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Sample records for agents sulfur mustard

  1. Sulfur Mustard

    MedlinePlus

    ... the environment. Sulfur mustard was introduced in World War I as a chemical warfare agent. Historically it ... fatal. When sulfur mustard was used during World War I, it killed fewer than 5% of the ...

  2. Mustard gas or sulfur mustard: an old chemical agent as a new terrorist threat.

    PubMed

    Wattana, Monica; Bey, Tareg

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is a member of the vesicant class of chemical warfare agents that causes blistering to the skin and mucous membranes. There is no specific antidote, and treatment consists of systematically alleviating symptoms. Historically, sulfur mustard was used extensively in inter-governmental conflicts within the trenches of Belgium and France during World War I and during the Iran-Iraq conflict. Longitudinal studies of exposed victims show that sulfur mustard causes long-term effects leading to high morbidity. Given that only a small amount of sulfur mustard is necessary to potentially cause an enormous number of casualties, disaster-planning protocol necessitates the education and training of first-line healthcare responders in the recognition, decontamination, triage, and treatment of sulfur mustard-exposed victims in a large-scale scenario. PMID:19557954

  3. Toxicology and pharmacology of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Dacre, J C; Goldman, M

    1996-06-01

    There have been reports of chemical attacks in which sulfur mustard might have been used (a) on Iranian soldiers and civilians during the Gulf War in 1984 and 1985 and (b) in an Iraqi chemical attack on the Iranian-occupied village of Halbja in 1988, resulting in many civilian casualties. Heavy use of chemical warfare in Afghanistan by the Soviet military is a recent innovation in military tactics that has been highly successful and may ensure further use of chemical agents in future military conflicts and terrorist attacks as a profitable adjunct to conventional military arms. Mustard is a poisonous chemical agent that exerts a local action on the eyes, skin, and respiratory tissue, with subsequent systemic action on the nervous, cardiac, and digestive systems in humans and laboratory animals, causing lacrimation, malaise, anorexia, salivation, respiratory distress, vomiting, hyperexcitability, and cardiac distress. Under extreme circumstances, dependent upon the dose and length of exposure to the agent, necrosis of the skin and mucous membranes of the respiratory system, bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, intestinal lesions, hemoconcentration, leucopenia, convulsions with systemic distress, and death occur. Severe mustard poisoning in humans is associated with systemic injury, which is manifested as headache, epigastric distresses, anorexia, diarrhea, and cachexia and is usually observed at mustard doses of 1000 mg/min/m3 with damage to hematopoietic tissues and progressive leucopenia. Sulfur mustard is a cell poison that causes disruption and impairment of a variety of cellular activities that are dependent upon a very specific integral relationship. These cytotoxic effects are manifested in widespread metabolic disturbances whose variable characteristics are observed in enzymatic deficiencies, vesicant action, abnormal mitotic activity and cell division, bone marrow disruption, disturbances in hematopoietic activity, and systemic poisoning. Indeed, mustard gas

  4. Surface decontamination for blister agents Lewisite, sulfur mustard and agent yellow, a Lewisite and sulfur mustard mixture.

    PubMed

    Stone, Harry; See, David; Smiley, Autumn; Ellingson, Anthony; Schimmoeller, Jessica; Oudejans, Lukas

    2016-08-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L) are blister agents that have a high potential for terrorist use; Agent Yellow (HL) is the eutectic mixture of HD and L. Bench-scale testing was used to determine the residual amount of these chemical warfare agents remaining on three building materials (wood, metal and glass) after application of various decontaminants (household bleach, full strength and dilute; hydrogen peroxide 3% solution; and EasyDECON(®) DF200). All decontaminants reduced the amount of L recovered from coupons. Application of dilute bleach showed little or no difference compared to natural attenuation in the amount of HD recovered from coupons. Full-strength bleach was the most effective of four decontaminants at reducing the amount of HD from coupons. Hydrogen peroxide (3% solution) and DF200 did decrease the amount of HD recovered from coupons more than natural attenuation (except DF200 against HD on metal), but substantial amounts of HD remained on some materials. Toxic HD by-products were generated by hydrogen peroxide treatment. The effectiveness of decontaminants was found to depend on agent, material, and decontaminant. Increased decontaminant reaction time (60min rather than 30min) did not significantly increase effectiveness. PMID:27107236

  5. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P. L.; Rommereim, R. L.; Burton, F. G.; Buschbom, R. L.; Sasser, L . B.

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with 0. 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development. These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats and rabbits since fetal effects were observed only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for "no observable effects levels" in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  6. Liquid sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Jonathan; Langer, Janice M; Capacio, Benedict; Barr, John; McIntosh, Roger G

    2007-02-01

    A 35-year-old active duty service member sustained a 6.5% body surface area burn as a result of exposure to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, which is the most severe mustard exposure of a U.S. military member since World War II that is known to us. New techniques were used to demonstrate the detectable persistence of mustard metabolites in the patient's blood for at least 41 days after exposure, validating these techniques for the first time for a human mustard patient; they were also used for the first time with human mustard blister fluid. The techniques extend eightfold the period of time that mustard exposure can be definitively diagnosed, compared with previous techniques. Although this patient's lesions were never life-threatening, he required 2 weeks of intensive burn care. He has been left with ongoing posttraumatic stress disorder and has had an incomplete dermatological recovery. In a major terrorist attack involving many patients exposed to sulfur mustard, care resources would be depleted quickly. PMID:17357776

  7. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Subchronic Toxicity of Sulfur Mustard (HD) In Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Miller, R. A.; Kalkwarf, D, R.; Buschbom, R. L.; Cushing, J. A.

    1989-06-30

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard [bis(2- chlorethyl)-sulfide], a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Seventytwo Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex, 6-7 weeks old, were divided into six groups (12/group/ sex) and gavaged with either 0, 0.003 , 0.01 , 0.03 , 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg of sulfur mustard in sesame oil 5 days/week for 13 weeks. No dose-related mortality was observed. A significant decrease (P ( 0.05) in body weight was observed in both sexes of rats only in the 0.3 mg/kg group. Hematological evaluations and clinical chemistry measurements found no consistent treatment-related effects at the doses studied. The only treatment-related lesion associated with gavage exposure upon histopathologic evaluation was epithelial hyperplasia of the forestomach of both sexes at 0.3 mg/kg and males at 0.1 mg/kg. The hyperplastic change was minimal and characterized by cellular disorganization of the basilar layer, an apparent increase in mitotic activity of the basilar epithelial cells, and thickening of the epithelial layer due to the apparent increase in cellularity. The estimated NOEL for HD in this 90-day study is 0.1 mg/kg/day when administered orally.

  8. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Modified Dominant Lethal Study of Sulfur Mustard in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-05-01

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard (HD) [bis{2-chloroethyl)-sulfide) ' a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Little, however, is known about the mutagenic activity of HD in mammalian species and data regarding the dominant lethal effects of HD are ambiguous. The purpose of this study was to determine the dominant lethal effect in male and female rats orally exposed to HD. The study was conducted in two phases; a female dominant lethal phase and a male dominant lethal phase. Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex were administered 0.08, 0.20, or 0.50 mg/kg HD in sesame oil 5 days/week for 10 weeks. For the female phase, treated or untreated males were mated with treated females and their fetuses were evaluated at approximately 14 days after copulation. For the male dominant lethal phase, treated males cohabited with untreated femal (during 5 days of each week for 10 weeks) and females were sacrificed for fetal evaluation 14 days after the midweek of cohabitation during each of the 10 weeks. The appearance and behavior of the rats were unremarkable throughout the experiment and there were no treatment-related deaths. Growth rates were reduced in both female and male rats treated with 0.50 mg/kg HD. Indicators of reproductive performance did not demonstrate significant female dominant lethal effects, although significant male dominant lethal effects were observed at 2 and 3 week post-exposure. These effects included increases of early fetal resorptions and preimplantation losses and decreases of total live embryo implants. These effects were most consistently observed at a dose of 0.50 mg/kg, but frequently occurred at the lower doses. Although no treatment-related effects on male reproductive organ weights or sperm motility were found, a significant increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm was detected in males exposed to 0. 50 mg/kg HD. The timing of these effects is consistent with an effect during the

  9. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Mutagenicity of Sulfur Mustard in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D. L.; Sass, E. J.; Fritz, L. K.; Sasser, L. B.

    1989-07-31

    The mutagenic potential of bis 2-chloroethyl sulfide (HD} a bifunctional sulfur mustard was evaluated in the standard plate incorporation version and the preincubation modification of the Salmonella/microsomal assay with tester strains TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102, with and without 59 activation. HD-induced point mutations in strain TA102 and frameshift mutations in TA97 but showed little or no mutagenicity against strains TA98 and TA100. Extensive HD-induced cell killing was observed with the excision repair deficient strains (TA100, TA98 and TA97) but not with strain TA102, which is wild-activation by Aroc1or induced rat liver microsomes (S9).

  10. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits - Part 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P L; Rommereim, R L; Burton, F G; Buschbom, R L; Sasser, L B

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with o. 0.5, 1 .0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats • and rabbits since fetal effects were obs~rved only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for •no observable effects levers· in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  11. Decontamination of chemical warfare sulfur mustard agent simulant by ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Meysam; Yekta, Sina; Ghaedi, Hamed

    2016-07-01

    In this study, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been surveyed to decontaminate the chloroethyl phenyl sulfide as a sulfur mustard agent simulant. Prior to the reaction, ZnO NPs were successfully prepared through sol-gel method in the absence and presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). PVA was utilized as a capping agent to control the agglomeration of the nanoparticles. The formation, morphology, elemental component, and crystalline size of nanoscale ZnO were certified and characterized by SEM/EDX, XRD, and FT-IR techniques. The decontamination (adsorption and destruction) was tracked by the GC-FID analysis, in which the effects of polarity of the media, such as isopropanol, acetone and n-hexane, reaction time intervals from 1 up to 18 h, and different temperatures, including 25, 35, 45, and 55 °C, on the catalytic/decontaminative capability of the surface of ZnO NPs/PVA were investigated and discussed, respectively. Results demonstrated that maximum decontamination (100 %) occurred in n-hexane solvent at 55 °C after 1 h. On the other hand, the obtained results for the acetone and isopropanol solvents were lower than expected. GC-MS chromatograms confirmed the formation of hydroxyl ethyl phenyl sulfide and phenyl vinyl sulfide as the destruction reaction products. Furthermore, these chromatograms proved the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the catalyst considering its surface Bronsted and Lewis acid sites. A non-polar solvent aids material transfer to the reactive surface acid sites without blocking these sites.

  12. Toxicology and pharmacology of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard - a review. Final technical report, 29 September 1994-31 January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dacre, J.C.; Beers, R.; Goldman, M.

    1995-04-05

    Sulfur mustard is a poisonous chemical agent which exerts a local action on the eyes, skin and respiratory tissue with subsequent systemic action on the nervous, cardiac, and digestive and endocrine systems in man and laboratory animals causing lacrimation, malaise, anorexia, salivation, respiratory distress, vomiting, hyperexcitability, cardiac distress, and death. Sulfur mustard is a cell poison which causes disumption and impairment of a variety of cellular activities which are dependent upon a very specific integral relationship. These cytotoxic effects are manifested in widespread metabolic disturbances whose variable characteristics are observed in enzymatic deficiencies, vesicant action, abnormal mitotic activity and cell division, bone marrow disruption, disturbances in hematopoietic activity and systemic poisoning. Indeed, mustard gas readily combines with various components of the cell such as amino acids, amines and proteins. Sulfur mustard has been shown to be mainly a lung carcinogen in various test animal species; this effect is highly dependent of size of the dose and the route of exposure. In the human, there is evidence of cancers of the respiratory tract in men exposed to mustard gas. Mutagenicity of sulfur mustard, due to the strong alkylating activity, has been reported to occur in many different species of animals, plants, bacteria, and fungi. There is no strong evidence that sulfur mustard is a teratogen but much further research, with particular emphasis on maternal and fetal toxicity, is needed and recommended.

  13. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard. Final report, October 1995-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Earley, J.T.; Irvine, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard was hydrolyzed to products that were biologically mineralized in sequencing batch reactors seeded with activated sludge. Greater than 90% carbon removal was achieved using laboratory scale bioreactors processing hydrolyzed munitions grade sulfur mustard obtained directly from the U.S. Chemical Stockpile. The bioreactor effluent was nontoxic and contained no detectable sulfur mustard or priority pollutants. The sulfur mustard hydrolysis biodegradation process has potential application to the congressionally mandated disposal of sulfur mustard stockpiles.

  14. Quantum molecular modeling of the interaction between guanine and alkylating agents--1--sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Broch, H; Hamza, A; Vasilescu, D

    1996-06-01

    Interaction between Guanine and the episulfonium form of Sulfur mustard (HD) was studied using the ab initio LCAO-MO method at the HF/6-31G level. The alkylation mechanism on guanine-N7 was analyzed by using a supermolecular modeling. Our stereostructural results associated with the molecular electrostatic potentials and HOMO-LUMO properties, show that in vacuum the alkylation of the N7 of guanine by HD in the aggressive episulfonium form is a direct process without transition state and of which the pathway is determined. PMID:8832373

  15. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  16. Effects of Exposure to Sulfur Mustard on Speech Aerodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent with highly cytotoxic properties even at low exposure. It was used widely against both military and civilian population by Iraqi forces in the Iraq-Iran war (1983-1988). Although various aspects of mustard gas effects on patients with chemical injury have been relatively well characterized, its effects on…

  17. Development and application of acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) for chemical warfare nerve and sulfur mustard agents.

    PubMed

    Watson, Annetta; Opresko, Dennis; Young, Robert; Hauschild, Veronique

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) have been developed for the chemical warfare agents GB, GA, GD, GF, VX, and sulfur mustard. These AEGLs were approved by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances after Federal Register publication and comment, and judged as scientifically valid by the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology Subcommittee on AEGLs. AEGLs represent general public exposure limits for durations ranging from 10 min to 8 h, and for three levels of severity (AEGL-1, AEGL-2, AEGL-3). Mild effects are possible at concentrations greater than AEGL-1, while life-threatening effects are expected at concentrations greater than AEGL-3. AEGLs can be applied to various civilian and national defense purposes, including evacuation and shelter-in-place protocols, reentry levels, protective clothing specifications, and analytical monitoring requirements. This report documents development and derivation of AEGL values for six key chemical warfare agents, and makes recommendations for their application to various potential exposure scenarios. PMID:16621779

  18. Development and Application of Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Chemical Warfare Nerve and Sulfur Mustard Agents.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Opresko, Dennis M; Young, Robert A; Hauschild, Veronique

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) have been developed for the chemical warfare agents GB, GA, GD, GF, VX, and sulfur mustard. These AEGLs were approved by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances after Federal Register publication and comment, and judged as scientifically valid by the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology Subcommittee on AEGLs. AEGLs represent general public exposure limits for durations ranging from 10 min to 8 h, and for three levels of severity (AEGL-1, AEGL-2, AEGL-3). Mild effects are possible at concentrations greater than AEGL-1, while life-threatening effects are expected at concentrations greater than AEGL-3. AEGLs can be applied to various civilian and national defense purposes, including evacuation and shelter-in-place protocols, reentry levels, protective clothing specifications, and analytical monitoring requirements. This report documents development and derivation of AEGL values for six key chemical warfare agents, and makes recommendations for their application to various potential exposure scenarios.

  19. Putative roles of inflammation in the dermatopathology or sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.

    1993-12-31

    Sulfur mustard (2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide), a radiomimetic agent with mutagenic (Cappizzi et al., 1973; Fox and Scott, 1983), cytotoxic (Wheeler, 1962; Papirmeister and Davison, 1965), and vesicant (Anslow and Houck, 1946; Renshaw, 1946) properties, is also a chemical-warfare blistering agent with no known antidote. Sulfur mustard predominantly effects exposed epithelial tissues of the skin, the eye, and the respiratory tract, although higher doses can produce systemic toxicity (reviewed by Papirmeister et al., 1991). The severity of sulfur mustard toxicity is dose dependent, causing irritation, edema, necrosis and ulceration; characteristic symptoms are unique to the site of exposure, e.g., vesication, conjunctivitis, bronchopneumonia (reviewed by Papirmeister et al., 1991). The basic histopathology of mustard-induced cutaneous lesions has been reviewed by Papirmeister et al. (1985, 1991) and includes degeneration of epidermal cells, especially in the basal layer, followed by the formation of vesicles (and, in man, bullae) that have been variously characterized as intraepidermal or subcorneal but that appear in most cases to result from cleavage at the dermal-epidermal junction. However, despite general agreement concerning the morphologic changes caused by mustard and despite more than 50 years of research, the pathogenesis of mustard injury is still incompletely understood.

  20. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Beaudry, W.T.; Szafraniec, L.L.

    1995-12-31

    One technology recommended for consideration for the disposal of the U.S. Chemical Stockpile is chemical neutralization followed by biodegradation. In the case of sulfur mustard ({open_quotes}mustard gas{close_quotes}, 2,2{prime}-dichlorodiethyl sulfide), alkaline hydrolysis yields a detoxified and biodegradable product. The hydrolysis reaction was studied with respect to the effects of temperature and sulfur mustard concentration on the rate and products of the reaction. A 28-fold overall rate enhancement was observed at 70{degrees}C vs. 30{degrees}C corresponding to an enthalpy of activation value of 17.9 Kcal/mole. Material balance studies conducted by {sup 1}H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis showed that the products of the reaction consisted of thiodiglycol was relatively greater at lower sulfur mustard concentrations and higher temperatures. As temperatures were decreased or sulfur mustard concentrations was increased, the proportion of ether-type compounds increased accordingly. Conditions of 1% (vol//vol) sulfur mustard, 5% stoichiometric excess of NaOH and 90{degrees}C were selected for generation of the hydrolyzed bioreactor influent material. The bioreactor was seeded with activated sludge and was initially operated as 5 liter sequencing batch reactor with a hydraulic residence time of approximately days. Early results show total organic carbon removal of greater than 90%.

  1. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Genetic Toxicity of Sulfur Mustard (HD) in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jostes, Jr., R. F.; Sasser, L. B.; Rausch, R. J.

    1989-05-01

    The cytotoxic, clastogenic and mutagenic effects of sulfur nustard in Chinese hamster ovary cells are described in this reoort. The cytotoxicity data indicate that micromolar amounts of HC are highly toxic in microrolar amounts. Chromosone aberration frequencies increased in a dose-dependent manner over a dose range of 0. 5 to 1.0 {micro}m and SCE increased in a dose-dependent fashion in the dose range of 0.0625 to 0.25 {micro}M. Mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was sporadic, but the majority of the exoosures resulted in mutation frequencies which were 1.2 to 4.3 fold higher than the spontaneous frequencies.

  2. Cytometric analysis of DNA changes induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.; Sanders, K.M.; Ruddle, S.E.; Gross, C.L.

    1993-05-13

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent which causes severe, potentially debilitating blisters following cutaneous exposure. Its mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown and no antidote exists to prevent its pathology. The biochemical basis of sulfur mustard's vesicating activity has been hypothesized to be a cascade of events beginning with alkylation of DNA. Using human cells in culture, we have assessed the effects of sulfur mustard on cell cycle activity using flow cytometry with propidium iodide. Two distinct patterns emerged, a Gl/S interface block at concentrations equivalent to vesicating doses (>50-micronM) and a G2 block at 10-fold lower concentrations. In addition, noticeable increases in amount of dye uptake were observed at 4 and 24 hours after sulfur mustard exposure. These increases are believed to be related to DNA repair activities and can be prevented by treatment of the cells with niacinamide, which inhibits DNA repair. Other drugs which provide alternate alkylating sites or inhibit cell cycle progression were shown to lower the cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard and to protect against its direct DNA damaging effects.

  3. Sulfur mustard and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2012-09-01

    Victims exposed to sulfur mustard (HD) in World War I and Iran-Iraq war, and those suffered occupational or accidental exposure have endured discomfort in the respiratory system at early stages after exposure, and marked general physical deterioration at late stages due to pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiolitis obliterans or lung cancer. At molecule levels, significant changes of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum, and of selectins (in particular sE-selectin) and soluble Fas ligand in the serum have been reported in recent studies of patients exposed to HD in Iran-Iraq war, suggesting that these molecules may be associated with the pathophysiological development of pulmonary diseases. Experimental studies in rodents have revealed that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their product peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), nitric oxide synthase, glutathione, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, activating protein-1 signaling pathway are promising drug targets for preventing HD-induced toxicity, whereas N-acetyl cysteine, tocopherols, melatonin, aprotinin and many other molecules have been proved to be effective in prevention of HD-induced damage to the respiratory system in different animal models. In this paper, we will systemically review clinical and pathophysiological changes of respiratory system in victims exposed to HD in the last century, update clinicians and researchers on the mechanism of HD-induced acute and chronic lung damages, and on the relevant drug targets for future development of antidotes for HD. Further research directions will also be proposed. PMID:22742653

  4. Comparison of latex body paint with wetted gauze wipes for sampling the chemical warfare agents VX and sulfur mustard from common indoor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hernon-Kenny, Laura A; Behringer, Deborah L; Crenshaw, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    Comparison of solvent-wetted gauze with body paint, a peelable surface sampling media, for the sampling of the chemical warfare agents VX and sulfur mustard from nine surfaces was performed. The nine surfaces sampled are those typical of interior public venues and include smooth, rough, porous, and non-porous surfaces. Overall, solvent-wetted gauze (wipes) performed better for the recovery of VX from non-porous surfaces while body paint (BP) performed better for the porous surfaces. The average percent VX recoveries using wipes and BP, respectively, are: finished wood flooring, 86.2%, 71.4%; escalator handrail, 47.3%, 26.7%; stainless steel, 80.5%, 56.1%; glazed ceramic tile, 81.8%, 44.9%; ceiling tile, 1.77%, 13.1%; painted drywall 7.83%, 21.1%; smooth cement, 0.64%, 10.3%; upholstery fabric, 24.6%, 23.1%; unfinished wood flooring, 9.37%, 13.1%. Solvent-wetted gauze performed better for the recovery of sulfur mustard from three of the relatively non-porous surfaces while body paint performed better for the more porous surfaces. The average percent sulfur mustard recoveries using wipes and BP, respectively, are: finished wood flooring, 30.2%, 2.97%; escalator handrail, 4.40%, 4.09%; stainless steel, 21.2%, 3.30%; glazed ceramic tile, 49.7%, 16.7%; ceiling tile, 0.33%, 11.1%; painted drywall 2.05%, 10.6%; smooth cement, 1.20%, 35.2%; upholstery fabric, 7.63%, 6.03%; unfinished wood flooring, 0.90%, 1.74%. PMID:26990562

  5. Detoxication of sulfur half-mustards by nucleophilic scavengers: robust activity of thiopurines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Powell, K Leslie; Thames, Howard D; MacLeod, Michael C

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) has been used in chemical warfare since World War I and is well known as an acutely toxic vesicant. It has been implicated as a carcinogen after chronic low-level exposure and is known to form interstrand cross-links in DNA. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards are currently of interest as potential chemical threat agents for terrorists because of ease of synthesis. Sulfur mustard and monofunctional analogues (half-mustards, 2-[chloroethyl] alkyl sulfides) react as electrophiles, damaging cellular macromolecules, and thus are potentially subject to scavenging by nucleophilic agents. We have determined rate constants for the reaction of four purine derivatives that contain nucleophilic thiol moieties with several sulfur-half-mustards. Three of these compounds, 2,6-dithiopurine, 2,6-dithiouric acid, and 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, exhibit facile reaction with the electrophilic mustard compounds. At near neutral pH, these thiopurines are much better nucleophilic scavengers of mustard electrophiles than other low molecular weight thiols such as N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. Progress curves calculated by numerical integration techniques indicate that equimolar concentrations of thiopurine provide significant reductions in the overall exposure to the episulfonium ions, which are the major reactive, electrophiles produced when sulfur mustards are dissolved in aqueous solution. PMID:20050632

  6. Sulfur mustard toxicity: history, chemistry, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S; Ghanei, Mostafa; Ansarin, Khalil; Panahi, Yunes; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2011-05-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) and similar bifunctional agents have been used as chemical weapons for almost 100 years. Victims of high-dose exposure, both combatants and civilians, may die within hours or weeks, but low-dose exposure causes both acute injury to the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and other parts of the body, and chronic sequelae in these organs are often debilitating and have a serious impact on quality of life. Ever since they were first used in warfare in 1917, SM and other mustard agents have been the subjects of intensive research, and their chemistry, pharmacokinetics and mechanisms of toxic action are now fairly well understood. In the present article we review this knowledge and relate the molecular-biological basis of SM toxicity, as far as it has been elucidated, to the pathological effects on exposure victims. PMID:21329486

  7. Capsaicinoids, Chloropicrin and Sulfur Mustard: Possibilities for Exposure Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Pesonen, Maija; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Halme, Mia; Vanninen, Paula; Seulanto, Heikki; Hemmilä, Matti; Pasanen, Markku; Kuitunen, Tapio

    2010-01-01

    Incapacitating and irritating agents produce temporary disability persisting for hours to days after the exposure. One can be exposed to these agents occupationally in industrial or other working environments. Also general public can be exposed in special circumstances, like industrial accidents or riots. Incapacitating and irritating agents discussed in this review are chloropicrin and capsaicinoids. In addition, we include sulfur mustard, which is an old chemical warfare agent and known to cause severe long-lasting injuries or even death. Chloropicrin that was used as a warfare agent in the World War I is currently used mainly as a pesticide. Capsaicinoids, components of hot pepper plants, are used by police and other law enforcement personnel as riot control agents. Toxicity of these chemicals is associated particularly with the respiratory tract, eyes, and skin. Their acute effects are relatively well known but the knowledge of putative long-term effects is almost non-existent. Also, mechanisms of effects at cellular level are not fully understood. There is a need for further research to get better idea of health risks, particularly of long-term and low-level exposures to these chemicals. For this, exposure biomarkers are essential. Validated exposure biomarkers for capsaicinoids, chloropicrin, and sulfur mustard do not exist so far. Metabolites and macromolecular adducts have been suggested biomarkers for sulfur mustard and these can already be measured qualitatively, but quantitative biomarkers await further development and validation. The purpose of this review is, based on the existing mechanistic and toxicokinetic information, to shed light on the possibilities for developing biomarkers for exposure biomonitoring of these compounds. It is also of interest to find ideas for early effect biomarkers considering the need for studies on subchronic and chronic toxicity. PMID:21833179

  8. Capsaicinoids, chloropicrin and sulfur mustard: possibilities for exposure biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Pesonen, Maija; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Halme, Mia; Vanninen, Paula; Seulanto, Heikki; Hemmilä, Matti; Pasanen, Markku; Kuitunen, Tapio

    2010-01-01

    Incapacitating and irritating agents produce temporary disability persisting for hours to days after the exposure. One can be exposed to these agents occupationally in industrial or other working environments. Also general public can be exposed in special circumstances, like industrial accidents or riots. Incapacitating and irritating agents discussed in this review are chloropicrin and capsaicinoids. In addition, we include sulfur mustard, which is an old chemical warfare agent and known to cause severe long-lasting injuries or even death. Chloropicrin that was used as a warfare agent in the World War I is currently used mainly as a pesticide. Capsaicinoids, components of hot pepper plants, are used by police and other law enforcement personnel as riot control agents. Toxicity of these chemicals is associated particularly with the respiratory tract, eyes, and skin. Their acute effects are relatively well known but the knowledge of putative long-term effects is almost non-existent. Also, mechanisms of effects at cellular level are not fully understood. There is a need for further research to get better idea of health risks, particularly of long-term and low-level exposures to these chemicals. For this, exposure biomarkers are essential. Validated exposure biomarkers for capsaicinoids, chloropicrin, and sulfur mustard do not exist so far. Metabolites and macromolecular adducts have been suggested biomarkers for sulfur mustard and these can already be measured qualitatively, but quantitative biomarkers await further development and validation. The purpose of this review is, based on the existing mechanistic and toxicokinetic information, to shed light on the possibilities for developing biomarkers for exposure biomonitoring of these compounds. It is also of interest to find ideas for early effect biomarkers considering the need for studies on subchronic and chronic toxicity. PMID:21833179

  9. Sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen mustards: stability and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2012-11-28

    Mustard gas, bis(β-chloroethyl) sulfide (HD), is highly toxic and harmful to humans and the environment. It comprises one class of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) that was used in both World Wars I and II. The three basic analogues or surrogates are: the monochloro derivative, known as the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES); an oxygen analogue, bis(β-chloroethyl) ether (BCEE); and several nitrogen analogues based on the 2,2'-dichlorodiethylamine framework (e.g., HN1, HN2, and HN3). The origin of their toxicity is considered to be from the formation of three-membered heterocyclic ions, a reaction that is especially accelerated in aqueous solution. The reaction of these cyclic ion intermediates with a number of important biological species such as DNA, RNA and proteins causes cell toxicity and is responsible for the deleterious effects of the mustards. While a number of studies have been performed over the last century to determine the chemistry of these compounds, early studies suffered from a lack of more sophisticated NMR and X-ray techniques. It is now well-established that the sulfur and nitrogen mustards are highly reactive in water, while the oxygen analog is much more stable. In this study, we review and summarize results from previous studies, and add results of our own studies of the reactivity of these mustards toward various nonaqueous solvents and nucleophiles. In this manner a more comprehensive evaluation of the stability and reactivity of these related mustard compounds is achieved. PMID:23070251

  10. Sulfur mustard induces the formation of keratin aggregates in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dillman, James F; McGary, Kriston L; Schlager, John J

    2003-12-01

    The vesicant sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent that has the capacity to cross-link biological molecules. We are interested in identifying specific proteins that are altered upon sulfur mustard exposure. Keratins are particularly important for the structural integrity of skin, and several genetically inherited blistering diseases have been linked to mutations in keratin 5 and keratin 14. We examined whether sulfur mustard exposure alters keratin biochemistry in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. Western blotting with specific monoclonal antibodies revealed the formation of stable high-molecular-weight "aggregates" containing keratin 14 and/or keratin 5. These aggregates begin to form within 15 min after sulfur mustard exposure. These aggregates display a complex gel electrophoresis pattern between approximately 100 and approximately 200 kDa. Purification and analysis of these aggregates by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of keratin 14 and keratin 5 and indicate that at least some of the aggregates are composed of keratin 14-keratin 14, keratin 14-keratin 5, or keratin 5-keratin 5 dimers. These studies demonstrate that sulfur mustard induces keratin aggregation in keratinocytes and support further investigation into the role of keratin aggregation in sulfur mustard-induced vesication. PMID:14644625

  11. Therapeutic Potential of a Non-Steroidal Bifunctional Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cholinergic Agent against Skin Injury Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 hr post-SM exposure. After 96 hr, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermalepidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. PMID:25127551

  12. Therapeutic potential of a non-steroidal bifunctional anti-inflammatory and anti-cholinergic agent against skin injury induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-10-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 h post-SM exposure. After 96 h, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermal–epidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. - Highlights: • Bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH4338) tested on SM exposed mouse skin • The prodrug NDH4338 was designed to target COX2 and acetylcholinesterase. • The application of NDH4338 improved cutaneous wound repair after SM induced injury. • NDH4338 treatment demonstrated a reduction in COX2 expression on SM injured skin. • Changes of skin repair

  13. Multiphoton imaging the disruptive nature of sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J.; Braue, Catherine R.; Dillman, James F.

    2005-03-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide] is a vesicating agent first used as a weapon of war in WWI. It causes debilitating blisters at the epidermal-dermal junction and involves molecules that are also disrupted by junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and other blistering skin diseases. Despite its recurring use in global conflicts, there is still no completely effective treatment. We have shown by imaging human keratinocytes in cell culture and in intact epidermal tissues that the basal cells of skin contain well-organized molecules (keratins K5/K14, α6β4 integrin, laminin 5 and α3β1 integrin) that are early targets of sulfur mustard. Disruption and collapse of these molecules is coincident with nuclear displacement, loss of functional asymmetry, and loss of polarized mobility. The progression of this pathology precedes basal cell detachment by 8-24 h, a time equivalent to the "clinical latent phase" that defines the extant period between agent exposure and vesication. Our images indicate that disruption of adhesion-complex molecules also impairs cytoskeletal proteins and the integration of structures required for signal transduction and tissue repair. We have recently developed an optical system to test this hypothesis, i.e., to determine whether and how the early disruption of target molecules alters signal transduction. This environmentally controlled on-line system provides a nexus for real-time correlation of imaged lesions with DNA microarray analysis, and for using multiphoton microscopy to facilitate development of more effective treatment strategies.

  14. Assay techniques for detection of exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide. Technical bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This technical bulletin provides analytical techniques to identify toxic chemical agents in urine or blood samples. It is intended to provide the clinician with laboratory tests to detect exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide.

  15. A review on delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans.

    PubMed

    Mansour Razavi, Seyed; Salamati, Payman; Saghafinia, Masoud; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Iranian soldiers were attacked with chemical bombs, rockets and artillery shells 387 times during the 8-years war by Iraq (1980-1988). More than 1,000 tons of sulfur mustard gas was used in the battlefields by the Iraqis against Iranian people. A high rate of morbidities occurred as the result of these attacks. This study aimed to evaluate the delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard gas on Iranian victims. During a systematic search, a total of 193 (109 more relevant to the main aim) articles on sulfur mustard gas were reviewed using known international and national databases. No special evaluation was conducted on the quality of the articles and their publication in accredited journals was considered sufficient. High rate of morbidities as the result of chemical attacks by sulfur mustard among Iranian people occurred. Iranian researchers found a numerous late complications among the victims which we be listed as wide range of respiratory, ocular, dermatological, psychological, hematological, immunological, gastrointestinal and endocrine complications, all influenced the quality of life of exposed victims. The mortality rate due to this agent was 3%. Although, mortality rate induced by sulfur mustard among Iranian people was low, variety and chronicity of toxic effects and complications of this chemical agent were dramatic. PMID:23351810

  16. Sulfur mustard-induced poikiloderma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Seyed Naser; Kaffashi, Mohammad; Poursaleh, Zohreh; Akhavan-Moghaddam, Jamal; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Emadi, Seyed Emad; Taghavi, Nez'hat-o-Sadat

    2011-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent chemical warfare agent that was widely used during the First World War and the Iran-Iraq conflict. This vesicant agent causes several acute and chronic effects on the skin, eye, and respiratory system. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who was injured with SM in Iraq chemical attack in 1988. After exposure, he developed severe skin blisters on his upper trunk, dorsum of hands, and genitalia. Based on several clinical observations, such as atrophy, pigmentation, and vascular changes on genitalia with relevant findings in histopathological studies, persistent pigmentation, and damaged skin appendix in hand lesions, a diagnosis of "SM-induced poikiloderma" was postulated. The absence of any complication on the palmar aspect of hands is another remarkable finding in presented case, which suggests a plausible role of the palms as a vector for transporting SM to other sites of the skin. PMID:21142708

  17. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Two-Generation Reproduction Study of Lewisite in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Mellick, P. W.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-07-15

    Occupational health standards have not been established for Lewisite [bis(2-chlorethyl)arsine], a potent toxic vesicant which reacts with the sulfhydryl groups of proteins through its arsenic group. The purposes of this study were to determine the reproductive consequences and dose~response of continuing Lewisite exposure of parental males and females and their offspring in a 42-week two-generation study. Solutions of Lewisite were prepared for administration by diluting the neat agent with sesame oil. Rats were administered Lewisite (0, 0.10, 0.25 or 0.60 mg/kg/day for 5 days a week) via intragastric intubation prior to mating, during mating and after mating until the birth of their offspring. The dams continued to receive Lewisite during lactation. At weaning, male and female offspring of each group were selected to continue on the study; rece1v1ng Lewisite during adolescence, mating and throughout gestation. Again, the dams continued to receive Lewisite until weaning of the offspring. Lewisite had no adverse effect on reproduction performance, fertility or reproductive organ weights of male or female rats through two consecutive generations. No adverse effect to offspring were attributed to Lewisite exposure. Minor changes in growth was the only maternal effect observed. Lewisite exposure of parental rats caused no gross or microscopic lesions in testes, epididymis, prostrate, seminal vesicles, ovaries, uterus or vagina. Severe inflammation of the lung was observed at necropsy in cases in which Lewisite gained access to the respiratory system from accidental dosing or reflux and aspiration; this usually caused early death of the animal. The NOEL for reproductive effects in this study was greater than 0.60 mg/kg/day.

