water ice in the FUV are presented, and Hapke models are used to interpret the spectra in terms of composition and grain size; the use of both areal and intimate mixing models is explored. Non-ice species used in these models include carbon, ice tholin, Triton tholin, poly-HCN and kerogen. Satisfactory disk-integrated fits are obtained for intimate mixtures of approx.10% H2O plus a non-ice species. Spatially resolved regions of higher (approx.20%) and lower (approx.5%) H2O ice concentrations are also detected. Phoebe does not display any evidence of volatile activity. Upper limits on atomic oxygen and carbon are 5 x 10(exp 11) and 2 x 10(exp 12) atoms/sq. cm, respectively, for solar photon scattering. The UVIS detection of water ice on Phoebe, and the ice amounts detected, are consistent with IR measurements and contribute to the evidence for a Phoebe origin in the outer Solar System rather than in the main asteroid belt.

  4. THE ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHTEST TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2011de

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.

    2014-11-20

    We present and discuss the ultraviolet (UV)/optical photometric light curves and absolute magnitudes of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2011de from the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. We find it to be the UV brightest SN Ia yet observed—more than a factor of 10 brighter than normal SNe Ia in the mid-ultraviolet. We find that the UV/optical brightness and broad light curve evolution can be modeled with additional flux from the shock of the ejecta hitting a relatively large red giant companion separated by 6 × 10{sup 13} cm. However, the post-maximum behavior of other UV-bright SNe Ia can also be modeled in a similar manner, including objects with UV spectroscopy or pre-maximum photometry which is inconsistent with this model. This suggests that similar UV luminosities can be intrinsic or caused by other forms of shock interaction. The high velocities reported for SN 2011de make it distinct from the UV-bright ''super-Chandrasekhar'' SNe Ia and the NUV-blue group of normal SNe Ia. SN 2011de is an extreme example of the UV variations in SNe Ia.

  5. The Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability (SWUSV) Microsatellite Mission

    PubMed Central

    Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Sarkissian, Alain; Marchand, Marion; Irbah, Abdenour; Quémerais, Éric; Bekki, Slimane; Foujols, Thomas; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Cessateur, Gaël; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Kuzin, Sergey; Slemzin, Vladimir; Urnov, Alexander; Bogachev, Sergey; Merayo, José; Brauer, Peter; Tsinganos, Kanaris; Paschalis, Antonis; Mahrous, Ayman; Khaled, Safinaz; Ghitas, Ahmed; Marzouk, Besheir; Zaki, Amal; Hady, Ahmed A.; Kariyappa, Rangaiah

    2013-01-01

    We present the ambitions of the SWUSV (Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability) Microsatellite Mission that encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 20 nm, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The paper briefly outlines the mission and describes the five proposed instruments of the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200–220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2017–2018. PMID:25685424

  6. Performance of The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Raymond G.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Conard, Steven J.; Friedman, Scott D.; Hampton, Jeffery; Moos, H. Warren; Nikulla, Paul; Oliveira, Cristina M.; Saha, Timo T.; Obenschain, Arthur (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer is a NASA astrophysics satellite which produces high-resolution spectra in the far-ultraviolet (90.5-118.7 nm bandpass) using a high effective area and low background detectors. The observatory was launched on its three-year mission from Cape Canaveral Air Station on 24 June 1999. The instrument contains four coaligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors which illuminate separate Rowland circle spectrograph channels equipped with holographically ruled diffraction gratings and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The telescope mirrors have a 352 x 387 mm aperture and 2245 mm focal length and are attached to actuator assemblies, which provide on-orbit, tip, tilt, and focus control. Two mirrors are coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and two are coated with lithium fluoride over aluminum (Al:LiF). We describe mirror assembly in-flight optical and mechanical performance. On-orbit measurements of the far-ultraviolet point spread function associated with each mirror are compared to expectations based on pre-flight laboratory measurements and modeling using the Optical Surface Analysis Code and surface metrology data. On-orbit imaging data indicate that the mirrors meet their instrument-level requirement of 50 percent and 95 percent slit transmission for the high- and mid-resolution spectrograph entrance slits, respectively. The degradation of mirror reflectivity during satellite integration and test is also discussed. The far-ultraviolet reflectivity of the SiC- and AlLiF-coated mirrors decreased about six percent and three percent, respectively, between coating and launch. Each mirror is equipped with three actuators, which consist of a stepper motor driving a ball screw via a two-stage planetary gear train. We also discuss the mechanical performance of the mirror assemblies, including actuator performance and thermal effects.

  7. Listening to Include

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  8. Results from the calibration of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Jelinsky, Pat; Vedder, Peter W.; Vallerga, John V.; Finley, David S.; Malina, Roger F.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the main features and selected results of the calibration of the scientific instruments to be flown on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer in 1991. The instrument payload includes three grazing incidence scanning telescopes and an EUV spectrometer/deep survey instrument covering the spectral region 70-800 A. The measured imaging characteristics, the effective areas, and the details of spectral responses of the instruments are presented. Diagrams of the cross-sectional views of the scanning telescope and the deep-survey/spectrometer telescope are included.

  9. Ultraviolet bactericidal irradiation of ice.

    PubMed

    Ladanyi, P A; Morrison, S M

    1968-03-01

    We investigated the germicidal activity of 2,537 A ultraviolet (UV) radiation on bacteria in ice cubes of varying thickness and in aqueous suspensions beneath an ice layer. The test bacteria used were Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis, and Sarcina lutea; aqueous suspensions of the selected organisms were frozen into ice cubes, 2 mm to 30 mm thick, at -20 C. The cubes were irradiated for 1 min, whereas the suspensions of bacteria were placed beneath an ice block (19 cm thick) and were irradiated for 0.5 to 15 min. In both groups of experiments, the standard plate count method was used to compare the number of bacteria surviving the UV treatment with the number of bacteria in the untreated controls. The results showed that 1 min of UV treatment killed as many as 97% of the gram-negative and at least 60% of the gram-positive test bacteria (freezing survivors) frozen in ice cubes 30-mm thick. Within 15 min, UV light transmitted through a 19-cm thick ice block inactivated 98% of the bacteria suspended in the buffer solution. We concluded that the UV rays were able to penetrate at least 19 cm of ice and still retain enough energy to kill bacteria. However, the UV penetration depended greatly on the optical quality of the ice. Although it was not the purpose of these experiments to find a practical method for sanitizing ice, the results of this study and of our other unpublished experiments indicate that UV light has adequate penetrating power to be considered practical in certain selected applications. PMID:4967756

  10. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation acts as an independent mitogen for normal human melanocytes in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Libow, L.F.; Scheide, S.; DeLeo, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Identification of growth factors for normal human melanocytes has been significantly aided by the recent development of in vitro culture systems for this cell. Utilizing such a system, we studied the effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on both melanocyte growth and melanization by incorporation of 3H-thymidine and 3H-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (3H-DOPA), respectively. 3H-thymidine incorporation was found to be significantly stimulated during the first 24 h following a single irradiation. 3H-DOPA incorporation was stimulated after a delay of 2 days postirradiation. Whereas UVR has long been known to induce melanocyte proliferation in vivo, these studies show that UVR can act as a mitogenic stimulus for this cell independent of the cutaneous environment. UVR can thus be added to a growing list of growth factors for epidermal pigment cells and is the only physical agent conclusively shown to act as a mitogen. Included in this list are substances that act via stimulation of the CAMP-kinase or protein kinase systems such as cholera toxin and phorbol esters. UVR is postulated to induce melanocyte proliferation by modulation of these second messenger pathways. With recent evidence linking growth factors, oncogenes and malignant transformation, this study supports the association between UVR exposure and the development of malignant melanoma, and suggests mechanisms whereby UVR may contribute to malignant transformation of this cell.

  12. An Overview of Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Skin Cancer Chemoprevention by Silibinin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer incidences are rising worldwide, and one of the major causative factors is excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Annually, ~5 million skin cancer patients are treated in United States, mostly with nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), which is also frequent in other Western countries. As sunscreens do not provide adequate protection against deleterious effects of UVR, additional and alternative chemoprevention strategies are urgently needed to reduce skin cancer burden. Over the last couple of decades, extensive research has been conducted to understand the molecular basis of skin carcinogenesis, and to identifying novel agents which could be useful in the chemoprevention of skin cancer. In this regard, several natural non-toxic compounds have shown promising efficacy in preventing skin carcinogenesis at initiation, promotion and progression stages, and are considered important in better management of skin cancer. Consistent with this, we and others have studied and established the notable efficacy of natural flavonolignan silibinin against UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. Extensive pre-clinical animal and cell culture studies report strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, DNA damage repair, immune-modulatory and anti-proliferative properties of silibinin. Molecular studies have identified that silibinin targets pleotropic signaling pathways including mitogenic, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, p53, NF-κB, etc. Overall, the skin cancer chemopreventive potential of silibinin is well supported by comprehensive mechanistic studies, suggesting its greater use against UV-induced cellular damages and photocarcinogenesis. PMID:26097804

  13. Earth, photographed in far-ultraviolet light with the ultraviolet camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Earth, photographed in far-ultraviolet light (1304 Angstrom) by Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 commander, with the ultraviolet camera. The auroral belts 13 degrees either side of the magnetic equator can be seen crossing each other on the middle of the right side of the Earth.

  14. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Asteroid(4) Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Bodewits, Dennis; Feaga, Lori M.; Landsman, Wayne; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mutchler, Max J.; Russell, Christopher T.; McFadden, Lucy A.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comprehensive review of the UV-visible spectrum and rotational lightcurve of Vesta combining new observations by Hubble Space Telescope and Swift with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer observations. The geometric albedos of Vesta from 220 nm to 953 nm arc derived by carefully comparing these observations from various instruments at different times and observing geometries. Vesta has a rotationally averaged geometric albedo of 0.09 at 250 nm, 0.14 at 300 nm, 0.26 at 373 nm, 0.38 at 673 nm, and 0.30 at 950 nm. The linear spectral slope in the ultraviolet displays a sharp minimum ncar sub-Earth longitude of 20deg, and maximum in the eastern hemisphere. This is completely consistent with the distribution of the spectral slope in the visible wavelength. The uncertainty of the measurement in the ultraviolet is approx.20%, and in the visible wavelengths better than 10%. The amplitude of Vesta's rotational lightcurves is approx.10% throughout the range of wavelengths we observed, but is smaller at 950 nm (approx.6%) ncar the 1-micron mafic band center. Contrary to earlier reports, we found no evidence for any difference between the phasing of the ultraviolet and visible/ncar-infrared lightcurves with respect to sub-Earth longitude. Vesta's average spectrum between 220 and 950 nm can well be described by measured reflectance spectra of fine particle howardite-like materials of basaltic achondrite meteorites. Combining this with the in-phase behavior of the ultraviolet, visible. and ncar-infrared lightcurves, and the spectral slopes with respect to the rotational phase, we conclude that there is no global ultraviolet/visible reversal on Vesta. Consequently, this implies lack of global space weathering on Vesta. Keyword,: Asteroid Vesta; Spectrophotometry; Spectroscopy; Ultraviolet observations; Hubble Space Telescope observations

  15. Benefit and risk of organic ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, G J; Schaefer, H

    2001-06-01

    Modern sunscreen products provide broad-spectrum UV protection and may contain one or several UV filters. A modern UV filter should be heat and photostable, water resistant, nontoxic, and easy to formulate. Identification of a substance that meets these criteria is as difficult as discovering a new drug; hundreds of new molecules are synthesized and screened before a lead candidate is identified. The most important aspect in the development of a new UV filter is its safety. In our laboratories, the safety of new ultraviolet filters is assessed by an initial in vitro screen including photostability, cytotoxicity, photocytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and photogenotoxicity tests. These tests are performed in mammalian, yeast, and bacterial cell systems. Skin penetration potential is measured in vitro using human skin or, when required by regulations, in vivo. Because modern sunscreens are selected on the basis of their retention on and in the stratum corneum and are formulated as poorly penetrating emulsions, they generally have very low to negligible penetration rates. The safety and efficacy of UV filters are regulated and approved by national and international health authorities. Safety standards in the European Union, United States, or Japan stipulate that new filters pass a stringent toxicological safety evaluation prior to approval. The safety dossier of a new UV filter resembles that of a new drug and includes acute toxicity, irritation, sensitization, phototoxicity, photosensitization, subchronic and chronic toxicity, reproductive toxicity, genotoxicity, photogenotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and, in the United States, photocarcinogenicity testing. The margin of safety of new UV filters for application to humans is estimated by comparing the potential human systemic exposure with the no-effect level from in vivo toxicity studies. Only substances with a safe toxicological profile and a margin of safety of at least 100-fold are approved for human use. Finally, prior to

  16. Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

    1993-01-01

    An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

  17. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Risheng; Li, Manman; Deng, Shengsong; Hu, Huajia; Wang, Huai; Li, Fenghe

    2012-04-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  18. Sunscreen Agents in the Environment: Determination by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and GC-MS and Calculation of Phototoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters, also known as sunscreen agents, are chemicals widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, and plastics to block UV radiation from the sun. There have been studies that show some sunscreen agents demonstrate estrogenicity and multiple hormonal activities in vi...

  19. Fluorescence cross section measurements of biological agent simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    Fluorescence is a powerful technique that has potential uses in detection and characterization of biological aerosols both in the battlefield and in civilian environments. Fluorescence techniques can be used with ultraviolet (UV) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) equipment to detect biological aerosol clouds at a distance, to provide early warning of a biological attack, and to track an potentially noxious cloud. Fluorescence can also be used for detection in a point sensor to monitor biological materials and to distinguish agents from benign aerosols. This work is part of a continuing program by the Army`s Chemical and Biological Defense Command to characterized the optical properties of biological agents. Reported here are ultraviolet fluorescence measurements of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus Globigii aerosols suspended in an electrodynamic particle trap. Fluorescence spectra of a common atmospheric aerosol, pine pollen, are also presented.

  20. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Kuca, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Biological warfare agents are a group of pathogens and toxins of biological origin that can be potentially misused for military or criminal purposes. The present review attempts to summarize necessary knowledge about biological warfare agents. The historical aspects, examples of applications of these agents such as anthrax letters, biological weapons impact, a summary of biological warfare agents and epidemiology of infections are described. The last section tries to estimate future trends in research on biological warfare agents.

  1. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  2. Rocket observations of the diffuse ultraviolet background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakobsen, P.; Bowyer, S.; Kimble, R.; Jelinsky, P.; Grewing, M.; Kraemer, G.; Wulf-Mathies, C.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the experiment reported here was to obtain additional information on the absolute intensity level and spatial variation of the diffuse ultraviolet background and thereby gain insight into the origin of this radiation. The experiment used three ultraviolet sensitive photometers placed in the focal plane of a 95-cm, f/2.8 normal incidence telescope flown on board an Aries sounding rocket. The measured intensities clearly refute the hypothesis of an isotropic background, the intensities of the high galactic latitude being definitely lower than the intensities seen at intermediate latitudes. Moreover, the count rates in all three channels along the slow scan exhibit local enhancements as well as an overall trend. In general, the spatial variations exhibited by the data correlate with the line of sight of neutral hydrogen column density as determined from 21-cm radio observations. This fact demonstrates that there is a galactic component to the diffuse ultraviolet radiation field.

  3. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  4. Occupational Skin Hazards From Ultraviolet (UV) Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, F.; Wolbarsht, M. L.

    1980-10-01

    The various types of UV effects on the skin are classified according to the part of the spectrum and their beneficial or deleterious nature. Some hazardous ultraviolet sources used in industrial processes are described, and examples of photoallergy, phototoxicity, and photosensitization resulting from UV exposures are given. The incidence of skin cancer as a function of geographical location and exposure to sunlight is discussed in relation to natural and artificial exposures to long and short wavelength UV, especially in connection with tanning booths. The conclusion is reached that there is enough ultraviolet in a normal environment to propose a hazard, and additional ultraviolet exposure from industrial or consumer sources is not necessary, and should be eliminated wherever possible.

  5. Occupational Skin Hazards From Ultraviolet (UV) Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, F.; Wolbarsht, M. L.