  18. Enzyme-Based Test Strips for Visual or Photographic Detection and Quantitation of Gaseous Sulfur Mustard.

    PubMed

    Bidmanova, Sarka; Steiner, Mark-Steven; Stepan, Martin; Vymazalova, Kamila; Gruber, Michael A; Duerkop, Axel; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2016-06-01

    Sulfur mustard is a chemical agent of high military and terroristic significance. No effective antidote exists, and sulfur mustard can be fairly easily produced in large quantity. Rapid field testing of sulfur mustard is highly desirable. Existing analytical devices for its detection are available but can suffer from low selectivity, laborious sample preparation, and/or the need for complex instrumentation. We describe a new kind of test strip for rapid detection of gaseous sulfur mustard that is based on its degradation by the enzyme haloalkane dehalogenase that is accompanied by a change of local pH. This change can be detected using pH indicators contained in the strips whose color changes from blue-green to yellow within 10 min. In addition to visual read-out, we also demonstrate quantitative reflectometric readout by using a conventional digital camera based on red-green-blue data acquisition. Organic haloalkanes, such as 1,2-dichloroethane, have a negligible interfering effect. The visual limit of detection is 20 μg/L, and the one for red-green-blue read-out is as low as 3 μg/L. The assays have good reproducibility ±6% and ±2% for interday assays and intraday assays, respectively. The strips can be stored for at least 6 months without loss of function. They are disposable and can be produced fairly rapidly and at low costs. Hence, they represent a promising tool for in-field detection of sulfur mustard. PMID:27118397

  19. Determination and prevention of cytotoxic effects induced in human lymphocytes by the alkylating agent 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD). (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, H.L.; Johnson, J.B.

    1992-12-31

    2,2`-Dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard), HD, 1,1`thiobis(2-chloroethane) is a potent vesicant which can cause severe lesions to skin, lung, and eyes. There is no convenient in vitro or in vivo method(s) to objectively measure the damage induced by HD; therefore, a simple in vitro method was developed using human peripheral lymphocytes to study HD-induced cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of HD was measured using dye exclusion as an indicator of human lymphocyte viability. Exposure to HD resulted in both a time- and a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect on human lymphocytes. Using this in vitro assay, the effectiveness of various therapeutics (niacin, niacinamide, and 3-aminobenzamide) in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity was studied. Niacinamide and 3-aminobenzamide prevented the cytotoxic effects of HD for up to 2 days.

  20. Molecular and cellular mechanism of lung injuries due to exposure to sulfur mustard: a review.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Mostafa; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2011-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a potent chemical weapon agent, was used by Iraqi forces against Iranian in the Iraq-Iran war (1981-1989). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a late toxic pulmonary consequence after SM exposure. The COPD observed in these patients is unique (described as Mustard Lung) and to some extent different from COPD resulted from other well-known causes. Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD including oxidative stress, disruption of the balance between apoptosis and replenishment, proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance and inflammation. However, it is not obvious which of these pathways are relevant to the pathogenesis of mustard lung. In this paper, we reviewed studies addressing the pathogenicity of mustard lung, and reduced some recent ambiguities in this field. There is ample evidence in favor of crucial role of both oxidative stress and apoptosis as two known mechanisms that are more involved in pathogenesis of mustard lung comparing to COPD. However, according to available evidences there are no such considerable data supporting neither proteolytic activity nor inflammation mechanism as the main underlying pathogenesis in Mustard Lung. PMID:21639706

  1. Cleft Palate induced by Sulfur Mustard in mice fetus

    PubMed Central

    Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad; Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shekouhi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent which was widely used in the World War I and more recently during Gulf war in the early 1980s'. SM is a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic and carcinogenic effects; but only few studies have been published on its teratogenicity. Since SM has been widely used as a chemical weapon by the Iraqi regime against the Iranian soldiers as well as the civilian population particularly pregnant women in the border area; therefore, the investigation of SM adverse effects on cleft malformations which is one of the most frequent congenital anomalies is considered in this study. An experimental work has been carried out in embryopathy in mouse with intraperitoneal injection of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg SM at different periods of gestation. Cleft lip and palate were examined by stereomicroscopy. Current data demonstrate that exposure with SM on the 11th day of gestation can increase the incidence of cleft defects in comparison with control group (P<0.001). These results also show that SM treatment in GD 11 and 13 can lead to more anomalies compared with GD 14 (P<0.001). They also show that the teratogenic effects of SM are restrictively under the influence of the threshold dose and time of gestation. The present results suggest that exposure to sufficient doses of SM on critical days of gestation may increase the risk of congenital cleft malformations. PMID:24551757

  2. Microarray gene expression analysis of the human airway in patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Ali; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohamad Reza

    2014-08-01

    There is much data about the acute effects of sulfur mustard gas on humans, animals and cells. But less is known regarding the molecular basics of chronic complications in humans. Basically, mustard gas, as an alkylating agent, causes several chronic problems in the eyes, skin and more importantly in the pulmonary system which is the main cause of death. Although recent proteomic research has been carried out on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum, but high-throughput transcriptomics have not yet been applied to chronic airway remodeling. This is the first cDNA-microarray report on the chronic human mustard lung disease, 25 years after exposure during the Iran-Iraq war. Microarray transcriptional profiling indicated that a total of 122 genes were significantly dysregulated in tissues located in the airway of patients. These genes are associated with the extracellular matrix components, apoptosis, stress response, inflammation and mucus secretion. PMID:24823320

  3. Degradation of sulfur mustard on KF/Al2O3 supports: insights into the products and the reactions mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Yossi; Goldvaser, Michael; Dagan, Shai; Feldberg, Liron; Mizrahi, Dana; Waysbort, Daniel; Gershonov, Eytan; Columbus, Ishay

    2009-11-01

    The degradation of the warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD) adsorbed onto KF/Al(2)O(3) sorbents is described. These processes were explored by MAS NMR, using (13)C-labeled sulfur mustard (HD*) and LC-MS techniques. Our study on the detoxification of this blister agent showed the formation of nontoxic substitution and less-toxic elimination products (t(1/2) = 3.5-355 h). Interestingly, the reaction rates were found to be affected by MAS conditions, i.e., by a centrifugation effect. The products and the mechanisms of these processes are discussed. PMID:19817399

  4. Sulfur mustard gas exposure: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Goverman, J.; Montecino, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Sarhane, K.A.; Tompkins, R.G.; Fagan, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report describes a case of burn injury following exposure to sulfur mustard, a chemical agent used in war. A review of the diagnostic characteristics, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic measures used to treat this uncommon, yet extremely toxic, entity is presented. The aim of this report is to highlight the importance of considering this diagnosis in any war victim, especially during these unfortunate times of rising terrorist activities. PMID:26170794

  5. Biochemical manipulation of intracellular glutathione levels influences cytotoxicity to isolated human lymphocytes by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C.L.; Innace, J.K.; Hovatter, R.C.; Meier, H.L.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major nonprotein thiol that can protect cells from damage due to electrophilic alkylating agents by forming conjugates with the agent. Sulfur mustard (HD) is an electrophilic alkylating agent that has potent mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, and vesicant properties. Compounds that elevate or reduce intracellular levels of GSH may produce changes in cytotoxicity induced by sulfur mustard. Pretreatment of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for 72 hr with 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which reduces intracellular GSH content to approximately 26% of control, appears to sensitize these in vitro cells to the cytotoxic effects of 10 AM HD but not to higher HD concentrations. Pretreatment of PBL for 48 hr with 10 mM N-acetyl cysteine (NA C), which elevates intracellular glutathione levels to 122% of control, appears to partially protect these in vitro cells from the cytotoxic effects of 10 LAIHD but not to higher HD concentrations. Augmentation of intracellular levels of glutathione may provide partial protection against cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard.

  6. NMR- and GC/MS-based metabolomics of sulfur mustard exposed individuals: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, B Fatemeh; Aliannejad, Rasoul; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouie, Afsaneh; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Parastar, Hadi; Aliakbarzadeh, Ghazaleh; Fathi, Fariba; Taheri, Salman

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent and its effects on cells and tissues are varied and complex. Due to limitations in the diagnostics of sulfur mustard exposed individuals (SMEIs) by noninvasive approaches, there is a great necessity to develop novel techniques and biomarkers for this condition. We present here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) metabolic profiling of serum from and healthy controls to identify novel biomarkers in blood serum for better diagnostics. Of note, SMEIs were exposed to SM 30 years ago and that differences between two groups could still be found. Pathways in which differences between SMEIs and healthy controls are observed are related to lipid metabolism, ketogenesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and amino acid metabolism. PMID:26984270

  7. Mass spectral studies on vinylic degradation products of sulfur mustards under gas chromatography/mass spectrometry conditions.

    PubMed

    Sai Sachin, L; Karthikraj, R; Kalyan Kumar, K; Sony, T; Prasada Raju, N; Prabhakar, S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustards are a class of vesicant chemical warfare agents that rapidly degrade in environmental samples. The most feasible degradation products of sulfur mustards are chloroethyl vinylic compounds and divinylic compounds, which are formed by the elimination of one and two HCl molecules from sulfur mustards, respectively. The detection and characterization of these degradation products in environmental samples are an important proof for the verification of sulfur mustard usage. In this study, we synthesized a set of sulfur mustard degradation products, i.e., divinylic compounds (1-7) and chloroethyl vinylic compounds (8-14), and characterized using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) under electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) (methane) conditions. The EI mass spectra of the studied compounds mainly included the fragment ions that resulted from homolytic cleavages with or without hydrogen migrations. The divinylic compounds (1-7) showed [M-SH](+) ions, whereas the chloroethylvinyl compounds (8-14) showed [M-Cl](+) and [M-CH2CH2Cl](+) ions. Methane/CI mass spectra showed [M+H](+) ions and provided molecular weight information. The GC retention index (RI) values were also calculated for the studied compounds. The EI and CI mass spectral data together with RI values are extremely useful for off-site analysis for the verification of the chemical weapons convention and also to participate in official Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons proficiency tests. PMID:26764309

  8. Teratogenic Effects of Sulfur Mustard on Mice Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shahsavan, Marziyeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur Mustard (SM) has been used as a chemical warfare agent, in the World War I and more recently during Iraq-Iran war in early 1980s’. Its biological poisoning effect could be local or systemic and its effect depends on environmental conditions, exposed organs, and the extent and duration of exposure. It is considered as a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic, carcinogenic effects; although a few studies have been performed on its teratogenicity so far. Materials and Methods Mice were administered with SM intraperitoneally with a dose of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg in different periods of their gestation (gestational age of 11, 13 and 14 weeks). Control mice groups were included. Between 5 and 9 mice were used in each group. Dams underwent cesarean section on day 19 of their gestation. External examination was performed on the animals investigating craniofacial and septal defects and limb malformations such as adactyly and syndactyly. All data were analyzed by Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test. The P- value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Craniofacial and septal defects as well as the limb malformations were the most common types of birth defects, displaying an extremely complex biomedical problem. Conclusion This study confirms a significant correlation between SM exposure and its teratogenic effect. We postulated that the malformations could be caused by an uncontrolled migration of neural crest cells, causing developmental disorders. In addition to environmental factors, modifying genes could play an important role in the pathogenesis of the defects. PMID:23493485

  9. Smad molecules expression pattern in human bronchial airway induced by sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Adelipour, Maryam; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Yazdani, Samaneh; Vahedi, Ensieh; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammad Reza

    2011-09-01

    Airway remodelling is characterized by the thickening and reorganization of the airways seen in mustard lung patients. Mustard lung is the general description for the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by sulfur mustard(SM). Pulmonary disease was diagnosed as the most important disorder in individuals that had been exposed to sulfur mustard. Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare agent developed during Wars. Iraqi forces frequently used it against Iranian during Iran -Iraq in the 1980-1988. Peribronchial fibrosis result from airway remodeling that include excess of collagen of extracellular matrix deposition in the airway wall. Some of Smads families in association with TGF-β are involved in airway remodeling due to lung fibrosis. In the present study we compared the mRNA expression of Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 and Smad7 genes in airway wall biopsies of chemical-injured patients with non-injured patients as control. We used airway wall biopsies of ten unexposed patients and fifteen SM-induced patients. Smads expression was evaluated by RT-PCR followed by bands densitometry. Expression levels of Smad3 and Smad4 in SM exposed patients were upregulated but Smad2 and Smad7 was not significantly altered. Our results revealed that Smad3, and 4 may be involved in airway remodeling process in SM induced patients by activation of TGF-β. Smad pathway is the most represented signaling mechanism for airway remodeling and peribronchial fibrosis. The complex of Smads in the nucleus affects a series of genes that results in peribronchial fibrosis in SM-induced patients. PMID:21891820

  10. Silibinin as a potential therapeutic for sulfur mustard injuries.

    PubMed

    Balszuweit, Frank; John, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Kehe, Kai; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent causing skin blistering, ulceration, impaired wound healing, prolonged hospitalization and permanent lesions. Silibinin, the lead compound from Silybum marianum, has also been discussed as a potential antidote to SM poisoning. However, its efficacy has been demonstrated only with regard to nitrogen mustards. Moreover, there are no data on the efficacy of the water-soluble prodrug silibinin-bis-succinat (silibinin-BS). We investigated the effect of SIL-BS treatment against SM toxicity in HaCaT cells with regard to potential reduction of necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation including dose-dependency of any protective effects. We also demonstrated the biotransformation of the prodrug into free silibinin. HaCaT cells were exposed to SM (30, 100, and 300μM) for 30min and treated thereafter with SIL-BS (10, 50, and 100μM) for 24h. Necrosis and apoptosis were quantified using the ToxiLight BioAssay and the nucleosome ELISA (CDDE). Pro-inflammatory interleukins-6 and -8 were determined by ELISA. HaCaT cells, incubated with silibinin-BS were lysed and investigated by LC-ESI MS/MS. LC-ESI MS/MS results suggest that SIL-BS is absorbed by HaCaT cells and biotransformed into free silibinin. SIL-BS dose-dependently reduced SM cytotoxicity, even after 300μM exposure. Doses of 50-100μM silibinin-BS were required for significant protection. Apoptosis and interleukin production remained largely unchanged by 10-50μM silibinin-BS but increased after 100μM treatment. Observed reductions of SM cytotoxicity by post-exposure treatment with SIL-BS suggest this as a promising approach for treatment of SM injuries. While 100μM SIL-BS is most effective to reduce necrosis, 50μM may be safer to avoid pro-inflammatory effects. Pro-apoptotic effects after high doses of SIL-BS are in agreement with findings in literature and might even be useful to eliminate cells irreversibly damaged by SM. Further investigations will focus on the

  11. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin

    SciTech Connect

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Bérard, Izabel; and others

    2013-12-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after exposure. However, adducts were persistent and still detectable 21 days post-exposure. The time-dependent formation of DNA adducts was also found to be correlated with the appearance of apoptotic cells. This temporal correlation suggests that these two early events are responsible for the severity of the damage to the skin. Besides, SM–DNA adducts were also detected in areas located next to contaminated zone, thus suggesting that SM diffuses in skin. Altogether, this work provides for the first time a clear picture of SM-induced genotoxicity using DNA adducts as a marker. - Highlights: • Sulfur mustard adducts are formed in DNA after skin exposure. • DNA damage formation is an early event in the pathological process of skin burn. • The amount of SM–DNA adducts is maximal at the earliest time point investigated. • Adducts are still detected 3 weeks after exposure. • Sulfur mustard diffuses in skin especially when large doses are applied.

  12. Inflammatory effects of inhaled sulfur mustard in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Cervelli, Jessica; Anderson, Dana R.; Holmes, Wesley W.; Conti, Michele L.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-10-15

    Inhalation of sulfur mustard (SM), a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes severe lung damage, is a significant threat to both military and civilian populations. The mechanisms mediating its cytotoxic effects are unknown and were investigated in the present studies. Male rats Crl:CD(SD) were anesthetized, and then intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.7-1.4 mg/kg SM by vapor inhalation. Animals were euthanized 6, 24, 48 h or 7 days post-exposure and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue collected. Exposure of rats to SM resulted in rapid pulmonary toxicity, including focal ulceration and detachment of the trachea and bronchial epithelia from underlying mucosa, thickening of alveolar septal walls and increased numbers of inflammatory cells in the tissue. There was also evidence of autophagy and apoptosis in the tissue. This was correlated with increased BAL protein content, a marker of injury to the alveolar epithelial lining. SM exposure also resulted in increased expression of markers of inflammation including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), each of which has been implicated in pulmonary toxicity. Whereas COX-2, TNF{alpha} and iNOS were mainly localized in alveolar regions, MMP-9 was prominent in bronchial epithelium. In contrast, expression of the anti-oxidant hemeoxygenase, and the anti-inflammatory collectin, surfactant protein-D, decreased in the lung after SM exposure. These data demonstrate that SM-induced oxidative stress and injury are associated with the generation of cytotoxic inflammatory proteins which may contribute to the pathogenic response to this vesicant.

  13. Historical perspective on effects and treatment of sulfur mustard injuries.

    PubMed

    Graham, John S; Schoneboom, Bruce A

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2'-dichlorodiethyl sulfide; SM) is a potent vesicating chemical warfare agent that poses a continuing threat to both military and civilian populations. Significant SM injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in long-term complications affecting the skin, eyes, and lungs. This report summarizes initial and ongoing (chronic) clinical findings from SM casualties from the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988), with an emphasis on cutaneous injury. In addition, we describe the cutaneous manifestations and treatment of several men recently and accidentally exposed to SM in the United States. Common, chronic cutaneous problems being reported in the Iranian casualties include pruritis (the primary complaint), burning, pain, redness, desquamation, hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, erythematous papular rash, xerosis, multiple cherry angiomas, atrophy, dermal scarring, hypertrophy, and sensitivity to mechanical injury with recurrent blistering and ulceration. Chronic ocular problems include keratitis, photophobia, persistent tearing, sensation of foreign body, corneal thinning and ulceration, vasculitis of the cornea and conjunctiva, and limbal stem cell deficiency. Chronic pulmonary problems include decreases in lung function, bronchitis with hyper-reactive airways, bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis, stenosis of the trachea and other large airways, emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, decreased total lung capacity, and increased incidences of lung cancer, pulmonary infections, and tuberculosis. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management; current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. New strategies are needed to provide for optimal and rapid healing, with the goals of (a) returning damaged tissue to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest period of time, and (b) ameliorating chronic

  14. UPPER-BOUND QUANTITATIVE CANCER RISK ESTIMATES FOR POPULATION ADJACENT TO SULFUR MUSTARD INCINERATION FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document characterizes the potential cancer hazard to populations residing near sulfur mustard incineration facilities while the incineration is taking place. he carcinogenicity of sulfur mustard is reviewed briefly to show what evidence has lead to the previously-accepted c...

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells are highly resistant to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Annette; Scherer, Michael; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    The effect of sulfur mustard (SM) to the direct injured tissues of the skin, eyes and airways is well investigated. Little is known about the effect of SM to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, this is an interesting aspect. Comparing the clinical picture of SM it is known today that MSC play an important role e.g. in chronic impaired wound healing. Therefore we wanted to get an understanding about how SM affects MSC and if these findings might become useful to get a better understanding of the effect of sulfur mustard gas with respect to skin wounds. We used mesenchymal stem cells, isolated from femoral heads from healthy donors and treated them with a wide range of SM to ascertain the dose-response-curve. With the determined inhibitory concentrations IC1 (1μM), IC5 (10μM), IC10 (20μM) and IC25 (40μM) we did further investigations. We analyzed the migratory ability and the differentiation capacity under influence of SM. Already very low concentrations of SM demonstrated a strong effect to the migratory activity whereas the differentiation capacity seemed not to be affected. Putting these findings together it seems to be likely that a link between MSC and the impaired wound healing after SM exposure might exist. Same as in patients with chronic impaired wound healing MSC had shown a reduced migratory activity. The fact that MSC are able to tolerate very high concentrations of SM and still do not lose their differentiation capacity may reveal new ways of treating wounds caused by sulfur mustard. PMID:23933411

  16. Evaluation of miR-9 and miR-143 expression in urine specimens of sulfur mustard exposed patients

    PubMed Central

    Khafaei, Mostafa; Samie, Shahram; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Alvanegh, Akbar Ghorbani; Mirzaei, Behnaz; Chavoshei, Somaye; Dorraj, Ghamar Soltan; Esmailnejad, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) or mustard gas is a chemical alkylating agent that causes blisters in the skin (blister gas), burns the eyes and causes lung injury. Some major cellular pathways are involved in the damage caused by mustard gas such as NF-κb signaling, TGF-β signaling, WNT pathway, inflammation, DNA repair and apoptosis. MicroRNAs are non-coding small RNAs (19–25 nucleotides) that are involved in the regulation of gene expression and are found in two forms, extracellular and intracellular. Changes in the levels of extracellular microRNAs are directly associated with many diseases, it is thus common to study the level of extracellular microRNAs as a biomarker to determine the pathophysiologic status. In this study, 32 mustard gas injured patients and 32healthy subjects participated. Comparative evaluation of miR-9 and miR-143 expression in urine samples was performed by Real Time PCR and Graph Pad software. The Mann Whitney t-test analysis of data showed that the expression level of miR-143 and miR-9 had a significant decrease in sulfur mustard individuals with the respective p-value of 0.0480 and 0.0272 compared to normal samples, with an imbalance of several above mentioned pathways. It seems that reducing the expression level of these genes has a very important role in the pathogenicity of mustard gas injured patients. PMID:27486378

  17. Evaluation of miR-9 and miR-143 expression in urine specimens of sulfur mustard exposed patients.

    PubMed

    Khafaei, Mostafa; Samie, Shahram; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Alvanegh, Akbar Ghorbani; Mirzaei, Behnaz; Chavoshei, Somaye; Dorraj, Ghamar Soltan; Esmailnejad, Mostafa; Tavallaie, Mahmood; Nourani, Mohammadreza

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) or mustard gas is a chemical alkylating agent that causes blisters in the skin (blister gas), burns the eyes and causes lung injury. Some major cellular pathways are involved in the damage caused by mustard gas such as NF-κb signaling, TGF-β signaling, WNT pathway, inflammation, DNA repair and apoptosis. MicroRNAs are non-coding small RNAs (19-25 nucleotides) that are involved in the regulation of gene expression and are found in two forms, extracellular and intracellular. Changes in the levels of extracellular microRNAs are directly associated with many diseases, it is thus common to study the level of extracellular microRNAs as a biomarker to determine the pathophysiologic status. In this study, 32 mustard gas injured patients and 32healthy subjects participated. Comparative evaluation of miR-9 and miR-143 expression in urine samples was performed by Real Time PCR and Graph Pad software. The Mann Whitney t-test analysis of data showed that the expression level of miR-143 and miR-9 had a significant decrease in sulfur mustard individuals with the respective p-value of 0.0480 and 0.0272 compared to normal samples, with an imbalance of several above mentioned pathways. It seems that reducing the expression level of these genes has a very important role in the pathogenicity of mustard gas injured patients. PMID:27486378

  18. Induction and repair of DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard in the A-549 cell line followed by a comet assay.

    PubMed

    Jost, Petr; Svobodova, Hana; Stetina, Rudolf

    2015-07-25

    Sulfur mustard is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent with devastating impact on intoxicated tissues. DNA cross-links are probably the most toxic DNA lesions induced in the cell by sulfur mustard. The comet assay is a very sensitive method for measuring DNA damage. In the present study using the A-549 lung cell line, the comet assay protocol was optimized for indirect detection of DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard. The method is based on the additional treatment of the assayed cells containing cross-links with the chemical mutagen, styrene oxide. Alkali-labile adducts of styrene oxide cause DNA breaks leading to the formation of comets. A significant dose-dependent reduction of DNA migration of the comet's tail was found after exposing cells to sulfur mustard, indicative of the amount of sulfur mustard induced cross-links. The remarkable decrease of % tail DNA could be observed as early as 5min following exposure to sulfur mustard and the maximal effect was found after 30min, when DNA migration was reduced to the minimum. Sulfur mustard preincubated in culture medium without cells lost its ability to induce cross-links and had a half-life of about 15min. Pre-incubation longer than 30min does not lead to a significant increase in cross-links when applied to cells. However, the amount of cross-links is decreased during further incubation due to repair. The current modification of the comet assay provides a useful tool for detecting DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard and could be used for detection of other DNA cross-linking agents such as chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:25986970

  19. Notes from the field: Exposures to discarded sulfur mustard munitions - Mid-Atlantic and New England States 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-04-26

    Before the 1970s, the United States sometimes disposed of at sea excess, obsolete, or unserviceable munitions, including chemical munitions. Chemical munitions known to have been disposed of at sea included munitions filled with sulfur mustard, a vesicant (i.e., an agent that causes chemical burns or blisters of the skin and mucous membranes). Signs and symptoms of exposure to a mustard agent can include redness and blistering of the skin, eye irritation, rhinorrhea, hoarseness, shortness of breath, and (rarely) diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. Since 2004, CDC has received notification of three separate incidents of exposure to sulfur mustard munitions. In one incident, a munition was found with ocean-dredged marine shells used to pave a driveway. The other two incidents involved commercial clam fishing operations. This report highlights the importance of considering exposure to sulfur mustard in the differential diagnosis of signs and symptoms compatible with exposure to a vesicant agent, especially among persons involved with clam fishing or sea dredging operations. PMID:23615677

  20. Mustard vesicating agent-induced toxicity in the skin tissue and silibinin as a potential countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to the vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) causes severe skin injury with delayed blistering. Depending upon the dose and time of their exposure, edema and erythema develop into blisters, ulceration, necrosis, desquamation, and pigmentation changes, which persist weeks and even years after exposure. Research advances have generated data that have started to explain the probable mechanism of action of vesicant-induced skin toxicity; however, despite these advances, effective and targeted therapies are still deficient. This review highlights studies on two SM analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and NM, and CEES- and NM-induced skin injury mouse models that have substantially added to the knowledge on the complex pathways involved in mustard vesicating agent-induced skin injury. Furthermore, employing these mouse models, studies under the National Institutes of Health Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats program have identified the flavanone silibinin as a novel therapeutic intervention with the potential to be developed as an effective countermeasure against skin injury following exposure to mustard vesicating agents. PMID:27326543

  1. Sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Weber, Jana; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent, which is acutely toxic to a variety of organ systems including skin, eyes, respiratory system and bone marrow. The underlying molecular pathomechanism was mainly attributed to the alkylating properties of SM. However, recent studies have revealed that cellular responses to SM exposure are of more complex nature and include increased protein expression and protein modifications that can be used as biomarkers. In order to confirm already known biomarkers, to detect potential new ones and to further elucidate the pathomechanism of SM, we conducted large-scale proteomic experiments based on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) exposed to SM. Surprisingly, our analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as one of the up-regulated proteins after exposure of HaCaT cells to SM. In this paper we demonstrate the sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in HaCaT cells by 2D gel-electrophoresis (2D GE), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western Blot (WB) and a combination thereof. 2D GE in combination with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis identified GAPDH as an up-regulated protein after SM exposure. Immunocytochemistry revealed a distinct nuclear translocation of GAPDH after exposure to 300μM SM. This finding was confirmed by fractionated WB analysis. 2D GE and subsequent immunoblot staining of GAPDH demonstrated two different spot locations of GAPH (pI 7.0 and pI 8.5) that are related to cytosolic or nuclear GAPDH respectively. After exposure to 300μM SM a significant increase of nuclear GAPDH at pI 8.5 occurred. Nuclear GAPDH has been associated with apoptosis, detection of structural DNA alterations, DNA repair and regulation of genomic integrity and telomere structure. The results of our study add new aspects to the pathophysiology of sulfur mustard toxicity, yet further studies will be necessary to reveal the specific function of nuclear GAPDH in the pathomechanism of sulfur mustard

  2. Prevention and Treatment of Respiratory Consequences Induced by Sulfur Mustard in Iranian Casualties

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed M.; Salamati, Payman; Harandi, Ali Amini; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Background: About 100,000 Iranian have been exposed to chemical weapons during Iraq-Iran conflict (1980-88). After being spent of more than two decades, still about 30,000 of them are under follow-up treatment. The main aim of this study was to review various preventive and therapeutic methods for injured patients with sulfur mustard in different phases. Methods: For gathering information, we have used the electronic databases including Scopus, Medline, ISI, IranMedex, Irandoc sites. According to this search strategy, 104 published articles associated to respiratory problems and among them 50 articles related to prevention and treatment of respiratory problems were found and reviewed. Results: There is not any curative treatment for sulfur mustard induced lung injuries, but some valuable experienced measures for prevention and palliative treatments are available. Some useful measures in acute phase include: Symptomatic management, oxygen supplementation, tracheostomy in laryngospasm, use of moist air, respiratory physical therapy, mucolytic agents and bronchodilators. In the chronic phases, these measures include: Periodic clinical examinations, administration of inhaled corticosteroids alone or with long-acting beta 2 agonists, use of antioxidants, magnesium ions, long term oxygen supplement, therapeutic bronchoscopy, laser therapy, and use of respiratory tract stents. Conclusions: Most treatments are symptomatic but using preventive points immediately after exposure could improve following outcomes. PMID:23671768

  3. Mechanisms of sulfur mustard-induced metabolic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, M.E.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-05-13

    Studies on the mechanism of metabolic injury induced by sulfur mustard (2, 2'- dichlorodiethyl sulfide, HD) have demonstrated that exposure of human epidermal keratinocytes in culture to HD induces time- and dose-dependent NAD+ depletion and inhibition of glucose metabolism (Martens, Biochem. Pharmacol., in press). Both occurred relatively early after alkylation, preceding the loss of membrane integrity that is indicative of metabolic cell death. The inhibition of glycolysis induced by HD was only partially correlated with the depletion of NAD+ and, thus, was not simply of changes in the NAD+ level. Rather, HD appeared to induce complex shifts in the pattern of glucose metabolism that paralleled both the timing and degree of injury. In line with these findings, recent experiments have shown that partial protection against HD-induced NAD+ depletion by 1 mM niacinamide did not protect against the inhibition of glycolysis. In preliminary experiments examining the effect of HD-induced metabolic changes on the cellular energy state, dose-dependent depletion of ATP was seen at 24 hours after exposure, but not at 4 or 8 hours. As seen for glucose metabolism, 1 mM niacinamide did not prevent the loss of high-energy intermediate (ATP). We conclude from these studies that relationships among HD exposure, glucose metabolism, and intracellular NAD and ATP are more complex than originally proposed (Papirmeister et al, Fund. Appl. Toxicol. 5:S134, 1985).

  4. Multiphoton imaging: a view to understanding sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J. S.; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that topical exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) produces persistent, incapacitating blisters of the skin. However, the primary lesions effecting epidermal-dermal separation and disabling of mechanisms for cutaneous repair remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent staining plus multiphoton imaging of human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes exposed to SM (400 μM x 5 min)have revealed that SM disrupts adhesion-complex molecules which are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Images of keratin-14 showed early, progressive, postexposure collapse of the K5/K14 cytoskeleton that resulted in ventral displacement of the nuclei beneath its collapsing filaments. This effectively corrupted the dynamic filament assemblies that link basal-cell nuclei to the extracellular matrix via α6β4-integrin and laminin-5. At 1 h postexposure, there was disruption in the surface organization of α6β4 integrins, associated displacement of laminin-5 anchoring sites and a concomitant loss of functional asymmetry. Accordingly, our multiphoton images are providing compelling evidence that SM induces prevesicating lesions that disrupt the receptor-ligand organization and cytoskeletal systems required for maintaining dermal-epidermal attachment, signal transduction, and polarized mobility.

  5. Response of mustard greens to gypsum in sulfur deficient light and heavy textured soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field-grown mustard greens, Brassica juncea (L.), ‘Florida Broadleaf’ were direct seeded on 12 Nov. 08 into light- and heavy-textured low sulfur soils near Weslaco, TX (Lat. 26° 08'). In order to determine the effects of added soil sulfur (S) on leaf blade S, rates of 0, 560, 1120, and 2240 kg/ha ...

  6. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular calcium: A mechanism of mustard toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Majerus, B.J.; Munavalli, G.S.; Petrali, J.P.

    1993-05-13

    The effect of sulfur mustard SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+)i was studied in vitro using the clonal mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 and primary normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cell culture models. SM depletes cellular glutathione (GSH) and thus may inhibit GSH-dependent Ca2+-ATPase (Ca2+ pump), leading to a high (Ca2+) and consequent cellular toxicity. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, GSH levels decreased 20-34% between 1-6 hr in NG108-15 cells. SM increased (Ca2+)i, measured using the Ca2+-specific fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM, in both NG108-15 cells (1030% between 2-6 hr) and NHEK (23-30% between 0.5-3 hr) . Depletion of cellular GSH by buthionine sulfoximine (1 mM), a specific GSH biosynthesis inhibitor, also increased Ca2+, (88% at 1 hr) in NHEK, suggesting that GSH depletion may lead to increased (Ca2+)i. Calcium, localized cytochemically with antimony, accumulated in increased amounts around mitochondria and endoplasmic reticula, in the cytosol, and in particular in the euchromatin regions of the nucleus beginning at 6 hr after 0.3 mM SM exposure of NG108-15 cells. Cell membrane integrity examined with the fluorescent membrane probe calcein AM was unaffected through 6 hr following 1 mM SM exposure; and cell viability (NG108-15 cells) measured by trypan blue exclusion was >80% of control through 9 hr following 0.3 mM SM exposure.

  7. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs. PMID:27085470

  8. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity by niacinamide, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-03-11

    The pathologic mechanism of sulfur mustard-induced skin vesication is as yet undefined. Papirmeister et al. have postulated a biochemical mechanism for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption resulting in NAD+ depletion and activation of protease. The authors have utilized a chromogenic peptide substrate assay to establish that human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed 24 hr previously to sulfur mustard exhibited an increase in proteolytic activity. Doses of compounds known to alter the biochemical events associated with sulfur mustard exposure or reduce protease activity were tested in this system for their ability to block the sulfur mustard-induced protease activity. Treatment with niacinamide 1 hr after or with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone 24 hr prior to sulfur mustard exposure resulted in a decrease of 39%, 33% and 42% respectively of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity. These data suggest that therapeutic intervention into the biochemical pathways that culminate in protease activation might serve as an approach to treatment of sulfur mustard-induced pathology.

  9. Intratracheal Heparin Improves Plastic Bronchitis Due to Sulfur Mustard Analog

    PubMed Central

    Houin, Paul R.; Veress, Livia A.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Inhalation of sulfur mustard (SM) and SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), cause fibrinous cast formation that occludes the conducting airways, similar to children with Fontan physiology-induced plastic bronchitis. These airway casts cause significant mortality and morbidity, including hypoxemia and respiratory distress. Our hypothesis was that intratracheal heparin, a highly cost effective and easily preserved rescue therapy, could reverse morbidity and mortality induced by bronchial cast formation. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 7.5% CEES via nose-only aerosol inhalation to produce extensive cast formation and mortality. The rats were distributed into three groups: non-treated, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated, and heparin-treated groups. Morbidity was assessed with oxygen saturations and clinical distress. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were obtained for analysis, and lungs were fixed for airway microdissection to quantify the extent of airway cast formation. Results Heparin, given intratracheally improved survival (100%) when compared to non-treated (75%) and PBS-treated (90%) controls. Heparin-treated rats also had improved oxygen saturations, clinical distress and airway cast scores. Heparin-treated rats had increased thrombin clotting times, factor Xa inhibition and activated partial thromboplastin times, indicating systemic absorption of heparin. There were also increased red blood cells (RBCs) in the BALF in 2/6 heparin-treated rats compared to PBS-treated control rats. Conclusions Intratracheal heparin 1 hr after CEES inhalation improved survival, oxygenation, airway obstruction, and clinical distress. There was systemic absorption of heparin in rats treated intratracheally. Some rats had increased RBCs in BALF, suggesting a potential for intrapulmonary bleeding if used chronically after SM inhalation. PMID:24692161

  10. Acute and chronic effects of sulfur mustard on the skin: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Mostafa; Poursaleh, Zohreh; Harandi, Ali Amini; Emadi, Seyed Emad; Emadi, Seyed Naser

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2-dichlorodiethyl sulfide, SM) is one of the vesicant classes of chemical warfare agents that causes blistering in the skin and mucous membranes, where it can have lingering long-term effects for up to ten years (1). SM was employed extensively by the Iraqi army against not only Iranian soldiers but also civilians between 1983 and 1988, resulting in over 100,000 chemical casualties. Approximately 45,000 victims are still suffering from long-term effects of exposure (2,3). More than 90% of the patients exposed to SM exhibit various cutaneous lesions in the affected area. The human skin can absorb approximately 20% of the SM through exposure. Up to 70% of the chemical is concentrated in the epidermis and the remainder in the basement membrane and in the dermis (4).Sulfur mustard exists in different physical states. The liquid form of SM evaporates slowly in cold weather and can penetrate through the clothing, thereby increasing exposure. However, the gas form readily diffuses in the air and it can be inhaled, leading to systemic absorption. In addition, warm temperatures are ideal conditions that liquid SM present in the clothing of the exposed individual could be converted to gas form. SM-induced clinical cutaneous symptoms include itching and burning. Other clinical findings include erythema or painless sunburn, bulla, hypo- and hyper pigmentation in both exposed and unexposed areas (5,6) The mechanism and biochemical cascade of SM-induced cutaneous manifestations are not completely understood but several published pathways support many of the know facts. Our current understanding fails to explain the time interval between the acute chemical exposure and the late-onset and delayed tissue damage (7,8). The aim of this article is to review the acute and long-term cutaneous findings resulting from SM exposure. Also, cellular and molecular mechanism involved in SM-induced skin pathology have been discussed. PMID:20868209

  11. A Simplified Method for Quantifying Sulfur Mustard Adducts to Blood Proteins by Ultra-High Pressure Liquid Chromatography-Isotope Dilution Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pantazides, Brooke G.; Crow, Brian S.; Garton, Joshua W.; Quiñones-González, Jennifer A.; Blake, Thomas A.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur mustard binds to reactive cysteine residues, forming a stable sulfur-hydroxyethylthioethyl [S-HETE] adduct that can be used as a long-term biomarker of sulfur mustard exposure in humans. The digestion of sulfur mustard-exposed blood samples with proteinase K following total protein precipitation with acetone produces the tripeptide biomarker [S-HETE]-Cys-Pro-Phe. The adducted tripeptide is purified by solid phase extraction, separated by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography, and detected by isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. This approach was thoroughly validated and characterized in our laboratory. The average interday relative standard deviation was ≤ 9.49%, and the range of accuracy was between 96.1-109% over a concentration range of 3.00 to 250. ng/mL with a calculated limit of detection of 1.74 ng/mL. A full 96-well plate can be processed and analyzed in 8 h which is five times faster than our previous 96-well plate method and only requires 50 µL of serum, plasma, or whole blood. Extensive ruggedness and stability studies and matrix comparisons were conducted to create a robust, easily transferrable method. As a result, a simple and high-throughput method has been developed and validated for the quantitation of sulfur mustard blood protein adducts in low volume blood specimens which should be readily adaptable for quantifying human exposures to other alkylating agents. PMID:25622494

  12. Epigenetic: A missing paradigm in cellular and molecular pathways of sulfur mustard lung: a prospective and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Saber; Panahi, Yunes; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis- (2-chloroethyl) sulphide) is a chemical warfare agent that causes DNA alkylation, protein modification and membrane damage. SM can trigger several molecular pathways involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, which cause cell necrosis and apoptosis, and loss of cells integrity and function. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a growing research topic and is addressed by DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and noncoding RNAs expression. It seems SM can induce the epigenetic modifications that are translated into change in gene expression. Classification of epigenetic modifications long after exposure to SM would clarify its mechanism and paves a better strategy for the treatment of SM-affected patients. In this study, we review the key aberrant epigenetic modifications that have important roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compared with mustard lung. PMID:26557960

  13. Epigenetic: A missing paradigm in cellular and molecular pathways of sulfur mustard lung: a prospective and comparative study.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Panahi, Yunes; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-08-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis- (2-chloroethyl) sulphide) is a chemical warfare agent that causes DNA alkylation, protein modification and membrane damage. SM can trigger several molecular pathways involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, which cause cell necrosis and apoptosis, and loss of cells integrity and function. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a growing research topic and is addressed by DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and noncoding RNAs expression. It seems SM can induce the epigenetic modifications that are translated into change in gene expression. Classification of epigenetic modifications long after exposure to SM would clarify its mechanism and paves a better strategy for the treatment of SM-affected patients. In this study, we review the key aberrant epigenetic modifications that have important roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compared with mustard lung. PMID:26557960

  14. Treatment of sulfur mustard (HD)-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D R; Byers, S L; Vesely, K R

    2000-12-01

    An in vivo sulfur mustard (HD) vapor exposure model followed by bronchoalveolar lavage was developed previously in this laboratory to study biochemical indicators of HD-induced lung injury. This model was used to test two treatment compounds--niacinamide (NIA) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)--for their ability to ameliorate HD-induced biochemical changes. Anesthetized rats were intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.35 mg of HD in 0.1 ml of ethanol or ethanol alone for 50 min. At the beginning of the exposure (t = 0), the rats were treated with either NIA (750 mg kg(-1)) or NAC (816 mg kg(-1)), i.p. At 24 h post-exposure, rats were euthanized and the lungs were lavaged with saline (three 5-ml washes). One milliliter of the recovered lavage fluid was analyzed for cellular components. The remaining fluid was centrifuged (10 min at 300 g) and the supernatant was assayed on a Cobas FARA clinical analyzer for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), albumin (ALB), total protein (TP) and glutathione peroxidase (GP). The HD alone and HD+NIA treatment caused significant increases in all of the biochemical parameters compared with control levels. The NAC treatment yielded LDH, ALB and TP values that, although elevated, were not significantly different from the control. The GP levels were significantly higher than the control but significantly lower than the HD alone levels, indicating some protection compared with the HD alone group. The GGT levels were unaffected by NAC compared with HD alone. Cytological analysis of lavage fluid showed that the percentages of neutrophils were 5.3 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM) for control, 46.6 +/- 4.5 for HD, 31.4 +/- 4.7 for HD + NIA and 21.6 +/- 4.7 for HD + NAC, respectively. The neutrophil counts were significantly higher for the three HD-exposed groups vs controls; however, the NAC-treated group had neutrophil counts lower than HD alone, indicating decreased inflammatory response. These results show that NAC may be

  15. Doxepin cream vs betamethasone cream for treatment of chronic skin lesions due to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Davoudi, Seyyed Masoud; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Amiri, Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Oral doxepin was shown to reduce chronic pruritus due to sulfur mustard. The present study compared the effects of topical doxepin 5% with betamethasone 1% for the treatment of pruritus in veterans exposed to sulfur mustard. This investigator-blinded, randomized, clinical trial was conducted in an outpatient dermatology clinic. Seventy-five men who were exposed to sulfur mustard 23 to 28 years ago during the Iran-Iraq war who complained of pruritus were randomized to receive doxepin cream 5% (n = 40) or betamethasone cream 0.1% (n = 35) twice a day for 6 weeks. Pruritus severity and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were evaluated before and after each treatment. Both groups showed significant improvement regarding pruritus (P < .05), burning sensation, skin dryness (P < .001), and skin scaling (P < 0.05). The lesions of all regions significantly reduced after treatments (P < .05), except those on the head, face, and genitalia. Pruritus, visual analog scores, and DLQI significantly decreased (P < .01, P < .01, and P < .001, respectively) in doxepin- and betamethasone-treated groups, and there was no difference between groups. All DLQI subscores decreased after both type of treatments (P < .01). Equal efficacy of doxepin cream and betamethasone suggest that doxepin is a potential alternative to control pruritus caused by sulfur mustard in exposed veterans. PMID:21675494

  16. Spinach and mustard greens response to soil type, sulfur addition and lithium level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  17. The Quantitation of Sulfur Mustard By-Products, Sulfur-Containing Herbicides, and Organophosphonates in Soil and Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkins, B.A., Sega, G.A. , Macnaughton, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    Over the past fifty years, the facilities at Rocky Mountain Arsenal have been used for the manufacturing, bottling, and shipping sulfur- containing herbicides, sulfur mustard, and Sarin. There is a need for analytical methods capable of determining these constituents quickly to determine exactly how specific waste structural materials should be handled, treated, and landfilled.These species are extracted rapidly from heated samples of soil or crushed concrete using acetonitrile at elevated pressure, then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Thiodiglycol, the major hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard, must be converted to a silylated derivative prior to quantitation. Detection limits, calculated using two statistically-unbiased protocols, ranged between 2-13 micrograms analyte/g soil or concrete.

  18. Comparative transcriptional and translational analysis of heme oxygenase expression in response to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent which reacts with nucleophilic groups on DNA, RNA and proteins. It is capable of inducing cellular toxicity and oxidative stress via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The accumulation of high amounts of the reactive species causes harmful effects such as DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, inflammation and apoptosis. Although SM (also known as mustard gas) and its derivatives are rapidly removed from the body, long-term damages are much more serious than the short-term effects and may be correlated with the subsequent changes occurred on the genome. In order to defend against oxidative properties of this toxic molecule, cells trigger several anti-oxidant pathways through up-regulating the corresponding genes. Enzymes like heme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase are the examples of such genes. These enzymes produce anti-oxidant substances that are able to scavenge the reactive species, alleviate their noxious effects and protect the cells. Following SM gas exposure, gene transcription (mRNA levels) of these enzymes are ramped up to help detoxify the cells. Yet, some studies have reported that the up-regulated transcription does not necessarily translate into higher protein expression levels. The exact reason why this phenomenon happens is not clear. Creation of mutations in the genome sequence may lead to protein structure changes. Phosphorylation or other post-translational alterations of proteins upon SM exposure are also considered as possible causes. In addition, alterations in some microRNAs responsible for regulating post-translation events may inhibit the expression of the anti-oxidant proteins in the poisoned cells at translational level. PMID:26096165

  19. Photoassisted and photocatalytic degradation of sulfur mustard using TiO2 nanoparticles and polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Sarabadani, Mansour; Ashrafi, Davood; Saeidian, Hamdollah; Babri, Mehran

    2013-02-01

    The decomposition of highly toxic chemical warfare agent, sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide or HD), has been studied by homogeneous photolysis and heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation on titania nanoparticles. Direct photolysis degradation of HD with irradiation system was investigated. The photocatalytic degradation of HD was investigated in the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles and polyoxometalates embedded in titania nanoparticles in liquid phase at room temperature (33 ± 2 °C). Degradation products during the treatment were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Whereas apparent first-order kinetics of ultraviolet (UV) photolysis were slow (0.0091 min(-1)), the highest degradation rate is obtained in the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles as nanophotocatalyst. Simultaneous photolysis and photocatalysis under the full UV radiation leads to HD complete destruction in 3 h. No degradation products observed in the presence of nanophotocatalyst without irradiation in 3 h. It was found that up to 90 % of agent was decomposed under of UV irradiation without TiO(2), in 6 h. The decontamination mechanisms are often quite complex and multiple mechanisms can be operable such as hydrolysis, oxidation, and elimination. By simultaneously carrying out photolysis and photocatalysis in hexane, we have succeeded in achieving faster HD decontamination after 90 min with low catalyst loading. TiO(2) nanoparticles proved to be a superior photocatalyst under UV irradiation for HD decontamination. PMID:22707206

  20. A Choline Oxidase Amperometric Bioassay for the Detection of Mustard Agents Based on Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with Prussian Blue Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Arduini, Fabiana; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Covaia, Corrado; Amine, Aziz; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In this work a novel bioassay for mustard agent detection was proposed. The bioassay is based on the capability of these compounds to inhibit the enzyme choline oxidase. The enzymatic activity, which is correlated to the mustard agents, was electrochemically monitored measuring the enzymatic product, hydrogen peroxide, by means of a screen-printed electrode modified with Prussian Blue nanoparticles. Prussian Blue nanoparticles are able to electrocatalyse the hydrogen peroxide concentration reduction at low applied potential (−50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl), thus allowing the detection of the mustard agents with no electrochemical interferences. The suitability of this novel bioassay was tested with the nitrogen mustard simulant bis(2-chloroethyl)amine and the sulfur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide. The bioassay proposed in this work allowed the detection of mustard agent simulants with good sensitivity and fast response, which are excellent premises for the development of a miniaturised sensor well suited for an alarm system in case of terrorist attacks. PMID:25688587

  1. Airway Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Acute Mortality Due to Lethal Sulfur Mustard Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Veress, Livia A.; Anderson, Dana R.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Houin, Paul R.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; Loader, Joan E.; Paradiso, Danielle C.; Smith, Russell W.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Holmes, Wesley W.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical weapon stockpiled today in volatile regions of the world. SM inhalation causes a life-threatening airway injury characterized by airway obstruction from fibrin casts, which can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is more than 80%. No therapy exists to prevent mortality after SM exposure. Our previous work using the less toxic analog of SM, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, identified tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) an effective rescue therapy for airway cast obstruction (Veress, L. A., Hendry-Hofer, T. B., Loader, J. E., Rioux, J. S., Garlick, R. B., and White, C. W. (2013). Tissue plasminogen activator prevents mortality from sulfur mustard analog-induced airway obstruction. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 48, 439–447). It is not known if exposure to neat SM vapor, the primary agent used in chemical warfare, will also cause death due to airway casts, and if tPA could be used to improve outcome. Methods: Adult rats were exposed to SM, and when oxygen saturation reached less than 85% (median: 6.5 h), intratracheal tPA or placebo was given under isoflurane anesthesia every 4 h for 48 h. Oxygen saturation, clinical distress, and arterial blood gases were assessed. Microdissection was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Results: Intratracheal tPA treatment eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h) and greatly improved morbidity after lethal SM inhalation (100% death in controls). tPA normalized SM-associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress. Moreover, tPA treatment resulted in greatly diminished airway casts, preventing respiratory failure from airway obstruction. Conclusions: tPA given via airway more than 6 h after exposure prevented death from lethal SM inhalation, and normalized oxygenation and ventilation defects, thereby rescuing from respiratory distress and failure. Intra-airway tPA should be considered as a life

  2. Treatment for sulfur mustard lung injuries; new therapeutic approaches from acute to chronic phase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sulfur mustard (SM) is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988). It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries. Method This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment. Results Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments. PMID:23351279

  3. Lack of FLT3-TKD835 gene mutation in toxicity of sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Rafiee, Mohammad; Keramati, Mohammad-Reza; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Asgharzadeh, Ali; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Sheikhi, Maryam; Amini, Nafiseh; Zarmehri, Azam Moradi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Sulfur mustard (SM) was used by the Iraqi army against the Iranian troops in the Iran-Iraq war from 1983–1988. This chemical gas affects different organs including the skin, lungs and the hematopoietic system. Any exposure to SM increases the risk of chromosomal breaking, hyperdiploidy and hypodiploidy. Studies have shown that the risk for acute myeloblastic and lymphoblastic leukemia increases in veterans exposed to SM. FLT3 mutations including ITD and TKD mutations had been observed in some cases of leukemia. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the frequency of FLT3-TKD835 mutations in the veterans exposed to SM agent. Materials and Methods: We studied 42 patients who were exposed to SM during the war in Khorasan Razavi province, Mashhad, Iran in 2012. As control group, 30 healthy males were selected from first-degree relatives of the patients. For assessment of TKD835 mutation, DNA was extracted and RFLP-PCR was performed. Results: Analysis of RFLP-PCR data showed no FLT-3 TKD mutation in any of the patients. Conclusion: Although contact with SM can increase the risk of malignancy especially hematologic neoplasms, results of the study show that another mechanism of leukemogenesis, other than FLT3-TKD mutation, may be the reason for increased risk of leukemia in SM toxicity. PMID:26523218

  4. [Long-term complications of sulfur mustard exposure: a therapeutic update].

    PubMed

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Rosman, Yossi; Krivoy, Amir; Statlender, Liran; Kassirer, Michael; Shrot, Shai

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is an alkylating chemical warfare agent with high military significance due to its high toxicity, resistance and availability. SM was widely used in military conflicts, the last being the Iran-Iraq war with more than 100,000 Iranians exposed, one-third of whom are still suffering from late effects. The intensity of the delayed complications correlates to the extent, the area and the route of exposure. The clinical manifestations most commonly involve respiratory, ocular and dermal effects. Respiratory complications include dyspnea, cough and expectorations and various obstructive and restrictive lung diseases. Dermal complications are itching, burning sensation, blisters, dry skin, dermatitis and pigmentary changes. Ocular complications include photophobia, red eye, tearing, corneal ulcers and blindness. Although the picture remains incomplete the major mechanisms responsible for the clinical and pathological effects of SM are: DNA alkylation and cross-linking, protein modification and membrane damage in addition to induction of inflammatory mediators in the target tissues causing extensive necrosis, apoptosis and loss of tissue structure. The current report reviews long-term complications of SM exposure, focusing on new treatments tested in clinical trials conducted on humans. Such treatments include: N-acetyl cysteine, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, Interferon-gamma, furosemide and morphine for the respiratory complications. Ocular complications may entail: Invasive procedures treating corneal complication, limbal ischemia and stem cell deficiency. Treatment for dermatological complications include: anti-depressants, pimercrolimus, Unna's boot, capsaicin, phenol and menthol, Aloe vera and olive oil, curcumin and Interferon-gamma. PMID:24791566

  5. Sulfur Mustard Research—Strategies for the Development of Improved Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kehe, Kai; Balszuweit, Frank; Emmler, Judith; Kreppel, Helmut; Jochum, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating substance being used as chemical warfare agent (vesicant). It is still regarded as a significant threat in chemical warfare and terrorism. Exposure to SM produces cutaneous blisters, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract injury, eye lesions, and bone marrow depression. Victims of World War I as well as those of the Iran-Iraq war have suffered from devastating chronic health impairment. Even decades after exposure, severe long-term effects like chronic obstructive lung disease, lung fibrosis, recurrent corneal ulcer disease, chronic conjunctivitis, abnormal pigmentation of the skin, and different forms of cancer have been diagnosed. Methods: This review briefly summarizes the scientific literature and own results concerning detection, organ toxicity of SM, its proposed toxicodynamic actions, and strategies for the development of improved medical therapy. Results: Despite extensive research efforts during the last century, efficient antidotes against SM have not yet been generated because its mechanism of action is not fully understood. However, deeper insights into these mechanisms gained in the last decade and promising developments of new drugs now offer new chances to minimize SM-induced organ damage and late effects. Conclusion: Polymerase inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, antioxidants, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and probably regulators of DNA damage repair are identified as promising approaches to improve treatment. PMID:18615149

  6. Inhalation Exposure Systems for the Development of Rodent Models of Sulfur Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Waylon M.; Kracko, Dean A.; Lehman, Mericka R.; Irvin, Clinton M.; Blair, Lee F.; White, Richard K.; Benson, Janet M.; Grotendorst, Gary R.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; McDonald, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical threat agent for which its effects have no current treatment. Due to the ease of synthesis and dispersal of this material, the need to develop therapeutics is evident. The present manuscript details the techniques used to develop SM laboratory exposure systems for the development of animal models of pulmonary injury. These models are critical for evaluating SM injury and developing therapeutics against that injury. Iterative trials were conducted to optimize a lung injury model. The resulting pathology was used as a guide, with a goal of effecting homogeneous and diffuse lung injury comparable to that of human injury. Inhalation exposures were conducted by either nose-only inhalation or intubated inhalation. The exposures were conducted to either directly vaporized SM or SM that was nebulized from an ethanol solution. Inhalation of SM by nose-only inhalation resulted in severe nasal epithelial degeneration and minimal lung injury. The reactivity of SM did not permit it to transit past the upper airways to promote lower airway injury. Intratracheal inhalation of SM vapors at a concentration of 5400 mg · min/m3 resulted in homogeneous lung injury with no nasal degeneration. PMID:20025432

  7. Comparative Proteomic Study Reveals the Molecular Aspects of Delayed Ocular Symptoms Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Pashandi, Zaiddodine; Saraygord-Afshari, Neda; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Naderi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent which produces ocular, respiratory, and skin damages. Eyes are the most sensitive organ to SM due to high intrinsic metabolic and rapid turnover rate of corneal epithelium and aqueous-mucous interfaces of the cornea and conjunctiva. Here we investigate underlying molecular mechanism of SM exposure delayed effects which is still a controversial issue after about 30 years. Materials and Methods. Following ethical approval, we have analyzed serum proteome of ten severe SM exposed male patients with delayed eye symptoms with two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The western blotting was used to confirm the proteins that have been identified. Results. We have identified thirteen proteins including albumin, haptoglobin, and keratin isoforms as well as immunoglobulin kappa chain which showed upregulation while transferrin and alpha 1 antitrypsin revealed downregulation in these patients in comparison with healthy control group. Conclusions. Our results elevated participation of free iron circulatory imbalance and local matrix-metalloproteinase activity in development of delayed ocular symptoms induced by SM. It demonstrates that SM induced systemic toxicity leads to some serum protein changes that continually and gradually exacerbate the ocular surface injuries. PMID:25685557

  8. Sulfur mustard-induced neutropenia: treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dana R; Holmes, Wesley W; Lee, Robyn B; Dalal, Stephen J; Hurst, Charles G; Maliner, Beverly I; Newmark, Jonathan; Smith, William J

    2006-05-01

    Although best known as a blistering agent, sulfur mustard (HD) can also induce neutropenia in exposed individuals, increasing their susceptibility to infection. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and pegylated G-CSF (peg-G-CSF) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as hematopoietic growth factors to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of G-CSF and peg-G-CSF in ameliorating HD-induced neutropenia. African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were challenged with HD and, at 1, 3, 5, or 7 days after exposure, G-CSF therapy (10 microg/kg per day for 21 days) was initiated. Peg-G-CSF (300 microg/kg, single treatment) was similarly tested, with treatment given at 3 days after exposure. Untreated HD-exposed animals recovered from neutropenia 28 days after exposure, whereas G-CSF- or peg-G-CSF-treated animals recovered 8 to 19 days after exposure (p < 0.05). These results indicate that G-CSF or peg-G-CSF may provide Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments that will reduce the duration of HD-induced neutropenia. PMID:16761898

  9. Quenching action of monofunctional sulfur mustard on chlorophyll fluorescence: towards an ultrasensitive biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simerjit; Singh, Minni; Flora, Swaran Jeet Singh

    2013-11-01

    An ultrasensitive fluorimetric biosensor for the detection of chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) was developed using its monofunctional analogue. SM is a vesicant and a potent chemical threat owing to its direct toxic effects on eyes, lungs, skin and DNA. This work investigates the quenching action of the analyte on chlorophyll fluorescence as elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies suggesting the electrophilic attack of carbonium ion on nitrogens of the porphyrin moiety of chlorophyll. The properties of immobilisation matrix were optimised and scanning electron microscope observations confirmed improvement in pore size of sol-gels by addition of 32 % (v/v) glycerol, a feature enabling enhanced sensitivity towards the analyte. Chlorophyll embedded sol-gel was treated with increasing concentrations of monofunctional SM and the corresponding drop in maximum fluorescence intensity as measured by emission at 673 nm was observed, which varied linearly and had a detection limit of 7.68 × 10(-16) M. The biosensor was found to be 6 orders of magnitude more sensitive than the glass microfibre-based disc biosensor previously reported by us. PMID:23955347

  10. Evaluation of candidate decontaminants against percutaneous sulfur mustard and thickened soman challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Hobson, D.W.; Menton, R.G.; Olson, C.T.; Korte, D.W.

    1993-05-13

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of candidate skin decontaminants relative to a standard control decontaminant, XE-555 resin, against percutaneous sulfur mustard (HD) or thickened soman (TGD) challenge. Male, New Zealand White rabbits were used as the model system with lesion area as the end point for HD exposures and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition as the endpoint for TGD exposure. Initial studies were performed to establish assay parameters for, and to validate the use of, AChE inhibition as an endpoint for assessing candidate decontaminant efficacy against nerve agent exposures. XE-555 resin was concurrently evaluated with each candidate decontaminant for both assay control and comparative purpose. Decontamination was initiated at 1, 3, or 5 min after HD exposures and 2 min after TGD exposures. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD) compounds 1513, 1514, 1515, 1516, and 1517 were evaluated against HD and against TGD. Results from these studies demonstrated the utility of AChE inhibition for evaluating skin decontaminants. None of the candidate decontaminants evaluated was more effective than the standard control decontaminant against HD or TGD exposures.

  11. Imaging sulfur mustard lesions in human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes by confocal and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2002-06-01

    Topical exposure to sulfur mustard (HD), a known theat agent, produces persistent and debilitating cutaneous blisters. The blisters occur at the dermal-epidermal junction following a dose-dependent latent period of 8-24 h, however, the primary lesions causing vesication remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent images reveal that a 5-min exposure to 400 (mu) M HD disrupts molecules that are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Using keratinocyte cultures and fluorochomes conjugated to two different keratin-14 (K14) antibodies (clones CKB1 and LL002), results have shown a statistically significant (p<0.1) 1-h decrease of 29.2% in expression of the CKB1 epitope, a nearly complete loss of CKB1 expression within 2 h, and progressive cytoskeletal (K14) collapse without loss in expression of the LL002 epitope. With human epidermal tissues, multi-photon images of (alpha) 6 integrin and laminin 5 showed disruptive changes in the cell-surface organization and integrity of these adhesion molecules. At 1 H postexposure, analyses showed a statistically significant (p<0.1) decrease of 27.3% in (alpha) 6 integrin emissions, and a 32% decrease in laminin 5 volume. Multi-photon imaging indicates that molecules essential for epidermal-dermal attachment are early targets in the alkylating events leading to HD-induced vesication.

  12. Epigenetic modulations in early endothelial cells and DNA hypermethylation in human skin after sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Simons, Thilo; Striepling, Enno; Bölck, Birgit; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-02-26

    Victims that were exposed to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) suffer from chronic dermal and ocular lesions, severe pulmonary problems and cancer development. It has been proposed that epigenetic perturbations might be involved in that process but this has not been investigated so far. In this study, we investigated epigenetic modulations in vitro using early endothelial cells (EEC) that were exposed to different SM concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 23.5 and 50μM). A comprehensive analysis of 78 genes related to epigenetic pathways (i.e., DNA-methylation and post-translational histone modifications) was performed. Moreover, we analyzed global DNA methylation in vitro in EEC after SM exposure as a maker for epigenetic modulations and in vivo using human skin samples that were obtained from a patient 1 year after an accidently exposure to pure SM. SM exposure resulted in a complex regulation pattern of epigenetic modulators which was accompanied by a global increase of DNA methylation in vitro. Examination of the SM exposed human skin samples also revealed a significant increase of global DNA methylation in vivo, underlining the biological relevance of our findings. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that SM affects epigenetic pathways and causes epigenetic modulations both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26392148

  13. Sulfur Mustard Exposure and Non-Ischemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Shoeibi, Nasser; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Abrishami, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year-old man was referred with a complaint of visual loss in his left eye and his best corrected visual acuity was 20/80. Slit lamp examination showed arborizing conjunctival vessels and dry eye. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed a non-ischemic central retinal vein occlusion. Cardiovascular, rheumatologic, and hematologic work up showed no abnormal findings. An ascertained history of exposure to sulfur mustard during the Iran-Iraq war was documented in his medical history. Four sessions of intravitreal bevacizumab injections were done as needed. After two-year follow-up, visual acuity in his left eye improved to 20/25 and macular edema was resolved without any need for further interventions. We conclude that sulfur mustard gas exposure may be considered as a predisposing factor for central retinal vein occlusion, as was found in our patient (an Iranian war veteran) by excluding all yet known etiologies and predisposing factors. PMID:26722147

  14. Thiodiglycol, the hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard: Analysis of in vitro biotransformation by mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases using nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.; Hodgson, Ernest

    2006-06-15

    Thiodiglycol (2,2'-bis-hydroxyethylsulfide, TDG), the hydrolysis product of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, has been implicated in the toxicity of sulfur mustard through the inhibition of protein phosphatases in mouse liver cytosol. The absence of any inhibitory activity when TDG was present in assays of pure enzymes, however, led us to investigate the possibility for metabolic activation of TDG to inhibitory compound(s) by cytosolic enzymes. We have successfully shown that mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) rapidly oxidize TDG in vitro, but the classic spectrophotometric techniques for following this reaction provided no information on the identity of TDG intermediates and products. The use of proton NMR to monitor the oxidative reaction with structural confirmation by independent synthesis allowed us to establish the ultimate product, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetic acid, and to identify an intermediate equilibrium mixture consisting of 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde hydrate and the cyclic 1,4-oxathian-2-ol. The intermediate nature of this mixture was determined spectrophotometrically when it was shown to drive the production of NADH when added to ADH and NAD.

  15. Detoxification of sulfur mustard by enzyme-catalyzed oxidation using chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Popiel, S; Nawała, J

    2013-10-10

    One of the most interesting methods for the detoxification of sulfur mustard is enzyme-catalyzed oxidation. This study examined the oxidative destruction of a sulfur mustard by the enzyme chloroperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10). Chloroperoxidase (CPO) belongs to a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of various organic compounds by peroxide in the presence of a halide ion. The enzymatic oxidation reaction is affected by several factors: pH, presence or absence of chloride ion, temperature, the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and enzyme and aqueous solubility of the substrate. The optimum reaction conditions were determined by analyzing the effects of all factors, and the following conditions were selected: solvent, Britton-Robinson buffer (pH=3) with tert-butanol (70:30 v/v); CPO concentration, 16U/mL; hydrogen peroxide concentration, 40mmol/L; sodium chloride concentration, 20mmol/L. Under these reaction conditions, the rate constant for the reaction is 0.006s(-1). The Michaelis constant, a measure of the affinity of an enzyme for a particular substrate, is 1.87×10(-3)M for this system. The Michaelis constant for enzymes with a high affinity for their substrate is in the range of 10(-5) to 10(-4)M, so this value indicates that CPO does not have a very high affinity for sulfur mustard. PMID:24034427

  16. Medical documentation, bioanalytical evidence of an accidental human exposure to sulfur mustard and general therapy recommendations.

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Striepling, Enno; Rudolf, Klaus-Dieter; Schröder-Kraft, Claudia; Püschel, Klaus; Hullard-Pulstinger, Andreas; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; John, Harald

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent (CWA) that was first used in World War I and in several military conflicts afterwards. The threat by SM is still present even today due to remaining stockpiles, old and abandoned remainders all over the world as well as to its ease of synthesis. CWA are banned by the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) interdicting their development, production, transport, stockpiling and use and are subjected to controlled destruction. The present case report describes an accidental exposure of three workers that occurred during the destruction of SM. All exposed workers presented a characteristic SM-related clinical picture that started about 4h after exposure with erythema and feeling of tension of the skin at the upper part of the body. Later on, superficial blister and a burning phenomenon of the affected skin areas developed. Similar symptoms occurred in all three patients differing severity. One patient presented sustained skin affections at the gluteal region while another patient came up with affections of the axilla and genital region. Fortunately, full recovery was observed on day 56 after exposure except some little pigmentation changes that were evident even on day 154 in two of the patients. SM-exposure was verified for all three patients using bioanalytical GC MS and LC MS/MS based methods applied to urine and plasma. Urinary biotransformation products of the β-lyase pathway were detected until 5 days after poisoning whereas albumin-SM adducts could be found until day 29 underlining the beneficial role of adduct detection for post-exposure verification. In addition, we provide general recommendations for management and therapy in case of SM poisoning. PMID:26321678

  17. Downregulation of super oxide dismutase level in protein might be due to sulfur mustard induced toxicity in lung.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, Leila; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) has been identified as an important chemical weapon. During the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-88, the extensive usage of SM against Iranian civilians and military forces was proven. This agent has been shown to cause severe damage mainly in the skin, eyes, lungs, and respiratory tract in Iranian veterans. The most common disease is bronchiolitis obliterans (BO)). SM increases the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are known as protective antioxidants against the harmful effects of ROS. Twenty exposed SM individuals (43.2±6.4 years), and 10 normal controls (41.3±2.5 years) were enrolled in this study. Evaluation of SODs was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that CuZnSOD and MnSOD mRNA were up-regulated 2.79±1.09 and 2.49±1.11 folds, respectively in SM-injured patients in comparison with control levels. In contrast, Immunohistochemistry results showed downregulation of CuZnSOD protein expression in SM injured patients. Our results revealed that SODs may play an important role in cellular protection against oxidative stress due to mustard gas toxicity in airway wall of SM exposed patients. PMID:23754354

  18. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards induce characteristic poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation responses in HaCaT keratinocytes with distinctive cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Debiak, Malgorzata; Birtel, Matthias; Ponath, Viviane; Balszuweit, Frank; Lex, Kirsten; Martello, Rita; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Strobelt, Romano; Siegert, Markus; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Mustard agents are potent DNA alkylating agents with mutagenic, cytotoxic and vesicant properties. They include bi-functional agents, such as sulfur mustard (SM) or nitrogen mustard (mustine, HN2), as well as mono-functional agents, such as "half mustard" (CEES). Whereas SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent, several nitrogen mustard derivatives, such as chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide, are being used as established chemotherapeutics. Upon induction of specific forms of genotoxic stimuli, several poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize the nucleic acid-like biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) by using NAD(+) as a substrate. Previously, it was shown that SM triggers cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation (PARylation), but so far this phenomenon is poorly characterized. In view of the protective effects of PARP inhibitors, the latter have been proposed as a treatment option of SM-exposed victims. In an accompanying article (Debiak et al., 2016), we have provided an optimized protocol for the analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to further analyze mustard-induced PARylation and its functional consequences, in general. Thus, in the present study, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the PARylation response in HaCaT cells after treatment with four different mustard agents, i.e., SM, CEES, HN2, and chlorambucil, on a qualitative, quantitative and functional level. In particular, we recorded substance-specific as well as dose- and time-dependent PARylation responses using independent bioanalytical methods based on single-cell immuno-fluorescence microscopy and quantitative isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we analyzed if and how PARylation contributes to mustard-induced toxicity by treating HaCaT cells with CEES, SM, and HN2 in combination with the clinically relevant PARP inhibitor ABT888. As evaluated by a novel immunofluorescence-based protocol for the detection of

  19. Comparison of fixation and processing methods for hairless guinea pig skin following sulfur mustard exposure. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, M.A.; Braue Jr, E.H.

    1992-12-31

    Ten anesthetized hairless guinea pigs Crl:IAF(HA)BR were exposed to 10 pi of neat sulfur mustard (HD) in a vapor cup on their skin for 7 min. At 24 h postexposure, the guinea pigs were euthanatized and skin sections taken for histologic evaluation. The skin was fixed using either 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF), McDowell Trump fixative (4CF-IG), Zenker`s formol-saline (Helly`s fluid), or Zenker`s fluid. Fixed skin sections were cut in half: one half was embedded in paraffin and the other half in plastic (glycol methacrylate). Paraffin-embedded tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin; plastic-embedded tissue was stained with Lee`s methylene blue basic fuchsin. Skin was also frozen unfixed, sectioned by cryostat, and stained with pinacyanole. HD-exposed skin was evaluated histologically for the presence of epidermal and follicular necrosis, microblister formation, epidermitis, and intracellular edema to determine the optimal fixation and embedding method for lesion preservation. The percentage of histologic sections with lesions varied little between fixatives and was similar for both paraffin and plastic embedding material. Plastic-embedded sections were thinner, allowing better histologic evaluation, but were more difficult to stain. Plastic embedding material did not infiltrate tissue fixed in Zenker`s fluid or Zenker`s formol-saline. Frozen tissue sections were prepared in the least processing time and lesion preservation was comparable to fixed tissue. It was concluded that standard histologic processing using formalin fixation and paraffin embedding is adequate for routine histopathological evaluation of HD skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig.... Sulfur mustard, Vesicating agents, Pathology, Hairless guinea pig model, Fixation.