    1981-11-01

    The various types of UV effects on the skin are classified according to the part of the spectrum and their beneficial or deleterious nature. Some hazardous ultraviolet sources used in industrial processes are described, and examples of photoallergy, phototoxicity, and photosensitization resulting from UV exposures are given. The incidence of skin cancer as a function of geographical location and exposure to sunlight is discussed in relation to natural and artificial exposures to long and short wavelength UV, especially in connection with tanning booths. The conclusion is reached that there is enough ultraviolet in a normal environment to propose a hazard, and additional ultraviolet exposure from industrial or consumer sources is not necessary, and should be eliminated wherever possible.

  6. Improved Radiometry For Extreme-ultraviolet Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrio, C.; Vest, R.E.; Grantham, S.; Liu, K.; Lucatorto, T.B.; Shaw, P.S.

    2004-05-12

    The absolute cryogenic radiometer (ACR), an electrical-substitution-based detector, is the most accurate method for measurement of radiant power in the extreme ultraviolet. At the National Institute of Standards and Technology, ACR-based measurements are currently used as standards from the infrared and into the vacuum ultraviolet, however, no radiometric facilities are currently in operation with enough incident power to use an ACR in the extreme-ultraviolet region. Therefore, we have installed transfer optics on an existing beamline to allow the installation of the ACR as an additional endstation. We will describe the current radiometric beamline, the ACR, and the high-throughput beamline, and the transfer-optical system. Finally, we will present the performance of the transfer optics and measurements of the beam profile and incident power of the new endstation.

  7. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken on May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered during the missions 'first light' milestone, and shows celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The objects shown represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period. The radial streaks at the edge of the image are due to stars reflecting from the near ultraviolet detector window.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  8. Far ultraviolet excitation processes in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Opal, C. B.; Meier, R. R.; Nicolas, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent observations of atomic oxygen and carbon in the far ultraviolet spectrum of comet Kohoutek have demonstrated the existence of these atomic species in the cometary coma. However, in order to identify the source of their origin, it is necessary to relate the observed ultraviolet flux to the atomic production rate. Analyses of observed OI wavelength 1304 and CI wavelength 1657 A multiplets have been carried out using high resolution solar spectra. Also examined is the possibility of observing ultraviolet fluorescence from molecules such as CO and H2, as well as resonance scattering either from atomic ions for which there are strong corresponding solar lines (CII) or from atoms for which there is an accidental wavelength coincidence (SI).

  9. SOLAR Ultraviolet Radiation AND Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Rajakumar, Kumaravel; Greenspan, Susan L.; Thomas, Stephen B.; Holick, Michael F.

    2007-01-01

    Rickets, the state of vitamin D deficiency, has reemerged as a potential problem in the United States. At the dawn of the 20th century, rickets was pervasive among infants residing in the polluted cities of Europe and the northeastern United States. Important milestones in the history of rickets were the understanding that photosynthesized vitamin D and dietary vitamin D were similar, the discernment of the antirachitic potency of artificial and natural ultraviolet rays, and the discovery that ultraviolet irradiation could render various foods antirachitic. Clinical guidelines were instituted to promote sensible exposure to sunlight and artificial ultraviolet radiation. In addition, irradiated ergosterol from yeast became the major vitamin D source for food fortification and the treatment of rickets, leading to a public health campaign to eradicate rickets by the 1930s. We review the sequence and turn of events pertaining to the discovery of vitamin D and the strategies for the eradication of the reemerging rickets problem. PMID:17761571

  10. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented. PMID:23811423

  11. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented.

  12. Ozone/Ultraviolet-Photo-Oxidation Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Ari Ben; Agthe, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental chemical-processing system destroys waste hydrazine in water by use of ozone in ultraviolet-photo-oxidation reactor. New process reduces concentrations of hydrazines and intermediate decomposition products in effluent liquid and gas to below limit of detectability. Liquid sprayed in reaction chamber past ultraviolet lamps, against flow of oxygen and ozone. Hydrazines and intermediate decomposition products oxidized to harmless substances. Effectiveness and speed of process depends on maintenance of circulating liquid at correct pH, determines lower limit of oxidation by ozone.

  13. Far and extreme ultraviolet astronomy with ORFEUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, G.; Barnstedt, J.; Eberhard, N.; Grewing, M.; Gringel, W.; Haas, C.; Kaelble, A.; Kappelmann, N.; Petrik, J.; Appenzeller, I.

    1990-01-01

    ORFEUS (Orbiting and Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer) is a 1 m normal incidence telescope for spectroscopic investigations of cosmic sources in the far and extreme ultraviolet spectral range. The instrument will be integrated into the freeflyer platform ASTRO-SPAS. ORFEUS-SPAS is scheduled with STS ENDEAVOUR in September 1992. We describe the telescope with its two spectrometer and their capabilities i.e., spectral range, resolution and overall sensitivity. The main classes of objects to be observed with the instrument are discussed and two examples of simulated spectra for the white dwarf HZ43 and an O9-star in LMC are shown.

  14. Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBrayer, R. O.; Frazier, J.; Nein, M.

    1993-09-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-m aperture telescope for imaging the stellar ultraviolet spectrum from the lunar surface. The aspects of Lute's educational value and the information it can provide on designing for the long-term exposure to the lunar environment are important considerations. This paper briefly summarizes the status of the phase A study by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) LUTE Task Team. The primary focus will be a discussion of the merits of LUTE as a small and relatively inexpensive project that benefits a wide spectrum of interests and could be operating on the lunar surface by the turn of the century.

  15. Ultraviolet colors of old LMC clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, A. P.; Hartwick, F. D. A.

    1992-01-01

    New ultraviolet spectra for five red LMC globular clusters have been obtained with IUE. These have been supplemented with archival spectra for eleven old LMC clusters. These data strengthen and extend the UV-color versus age relation for clusters older than about 10 exp 9 yr, but do not offer much precision in age determination, presumably because the ultraviolet colors of the oldest clusters depend strongly on the horizontal-branch morphology. Comparison of LMC data with UV colors for the brightest M31 clusters suggests their ages might be only a few gigayears.

  16. Self-cleaning optic for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-12-16

    A multilayer reflective optic or mirror for lithographic applications, and particularly extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, having a surface or "capping" layer which in combination with incident radiation and gaseous molecular species such as O.sub.2, H.sub.2, H.sub.2 O provides for continuous cleaning of carbon deposits from the optic surface. The metal capping layer is required to be oxidation resistant and capable of transmitting at least 90% of incident EUV radiation. Materials for the capping layer include Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Au and combinations thereof.

  17. Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance Variability During the Decline of Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; McClintock, W. E.; Woods, T. N.; Harder, J. W.; Richard, E. C.

    2010-12-01

    Observations from the SOLar-STellar Irradiance Comparision Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) began in 2003 and continue through the present. This time period includes the decline of solar cycle 23 through solar minimum. SOLSTICE measures solar irradiance from 115 nm to 300 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The variability seen by SORCE SOLSTICE is greater than the variability recorded by the instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite(UARS). This poster will describe the magnitude and uncertainty of solar irradiance variability in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum during the SORCE mission with comparisons to irradiance models based on UARS measurements.

  18. Interferometry in the Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.; Shipley, A.; Osterman, S.; Joy, M. K.

    2000-01-01

    We report on demonstration of an x-ray interferometer that uses plane mirrors at grazing incidence to create interference fringes in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray portions of the spectrum. X-ray interferometry has historically been implemented through narrow band, diffractive systems that split the wavefront. Our system, by using two separate optical channels to create interference from two areas of the wavefront, has broad band response and much higher efficiency. We discuss some applications of this technique to astronomy and microscopy including the possibility of eventually capturing a micro-arcsecond image of a black hole.

  19. SOLAR/SOLSPEC ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance variability since 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsee, David; Hauchecorne, Alain; Meftah, Mustapha; Bekki, Slimane; Pereira, Nuno

    2016-07-01

    The SOLAR/SOLSPEC experiment measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the Space Station since April 2008. Measurements are carried between 166 nm and 3088 nm by three double-monochromators. SSI, particularly in the ultraviolet, is a key input to determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's atmosphere in response to solar and terrestrial inputs. In-flight operations and performances of the instrument, including corrections, will be presented for the 8 years of the mission. After an accurate calibration following recent special on-orbit new operations, we present the variability measured in the UV by SOLAR/SOLSPEC. The accuracy of these measurements will be discussed.

  20. ESA innovation rescues Ultraviolet Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    Astrophysicist Freeman J. Dyson from the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton characterizes IUE as "A little half-meter mirror sitting in the sky, unnoticed by the public, pouring out results". By use of the IUE satellite, astronomers obtain access to the ultraviolet radiation of celestial bodies in unique ways not available by any other means, neither from the ground nor by any other spacecraft currently in orbit. IUE serves a wide community of astronomers all over Europe, the United States and many other parts of the world. It allows the acquisition of critical data for fundamental studies of comets and their evaporation when they approach the Sun, of the mechanisms driving the stellar winds which make many stars lose a significant fraction of their mass (before they die slowly as White Dwarfs or in sudden Supernova explosions), as well as in the search to understand the ways in which black holes possibly power the violent nuclei of Active galaxies. One year ago the project was threatened with termination and serious concern was expressed by astronomers about the potential loss of IUE's capabilities, as a result of NASA not continuing to operate the spacecraft. Under the leadership of ESA, the three Agencies involved in the operations of IUE (ESA, NASA and the United Kingdom's Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, PPARC), reviewed the operations agreements of the Project. A minor investment allowing the implementation of modern management and engineering techniques as well as a complete revision of the communication infrastructure of the project and continuous improvements in efficiency in the ESA management, also taking advantage of today's technologies, both in computing and communications, have made it possible to continue IUE operations within the financial means available, with ESA taking up most of NASA's share in the operations. According to Dr. Willem Wamsteker, ESA's Dutch IUE Project Scientist, "it was a extremely interesting

  1. Spectral observations of the extreme ultraviolet background.

    PubMed

    Labov, S E; Bowyer, S

    1991-04-20

    A grazing incidence spectrometer was designed to measure the diffuse extreme ultraviolet background. It was flown on a sounding rocket, and data were obtained on the diffuse background between 80 and 650 angstroms. These are the first spectral measurements of this background below 520 angstroms. Several emission features were detected, including interplanetary He I 584 angstroms emission and geocoronal He II 304 angstroms emission. Other features observed may originate in a hot ionized interstellar gas, but if this interpretation is correct, gas at several different temperatures is present. The strongest of these features is consistent with O V emission at 630 angstroms. This emission, when combined with upper limits for other lines, restricts the temperature of this component to 5.5 < log T < 5.7, in agreement with temperatures derived from O VI absorption studies. A power-law distribution of temperatures is consistent with this feature only if the power-law coefficient is negative, as is predicted for saturated evaporation of clouds in a hot medium. In this case, the O VI absorption data confine the filling factor of the emission of f < or = 4% and the pressure to more than 3.7 x 10(4) cm-3 K, substantially above ambient interstellar pressure. Such a pressure enhancement has been predicted for clouds undergoing saturated evaporation. Alternatively, if the O V emission covers a considerable fraction of the sky, it would be a major source of ionization. A feature centered at about 99 angstroms is well fitted by a cluster of Fe XVIII and Fe XIX lines from gas at log T = 6.6-6.8. These results are consistent with previous soft X-ray observations with low-resolution detectors. A feature found near 178 angstroms is consistent with Fe X and Fe XI emission from gas at log T = 6; this result is consistent with results from experiments employing broad-band soft X-ray detectors.

  2. Method for the detection of nitro-containing compositions using ultraviolet photolysis

    DOEpatents

    Reagen, William K.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Partin, Judy K.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting nitro-containing compositions (e.g. nitrate/nitrite materials) in water samples and on solid substrates. In a water sample, ultraviolet light is applied to the sample so that dissolved nitro compositions therein will photolytically dissociate into gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.2(g) and/or NO.sub.(g)). A carrier gas is then introduced into the sample to generate a gaseous stream which includes the carrier gas combined with any gaseous nitrogen oxides. The carrier gas is thereafter directed into a detector. To detect nitro-compositions on solid substrates, ultraviolet light is applied thereto. A detector is then used to detect any gaseous nitrogen oxides which are photolytically generated during ultraviolet illumination. An optional carrier gas may be applied to the substrate during illumination to produce a gaseous stream which includes the carrier gas and any gaseous nitrogen oxides. The gaseous stream is then supplied to the detector.

  3. View of Gemini 11 experiment S-13 Ultraviolet Astronomical Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    View of Gemini 11 experiment S-13 Ultraviolet Astronomical Camera before flight. Its object was to obtain data on ultraviolet radiation of hot stars and to develop and evaluate basic techniques for photography of celestial objects from manned spacecraft.

  4. Natural products as antimitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Natural products still play an important role in the medicinal chemistry, especially in some therapeutic areas. As example more than 60% of currently-used anticancer agents are derives from natural sources including plants, marine organisms or micro-organism. Thus natural products (NP) are an high-impact source of new "lead compounds" or new potential therapeutic agents despite the large development of biotechnology and combinatorial chemistry in the drug discovery and development. Many examples of anticancer drugs as paclitaxel, combretastatin, bryostatin and discodermolide have shown the importance of NP in the anticancer chemotherapy through many years. Many organisms have been studied as sources of drugs namely plants, micro-organisms and marine organisms and the obtained NP can be considered a group of "privileged chemical structures" evolved in nature to interact with other organisms. For this reason NP are a good starting points for pharmaceutical research and also for library design. Tubulin and microtubules are one of the most studied targets for the search of anticancer compounds. Microtubule targeting agents (MTA) also named antimitotic agents are compounds that are able to perturb mitosis but are also able to arrest cell growing during interphase. The anticancer drugs, taxanes and vinca alkaloids have established tubulin as important target in cancer therapy. More recently the vascular disrupting agents (VDA) combretastatin analogues were studied for their antimitotics properties. This review will consider the anti mitotic NP and their potential impact in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  5. Chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S; Chauhan, S; D'Cruz, R; Faruqi, S; Singh, K K; Varma, S; Singh, M; Karthik, V

    2008-09-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA's) are defined as any chemical substance whose toxic properties are utilised to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy in warfare and associated military operations. Chemical agents have been used in war since times immemorial, but their use reached a peak during World War I. During World War II only the Germans used them in the infamous gas chambers. Since then these have been intermittently used both in war and acts of terrorisms. Many countries have stockpiles of these agents. There has been a legislative effort worldwide to ban the use of CWA's under the chemical weapons convention which came into force in 1997. However the manufacture of these agents cannot be completely prohibited as some of them have potential industrial uses. Moreover despite the remedial measures taken so far and worldwide condemnation, the ease of manufacturing these agents and effectiveness during combat or small scale terrorist operations still make them a powerful weapon to reckon with. These agents are classified according to mechanism of toxicity in humans into blister agents, nerve agents, asphyxiants, choking agents and incapacitating/behavior altering agents. Some of these agents can be as devastating as a nuclear bomb. In addition to immediate injuries caused by chemical agents, some of them are associated with long term morbidities and psychological problems. In this review we will discuss briefly about the historical background, properties, manufacture techniques and industrial uses, mechanism of toxicity, clinical features of exposure and pharmacological management of casualties caused by chemical agents. PMID:21783898

  6. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    EPA Science Inventory

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex inte...

  7. Biological effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bees

    SciTech Connect

    Es`kov, E.K.

    1995-09-01

    The influence of natural solar and artificial ultraviolet irradiation on developing bees was studied. Lethal exposures to irradiation at different stages of development were determined. The influence of irradiation on the variability of the morphometric features of bees was revealed. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  9. Ultraviolet protective eyewear for Wood's light use.

    PubMed

    Herro, Elise M; Cosan, Therese; Jacob, Sharon E

    2011-01-01

    When interpreting delayed patch test reads for children suspected of having contact dermatitis, we use the Wood's light to illuminate the highlighter outlines we made at the first read. Our pediatric patients wear single-use ultraviolet protective goggles to shield their retinas, because children have a propensity to attempt to look into the Wood's lamp.

  10. Atomic Oscillator Strengths in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Szabo, Csilla I.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed techniques to measure branching fractions in the vacuum ultraviolet using diffraction grating spectroscopy and phosphor image plates as detectors. These techniques have been used to measure branching fractions in Fe II that give prominent emission lines in astrophysical objects.