  20. Influence of sulfur and cadmium on antioxidants, phytochelatins and growth in Indian mustard.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Humayra; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Bagheri, Rita; Ahmad, Javed; Arif, Ibrahim A; Baig, M Affan; Qureshi, M Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Soils in many parts of the world are contaminated with heavy metals, leading to multiple, deleterious effects on plants and threats to world food production efficiency. Cadmium (Cd) is one such metal, being toxic at relatively low concentrations as it is readily absorbed and translocated in plants. Sulfur-rich compounds are critical to the impact of Cd toxicity, enabling plants to increase their cellular defence and/or sequester Cd into vacuoles mediated by phytochelatins (PCs). The influence of sulfur on Cd-induced stress was studied in the hyperaccumulator plant Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) using two sulfur concentrations (+S, 300 µM [Formula: see text] and S-deficient -S, [Formula: see text]) with and without the addition of Cd (100 µM CdCl2) at two different time intervals (7 and 14 days after treatment). Compared with control plants (+S/-Cd), levels of oxidative stress were higher in S-deficient (-S/-Cd) plants, and greatest in S-deficient Cd-treated (-S/+Cd) plants. However, additional S (+S/+Cd) helped plants cope with oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase emerged as a key player against Cd stress under both -S and +S conditions. The activity of ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase and catalase declined in Cd-treated and S-deficient plants, but was up-regulated in the presence of sulfur. Sulfur deficiency mediated a decrease in ascorbate and glutathione (GSH) content but changes in ascorbate (reduced : oxidized) and GSH (reduced : oxidized) ratios were alleviated by sulfur. Our data clearly indicate that a sulfur pool is needed for synthesis of GSH, non-protein thiols and PCs and is also important for growth. Sulfur-based defence mechanisms and the cellular antioxidant pathway, which are critical for tolerance and growth, collapsed as a result of a decline in the sulfur pool. PMID:25587194

  1. Influence of sulfur and cadmium on antioxidants, phytochelatins and growth in Indian mustard

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Humayra; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Bagheri, Rita; Ahmad, Javed; Arif, Ibrahim A.; Baig, M. Affan; Qureshi, M. Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Soils in many parts of the world are contaminated with heavy metals, leading to multiple, deleterious effects on plants and threats to world food production efficiency. Cadmium (Cd) is one such metal, being toxic at relatively low concentrations as it is readily absorbed and translocated in plants. Sulfur-rich compounds are critical to the impact of Cd toxicity, enabling plants to increase their cellular defence and/or sequester Cd into vacuoles mediated by phytochelatins (PCs). The influence of sulfur on Cd-induced stress was studied in the hyperaccumulator plant Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) using two sulfur concentrations (+S, 300 µM SO42− and S-deficient −S, 30μMSO42−) with and without the addition of Cd (100 µM CdCl2) at two different time intervals (7 and 14 days after treatment). Compared with control plants (+S/−Cd), levels of oxidative stress were higher in S-deficient (−S/−Cd) plants, and greatest in S-deficient Cd-treated (−S/+Cd) plants. However, additional S (+S/+Cd) helped plants cope with oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase emerged as a key player against Cd stress under both −S and +S conditions. The activity of ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase and catalase declined in Cd-treated and S-deficient plants, but was up-regulated in the presence of sulfur. Sulfur deficiency mediated a decrease in ascorbate and glutathione (GSH) content but changes in ascorbate (reduced : oxidized) and GSH (reduced : oxidized) ratios were alleviated by sulfur. Our data clearly indicate that a sulfur pool is needed for synthesis of GSH, non-protein thiols and PCs and is also important for growth. Sulfur-based defence mechanisms and the cellular antioxidant pathway, which are critical for tolerance and growth, collapsed as a result of a decline in the sulfur pool. PMID:25587194

  2. Development of the sulfur mustard resistant keratinocyte cell line HaCaT/SM.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Annette; Steinritz, Dirk; Thiermann, Horst

    2016-02-26

    Pairs of corresponding cytotoxic drug sensitive and resistant cell lines are powerful tools to develop treatment strategies. Developing cytotoxic drug resistant cell lines is a well-established method in cancer research. In more than fifty years of sulfur mustard (SM) resistant research such a cell pair has never been produced. Hereinafter we describe the first successful approach to develop a SM resistant keratinocyte cell line. Starting with the SM sensitive keratinocyte cell line HaCaT we used a strategy of continuous exposure with gradually increased concentrations. Cells were cultured in total for more than 40 months starting with an initial concentration of 0.07μM SM twice a week up to a final concentration of 7.2μM SM. The achieved cell line HaCaT/SM had an LC50 resistance increase of 4.7-fold and an LC90 increase of 8.2-fold. Hereinafter we demonstrate the production of the first sulfur mustard (SM) resistant cell line. The new achieved cell line called HaCaT/SM is able to tolerate a continuous exposure of an SM concentration, which is associated with an inhibitory effect of 93% within the original HaCaT cells, which were used as starting point. PMID:26463895

  3. Effect of sulfur mustard on mast cells in hairless guinea pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.S.; Bryant, M.A.; Braue, E.H.

    1993-05-13

    The skin of 24 anesthetized hairless guinea pigs was exposed to saturated sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide; HD) for 5 and 7 minutes using 14-mm diameter vapor cups. Animals were euthanatized 24 hours after exposure and skin specimens taken for morphometric evaluation of granulated mast cells with an image analysis system (IAS). Tissue specimens were processed in paraffin, sectioned at 5 microns and stained with Unna's stain for mast cells. The number of granulated mast cells and the area occupied by mast cell granules was determined. There were significantly fewer mast cells (p < 0.05) in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals, with significantly fewer mast cells in the 7-minute than the 5-minute HD group. There were also significantly smaller areas occupied by granules in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals. HD-induced lesions in the hairless guinea pig have shown signs of an inflammatory response, and with their granules of vasoactive histamine, mast cells might be expected to play a role in HD-induced injury. Changes in mast cells exposed to low sulfur mustard levels, as detected by an IAS, may serve as an early marker for cutaneous damage, which might not be as easily determined with routine light microscopy.

  4. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity studies of DRDE-07 and its analogs against sulfur mustard in the in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vinod; Pathak, Uma; Meshram, Ghansham Pundilikji

    2014-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM), a chemical warfare agent, is classified as a class I human carcinogen by IARC. No effective antidote against this agent is available. The synthetic aminothiol, amifostine, earlier known as WR-2721, has been extensively used as a chemical radioprotector for normal tissues in cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy. SM is a radiomimetic agent; this prompted us to evaluate the protective efficacy of amifostine and three of its analogs, DRDE-07 [S-2(2-aminoethylamino) ethyl phenyl sulphide], DRDE-30 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl propyl sulphide] and DRDE-35 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl butyl sulphide], against sulfur mustard-induced mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay. The antidotes were also evaluated for possible mutagenic activity. DRDE-07 was mutagenic in strain TA104 in the absence of S9; DRDE-30 was mutagenic in strain TA100; amifostine and DRDE-35 did not show mutagenic activity in any of the five tester strains used. SM is mutagenic in strains TA97a and TA102, with or without S9 activation. In the antimutagenicity studies, DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 showed promising antimutagenic activity against SM in the absence of S9, in comparison to amifostine. DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 are promising protective agents against SM-induced mutagenicity. PMID:25308705

  5. Cancer Events After Acute or Chronic Exposure to Sulfur Mustard: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Mansour; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Salamati, Payman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sulfur mustard (SM) has been considered as a carcinogen in the laboratory studies. However, its carcinogenic effects on human beings were not well discussed. The main purpose of our study is to assess carcinogenesis of SM following acute and/or chronic exposures in human beings. Methods: The valid scientific English and Persian databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, IranMedex, and Irandoc were searched and the collected papers reviewed. The used keywords were in two languages: English and Persian. The inclusion criteria were the published original articles indexed in above-mentioned databases. Eleven full-texts out of 296 articles were found relevant and then assessed. Results: Studies on the workers of the SM factories during the World Wars showed that the long-term chronic exposure to mustards can cause a variety of cancers in the organs such as oral cavity, larynx, lung, and skin. Respiratory system was the most important affected system. Acute single exposure to SM was assumed as the carcinogenic inducer in the lung and blood and for few cancers including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions: SM is a proven carcinogen in chronic situations although data are not enough to strongly conclude in acute exposure. PMID:27280012

  6. Macromolecular metabolism of a differentiated rat keratinocyte culture system following exposure to sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, F.L.; Zaman, S.; Scavarelli, R.; Bernstein, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stratified, squamous epithelium in vitro by cultivating rat keratinocytes on nylon membranes has been developed in this laboratory. This epidermal-like culture is being used to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of skin vesication after topical exposure to the sulfur mustard bis(beta-chloroethyl) sulfide (BCES) dissolved in a selected solvent. Radiolabeled macromolecular precursors (thymidine, uridine, and leucine) have been used to study the effect of BCES on the synthesis of DNA, RNA, and protein, respectively, after topical exposure to the mustard at concentrations of 0.01-500 nmol/cm2 dissolved in 70% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). From these and other studies it has been determined that exposure to even the low concentration of 0.01 nmol BCES/cm2 for 30 min results in significant inhibition of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation, although complete recovery occurs by 24 h. Significant inhibition of (/sup 3/H)uridine and (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation is observed only after exposure to much higher concentrations of BCES (10-500 nmol/cm2). This suggests a very early lesion in macromolecular metabolism with DNA being the primary target.

  7. Antifibrinolytic Mechanisms in Acute Airway Injury after Sulfur Mustard Analog Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Veress, Livia A.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury in response to mustard gas (sulfur mustard [SM]) inhalation results in formation of fibrin casts, which obstruct the airway. The objective of this study was to identify fibrinolytic pathways that could be contributing to the persistence of airway casts after SM exposure. Rats were exposed to the SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, via nose-only aerosol inhalation. At 4 and 18 hours after exposure, animals were killed and airway–capillary leak estimated by measuring bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein and IgM content. The fibrin clot–degrading and plasminogen-activating capabilities of BALF were also assessed by activity assays, whereas Western blotting was used to determine the presence and activities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, thrombin activatable fibrinolytic inhibitor and α2-antiplasmin. Measurement of tissue-specific steady-state mRNA levels was also conducted for each fibrinolytic inhibitor to assess whether its synthesis occurs in lung or at extrapulmonary sites. The results of this study demonstrate that fibrin-degrading and plasminogen-activating capabilities of the airways become impaired during the onset of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide–induced vascular leak. Findings of functionally active reservoirs of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, and α2-antiplasmin in BALF indicate that airway fibrinolysis is inhibited at multiple levels in response to SM. PMID:24796565

  8. Impact of topical application of sulfur mustard on mice skin and distant organs DNA repair enzyme signature.

    PubMed

    Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Sarrazy, Fanny; Batal, Mohamed; Caillat, Sylvain; Pitiot, Benoit; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Boudry, Isabelle; Douki, Thierry

    2016-01-22

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that, upon topical application, damages skin and reaches internal organs through diffusion in blood. Two major toxic consequences of SM exposure are inflammation, associated with oxidative stress, and the formation of alkylated DNA bases. In the present study, we investigated the impact of exposure to SM on DNA repair, using two different functional DNA repair assays which provide information on several Base Excision Repair (BER) and Excision/Synthesis Repair (ESR) activities. BER activities were reduced in all organs as early as 4h after exposure, with the exception of the defense systems against 8-oxo-guanine and hypoxanthine which were stimulated. Interestingly, the resulting BER intermediates could activate inflammation signals, aggravating the inflammation triggered by SM exposure and leading to increased oxidative stress. ESR activities were found to be mostly inhibited in skin, brain and kidneys. In contrast, in the lung there was a general increase in ESR activities. In summary, exposure to SM leads to a significant decrease in DNA repair in most organs, concomitant with the formation of DNA damage. These synergistic genotoxic effects are likely to participate in the high toxicity of this alkylating agent. Lungs, possibly better equipped with repair enzymes to handle exogenous exposure, are the exception. PMID:26551547

  9. Development of a liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring procedure for concurrent verification of exposure to different forms of mustard agents.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Thong-Hiang; Ho, Mer-Lin; Loke, Weng-Keong

    2008-01-01

    A novel liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MRM) procedure has been developed for retrospective diagnosis of exposure to different forms of mustard agents. This concise method is able to validate prior exposure to nitrogen mustards (HN-1, HN-2, and HN-3) or sulfur mustard (HD) in a single run, which significantly reduces analysis time compared to separate runs to screen for different mustards' biomarkers based on tandem mass spectrometry. Belonging to one of the more toxic classes of chemical warfare agents, these potent vesicants bind covalently to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin. This results in the formation of stable adducts whose identities were confirmed by a de novo sequencing bioinformatics software package. Our developed technique tracks these albumin-derived adduct biomarkers in blood samples which persist in vitro following exposure, enabling a detection limit of 200 nM of HN-1, 100 nM of HN-2, 200 nM of HN-3, or 50 nM of HD in human blood. The CWA-adducts formed in blood samples can be conveniently and sensitively analyzed by this MRM technique to allow rapid and reliable screening. PMID:18269793

  10. Evidence of VX nerve agent use from contaminated white mustard plants.

    PubMed

    Gravett, Matthew R; Hopkins, Farrha B; Self, Adam J; Webb, Andrew J; Timperley, Christopher M; Baker, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by Member States. Verification of compliance and investigations into allegations of use require accurate detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their degradation products. Detection of CWAs such as organophosphorus nerve agents in the environment relies mainly upon the analysis of soil. We now present a method for the detection of the nerve agent VX and its hydrolysis products by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry of ethanol extracts of contaminated white mustard plants (Sinapis alba) which retained the compounds of interest for up to 45 days. VX is hydrolysed by the plants to ethyl methylphosphonic acid and then to methylphosphonic acid. The utility of white mustard as a nerve agent detector and remediator of nerve agent-polluted sites is discussed. The work described will help deter the employment of VX in conflict. PMID:25104906

  11. Evidence of VX nerve agent use from contaminated white mustard plants

    PubMed Central

    Gravett, Matthew R.; Hopkins, Farrha B.; Self, Adam J.; Webb, Andrew J.; Timperley, Christopher M.; Baker, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by Member States. Verification of compliance and investigations into allegations of use require accurate detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their degradation products. Detection of CWAs such as organophosphorus nerve agents in the environment relies mainly upon the analysis of soil. We now present a method for the detection of the nerve agent VX and its hydrolysis products by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry of ethanol extracts of contaminated white mustard plants (Sinapis alba) which retained the compounds of interest for up to 45 days. VX is hydrolysed by the plants to ethyl methylphosphonic acid and then to methylphosphonic acid. The utility of white mustard as a nerve agent detector and remediator of nerve agent-polluted sites is discussed. The work described will help deter the employment of VX in conflict. PMID:25104906

  12. Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOJUAN; ZHANG, ZHIDAN; CHEN, SONG; ZHAO, DONGMEI; ZHANG, FANGXIAO; HU, ZIWEI; XIAO, FENG; MA, XIAOCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards are chemical agents that are similar to sulfur mustards, with similar toxicities. The present study describes a case of nitrogen mustard-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression in a 33-year-old man. The patient, who was accidentally exposed to nitrogen mustard hydrochloride in a pharmaceutical factory, exhibited severe inhalation injury and respiratory symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed reduced white blood cell counts and lowered platelet levels during the first 6 days after the skin exposure to nitrogen mustard. Following treatment with mechanical ventilation, immunity-enhancing agents and nutritional supplements for 1 month, the patient successfully recovered and was released from hospital. PMID:26622480

  13. Prediction of acute mammalian toxicity using QSAR methods: a case study of sulfur mustard and its breakdown products.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Patricia; Begluitti, Gino; Tincher, Terry; Wheeler, John; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2012-01-01

    Predicting toxicity quantitatively, using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR), has matured over recent years to the point that the predictions can be used to help identify missing comparison values in a substance's database. In this manuscript we investigate using the lethal dose that kills fifty percent of a test population (LD₅₀) for determining relative toxicity of a number of substances. In general, the smaller the LD₅₀ value, the more toxic the chemical, and the larger the LD₅₀ value, the lower the toxicity. When systemic toxicity and other specific toxicity data are unavailable for the chemical(s) of interest, during emergency responses, LD₅₀ values may be employed to determine the relative toxicity of a series of chemicals. In the present study, a group of chemical warfare agents and their breakdown products have been evaluated using four available rat oral QSAR LD₅₀ models. The QSAR analysis shows that the breakdown products of Sulfur Mustard (HD) are predicted to be less toxic than the parent compound as well as other known breakdown products that have known toxicities. The QSAR estimated break down products LD₅₀ values ranged from 299 mg/kg to 5,764 mg/kg. This evaluation allows for the ranking and toxicity estimation of compounds for which little toxicity information existed; thus leading to better risk decision making in the field. PMID:22842643

  14. Zinc oxide nanocubes as a destructive nanoadsorbent for the neutralization chemistry of 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide: A sulfur mustard simulant.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Armin; Dastafkan, Kamran

    2016-09-15

    Zinc oxide nanocubes were surveyed for their destructive turn-over to decontaminate 2-chloro ethyl phenyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. Prior to the reaction, nanocubes were prepared through sol-gel method using monoethanolamine, diethylene glycol, and anhydrous citric acid as the stabilizing, cross linking/structure directing agents, respectively. The formation of nanoscale ZnO, the cubic morphology, crystalline structure, and chemical-adsorptive characteristics were certified by FESEM-EDS, TEM-SAED, XRD, FTIR, BET-BJH, H2-TPR, and ESR techniques. Adsorption and destruction reactions were tracked by GC-FID analysis in which the effects of polarity of the media, reaction time, and temperature on the destructive capability of the surface of nanocubes were investigated and discussed. Results demonstrated that maximum neutralization occurred in n-heptane solvent after 1/2h at 55°C. Kinetic study construed that the neutralization reaction followed the pseudo-second order model with a squared correlation coefficient and rate constant of 0.9904 and 0.00004gmg(-1)s(-1), respectively. Furthermore, GC-MS measurement confirmed the formation of 2-hydroxy ethyl phenyl sulfide (2-HEPS) and phenyl vinyl sulfide (PVS) as neutralization products that together with Bronsted and Lewis acid/base approaches exemplify the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the surface of zinc oxide nanocubes. PMID:27309947

  15. Atopic dermatitis-associated protein interaction network lead to new insights in chronic sulfur mustard skin lesion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mojtaba; Jafari, Mohieddin; Azimzadeh Jamalkandi, Sadegh; Davoodi, Seyed-Masoud

    2013-10-01

    Chronic sulfur mustard skin lesions (CSMSLs) are the most common complications of sulfur mustard exposure; however, its mechanism is not completely understood.According to clinical signs, there are similarities between CSMSL and atopic dermatitis (AD). In this study, proteomic results of AD were reviewed and the AD-associated protein-protein interaction network (PIN) was analyzed. According to centrality measurements, 16 proteins were designated as pivotal elements in AD mechanisms. Interestingly, most of these proteins had been reported in some sulfur mustard-related studies in late and acute phases separately. Based on the gene enrichment analysis, aging, cell response to stress, cancer, Toll- and NOD-like receptor and apoptosis signaling pathways have the greatest impact on the disease. By the analysis of directed protein interaction networks, it is concluded that TNF, IL-6, AKT1, NOS3 and CDKN1A are the most important proteins. It is possible that these proteins play role in the shared complications of AD and CSMSL including xerosis and itching. PMID:24117202

  16. Mustards and Vesicants

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Robert A; Bast, Cheryl B

    2009-01-01

    Vesicants (sulfur mustards, lewisite, and nitrogen mustards) are chemicals that cause blistering of the skin. Developed as chemical warfare agents, their biological activity is complex and not fully understood. These vesicants in liquid or vapor form are capable of causing injury to most any tissue. Contact with the skin results in erythema and blistering. Exposure to vapors produces ocular and respiratory effects which occur at exposures below those causing dermal effects. Systemic and long-lasting effects may occur, especially following acute exposures that result in severe injury. Multi-organ involvement and fluid loss shock resulting in death may follow severe exposures. As alkylating agents, all of the mustards are known or potential carcinogens. The carcinogenic potential of lewisite in humans is equivocal. Toxicity data in animals are available for the vesicants although data on sulfur mustard and lewisite are more extensive than for the nitrogen mustards. Data from tests with human volunteers and occupational exposure information are also available. These data collectively have provided a basis for the development of exposure standards, guidelines, and criteria for use in emergency planning and emergency response, and remediation efforts. The mode of action of the vesicants is complex, not fully understood, and represents an ongoing area of investigation especially with respect to treatment of vesicant-induced injury. Prevention of exposure and decontamination are critical initial steps in eliminating or minimizing injury. With the exception of arsenic chelating antidotes (e.g., British anti-lewisite; BAL) for lewisite, no antidotes exist for the vesicant agents. Medical management currently focuses on palliative treatment of signs and symptoms.

  17. The Mixture of Salvianolic Acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and Total Flavonoids from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Attenuate Sulfur Mustard-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzhong; Chen, Linlin; Wu, Hongyuan; Lu, Yiming; Hu, Zhenlin; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent used in numerous military conflicts and remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. Exposure to SM causes the depletion of cellular antioxidant thiols, mainly glutathione (GSH), which may lead to a series of SM-associated toxic responses. MSTF is the mixture of salvianolic acids (SA) of Salvia miltiorrhiza and total flavonoids (TFA) of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. SA is the main water-soluble phenolic compound in Salvia miltiorrhiza. TFA mainly includes mangiferin, isomangiferin and neomangiferin. SA and TFA possess diverse activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation activities. In this study, we mainly investigated the therapeutic effects of MSTF on SM toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. Treatment with MSTF 1 h after subcutaneous injection with 3.5 mg/kg (equivalent to 0.7 LD50) SM significantly increased the survival levels of rats and attenuated the SM-induced morphological changes in the testis, small intestine and liver tissues. Treatment with MSTF at doses of 60 and 120 mg/kg caused a significant (p < 0.05) reversal in SM-induced GSH depletion. Gene expression profiles revealed that treatment with MSTF had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by SM. Treatment with MSTF prevented SM-induced differential expression of 93.8% (973 genes) of 1037 genes. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 36 pathways, such as the MAPK signaling pathway, pathways in cancer, antigen processing and presentation. These data suggest that MSTF attenuates SM-induced injury by increasing GSH and targeting multiple pathways, including the MAPK signaling pathway, as well as antigen processing and presentation. These results suggest that MSTF has the potential to be used as a potential therapeutic agent against SM injuries. PMID:26501264

  18. The Mixture of Salvianolic Acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and Total Flavonoids from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Attenuate Sulfur Mustard-Induced Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhong; Chen, Linlin; Wu, Hongyuan; Lu, Yiming; Hu, Zhenlin; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent used in numerous military conflicts and remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. Exposure to SM causes the depletion of cellular antioxidant thiols, mainly glutathione (GSH), which may lead to a series of SM-associated toxic responses. MSTF is the mixture of salvianolic acids (SA) of Salvia miltiorrhiza and total flavonoids (TFA) of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. SA is the main water-soluble phenolic compound in Salvia miltiorrhiza. TFA mainly includes mangiferin, isomangiferin and neomangiferin. SA and TFA possess diverse activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation activities. In this study, we mainly investigated the therapeutic effects of MSTF on SM toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. Treatment with MSTF 1 h after subcutaneous injection with 3.5 mg/kg (equivalent to 0.7 LD50) SM significantly increased the survival levels of rats and attenuated the SM-induced morphological changes in the testis, small intestine and liver tissues. Treatment with MSTF at doses of 60 and 120 mg/kg caused a significant (p<0.05) reversal in SM-induced GSH depletion. Gene expression profiles revealed that treatment with MSTF had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by SM. Treatment with MSTF prevented SM-induced differential expression of 93.8% (973 genes) of 1037 genes. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 36 pathways, such as the MAPK signaling pathway, pathways in cancer, antigen processing and presentation. These data suggest that MSTF attenuates SM-induced injury by increasing GSH and targeting multiple pathways, including the MAPK signaling pathway, as well as antigen processing and presentation. These results suggest that MSTF has the potential to be used as a potential therapeutic agent against SM injuries. PMID:26501264

  19. Activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase by sulfur mustard in HeLa cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, O.E.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-05-13

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) E.C.2.4.2.30 has been proposed to play a key role in the NAD+ depletion following alkylation of DNA in sulfur mustard (HD) exposures. Papirmeister et al. (Fundam Appl Toxicol 5:Sl34, 1985) hypothesized that activation of PADPRP was central to the subsequent depletion of NAD+ and activation of proteolytic enzymes leading to vesication. NAD+ depletion following HD exposure has been previously documented and the results have been used to infer the effect of HD exposure on PADPRP. The present study was undertaken to demonstrate the direct effect of HD on PADPRP activity. HeLa cells culture were used as the model system. At 10 microns HD PADPRP activity was increased above the levels of controls in the first hour. The activity peaked at 4 hrs and by 6 hrs had returned to control levels. The 24-hour level of PADPRP activity was again elevated above the controls. The 100 microns HD exposures had maximal enzymatic response in HeLa cells within the first hour. The level had decreased 40% from the maximum by the second hour reaching a plateau at 30% of the maximum response after 4 hrs. Cells exposed to 100 microns HD showed enzyme levels at or below those seen with the 10 microns dose after 24 hours. The doses of HD used did not decrease viability as measured by trypan blue dye exclusion within 24 hr.

  20. Nitric Oxide Alleviates Salt Stress Inhibited Photosynthetic Performance by Interacting with Sulfur Assimilation in Mustard.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Mehar; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur (S) on stomatal responses and photosynthetic performance was studied in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) in presence or absence of salt stress. The combined application of 100 μM NO (as sodium nitroprusside) and 200 mg S kg(-1) soil (S) more prominently influenced stomatal behavior, photosynthetic and growth performance both in the absence and presence of salt stress. The chloroplasts from salt-stressed plants had disorganized chloroplast thylakoids, but combined application of NO and S resulted in well-developed chloroplast thylakoids and properly stacked grana. The leaves from plants receiving NO plus S exhibited lower superoxide ion accumulation under salt stress than the plants receiving NO or S. These plants also exhibited increased activity of ATP-sulfurylase (ATPS), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and optimized NO generation that helped in minimizing oxidative stress. The enhanced S-assimilation of these plants receiving NO plus S resulted in increased production of cysteine (Cys) and reduced glutathione (GSH). These findings indicated that NO influenced photosynthesis under salt stress by regulating oxidative stress and its effects on S-assimilation, an antioxidant system and NO generation. The results suggest that NO improves photosynthetic performance of plants grown under salt stress more effectively when plants received S. PMID:27200007

  1. Nitric Oxide Alleviates Salt Stress Inhibited Photosynthetic Performance by Interacting with Sulfur Assimilation in Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Fatma, Mehar; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur (S) on stomatal responses and photosynthetic performance was studied in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) in presence or absence of salt stress. The combined application of 100 μM NO (as sodium nitroprusside) and 200 mg S kg−1 soil (S) more prominently influenced stomatal behavior, photosynthetic and growth performance both in the absence and presence of salt stress. The chloroplasts from salt-stressed plants had disorganized chloroplast thylakoids, but combined application of NO and S resulted in well-developed chloroplast thylakoids and properly stacked grana. The leaves from plants receiving NO plus S exhibited lower superoxide ion accumulation under salt stress than the plants receiving NO or S. These plants also exhibited increased activity of ATP-sulfurylase (ATPS), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and optimized NO generation that helped in minimizing oxidative stress. The enhanced S-assimilation of these plants receiving NO plus S resulted in increased production of cysteine (Cys) and reduced glutathione (GSH). These findings indicated that NO influenced photosynthesis under salt stress by regulating oxidative stress and its effects on S-assimilation, an antioxidant system and NO generation. The results suggest that NO improves photosynthetic performance of plants grown under salt stress more effectively when plants received S. PMID:27200007

  2. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. PMID:23357548

  3. A simple degradation method for sulfur mustard at ambient conditions using nickelphthalocyanine incorporated polypyrrole modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pushpendra K.; Sikarwar, Bhavna; Gupta, Garima; Nigam, Anil K.; Tripathi, Brijesh K.; Pandey, Pratibha; Boopathi, Mannan; Ganesan, Kumaran; Singh, Beer

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalytic degradation of sulfur mustard (SM) was studied using a gold electrode modified with nickelphthalocyanine and polypyrrole (NiPc/pPy/Au) in the presence of a cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide. Several techniques such as cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been employed for the characterization of modified electrodes. NiPc/pPy/Au modified electrode exhibited excellent electrochemical sensing and degradation ability towards SM. The present modification indicated two electron involvements in the electrocatalytic degradation of SM in addition to being an irreversible adsorption controlled process. Degraded products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Moreover, electrochemical parameters of oxidation of SM such as heterogeneous rate constant (0.436 s-1), transfer coefficient (0.47) and the number of electrons involved (2) were deduced from cyclic voltammetry results. The NiPc/pPy/Au modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic degradation towards SM when compared to bare gold, pPy/Au and NiPc/Au modified electrode at ambient conditions.

  4. Sulfur mustard inhalation induced respiratory lesions in guinea pigs: Physiological, biochemical, and histological study

    SciTech Connect

    Allon, N.; Gilat, E.; Amir, A.; Fishbine, E.; Liani, H.

    1993-05-13

    Inhalation exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) vapor causes long term damage to the respiratory system. The lesions were characterized by specific physiological, biochemical and histopathological methods. Awake 128 guinea-pigs (GP) were exposed for 10 min to SM (1200-1700 microns x min/1). Respiratory parameters were monitored per animal before, during and after the exposure using plethysmography. Biochemical and histological evaluations were performed at different time intervals for up to 7 days post exposure. SM inhalation resulted in a decrease in both respiratory rate and minute volume, and in an increase in tidal volume. These changes occurred immediately after the onset of exposure and lasted for up to 7 days. The changes in the respiratory parameters were accompanied by a massive reduction in O2 diffusion capacity. Evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid indicated neutrophil infiltration, an increase in the protein content, and in the activity of both lysosomal enzymes and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) in the alveolar space. In addition, a decrease in glutathione content was observed one day post exposure in the BAL fluid and the lung whereas an increase in lung glutathione content was observed 6 days later. Histological evaluation of the lungs and trachea revealed severe lesions in both tissues. Recovery was incomplete 7 days post exposure. The detailed characterization of the effect of SM inhalation offers a reliable model for the evaluation of potential therapies against SM exposure.

  5. Acute and chronic respiratory lesions induced by sulfur mustard in guinea pigs: Role of tachykinins

    SciTech Connect

    Calvet, J.H.; Trouiller, G.; Harf, A.

    1993-05-13

    We investigated in anesthetized guinea pigs the involvement of tachykinins in respiratory alterations after an airway intoxication by sulfur mustard (SM). Early lesions were evaluated after 5h. Respiratory system resistance (R) and compliance were measured by the occlusion method and airway microvascular permeability by measuring the Evans Blue dye concentration in the trachea and main bronchi. Two groups of animals were studied treated with capsaicin (which induces a tachykinin depletion) or by its vehicle. Capsaicin pretreatment had no effect on the measured parameters. We also measured 14 J after the intoxication tracheal epithelium neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (the main enzyme which degrades tachykinins). In addition bronchial responsiveness to exogenous substance P was studied in two groups of animals intoxicated with SM or not. Tracheal epithelium NEP activity was decreased from 0.448 + or 0.027 nmol.min- 1.mg protein- 1 in controls to 0. 182 + or 0.038 in intoxicated animals. Response to substance P was greater in intoxicated animals with R=2.98 + or - 1.57 cmH20.MI-1.s versus 0.35 + or 0.02 in controls, after 5.10-5 M aerosolized substance P These results suggest tachykinins are not preponderant in the early stage lesions but that bronchial hyperactivity is present at recovery, related to epithelium NEP depletion.

  6. Structural Changes in the Skin of Hairless Mice Following Exposure to Sulfur Mustard Correlate with Inflammation and DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Laurie B.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Heck, Diane E.; Black, Adrienne T.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Cervelli, Jessica A.; Casillas, Robert P.; Babin, Michael C.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes dermal inflammation, edema and blistering. To investigate the pathogenesis of SM-induced injury, we used a vapor cup model which provides an occlusive environment in which SM is in constant contact with the skin. The dorsal skin of SKH-1 hairless mice was exposed to saturated SM vapor or air control. Histopathological changes, inflammatory markers and DNA damage were analyzed 1–14 days later. After 1 day, SM caused epidermal thinning, stratum corneum shedding, basal cell karyolysis, hemorrhage and macrophage and neutrophil accumulation in the dermis. Cleaved caspase-3 and phosphorylated histone 2A.X (phospho-H2A.X), markers of apoptosis and DNA damage, respectively, were increased whereas proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was down-regulated after SM exposure. By 3 days, epithelial cell hypertrophy, edema, parakeratosis and loss of epidermal structures were noted. Enzymes generating pro-inflammatory mediators including myeloperoxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 were upregulated. After 7 days, keratin-10, a differentiation marker, was evident in the stratum corneum. This was associated with an underlying eschar, as neoepidermis began to migrate at the wound edges. Trichrome staining revealed increased collagen deposition in the dermis. PCNA expression in the epidermis was correlated with hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and parakeratosis. By 14 days, there was epidermal regeneration with extensive hyperplasia, and reduced expression of cleaved caspase-3, cyclooxygenase-2 and phospho-H2A.X. These findings are consistent with the pathophysiology of SM-induced skin injury in humans suggesting that the hairless mouse can be used to investigate the dermatoxicity of vesicants and the potential efficacy of countermeasures. PMID:21672537

  7. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    PubMed Central

    Gerecke, Donald R.; Chen, Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Yoke-Chen; Tong, Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal–epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors. PMID:18955075

  8. Procedures for Analysis of Dried Plasma Using Microsampling Devices to Detect Sulfur Mustard-Albumin Adducts for Verification of Poisoning.

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Willoh, Sophia; Hörmann, Philipp; Siegert, Markus; Vondran, Antje; Thiermann, Horst

    2016-09-01

    Incorporation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) produces a covalent adduct with human serum albumin (HSA) representing an established plasma biomarker of poisoning. Bioanalytical verification requires both plasma generation from whole blood and shipping to specialized laboratories following strict guidelines for complex packaging. These needs often push the infrastructural boundary in crisis regions and war zones. Therefore, we herein originally introduce different reliable bioanalytical procedures using filter paper as well as novel volumetric microsampling tools (Mitra devices and Noviplex DUO cards) to generate dried plasma samples not liable to the shipping constraints. In addition, the Noviplex device enables in-transit separation of plasma from whole blood without the need of a centrifuge. Plasma-loaded and dried devices were subjected to pronase treatment yielding the alkylated dipeptide hydroxyethylthioethyl-CysPro (HETE-CP) derived from the HSA-SM adduct that was detected by microbore liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem-mass spectrometry (μLC-ESI MS/MS). For all devices, samples exposed to SM yielded excellent linearity (0.025-50 μM SM) and good precision (≤13%) and fulfilled forensic quality criteria for ion ratios of qualifying and quantifying product ions. Stability of the HSA-SM adduct in dried and liquid plasma is shown under conditions of three climatic zones (temperate climate, hot and dry climate, and hot and humid climate) for at least 9 days simulating the period of delayed sample shipping. Our results originally document that dried plasma is appropriate for storage and shipping at ambient temperature and that novel microsampling tools are of essential benefit when targeting the HSA-SM adduct for verification analysis. PMID:27482832

  9. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gerecke, Donald R. Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  10. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular free calcium level and arachidonic acid release from cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Legere, R.H.; Majerus, B.J.; Petrali, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanism of action of the alkylating agent bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM) was studied using the in thai vitro mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG 108-1 S clonal p cell line model. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, cell viability remained high (>80% of untreated control) up to 9 hr and then declined steadily to about 40% of control after 20-24 hr. During the early period of SM exposure, when there was no significant cell viability loss, the following effects were observed. The cellular glutathione level decreased 20% after 1 hr and 34% after 6 hr. Between 2 and 6 hr, there was a time-dependent increase (about 10 to 30%) in intracellular free calcium (Ca2+), which was localized to the limiting membrane of swollen endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, to euchromatin areas of the nucleus, and to areas of the cytosol and plasma membrane. Moreover,there was also a time-dependent increase in the release of isotopically labeled arachidonic acid ((3H)AA) from cellular membranes. Increase in (3H)AA release was 28% at 3 hr and about 60-80% between 6 and 9 hr. This increase in I3HIAA release was inhibited by quinacrine (20 uM), which is a phospholipase (PLA2) inhibitor. At 16 hr after SM exposure, there was a large increase (about 200% of control) in I3HIAA release, which was coincident with a 50% loss of cell viability. These results suggest a Ca2+-mediated toxic mechanism of SM via PLA2 activation and arachidonate release.

  11. Protective effects of the thiol compounds GSH and NAC against sulfur mustard toxicity in a human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Balszuweit, Frank; Menacher, Georg; Schmidt, Annette; Kehe, Kai; Popp, Tanja; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent causing blistering, inflammation and ulceration of the skin. Thiol compounds such as glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) have been suggested as potential antidotes. We investigated SM toxicity in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) and used GSH and NAC to counteract its cytotoxic effects. Cells were treated with 1, 5 or 10mM GSH or NAC and exposed to 30, 100 or 300μM SM. Different treatment regimens were applied to model extra- and intra-cellular GSH/NAC effects on SM toxicity. Necrosis, apoptosis and interleukin-6 and -8 levels were determined 24h post-exposure. Necrosis and apoptosis increased with SM dose. Interleukin-6 and -8 production peaked at 100μM and decreased at 300μM probably due to reduced ability for interleukin biosynthesis. Intracellular GSH/NAC diminished necrosis induced by 100μM SM. Extracellular GSH/NAC protected against necrosis and apoptosis induced by 100 and 300μM SM. Interleukin-6 and -8 production, induced by 100μM SM was reduced by GSH/NAC. However, low-dose GSH/NAC treatment of cells exposed to 300μM SM led to increased interleukin production. Thus, moderately poisoned cells are mostly responsible for SM-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. GSH and NAC treatment can reduce SM-induced toxic effects. Protective effects were more pronounced by extracellular GSH or NAC administration. Rescue of severely poisoned cells may result in a strong secretion of pro- inflammatory cytokines. In summary, thiol compounds such as GSH or NAC constitute a promising approach to improve the therapy for SM injury. Additional intervention to prevent adverse effects of interleukin production might be beneficial. PMID:26361990

  12. Relationship between levels of IFNγ, TNFα, and TGFβ and pruritus in sulfur mustard-exposed veterans.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Davoudi, Seyyed Masoud; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Saadat, Alireza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2013-01-01

    One of the foremost negative effects of sulfur mustard (SM) is chronic pruritus, which affects the quality-of-life. In the present study, pruritus was assessed in relation with inflammatory factors in the blood. Seventy-two blood samples were collected from SM-injured veterans of the Iran-Iraq War (Case Group; n = 36) and non-exposed patients (Control Group; n = 36) suffering from skin pruritus. Pruritus severity in all subjects was assessed, as were levels of IFNγ, TGFβ, and TNFα. The results indicated that total pruritus severity did not significantly differ between the two groups. While WBC counts in Control patients were significantly higher than among the exposed veterans, there were no significant differences in levels of any specific WBC sub-classes. Levels of serum IFNγ and TGFβ in the control subjects were significantly greater than those in the exposed veterans. In contrast, serum TNFα in the SM-exposed group appeared to be in the normal range, albeit significantly higher than that of the control group. A positive correlation between pruritus and each of the evaluated cytokines was noted in the Case Group. As for the non-SM-exposed veterans, correlations were significant only in the cases of IFNγ (stimulated) and TGFβ. The results of the present study suggested that there might be a relationship between cytokine alterations and pruritus in SM-exposed veterans. Based on these studies, designing of new treatments to modulate blood levels of mediators might be helpful to decrease the problem of SM-induced pruritus, thereby improving the quality-of-life in exposed veterans. PMID:22994697

  13. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  14. Mechanistic insights of sulfur mustard-induced acute tracheal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Ji; Xu, Rui; Meng, Xiao; Chu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Chao; Lian, Cheng-Jin; Wang, Tao; Guo, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Sheng-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is believed to be a major threat to civilian populations because of the persistent asymmetric threat by nonstate actors, such as terrorist groups, the ease of synthesis and handling, and the risk of theft from stockpiles. The purpose of this study was to establish mechanisms of acute tracheal injury in rats induced by SM using histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical parameters. Male rats (Sprague-Dawley) were anesthetized, intratracheally intubated, and exposed to 2 mg/kg of SM. Animals were euthanized 6-, 24-, 48-, and 72-hour postexposure, and intracavitary blood samples from the heart and tracheal tissues were collected. Exposure of rats to SM resulted in rapid tracheal injury, including tracheal epithelial cell shedding, focal ulceration, and abundant lymphocyte invasion of the submucosa. There was also evidence of a large number of apoptotic cells in the epithelium and submucosa, the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β (IL) 1β, IL-6, and γ-glutamyl transferase peaked at 24 hours, and the serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance peaked at 6 hours. The SM exposure also resulted in a loss of the cellular membrane, leakage of cytoplasm, fuzzy mitochondrial cristae, medullary changes in ciliated and goblet cells, and the nuclear chromatin appeared marginated in basal cells and fibroblasts. The results in the propylene glycol group were the same as the control group. These data demonstrated the histologic changes, inflammatory reactions, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and DNA damage following SM (2 mg/kg)-induced acute tracheal injury; the severity of changes was time dependent. PMID:25163474

  15. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Mortality from Sulfur Mustard Analog–Induced Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes the rare but life-threatening disorder of plastic bronchitis, characterized by bronchial cast formation, resulting in severe airway obstruction that can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is greater than 80%. To date, no antidote exists for SM toxicity. In addition, therapies for plastic bronchitis are solely anecdotal, due to lack of systematic research available to assess drug efficacy in improving mortality and/or morbidity. Adult rats exposed to SM analog were treated with intratracheal tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (0.15–0.7 mg/kg, 5.5 and 6.5 h), compared with controls (no treatment, isoflurane, and placebo). Respiratory distress and pulse oximetry were assessed (for 12 or 48 h), and arterial blood gases were obtained at study termination (12 h). Microdissection of fixed lungs was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Optimal intratracheal tPA treatment (0.7 mg/kg) completely eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h), and greatly improved morbidity in this nearly uniformly fatal disease model (90–100% mortality at 48 h). tPA normalized plastic bronchitis–associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress (i.e., clinical scores) while decreasing airway fibrin casts. Intratracheal tPA diminished airway-obstructive fibrin–containing casts while improving clinical respiratory distress, pulmonary gas exchange, tissue oxygenation, and oxygen utilization in our model of severe chemically induced plastic bronchitis. Most importantly, mortality, which was associated with hypoxemia and clinical respiratory distress, was eliminated. PMID:23258228

  16. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Rancourt, Raymond C. Veress, Livia A. Ahmad, Aftab Hendry-Hofer, Tara B. Rioux, Jacqueline S. Garlick, Rhonda B. White, Carl W.

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI

  17. Reduction of erythema in hairless guinea pigs after cutaneous sulfur mustard vapor exposure by pretreatment with niacinamide, promethazine and indomethacin

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Dawson, J.S.; Mitcheltree, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    Erythema is the initial symptom that occurs after sulfur mustard (HD) cutaneous exposure. The time course of HD-induced erythema is similar to that observed after UV irradiation, which can be reduced by indomethacin. Sulfur mustard lethality is decreased by using promethazine, which is an antihistamine. Niacinamide can reduce microvesication after HD vapor exposure in hairless guinea pig (HGP) skin. The present study examines the effect of the combined administration of niacinamide, indomethacin and promethazine used alone or in all possible combinations on the degree of erythema and histopathologic skin damage after HD exposure in HGP. Niacinamide (750 mg kg%`, i.p.), promethazine (12.5 mg kg%1, i.m.) or indomethacin (4 mg kg%1, p.o.) used singly or in combination was given as a 30-min pretreatment before an 8-min HD vapor cup skin exposure. Using a combination pretreatment of niacinamide, promethazine and indomethacin, erythema was reduced at 4 (91%) and 6 (55%) h, but not 24 h after HD. The incidence of histopathological skin changes (microvesicles, follicular involvement, epidermal necrosis, intracellular edema and pustular epidermatitis) 24 h after HD was not reduced. This study indicates that HD (induced erythema) may result from several different mechanisms, including inflammation, histamine release and DNA damage. It is suggested that two phases of inflammation may occur: an early phase sensitive to antihistamines and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and a late phase of extensive cell damage that was not sensitive to these drug pretreatments.

  18. Structural flexibility of the sulfur mustard molecule at finite temperature from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lach, Joanna; Goclon, Jakub; Rodziewicz, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is one of the most dangerous chemical compounds used against humans, mostly at war conditions but also in terrorist attacks. Even though the sulfur mustard has been synthesized over a hundred years ago, some of its molecular properties are not yet resolved. We investigate the structural flexibility of the SM molecule in the gas phase by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Thorough conformation analysis of 81 different SM configurations using density functional theory is performed to analyze the behavior of the system at finite temperature. The conformational diversity is analyzed with respect to the formation of intramolecular blue-shifting CH⋯S and CH⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that all structural rearrangements between SM local minima are realized either in direct or non-direct way, including the intermediate structure in the last case. We study the lifetime of the SM conformers and perform the population analysis. Additionally, we provide the anharmonic dynamical finite temperature IR spectrum from the Fourier Transform of the dipole moment autocorrelation function to mimic the missing experimental IR spectrum. PMID:26774981

  19. Desorption of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, mustard agent, from the surface of hardened cement paste (HCP) wafers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hairong; Zhou, Xuezhi; Guan, Yingqiang; Zhou, Liming; Wang, Xinming; Yan, Huijuan

    2013-05-01

    The decontamination of surfaces exposed to chemical warfare agents is an interesting scientific topic. The desorption behavior of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD) from the surface of the HD-contaminated hardened cement paste (HCP) was investigated under different weather conditions, which should provide scientific reference data for protection and decontamination projects involving HD-contaminated HCP in different conditions. The desorption of HD from the surface of HCP wafers was studied, and the effects of the purge air flow rate, water content, sorption temperature, and substrate age were investigated. HD desorption was detected from the surface of HD-contaminated HCP, but the desorption velocity was relatively slow. The desorption quantity remained within an order of magnitude throughout a time span of 36h (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), and the amount of HD that was desorbed from each square meter of HCP surface was approximately 1.1g (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), which was approximately 5.5 percent of the total HD that was initially applied. A higher flow rate of the purge air, increased water content, and longer substrate age of HCP all increased the HD desorption. In contrast, increased temperatures suppressed HD desorption. PMID:23395389

  20. Evaluation of risk assessment guideline levels for the chemical warfare agents mustard, GB, and VX.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, H.; Environmental Assessment

    2002-06-01

    The U.S. Army has estimated acute lethality guideline levels for inhalation of the chemical warfare agents mustard, GB, and VX. These levels are expressed as dosages measured in milligram-minutes per cubic meter (mg-min/m3). The National Advisory Council has also proposed acute emergency guideline levels (AEGLs) for the agents. The AEGLs are threshold exposure limits for the general public for mild effects, serious adverse effects, and lethality. They are expressed as air concentrations (in units of mg/m3) and are applicable to emergency exposure periods ranging from 10 min to 8 h. The report discusses strengths and deficiencies in the levels, important parameters (i.e., exposure time, breathing rate) that need to be explicitly addressed in deriving the guideline levels, and possible impacts that could result from using AEGLs instead of guideline dosages in future assessments.

  1. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury. PMID:20561902

  2. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  3. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation by the macrolide antibiotic roxithromycin in human respiratory epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiugong; Ray, Radharaman; Xiao, Yan; Barker, Peter E; Ray, Prabhati

    2007-01-01

    Background Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent chemical vesicant warfare agent that remains a significant military and civilian threat. Inhalation of SM gas causes airway inflammation and injury. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence of the effectiveness of macrolide antibiotics in treating chronic airway inflammatory diseases. In this study, the anti-cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of a representative macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin, were tested in vitro using SM-exposed normal human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells and bronchial/tracheal epithelial (BTE) cells. Cell viability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were examined, since these proinflammatory cytokines/mediators are import indicators of tissue inflammatory responses. We suggest that the influence of roxithromycin on SM-induced inflammatory reaction could play an important therapeutic role in the cytotoxicity exerted by this toxicant. Results MTS assay and Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer (EthD-1) fluorescence staining showed that roxithromycin decreased SM cytotoxicity in both SAE and BTE cells. Also, roxithromycin inhibited the SM-stimulated overproduction of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF at both the protein level and the mRNA level, as measured by either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or real-time RT-PCR. In addition, roxithromycin inhibited the SM-induced overexpression of iNOS, as revealed by immunocytochemical analysis using quantum dots as the fluorophore. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that roxithromycin has inhibitory effects on the cytotoxicity and inflammation provoked by SM in human respiratory epithelial cells. The decreased cytotoxicity in roxithromycin-treated cells likely depends on the ability of the macrolide to down-regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines and

  4. Acute and long-term transcriptional responses in sulfur mustard-exposed SKH-1 hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Vallet, V; Poyot, T; Cléry-Barraud, C; Coulon, D; Sentenac, C; Peinnequin, A; Boudry, I

    2012-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) ranks among the alkylating chemical warfare agents. Skin contact with HD produces an inflammatory response that evolves into separation at the epidermal-dermal junction conducting to blistering and epidermis necrosis. Up to now, current treatment strategies of HD burns have solely consisted in symptomatic management of skin damage. Therapeutic efficacy studies are still being conducted; classically using appropriate animal skin toxicity models. In order to substantiate the use of SKH-1 hairless mouse as an appropriate model for HD-induced skin lesions, we investigate the time-dependent quantitative gene expression of various selected transcripts associated to the dorsal skin exposure to HD saturated vapors. Using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the expression of interleukins (IL-1β and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP)-2α (also called Cxcl2) and MIP-1αR (also called Ccr1), matrix metalloproteases (MMP-9 and MMP-2), laminin γ2 monomer (Lamc2) and keratin (K)1 was determined up to 21 days after HD challenge in order to allow enough time for wound repair to begin. Specific transcript RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that IL-6, IL-1β, Ccr1, Cxcl2 mRNA levels increased as early as 6 h in HD-exposed skins and remained up-regulated over a 14-day period. Topical application of HD also significantly up-regulated MMP-9, TNF-α, and Lamc2 expression at specific time points. In contrast, MMP-2 mRNA levels remained unaffected by HD over the time-period considered, whereas that long-term study revealed that K1 mRNA level significantly increased only 21 days after HD challenge. Our study hereby provides first-hand evidence to substantiate a long period variation expression in the inflammatory cytokine, MMPs and structural components following cutaneous HD exposure in hairless mouse SKH-1. Our data credit the use of SKH-1 for investigating mechanisms of HD-induced skin toxicity and for

  5. Veterans at risk: The health effects of mustard gas and lewisite

    SciTech Connect

    Pechura, C.M.; Rall, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    So vivid were the memories of the first use of mustard gas (sulfur mustard) by the Germans in World War I that the United States government began to prepare for chemical warfare even before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. This work was also spurred by the fury of war in Europe and reports of Japanese use of sulfur mustard against the Chinese. The US preparations included the establishment of war-related research programs organized by President Roosevelt under the White House Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). Two groups under the OSRD became involved in secret testing programs concerned with mustard agents (Sulfur and nitrogen mustard) and Lewisite: The Committee on Medical Research; This group studied protective ointments and other treatments through the National Research Council's Committee on Treatment of Gas Casualties, and The National Defense Research Committee; This group studied protective clothing and gas masks through military units such as the Chemical Warfare Service.

  6. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, were instilled into the trachea. Arterial O2 saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts were evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. PMID:23727623

  7. Involvement of ethylene in gibberellic acid-induced sulfur assimilation, photosynthetic responses, and alleviation of cadmium stress in mustard.

    PubMed

    Masood, Asim; Khan, M Iqbal R; Fatma, Mehar; Asgher, Mohd; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2016-07-01

    The role of gibberellic acid (GA) or sulfur (S) in stimulation of photosynthesis is known. However, information on the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced photosynthetic responses and cadmium (Cd) tolerance is lacking. This work shows that ethylene is involved in S-assimilation, photosynthetic responses and alleviation of Cd stress by GA in mustard (Brassica juncea L.). Plants grown with 200 mg Cd kg(-1) soil were less responsive to ethylene despite high ethylene evolution and showed photosynthetic inhibition. Plants receiving 10 μM GA spraying plus 100 mg S kg(-1) soil supplementation exhibited increased S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses under Cd stress. Application of GA plus S decreased oxidative stress of plants grown with Cd and limited stress ethylene formation to the range suitable for promoting sulfur use efficiency (SUE), glutathione (GSH) production and photosynthesis. The role of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and reversal of photosynthetic inhibition by Cd was substantiated by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis with the use of aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). The suppression of S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses by inhibiting ethylene in GA plus S treated plants under Cd stress indicated the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and Cd stress alleviation. The outcome of the study is important to unravel the interaction between GA and ethylene and their role in Cd tolerance in plants. PMID:26998941

  8. Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Transfer Overcomes the Inhibition of Wound Healing by Sulfur Mustard in a Human Keratinocyte In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Ray, Radharaman; Amnuaysirikul, Jack; Ishida, Keiko; Ray, Prabhati

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that causes extensive skin injury. Previously we reported that SM exposure resulted in suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression to inhibit the healing of scratch wounds in a cultured normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) model. Based on this finding, the present study was to use adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of iNOS to restore the nitric oxide (NO) supply depleted by exposure to SM and to evaluate the effect of NO on wound healing inhibited by SM in NHEKs. The effect of the iNOS gene transfer on iNOS protein expression and NO generation were monitored by Western blot and flow cytometry, respectively. Wound healing with or without the iNOS gene transfer after SM exposure was assessed by light and confocal microscopy. The iNOS gene transfer via adenovirus resulted in overexpression of the iNOS and an increase in NO production regardless of SM exposure in the NHEK model. The gene transfer was also effective in overcoming the inhibition of wound healing due to SM exposure leading to the promotion of wound closure. The findings in this study suggest that the iNOS gene transfer is a promising therapeutic strategy for SM-induced skin injury. PMID:23762631

  9. Distribution of DNA adducts and corresponding tissue damage of Sprague-Dawley rats with percutaneous exposure to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lijun; Zhang, Yajiao; Chen, Jia; Zhao, Zengming; Liu, Qin; Wu, Ruiqin; Guo, Lei; He, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Xie, Jianwei; Peng, Shuangqing

    2015-03-16

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylation vesicant and cytotoxic agent that has been recognized as an animal and human carcinogen. Although the exact mechanism of toxicology is vague, DNA alkylation seems to be responsible for the triggering of apoptosis. In this study, after male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cutaneous exposed to a low concentration of SM at parts-per-million levels, their lungs, livers, pancreases, spleens, marrow, and brains were collected at 11 different time points and analyzed. N7-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]guanine (N7-HETEG), N3-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]adenine (N3-HETEA), and bis[2-(guanin-7-yl)ethyl]sulfide (Bis-G) as the biomarkers for DNA damage were measured in the vital tissues by isotope dilution ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-UPLC-MS/MS). At the same time, general variations and pathological changes were monitored and detected to evaluate the tissue damage. Time- and dose-dependent data showed that SM had strong permeability and reactivity and that three SM-DNA adducts were detected in all investigated tissues only after 10 min after exposure. Obvious dose-dependency was observed except in the brain and pancreas. Most times to peak (tmax) of all three adducts were less than 3 h, while half-lifetimes (t1/2) were less than 24 h. We also suggested that the lipophilic SM can easily pass through the blood-brain barrier and can be stored in the fatty organs. To the best of our knowledge, the abundant adducts in marrow were found and reported for the first time. The surveillance of N7-HETEG in vivo, which was the most abundant adduct, may be the most efficient indicator to validate SM exposure even without any symptoms. Bis-G can be regarded as a biomarker of effect, which is directly related to the extent of damage. The most abundant Bis-G was found in the most sensitive tissues, marrow, spleen, and lung, which is in good accordance with histopathologic results. General variations

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors regulate the mechanism of sulfur mustard-initiated cell death in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Meier, H L; Millard, C; Moser, J

    2000-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) produces slow-healing skin lesions that contain large, tight fluid-filled blisters. These lesions are the result of severe damage to areas of the body exposed to HD and require extensive medical care before complete recovery is achieved. Converting the mechanism of HD-initiated cell death from an inflammatory oncosis (homicide) to benign apoptosis (assisted suicide) may reduce the extent of cellular damage and the time required for healing. HD-exposed human lymphocytes lose cellular function, membrane integrity and viability, and suffer degradation of their nuclear components. The treatment of HD-exposed cells with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors prevents or alters the HD-initiated loss of cell viability, membrane integrity, cellular metabolic constituent (NAD) and cellular energy (ATP), while initiating alterations in nuclear constituents. It is hoped that by preventing or altering these HD-initiated changes we can limit the extent of the injury, decrease the time required for repair and reduce the loss of performance suffered by exposed individuals. The use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors to assist in initiating apoptosis in affected cells should help to achieve these objectives while preventing the chance of further disease development later in the exposed individuals. PMID:11428651

  11. Proteomic assessment of sulfur mustard-induced protein adducts and other protein modifications in human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, Marijke A.E. Berg, Roland M. van den; Benschop, Henk P.

    2008-07-01

    Although some toxicological mechanisms of sulfur mustard (HD) have been uncovered, new knowledge will allow for advanced insight in the pathways that lead towards epidermal-dermal separation in skin. In the present investigation, we aimed to survey events that occur at the protein level in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) during 24 h after exposure to HD. By using radiolabeled {sup 14}C-HD, it was found that proteins in cultured HEK are significant targets for alkylation by HD. HD-adducted proteins were visualized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Several type I and II cytokeratins, actin, stratifin (14-3-3{sigma}) and galectin-7 were identified. These proteins are involved in the maintenance of the cellular cytoskeleton. Their alkylation may cause changes in the cellular architecture and, in direct line with that, be determinative for the onset of vesication. Furthermore, differential proteomic analysis was applied to search for novel features of the cellular response to HD. Partial breakdown of type I cytokeratins K14, K16 and K17 as well as the emergence of new charge variants of the proteins heat shock protein 27 and ribosomal protein P0 were observed. Studies with caspase inhibitors showed that caspase-6 is probably responsible for the breakdown of type I cytokeratins in HEK. The significance of the results is discussed in terms of toxicological relevance and possible clues for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Hypochlorite solution as a decontaminant in sulfur mustard contaminated skin defects in the euthymic hairless guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.B.; Bongiovanni, R.; Scharf, B.A.; Gresham, V.C.; Woodward, C.L.

    1994-12-31

    Hypochlorite solutions are thought to be efficacious when used to topically decontaminate intact skin. However, few studies have examined the efficacy of decontamination of chemically contaminated wounds. Therefore, we compared the decontamination efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions), calcium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions) and sterile water to untreated controls in wounds exposed to sulfur mustard (HD). Anesthetized euthymic hairless guinea pigs (EHGP) (n=6) were exposed to 20 mg/kg (approximately 0.4 LD%) HD in a full-thickness 8 mm surgical biopsy skin defect (i.e., wound). Each animal was subsequently decontaminated, after a two-minute intra-wound exposure to liquid HD, with nothing or one of the decontamination solutions. Decontamination efficacy was determined by the visual grading of the HD-traumatized wound lesion and by comparison of the expected HD-induced leukocyte suppression. Leukocyte suppression was inconsistent in all animals; therefore, the visual grading was the only viable evaluation method. No significant differences were observed among wounds decontaminated with any of the solutions. However, the skin surrounding non-decontaminated (but exposed) control animals showed the least visual pathology. The lesions induced following decontamination are presumed to be due to the mechanical flushing of HD onto the peri-lesional skin, or by chemical damage induced by the solution, or ND-solution interaction. Further studies are required to best delineate the optimal decontamination process for HD contaminated wounds.

  13. Hypochlorite solution as a decontaminant in sulfur mustard contaminated skin defects in the euthymic hairless guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.B.; Bongiovanni, R.; Scharf, B.A.; Gresham, V.C.; Woodard, C.L.

    1993-05-13

    Hypochlorite solutions are thought to be efficacious when used to topically decontaminate intact skin. However, few studies have examined the efficacy of decontamination of chemically contaminated wounds. Therefore, we compared the decontamination efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions), calcium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions) and sterile water to untreated controls in wounds exposed to sulfur mustard (HD). Anesthetized euthymic hairless guinea pigs (EHGP) (n=6) were exposed to 0.4 LD50 HD in a full-thickness 8 mm surgical biopsy skin defect (i.e., wound). Each animal was subsequently decontaminated, after a two-minute intra-wound exposure to liquid HD, with one of the decontamination solutions. Decontamination efficacy was determined by the visual grading of the HD-traumatized wound lesion and by comparison of the expected HD-induced leukocyte suppression. Leukocyte suppression was inconsistent in all animals; therefore, the visual grading was the only viable evaluation method. No significant differences were observed among wounds decontaminated with any of the solutions. However, the skin surrounding undecontaminated (but exposed) control animals showed the least visual pathology. The lesions induced following decontamination are presumed to be due to the mechanical flushing HD onto the peri-lesional skin, or by chemical damage induced by the solution, or HD-solution interaction. Further studies are required to best delineate the optimal decontamination process for HD contaminated wounds.

  14. Evaluation of the effects of hypochlorite solutions in the decontamination of wounds exposed to either vx or sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, D.W.; Snider, T.H.; Korte, D.W.

    1993-05-13

    The decontamination safety and efficacy of aqueous solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and calcium hypochlorite Ca(OC1)2 against sulfur mustard (HD) and the organophosphonate O-ethyl S-(2-Diisopropylnmino)-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) were examined in the New Zealand White rabbit. Tests on shaved rabbit dorsa indicated moderate irritation due to either NaOC1 or Ca(OCI)2 at 5 percent but no appreciable irritation at 0.5 percent concentrations. Against VX applied topically on shaved rabbit dorsa, significant protection, as indicated by higher 24-hr median lethality doses, was afforded by 0.5 and 5.0 percent NaOC1. However, when VX was applied either directly into a dermal wound or onto a swatch of fabric sampled from battle dress uniform (BDU) and subsequently placed into a wound, only 5.0 percent NaOC1 offered significant protection. Against HD, 0.5 and 5.0 percent NaOC1 were equally effective decontaminants as indexed by dermal lesion areas resulting from 1- to 60-min exposures. Neither NaOC1 solution demonstrated sustained efficacy against HD applied on fabric and placed in wounds.

  15. The effects of sulfur mustard exposure and freezing on transdermal penetration of tritiated water through ex vivo pig skin.

    PubMed

    Payne, O J; Graham, S J; Dalton, C H; Spencer, P M; Mansson, R; Jenner, J; Azeke, J; Braue, E

    2013-02-01

    The percutaneous absorption of tritiated water ((3)H(2)O) through sulfur mustard (SM) exposed abdominal pig skin was measured using in vitro Franz-type static diffusion cells. The barrier function to water permeation following exposure to liquid SM for 8 min and excision 3h later did not change significantly. A small, but statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in steady state penetration (Jss), permeability coefficient (Kp) and lag time (t(L)) of (3)H(2)O was observed between fresh skin and skin stored frozen (-20 °C) for up to two weeks. Steady-state penetration and Kp values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in skin stored frozen compared with fresh skin. Fresh naïve skin had an average Kp of 1.65 × 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen naïve skin was 2.04 × 10(-3) cm h(-1). Fresh SM exposed skin had a mean Kp of 1.72 × 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen SM exposed skin was 2.31 × 10(-3) cm h(-1). Lag times were also shorter (P<0.05) in skin that had been stored frozen. Frozen, SM-exposed porcine abdominal skin may be used for in vitro penetration studies, but effects of treatment and storage on the barrier layer should be taken into account. PMID:23041075

  16. Niacinamide pretreatment reduces microvesicle formation in hairless guinea pigs cutaneously exposed to sulfur mustard. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Clark, C.R.; Mitcheltree, L.W.

    1991-12-31

    It has been proposed that sulfur mustard (HD) may indirectly activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) by alkylating cellular DNA (Papirmeister et al., 1985). Activation of PADPRP results in the depletion of cellular NAD+ which initiates a series of biochemical processes that have been proposed to culminate in blister formation. Preventing PADPRP activation and NAD+ depletion should inhibit blister formation. Niacinamide is both an inhibitor of PADPRP and a precursor for NAD+ synthesis. The present study was undertaken to determine whether niacinamide can protect against HD-induced microvesication in cutaneously exposed hairless guinea pigs. Each site was exposed to HD for 8 min by means of a vapor cup. Niacinamide (750 mg/kg, ip) given as a 30-min pretreatment inhibited microvesicle formation by 50% after HD application. However, niacinamide given 2 hr after HD application did not reduce microvesicle formation. There was no benefit when niacinamide was given as both a pretreatment and treatment when compared to niacinamide given only as a pretreatment. The reduction in microvesication 24 hr after HD did not correlate with skin NAD+ content. Niacinamide did not reduce the degree of erythema or edema. Ballooning degeneration of basal epidermal cells was present in some niacinamide pretreated HD exposure sites.

  17. Sulfur Mustard Effects on Mental Health and Quality-of-Life: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Mansour; Negahban, Zahra; Pirhosseinloo, Mohsen; Razavi, Mahdiyeh Sadat; Hadjati, Gholamreza; Salamati, Payman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Mental disorders are more common among the chemically injured veterans rather the than the normal population. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mustard gas (MG) on mental health and quality-of-life (QOL) in the people exposed to it based on reviewing valid published articles. Methods: We searched English databases including Medline, ISI and Scopus as well as Farsi databases including Iranmedex and Irandoc and reviewed them. The used keywords were in two English and Farsi languages. Forty related full texts out of more than 300 articles were assessed and for their qualification, only the publications in accredited journals were considered sufficient. Results: The average mental health score of victims using the general health questionnaire (GHQ) was 48.92. The frequency of anxiety was (18-65%), insomnia (13.63%), social performance disturbances (10.73%), severe depression (6-46%), low concentration (54%), emotional problems (98%), behavioral abnormalities (80%), thought processing disturbances (14%), memory impairment (80%), personality disorders (31%), seizures (6%), psychosis (3%). Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common and important disorders with lifetime PTSD (8-59%), current PTSD (2-33%) and the QOL in chemical warfare victims decreased. Conclusion: Exposure to chemical weapons may lead to physical, mental, social, and economic damages and consequently decrease the victims’ (QOL. Therefore, they should be taken into more care. PMID:25780370

  18. Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Hayden, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

  19. Inhalation of sulfur mustard causes long-term T cell-dependent inflammation: Possible role of Th17 cells in chronic lung pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Grotendorst, Gary R.; Langley, Raymond J.; Singh, Shashi P.; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Weber, Waylon M.; Pena-Philippides, Juan C.; Duncan, Matthew R.; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent that remains a threat to human health. The immediate symptoms of pulmonary distress may develop into chronic lung injury characterized by progressive lung fibrosis, the major cause of morbidity among the surviving SM victims. Although SM has been intensely investigated, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which SM induces chronic lung pathology. Increasing evidence suggests that IL-17+ cells are critical in fibrosis, including lung fibrotic diseases. In this study we exposed F344 rats and cynomolgus monkeys to SM via inhalation and determined the molecular and cellular milieu in their lungs at various times after SM exposure. In rats, SM induced a burst of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines within 72 h, including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6, CCL2, CCL3, CCL11, and CXCL1 that was associated with neutrophilic infiltration into the lung. At 2 wk and beyond (chronic phase), lymphocytic infiltration and continued elevated expression of cytokines/chemokines were sustained. TGF-β, which was undetectable in the acute phase, was strongly upregulated in the chronic phase; these conditions persisted until the animals were sacrificed. The chronic phase was also associated with myofibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, and presence of IL-17+ cells. At 30 days, SM inhalation promoted the accumulation of IL-17+ cells in the inflamed areas of monkey lungs. Thus, SM inhalation causes acute and chronic inflammatory responses; the latter is characterized by the presence of TGF-β, fibrosis, and IL-17+ cells in the lung. IL-17+ cells likely play an important role in the pathogenesis of SM-induced lung injury. PMID:22465472

  20. Identification of Reliable Reference Genes for Quantification of MicroRNAs in Serum Samples of Sulfur Mustard-Exposed Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gharbi, Sedigheh; Shamsara, Mehdi; Khateri, Shahriar; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbanmehr, Nassim; Tavallaei, Mahmood; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objective In spite of accumulating information about pathological aspects of sulfur mustard (SM), the precise mechanism responsible for its effects is not well understood. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are promising biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. Accurate normalization using appropriate reference genes, is a critical step in miRNA expression studies. In this study, we aimed to identify appropriate reference gene for microRNA quantification in serum samples of SM victims. Materials and Methods In this case and control experimental study, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we evaluated the suitability of a panel of small RNAs including SNORD38B, SNORD49A, U6, 5S rRNA, miR-423-3p, miR-191, miR-16 and miR-103 in sera of 28 SM-exposed veterans of Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) and 15 matched control volunteers. Different statistical algorithms including geNorm, Normfinder, best-keeper and comparative delta-quantification cycle (Cq) method were employed to find the least variable reference gene. Results miR-423-3p was identified as the most stably expressed reference gene, and miR- 103 and miR-16 ranked after that. Conclusion We demonstrate that non-miRNA reference genes have the least stabil- ity in serum samples and that some house-keeping miRNAs may be used as more reliable reference genes for miRNAs in serum. In addition, using the geometric mean of two reference genes could increase the reliability of the normalizers. PMID:26464821

  1. Sulfur mustard primes human neutrophils for increased degranulation and stimulates cytokine release via TRPM2/p38 MAPK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Hwa-Yong; Hong, Chang-Won; Lee, Si-Nae; Kwon, Min-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Song, Dong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2′-bis-chloroethyl-sulfide; SM) has been a military threat since the World War I. The emerging threat of bioterrorism makes SM a major threat not only to military but also to civilian world. SM injury elicits an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils. Although SM was reported to prime neutrophils, the mechanism has not been identified yet. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of SM-induced priming in human neutrophils. SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent fashion. Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 2 inhibitors (clotrimazole, econazole and flufenamic acid) and silencing of TRPM2 by shRNA attenuated SM-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase. SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules in response to activation by fMLP as previously reported. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, inhibited SM-induced priming. Neither PD98057, an ERK inhibitor, nor SP600215, a JNK inhibitor, inhibited SM-induced priming. In addition, SM enhanced phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 and release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. SB203580 inhibited SM-induced NF-kB phosphorylation and cytokine release. These results suggest the involvement of TRPM2/p38 MAPK pathway in SM-induced priming and cytokines release in neutrophils. -- Highlights: ► SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils through TPRM2-mediated calcium influx. ► SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules. ► SM enhanced p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. ► SM enhanced release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from human neutrophils. ► SB203580 inhibited SM-induced priming, NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and cytokine release.