  11. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Sirius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A1 V star Alpha CMa (Sirius) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 1649 to 3170 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs, and line identifications for the absorption features have been tabulated.

  12. Ultraviolet Stellar Astronomy - Skylab Experiment S019

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This chart provides information about Skylab's Ultraviolet (UV) Stellar Astronomy experiment (SO19), a scientific airlock-based facility/experiment that would study UV spectra of early-type stars and galaxies. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  13. Some Thoughts on Teaching about Ultraviolet Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thumm, Walter

    1975-01-01

    Describes the major obstacles in the study of ultraviolet radiation (UV). Presents the beneficial aspects of UV such as vitamin O production, sterilization, clinical treatment of diseases and wounds, and the marking of patients for radiotherapy. Warns of the dangers of UV exposure such as skin cancer and early aging. (GS)

  14. Ultraviolet Light: Some Considerations for Vision Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Marie

    1986-01-01

    The article examines evidence of visual impairment caused by excessive amounts of ultraviolet (UV) light. Among considerations when using a source of UV light for vision stimulation are the position of the child and teacher, use of window glass filters or protective glasses, and careful recordkeeping of all UV stimulation. (Author/JW)[

  15. Far-ultraviolet diffuse galactic light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Diffuse galactic light is detected at very low galactic latitudes, and useful upper limits are obtained at moderate and high galactic latitudes. Together, these data indicate that the albedo of the interstellar grains is high (a greater than 0.5) and that the grains very strongly (g greater than 0.7) forward-scatter far-ultraviolet radiation.

  16. Ultraviolet Viewing with a Television Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Thomas; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a portable video color camera that is fully suited for seeing ultraviolet images and offers some expanded viewing possibilities. Discusses the basic technique, specialized viewing, and the instructional value of this system of viewing reflectance patterns of flowers and insects that are invisible to the unaided eye. (CW)

  17. Comet Kohoutek - Ultraviolet images and spectrograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opal, C. B.; Carruthers, G. R.; Prinz, D. K.; Meier, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Emissions of atomic oxygen (1304 A), atomic carbon (1657 A), and atomic hydrogen (1216 A) from Comet Kohoutek were observed with ultraviolet cameras carried on a sounding rocket on Jan. 8, 1974. Analysis of the Lyman alpha halo at 1216 A gave an atomic hydrogen production rate of 4.5 x 10 to the 29th atoms per second.

  18. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  20. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet air purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in the air by...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  5. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... exposure to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  8. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  9. [New agents for hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier; García Gómez, María Carmen

    2016-02-19

    An elevated proportion of high cardiovascular risk patients do not achieve the therapeutic c-LDL goals. This owes to physicians' inappropriate or insufficient use of cholesterol lowering medications or to patients' bad tolerance or therapeutic compliance. Another cause is an insufficient efficacy of current cholesterol lowering drugs including statins and ezetimibe. In addition, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 inhibitors are a new cholesterol lowering medications showing safety and high efficacy to reduce c-LDL in numerous already performed or underway clinical trials, potentially allowing an optimal control of hypercholesterolemia in most patients. Agents inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis and microsomal transfer protein are also providing a new potential to decrease cholesterol in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia and in particular in homozygote familial hypercholesterolemia. Last, cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have shown powerful effects on c-HDL and c-LDL, although their efficacy in cardiovascular prevention and safety has not been demonstrated yet. We provide in this article an overview of the main characteristics of therapeutic agents for hypercholesterolemia, which have been recently approved or in an advanced research stage.

  10. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with the use of biologic and other investigational agents: the importance of long-term post-marketing safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Allison; Borovicka, Judy H; West, Dennis P; Evens, Andrew M; Laumann, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes a patient who developed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) after receiving courses of two investigational biologic agents and cyclosporine followed by more than four years of subcutaneous efalizumab for the treatment of extensive chronic plaque psoriasis. Three years later, the patient remains free of lymphoma and his psoriasis is well controlled with thrice-weekly narrow-band ultraviolet phototherapy. This case emphasizes the importance of continued long-term post-marketing safety surveillance and the early reporting of all possible serious side effects, including cancers, related to the use of any newly available product. In particular, surveillance should focus on the immunomodulating biologic agents in order to identify possible dangerous sequelae.

  11. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  12. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  13. Imaging performance of telescope mirrors for far-ultraviolet astronomy.

    PubMed

    Ohl, R G; Saha, T T; Friedman, S D; Barkhouser, R H; Moos, H W

    2000-09-01

    We describe image testing, surface metrology, and modeling of telescope mirrors (0.5 m in diameter, f/4.3) for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Laboratory image testing of wavelengths in the visible, vacuum, and midultraviolet validated a theoretical analysis by use of the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC). Our modeling is based on surface metrology, including measurements of figure, midfrequency error, and microroughness. This combination of metrology, out-of-band performance testing, and modeling verified that the mirrors would meet mission requirements. We use OSAC to predict the FUSE telescope's far-ultraviolet (90-120-nm) point-spread function and assess its effect on instrument efficiency. The mirrors have a 90% encircled energy diameter of 1.5 arc sec at lambda = 100 nm. Including the effects of spacecraft pointing error, the mirrors have a predicted average slit transmission at lambda = 100 nm of approximately 87% and 96% for the 1.25- and 4-arc sec-wide spectrograph slits, respectively, where the required transmissions are 50% and 95%.

  14. New advances in protection against solar ultraviolet radiation in textiles for summer clothing.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, José; de Gálvez, María Victoria; Sánchez-Roldán, Cristina; Herrera-Ceballos, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Clothing is considered one of the most important tools for photoprotection against harmful solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The standard for sun-protective clothing is based on erythema despite other biological effects of UVR on the skin. We analyzed the potential protection against UVR in fabrics destined for summer clothing based on several action spectra. We examined 50 garments classified by type of fabric composition, structure of the fiber yarn and color. The ultraviolet protection factor was calculated based on fabric ultraviolet transmittance corrected for erythema according to the EU standard E-13758 as well as the UVA transmittance of fabrics. UVR protection was also analyzed in base of different action spectra as for previtamin D3, nonmelanoma skin cancer, photoimmunosuppression and photoaging. Most knitted fabrics used for sports T-shirts offered excellent ratings for ultraviolet protection while normal shirts showed very low ratings, particularly against photoaging. The cover is the most influential variable in fabric photoprotection, having an exponential relationship with the UPF. The relation between cover and UVA protection was linearly negative. Information about ultraviolet protection in textiles used for summer clothing should be included in labeling as some types of fabrics, especially those used for shirts, offer very low UVR protection.

  15. New advances in protection against solar ultraviolet radiation in textiles for summer clothing.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, José; de Gálvez, María Victoria; Sánchez-Roldán, Cristina; Herrera-Ceballos, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Clothing is considered one of the most important tools for photoprotection against harmful solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The standard for sun-protective clothing is based on erythema despite other biological effects of UVR on the skin. We analyzed the potential protection against UVR in fabrics destined for summer clothing based on several action spectra. We examined 50 garments classified by type of fabric composition, structure of the fiber yarn and color. The ultraviolet protection factor was calculated based on fabric ultraviolet transmittance corrected for erythema according to the EU standard E-13758 as well as the UVA transmittance of fabrics. UVR protection was also analyzed in base of different action spectra as for previtamin D3, nonmelanoma skin cancer, photoimmunosuppression and photoaging. Most knitted fabrics used for sports T-shirts offered excellent ratings for ultraviolet protection while normal shirts showed very low ratings, particularly against photoaging. The cover is the most influential variable in fabric photoprotection, having an exponential relationship with the UPF. The relation between cover and UVA protection was linearly negative. Information about ultraviolet protection in textiles used for summer clothing should be included in labeling as some types of fabrics, especially those used for shirts, offer very low UVR protection. PMID:24861801

  16. Mother ship and physical agents collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Budulas, Peter P.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that investigates the feasibility of developing a collaboration architecture between small physical agents and a mother ship. This incudes the distribution of planning, perception, mobility, processing and communications requirements between the mother ship and the agents. Small physical agents of the future will be virtually everywhere on the battlefield of the 21st century. A mother ship that is coupled to a team of small collaborating physical agents (conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); logistics; sentry; and communications relay) will be used to build a completely effective and mission capable intelligent system. The mother ship must have long-range mobility to deploy the small, highly maneuverable agents that will operate in urban environments and more localized areas, and act as a logistics base for the smaller agents. The mother ship also establishes a robust communications network between the agents and is the primary information disseminating and receiving point to the external world. Because of its global knowledge and processing power, the mother ship does the high-level control and planning for the collaborative physical agents. This high level control and interaction between the mother ship and its agents (including inter agent collaboration) will be software agent architecture based. The mother ship incorporates multi-resolution battlefield visualization and analysis technology, which aids in mission planning and sensor fusion.

  17. Ultraviolet Synthetic Spectra for Three Lambda Bootis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Johnson, Dustin; Tarbell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. We show that the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra (1280-3200 A) of Lambda Bootis, 29 Cygni (a "confirmed" Lambda Boo star), and Vega (a "mild" Lambda Boo star) can be fit remarkably well by single-temperature synthetic spectra. We computed the full resolution synthetic ultraviolet (UV) spectrum covering the IUE wavelength range using Gray's Stellar Spectral Synthesis Program SPECTRUM. To improve the synthetic spectra, we generated a grid of LTE atmosphere models with the appropriate stellar parameters using ATLAS9 and the existing Castelli and Kurucz 2004 models. One of the improvements of their opacity distribution functions (ODFs) is the addition to the line blanketing near 1400 A and 1600 A by the quasi-molecular absorptions of atomic hydrogen undergoing collisions with protons and other neutral hydrogen atoms. New-ODF fluxes reproduce the ultraviolet observations of Lambda Boo stars in a more realistic way than previous computations. We also constructed our own UV line list for the relevant set of absorption features. Modeling the UV line spectra of Lambda Boo stars allows us to confirm their published surface abundances, including CNO and the iron group elements. It also provides further insight into their photospheric conditions (e.g., Teff, log g, [M/H], micro turbulent velocity, etc.). About 40 percent of the published Lambda Boo candidates have existing IUE spectra. We plan to follow this pilot study and perform UV spectral synthesis for all of them.

  18. Research in extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis and interpretation continued on data generated by the flight of 27.086 in April of 1986 and by the successful UVX mission. Optical and mechanical design of the 1 meter EUV telescope, planned for launch with the large SPARTAN type carrier, ASTRO-SPAS, was also continued. The major effort centered on the preparation of flight 27.106, scheduled to launch in September, 1986. Work which was performed included: design of the skins and bulkheads; completion of the optical, mechanical, and electrical design; purchase of the major components of the instruments; assemblage of the electrical components; and performance of theoretical work, to support the data interpretation.

  19. Evaluation of miniature vacuum ultraviolet lamps for stability and operating characteristics, Lyman-Alpha task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    Modifications required to change the near ultraviolet source in the Optical Contamination Monitor to a source with output at or near the Lyman-Alpha hydrogen line are discussed. The effort consisted of selecting, acquiring and testing candidate miniature ultraviolet lamps with significant output in or near 121.6 nm. The effort also included selection of a miniature dc high-voltage power supply capable of operating the lamp. The power supply was required to operate from available primary power supplied by the Optical Effect Module (DEM) and it should be flight qualified or have the ability to be qualified by the user.

  20. The generation of infrared and ultraviolet astronomical data bases and retrieval systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Observations with the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) and with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite have stimulated the need for machine-readable data bases at infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths along with associated software. This paper describes the generation of three such data sets at the Astronomical Data Center (ADC) of the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC): the Catalog of Infrared Observations, the Combined List of Astronomical Sources, and the Bibliographical Index of Objects Observed by IUE 1978-82. The discussion is divided by spectral regime and includes summaries of the data products developed in each category.

  1. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.

  2. Design of fire detection equipment based on ultraviolet detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenji; Liu, Jin; Chu, Sheng; Ping, Chao; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2015-03-01

    Utilized the feature of wide bandgap semiconductor of MgZnO, researched and developed a kind of Mid-Ultraviolet-Band(MUV) ultraviolet detector which has passed the simulation experiment in the sun circumstance. Based on the ultraviolet detector, it gives out a design scheme of gun-shot detection device, which is composed of twelve ultraviolet detectors, signal amplifier, processor, annunciator , azimuth indicator and the bracket. Through Analysing the feature of solar blind, ultraviolet responsivity, fire feature of gunshots and detection distance, the feasibility of this design scheme is proved.

  3. Summary of the Workshop on Ultraviolet Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship of the ultraviolet background radiation to the X-ray background is shown. The ultraviolet background, which is four orders of magnitude brighter than the x-ray background, is much less well determined. The relationship of the ultraviolet background to the EUV background and an excellent summary of the discordant ultraviolet observations at high galactic latitudes are given. A picture of the universe from the point of view of those who study ultraviolet background radiation, with emphasis on the various sources of noise that can affect the measurements is presented. The altitudes of various observing platforms are also indicated.

  4. The EO-1 Autonomous Science Agent Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Lee, Rachel; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Trout, Bruce; Hengemihle, Jerry; D'Agostino, Jeff; Shulman, Seth; Ungar, Stephen; Brakke, Thomas; Boyer, Darrell; Van Gaasbeck, Jim; Greeley, Ronald; Doggett, Thomas; Baker, Victor; Dohm, James; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    An Autonomous Science Agent is currently flying onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft. This software enables the spacecraft to autonomously detect and respond to science events occurring on the Earth. The package includes software systems that perform science data analysis, deliberative planning, and run-time robust execution. Because of the deployment to a remote spacecraft, this Autonomous Science Agent has stringent constraints of autonomy, reliability, and limited computing resources. We describe these constraints and how they are reflected in our agent architecture.

  5. An ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer automation system. Part 3: Program documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, G. S.; Teuschler, J. M.; Budde, W. L.

    1982-07-01

    The Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometer (UVVIS) automation system accomplishes 'on-line' spectrophotometric quality assurance determinations, report generations, plot generations and data reduction for chlorophyll or color analysis. This system also has the capability to process manually entered data for the analysis of chlorophyll or color. For each program of the UVVIS system, this document contains a program description, flowchart, variable dictionary, code listing, and symbol cross-reference table. Also included are descriptions of file structures and of routines common to all automated analyses. The programs are written in Data General extended BASIC, Revision 4.3, under the RDOS operating systems, Revision 6.2. The BASIC code has been enhanced for real-time data acquisition, which is accomplished by CALLS to assembly language subroutines. Two other related publications are 'An Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometer Automation System - Part I Functional Specifications,' and 'An Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometer Automation System - Part II User's Guide.'

  6. Ultraviolet A does not induce melanomas in a Xiphophorus hybrid fish model

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David L.; Fernandez, André A.; Nairn, Rodney S.; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Trono, David; Thames, Howard D.; Gimenez-Conti, Irma

    2010-01-01

    We examined the wavelength dependence of ultraviolet (UV) ra-diation (UVR)-induced melanoma in a Xiphophorus backcross hybrid model previously reported to be susceptible to melanoma induction by ultraviolet A (UVA) and visible light. Whereas ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of neonates yielded high frequencies of melanomas in pigmented fish, UVA irradiation resulted in melanoma frequencies that were not significantly different from unirradiated fish. Spontaneous and UV-induced melanoma frequencies correlated with the degree of pigmentation as expected from previous studies, and the histopathology phenotypes of the melanomas were not found in significantly different proportions in UV-treated and -untreated tumor-bearing fish. Our results support the conclusion that a brief early-life exposure to UVB radiation causes melanoma formation in this animal model. These data are consistent with an essential role for direct DNA damage, including cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts, in the etiology of melanoma. PMID:20439744

  7. Ultraviolet A does not induce melanomas in a Xiphophorus hybrid fish model.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David L; Fernandez, André A; Nairn, Rodney S; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Trono, David; Thames, Howard D; Gimenez-Conti, Irma

    2010-05-18

    We examined the wavelength dependence of ultraviolet (UV) ra-diation (UVR)-induced melanoma in a Xiphophorus backcross hybrid model previously reported to be susceptible to melanoma induction by ultraviolet A (UVA) and visible light. Whereas ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of neonates yielded high frequencies of melanomas in pigmented fish, UVA irradiation resulted in melanoma frequencies that were not significantly different from unirradiated fish. Spontaneous and UV-induced melanoma frequencies correlated with the degree of pigmentation as expected from previous studies, and the histopathology phenotypes of the melanomas were not found in significantly different proportions in UV-treated and -untreated tumor-bearing fish. Our results support the conclusion that a brief early-life exposure to UVB radiation causes melanoma formation in this animal model. These data are consistent with an essential role for direct DNA damage, including cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts, in the etiology of melanoma.