  2. Long term impact of sulfur mustard exposure on peripheral blood mononuclear subpopulations--Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study (SICS).

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Tooba; Kariminia, Amina; Yaraee, Roya; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Ardestani, Sussan K; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Mostafaie, Ali; Foroutan, Abbas; Rezaei, Abbas; Shams, Jalaleddin; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Vaez-Mahdavi, Mohammad R; Soroush, Mohammad R; Jalali-Nadoushan, Mohammadreza; Moaiedmohseni, Sakine; Ajdary, Soheila; Darabi, Hiedeh; Naghizadeh, Mohammad M; Kazemi, Hadi; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2013-11-01

    The most important long-term morbidity problem of sulfur mustard (SM) toxicity is pulmonary complications but the pathogenesis of these complications is not clearly understood. This study evaluates the peripheral blood mononuclear sub-sets and their correlation with pulmonary function in SM exposed civilian cases 20 years post-exposure as gathered in the context of the Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study (SICS). Samples were randomly selected from two groups, SM-exposed (n=372) and control (n=128), with the same ethnicity, culture, and demography. Three color flow cytometry was applied for peripheral blood mononuclear sub-population determination. Results indicated a significant decrease in CD45+/CD3+, CD45+/CD3+/CD4+, and an increase in CD3+/CD16+56+ percentages. It was also found that absolute count of NK cells was highly increased in peripheral blood of exposed cases. There was a significant increase in NK cell count of SM exposed group with pulmonary problems as compared to the same group without pulmonary problems (p-value<0.04) based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). The findings showed a significant negative correlation between absolute numbers of T lymphocyte and FVC % and positive correlation with FEV1/FVC%. The results also demonstrated that absolute numbers of monocytes had a negative correlation with FVC %. We propose that NK and T cells are probably involved in the pathogenesis or immune reactions to the delayed pulmonary complications induced by SM. This hypothesis should be tested in a more severe pulmonary complicated group. PMID:23434855

  3. Fibrinogen and inflammatory cytokines in spontaneous sputum of sulfur-mustard-exposed civilians--Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Yaraee, Roya; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Rezaei, Abbas; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Soroush, Mohammad-Reza; Ardestani, Sussan K; Kazemi, Hadi; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Ghazanfari, Zeinab; Foroutan, Abbas; Jalaie, Shohreh; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2013-11-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) causes late complications in respiratory system of exposed individuals. In this preliminary study, the levels of IL-1α and β, TNF, IL-1Ra, IL-6 and fibrinogen in the spontaneous sputum of SM-exposed individuals were examined 20 years after exposure and the correlation with pulmonary function was tested. The participants were categorized into two major subgroups (hospitalized and non-hospitalized) based on the severity of the clinical complications immediately after exposure. Every participant was visited by a physician; the respiratory functions were checked using spirometry and were categorized as normal, mild, moderate or severe pulmonary complications. The levels of cytokines in the sputum and serum samples were measured using ELISA method. The mean values of TNF, IL-1α and IL-1β were 524.15, 115.15, 1951.33 pg/ml respectively, and the mean levels of IL-1Ra and IL-6 were 6410.52 and 124.44 pg/ml respectively; fibrinogen was 71.59 ng/ml and index of IL-Ra/IL-1β was 7.78. There was more TNF-α and IL-1β and less IL-1Ra and fibrinogen in the sputum of the hospitalized subgroup. The level of TNF-α and IL-1β also increased in moderate and severe pulmonary status comparing with the group with mild disorders, while fibrinogen was lower or decreased significantly in problematic patients. IL-1β and TNF showed positive correlation (r=0.5, and r=0.59, respectively); fibrinogen and IL1Ra/IL-1β have negative correlation with lung function according to the GOLD classification (r=-0.4, and r=-0.61, respectively). It is concluded that sputum cytokines and fibrinogen, reflect the degree of the severity of airway inflammation and the cytokine levels in the sputum might be completely different from the serum fluctuations. PMID:23375935

  4. Investigating the Association between Angiogenic Cytokines and Corneal Neovascularization in Sulfur Mustard Intoxicated Subjects 26 Years after Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadeh, Mohammad; Aidenloo, Naser Samadi; Nematollahi, Mohammad Karim; Motarjemizadeh, Qader

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the associations between the concentrations of three major angiogenic cytokines–vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (VEGF-A165), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)–in the tear of sulfur mustard (SM)-exposed subjects and corneal neovascularization (CNV) 26 years after exposure. Materials and Methods: The concentrations of VEGF-A, bFGF, and PDGF-BB were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in reflex tears of (i) SM-injured patients with CNV (positive case group including 18 individuals) and (ii) SM-injured patients without CNV (negative case group including 22 individuals). Then results were compared to corresponding values obtained from tears of 40 healthy control subjects. Results: The mean concentrations of all investigated growth factors, VEGF-A165, bFGF, and PDGF-BB, were significantly higher in positive cases than controls (P ≤ 0.001, P = 0.028, and P = 0.041, respectively). Whereas, VEGF-A165 was the only growth factor which displayed significantly elevated concentrations in negative case group compared to the healthy individuals (P = 0.030). Additionally, the mean level of VEGF-A165 was also higher in positive patient group than negative patients (P = 0.022). Subjects with increased concentrations of tear VEGF-A165 were more than 10 times more likely to suffer from CNV than normal individuals (odds ratio (OR) = 10.43, confidence interval (CI): 2.14–38.46, P = 0.001), while elevated levels of bFGF and PDGF-BB increased the risk of CNV by about twofold. Conclusion: Although all investigated cytokines had increased in tears of positive patients, VEGF-A was the only one which showed a significant correlation with the severity of CNV, and thus played a crucial role in corneal angiogenesis. PMID:25948970

  5. Epidermal hydration and skin surface lipids in patients with long-term complications of sulfur mustard poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Layegh, Pouran; Maleki, Masoud; Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Yousefzadeh, Hadis; Momenzadeh, Akram; Golmohammadzadeh, Shiva; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite almost the three decades passed since the chemical attacks of Iraqi's army against the Iranian troops, some veterans are still suffering from long-term complications of sulfur mustard (SM) poisoning, including certain skin complaints specially dryness, burning, and pruritus. We thus aimed to evaluate the skin's water and lipid content in patients with a disability of >25% due to complications of SM poisoning and compare them with a matched control group. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine male participants were included in this study; 43 SM-exposed patients, and 26 normal controls from their close relatives. The water and lipid content was measured in four different locations: Extensor and flexor sides of forearms and lateral and medial sides of legs by the Corneometer CM 820/Sebumeter SM 810. Collected data was analyzed and P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The mean age of the patients and controls was 49.53 ± 11.34 (ranges: 40-71) and 29.08 ± 8.836 (ranges: 15-49 years), respectively. In the veterans group, the main cutaneous complaint was itching and skin dryness. Cherry angioma, dry skin, and pruritus were significantly more common in the SM-exposed cases than in the controls. (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.04, respectively). The moisture and lipid content of all areas were lower in the SM-exposed group, but it was only significant in skin sebum of lateral sides of legs (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Exposure to SM could decrease the function of stratum corneum and lipid production as a barrier, even after several years of its exposure. PMID:26622252

  6. Inhalation exposure to sulfur mustard in the guinea pig model: Clinical, biochemical and histopathological characterization of respiratory injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Allon, Nahum; Amir, Adina; Manisterski, Eliau; Rabinovitz, Ishay; Dachir, Shlomit; Kadar, Tamar

    2009-12-01

    Guinea pigs (GP) were exposed (head only) in individual plethysmographs to various concentrations of sulfur mustard vapor, determined online, using FTIR attached to flow chamber. The LCt{sub 50} and the inhaled LD{sub 50} were calculated at different time points post exposure. Surviving animals were monitored for clinical symptoms, respiratory parameters and body weight changes for up to 30 days. Clinical symptoms were noted at 3 h post exposure, characterized by erythematic and swelling nose with extensive mucous secretion (with or without bleeding). At 6 h post exposure most of the guinea pigs had breathing difficulties, rhonchi and dyspnea and few deaths were noted. These symptoms peaked at 48 h and were noted up to 8 days, associated with few additional deaths. Thereafter, a spontaneous healing was noted, characterized by recovery of respiratory parameters and normal weight gain with almost complete apparent healing within 2 weeks. Histopathological evaluation of lungs and trachea in the surviving GPs at 4 weeks post exposure revealed a dose-dependent residual injury in both lung and trachea expressed by abnormal recovery of the tracheal epithelium concomitant with a dose-dependent increase in cellular volume in the lungs. These abnormal epithelial regeneration and lung remodeling were accompanied with significant changes in protein, LDH, differential cell count and glutathione levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). It is suggested that the abnormal epithelial growth and cellular infiltration into the lung as well as the continuous lung inflammation could cause recurrent lung injury similar to that reported for HD exposed human casualties.

  7. Toxicological profile for mustard gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Statement was prepared to give information about mustard gas (sulfur mustard) and to emphasize the human health effects that may result from exposure to it. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified 1,177 sites on its National Priorities List (NPL). Mustard gas has been found at 4 of these sites. As EPA evaluates more sites, the number of sites at which mustard gas is found may change. The information is important because these sites are potential or actual sources of human exposure to mustard gas. Mustard gas may cause harmful health effects.

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Alleviates Nickel-Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses through Increase in Use-Efficiency of Nitrogen and Sulfur, and Glutathione Production in Mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, M I R; Khan, Nafees A; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S; Asgher, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The response of two mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or nickel (Ni) was evaluated. Further, the effect of H2O2 on photosynthetic responses of the mustard cultivars grown with or without Ni stress was studied. Application of 50 μM H2O2 increased photosynthesis and growth more prominently in high photosynthetic capacity cultivar (Varuna) than low photosynthetic capacity cultivar (RH30) grown without Ni stress. The H2O2 application also resulted in alleviation of photosynthetic inhibition induced by 200 mg Ni kg(-1) soil through increased photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), sulfur-use efficiency (SUE), and glutathione (GSH) reduced production together with decreased lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage in both the cultivars. However, the effect of H2O2 was more pronounced in Varuna than RH30. The greater increase in photosynthetic-NUE and SUE and GSH production with H2O2 in Varuna resulted from higher increase in activity of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) assimilation enzymes, nitrate reductase and ATP-sulfurylase, respectively resulting in enhanced N and S assimilation. The increased N and S content contributed to the higher activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase under Ni stress. Application of H2O2 also regulated PS II activity and stomatal movement under Ni stress for maintaining higher photosynthetic potential in Varuna. Thus, H2O2 may be considered as a potential signaling molecule for augmenting photosynthetic potential of mustard plants under optimal and Ni stress conditions. It alleviates Ni stress through the regulation of stomatal and non-stomotal limitations, and photosynthetic-NUE and -SUE and GSH production. PMID:26870064

  9. Efficacy of omeprazole on cough, pulmonary function and quality of life of patients with sulfur mustard lung injury: A placebo-control, cross-over clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Mohammad Hossein; Talaei, Mohammad; Panahi, Yunes; Saburi, Amin; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent and related to more severe disease in patients with respiratory problems. We evaluated the effects of antireflux therapy in warfare victims of exposure to Mustard gas with chronic cough. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was conducted on 45 cases of sulfur mustard injury with chronic cough (≥8 weeks) and GERD. Patients were randomized into two groups, receiving either 20 mg twice daily omeprazole-placebo (OP) or matching placebo (placebo-omeprazole [PO]) for 4 months, followed by a 1-month washout period and the alternative treatment for 4 months. Assessments included GERD and cough, quality of life, and pulmonary function using spirometry. Leicester Cough Questionnaire and SF-36 were used for measuring quality of life. Results: Patients in the OP group experienced a more decrease than those in the PO group in severity of Leicester cough scores during the first 4-month of trial. After crossing the groups, the OP group experienced an increase (P = 0.036) and the PO group experienced a nonsignificant decrease (P = 0.104) in the severity of scores. The OP group also experienced improvement in GERD symptoms and quality of life at the end of the trial, but changes in the PO group was not significant. There was no significant change in respiratory function indices in any groups. Conclusion: Long-term treatment with high-dose omeprazole improved GERD as well as cough, and quality of life, but not changed respiratory function indices in sulfur mustard injured cases with respiratory symptoms. PMID:25657745

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Alleviates Nickel-Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses through Increase in Use-Efficiency of Nitrogen and Sulfur, and Glutathione Production in Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. I. R.; Khan, Nafees A.; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S.; Asgher, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The response of two mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or nickel (Ni) was evaluated. Further, the effect of H2O2 on photosynthetic responses of the mustard cultivars grown with or without Ni stress was studied. Application of 50 μM H2O2 increased photosynthesis and growth more prominently in high photosynthetic capacity cultivar (Varuna) than low photosynthetic capacity cultivar (RH30) grown without Ni stress. The H2O2 application also resulted in alleviation of photosynthetic inhibition induced by 200 mg Ni kg-1 soil through increased photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), sulfur-use efficiency (SUE), and glutathione (GSH) reduced production together with decreased lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage in both the cultivars. However, the effect of H2O2 was more pronounced in Varuna than RH30. The greater increase in photosynthetic-NUE and SUE and GSH production with H2O2 in Varuna resulted from higher increase in activity of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) assimilation enzymes, nitrate reductase and ATP-sulfurylase, respectively resulting in enhanced N and S assimilation. The increased N and S content contributed to the higher activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase under Ni stress. Application of H2O2 also regulated PS II activity and stomatal movement under Ni stress for maintaining higher photosynthetic potential in Varuna. Thus, H2O2 may be considered as a potential signaling molecule for augmenting photosynthetic potential of mustard plants under optimal and Ni stress conditions. It alleviates Ni stress through the regulation of stomatal and non-stomotal limitations, and photosynthetic-NUE and -SUE and GSH production. PMID:26870064

  11. Characterization of acute and long-term pathologies of superficial and deep dermal sulfur mustard skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Dachir, Shlomit; Cohen, Maayan; Kamus-Elimeleh, Dikla; Fishbine, Eliezer; Sahar, Rita; Gez, Rellie; Brandeis, Rachel; Horwitz, Vered; Kadar, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard induces severe acute and prolonged damage to the skin and only partially effective treatments are available. We have previously validated the use of hairless guinea pigs as an experimental model for skin lesions. The present study aimed to characterize a model of a deep dermal lesion and to compare it with the previously described superficial lesion. Clinical evaluation of the lesions was conducted using reflectance colorimetry, trans-epidermal water loss and wound area measurements. Prostaglandin E(2) content, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activity, and histopathology were conducted up to 4 weeks post-exposure. Sulfur mustard skin injury, including erythema and edema, impairment of skin barrier and wounds developed in a dose-dependent manner. Prostaglandin E(2) content and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activities were elevated during the wound development and the healing process. Histological evaluation revealed severe damage to the epidermis and deep dermis and vesications. At 4 weeks postexposure, healing was not completed: significantly impaired stratum corneum, absence of hair follicles, and epidermal hyperplasia were observed. These results confirm the use of the superficial and deep dermal skin injuries in the hairless guinea pigs as suitable models that can be utilized for the investigation of the pathological processes of acute as well as long-term injuries. These models will be further used to develop treatments to improve the healing process and prevent skin damage and long-term effects. PMID:23082902

  12. Selection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and treatment regimen for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Plahovinsak, Jennifer L; Buccellato, Matthew A; Reid, Frances M; Graham, John S

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in sulfur mustard (HD) injury and HD pathogenesis, suggesting that anti-inflammatory treatments applied as soon as possible following HD injury may reduce tissue damage and accelerate healing. This study used the HD dermal weanling swine model to investigate the efficacy of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin and diclofenac, when applied in combination with the steroid, clobetasol. The therapeutic regimen was also investigated with respect to initiation of treatment post-exposure, frequency and duration. Yorkshire-cross pigs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, corresponding to all combinations of treatment (capsaicin with clobetasol or diclofenac with clobetasol), onset time (1, 2 or 4 h post-exposure), treatment duration (1, 3 or 5 days) and frequency of applications (2, 3 or 4 per day). For each animal, two sites on the ventral abdomen were exposed to 400 μL of neat HD for 8 min to achieve superficial dermal (SD) lesions and two sites were exposed to 400 μL neat HD for 30 min to achieve deep dermal (DD) lesions. Each treatment regimen was tested against a SD and a DD injury. Untreated SD and DD lesion sites served as within-animal controls. Assessments, up to one week post-challenge, included digital photographs, clinical assessments (lesion size measurements and modified Draize scoring), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), reflectance colorimetry and histopathologic evaluations that included an estimate for depth of injury and wound healing parameters. Diclofenac plus clobetasol treatment resulted in significant reductions in lesion contracture and modified Draize scores, increased barrier function (decreased TEWL), and increased healing as determined by histopathology for both SD and DD injury when compared with untreated sites and sites treated with capsaicin plus clobetasol. An increased duration of treatment from 1 to 5 days was most commonly associated with decreased

  13. Efficacy of Tiotropium Bromide and Rehabilitation Treatment on Pulmonary Function of Patients With Sulfur Mustard Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shohrati, Majid; Jalili, Maryam; Afshar, Homa; Najafian, Bita; Qazvini, Ali; Zaeri, Meysam; Amini Harandi, Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pulmonary complication is the most common delayed toxic effect of sulfur mustard (SM) and it has no treatment so far. Objectives: To evaluate short-term therapeutic effects of inhaled tiotropium bromide and pulmonary rehabilitation on pulmonary function of patients with SM induced lung injury. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, using convenient sampling method, 54 patients with chronic lung disease due to SM exposure were recruited in Baqiyatallah General Hospital, Tehran, Iran for a period of 2-month study. They were randomly divided into 3 groups of 18 participants each. Group 1 received routine drugs (Serevent, Flixotide), pulmonary rehabilitation 30 minutes/2 times a week, and tiotropium bromide 18 µg/day. Group 2 was treated with routine drugs and pulmonary rehabilitation and group 3 was only on the routine drugs. cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), plethysmographic measurements, and respiratory symptoms evaluation were performed before and after medical intervention. Results: In group 1, compared to group 3, significant differences were found with regard to symptoms of cough ([difference between the first and last visit in group 1: Diff 1] = -1.6, Diff 3 = -0.3, P = 0.01) and nocturnal dyspnea (Diff 1 = -1.9, Diff 3 = 0.0, P = 0.01), likewise, compared to group 2, significant differences were found with regard to lung function parameters of forced vital capacity (Diff 1 = 3.0, Diff 2 = -3.5, P = 0.03), forced expiratory volume in one second (Diff 1 = 3.9, Diff 2 = -5.6, P = 0.009), maximal mid-expiratory flow rate 25% - 75% (Diff 1 = 1.5, Diff 2 = -3.2, P = 0.007) and peak expiratory flow (Diff 1 = -2.06, Diff 2 = -4.3, P = 0.04). Total lung capacity (Diff 2 = 9.28, Diff 3 = -12.07, P = 0.02) and residual volume (Diff2 = 32.1, Diff3 = -27.6, P = 0.04) were increased in group 2 compared to group 3. There were no significant differences with regard to CPET results among all groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Inhalation of

  14. Applying pattern recognition methods to analyze the molecular properties of a homologous series of nitrogen mustard agents.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald; Donigan, Laura

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the pharmacological properties of a homologous series of nitrogen mustard (N-mustard) agents formed after inserting 1 to 9 methylene groups (-CH2-) between 2 -N(CH2CH2Cl)2 groups. These compounds were shown to have significant correlations and associations in their properties after analysis by pattern recognition methods including hierarchical classification, cluster analysis, nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), detrended correspondence analysis, K-means cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and self-organizing tree algorithm (SOTA) analysis. Detrended correspondence analysis showed a linear-like association of the 9 homologs, and hierarchical classification showed that each homolog had great similarity to at least one other member of the series-as did cluster analysis using paired-group distance measure. Nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling was able to discriminate homologs 2 and 3 (by number of methylene groups) from homologs 4, 5, and 6 as a group, and from homologs 7, 8, and 9 as a group. Discriminant analysis, K-means cluster analysis, and hierarchical classification distinguished the high molecular weight homologs from low molecular weight homologs. As the number of methylene groups increased the aqueous solubility decreased, dermal permeation coefficient increased, Log P increased, molar volume increased, parachor increased, and index of refraction decreased. Application of pattern recognition methods discerned useful interrelationships within the homologous series that will determine specific and beneficial clinical applications for each homolog and methods of administration. PMID:16796353

  15. Comparison of the Lonidamine Potentiated Effect of Nitrogen Mustard Alkylating Agents on the Systemic Treatment of DB-1 Human Melanoma Xenografts in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Putt, Mary E.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Garman, Bradley; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2016-01-01

    Previous NMR studies demonstrated that lonidamine (LND) selectively diminishes the intracellular pH (pHi) of DB-1 melanoma and mouse xenografts of a variety of other prevalent human cancers while decreasing their bioenergetic status (tumor βNTP/Pi ratio) and enhancing the activities of melphalan and doxorubicin in these cancer models. Since melphalan and doxorubicin are highly toxic agents, we have examined three other nitrogen (N)-mustards, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide and bendamustine, to determine if they exhibit similar potentiation by LND. As single agents LND, melphalan and these N-mustards exhibited the following activities in DB-1 melanoma xenografts; LND: 100% tumor surviving fraction (SF); chlorambucil: 100% SF; cyclophosphamide: 100% SF; bendamustine: 79% SF; melphalan: 41% SF. When combined with LND administered 40 min prior to administration of the N-mustard (to maximize intracellular acidification) the following responses were obtained; chlorambucil: 62% SF; cyclophosphamide: 42% SF; bendamustine: 36% SF; melphalan: 10% SF. The effect of LND on the activities of these N-mustards is generally attributed to acid stabilization of the aziridinium active intermediate, acid inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase, which acts as a scavenger of aziridinium, and acid inhibition of DNA repair by O6-alkyltransferase. Depletion of ATP by LND may also decrease multidrug resistance and increase tumor response. At similar maximum tolerated doses, our data indicate that melphalan is the most effective N-mustard in combination with LND when treating DB-1 melanoma in mice, but the choice of N-mustard for coadministration with LND will also depend on the relative toxicities of these agents, and remains to be determined. PMID:27285585

  16. MUSTARD GAS EXPOSURE AND CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-khalili, Alireza; Haines, David D; Modirian, Ehsan; Soroush, Mohammadreza; Khateri, Shahriar; Joshi, Rashmi; Zendehdel, Kazem; Ghanei, Mostafa; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is an alkylating compound used as a chemical weapon in World War I and by Iraqi forces against Iranians and indigenous Iraqi Kurds during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. Although SM is a proven carcinogen there are conflicting views regarding the carcinogenicity of a single exposure. The present study characterizes lung cancers formed in mustard gas victims from the Iran-Iraq War. Methods and Materials Demographic information and tumor specimens were collected from 20 Iranian male lung cancer patients with single high-dose SM exposures during the Iran-Iraq war. Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded lung cancers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for p53 protein. In addition, DNA was extracted from the tissues, PCR amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the p53 and KRAS genes associated with SM exposure. Results A relatively early age of lung cancer onset (ranging from 28 to 73 with a mean of 48) in mustard gas victims, particularly those in the non-smoking population (mean age of 40.7), may be an indication of a unique etiology for these cancers. Seven of the 20 patients developed lung cancer before the age of 40. Five of 16 cancers from which DNA sequence data was obtainable provided information on eight p53 mutations (within exons 5–8). These mutations were predominately G to A transitions; a mutation consistent with the DNA lesion caused by SM. Two of the lung cancers had multiple p53 point mutations, similar to results obtained from factory workers chronically exposed to mustard agent. No mutations were detected in the KRAS gene. Discussion The distinguishing characteristics of lung carcinogenesis in these mustard gas victims suggest that a single exposure may increase the risk of lung cancer development in some individuals. PMID:19559099

  17. Design and synthesis of novel hydroxyanthraquinone nitrogen mustard derivatives as potential anticancer agents via a bioisostere approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Ma, Feng-Yan; Jin, Hai-Shan; Zheng, Shilong; Zhong, Qiu; Wang, Guangdi

    2016-01-01

    A series of hydroxyanthraquinones having an alkylating N-mustard pharmacophore at 1′-position were synthesized via a bioisostere approach to evaluate their cytotoxicity against four tumor cell lines (MDA-MB-231, HeLa, MCF-7 and A549). These compounds displayed significant in vitro cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, reflecting the excellent selectivity for the human breast cancer. Among them, compound 5k was the most cytotoxic with IC50 value of 0.263 nM and is more potent than DXR (IC50 = 0.294 nM) in inhibiting the growth of MCF-7 cells. The excellent cytotoxicity and good selectivity of compound 5k suggest that it could be a promising lead for further design and development of anticancer agents, especially for breast cancer. PMID:26291039

  18. Simultaneous determination of sulfur mustard and related oxidation products by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS method coupled with a chemical conversion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meiling; Xu, Bin; Wu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yajiao; Zong, Cheng; Chen, Jia; Guo, Lei; Xie, Jianwei

    2016-08-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating vesicant with high toxicity and complicated metabolism, the in vivo profile of its oxidation metabolism is not still fully known and urgently needs to be clarified well. In this work, an isotope-dilution high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method coupled with chemical conversion was developed for the simultaneous quantification of SM and its oxidation products, i.e., mustard sulfoxide (SMO) and mustard sulfone (SMO2). The accurate measurement of SM and its oxidation products with high reaction activity was achived via the method of chemical conversion of 2-(3,5-bis(mercaptomethyl)phenoxy) acetic acid into stable derivative products. Method validation was performed in whole blood matrix, the linear range of the method was between 0.2 and 1000μg/L with correlation coefficients (r(2))>0.99, and the lower limits of quantification for SM, SMO and SMO2 were 1, 1, 0.2μg/L, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied to a toxicokinetics research of SM and its oxidation products after SM dermal exposed rats in a single dose. All three target analytes were found in whole blood samples from poisoned rats, and significant time-dependent responses were also observed. Among them, SMO2 with relatively high toxicity was identified and quantified in vivo for the first time, while SMO was the major product in whole blood and some of them continued to be oxidized to SMO2in vivo. These results give a direct experimental evidence to support that a large amount of SM is converted into the corresponding SMO and SMO2, and these oxidation products might cause potential combined toxic effects. PMID:27322628

  19. Development of a dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for on-site analysis of sulfur mustard degradation products in sediments.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Nordlander, T; Östin, A

    2016-01-15

    Sampling teams performing work at sea in areas where chemical munitions may have been dumped require rapid and reliable analytical methods for verifying sulfur mustard leakage from suspected objects. Here we present such an on-site analysis method based on dynamic headspace GC-MS for analysis of five cyclic sulfur mustard degradation products that have previously been detected in sediments from chemical weapon dumping sites: 1,4-oxathiane, 1,3-dithiolane, 1,4-dithiane, 1,4,5-oxadithiephane, and 1,2,5-trithiephane. An experimental design involving authentic Baltic Sea sediments spiked with the target analytes was used to develop an optimized protocol for sample preparation, headspace extraction and analysis that afforded recoveries of up to 60-90%. The optimized method needs no organic solvents, uses only two grams of sediment on a dry weight basis and involves a unique sample presentation whereby sediment is spread uniformly as a thin layer inside the walls of a glass headspace vial. The method showed good linearity for analyte concentrations of 5-200 ng/g dw, good repeatability, and acceptable carry-over. The method's limits of detection for spiked sediment samples ranged from 2.5 to 11 μg/kg dw, with matrix interference being the main limiting factor. The instrumental detection limits were one to two orders of magnitude lower. Full-scan GC-MS analysis enabled the use of automated mass spectral deconvolution for rapid identification of target analytes. Using this approach, analytes could be identified in spiked sediment samples at concentrations down to 13-65 μg/kg dw. On-site validation experiments conducted aboard the research vessel R/V Oceania demonstrated the method's practical applicability, enabling the successful identification of four cyclic sulfur mustard degradation products at concentrations of 15-308μg/kg in sediments immediately after being collected near a wreck at the Bornholm Deep dumpsite in the Baltic Sea. PMID:26711154

  20. Role of TNFR1 in lung injury and altered lung function induced by the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-02-01

    Lung toxicity induced by sulfur mustard is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. To elucidate mechanisms mediating pulmonary damage, we used 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. Male mice (B6129) were treated intratracheally with CEES (3 or 6 mg/kg) or control. Animals were sacrificed 3, 7 or 14 days later and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue collected. Treatment of mice with CEES resulted in an increase in BAL protein, an indication of alveolar epithelial damage, within 3 days. Expression of Ym1, an oxidative stress marker also increased in the lung, along with inducible nitric oxide synthase, and at 14 days, cyclooxygenase-2 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, inflammatory proteins implicated in tissue injury. These responses were attenuated in mice lacking the p55 receptor for TNF{alpha} (TNFR1-/-), demonstrating that signaling via TNFR1 is key to CEES-induced injury, oxidative stress, and inflammation. CEES-induced upregulation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and MnSOD was delayed or absent in TNFR1-/- mice, relative to WT mice, suggesting that TNF{alpha} mediates early antioxidant responses to lung toxicants. Treatment of WT mice with CEES also resulted in functional alterations in the lung including decreases in compliance and increases in elastance. Additionally, methacholine-induced alterations in total lung resistance and central airway resistance were dampened by CEES. Loss of TNFR1 resulted in blunted functional responses to CEES. These effects were most notable in the airways. These data suggest that targeting TNF{alpha} signaling may be useful in mitigating lung injury, inflammation and functional alterations induced by vesicants.

  1. Sulfur mustard-induced microvesication in hairless guinea pigs: Effect of short-term niacinamide administration. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Dawson, J.S.; Mitcheltree, L.W.

    1992-12-31

    It has been postulated that sulfur mustard (HD) damage may activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP), resulting in depletion of cellular NAD+. This biochemical alteration is postulated to result in blister (vesicle) formation. It has been previously demonstrated that niacinamide (NAM), an inhibitor of PADPRP and a precursor for NAD+ synthesis, may be useful as a pretreatment compound to reduce HD-induced microvesication. The present study was undertaken to determine whether niacinamide`s protective action could be extended beyond 24 hr and if the degree of microvesication is related to changes in skin NAD+ content. HD exposures were made by vapor cup to hairless guinea pigs. Niacinamide (750 mg/kg, ip) given as a 30-min pretreatment did not reduce the degree of microvesication 72 hr after HD compared to saline controls. However, niacinamide given as a 30-min pretreatment and at 6-, 24-, and 48-hr after HD, exhibited a 28% reduction in microvesication 72 hr after HD. Skin NAD+ content at 72 hr after HD was depleted by approximately 53% in the saline and NAM-treated groups. Skin NAD+ content was depleted despite NAM administration. Niacinamide did not reduce the degree of erythema at 48 or 72 hr. These results suggest that niacinamide`s protective effect against HD-induced microvesication may be extended for at least 72 hr, but NAM levels must be sustained during the post-HD period. The link between maintenance of skin NAD+ and reductions in microvesication is still uncertain.... Pretreatment, Niacinamide, Hairless guinea pig, Sulfur mustard microvesication.

  2. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan

    2001-12-01

    We propose a process that uses sulfur dioxide from coal combustion as a raw material to synthesize polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a water treatment agent. The process uses sodium chlorate as an oxidant and ferrous sulfate as an absorbent. The major chemical mechanisms in this reaction system include oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. Oxidation determines sulfur conversion efficiency while hydrolysis and polymerization control the quality of product. Many factors, including SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, flow rate of simulated flue gas, reaction temperature, addition rate of oxidant and stirring rate, may affect the efficiencies of SO{sub 2} removal. Currently, the effects of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, the flow rate of simulated flue gas and addition rate of flue gas on removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, are being investigated. Experiments shown in this report have demonstrated that the conversion efficiencies of sulfur dioxide with ferrous sulfate as an absorbent are in the range of 60-80% under the adopted process conditions. However, the conversion efficiency of sulfur dioxide may be improved by optimizing reaction conditions to be investigated. Partial quality indices of the synthesized products, including Fe{sup 2+} concentration and total iron concentration, have been evaluated.

  3. Enhanced accumulation of Pb in Indian mustard by soil-applied chelating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, M.J.; Dushenkov, S.; Zakharova, O.; Gussman, C.; Kapulnik, Y.; Ensley, B.D.; Salt, D.E.; Raskin, I.

    1997-03-01

    Phytoremediation is emerging as a potential cost-effective solution for the remediation of contaminated soils. Because contaminants such as lead (Pb) have limited bioavailability in the soil, a means of solubilizing the Pb in the soil and facilitating its transport to the shoots of plants is vital to the success of phytoremediation. Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) was used to demonstrate the capability of plants to accumulate high tissue concentrations of Pb when grown in Pb-contaminated soil. Concentrations of 1.5% Pb in the shoots of B. juncea were obtained from soils containing 600 mg of Pb/kg amended with synthetic chelates such as EDTA. The accumulation of Pb in the tissue corresponded to the concentration of Pb in the soil and the concentration of EDTA added to the soil. The accumulation of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn from contaminated soil amended with EDTA and other synthetic chelators was also demonstrated. The research indicates that the accumulation of metal in the shoots of B. juncea can be enhanced through the application of synthetic chelates to the soil, facilitating high biomass accumulation as well as metal uptake. 23 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Chemical Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... glycol Hydrazine Hydrofluoric acid Hydrogen chloride Lewisite Melamine Mercury Methyl bromide Methyl isocyanate Nicotine Nitrogen mustard Opioids ... L-3) Long-acting anticoagulant (super warfarin) M Mercury Methyl bromide Methyl isocyanate Mustard gas (H) (sulfur ...

  5. Optimized verification method for detection of an albumin-sulfur mustard adduct at Cys(34) using a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer after direct plasma proteolysis.

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Siegert, Markus; Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; Kranawetvogl, Andreas; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Thiermann, Horst

    2016-02-26

    The vesicant sulfur mustard (SM) is a banned chemical warfare agent that is controlled by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). Bioanalytical procedures are mandatory for proving an alleged use and incorporation of SM into the body. We herein present the development and application of a novel optimized procedure suitable for qualitative verification analysis of plasma targeting the SM-adduct of human serum albumin (HSA) alkylated at the cysteine(34) residue. Diluted human plasma is directly mixed with pronase in an ultrafiltration device (10kDa cut-off) for proteolysis (4h, 37°C). Following ultrafiltration the filtrate is diluted and analyzed by microbore liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization high resolution tandem-mass spectrometry (μLC-ESI HR MS/MS) targeting the alkylated dipeptide hydroxyethylthioethyl-CysPro (HETE-CP). A hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer provided high mass spectrometric resolution in the MS/MS mode enabling highest selectivity and sensitivity (lower limit of detection corresponding to 9.8nM SM in plasma). Kinetics of HETE-CP formation from heparin-, citrate-, and EDTA-plasma as well as serum are presented and the influence of different EDTA and pronase concentrations was characterized. The novel procedure was applied to plasma samples provided by the OPCW as well as to patientś plasma derived from real cases of SM-poisoning. PMID:26449527

  6. A novel approach for high sensitive determination of sulfur mustard by derivatization and isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zong, Cheng; Nie, Zhiyong; Guo, Lei; Xie, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    A new isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for determination of sulfur mustard (SM) has been developed using a direct chemical derivatization method by nucleophile potassium thioacetate (PTA) in aqueous solution. The reaction conditions for derivatization, such as reaction temperature, time, solvent and concentration of PTA, were optimized for high performance. Reversed phase liquid chromatography was suitable for analysis of such a PTA derivatized SM in complex environmental samples. Compared with other conventional gas chromatography or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for direct detection on SM, better sensitivity and selectivity were achieved by this direct derivatization and LC-MS/MS method, where SM can be detected as low as 0.05 ng/mL in acetonitrile. The linear range was from 0.1 to 1000 ng/mL. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the intra-day precision was less than 11.8%, and RSD of the inter-day precision was less than 12.3%. The whole procedure for both derivatization and analysis was quick and simple, and the total time was less than 1h. This established method has been successfully employed for determination of spiking samples both in water and soil. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL was achieved for river water, while the SM in soil sample could be detected at 0.1 ng/g. PMID:25476305

  7. Impairment of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α signaling in keratinocytes and fibroblasts by sulfur mustard is counteracted by a selective PHD-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Janina; Popp, Tanja; Egea, Virginia; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Thiermann, Horst; Weber, Christian; Ries, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Skin exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) provokes long-term complications in wound healing. Similar to chronic wounds, SM-induced skin lesions are associated with low levels of oxygen in the wound tissue. Normally, skin cells respond to hypoxia by stabilization of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). HIF-1α modulates expression of genes including VEGFA, BNIP3, and MMP2 that control processes such as angiogenesis, growth, and extracellular proteolysis essential for proper wound healing. The results of our studies revealed that exposure of primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) to SM significantly impaired hypoxia-induced HIF-1α stabilization and target gene expression in these cells. Addition of a selective inhibitor of the oxygen-sensitive prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD-2), IOX2, fully recovered HIF-1α stability, nuclear translocation, and target gene expression in NHEK and NHDF. Moreover, functional studies using a scratch wound assay demonstrated that the application of IOX2 efficiently counteracted SM-mediated deficiencies in monolayer regeneration under hypoxic conditions in NHEK and NHDF. Our findings describe a pathomechanism by which SM negatively affects hypoxia-stimulated HIF-1α signaling in keratinocytes and fibroblasts and thus possibly contributes to delayed wound healing in SM-injured patients that could be treated with PHD-2 inhibitors. PMID:26082309

  8. The synthesis and biological evaluation of new DNA-directed alkylating agents, phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates containing a urea linker.

    PubMed

    Marvania, Bhavin; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Christian, Wilson; Chen, Tai-Lin; Wu, Ming-Hsi; Suman, Sharda; Tala, Kiran; Lee, Te-Chang; Shah, Anamik; Su, Tsann-Long

    2014-08-18

    We synthesized a series of phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates to study their antitumorigenic effects. These agents were prepared by the condensation of 4-[N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl isocyanate with 6-amino-4-methylamino or 4-anilinoquinolines. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed that the C2-methylquinoline derivatives (18a-o) were generally more cytotoxic than the C2-phenylquinoline conjugates (23a-d) in inhibiting the cell growth of various human tumor cell lines in vitro. However, the methylamino or aniline substituents at C4 of quinoline did not influence the cytotoxic effects. The title conjugates were capable of inducing DNA cross-linking and promoting cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. This study demonstrates that phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates are generally more potent than phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinazoline conjugates against the cell growth of various tumor cell-lines. PMID:25014640

  9. Hair analysis as a useful procedure for detection of vapour exposure to chemical warfare agents: simulation of sulphur mustard with methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) are highly toxic compounds which have been produced to kill or hurt people during conflicts or terrorist attacks. Despite the fact that their use is strictly prohibited according to international convention, populations' exposure still recently occurred. Development of markers of exposure to CWA is necessary to distinguish exposed victims from unexposed ones. We present the first study of hair usage as passive sampler to assess contamination by chemicals in vapour form. This work presents more particularly the hair adsorption capacity for methyl salicylate used as a surrogate of the vesicant sulphur mustard. Chemical vapours toxicity through the respiratory route has historically been defined through Haber's law's concentration-time (Ct) product, and vapour exposure of hair to methyl salicylate was conducted with various times or doses of exposure in the range of incapacitating and lethal Ct products corresponding to sulphur mustard. Following exposure, extraction of methyl salicylate from hair was conducted by simple soaking in dichloromethane. Methyl salicylate could be detected on hair for vapour concentration corresponding to about one fifth of the sulphur mustard concentration that would kill 50% of exposed individuals (LCt50). The amount of methyl salicylate recovered from hair increased with time or dose of exposure. It showed a good correlation with the concentration-time product, suggesting that hair could be used like a passive sampler to assess vapour exposure to chemical compounds. It introduces great perspectives concerning the use of hair as a marker of exposure to CWA. PMID:24817050

  10. Chemical genetics analysis of an aniline mustard anticancer agent reveals complex I of the electron transport chain as a target.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Zhu, Angela Y; Young, Kellie S; Hillier, Shawn M; Proffitt, Kyle D; Essigmann, John M; Croy, Robert G

    2011-09-30

    The antitumor agent 11β (CAS 865070-37-7), consisting of a DNA-damaging aniline mustard linked to an androgen receptor (AR) ligand, is known to form covalent DNA adducts and to induce apoptosis potently in AR-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro; it also strongly prevents growth of LNCaP xenografts in mice. The present study describes the unexpectedly strong activity of 11β against the AR-negative HeLa cells, both in cell culture and tumor xenografts, and uncovers a new mechanism of action that likely explains this activity. Cellular fractionation experiments indicated that mitochondria are the major intracellular sink for 11β; flow cytometry studies showed that 11β exposure rapidly induced oxidative stress, mitochondria being an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, 11β inhibited oxygen consumption both in intact HeLa cells and in isolated mitochondria. Specifically, 11β blocked uncoupled oxygen consumption when mitochondria were incubated with complex I substrates, but it had no effect on oxygen consumption driven by substrates acting downstream of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Moreover, 11β enhanced ROS generation in isolated mitochondria, suggesting that complex I inhibition is responsible for ROS production. At the cellular level, the presence of antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine or vitamin E) significantly reduced the toxicity of 11β, implicating ROS production as an important contributor to cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings establish complex I inhibition and ROS generation as a new mechanism of action for 11β, which supplements conventional DNA adduct formation to promote cancer cell death. PMID:21832047

  11. Nitrogen Mustards

    MedlinePlus

    ... your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly ... mustard from your skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will ...

  12. Organic Chemical Attribution Signatures for the Sourcing of a Mustard Agent and Its Starting Materials.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Carlos G; Bronk, Krys; Dockendorff, Brian P; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-05-17

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) are being investigated for the sourcing of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their starting materials that may be implicated in chemical attacks or CW proliferation. The work reported here demonstrates for the first time trace impurities from the synthesis of tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) that point to the reagent and the specific reagent stocks used in the synthesis of this CW agent. Thirty batches of HN3 were synthesized using different combinations of commercial stocks of triethanolamine (TEA), thionyl chloride, chloroform, and acetone. The HN3 batches and reagent stocks were then analyzed for impurities by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. All the reagent stocks had impurity profiles that differentiated them from one another. This was demonstrated by building classification models with partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) and obtaining average stock classification errors of 2.4, 2.8, 2.8, and 11% by cross-validation for chloroform (7 stocks), thionyl chloride (3 stocks), acetone (7 stocks), and TEA (3 stocks), respectively, and 0% for a validation set of chloroform samples. In addition, some reagent impurities indicative of reagent type were found in the HN3 batches that were originally present in the reagent stocks and presumably not altered during synthesis. More intriguing, impurities in HN3 batches that were apparently produced by side reactions of impurities unique to specific TEA and chloroform stocks, and thus indicative of their use, were observed. PMID:27116337

  13. Allyl isothiocyanate from mustard seed is effective in reducing the levels of volatile sulfur compounds responsible for intrinsic oral malodor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Minmin; Hanley, A Bryan; Dodds, Michael W J

    2013-06-01

    Oral malodor is a major social and psychological issue that affects general populations. Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), particularly hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) and methyl mercaptan (CH₃SH), are responsible for most oral malodor. The objectives for this study were to determine whether allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) at an organoleptically acceptable level can eliminate VSCs containing a free thiol moiety and further to elucidate the mechanism of action and reaction kinetics. The study revealed that gas chromatograph with a sulfur detector demonstrated a good linearity, high accuracy and sensitivity on analysis of VSCs. Zinc salts eliminate the headspace level of H₂S but not CH₃SH. AITC eliminates both H₂S and CH₃SH via a nucleophilic addition reaction. In addition, a chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that the presence of unsaturated group on the side chain of the isothiocyanate accelerates the elimination of VSCs. PMID:23470258

  14. Airway tissue factor-dependent coagulation activity in response to sulfur mustard analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Guo, XiaoLing; Jones, Tara N.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in response to mustard gas (SM) inhalation. Obstructive, fibrin-containing airway casts have recently been reported in a rat inhalation model employing the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The present study was designed to identify the mechanism(s) causing activation of the coagulation cascade after CEES-induced airway injury. Here we report that CEES inhalation elevates tissue factor (TF) activity and numbers of detached epithelial cells present in lavage fluid (BALF) from rats after exposure (18 h). In vitro studies using 16HBE cells, or with rat BALF, indicated that detached epithelial cells could convert factor X (FX) to the active form FXa when incubated with factor VII and could elicit rapid clotting of plasma. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated elevated cell surface (TF) expression on CEES-exposed 16HBE cells as a function of time. However, total cell TF expression did not increase. Since membrane surfaces bearing TF are important determinants of clot initiation, anticoagulants directed against these entities were tested for ability to limit plasma clotting or FX activation capacity of BALF or culture media. Addition of tifacogin, a TF pathway inhibitor, effectively blocked either activity, demonstrating that the procoagulant actions of CEES were TF pathway dependent. Lactadherin, a protein capable of competing with clotting factors for phospholipid-binding sites, was partially effective in limiting these procoagulant actions. These findings indicate that TF pathway inhibition could be an effective strategy to prevent airway obstruction after SM or CEES inhalation. PMID:21964405

  15. On-site analysis of old deposited chemical warfare agents by combined use of ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, J.; Adler, J.; Brodacki, M.; Doering, H.R.; Flachowsky, J.; Loudon, A.

    1995-12-31

    The factory site of an old mustard gas plant was investigated with on-site analysis methods. Using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry a lot of degradation products of mustard gas could be detected. Sulfur mustard was found in one soil sample and in ceramic material of a bunker used for storage of the produced warfare agents. Concentrations of the mustard gas are in the sub ppb level. The results of ion mobility and mass spectrometry agreed in 95 % of the investigated samples.

  16. Evidence of Sulfur Mustard Exposure in Human Plasma by LC-ESI-MS-MS Detection of the Albumin-Derived Alkylated HETE-CP Dipeptide and Chromatographic Investigation of Its Cis/Trans Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; Thiermann, Horst; John, Harald

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that causes painful blisters and chemically modifies endogenous biomacromolecules by alkylation to hydroxyethylthioethyl (HETE) adducts representing valuable long-term markers for post-exposure analysis. The albumin adduct formed in human plasma in vitro (HETE bound to the side chain of cysteine 34) was isolated and cleaved by current lots of pronase primarily generating the internal modified dipeptide (HETE-cysteine-proline, HETE-CP) instead of the formerly reported HETE-CPF tripeptide. The analyte was detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS). In principle, HETE-CP undergoes a dynamic on-column equilibrium of cis-trans isomerism thus requiring separation at 50°C to obtain one narrow peak. Accordingly, we developed both a novel longer lasting but more sensitive microbore (1 mm i.d., flow 30 µL/min, cycle time 60 min, LOD 50 nM) and a faster, less sensitive narrowbore (2.1 mm i.d., 200 µL/min, cycle time 16 min, LOD 100 nM, both on Atlantis T3 material at 50°C) LC-ESI-MS-MS method suitable for verification analysis. The corresponding tri- and tetrapeptide, Q(HETE)-CPF were monitored simultaneously. HETE-CP peak areas were directly proportional to SM concentrations added to plasma in vitro (0.05-100 µM). Albumin adducts formed by deuterated SM (d8-SM) served as internal standard. PMID:25712440

  17. Upregulation of miR-203 and miR-210 affect growth and differentiation of keratinocytes after exposure to sulfur mustard in normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Janina; Steinritz, Dirk; Santovito, Donato; Egea, Virginia; Schmidt, Annette; Weber, Christian; Ries, Christian

    2016-02-26

    Exposure of the skin to sulfur mustard (SM) results in long-term complications such as impaired tissue regeneration. Previous own studies in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) treated with SM demonstrated reduced proliferation, premature differentiation and a restricted functionality of hypoxia-mediated signaling in the cells. Here, we investigated the involvement of microRNAs, miR-203 and miR-210, in these mechanisms. SM significantly upregulated the expression of miR-203 in NHEK when cultivated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. SM had no effect on miR-210 under normoxia. However, miR-210 levels were greatly increased in NHEK when grown in hypoxia and further elevated upon exposure of the cells to SM. In normoxia and hypoxia, inhibition of miR-203 by transfection of NHEK with complementary oligonucleotides, anti-miR-203, attenuated the SM-induced impairment of metabolic activity and proliferation, and counteracted SM-promoted keratin-1 expression in these cells. Consistent ameliorating effects on dysregulated metabolic activity, proliferation and keratin-1 expression in SM-treated NHEK were obtained upon inhibition of miR-210 in these cells grown in hypoxia. Our findings provide evidence that miR-203 and miR-210 are key regulators in normal and SM-impaired keratinocyte functionality, and suggest potential usefulness of inhibitors against miR-203 and miR-210 for target-directed therapeutical intervention to improve re-epithelialization of SM-injured skin. PMID:26383628

  18. Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Hayden, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2011-06-01

    Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

  19. An improved method for retrospective quantification of sulfur mustard exposure by detection of its albumin adduct using ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, ChangCai; Liang, LongHui; Xiang, Yu; Yu, HuiLan; Zhou, ShiKun; Xi, HaiLing; Liu, ShiLei; Liu, JingQuan

    2015-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) adduct to human serum albumin (ALB) at Cys-34 residue has become an important and long-term retrospective biomarker of HD exposure. Here, a novel, sensitive, and convenient approach for retrospective quantification of HD concentration exposed to plasma was established by detection of the HD-ALB adduct using ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) with a novel non-isotope internal standard (IS). The HD-ALB adduct was isolated from HD-exposed plasma with blue Sepharose. The adduct was digested with proteinase K to form sulfur-hydroxyethylthioethyl ([S-HETE])-Cys-Pro-Phe tripeptide biomarker. The tripeptide adduct could be directly analyzed by UHPLC-MS/MS without an additional solid phase extraction (SPE), which was considered as a critical procedure in previous methods. The easily available 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (2-CEES) as HD surrogate was first reported to be used as IS in place of traditional d8-HD for quantification of HD exposure. Furthermore, 2-CEES was also confirmed to be a good IS alternative for quantification of HD exposure by investigation of product ion spectra for their corresponding tripeptide adducts which exhibited identical MS/MS fragmentation behaviors. The method was found to be linear between 1.00 and 250 ng•mL(-1) HD exposure (R(2)>0.9989) with precision of <4.50% relative standard deviation (%RSD), accuracy range between 96.5% and 114%, and a calculated limit of detection (LOD) of 0.532 ng•mL(-1). The lowest reportable limit (LRL) is 1.00 ng•mL(-1), over seven times lower than that of the previous method. The entire method required only 0.1 mL of plasma sample and took under 7 h without special sample preparation equipment. It is proven to be a sensitive, simple, and rugged method, which is easily applied in international laboratories to improve the capabilities for the analysis of biomedical samples related to verification of the Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC). PMID

  20. Molecular biology basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to dna damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Final report, 30 April 1990-30 July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1994-08-30

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments whose intent has been to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) in cultured keratinocytes. During this study, human keratinocyte lines were stably transfected with the cDNA for human PADPRP in the antisense orientation under an inducible promoter. Induction of this antisense RNA by dexamethasone in cultured cells selectively lowered levels of PADPRP in RNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Induction of antisense RNA led to a reduction in the levels of PADPRP in individual cell nuclei, as well as the loss of the ability of cells to synthesize and modify proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer in response to an alkylating agent. When keratinocyte clones containing the antisense construct or empty vector alone were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. The PADPRP antisense construct was also inducible in vivo by the topical application of dexamethasone to the reconstituted epidermis. In addition, poly(ADP-ribose) polymer could be induced and detected in vivo following the topical application of a sulfur mustard to the grafted transfected skin layers. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PADPRP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in cell culture, and potentially in reconstituted epidermis as well.

  1. Recent trends in the chemistry of sulfur-containing reducing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Sergei V.

    2001-10-01

    Data on the structure, synthesis, stability and reactivity of sulfur-containing reducing agents with C-S or S-S bonds — sodium dithionite, sodium hydroxymethanesulfinate and thiourea oxides — are surveyed. Reactions of anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of sulfur-containing reducing agents are discussed. The applications of these compounds in the studies of non-linear phenomena in chemical kinetics and in guanidine syntheses are considered. The bibliography includes 165 references.

  2. Sulfur polymer cement, a solidification and stabilization agent for hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, G.R.

    1992-09-01

    Hydraulic cements have been the primary radioactive waste stabilization agents in the United States for 50 years. Twelve years ago, Brookhaven National Laboratory was funded by the Department of Energy`s Defense Low-Level Waste Management Program to test and develop sulfur polymer cement (SPC). It has stabilized routine wastes as well as some troublesome wastes with high waste-to-agent ratios. The Department of Energy`s Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program joined the effort by providing funding for testing and developing sulfur polymer cement as a hazardous-waste stabilization agent. Sulfur polymer cement has passed all the laboratory scale tests required by the US Environmental Protection Agency and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two decades of tests by the US Bureau of Mines and private concrete contractors indicate this agent is likely to exceed other agents in longevity. This bulletin provides technical data from pertinent tests conducted by these various entities.

  3. Sulfur polymer cement, a solidification and stabilization agent for hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Hydraulic cements have been the primary radioactive waste stabilization agents in the United States for 50 years. Twelve years ago, Brookhaven National Laboratory was funded by the Department of Energy's Defense Low-Level Waste Management Program to test and develop sulfur polymer cement (SPC). It has stabilized routine wastes as well as some troublesome wastes with high waste-to-agent ratios. The Department of Energy's Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program joined the effort by providing funding for testing and developing sulfur polymer cement as a hazardous-waste stabilization agent. Sulfur polymer cement has passed all the laboratory scale tests required by the US Environmental Protection Agency and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two decades of tests by the US Bureau of Mines and private concrete contractors indicate this agent is likely to exceed other agents in longevity. This bulletin provides technical data from pertinent tests conducted by these various entities.

  4. Toward Hypoxia-Selective DNA-Alkylating Agents Built by Grafting Nitrogen Mustards onto the Bioreductively Activated, Hypoxia-Selective DNA-Oxidizing Agent 3-Amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-Dioxide (Tirapazamine)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide) is a heterocyclic di-N-oxide that undergoes enzymatic deoxygenation selectively in the oxygen-poor (hypoxic) cells found in solid tumors to generate a mono-N-oxide metabolite. This work explored the idea that the electronic changes resulting from the metabolic deoxygenation of tirapazamine analogues might be exploited to activate a DNA-alkylating species selectively in hypoxic tissue. Toward this end, tirapazamine analogues bearing nitrogen mustard units were prepared. In the case of the tirapazamine analogue 18a bearing a nitrogen mustard unit at the 6-position, it was found that removal of the 4-oxide from the parent di-N-oxide to generate the mono-N-oxide analogue 17a did indeed cause a substantial increase in reactivity of the mustard unit, as measured by hydrolysis rates and DNA-alkylation yields. Hammett sigma values were measured to quantitatively assess the magnitude of the electronic changes induced by metabolic deoxygenation of the 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide heterocycle. The results provide evidence that the 1,2,4-benzotiazine 1,4-dioxide unit can serve as an oxygen-sensing prodrug platform for the selective unmasking of bioactive agents in hypoxic cells. PMID:25029663

  5. Th17/Treg-related cytokine imbalance in sulfur mustard exposed and stable chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD) patients: correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated expression changes of Th17/Treg-related cytokine in transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLBs) of sulfur mustard (SM) exposure, stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and also compared it with a healthy control (HC) group. Here, ROR-γt, FoxP3, and Treg/Th17-related cytokines (IL-10, IL-17A, IL-6, and TGF-β1) were assessed using a combination of RT-QPCR and ELISA in 11 SM-exposed cases, 9 patients with GOLD stage II COPD diagnosed, and 8 HC. Our results showed that the levels of Foxp3 expression were lower and ROR-γt expression was higher in SM and COPD patients when compared with HC (all p values were less than 0.001). The relative Foxp3 expressions and Foxp3/ROR-γt ratio were positively correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.682 and R = 0.602, respectively; p ≤ 0.001). However, the relative ROR-γt expressions were inversely correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R= -0.75, p = 0.003) and relative Foxp3 expression (R= -0.704, p = 0.003). The mRNA and protein expression of IL-10 were significantly decreased in SM and COPD patients compared with HC (p < 0.001). An increase of IL-17A (∼7.2 fold) and TGF-β1 (∼5.6 fold) are involved in the lung exacerbation of SM and COPD patients. The expression of IL-6 was variable between three groups (p ≥ 0.05). In addition, an inverse correlation were observed between FEV1 (%) pred and expressions of IL-17A (R= -0.741), IL-6 (R= -0.673) and TGF-β1 (R= -0.632) (p ≤ 0.001). Instead, positive correlation was found between IL-10 ratios and FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.777, p = 0.001). These findings suggest that Treg/Th17-mediated distributions are involved in the progression of chronic lung injury of SM and COPD patients. PMID:27241137

  6. Effects of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition on sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injuries in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Jiang, Ning; Xiao, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Jun-ping; Mei, Yi-zhou; Zheng, Pan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Xin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Early studies with first-generation poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have already indicated some therapeutic potential for sulfur mustard (SM) injuries. The available novel and more potential PARP inhibitors, which are undergoing clinical trials as drugs for cancer treatment, bring it back to the centre of interest. However, the role of PARP-1 in SM-induced injury is not fully understood. In this study, we selected a high potent specific PARP inhibitor ABT-888 as an example to investigate the effect of PARP inhibitor in SM injury. The results showed that in both the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) and HaCaT cell model, PARP inhibitor ABT-888 can reduce cell damage induced by severe SM injury. ABT-888 significantly reduced SM induced edema and epidermal necrosis in MEVM. In the HaCaT cell model, ABT-888 can reduce SM-induced NAD+/ATP depletion and apoptosis/necrosis. Then, we studied the mechanism of PARP-1 in SM injury by knockdown of PARP-1 in HaCaT cells. Knockdown of PARP-1 protected cell viability and downregulated the apoptosis checkpoints, including p-JNK, p-p53, Caspase 9, Caspase 8, c-PARP and Caspase 3 following SM-induced injury. Furthermore, the activation of AKT can inhibit autophagy via the regulation of mTOR. Our results showed that SM exposure could significantly inhibit the activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. Knockdown of PARP-1 reversed the SM-induced suppression of the Akt/mTOR pathway. In summary, the results of our study indicated that the protective effects of downregulation of PARP-1 in SM injury may be due to the regulation of apoptosis, necrosis, energy crisis and autophagy. However, it should be noticed that PARP inhibitor ABT-888 further enhanced the phosphorylation of H2AX (S139) after SM exposure, which indicated that we should be very careful in the application of PARP inhibitors in SM injury treatment because of the enhancement of DNA damage. PMID:27077006

  7. Monitoring urinary metabolites resulting from sulfur mustard exposure in rabbits, using highly sensitive isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yajiao; Chen, Jia; Lin, Ying; Wu, Bidong; Dong, Yuan; Feng, Jianlin; Liu, Qin; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-08-01

    A highly sensitive method for the determination of sulfur mustard (SM) metabolites thiodiglycol (TDG) and thiodiglycol sulfoxide (TDGO) in urine was established and validated using isotope-dilution negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). TDGO in the samples was reduced with TiCl3, and then determined together with TDG as a single analyte. The sample preparation procedures, including two solid-phase-extraction (SPE) clean-up steps, were optimized to improve the sensitivity of the method. The limits of detection (LOD) for both TDG and TDG plus TDGO (TDG + TDGO) were 0.1 ng mL(-1), and the limits of quantitation (LOQ) for both were 0.3 ng mL(-1). The method was used in a rabbit cutaneous SM exposure model. Domestic rabbits were exposed to neat liquid SM at three dosage levels (0.02, 0.05, and 0.15 LD50), and the urinary excretion of four species of hydrolysis metabolites, namely free TDG, free plus conjugated TDG (total TDG), free TDG + TDGO, and free plus conjugated TDG + TDGO (total TDG + TDGO), was evaluated to investigate the metabolic processes. The total urinary excretion profiles of the metabolites, including the peak time, time window, and dose-response and time-response relationships, were clarified. The results revealed that the concentrations of TDG and TDG + TDGO in the urine increased quickly and then decreased rapidly in the first two days after SM exposure. The cumulative amount of total TDG + TDGO excreted in urine during the first five days accounted for 0.5-1% of the applied dose of SM. It is also concluded that TDG and TDGO in urine existed mainly in free form, the levels of glucuronide and of sulfate conjugates of TDG or TDGO were very low, and most hydrolysis metabolites were present in the oxidized form (TDGO). The study indicates that the abnormal increase of TDG and TDGO excretion levels can be used as a diagnostic indicator and establishes a reference time-window for retrospective analysis and

  8. sup 14 C-sulfur mustard adducts of calf thymus DNA. Final report, Aug-Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Yaverbaum, S.

    1991-02-01

    A grant was awarded to TNO-PML to develop immunochemical monitoring systems for the detection of DNA-HD and Protein-HD adducts in humans following exposure to HD. TNO-PML has been using 35S-HD to prepare adducts for their assays, which have inherent shortcomings that limit detection sensitivity. An experimental batch of 14C-HD-DNA adducts was prepared in an attempt to increase the assay sensitivity. Double - and single-stranded purified calf thymus DNA preparations were reacted with 142, 14.2 and 1.42 uM of 14C-HD under aqueousfree conditions. The 14C-HD-DNA adducts were isolated at -20C in 75% ethanol solution and freed of HD agent and organic solvents (i.e., acetone and alcohol). The 14C-HD-DNA adducts in aqueous buffer were analyzed for specific activity and purity. The ds-DNA-HD adducts were uncontaminated, but the ss-DNA-HD adducts were initially slightly contaminated with alcohol.

  9. Biological and molecular mechanisms of sulfur mustard analogue-induced toxicity in JB6 and HaCaT cells: possible role of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated/ataxia telangiectasia-Rad3-related cell cycle checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2010-06-21

    Effective medical treatment and preventive measures for chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD)-caused incapacitating skin toxicity are lacking, because of limited knowledge of its mechanism of action. The proliferating basal epidermal cells are primary major sites of attack during HD-caused skin injury. Therefore, employing mouse JB6 and human HaCaT epidermal cells, here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of HD analogue 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES)-induced skin cytotoxicity. As compared to the control, up to 1 mM CEES treatment of these cells for 2, 4, and 24 h caused dose-dependent decreases in cell viability and proliferation as measured by DNA synthesis, together with S and G2-M phase arrest in cell cycle progression. Mechanistic studies showed phosphorylation of DNA damage sensors and checkpoint kinases, ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) at ser1981 and ataxia telangiectasia-Rad3-related (ATR) at ser428 within 30 min of CEES exposure, and modulation of S and G2-M phase-associated cell cycle regulatory proteins, which are downstream targets of ATM and ATR kinases. Hoechst-propidium iodide staining demonstrated that CEES-induced cell death was both necrotic and apoptotic in nature, and the latter was induced at 4 and 24 h of CEES treatment in HaCaT and JB6 cells, respectively. An increase in caspase-3 activity and both caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage coinciding with CEES-caused apoptosis in both cell lines suggested the involvement of the caspase pathway. Together, our findings suggest a DNA-damaging effect of CEES that activates ATM/ATR cell cycle checkpoint signaling as well as caspase-PARP pathways, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/necrosis in both JB6 and HaCaT cells. The identified molecular targets, quantitative biomarkers, and epidermal cell models in this study have the potential and usefulness in rapid development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against HD-induced skin toxicity

  10. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant. PMID:27212445

  11. Preclinical investigation of the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and protein and red blood cell binding of DRDE-07: a prophylactic agent against sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pankaj; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2014-10-01

    DRDE-07, a newly synthesized amifostine analog currently under clinical investigation in a phase I trial, is a potent antidote against sulfur mustard toxicity. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of DRDE-07 in female Swiss Albino mice after a single oral dose of 400 or 600 mg/kg. The physicochemical properties of DRDE-07, including solubility, pK a, Log P, plasma protein binding and plasma/blood partitioning, were determined to support the pharmacokinetic characterization. DRDE-07 concentration was determined by an HPLC-UV method. The profile of plasma concentration versus time was analyzed using a non-compartmental model. Plasma protein binding was assessed using ultrafiltration. DRDE-07 appeared rapidly in plasma after oral administration with peak plasma levels (C max) observed in less than 15 min. There was a rapid decline in the plasma levels followed by a smaller second peak about 90 min after dosing. The plasma protein binding of DRDE-07 was found to be less than 25% at all concentrations studied. Plasma clearance of DRDE-07 is expected to be ~1.5 fold higher than the blood clearance of DRDE-07. The probable metabolite of DRDE-07 was identified as phenyl-S-ethyl amine. PMID:26579409

  12. Wipe selection for the analysis of surface materials containing chemical warfare agent nitrogen mustard degradation products by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Willison, Stuart A

    2012-12-28

    Degradation products arising from nitrogen mustard chemical warfare agent were deposited on common urban surfaces and determined via surface wiping, wipe extraction, and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry detection. Wipes investigated included cotton gauze, glass fiber filter, non-woven polyester fiber and filter paper, and surfaces included several porous (vinyl tile, painted drywall, wood) and mostly non-porous (laminate, galvanized steel, glass) surfaces. Wipe extracts were analyzed by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS/MS) and compared with high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS/MS) results. An evaluation of both techniques suggests UPLC–MS/MS provides a quick and sensitive analysis of targeted degradation products in addition to being nearly four times faster than a single HPLC run, allowing for greater throughput during a wide-spread release concerning large-scale contamination and subsequent remediation events. Based on the overall performance of all tested wipes, filter paper wipes were selected over other wipes because they did not contain interferences or native species (TEA and DEA) associated with the target analytes, resulting in high percent recoveries and low background levels during sample analysis. Other wipes, including cotton gauze, would require a pre-cleaning step due to the presence of large quantities of native species or interferences of the targeted analytes. Percent recoveries obtained from a laminate surface were 47–99% for all nitrogen mustard degradation products. The resulting detection limits achieved from wipes were 0.2 ng/cm(2) for triethanolamine (TEA), 0.03 ng/cm(2) for N-ethyldiethanolamine (EDEA), 0.1 ng/cm(2) for N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and 0.1 ng/cm(2) for diethanolamine (DEA). PMID:23218189

  13. Inflammatory mechanisms of pulmonary injury induced by mustards.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Vayas, Kinal N; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-02-26

    Exposure of humans and animals to vesicants, including sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), causes severe and debilitating damage to the respiratory tract. Both acute and long term pathological consequences are observed in the lung following a single exposure to these vesicants. Evidence from our laboratories and others suggest that macrophages and the inflammatory mediators they release play an important role in mustard-induced lung injury. In this paper, the pathogenic effects of SM and NM on the lung are reviewed, along with the potential role of inflammatory macrophages and mediators they release in mustard-induced pulmonary toxicity. PMID:26478570

  14. Rubber vulcanizing agents comprising reaction products of sulfur and unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.H.; Woodruff, D.; Flanders, S.K.; Swigert, J.L.

    1988-04-26

    A process for making an improved vulcanizing agent is described comprising the steps of: A. providing starting materials consisting essentially of sulfur and an unsaturated reactant selected from at least one of d-limonene, 5-ethylidene-2-norbornene, styrene, and dicyclopentadiene; B. reacting the starting materials at a first temperature greater than the melting point of the sulfur and less than the temperature at which the sulfur begins to be converted to insoluble sulfur until substantially all of the unsaturated reactant is consumed, forming an intermediate product; C. maintaining the intermediate product at a second temperature greater than the melting point of the sulfur and the same as or different from the first temperature for a sufficient time to form an end product which is dispersible in rubber and provides less sulfur bloom than insoluble sulfur when incorporated in a rubber composition; and D. terminating the maintaining step by reducing the temperature of the end product, thereby maintaining the dispersibility of the end product in rubber.

  15. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2004-11-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. Characterizations of dry PFS synthesized from SO{sub 2} show the PFS possesses amorphous structure, which is desired for it to be a good coagulant in water and wastewater treatment. A series of lab-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of PFS synthesized from waste sulfur dioxide, ferrous sulfate and sodium chlorate. The performance assessments were based on the comparison of PFS and other conventional and new coagulants for the removal of turbidity and arsenic under different laboratory coagulant conditions. Pilot plant studies were conducted at Des Moines Water Works in Iowa and at the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic (I&D) Water Treatment Plant in Port Wentworth, Georgia. PFS performances were compared with those of conventional coagulants. The tests in both water treatment plants have shown that PFS is, in general, comparable or better than other coagulants in removal of turbidity and organic substances. The corrosion behavior of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) prepared from SO{sub 2} and ferric chloride (FC) were compared. Results

  16. Increased γ-H2AX and Rad51 DNA Repair Biomarker Expression in Human Cell Lines Resistant to the Chemotherapeutic Agents Nitrogen Mustard and Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Adam-Zahir, Sheba; Plowman, Piers N; Bourton, Emma C; Sharif, Fariha; Parris, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs mediate cytotoxicity by a number of mechanisms. However, alkylating agents which induce DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL) are amongst the most effective anticancer agents and often form the mainstay of many anticancer therapies. The effectiveness of these drugs can be limited by the development of drug resistance in cancer cells and many studies have demonstrated that alterations in DNA repair kinetics are responsible for drug resistance. In this study we developed two cell lines resistant to the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard (HN2) and cisplatin (Pt). To determine if drug resistance was associated with enhanced ICL DNA repair we used immunocytochemistry and imaging flow cytometry to quantitate the number of γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells after drug exposure. γ-H2AX was used to evaluate DNA strand breaks caused by repair incision nucleases and Rad51 was used to measure the activity of homologous recombination in the repair of ICL. In the drug-resistant derivative cell lines there was overall a significant increase in the number and persistence of both γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells over a 72-hour period, when compared to the non-resistant parental cell lines (ANOVA p < 0.0001). In a Pt-resistant ovarian cancer cell line (A2780cis(R)) a similar enhancement of DNA repair was observed when compared to the non-drug-resistant wild-type ovarian cancer cells (A2780) following exposure to HN2. Our data suggest that using DNA repair biomarkers to evaluate mechanisms of resistance in cancer cell lines and human tumours may be of experimental and clinical benefit. We concede, however, that examination of a larger population of cell lines and tumours is required to fully evaluate the validity of this approach. PMID:26138778

  17. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2002-10-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. The PFS product was used in pilot-scale tests at a municipal water treatment facility and gave good results in removal of turbidity and superior results in removal of disinfection byproduct precursors (TOC, DOC, UV-254) when compared with equal doses of ferric chloride.

  18. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, E.L.; Boulware, S.; Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L.; DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M.; MacLeod, M.C.

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  19. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils. PMID:17894540

  20. Sulfur compounds in therapy: Radiation-protective agents, amphetamines, and mucopolysaccharide sulfation

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, W.O. )

    1992-09-01

    Sulfur-containing compounds have been used in the search for whole-body radiation-protective compounds, in the design of amphetamine derivatives that retain appetite-suppressive effects but lack most behavioral effects characteristic of amphetamines, and in the search for the cause of kidney stone formation in recurrently stoneforming patients. Organic synthetic procedures were used to prepare radiation-protective compounds having a variety of sulfur-containing functional groups, and to prepare amphetamine derivatives having electron-attracting sulfur functions. In the case of the kidney stone causation research, isolation of urinary mucopolysaccharides (MPS) from recurrently stoneforming patients was carried out and the extent of sulfation of the MPS was determined by electrophoresis. Whole-body radiation-protective agents with a high degree of protection against lethal doses of gamma-radiation in mice were found in a series of quinolinium and pyridinium bis(methylthio) and methylthio amino derivatives. Mechanism studies showed that the copper complexes of these agents mimicked the beneficial action of superoxide dismutase. Electron-attracting sulfur-containing functions on amphetamine nitrogen, as well as 4'-amino nitrogen provided amphetamine derivatives with good appetite-suppressant effects and few or no adverse behavioral effects. Higher than normal levels of sulfation of the urinary MPS of stone formers suggested a cause for recurrent kidney stone formation. A sulfation inhibitor was found to prevent recurrence of stone formation and inhibit growth of existing stones. The inclusion of various sulfur-containing functions in organic molecules yielded compounds having whole-body radiation protection from lethal doses of gamma-radiation in animals. The presence of electron-attracting sulfur functions in amphetamine gave derivatives that retained appetite-suppressant effects and eliminated most adverse behavioral effects.