  8. Effect of ultraviolet on the survival of bacteria airborne in simulated Martian dust clouds.

    PubMed

    Hagen, C A; Hawrylewicz, E J; Anderson, B T; Cephus, M L

    1970-01-01

    A chamber was constructed to create simulated Martian dust storms and thereby study the survival of airborne micro-organisms while exposed to the rigors of the Martian environment, including ultraviolet irradiation. Representative types of sporeforming and non-sporeforming bacteria present in spacecraft assembly areas and indigenous to humans were studied. It was found that daily ultraviolet irradiation of 2 to 9 X 10(7) erg cm-2 was not sufficient to sterilize the dust clouds. The soil particles protected the organisms from ultraviolet irradiation since the numbers of survivors from irradiated environments were similar to those from unirradiated environments. Pending further data of the Martian environment, the contamination and dissemination of Mars with terrestrial micro-organisms is still a distinct possibility.

  9. Planned observations of P/Halley with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope on Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Davidsen, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) is an f/2 90-cm prime-focus telescope with an f/2 Rowland-circle spectrograph designed for far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of faint astronomical sources. The wavelength range is 850-1850 A with an ultimate spectral resolution of 2 A, but for observations of solar-system objects the spectrograph is responsive, in second order, to wavelengths as short as 500 A. The HUT is one of three instruments to be carried on Space Shuttle in 1986 as part of an ultraviolet astronomy payload, and it is intended to use these instruments for observations of Halley during the encounters in March, 1986. In addition to its unique capability to observe at wavelengths shorter than 1150 A, the spectral region that includes the resonance transitions of the noble gases, the HUT is significantly more sensitive for observations of extended sources than either IUE or Space Telescope.

  10. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  11. SR-71 Ship #1 - Ultraviolet Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA's SR-71 streaks into the twilight on a night/science flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Mounted in the nose of the SR-71 was an ultraviolet video camera aimed skyward to capture images of stars, asteroids and comets. The science portion of the flight is a project of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as test beds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. One early research project flown on one of Dryden's SR-71s consisted of a proposal for a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of the California Institute of Technology, which operates under contract to NASA in much the way that NASA centers do. In March 1993, an upward-looking ultraviolet (UV) video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in the ultraviolet light spectrum. The SR-71 was proposed as a test bed for the experiment because it is capable of flying at altitudes above 80,000 feet for an extended length of time. Observation of ultraviolet radiation is not possible from the Earth's surface because the atmosphere's ozone layer absorbs UV rays. Study of UV radiation is important because it is known to cause skin cancer with prolonged exposure. UV radiation is also valuable to study from an astronomical perspective. Satellite study of ultraviolet radiation is very expensive. As a result, the South West Research Institute (SWRI) in Texas developed the hypothesis of using a high-flying aircraft such as the SR-71 to conduct UV observations. The SR-71 is capable of flying above 90 percent of the Earth's atmosphere. The flight program was also designed to test the stability of the aircraft as a test bed for UV observation. A joint flight program was developed between the JPL and NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1994) in

  12. Suppression of ultraviolet B exposure-mediated activation of NF-kappaB in normal human keratinocytes by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Afaq, Farrukh; Ahmad, Nihal

    2003-01-01

    Chemoprevention by naturally occurring agents is a newer dimension in the management of neoplasia, including skin cancer. Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the major cause of skin cancer. We recently demonstrated that resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic antioxidant found in grapes and red wine, imparts protection from UVB-mediated cutaneous damages in SKH-1 hairless mice. The mechanism of action of resveratrol is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the involvement of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), which is known to play a critical role in skin biology and the development of skin cancer, as the mechanism of chemoprevention of UV damage by resveratrol. In the normal human epidermal keratinocytes, resveratrol blocked UVB-mediated (40 mJ/cm(2)) activation of NF-kappaB in a dose-dependent (5, 10, and 25 micro M resveratrol for 24 hours) as well as time-dependent (5 micro M resveratrol for 12, 24, and 48 hours) fashion. Resveratrol treatment of keratinocytes also inhibited UVB-mediated 1) phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, and 2) activation of IKKalpha. We suggest that NF-kappaB pathway plays a critical role in the chemopreventive effects of resveratrol against the adverse effects of UV radiation including photocarcinogenesis.

  13. Future of Ultraviolet Astronomy Based on Six Years of IUE Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, J. M. (Editor); Chapman, R. D. (Editor); Kondo, Y. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Physical insights into the various astronomical objects which were studied using the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Topics covered included galaxies, cool stars, hot stars, close binaries, variable stars, the interstellar medium, the solar system, and IUE follow-on missions.

  14. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jie; Li, Yannian; Li, Quan; Paterson, Daniel A; Storey, John M D; Imrie, Corrie T; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-20

    Electrical tuning of selective reflection of light is achieved in a very broad spectral range from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by an oblique helicoidal state of a cholesteric liquid crystal in a wide temperature range (including room temperature). The phenomenon offers potential applications in tunable smart windows, lasers, optical filters and limiters, as well as in displays. PMID:25821155

  15. Extreme Ultraviolet Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, Gregory; Garg, Rashi; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Goldberg, Kenneth; Gullikson, Eric; Liu, Yanwei; Wood, Obert

    2005-11-01

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) zone plate microscopy provides high resolution imaging of EUV masks; (2) using phase plates in the back focal plane of the objective lens can provide contrast mechanisms for measurement of the phase shift from defects on the mask; (3) the first high resolution EUV Zernike phase contrast images have been acquired; and (4) future work will include phase contrast mode in reflection from an EUV mask to directly measure the reflectivity and phase shift from defects.

  16. Impact of biofibers and coupling agents on the weathering characteristics of composites polymer degradation and stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper explores the ultraviolet (UV) weathering performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with different biofiber fillers and coupling agent. Biofiber polymer composite (BFPC) material samples were prepared using oak, cotton burr and stem (CBS) or guayule bagasse as fiber source...

  17. Opinion evolution influenced by informed agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kangqi; Pedrycz, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Guiding public opinions toward a pre-set target by informed agents can be a strategy adopted in some practical applications. The informed agents are common agents who are employed or chosen to spread the pre-set opinion. In this work, we propose a social judgment based opinion (SJBO) dynamics model to explore the opinion evolution under the influence of informed agents. The SJBO model distinguishes between inner opinions and observable choices, and incorporates both the compromise between similar opinions and the repulsion between dissimilar opinions. Three choices (support, opposition, and remaining undecided) are considered in the SJBO model. Using the SJBO model, both the inner opinions and the observable choices can be tracked during the opinion evolution process. The simulation results indicate that if the exchanges of inner opinions among agents are not available, the effect of informed agents is mainly dependent on the characteristics of regular agents, including the assimilation threshold, decay threshold, and initial opinions. Increasing the assimilation threshold and decay threshold can improve the guiding effectiveness of informed agents. Moreover, if the initial opinions of regular agents are close to null, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion can be realized, indicating that, to maximize the influence of informed agents, the guidance should be started when regular agents have little knowledge about a subject under consideration. If the regular agents have had clear opinions, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion cannot be achieved. However, the introduction of informed agents can make the majority of agents choose the pre-set opinion.

  18. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  19. HST ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, Robert; Hurt, Todd; Miller, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We present multiaperture spectropolarimetric observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The nuclear region of NGC 1068 was observed with three apertures (4.3 sec x 1.4 sec., 1.0 sec., and 0.3 sec.) by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These ultraviolet data allow us to study the scattered, nuclear light without the complication of polarization dilution caused by strong unpolarized starlight. In particular, we can determine the mechanism of the scattering and the size scale of the scattering region. Our data confirm the findings of Antonicci & Miller (1985) and Code et al. (1993). Shortward of 2700 A, the continuum polarization is constant, P is approximately 16%, at a position angle of 97 deg, indicating electron scattering as the mechanism for the polarization. In addition, the narrow-line emission is much less polarized than the continuum, and two broad lines, Mg II lambda lambda 2796, 2804 and C III lambda 1909, are seen in polarized flux Ly-alpha and C IV are not included in our spectral region). The total flux data also indicate that from approximately 2200 A to approximately 3000 A, the spectrum of NGC 1068 is strongly affected by blended Fe II emission. These polarimetry data are explained by the occulation/reflection model proposed by Antonucci & Miller (1985). According to this model, NGC 1068 harbors a Seyfert 1 nucleus which is obscured along the line of sight by an opaque torus. The symmetry axis of the torus is alinged with the radio axis. Radiation from the broad-line region and feature continuum source can escape along the poles of the torus where it is scattered to us. This scattered light receives a partial linear polarization, perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the torus. Our measurements of the relative fluxes and polarized fluxes in the three apertures indicated that the scattering region is spatially extended on a scale of approximatley 1 sec. Also, in the 0.3 sec aperture, and to a lesser extent in the 1.0 sec aperture, the polarization

  20. Next Generation Remote Agent Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Muscettola, Nicola; Morris, Paul H.; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    In May 1999, as part of a unique technology validation experiment onboard the Deep Space One spacecraft, the Remote Agent became the first complete autonomous spacecraft control architecture to run as flight software onboard an active spacecraft. As one of the three components of the architecture, the Remote Agent Planner had the task of laying out the course of action to be taken, which included activities such as turning, thrusting, data gathering, and communicating. Building on the successful approach developed for the Remote Agent Planner, the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner is a completely redesigned and reimplemented version of the planner. The new system provides all the key capabilities of the original planner, while adding functionality, improving performance and providing a modular and extendible implementation. The goal of this ongoing project is to develop a system that provides both a basis for future applications and a framework for further research in the area of autonomous planning for spacecraft. In this article, we present an introductory overview of the Next Generation Remote Agent Planner. We present a new and simplified definition of the planning problem, describe the basics of the planning process, lay out the new system design and examine the functionality of the core reasoning module.

  1. Investigational Antimicrobial Agents of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  2. Phytonutrients as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients present in various foods plays an important role in maintaining the normal functions of the human body. The major nutrients present in foods include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. Besides these, there are some bioactive food components known as "phytonutrients" that play an important role in human health. They have tremendous impact on the health care system and may provide medical health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of disease and various physiological disorders. Phytonutrients play a positive role by maintaining and modulating immune function to prevent specific diseases. Being natural products, they hold a great promise in clinical therapy as they possess no side effects that are usually associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. They are also comparatively cheap and thus significantly reduce health care cost. Phytonutrients are the plant nutrients with specific biological activities that support human health. Some of the important bioactive phytonutrients include polyphenols, terpenoids, resveratrol, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, carotenoids, limonoids, glucosinolates, phytoestrogens, phytosterols, anthocyanins, ω-3 fatty acids, and probiotics. They play specific pharmacological effects in human health such as anti-microbial, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anti-spasmodic, anti-cancer, anti-aging, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, neuroprotective, hypotensive, diabetes, osteoporosis, CNS stimulant, analgesic, protection from UVB-induced carcinogenesis, immuno-modulator, and carminative. This mini-review attempts to summarize the major important types of phytonutrients and their role in promoting human health and as therapeutic agents along with the current market trend and commercialization.

  3. Rapid screening of Veillonella by ultraviolet fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, A W; Patten, V; Guze, L B

    1975-01-01

    Among 51 strains of anaerobic gram-negative cocci belonging to the family Veillonellaceae, all strains of Veillonella (V. parvula and V. alcalescens) displayed red fluorescence under long-wave (366 nm) ultraviolet light, whereas no Acidaminococcus or Megasphaera demonstrated fluorescence. In contrast to Bacteroides melaninogenicus, growth of Veillonella does not require hemin and menadione, and flourescence is rapidly lost upon exposure to air. The fluorescent component of a strain of V. parvula examined could not be extracted in solution with water, ether, methanol, or chloroform, but was readily extracted with 0.4 N NaOH. Spectrophotofluorometrically, the fluorescence maximum of this extract was 660 nm with an excitation maximum of 300 nm, when measured at pH 7.2 and 25 C. Coupled with the Gram stain, ultraviolet fluorescence may be a useful tool for rapid screening of Veillonella and is particularly helpful for detection and, isolation of this organism from mixed culture. Images PMID:1419

  4. Ultraviolet spectrometer observations of neptune and triton.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, A L; Atreya, S K; Bertaux, J L; Blamont, J E; Dessler, A J; Donahue, T M; Forrester, W T; Hall, D T; Herbert, F; Holberg, J B; Hunter, D M; Krasnopolsky, V A; Linick, S; Lunine, J I; McConnell, J C; Moos, H W; Sandel, B R; Schneider, N M; Shemansky, D E; Smith, G R; Strobel, D F; Yelle, R V

    1989-12-15

    Results from the occultation of the sun by Neptune imply a temperature of 750 +/- 150 kelvins in the upper levels of the atmosphere (composed mostly of atomic and molecular hydrogen) and define the distributions of methane, acetylene, and ethane at lower levels. The ultraviolet spectrum of the sunlit atmosphere of Neptune resembles the spectra of the Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus atmospheres in that it is dominated by the emissions of H Lyman alpha (340 +/- 20 rayleighs) and molecular hydrogen. The extreme ultraviolet emissions in the range from 800 to 1100 angstroms at the four planets visited by Voyager scale approximately as the inverse square of their heliocentric distances. Weak auroral emissions have been tentatively identified on the night side of Neptune. Airglow and occultation observations of Triton's atmosphere show that it is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, with a trace of methane near the surface. The temperature of Triton's upper atmosphere is 95 +/- 5 kelvins, and the surface pressure is roughly 14 microbars.

  5. Antlia Supernova Remnant in Far-ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Min, K. W.; Seon, K.; Lim, Y.; Edelstein, J.; Han, W.; Sankrit, R.; FIMS Team at KAIST; FIMS Team at KASI; SPEAR Team at SSL

    2006-09-01

    Antlia supernova remnant (l = 276.52°, b = +19.05°) was recently discovered by McCullough et al. (2002), and its angular size ( 24°) is comparable to Monogem Ring. It shows a diffuse appearance in soft X-ray, which is anti-correlated with 100 μm infrared emission and surrounded by annular enhancements in Hα. We present the far-ultraviolet view of the remnant observed with Spectroscopy of Plasma Evolution from Astrophysical Radiation (SPEAR), also known as Far-ultraviolet IMaging Spectrograph (FIMS). C IV λ and Si II emission lines were detected in the remnant region, and their emission-line maps show a rough anti-correlation with a soft X-ray map (ROSAT All Sky Survey 0.25 keV map).

  6. Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbrayer, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-meter telescope for imaging from the lunar surface the ultraviolet spectrum between 1,000 and 3,500 angstroms. There have been several endorsements of the scientific value of a LUTE. In addition to the scientific value of LUTE, its educational value and the information it can provide on the design of operating hardware for long-term exposure in the lunar environment are important considerations. This report provides the results of the LUTE phase A activity begun at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in early 1992. It describes the objective of LUTE (science, engineering, and education), a feasible reference design concept that has evolved, and the subsystem trades that were accomplished during the phase A.

  7. Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE), phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBrayer, Robert O.

    1994-04-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-meter telescope for imaging from the lunar surface the ultraviolet spectrum between 1,000 and 3,500 angstroms. There have been several endorsements of the scientific value of a LUTE. In addition to the scientific value of LUTE, its educational value and the information it can provide on the design of operating hardware for long-term exposure in the lunar environment are important considerations. This report provides the results of the LUTE phase A activity begun at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in early 1992. It describes the objective of LUTE (science, engineering, and education), a feasible reference design concept that has evolved, and the subsystem trades that were accomplished during the phase A.

  8. Gradient-based inverse extreme ultraviolet lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Xuanbo; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-08-20

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the most promising successor of current deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography. The very short wavelength, reflective optics, and nontelecentric structure of EUV lithography systems bring in different imaging phenomena into the lithographic image synthesis problem. This paper develops a gradient-based inverse algorithm for EUV lithography systems to effectively improve the image fidelity by comprehensively compensating the optical proximity effect, flare, photoresist, and mask shadowing effects. A block-based method is applied to iteratively optimize the main features and subresolution assist features (SRAFs) of mask patterns, while simultaneously preserving the mask manufacturability. The mask shadowing effect may be compensated by a retargeting method based on a calibrated shadowing model. Illustrative simulations at 22 and 16 nm technology nodes are presented to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:26368764

  9. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, S. D.; Kuehne, M.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.

    1992-01-01

    The experiment Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) is designed for the investigations of plasma flow characteristics, turbulence and wave motions, plasma densities and temperatures, structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity in the chromosphere, the transition zone and the corona. Specifically, SUMER will measure profiles and intensities of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lines emitted in the solar atmosphere ranging from the upper chromosphere to the lower corona; determine line broadenings, spectral positions and Doppler shifts with high accuracy, provide stigmatic images of selected areas of the Sun in the EUV with high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution and obtain full images of the Sun and the inner corona in selectable EUV lines, corresponding to a temperature from 10,000 to more than 1,800,000 K.

  10. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of planetary nebulae: Cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    Optical spectrophotometry of PW Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 1984 no. 1) is combined with ultraviolet data to estimate electron temperatures, densities, and abundances in the ejecta of this slow classical nova. The reddening, distance, and evolution of the ultraviolet spectrum are also discussed. Abundances are nearly solar, with the exception of Nitrogen, which is substantially higher. Although Neon has been reported to be enhanced in several novae, it does not seem to be the case for PW Vul. Photoionization model calculations are presented of the ejecta that give a reasonable match of the observed emission spectrum. A strong featureless continuum shows that very hot, presumably shock heated, gas plays a major role in determining the energetics of this nova. Emission from this hot gas is responsible for the ionization of the nebular gas. A calculation of the masses of both the hot coronal gas and the cooler nebular gas shows that the former may account for most of the mass of the ejecta.

  11. GALEX 1st Light Far Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the far ultraviolet channel of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 400 celestial objects, appearing in blue, detected over a 3-minute, 20-second period in the constellation Hercules.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  12. Near-ultraviolet photolysis of beta-phenylpyruvic acid generates free radicals and results in DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, A; Taiwo, F A; Duggan, O; Kirk, S H; Ahmad, S I

    2007-12-14

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) light (315-400 nm) is ubiquitously found in our environment and constitutes about 95% of the total solar UV; all UVC and most UVB being absorbed by the stratospheric ozone layer. Compared with UVB and C, UVA does not show any direct effect on biological systems. Indirect effects of UVA, however, have been recognised overwhelmingly and this includes photosensitization of biological and non-biological compounds and production of free radicals many of which include oxygen and are hence known as reactive oxygen species or ROS. Several types of free radicals have been identified although their impacts on various macro- and micro-biomolecules are yet to be fully elucidated. beta-Phenylpyruvic acid is ubiquitously found in eukaryotic cells as a metabolite of phenylalanine, which is subsequently converted to phenyllactate and/or to 2-hydroxyphenylacetate and mandelate. In patients suffering from phenylketonuria the hydroxylation of phenylalanine to tyrosine is defective due to lack of phenylalanine hydroxylase. These result in accumulation and excretion of this compound in the urine. Here we present evidence that photolysis of beta-phenylpyruvic acid by a skin tanning lamp, emitting 99% UVA (315-400 nm) and 1% UVB (290-315 nm) generates carboxyl radicals (CO(2)(*)) and also possibly causes direct electron transfer (or type 1) reactions. Electron paramagnetic resonance was used to detect the free radicals. To determine the biological effects of this photolytic reaction, T7 was exposed to these photolytic reactive agents and found to lead to high levels of phage inactivation. Damage to DNA and/or components such as tail fibre proteins may be involved in T7 inactivation. In addition, our unpublished data suggest that certain phenylketonuria cell lines are more sensitive to PPA+NUV, lending importance to photolytic studies of this agent.

  13. Monitoring of phenol photodegradation by ultraviolet spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, B.; Gonzalez, C.; Thomas, O.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been developed as an emerging technology for hazardous organic treatment in industrial wastewater. In this paper, the contribution of ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy to follow phenol photodegradation was studied in a laboratory photochemical reactor equipped with a low pressure mercury lamp. It has been observed that a multicomponent approach is efficient for the evolution estimation of the initial product or intermediate compounds formed during the photodegradation.

  14. Solar ultraviolet radiation: definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Matts, Paul J

    2006-01-01

    In the rapidly developing field of photobiology as it relates to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), there is a need as never before to ensure that definitions and terminology are current, correct, and standard. This article provides a basic definition of UVR; a review of correct UVR radiometric symbols, units, and nomenclature; defines extraterrestrial and terrestrial solar UVR; and reviews the measurement of biologically effective dose of solar UVR in humans.

  15. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures. PMID:17744366

  16. Spectrophotometric Attachment for the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrod, Norman N.

    1961-01-01

    An absorption spectrophotometric attachment to a vacuum ultraviolet monochromator has been built and tested. With an empty sample chamber, the ratio of the radiant flux through the sample chamber to the radiant flux through the reference chamber was measured. By optimizing conditions at the entrance slit, the ratio was constant within experimental error over the region 1000-1600 A. The transmittance of thin celluloid films was measured with the attachment.

  17. Ultraviolet spectra of R Coronae Borealis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.; Wu, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of the International Ultraviolet Explorer spectra of the R CrB-type variables R CrB, RY Sgr, XX Cam, and MV Sgr suggests that: (1) it should be possible to construct useful models for the atmospheres of these hydrogen deficient, carbon rich stars if present standards of metallic line blanketing are used; and (2) the observed wavelength dependence of the circumstellar extinction is primarily due to circumstellar grains.

  18. Rotational Variability in Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; Richard, E. C.; Harder, J. W.; Thuillier, G. O.

    2011-12-01

    There are currently many observations and models of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet (UV). The models and the observations are often in agreement, but sometimes have significant differences. Using the decline of solar cycle 23 and the rise of solar cycle 24 as a test case, we will investigate the systematic differences between the short term SSI variation observed by satellite instruments and the predictions of proxy models.

  19. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Science Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, G. S.; Kronberg, F. A.; Meriwether, H. D.; Wong, L. S.; Grassi, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    The EUVE Science Operations Center (ESOC) is a satellite payload operations center for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project, located on the Berkeley campus of the University of California. The ESOC has the primary responsibility for commanding the EUVE telescopes and monitoring their telemetry. The ESOC is one of a very few university-based satellite operations facilities operating with NASA. This article describes the history, operation, and advantages of the ESOC as an on-campus operations center.

  20. Large-Area Vacuum Ultraviolet Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Franz, David

    2012-01-01

    Pt/(n-doped GaN) Schottky-barrier diodes having active areas as large as 1 cm square have been designed and fabricated as prototypes of photodetectors for the vacuum ultraviolet portion (wavelengths approximately equal 200 nm) of the solar spectrum. In addition to having adequate sensitivity to photons in this wavelength range, these photodetectors are required to be insensitive to visible and infrared components of sunlight and to have relatively low levels of dark current.

  1. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas was presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It was scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution was 0.1 A. The atlas was presented in both tables and graphs.

  2. Solar ultraviolet radiation: definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Matts, Paul J

    2006-01-01

    In the rapidly developing field of photobiology as it relates to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), there is a need as never before to ensure that definitions and terminology are current, correct, and standard. This article provides a basic definition of UVR; a review of correct UVR radiometric symbols, units, and nomenclature; defines extraterrestrial and terrestrial solar UVR; and reviews the measurement of biologically effective dose of solar UVR in humans. PMID:16311162

  3. Cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, J.; Chai, A.-T.; Mo, T.; Green, A. E. O.

    1977-01-01

    An Eppley radiometer and a Robertson-Berger sunburn meter are employed along with an all-sky camera setup to study cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation at the ground level. Semiempirical equations to allow for cloud effects presented in previous work are compared with the experimental data. The study suggests a means of defining eigenvectors of cloud patterns and correlating them with the radiation at the ground level.

  4. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A0 V star Alpha Lyr (Vega) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 2000 to 3187 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs with a normalized continuum, and an identification table for the absorption features has been prepared.

  5. S201 catalog of far-ultraviolet objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, T.; Carruthers, G. K.; Hill, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A catalog of star images was compiled from images obtained by an NRL Far-Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph operated from 21 to 23 April 1972 on the lunar surface during the Apollo-16 mission. These images were scanned on a microdensitometer, and the output recorded on magnetic tapes. The catalog is divided into 11 parts, covering ten fields in the sky (the Sagittarius field being covered by two parts), and each part is headed by a constellation name and the field center coordinates. The errors in position of the detected images are less than about 3 arc-min. Correlations are given with star numbers in the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory catalog. Values are given of the peak density and the density volume. The text includes a discussion of the photometry, corrections thereto due to threshold and saturation effects, and its comparison with theoretical expectation, stellar model atmospheres, and a generalized far-ultraviolet interstellar extinction law. The S201 catalog is also available on a single reel of seven-track magnetic tape.

  6. The far-ultraviolet spectra of "cool" PG 1159 stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Kruk, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    We present a comprehensive study of Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra (912-1190 Å) of two members of the PG 1159 spectral class, which consists of hydrogen-deficient (pre-) white dwarfs with effective temperatures in the range Teff = 75 000-200 000 K. As two representatives of the cooler objects, we have selected PG 1707+427 (Teff = 85 000 K) and PG 1424+535 (Teff = 110 000 K), complementing a previous study of the hotter prototype PG 1159-035 (Teff = 140 000 K). The helium-dominated atmospheres are strongly enriched in carbon and oxygen, therefore, their spectra are dominated by lines from C iii-iv and O iii-vi, many of which were never observed before in hot stars. In addition, lines of many other metals (N, F, Ne, Si, P, S, Ar, Fe) are detectable, demonstrating that observations in this spectral region are most rewarding when compared to the near-ultraviolet and optical wavelength bands. We perform abundance analyses of these species and derive upper limits for several undetected light and heavy metals including iron-group and trans-iron elements. The results are compared to predictions of stellar evolution models for neutron-capture nucleosynthesis and good agreement is found. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Terrestrial ultraviolet monitoring spectroradiometer intercomparisons: results and field standard development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Early, Edward A.; Thompson, Ambler E.

    1996-11-01

    Two interagency solar ultraviolet spectroradiometer intercomparisons (September 1994 and June 1995) have been conducted at Table Mountain outside Boulder, Colorado. A third intercomparison is planned for June 1996 at the same location. The intercomparisons were organized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at a field site supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and included participants representing North American agencies currently monitoring solar ultraviolet irradiance. Instruments were characterized at the intercomparisons for wavelength error, bandwidth, and stray- light rejection. All instruments were calibrated for spectral irradiance responsivity by NIST personnel with specially developed quartz-halogen field irradiance standards. Thus, comparisons of synchronized solar irradiance measurements allowed true comparisons between instruments, without the added complication of differences in irradiance scales of the participants. Estimates of differences in individual network propagation of irradiance scales were made separately. In addition, there were extensive concurrent ancillary measurements in an effort to compile a standard data set. We will discuss the results of these experiments and the overall agreement between the participants.

  8. Solar glint suppression in compact planetary ultraviolet spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael W.; Cook, Jason C.; Grava, Cesare; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2015-08-01

    Solar glint suppression is an important consideration in the design of compact photon-counting ultraviolet spectrographs. Southwest Research Institute developed the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (launch in 2009), and the Ultraviolet Spectrograph on Juno (Juno-UVS, launch in 2011). Both of these compact spectrographs revealed minor solar glints in flight that did not appear in pre-launch analyses. These glints only appeared when their respective spacecraft were operating outside primary science mission parameters. Post-facto scattered light analysis verifies the geometries at which these glints occurred and why they were not caught during ground testing or nominal mission operations. The limitations of standard baffle design at near-grazing angles are discussed, as well as the importance of including surface scatter properties in standard stray light analyses when determining solar keep-out efficiency. In particular, the scattered light analysis of these two instruments shows that standard "one bounce" assumptions in baffle design are not always enough to prevent scattered sunlight from reaching the instrument focal plane. Future builds, such as JUICE-UVS, will implement improved scattered and stray light modeling early in the design phase to enhance capabilities in extended mission science phases, as well as optimize solar keep out volume.

  9. Is N=8 Supergravity Ultraviolet Finite?

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Roiban, Radu

    2006-11-15

    Conventional wisdom holds that no four-dimensional gravity field theory can be ultraviolet finite. This understanding is based mainly on power counting. Recent studies confirm that one-loop N = 8 supergravity amplitudes satisfy the so-called 'no-triangle hypothesis', which states that triangle and bubble integrals cancel from these amplitudes. A consequence of this hypothesis is that for any number of external legs, at one loop N = 8 supergravity and N = 4 super-Yang-Mills have identical superficial degrees of ultraviolet behavior in D dimensions. We describe how the unitarity method allows us to promote these one-loop cancellations to higher loops, suggesting that previous power counts were too conservative. We discuss higher-loop evidence suggesting that N = 8 supergravity has the same degree of divergence as N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory and is ultraviolet finite in four dimensions. We comment on calculations needed to reinforce this proposal, which are feasible using the unitarity method.

  10. Photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection of human skin by means of sunscreens or daily skin-care products is traditionally centered around the prevention of acute (e.g. sunburn) and chronic (e.g. skin cancer and photoaging) skin damage that may result from exposure to ultraviolet rays (UVB and UVA). Within the last decade, however, it has been appreciated that wavelengths beyond the ultraviolet spectrum, in particular visible light and infrared radiation, contribute to skin damage in general and photoaging of human skin in particular. As a consequence, attempts have been made to develop skin care/sunscreen products that not only protect against UVB or UVA radiation but provide photoprotection against visible light and infrared radiation as well. In this article, we will briefly review the current knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for visible light/infrared radiation-induced skin damage and then, based on this information, discuss strategies that have been successfully used or may be employed in the future to achieve photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation. In this regard we will particularly focus on the use of topical antioxidants and the challenges that result from the task of showing their efficacy.

  11. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet -50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the two channels of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 50 celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The reddish objects represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period, while bluish objects were detected over a 3-minute period by the camera's far ultraviolet channel. Deeper imaging may confirm the apparent existence in this field of galaxy pairs and triplets or individual star formation regions in single galaxies.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  12. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  13. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XXII Ultraviolet light variation of Beta Lyrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.; Eaton, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Six-color ultraviolet light curves of the complex eclipsing binary system Beta Lyr were obtained with the OAO-2 Wisconsin Experiment Package. The filters had a typical width at half maximum of 150 to 200 A and were centered at 1430, 1550, 1910, 2460, 2980, and 3320 A. The most striking characteristics of the ultraviolet light curves are that the secondary minimum deepens at shorter wavelengths. This indicates that we are not observing the eclipse effect of two stars having roughly a Planckian distribution of energy. In combination with the high-resolution far-ultraviolet spectra of Beta Lyr recently obtained with Copernicus (OAO-3) Princeton Telescope Spectrometer, it is concluded that the far-ultraviolet light curves are dominated by emission from the high-temperature gas surrounding the binary system. The ultraviolet observations of OAO-2 and Copernicus are consistent with a model in which the enigmatic secondary component involves a gravitationally collapsed object; i.e., a black hole. However, alternative models are also admissible.

  14. Deep ultraviolet diamond Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Granados, Eduardo; Spence, David J; Mildren, Richard P

    2011-05-23

    We present a synchronously pumped diamond Raman laser operating at 275.7 nm pumped by the 4th harmonic of a mode locked Nd:YVO4 laser. The laser had a threshold pump pulse energy of 5.8 nJ and generated up to 0.96 nJ pulses at 10.3% conversion efficiency. The results agree well with a numerical model that includes two-photon absorption of the pump and Stokes beams and uses a Raman gain coefficient of diamond of 100 cm/GW. We also report on the observation of nanometer scale two-photon assisted etching of the diamond crystal surfaces. PMID:21643343

  15. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemen, J. R.; Freeland, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on development and implementation of the SolarSoft (SSW) data analysis system. From an EIT analysis perspective, this system was designed to facilitate efficient reuse and conversion of software developed for Yohkoh/SXT and to take advantage of a large existing body of software developed by the SDAC, Yohkoh, and SOHO instrument teams. Another strong motivation for this system was to provide an EIT analysis environment which permits coordinated analysis of EIT data in conjunction with data from important supporting instruments, including Yohkoh/SXT and the other SOHO coronal instruments; CDS, SUMER, and LASCO. In addition, the SSW system will support coordinated EIT/TRACE analysis (by design) when TRACE data is available; TRACE launch is currently planned for March 1998. Working with Jeff Newmark, the Chianti software package (K.P. Dere et al) and UV /EUV data base was fully integrated into the SSW system to facilitate EIT temperature and emission analysis.

  16. Variability of solar ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    A model of solar Lyman alpha irradiance developed by multiple linear regression analysis, including the daily values and 81-day running means of the full disk equivalent width of the Helium line at 1083 nm, predicts reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. In contrast, Lyman alpha models calculated from the 10.7-cm radio flux overestimate the observed variations in the rising portion and maximum period of solar cycle, and underestimates them during solar minimum. Models are shown of Lyman alpha based on the He-line equivalent width and 10.7-cm radio flux for those time intervals when no satellite observations exist, namely back to 1974 and after April 1989, when the measurements of the Solar Mesosphere Satellite were terminated.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized oxygen and fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Griffin, P. M.; Haselton, H. H.; Laubert, R.; Mowat, J. R.; Thoe, R. S.; Peterson, R. S.; Sellin, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    The foil-excitation method has been used to study the extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized oxygen and fluorine. Several previously unreported lines in heliumlike fluorine are reported and other newly reported lines in heliumlike oxygen have been measured to higher accuracy. Included in the measurements are certain heliumlike oxygen transitions of significance in interpretation of solar-flare spectral observations. The wavelength determinations are usually in good agreement with calculated results which includes relativistic corrections, but discrepancies arise when nonrelativistic calculations are used. A comparison of the present results and those recently obtained by theta-pinch and laser-induced plasma sources is made for both heliumlike and lithiumlike ions; a few discrepancies occur, with results in most cases in better agreement with relativistically corrected calculations. Certain unidentified lines in the spectra may be attributable to radiative transitions between quartet states of lithiumlike ions.

  18. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wan-Ting; Dai, Ming-Xiang; Xue, Fang-Zheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all of the agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all of the agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups and that agents in the same group collaborate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203080 and 61473051) and the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City (Grant No. CSTC 2011BB0081).

  19. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials.

  20. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  1. God's Beliefs versus Mother's: The Development of Nonhuman Agent Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Justin L.; Richert, Rebekah A.; Driesenga, Amanda

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments examined assumption that children attribute human properties to nonhuman agents. Two- to 8-year-olds participated in false-belief tests concerning human and various nonhuman agents, including animals and God, and in a modified perspective-taking task including nonhuman agents. Results suggested that children do not consistently…

  2. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course.Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations,which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

  3. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    : Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course. Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations, which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

  4. Studying Extreme Ultraviolet Wave Transients with a Digital Laboratory: Direct Comparison of Extreme Ultraviolet Wave Observations to Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Cooper; Roussev, Ilia I.; van der Holst, Bart; Lugaz, Noé; Sokolov, Igor V.; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    2011-02-01

    In this work, we describe our effort to explore the signatures of large-scale extreme ultraviolet (EUV) transients in the solar corona (EUV waves) using a three-dimensional thermodynamic magnetohydrodynamic model. We conduct multiple simulations of the 2008 March 25 EUV wave (~18:40 UT), observed both on and off of the solar disk by the STEREO-A and B spacecraft. By independently varying fundamental parameters thought to govern the physical mechanisms behind EUV waves in each model, such as the ambient magneto-sonic speed, eruption free energy, and eruption handedness, we are able to assess their respective contributions to the transient signature. A key feature of this work is the ability to synthesize the multi-filter response of the STEREO Extreme UltraViolet Imagers directly from model data, which gives a means for direct interpretation of EUV observations with full knowledge of the three-dimensional magnetic and thermodynamic structures in the simulations. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to some commonly held interpretations of EUV waves (e.g., fast-mode magnetosonic wave, plasma compression, reconnection front, etc.) and present a unified scenario which includes both a wave-like component moving at the fast magnetosonic speed and a coherent driven compression front related to the eruptive event itself.

  5. Surface modification of Sylgard-184 poly(dimethyl siloxane) networks by ultraviolet and ultraviolet/ozone treatment.

    PubMed

    Efimenko, Kirill; Wallace, William E; Genzer, Jan

    2002-10-15

    We report on the surface modification of Sylgard-184 poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) networks by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and ultraviolet/ozone (UVO) treatment. The effects of the UV light wavelength and ambient conditions on the surface properties of Sylgard-184 are probed using a battery of experimental probes, including static contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray reflectivity. Our results reveal that when exposed to UV, the PDMS macromolecules in the surface region of Sylgard-184 undergo chain scission, involving both the main chain backbone and the side groups. The radicals formed during this process recombine and form a network whose wetting properties are similar to those of a UV-modified model PDMS. In contrast to the UV radiation, the UVO treatment causes very significant changes in the surface and near-surface structure of Sylgard-184. Specifically, the molecular oxygen and ozone created during the UVO process interact with the UV-modified specimen. As a result of these interactions, the surface of the sample contains a large number of hydrophilic (mainly -OH) groups. In addition, the material density within the first approximately 5 nm reaches about 50% of that of pure silica. A major conclusion that can be drawn from the results and analysis described in this work is that the presence of the silica fillers in Sylgard-184 does not alter the surface properties of the UVO- and UV-modified Sylgard-184.

  6. Agent Reward Shaping for Alleviating Traffic Congestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Traffic congestion problems provide a unique environment to study how multi-agent systems promote desired system level behavior. What is particularly interesting in this class of problems is that no individual action is intrinsically "bad" for the system but that combinations of actions among agents lead to undesirable outcomes, As a consequence, agents need to learn how to coordinate their actions with those of other agents, rather than learn a particular set of "good" actions. This problem is ubiquitous in various traffic problems, including selecting departure times for commuters, routes for airlines, and paths for data routers. In this paper we present a multi-agent approach to two traffic problems, where far each driver, an agent selects the most suitable action using reinforcement learning. The agent rewards are based on concepts from collectives and aim to provide the agents with rewards that are both easy to learn and that if learned, lead to good system level behavior. In the first problem, we study how agents learn the best departure times of drivers in a daily commuting environment and how following those departure times alleviates congestion. In the second problem, we study how agents learn to select desirable routes to improve traffic flow and minimize delays for. all drivers.. In both sets of experiments,. agents using collective-based rewards produced near optimal performance (93-96% of optimal) whereas agents using system rewards (63-68%) barely outperformed random action selection (62-64%) and agents using local rewards (48-72%) performed worse than random in some instances.

  7. Photoreactivation and ultraviolet-enhanced reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated nuclear polyhedrosis virus by insect cells.

    PubMed

    Witt, D J

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus) of Galleria mellonella (Pryalidae: Lepidoptera) was used to investigate the capability of cultured insect cells to repair ultraviolet (UV) induced damage in the viral genome. When assayed by the formation of plaques in the cell line TN-368, the survival of the virus was found to decrease linearly with increased ultraviolet exposure. The infectious capacity of UV-irradiated virions was significantly restored after exposing the TN-368 monolayers to either photoreactivation conditions (white fluorescent and black light) or to UV-enhanced reactivation conditions (far ultraviolet radiation). Using both types of repair sequentially resulted in higher reactivation than when either was used alone. These results indicate that pyrimidine dimers are the major factor responsible for inactivation of this virus by UV radiation but that other photolesions not repairable by photoreactivation partially account for the inactivation of the virus. PMID:6365037

  8. Spectral synthesis in the ultraviolet. I - Far-ultraviolet stellar library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanelli, Michael N.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Thuan, Trinh X.

    1987-01-01

    A library of mean stellar energy distributions for use in population synthesis of the ultraviolet spectra of active star-forming galaxies is derived from the ultraviolet spectrophotometry in the IUE Spectral Atlas. The spectra extend from 1230 to 1930 A with a resolution of 6 A. The library contains eight main-sequence groups from O3 to A7 V, four giant groups from O5 to B9 III, and three supergiant groups from O9 to A0 I. Several continuum and spectral line indices are computed, and their usefulness as temperature and luminosity discriminants is discussed. The advantages of analyzing composite stellar populations in the far-ultraviolet, where cool starlight is strongly suppressed, are examined.

  9. International Ultraviolet Explorer Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CSC processed IUE images through the Final Archive Data Processing System. Raw images were obtained from both NDADS and the IUEGTC optical disk platters for processing on the Alpha cluster, and from the IUEGTC optical disk platters for DECstation processing. Input parameters were obtained from the IUE database. Backup tapes of data to send to VILSPA were routinely made on the Alpha cluster. IPC handled more than 263 requests for priority NEWSIPS processing during the contract. Staff members also answered various questions and requests for information and sent copies of IUE documents to requesters. CSC implemented new processing capabilities into the NEWSIPS processing systems as they became available. In addition, steps were taken to improve efficiency and throughput whenever possible. The node TORTE was reconfigured as the I/O server for Alpha processing in May. The number of Alpha nodes used for the NEWSIPS processing queue was increased to a maximum of six in measured fashion in order to understand the dependence of throughput on the number of nodes and to be able to recognize when a point of diminishing returns was reached. With Project approval, generation of the VD FITS files was dropped in July. This action not only saved processing time but, even more significantly, also reduced the archive storage media requirements, and the time required to perform the archiving, drastically. The throughput of images verified through CDIVS and processed through NEWSIPS for the contract period is summarized below. The number of images of a given dispersion type and camera that were processed in any given month reflects several factors, including the availability of the required NEWSIPS software system, the availability of the corresponding required calibrations (e.g., the LWR high-dispersion ripple correction and absolute calibration), and the occurrence of reprocessing efforts such as that conducted to incorporate the updated SWP sensitivity-degradation correction in May.

  10. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  11. Physical factors in cataractogenesis: ambient ultraviolet radiation and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sliney, D.H.

    1986-05-01

    A number of environmental cofactors have been implicated in cataracto-genesis. Two have received the greatest attention: ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and ambient temperature. Unfortunately, both temperature and UVR levels vary similarly with geographical latitude. Careful attention to several more refined physical variables and the geometry of exposure may permit investigators to separate the contributory effects of these two physical agents. This paper briefly reviews the available data, estimates the variation of lenticular temperature with ambient temperature, and provides measurements of short-wavelength (UV-B) UVR exposure to the human eye with different meterological conditions. The study attempts to provide epidemiological investigators with more detailed information necessary to perform more accurate studies of cataract and other ocular pathologies that appear to be related to environmental factors. Ocular UV-B radiation exposure levels were measured at nine locations in the USA near 40 degrees latitude at elevations from sea level to 8000 ft. Terrain reflectance is shown to be much more important than terrain elevation; cloud cover and haze may actually increase ocular exposure; and the value of wearing brimmed hats and spectacles varies with the environment. Several avenues for future research are suggested.

  12. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  13. FULVUE: Far Ultraviolet Universal Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, David L.; Cross, Eugene W.

    1997-10-01

    This is a concept study for a proposal to NASA/GSFC for a medium class Explorer Mission. It is designed to replace a prior SBIR Phase I design for NASA/MSFC for a Lunar far-UV survey telescope done in 1994 - 1995 for the Pathfinder Program (by the authors for I.S.E., under M. E. Nein, MSFC). A full investigation by project scientist D. L. White as to the most desirable mission science for a Lunar-based UV telescope, resulted in the decision to do a universal survey of the most interesting lines in the Lyman alpha forest, especially the O VI doublet lines around 103.2/103.8 nm. A telescope was designed by the authors incorporating a multiple instrument pod (MEDUSA), and a unique optical train featuring a selectable element secondary mirror module, with a special high resolution mode debuting a new optical design, all by chief optical engineer E. W. Cross. Special thanks go to chief spacecraft engineer T. L. Kessler for all packaging and integration of the telescope, its attendant systems, and the entire mission, including the launch interface and all presentations. In this incarnation, the basic concept has been converted by D. L. White into a free flyer designed for at least a LEO. In reconfiguring the original concept in the order to accomplish the original mission science goals, it has been necessary to take a fresh approach in order to fit the largest feasible Explorer Class Fairing (10L). In addition, the reconsideration of the mission science and the performance level available from the prior mission's optics, the authors decided to push the limits of the possible in the pursuit of excellence and choose two exceptional optical designs, augment them, and integrate them into the same limited envelope, while not sacrificing performance, communications, power, control, or serviceability. This we have kept close to focus throughout our pursuit of the mission science, which we hold foremost. We see a great need to bring the lessons learned at other portions of the

  14. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  15. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  16. The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI): An Ultraviolet Sensor of the Thermospheric and Ionospheric States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, K. F.; Thonnard, S. E.; Nicholas, A. C.; Budzien, S. A.; McCoy, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    We present a brief overview of the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) ultraviolet remote sensor that is currently in operation aboard the Defense Meteorlogical Satellite Program's F-16 satellite. The satellite is an a sun-synchronous orbit at 0730 local time, at a 98° inclination, and a circular orbit at an altitude of ˜840 km. The instrument has been operating since mid-October 2003. We present an overview of the instrument's capabilities, its measurement goals, and some of the data that are being used for basic research.

  17. Ultraviolet interstellar extinction in the large Magellanic Cloud using observations with the International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koornneef, J.; Code, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten early-type supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). The spectra (1150-3200 A) are shown, and their photometric properties are discussed. It is confirmed that the LMC interstellar extinction law for these stars deviates significantly from the average galactic law in the sense that the 2200 A feature is deficient in strength and that, in the far-ultraviolet (wavelength less than 2000 A), the observed LMC extinction law is significantly above the galactic curve.

  18. Ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of the solar corona at the Naval Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Moses, J D; Ko, Y-K; Laming, J M; Provornikova, E A; Strachan, L; Beltran, S Tun

    2015-11-01

    We review the history of ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy with a specific focus on such activities at the Naval Research Laboratory and on studies of the extended solar corona and solar-wind source regions. We describe the problem of forecasting solar energetic particle events and discuss an observational technique designed to solve this problem by detecting supra-thermal seed particles as extended wings on spectral lines. Such seed particles are believed to be a necessary prerequisite for particle acceleration by heliospheric shock waves driven by a coronal mass ejection. PMID:26560611

  19. UV radiation effects over microorganisms and study of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Gómez, Felipe; Grau Carles, Agustín; Vazquez, Luis; Amils, Ricardo

    2004-03-01

    An important subject of astrobiological interest is the study of the effect of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms and their protection mechanisms against this damaging agent. UV radiation is considered highly mutagenic and sterilizing, especially during the period of origin of life on Earth when the absence of the ozone layer meant there was no effective protection against ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Ferric iron, the product of iron metabolism, as a consequence of its spectral properties, has been suggested to provide protection against radiation making the study of its protective effect on acidophilic microorganisms from the Tinto ecosystem of interest in order to gain information about its possible implications in the development of life during the Archaean as well on planets lacking a protective atmosphere such as Mars. The studies described in this paper constitute preliminary experiments.

  20. Artocarpin attenuates ultraviolet B-induced skin damage in hairless mice by antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Ko, Horng-Huey; Lin, Chun-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Yen, Feng-Lin

    2013-10-01

    Artocarpin, a prenylated flavonoid isolated from an agricultural plant Artocarpus communis, has been documented to possess anti-inflammation and anticancer activities. As oxidative stress and inflammation promote the development of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation-induced photodamage, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the photoprotective effect of artocarpin on UVB-induced skin damage in hairless mice. Artocarpin at a topical dose of 0.05% and 0.1% showed a significant photoprotective effect by decreasing histopathological changes, such as desquamation, epidermal thicken and sunburn cell formation, but 0.1% of artocarpin administration did not show better effect. Regarding the antioxidant activities, artocarpin exhibited a significant effect (P<0.05) by decreasing levels of reactive species oxygen and lipid peroxidation. In addition, artocarpin can significant decrease the level of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β for downregulating the inflammation protein, including the synthesis of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase-2 (P<0.05). In conclusion, these data suggest that artocarpin can prevent skin damage from UVB irradiation-induced photodamage in hairless mice and this is likely mediated through its antioxidant and anti-inflammation mechanisms. Therefore, we suggested that artocarpin could be a useful photoprotective agent in medicine and/or cosmetics.

  1. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a triterpenoid saponin glycoside alleviates ultraviolet-B irradiation-induced photoaging in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Afnan, Quadri; Adil, Mushtaq Dar; Nissar-Ul, Ashraf; Rafiq, Ahmad Rather; Amir, Hussian Faridi; Kaiser, Peerzada; Gupta, Vijay Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ram; Tasduq, Sheikh Abdullah

    2012-05-15

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a triterpenoid saponin glycoside from the roots and rhizomes of licorice is used in traditional and modern medicine for the treatment of numerous medical conditions including skin diseases and beauty care product. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA against ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation-induced photoaging in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and its possible mechanism of action. HDFs were subjected to photoaging by sub-toxic dose of UVB (10 mj/cm(2)) irradiation. Cell viability, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1), pro-collagen 1, cellular and nuclear morphology, cell cycle, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), caspase 3 and hyaluronidase inhibition assays were performed. Western blotting was used to evaluate the expression of NF-kappa B (NF-κB) and cytochrome-C proteins. GA treatment significantly inhibited photoaging. It achieved this by reducing ROS, NF-κB, cytochrome c, caspase 3 levels and inhibiting hyaluronidase enzyme. The main mechanism seems to be, most likely by blocking MMP1 activation by modulating NF-κB signaling. These findings may be useful for development of natural and safe photoprotective agents against UVB irradiation. PMID:22516896

  2. Optimization of curved drift tubes for ultraviolet-ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kai; Ou, Guangli; Zhang, Xiaoguo; Yu, Zhou; Yu, Quan; Qian, Xiang; Wang, Xiaohao

    2015-08-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a key trace detection technique for toxic pollutants and explosives in the atmosphere. Ultraviolet radiation photoionization source is widely used as an ionization source for IMS due to its advantages of high selectivity and non-radioactivity. However, UV-IMS bring problems that UV rays will be launched into the drift tube which will cause secondary ionization and lead to the photoelectric effect of the Faraday disk. So air is often used as working gas to reduce the effective distance of UV rays, but it will limit the application areas of UV-IMS. In this paper, we propose a new structure of curved drift tube, which can avoid abnormally incident UV rays. Furthermore, using curved drift tube may increase the length of drift tube and then improve the resolution of UV-IMS according to previous research. We studied the homogeneity of electric field in the curved drift tube, which determined the performance of UV-IMS. Numerical simulation of electric field in curved drift tube was conducted by SIMION in our study. In addition, modeling method and homogeneity standard for electric field were also presented. The influences of key parameters include radius of gyration, gap between electrode as well as inner diameter of curved drift tube, on the homogeneity of electric field were researched and some useful laws were summarized. Finally, an optimized curved drift tube is designed to achieve homogenous drift electric field. There is more than 98.75% of the region inside the curved drift tube where the fluctuation of the electric field strength along the radial direction is less than 0.2% of that along the axial direction.

  3. Five-color band ultraviolet photometry of fourteen close binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.; Wu, C.-C.

    1981-01-01

    Photometric observations obtained with the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite in five ultraviolet wavelength regions for 14 close binaries are presented. Strong excess far-ultraviolet flux is detected in four objects. The binaries TT Hya, RX Cas, and SX Cas exhibit a pronounced excess of far-ultraviolet flux, which is thought to be the result of mass transfer phenomena in these systems. Observations of the binary R Ara show very peculair variations; its far ultraviolet flux at 1550 A brightened by 0.4 mag between phases 0.7 and 0.8, while its near ultraviolet flux at 3300 A decreased by 0.5 mag over this same half-day interval. The A0 II-III component in the system RZ Sct is seen to dominate the ultraviolet spectrum.

  4. [Research on clouds affecting the spectra of solar ultraviolet radiation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Zhen, Zhi-Qiang; Tang, Zheng-Xin; Wang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, using UV CCD optical multi-channel analyzer, the solar ultraviolet radiation spectra under the conditions of cloud cover were measured, and the impact of clouds on the solar ultraviolet radiation spectra were studied mostly. The results of spectral analysis showed that the intensity of solar ultraviolet radiation spectra was weakened by the clouds. The solar ultraviolet radiation spectral intensity attenuation depended on the wavelength and decreased with decreasing wavelength. The greater the cloud cover, the stronger the attenuation, The solar ultraviolet radiation spectral intensity at wavelengths below 315 nm was affected relatively less by the cloud cover. These results have more important practical applications. When we use solar ultraviolet radiation spectrum to study the atmospheric composition, we should choose the spectral band that is less affected by the atmospheric environment.

  5. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals including radium-223.

    PubMed

    Brady, Darren; Parker, Chris C; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2013-01-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides including samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate and strontium-89 have been used for decades in the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially from prostate cancer. Emerging evidence of improved survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the first-in-class α-radionuclide, radium-223 (Ra) has rekindled interest in the role of bone-seeking radionuclide therapy.We review the literature for randomized controlled trials of bone-seeking radionuclides and explore some of the issues regarding the optimal use of these agents. In particular, we discuss dose, dose rate, radiobiology, and quality of radiation and postulate on potential future directions in particular combination schedules. β-Emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides have proven ability to control pain in prostate cancer metastatic to bone with pain response rates in the order of 60% to 70% when used as single agents. Most of the published trials were underpowered to detect differences in survival; however, there is evidence of the potential for disease modification when these agents are used in combination with chemotherapy or in multiple cycles.Data from the recent phase III ALSYMPCA trial that compared Ra to placebo in symptomatic CRPC demonstrate a significant improvement in median overall survival of 3.6 months for patients with symptomatic CRPC metastatic to bone treated with 6 cycles of the α-emitting radionuclide Ra compared with placebo. The success of Ra in improving survival in CRPC will lead this agent to become part of the treatment paradigm for this disease, and with such an excellent safety profile, Ra has huge potential in combination strategies as well as for use earlier in the natural history of metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Putative neuroprotective agents in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Maes, Michael; Anderson, George; Dean, Olivia M; Moylan, Steven; Berk, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In many individuals with major neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, their disease characteristics are consistent with a neuroprogressive illness. This includes progressive structural brain changes, cognitive and functional decline, poorer treatment response and an increasing vulnerability to relapse with chronicity. The underlying molecular mechanisms of neuroprogression are thought to include neurotrophins and regulation of neurogenesis and apoptosis, neurotransmitters, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, cortisol and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and epigenetic influences. Knowledge of the involvement of each of these pathways implies that specific agents that act on some or multiple of these pathways may thus block this cascade and have neuroprotective properties. This paper reviews the potential of the most promising of these agents, including lithium and other known psychotropics, aspirin, minocycline, statins, N-acetylcysteine, leptin and melatonin. These agents are putative neuroprotective agents for schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  7. Detecting biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Song, Linan; Ahn, Soohyoun; Walt, David R

    2005-10-01

    We developed a fiber-optic, microsphere-based, high-density array composed of 18 species-specific probe microsensors to identify biological warfare agents. We simultaneously identified multiple biological warfare agents in environmental samples by looking at specific probe responses after hybridization and response patterns of the multiplexed array.

  8. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  9. Change Agent Survival Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Folwell L.

    2011-01-01

    Consulting is a rough racket. Only a tarantula hair above IRS agents, meter maids and used car sales people, the profession is a prickly burr for slings and arrows. Throw in education, focus on dysfunctional schools and call oneself a "change agent," and this bad rap all but disappears. Unfortunately, though, consulting/coaching/mentoring in…

  10. Nitrosoguanidine and ultraviolet light mutagenesis in Eudorina elegans (chlorophyceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Toby, A.L.; Kemp, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    Reversion of an acetate requiring strain and the induction of sectored colonies are used to establish optimal conditions for nitrosoguanidine and ultraviolet light mutagenesis in Eudorina elegans Ehrenberg. Nitrosoguanidine is more effective in causing reversion of the acetate requiring strain and inducing auxotrophs. Morphogenetic mutants are more readily induced by ultraviolet light. The effectiveness of ultraviolet light as a mutagen is cell cycle dependent whereas the mutagenic action of nitrosoguanidine is not.

  11. Cosmic far ultraviolet background. [observations for intergalactic medium properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, A.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

    1974-01-01

    The expected intensities of various possible components of the far ultraviolet background are discussed. It is concluded that existing results do not place interesting constraints on the density of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Current techniques and instrumentation for far ultraviolet astronomy are, however, sufficient to achieve vastly improved limits. New observations are required to determine whether the IGM can be detected in the far ultraviolet or whether the extragalactic component of the background is masked by radiation with a more local origin.

  12. Ferrimagnetic susceptibility contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bach-Gansmo, T

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on superparamagnetic particles have been in clinical development for more than 5 years, and the complexity of their effects is still not elucidated. The relaxivities are frequently used to give an idea of their efficacy, but these parameters can only be used if they are concentration independent. For large superparamagnetic systems, the evolution of the transverse magnetization is biexponential, after an initial loss of magnetization. Both these characteristics of large superparamagnetic systems should lead to prudence in using the relaxivities as indicators of contrast medium efficacy. Susceptibility induced artefacts have been associated with the use of superparamagnetic contrast agents since the first imaging evaluation took place. The range of concentrations where good contrast effect was achieved without inducing artefacts, as well as blurring and metal artefacts were evaluated. The influence of motion on the induction of artefacts was studied, and compared to the artefacts induced by a paramagnetic agent subject to motion. With a suitable concentration of a negative contrast agent, a signal void could be achieved in the region prone to motion, and no artefacts were induced. If the concentration was too high, a displacement of the region close to the contrast agent was observed. The artefacts occurred in a volume surrounding the contrast agent, i.e., also outside the imaging plane. In comparison a positive, paramagnetic contrast agent induced heavy artefacts in the phase encoding direction, appearing as both high intensity regions and black holes, in a mosaic pattern. Clinical trials of the oral contrast agent OMP for abdominal MR imaging showed this agent to be safe and efficacious. OMP increased the diagnostic efficacy of abdominal MR imaging in 2 of 3 cases examined, with a significant decrease in motion artefacts. Susceptibility contrast agents may also be of use in the evaluation of small lesions in the liver. Particulate material

  13. Standard Agent Framework 1

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4)more » Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.« less

  14. How do agents represent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Alex

    Representation is inherent to the concept of an agent, but its importance in complex systems has not yet been widely recognised. In this paper I introduce Peirce's theory of signs, which facilitates a definition of representation in general. In summary, representation means that for some agent, a model is used to stand in for another entity in a way that shapes the behaviour of the agent with respect to that entity. Representation in general is then related to the theories of representation that have developed within different disciplines. I compare theories of representation from metaphysics, military theory and systems theory. Additional complications arise in explaining the special case of mental representations, which is the focus of cognitive science. I consider the dominant theory of cognition — that the brain is a representational device — as well as the sceptical anti-representational response. Finally, I argue that representation distinguishes agents from non-representational objects: agents are objects capable of representation.

  15. Catalase has only a minor role in protection against near-ultraviolet radiation damage in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eisenstark, A; Perrot, G

    1987-04-01

    In bacterial cells near-ultraviolet radiation (NUV) generates H2O2 which can be decomposed by endogenous catalase to H2O and O2. To assess the roles of H2O2 and catalase in NUV lethality, we manipulated the amount of intracellular catalase (a) by the use of mutant and plasmid strains with altered endogenous catalase, (b) physiologically, by the addition of glucose, and (c) by induction of catalase synthesis with oxidizing agents. Not only was there no direct correlation between NUV-resistance and catalase activity, but in some cases the correlation was inverse. Also, while there was correlation between NUV and H2O2 sensitivity for most strains tested, there were a number of exceptions which indicates that the modes of killing were different for the two agents. PMID:3299003

  16. Evidence for the role of environmental agents in the initiation or progression of autoimmune conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J J; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    1999-01-01

    The concordance of autoimmune disease among identical twins is virtually always less than 50% and often in the 25-40% range. This observation, as well as epidemic clustering of some autoimmune diseases following xenobiotic exposure, reinforces the thesis that autoimmune disease is secondary to both genetic and environmental factors. Because nonliving agents do not have genomes, disease characteristics involving nonliving xenobiotics are primarily secondary to host phenotype and function. In addition, because of individual genetic susceptibilities based not only on major histocompatibility complex differences but also on differences in toxin metabolism, lifestyles, and exposure rates, individuals will react differently to the same chemicals. With these comments in mind it is important to note that there have been associations of a number of xenobiotics with human autoimmune disease, including mercury, iodine, vinyl chloride, canavanine, organic solvents, silica, l-tryptophan, particulates, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. In addition, there is discussion in the literature that raises the possibility that xenobiotics may also exacerbate an existing autoimmune disease. In this article we discuss these issues and, in particular, the evidence for the role of environmental agents in the initiation or progression of autoimmune conditions. With the worldwide deterioration of the environment, this is a particularly important subject for human health. PMID:10970167

  17. Ultraviolet spectrophotometer for measuring columnar atmospheric ozone from aircraft.

    PubMed

    Hanser, F A; Sellers, B; Briehl, D C

    1978-05-15

    An ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UVS) to measure downward solar fluxes from an aircraft or other high altitude platform is described. The UVS uses an ultraviolet diffuser to obtain large angular response with no aiming requirement, a twelve-position filter wheel with narrow (2-nm) and broad (20-nm) bandpass filters, and an ultraviolet photodiode. The columnar atmospheric ozone above the UVS (aircraft) is calculated from the ratios of the measured ultraviolet fluxes. Comparison with some Dobson station measurements gives agreement to 2%. Some UVS measured ozone profiles over the Pacific Ocean for November 1976 are shown to illustrate the instrument's performance.

  18. Apollo-Soyuz test project Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope MA-083. [stellar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    Follow-on studies to the Apollo-Soyuz Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope experiment (MA-083) include analyses of individual target stars or classes of stars, not only with regard to the EUV data but also in connection with theoretical models and observations in other parts of the spectrum. Topics discussed include: observations of SS Cygni, Proxima Centauri, HZ 43, and Feige 24; computer searches for new EUV sources; Sirius: models and inferences; EUV emission from a hot gas; and the diffuse EUV background.

  19. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Delta)lambda equals 3 A) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original datareduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quicklook plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  20. Method for the protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOEpatents

    Grunow, Philip A.; Clift, Wayne M.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-06-22

    A coating for the protection of optical surfaces exposed to a high energy erosive plasma. A gas that can be decomposed by the high energy plasma, such as the xenon plasma used for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), is injected into the EUVL machine. The decomposition products coat the optical surfaces with a protective coating maintained at less than about 100 .ANG. thick by periodic injections of the gas. Gases that can be used include hydrocarbon gases, particularly methane, PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S. The use of PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S is particularly advantageous since films of the plasma-induced decomposition products S and P cannot grow to greater than 10 .ANG. thick in a vacuum atmosphere such as found in an EUVL machine.

  1. Ultraviolet Spectrograph Concepts for the Outer Planet Flagship Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Stern, A.; Slater, D. C.; Gladstone, R.; Davis, M. W.; Parker, J. W.; Steffl, A. J.; Greathouse, T. K.; Cunningham, N. J.; Spencer, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    SwRI's Alice line of ultraviolet spectrographs (UVS) is founded on a lightweight, low power, and highly capable and versatile instrument design. With generally small changes in detector photocathode, detector pixel size, slit size and shape, optical coatings, pinhole aperture implementations, and other minor tweaks we've found a wide variety of applications for the Alice design, to date, at comets (Rosetta/Alice), Pluto (New Horizons/Alice), Luna (LRO/LAMP), and Jupiter (Juno/UVS). The SwRI UVS heritage includes very broad experience and strong performance to date on the Rosetta (Phase E; successful Mars flyby), New Horizons (Phase E; successful Jupiter flyby), LRO (Phase D; mated to the spacecraft), and Juno (Phase C) missions. Alice's high capability, low resource requirements, and our experience with Juno-based radiation environment and NH-based outer solar system environment requirements make this UVS a good choice for the Outer Planet Flagship mission concepts.

  2. Ultraviolet spectra and chromospheres of cool carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis R.; Luttermoser, Donald G.

    1987-01-01

    The authors assemble and discuss all available low-resolution IUE spectra of N-type carbon stars - including TW Hor, BL Ori, UU Aur, NP Pup, U Hya, T Ind, and TX Psc. Identification of spectral features is aided by a composite spectrum. Shortward of 2850 A only emission lines of C II, Mg II, Al II, and Fe II are seen, while the spectrum longward of 2850 A appears to be a photospheric absorption spectrum with a few superposed emission lines of Fe II. The most prominent absorption features are due to Fe I, CH, and CaCl. The emission feature at 2325 A, second only to Mg II in strength, is conclusively identified as C II (UV 0.01). Ultraviolet spectra of N-type carbon stars are similar to, though the emission-line fluxes are generally weaker than, those of the coolest M-giant stars available, such as HD 18191 (M6 III).

  3. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet Wavelength Range.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Moran, Andrew M

    2012-09-20

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopies conducted at visible and infrared wavelengths are having a transformative impact on the understanding of numerous processes in condensed phases. The extension of 2D spectroscopy to the ultraviolet spectral range (2DUV) must contend with several challenges, including the attainment of adequate laser bandwidth, interferometric phase stability, and the suppression of undesired nonlinearities in the sample medium. Solutions to these problems are motivated by the study of a wide range of biological systems whose lowest-frequency electronic resonances are found in the UV. The development of 2DUV spectroscopy also makes possible the attainment of new insights into elementary chemical reaction dynamics (e.g., electrocyclic ring opening in cycloalkenes). Substantial progress has been made in both the implementation and application of 2DUV spectroscopy in the past several years. In this Perspective, we discuss 2DUV methodology, review recent applications, and speculate on what the future will hold.

  4. World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet mission: state of art 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, Mikhail; Gomez De Castro, Ana; Shustov, Boris M.

    2016-07-01

    The WSO-UV (World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet) project is intended to built and operate an international space observatory designed for observations in the UV (115 - 300 nm) range, where some of the most important astrophysical processes can be efficiently studied. The observatory includes a 170 cm aperture telescope capable of high-resolution spectroscopy and long slit low-resolution spectroscopy with the WUVS instrument; moreover UV imaging will be available with cameras. WSO-UV is a Russian led mission that will be operating in high Earth orbit (geosynchronous with inclination 51.^o6) for five+five years grating access to the UV range to the world-wide astronomical community in the post-Hubble era. Spain is a major partner to the project. Updated information of the WSO-UV project is provided periodically in the COSPAR meetings. Henceforth, this review provides a summary on the project, its status and the major outcomes since the last COSPAR Assembly.

  5. Solution processable organic/inorganic hybrid ultraviolet photovoltaic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaopeng; Tang, Libin; Xiang, Jinzhong; Ji, Rongbin; Zhang, Kai; Lai, Sin Ki; Zhao, Jun; Kong, Jincheng; Lau, Shu Ping

    2016-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodetector is a kind of important optoelectronic device which can be widely used in scientific and engineering fields including astronomical research, environmental monitoring, forest-fire prevention, medical analysis, and missile approach warning etc. The development of UV detector is hindered by the acquirement of stable p-type materials, which makes it difficult to realize large array, low-power consumption UV focal plane array (FPA) detector. Here, we provide a novel structure (Al/Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfuorenyl-2,7-diyl)(PFO)/ZnO/ITO) to demonstrate the UV photovoltaic (PV) response. A rather smooth surface (RMS roughness: 0.28 nm) may be reached by solution process, which sheds light on the development of large-array, light-weight and low-cost UV FPA detectors.

  6. Survey of ultraviolet non-line-of-sight communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, Robert J.; Sadler, Brian M.

    2014-06-01

    The unique characteristics of the atmospheric propagation of deep ultraviolet (UV) radiation make possible the novel capability of establishing non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical communication links. Although NLOS UV communications (UVC) has been studied for decades, early work focused on the use of lasers and flash lamps as sources. Recent advances in device technology, including UV light-emitting diodes and solar-blind optical filters, suggest that compact low-power systems may soon be feasible, and, as a result, research into the effective use of this rapidly maturing technology has accelerated. In this paper, we review the NLOS UVC literature, examining a range of topics from channel modelling and experimentation through system analysis and prototype development. The breadth of this research not only indicates the growing interest in UVC technology but also suggests the existence of many avenues for continued exploration.

  7. Laser plasma formation assisted by ultraviolet pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Yalin, Azer P. Dumitrache, Ciprian; Wilvert, Nick; Joshi, Sachin; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2014-10-15

    We present experimental and modeling studies of air pre-ionization using ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses and its effect on laser breakdown of an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) pulse. Experimental studies are conducted with a 266 nm beam (fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG) for UV pre-ionization and an overlapped 1064 nm NIR beam (fundamental of Nd:YAG), both having pulse duration of ∼10 ns. Results show that the UV beam produces a pre-ionized volume which assists in breakdown of the NIR beam, leading to reduction in NIR breakdown threshold by factor of >2. Numerical modeling is performed to examine the ionization and breakdown of both beams. The modeled breakdown threshold of the NIR, including assist by pre-ionization, is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Ultraviolet and optical spectra of broadline radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Peterson, Bradley M.; Wagner, R. Mark

    1988-01-01

    Near-simultaneous ultraviolet and optical spectra of three broadline radio galaxies (3C 382, 3C 445, and PKS 2349-014) have been obtained, and the emission lines of Ly-alpha, H-beta, and H-alpha have been deconvolved into narrow and broad components; published fluxes for 3C 390.3 are also included in this study. Although the broad Ly-alpha/H-beta ratios in these objects cover a large range (1.2-22.3), there is no evidence that these ratios are intrinsically different from those of Seyfert 1 galaxies or quasars. Thus, in general, the higher H-alpha/H-beta ratios in these broadline radio galaxies cannot entirely be due to additional reddening of the broadline region. However, in the specific case of 3C 445, there is evidence that the nonstellar continuum and broadline region are highly reddened.

  9. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn; Holberg, Jay B.

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  10. Normal incidence multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, R. A.; Haisch, B. M.; Joki, E. G.; Catura, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Sputtered multilayer coatings allow the use of normal incidence optics in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region below 500 A. Multilayer mirrors can be tailored to provide images at strong EUV lines in the sun and stars, in many cases making more efficient use of the telescope aperture than grazing incidence optics. Alternatively, the bandpass can be broadened at the expense of peak effective area, by varying the multilayer structure over the mirror surface. Such mirrors can also serve as optical elements in spectrographs for investigation of specific emission and absorption line complexes, and are self-filtering in that they reject nearby geocoronal and cosmic resonance line backgrounds. Current efforts at the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory in the design, fabrication, and testing of EUV multilayer mirrors are discussed. This program includes the design and fabrication of normal incidence EUV multilayer mirrors, and the deposition of multilayers on lacquer-coated substrates.

  11. Targeted ultraviolet B phototherapy: definition, clinical indications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Alshiyab, D; Edwards, C; Chin, M F; Anstey, A V

    2015-01-01

    Targeted ultraviolet B (UVB) phototherapy is defined as UVB radiation applied only to clinically diseased skin, with sparing of adjacent normal skin, unlike conventional phototherapy, which involves irradiation of both diseased and normal skin. Targeted UVB radiation is a relatively new concept, which is now widely available because of advances in technology. Devices developed for targeted UVB phototherapy of the skin include the monochromatic excimer laser and lamp, both of which are now used by dermatologists in developed and developing countries. The aim of this review is to collate data from research studies on targeted phototherapy and to provide a concise description of currently available devices, their clinical indications and therapeutic efficacy. Additionally, potential adverse effects are summarized, and the limitations of these novel devices are highlighted. PMID:25495672

  12. Can Nitrous Oxide be Measured Using Space Borne Ultraviolet Spectrometers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Abad, G.; Wang, S.; García Nieto, D.; Benavent Oltra, N.; Anguas Ballesteros, M.; Serranía Alarcón, F.

    2015-12-01

    The photolysis of nitrous oxide (HONO) by longwave UV radiation has hydroxyl radicals (OH) and nitric oxide (NO) as products. Since HONO accumulates in the troposphere during the night hours it plays a major role in the production of OH in the early morning during the wake-up tropospheric photochemistry. Therefore HONO concentrations have strong implications for the formation of ozone (O3) and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) in the early hours of the morning. Given the diurnal variation of HONO concentration, measurements from space borne ultraviolet spectrometers have been unsuccessful. The upcoming geostationary instruments devoted to monitor air quality, including TEMPO, will open possibilities to systematically make early morning measurements of HONO. Here we present an observation experiment to analyze the feasibility of HONO measurements from geostationary instruments using a combination of chemical transport models, in situ DOAS measurements of HONO in Madrid and radiative transfer calculations.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation from evolved stellar populations. 2: The ultraviolet upturn phenomenon in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, Ben; O'Connell, Robert W.; Rood, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the far-ultraviolet upturn phenomenon (UVX) observed in elliptical galaxies and spiral galaxy bulges. Our premise is the UV radiation from these systems emanates primarily from extreme horizontal branch (EHB) stars and their progeny. We derive the broad-band UV colors 1500-V and 2500-V for globular clusters and elliptical galaxies from the available satellite data and investigate color-color and color-line strength correlation. Clusters can be bluer than any galaxy in 15-V and 25-V, implying larger hot star populations, but galaxies are significantly bluer than clusters in 15-25 at a given 15-V. We attribute this primarily to the effect of metal abundance on the mid-UV (2500 A) light. These redder colors of the galaxies also imply that the UVX in galaxies is not produced by metal-poor subpopulations similar to the clusters. We devlop a simple spectral synthesis formulation for all phases of single star evolution from the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) to the white dwarf cooling track that requires only one or two parameters for each choice of age and abundance. We provide the ingredients necessary for constructing models with arbitrary horizontal branch (HB) morphologies in the age range 2 less than t less than 20 Gyr and for six metallicities in the range -2.26 less than (Fe/H) less than 0.58; we also consider the efect of enhanced Y in metal-rich models. The maximum lifetime UV output is produced by EHB stars with (M(sub env))(sup 0) approximately 0.02 solar mass and can be up to 30 times higher than for post-asymptotic giant branch (P-AGB) stars. The ultraviolet output of old populations is governed primarily by the distribution of (M(sub env))(sup 0)P(M(sub env))(sup 0), on the ZAHB. The UV output is not very sensitive to (Fe/H) or to Y, but it can change very rapidly with (M(sub env))(sup 0). Thus it is extremely sensitive to the precise nature of giant-branch mass loss. Our models use simple descriptions of P(M(sub env))(sup 0) to bracket the colors

  14. Multi-agent autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  15. Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Byrne, Scott N; Correale, Jorge; Ilschner, Susanne; Hart, Prue H

    2015-10-01

    There is compelling epidemiological evidence that the risk of developing multiple sclerosis is increased in association with low levels of sun exposure, possibly because this is associated with low vitamin D status. Recent work highlights both vitamin D and non-vitamin D effects on cellular immunity that suggests that higher levels of sun exposure and/or vitamin D status are beneficial for both MS risk and in ameliorating disease progression. Here we review this recent evidence, focusing on regulatory cells, dendritic cells, and chemokines and cytokines released from the skin following exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

  16. Jupiter in blue, ultraviolet and near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These three images of Jupiter, taken through the narrow angle camera of NASA's Cassini spacecraft from a distance of 77.6 million kilometers (48.2 million miles) on October 8, reveal more than is apparent to the naked eye through a telescope.

    The image on the left was taken through the blue filter. The one in the middle was taken in the ultraviolet. The one on the right was taken in the near infrared.

    The blue-light filter is within the part of the electromagnetic spectrum detectable by the human eye. The appearance of Jupiter in this image is, consequently, very familiar. The Great Red Spot (below and to the right of center) and the planet's well-known banded cloud lanes are obvious. The brighter bands of clouds are called zones and are probably composed of ammonia ice particles. The darker bands are called belts and are made dark by particles of unknown composition intermixed with the ammonia ice.

    Jupiter's appearance changes dramatically in the ultraviolet and near infrared images. These images are near negatives of each other and illustrate the way in which observations in different wavelength regions can reveal different physical regimes on the planet.

    All gases scatter sunlight efficiently at short wavelengths; this is why the sky appears blue on Earth. The effect is even more pronounced in the ultraviolet. The gases in Jupiter's atmosphere, above the clouds, are no different. They scatter strongly in the ultraviolet, making the deep banded cloud layers invisible in the middle image. Only the very high altitude haze appears dark against the bright background. The contrast is reversed in the near infrared, where methane gas, abundant on Jupiter but not on Earth, is strongly absorbing and therefore appears dark. Again the deep clouds are invisible, but now the high altitude haze appears relatively bright against the dark background. High altitude haze is seen over the poles and the equator.

    The Great Red Spot, prominent in all images, is

  17. Transparent conductive coatings in the far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Park, Jung HO; Wilson, Michele M.; Keffer, Charles E.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases a space-borne optical instrument with a dielectric window requires a transparent conductive coating deposited on the window to remove the electrostatic charge collected due to the bombardment of ionized particles. Semiconductor and metal films are studied for use as transparent conductive coatings for the front window of far ultraviolet camera. Cr is found to be the best coating material. The theoretical search for the semiconductor and metal coating materials and experimental results for ITO and Cr films are reported.

  18. Ultraviolet Pulsations from X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    We propose to obtain high-speed photometry at ultraviolet wavelengths of all the pulsing X-ray heated stellar atmospheres of the companion stars to the neutron stars in the binaries and to create list of X-ray pulsars with optical pulsations that can be further observed for such purposes as determining the mass ratios of the binary system. Revision History: Prepared for future cycles submission-- BJW 4/24/92; Cycle 3 to cycle 2; PRISM to SINGLE-- BJW 8/27/92;

  19. Z-DNA: vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J C; Griffin, K P; Keck, P C; Takacs, P Z

    1981-08-01

    In concentrated salt or ethanolic solutions, the self-complementary copolymer poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) forms a left-handed double-helical structure that has been termed "Z-DNA." The first evidence for this structure came from changes observed in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum between 230 and 300 nm for low- and high-salt solutions (Pohl, F. M. & Jovin, T. M. (1972) J. Mol. Biol. 67, 675-696). In 3 M NaCl, the CD spectrum is approximately inverted compared to the B-form spectrum observed in low-salt solution. We measured the vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum of poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) down to 180 nm under conditions in which the 230- to 300-nm spectrum is inverted. Below 200 nm, where the B form exhibits the large positive peak at 187 nm that is characteristic of right-handed double-helical DNAs, the Z form exhibits a large negative peak at 194 nm and a positive band below 186 nm. Therefore, the Z-form vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum resembles an inverted and red-shifted B-form spectrum. The magnitudes of the differences observed between the B and Z forms in the CD spectrum below 200 nm are about 10 times greater than those observed between 230 and 300 nm. The vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum of poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) in 3 M Cs2SO4 also is inverted compared to the B-form spectrum; however, between 230 and 300 nm, it is nonconservative with a negative maximum at 290 nm and a weak positive CD signal above 300 nm, presumably reflecting differential light scattering and indicating the existence of molecular aggregates. Our results suggest that the vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum is sensitive to the handedness of double-helical DNA structures. The CD spectrum in this region should complement other spectroscopic methods in relating the structures of poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) existing in solution to those determined in the solid state by x-ray crystallography.

  20. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of interstellar and intergalactic matter.

    PubMed

    Shull, J M

    1980-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation in absorption and emission provides diagnostics of interstellar and intergalactic matter. After reviewing some basic physical reasons for the importance of UV astronomy, the UV observations of both media, the future uses of high resolution spectrometers in the far UV, and the atomic data required for proper interpretation are discussed. Satellite UV observations have the potential of answering fundamental questions dealing with the nature of the gaseous matter in the outer regions of our galaxy, in neighboring galaxies, and in the intergalactic matter seen in quasar absorption spectra.