  1. TOXICOLOGY STUDIES OF LEWISITE AND SULFUR MUSTARD AGENTS:GENETIC TOXICITY OF LEWISITE (L) IN CHINESE HAMSTER OVARY CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jostes,R.F. Jr.; Sasser, LB; Rausch, R.J.

    1989-05-31

    The cytotoxic clastogenic and mutagenic effects of the arsenic containing vesicant, Lewisite (L) [dichloro(2-chlorovinyl) arsine], have been investigated using Chinese hamster ovary cells. One hour exposures to Lewisite were cytotoxic in uM amounts. The cell survival response yields a D37 of 0.6 uM and an extrapolation number of 2.5. The mutagenic response at the hypoxantnine-guanine phosporibosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus was sporadic and not significantly greater than control values when cells were exposed over a range of 0.125 to2.0 uM. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction, a measure of chromosomal rearrangement, was weakly positive over a range of 0.25 to 1.0 uM but the values were not significantly greater than the control response. Chromosomal aberrations were induced at 0.75 and 1.0 UMin one experiment and 0.5 and 0.75 uM in another experiment. The Induced values were significantly greater than the control values. Lewisite appears to be cytotoxic and clastogenic in our investigations but SCE and mutation at the HGPRT locus are not significantly greater than control values. Lewisita toxicity was in some ways similar to radiomimetic chemicals such as bleomycin.

  2. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Mutagenicity of Lewisite in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D. L.; Sass, E. J.; Fritz, L. K.; Sasser, L. B.

    1989-07-31

    The mutagenic potential of lewisite was evaluated in the standard plate incorporation method and by the preincubation modification of the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay with tester strains TA97, TA98, TAlOO and TA102. All strains were tested with activation (20 and 50 {micro}l/ plate) and without activation. The lewisite was screened initially for toxicity with TA98 over a range of concentrations from 0.01 to 250 {micro}g of material per plate. However, concentrations selected for mutagenicity testing were adjusted to a range of 0.001 to 5 {micro}g/plate because of the sensitivity of tester strain TA102, which exhibited cytotoxicity at 0.01 ug/plate. No mutagenic response was exhibited by any of the strains in either method used. All other tester strains showed evidence of cytoxicity (reduction in mutagen response or sparse background lawn) at 5.0 {micro}g/plate or lower.

  3. The sources, fate, and toxicity of chemical warfare agent degradation products.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, N B; Talmage, S S; Griffin, G D; Waters, L C; Watson, A P; King, J F; Hauschild, V

    1999-01-01

    We include in this review an assessment of the formation, environmental fate, and mammalian and ecotoxicity of CW agent degradation products relevant to environmental and occupational health. These parent CW agents include several vesicants: sulfur mustards [undistilled sulfur mustard (H), sulfur mustard (HD), and an HD/agent T mixture (HT)]; nitrogen mustards [ethylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN1), methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN2), tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3)], and Lewisite; four nerve agents (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), and soman (GD)); and the blood agent cyanogen chloride. The degradation processes considered here include hydrolysis, microbial degradation, oxidation, and photolysis. We also briefly address decontamination but not combustion processes. Because CW agents are generally not considered very persistent, certain degradation products of significant persistence, even those that are not particularly toxic, may indicate previous CW agent presence or that degradation has occurred. Of those products for which there are data on both environmental fate and toxicity, only a few are both environmentally persistent and highly toxic. Major degradation products estimated to be of significant persistence (weeks to years) include thiodiglycol for HD; Lewisite oxide for Lewisite; and ethyl methyl phosphonic acid, methyl phosphonic acid, and possibly S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioic acid (EA 2192) for VX. Methyl phosphonic acid is also the ultimate hydrolysis product of both GB and GD. The GB product, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, and a closely related contaminant of GB, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, are also persistent. Of all of these compounds, only Lewisite oxide and EA 2192 possess high mammalian toxicity. Unlike other CW agents, sulfur mustard agents (e.g., HD) are somewhat persistent; therefore, sites or conditions involving potential HD contamination should include an

  4. The sources, fate, and toxicity of chemical warfare agent degradation products.

    PubMed

    Munro, N B; Talmage, S S; Griffin, G D; Waters, L C; Watson, A P; King, J F; Hauschild, V

    1999-12-01

    We include in this review an assessment of the formation, environmental fate, and mammalian and ecotoxicity of CW agent degradation products relevant to environmental and occupational health. These parent CW agents include several vesicants: sulfur mustards [undistilled sulfur mustard (H), sulfur mustard (HD), and an HD/agent T mixture (HT)]; nitrogen mustards [ethylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN1), methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN2), tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3)], and Lewisite; four nerve agents (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), and soman (GD)); and the blood agent cyanogen chloride. The degradation processes considered here include hydrolysis, microbial degradation, oxidation, and photolysis. We also briefly address decontamination but not combustion processes. Because CW agents are generally not considered very persistent, certain degradation products of significant persistence, even those that are not particularly toxic, may indicate previous CW agent presence or that degradation has occurred. Of those products for which there are data on both environmental fate and toxicity, only a few are both environmentally persistent and highly toxic. Major degradation products estimated to be of significant persistence (weeks to years) include thiodiglycol for HD; Lewisite oxide for Lewisite; and ethyl methyl phosphonic acid, methyl phosphonic acid, and possibly S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioic acid (EA 2192) for VX. Methyl phosphonic acid is also the ultimate hydrolysis product of both GB and GD. The GB product, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, and a closely related contaminant of GB, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, are also persistent. Of all of these compounds, only Lewisite oxide and EA 2192 possess high mammalian toxicity. Unlike other CW agents, sulfur mustard agents (e.g., HD) are somewhat persistent; therefore, sites or conditions involving potential HD contamination should include an

  5. Waste form development/test. [Low-density polyethylene and modified sulfur cement as solidification agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1983-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate new solidification agents relative to their potential application to wastes generated by advanced high volume reduction technologies, e.g., incinerator ash, dry solids, and ion exchange resins. Candidate materials selected for the solidification of these wastes include a modified sulfur cement and low-density polyethylene, neither of which are currently employed commerically for the solidification of low-level waste (LLW). As both the modified sulfur cement and the polyethylene are thermoplastic materials, a heated screw type extruder is utilized in the production of waste form samples for testing and evaluation. In this regard, work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be satisfactorily applied to the specific LLW streams and to provide information relevant to operating parameters and process control.

  6. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in human glioblastoma cells by the DNA N-mustard alkylating agent BO-1051 through augmented and sustained DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 1-{4-[Bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl}-3-[2-methyl-5-(4-methylacridin-9-ylamino)phenyl]urea (BO-1051) is an N-mustard DNA alkylating agent reported to exhibit antitumor activity. Here we further investigate the effects of this compound on radiation responses of human gliomas, which are notorious for the high resistance to radiotherapy. Methods The clonogenic assay was used to determine the IC50 and radiosensitivity of human glioma cell lines (U87MG, U251MG and GBM-3) following BO-1051. DNA histogram and propidium iodide-Annexin V staining were used to determine the cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis, respectively. DNA damage and repair state were determined by γ-H2AX foci, and mitotic catastrophe was measure using nuclear fragmentation. Xenograft tumors were measured with a caliper, and the survival rate was determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Results BO-1051 inhibited growth of human gliomas in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using the dosage at IC50, BO-1051 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity to different extents [The sensitizer enhancement ratio was between 1.24 and 1.50 at 10% of survival fraction]. The radiosensitive G2/M population was raised by BO-1051, whereas apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were not affected. γ-H2AX foci was greatly increased and sustained by combined BO-1051 and γ-rays, suggested that DNA damage or repair capacity was impaired during treatment. In vivo studies further demonstrated that BO-1051 enhanced the radiotherapeutic effects on GBM-3-beared xenograft tumors, by which the sensitizer enhancement ratio was 1.97. The survival rate of treated mice was also increased accordingly. Conclusions These results indicate that BO-1051 can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. It suggests that BO-1051 is a potent radiosensitizer for treating human glioma cells. PMID:21244709

  7. Preventive measures against the mustard gas: a review

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Mansour; Karbakhsh, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    The main aim in this study was to collect the experiences of Iranian researchers about sulfur mustard (SM) and provide a guideline for the prevention of abuse for this dangerous agent. We searched valid national and international databases using related key words in the two languages. We found 193 articles which had been published in medical journals. Among them, 25 articles had some implications about prevention measures. In this study, we have mentioned 8 preventive points before the attacks, 10 points during and 2 points afterwards, we also found 12 points for the prevention of people who were exposed with SM and suffering from respiratory, ocular, dermatologic and psychological complications. In conclusion, most of the published studies on chemical war victims in Iran are focused on diagnosis and treatment of late SM-induced complications. Hence, a research should be conducted separately in relation to the prevention. PMID:23741170

  8. Evaluation of Molecular Markers and Analytical Methods Documenting the Occurrence of Mustard Gas and Arsenical Warfare Agents in Soil.

    PubMed

    Sassolini, Alessandro; Brinchi, Giampaolo; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Dionisi, Simone; Dominici, Carola; Fantozzi, Luca; Onofri, Giorgio; Piazza, Rosario; Guidotti, Maurizio

    2016-09-01

    The chemicals warfare agents (CWAs) are an extremely toxic class of molecules widely produced in many industrialized countries for decades, these compounds frequently contained arsenic. The plants where the CWAs have been produced or the plants where they have been demilitarized after the Second World War with unacceptable techniques can represent a serious environmental problem. CWAs standards are difficult to find on market so in present work an environmental assessment method based on markers has been proposed. Triphenylarsine, phenylarsine oxide and thiodiglycol have been selected as markers. Three reliable analytical methods based on gaschromatography and mass detection have been proposed and tested for quantitative analysis of markers. Methods performance have been evaluated testing uncertainty, linearity, recovery and detection limits and also comparing detection limits with exposure limits of reference CWAs. Proposed assessment methods have been applied to a case study of a former industrial plant sited in an area characterized by a high background of mineral arsenic. PMID:27385368

  9. Estimated Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Clearance Goals for Remediation Pre-Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dolislager, Frederick; Bansleben, Dr. Donald; Watson, Annetta Paule

    2010-01-01

    Health-based surface clearance goals, in units of mg/cm2, have been developed for the persistent chemical warfare agents sulfur mustard (HD) and nerve agent VX as well as their principal degradation products. Selection of model parameters and critical receptor (toddler child) allow calculation of surface residue estimates protective for the toddler child, the general population and adult employees of a facilty that has undergone chemical warfare agent attack.

  10. Toxicity of vesicant agents scheduled for destruction by the chemical stockpile disposal program

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Griffin, G.D. )

    1992-11-01

    The vesicant agents of the unitary chemical munitions stockpile include various formulations of sulfur mustard [bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide; agents H, HD, and HT] and small quantities of the organic arsenical Lewisite [dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine; agent L]. These agents can be dispersed in liquid, aerosol, or vapor form and are capable of producing severe chemical burns upon direct contact with tissue. Moist tissues such as the eyes, respiratory tract, and axillary areas are particularly affected. Available data summarizing acute dose response in humans and laboratory animals are summarized. Vesicant agents are also capable of generating delayed effects such as chronic bronchitis, carcinogenesis, or keratitis/keratopathy of the eye under appropriate conditions of exposure and dose. These effects may not become manifest until years following exposure. Risk analysis derived from carcinogenesis data indicates that sulfur mustard possesses a carcinogenic potency similar to that of benzo[a]pyrene. Because mustard agents are alkylating compounds, they destroy individual cells by reaction with cellular proteins, enzymes, RNA, and DNA. Once begun, tissue reaction is irreversible. Mustard agents are mutagenic; data for cellular and laboratory animal assays are presented. Reproductive effects have not been demonstrated in the offspring of laboratory rats. Acute Lewisite exposure has been implicated in cases of Bowen's disease, an intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma. Lewisite is not known to generate reproductive or teratogenic effects. 112 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  11. Toxicity of vesicant agents scheduled for destruction by the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program.

    PubMed

    Watson, A P; Griffin, G D

    1992-11-01

    The vesicant agents of the unitary chemical munitions stockpile include various formulations of sulfur mustard [bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide; agents H, HD, and HT] and small quantities of the organic arsenical Lewisite [dichloro(2-chlorovinyl) arsine; agent L]. These agents can be dispersed in liquid, aerosol, or vapor form and are capable of producing severe chemical burns upon direct contact with tissue. Moist tissues such as the eyes, respiratory tract, and axillary areas are particularly affected. Available data summarizing acute dose response in humans and laboratory animals are summarized. Vesicant agents are also capable of generating delayed effects such as chronic bronchitis, carcinogenesis, or keratitis/keratopathy of the eye under appropriate conditions of exposure and dose. These effects may not become manifest until years following exposure. Risk analysis derived from carcinogenesis data indicates that sulfur mustard possesses a carcinogenic potency similar to that of benzo[a]pyrene. Because mustard agents are alkylating compounds, they destroy individual cells by reaction with cellular proteins, enzymes, RNA, and DNA. Once begun, tissue reaction is irreversible. Mustard agents are mutagenic; data for cellular and laboratory animal assays are presented. Reproductive effects have not been demonstrated in the offspring of laboratory rats. Acute Lewisite exposure has been implicated in cases of Bowen's disease, an intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma. Lewisite is not known to generate reproductive or teratogenic effects. PMID:1486858

  12. Toxicity of vesicant agents scheduled for destruction by the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A P; Griffin, G D

    1992-01-01

    The vesicant agents of the unitary chemical munitions stockpile include various formulations of sulfur mustard [bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide; agents H, HD, and HT] and small quantities of the organic arsenical Lewisite [dichloro(2-chlorovinyl) arsine; agent L]. These agents can be dispersed in liquid, aerosol, or vapor form and are capable of producing severe chemical burns upon direct contact with tissue. Moist tissues such as the eyes, respiratory tract, and axillary areas are particularly affected. Available data summarizing acute dose response in humans and laboratory animals are summarized. Vesicant agents are also capable of generating delayed effects such as chronic bronchitis, carcinogenesis, or keratitis/keratopathy of the eye under appropriate conditions of exposure and dose. These effects may not become manifest until years following exposure. Risk analysis derived from carcinogenesis data indicates that sulfur mustard possesses a carcinogenic potency similar to that of benzo[a]pyrene. Because mustard agents are alkylating compounds, they destroy individual cells by reaction with cellular proteins, enzymes, RNA, and DNA. Once begun, tissue reaction is irreversible. Mustard agents are mutagenic; data for cellular and laboratory animal assays are presented. Reproductive effects have not been demonstrated in the offspring of laboratory rats. Acute Lewisite exposure has been implicated in cases of Bowen's disease, an intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma. Lewisite is not known to generate reproductive or teratogenic effects. PMID:1486858

  13. Effects of Curcuminoids-Piperine Combination on Systemic Oxidative Stress, Clinical Symptoms and Quality of Life in Subjects with Chronic Pulmonary Complications Due to Sulfur Mustard: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa; Hajhashemi, Ali; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the development of chronic pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard (SM). Curcuminoids are polyphenols with documented safety and antioxidant activity. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of short-term supplementation with curcuminoids (co-administered with piperine to enhance the bioavailability of curcuminoids) in alleviating systemic oxidative stress and clinical symptoms, and improvement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in subjects suffering from chronic pulmonary complications due to SM exposure who are receiving standard respiratory treatments. Eighty-nine subjects were recruited to this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, being randomly allocated to either curcuminoids (1500 mg/day) + piperine (15 mg/day) combination (n = 45) or placebo (n = 44) for a period of 4 weeks. High-resolution computed tomography suggested the diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans in all subjects. Efficacy measures were changes in serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malonedialdehyde (MDA). The severity and frequency of respiratory symptoms and HRQoL were also assessed using St. George respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) indices. Serum levels of GSH were increased whilst those of MDA decreased by the end of trial in both groups. Likewise, there were significant improvements in the total as well as subscale (symptoms, activity and impact) SGRQ and CAT scores in both groups. However, comparison of magnitude of changes revealed a greater effect of curcuminoids-piperine combination compared to placebo in elevating GSH, reducing MDA and improving CAT and SGRQ (total and subscale) scores (p < 0.001). Regarding the promising effects of curcuminoids on the measures of systemic oxidative stress, clinical symptoms and HRQoL, these phytochemicals may be used as safe adjuvants in patients suffering from chronic SM-induced pulmonary complications who are receiving standard treatments

  14. Gas chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of β-lyase metabolites of sulfur mustard adducts with glutathione in urine and its use in a rabbit cutaneous exposure model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Dong, Yuan; Chen, Jia; Li, Chun-Zheng; Nie, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Lei; Liu, Qin; Xie, Jian-Wei

    2014-01-15

    A method for quantitation of β-lyase metabolites of sulfur mustard (SM) adducts with glutathione has been developed and validated using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The linear range of quantitation was 0.1-1000ng/mL in urine with a method detection limit of 0.02ng/mL. The method was applied in a rabbit exposure model. Domestic rabbits were cutaneously exposed to neat liquid SM in three dosage levels, and the β-lyase metabolites in urine were determined as 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio)ethane] (SBMTE). The study showed that even though more than 99% of the total amount of β-lyase metabolites was excreted in the first week after exposure, the β-lyase metabolites of SM adducts with glutathione could be detected in urine from rabbits for up to 3 or 4 weeks after the SM cutaneous exposure. For high dosage group (15mg/kg, 0.15 LD50), the mean concentration of SBMTE detected was 0.32ng/mL on day 28. For middle (5mg/kg, 0.05 LD50) and low (2mg/kg, 0.02 LD50) dosage groups, the mean concentrations of SBMTE were 0.07ng/mL and 0.02ng/mL on day 21, respectively. The data from this study indicate that the method is sensitive and provides a relatively long time frame for the retrospective detection of SM exposure. PMID:24361979

  15. Sulfur polymer cement, a new stabilization agent for mixed and low- level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Solidification and stabilization agents for radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes are failing to pass governmental tests at alarming rates. The Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program funded testing of Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) by Brookhaven National Laboratory during the 1980s. Those tests and tests by the US Bureau of Mines (the original developer of SPC), universities, states, and the concrete industry have shown SPC to be superior to hydraulic cements in most cases. Superior in what wastes can be successfully combined and in the quantity of waste that can be combined and still pass the tests established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  16. Sulfur polymer cement, a new stabilization agent for mixed and low- level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, G.R.

    1991-12-31

    Solidification and stabilization agents for radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes are failing to pass governmental tests at alarming rates. The Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program funded testing of Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) by Brookhaven National Laboratory during the 1980s. Those tests and tests by the US Bureau of Mines (the original developer of SPC), universities, states, and the concrete industry have shown SPC to be superior to hydraulic cements in most cases. Superior in what wastes can be successfully combined and in the quantity of waste that can be combined and still pass the tests established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  17. Cutaneous challenge with chemical warfare agents in the SKH-1 hairless mouse (II): effects of some currently used skin decontaminants (RSDL and Fuller's earth) against liquid sulphur mustard and VX exposure.

    PubMed

    Taysse, L; Dorandeu, F; Daulon, S; Foquin, A; Perrier, N; Lallement, G; Breton, P

    2011-06-01

    Using the hairless mouse screening model presented in the companion paper(1) the aim of this study was to assess two skin decontaminating systems: Fuller's earth (FE) and Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) against two extremely toxic chemical warfare agents that represent a special percutaneous hazard, sulphur mustard (SM) and O-ethyl-S-(2[di-isopropylamino]ethyl)methyl-phosphonothioate (VX). Five minutes after being exposed on the back to either 2 µL of neat sulphur mustard or 50 µg.kg(-1) of diluted VX, mice were decontaminated. Both systems were able to reduce blisters 3 days after SM exposure. However, RSDL was found to be more efficient than FE in reducing the necrosis of the epidermis and erosion. In the case of VX exposure, RSDL, whatever the ratio of decontaminant to toxicant used (RSDL 10, 20, 50), was not able to sufficiently prevent the inhibition of plasma cholinesterases taken as a surrogate marker of exposure and toxicity. Only FE reduced significantly the ChE inhibition. Some of these observations are different from our previous results obtained in domestic swine and these changes are thus discussed in the perspective of using SKH-1 hairless mice for the initial in vivo screening of decontaminants. PMID:20534641

  18. BR1: A new ultrasonographic contrast agent based on sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Scheider, M.; Arditi, M.; Barrau, M.B.

    1995-08-01

    Rationale and objectives. The basic characteristics of BR1, a novel echo contrast agent based on stabilized sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) microbubbles have been evaluated. Methods. The authors determined the physicochemical properties (bubble concentration, bubble size distribution, resistance to pressure, and stability) and the acoustic properties (backscatter and attenuation coefficients) of BR1. The diagnostic value of BR1 was evaluated further in minipigs. Left heart images were recorded before and after injection of different doses of BR1. Results. BR1 is formulated as a lyophilized products, which after addition of saline, provides a suspension containing 2 X 10{sup 8} SF{sub 6} microbubbles/mL with a number mean diameter of 2.5 {mu}m. More than 90% of the bubbles are below 8 {mu}m. The use of SF{sub 6} rather than air provides an improved resistance to pressure increases such as the ones occuring in the left heart during systole. After reconstitution, the echogenicity and the bubble characteristics are unchanged for more than 8 hours. The high echogenicity remains almost constant over the entire medical frequency range (1-10 MH{sub Z}). BR1 injections in animals resulted in a homogenous, dose-dependent opacification of the left heart. Conclusions. Considering its high echogenicity, outstanding stability, and resistance to pressure changes, BR1 is a very promising ultrasound contrast agent. 14 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to the analysis of chemical warfare samples, found to contain residues of the nerve agent sarin, sulphur mustard and their degradation products.

    PubMed

    Black, R M; Clarke, R J; Read, R W; Reid, M T

    1994-02-25

    Samples of clothing, grave debris, soil and munition fragments, collected from the Kurdish village of Birjinni, were analysed by GC-MS with selected ion monitoring (SIM) for traces of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products. Positive analyses were confirmed, where possible, by full scan mass spectra, or at low concentrations by additional GC-MS-SIM analysis using chemical ionisation, by higher resolution GC-MS-SIM, and by GC-tandem mass spectrometry using multiple reaction monitoring. Sulphur mustard and/or thiodiglycol were detected in six soil samples; isopropyl methylphosphonic acid and methylphosphonic acid, the hydrolysis products of the nerve agent sarin, were detected in six different soil samples. Trace amounts of intact sarin were detected on a painted metal fragment associated with one of these soil samples. The results demonstrate the application of different GC-MS and GC-MS-MS techniques to the unequivocal identification of chemical warfare agent residues in the environment at concentrations ranging from low ppb to ppm (w/w). They also provide the first documented unequivocal identification of nerve agent residues in environmental samples collected after a chemical attack. PMID:8143028

  20. Abundance of four sulfur mustard-DNA adducts ex vivo and in vivo revealed by simultaneous quantification in stable isotope dilution-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lijun; Wei, Yuxia; Chen, Jia; Shi, Huiqin; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yajiao; He, Jun; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Tingfen; Xie, Jianwei; Peng, Shuangqing

    2014-04-21

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating vesicant and causes blisters upon contact with skin, eyes, and respiratory organs. It covalently links with DNAs by forming four mono- or cross-link adducts. In this article, the reference standards of SM-DNA adducts and deuterated analogues were first synthesized with simplified procedures containing only one or two steps and using less toxic chemical 2-(2-chloroethylthio)ethanol or nontoxic chemical thiodiglycol as starting materials. A sensitive and high-throughput simultaneous quantification method of N(7)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]guanine (N(7)-HETEG), O(6)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]guanine (O(6)-HETEG), N(3)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]adenine (N(3)-HETEA), and bis[2-(guanin-7-yl)ethyl]sulfide (Bis-G) in the Sprague-Dawley rat derma samples was developed by stable isotope dilution-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-UPLC-MS/MS) with the aim of revealing the real metabolic behaviors of four adducts. The method was validated, the limit of detection (S/N ratio greater than 10) was 0.01, 0.002, 0.04, and 0.11 fmol on column for N(7)-HETEG, O(6)-HETEG, Bis-G, and N(3)-HETEA, respectively, and the lower limit of quantification (S/N ratio greater than 20) was 0.04, 0.01, 0.12, and 0.33 fmol on column for N(7)-HETEG, O(6)-HETEG, Bis-G, and N(3)-HETEA, respectively. The accuracy of this method was determined to be 76% to 129% (n = 3), and both the interday (n = 6) and intraday (n = 7) precisions were less than 10%. The method was further applied for the quantifications of four adducts in the derma of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to SM ex vivo and in vivo, and all adducts had time- and dose-effect relationships. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the real presented status of four DNA adducts was simultaneously revealed by the MS-based method, in which Bis-G showed much higher abundance than the result previously reported and N(3

  1. Various concentrations of erucic acid in mustard oil and mustard.

    PubMed

    Wendlinger, Christine; Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2014-06-15

    Erucic acid is a typical constituent of mustard or rape. Foodstuff with a high content of erucic acid is considered undesirable for human consumption because it has been linked to myocardial lipidosis and heart lesions in laboratory rats. As a result, several countries have restricted its presence in oils and fats. In this study, the erucic acid content in several mustard oils and prepared mustard samples from Germany and Australia was determined. Seven of nine mustard oil samples exceeded the permitted maximum levels established for erucic acid (range: 0.3-50.8%, limit: 5%). The erucic acid content in mustard samples (n=15) varied from 14% to 33% in the lipids. Two servings (i.e. 20 g) of the mustards with the highest erucic acid content already surpassed the tolerable daily intake established by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. However, a careful selection of mustard cultivars could lower the nutritional intake of erucic acid. PMID:24491745

  2. Mustard gas exposure in Iran–Iraq war – A scientometric study

    PubMed Central

    Nokhodian, Zary; ZareFarashbandi, Firoozeh; Shoaei, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Iranian victims of sulfur mustard attack are now more than 20 years post-exposure and form a valuable cohort for studying the chronic effects of an exposure to sulfur mustard. Articles on sulfur mustard exposure in Iran–Iraq war were reviewed using three known international databases such as Scopus, Medline, and ISI. The objectives of the study were measurement of the author-wise distribution, year-wise distribution, subject area wise, and assessment of highly cited articles. Materials and Methods: We searched three known international databases, Scopus, Medline, and the international statistical institute (ISI), for articles related to mustard gas exposure in Iran–Iraq war, published between 1988 and 2012. The results were analyzed using scientometric methods. Results: During the 24 years under examination, about 90 papers were published in the field of mustard gas in Iran–Iraq war. Original article was the most used document type forming 51.4% of all the publications. The number of articles devoted to mustard gas and Iran–Iraq war research increased more than 10-fold, from 1 in 1988 to 11 in 2011. Most of the published articles (45.7%) included clinical and paraclinical investigations of sulfur mustard in Iranian victims. The most highly productive author was Ghanei who occupied the first rank in the number of publications with 20 papers. The affiliation of most of the researchers was Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University (research center of chemical injuries and dermatology department) in Iran. Conclusion: This article has highlighted the quantitative share of Iran in articles on sulfur mustard and lays the groundwork for further research on various aspects of related problems. PMID:26430683

  3. Mustard meal weed control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in organic production systems can be a labor intensive and expensive process. Mustard meal (MM) is phytotoxic and a potential pre-emergent and preplant-incorporated organic herbicide for controlling germinating and emerging weed seedlings. Unfortunately, MM may also adversely impact s...

  4. [Effects of peeling agents (resorcinol, crystalline sulfur, salicylic acid) on the epidermis of guinea pig (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Windhager, K; Plewig, G

    1977-08-22

    The mode of action of "classical peeling agents" such as resorcinol, crystalline sulfur, and salicylic acid on the epidermis is almost unknown. There are only a few experimental data available. Therefore the effects of resorcinol, crystalline sulfur, and salicylic acid were studied. A 1% and 3% concentration of these chemicals in vaselinum flavum or Unguentum Cordes was applied to the ears and flanks of adult male guinea pigs up to 14 days. Prior to biopsies at various time intervals, 3H-thymidine was injected intradermally. Specimens were paraffin embedded and routinely processed for autoradiographical analysis. The following parameters were assessed: Labelling index (L.I. in %); number of labelled basal cells per unit length of basement membrane; papillomatosis-index; and acanthosis-factor (projection histoplanimetry). The data were statistically analysed. The peeling agents induced a concentration-dependent increase of the L.I., acanthosis, and papillomatosis. Crystalline sulfur caused the most pronounced effect, followed by resorcinol. In contrast salicylic acid caused only a minute acanthosis factor and a slight increase in labelling. The correlation coefficient r of epidermal thickness to the L.I. for all concentrations and peeling agents used reaches the high figure of 0.978 for the ear. The 1% and 3% salicylic acid has a lower acanthosis factor than vaselinum flavum by itself. Preliminary autoradiographical studies in humans with 1% and 10% salicylic acid confirm these data. Salicylic acid counteracts acanthosis. These experiments show that crystalline sulfur and resorcinol have a potent effect on cell proliferation and acanthosis. They peel via proliferation hyperkeratosis. The mode of peeling by salicylic acid must be different, as cell proliferation and acanthosis are barely enhanced. The clinically known "keratolytic" effect of salicylic acid may be due to a direct action on the intercellular cement substance of the horny cells. PMID:907368

  5. Molecular biological basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to DNA damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Midterm report

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1996-07-01

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), in cultured keratinocytes. This enzyme modifies a variety of nuclear proteins utilizing NAD. DNA is required for the catalytic activity of the enzyme and the activity is dependent upon the presence of strand breaks in this DNA. It has been hypothesized that human skin exposed to mustards may develop blisters due to a generalized lowering of NAD in exposed skin cells. During the contract period, we have established a stably transfected human keratinocyte cell line which expresses antisense transcripts to PARP mRNA when these keratinocyte were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PARP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in reconstituted epidermis as well. We also showed that PARP was proteolytically cleaved at the onset of spontaneous apoptosis following proteolytic conversion of CPP32b to its active form, termed `apopain`. Having characterized the events associated with apoptosis, we determined, during the last period, whether any or all of these features could be observed following exposure of keratinocytes to SM.

  6. Characterization of Lung Fibroblasts More than Two Decades after Mustard Gas Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pirzad Jahromi, Gila; Ghanei, Mostafa; Hosseini, Seyed Kazem; Shamsaei, Alireza; Gholipourmalekabadi, Mazaher; Koochaki, Ameneh; Karkuki Osguei, Nushin; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In patients with short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas, the delayed cellular effects on lungs have not been well understood yet. The lung pathology shows a dominant feature consistent with obliterative bronchiolitis, in which fibroblasts play a central role. This study aims to characterize alterations to lung fibroblasts, at the cellular level, in patients with delayed respiratory complications after short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas. Methods Fibroblasts were isolated from the transbronchial biopsies of patients with documented history of exposure to single high-dose sulfur mustard during 1985–7 and compared with the fibroblasts of control subjects. Results Compared with controls, patients’ fibroblasts were thinner and shorter, and showed a higher population doubling level, migration capacity and number of filopodia. Sulfur mustard decreased the in vitro viability of fibroblasts and increased their sensitivity to induction of apoptosis, but did not change the rate of spontaneous apoptosis. In addition, higher expression of alpha smooth muscle actin showed that the lung's microenvironment in these patients is permissive for myofibroblastic differentiation. Conclusions These findings suggest that in patients under the study, the delayed pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard should be considered as a unique pathology, which might need a specific management by manipulation of cellular components. PMID:26679937

  7. Final report : multicomponent forensic signature development : interactions with common textiles; mustard precursors and simulants.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-02-01

    2-Chloroethyl phenyl sulfide (CEPS), a surrogate compound of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, was examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a novel method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. Various multivariate analysis schemes were employed to analyze the data. These methods may be able to discern different sources of CEPS. In addition, CEPS was applied to cotton, nylon, polyester, and silk swatches. These swatches were placed in controlled humidity chambers maintained at 23%, 56%, and 85% relative humidity. At regular intervals, samples were removed from each test swatch, and the samples analyzed using TD/GC-MS. The results were compared across fabric substrate and humidity.

  8. Pulmonary complications of mustard gas exposure: a study on cadavers.

    PubMed

    Taghaddosinejad, Fakhreddin; Fayyaz, Amir Farshid; Behnoush, Behnam

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard gas is one of the chemical warfare gases that roughly about 45000 soldiers continue to suffer long-lasting consequences of exposure during the Iran-Iraq war between 1980 and 1988. According to the common pulmonary lesions due to this gas exposure, we studied gross and microscopic pulmonary lesions in cadavers and also assessed the main causes of mortality caused by mustard gas exposure. A case-series study was performed on hospital record files of 100 cadavers that were exposed with documented sulfur mustard gas during the Iran-Iraq war from 1979 to 1988 and autopsied in legal medicine organization In Tehran between 2005 and 2007 and gross and microscopic pathological findings of autopsied organs such as hematological, pulmonary, hepatic, and renal changes were evaluated. All cases were male with the mean age of 43 years. The time interval between the gas exposure and death was almost 20years. The most frequent pulmonary complication was chronic bronchitis in 81% of autopsied cadavers. Other pulmonary findings were progressive pulmonary fibrosis (9%), pulmonary infections and tuberculosis (29%), malignant cellular infiltration (4%), and aspergilloma (1%). According to the chronic progressive lesions caused by mustard gas exposure such as pulmonary lesions and also its high mortality rate, suitable programming for protection of the gas exposed persons and prohibiting chemical warfare are recommended. PMID:21713733

  9. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J.; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  10. Mustard vesicants alter expression of the endocannabinoid system in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Wohlman, Irene M; Composto, Gabriella M; Heck, Diane E; Heindel, Ned D; Lacey, C Jeffrey; Guillon, Christophe D; Casillas, Robert P; Croutch, Claire R; Gerecke, Donald R; Laskin, Debra L; Joseph, Laurie B; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2016-07-15

    Vesicants including sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) are bifunctional alkylating agents that cause skin inflammation, edema and blistering. This is associated with alterations in keratinocyte growth and differentiation. Endogenous cannabinoids, including N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), are important in regulating inflammation, keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing. Their activity is mediated by binding to cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Levels of endocannabinoids are regulated by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We found that CB1, CB2, PPARα and FAAH were all constitutively expressed in mouse epidermis and dermal appendages. Topical administration of NM or SM, at concentrations that induce tissue injury, resulted in upregulation of FAAH, CB1, CB2 and PPARα, a response that persisted throughout the wound healing process. Inhibitors of FAAH including a novel class of vanillyl alcohol carbamates were found to be highly effective in suppressing vesicant-induced inflammation in mouse skin. Taken together, these data indicate that the endocannabinoid system is important in regulating skin homeostasis and that inhibitors of FAAH may be useful as medical countermeasures against vesicants. PMID:27125198

  11. Possible protein phosphatase inhibition by bis(hydroxyethyl) sulfide, a hydrolysis product of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, the natural vesicant cantharidin was shown to bind exclusively to and inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse tissue extracts (Li and Casida (1992) Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 11867-11870). To explore the generality of this effect in vesicant action, we measured the protein serinelthreonine phosphatase activity in mouse liver cytosol (in the form of the okadaic acid inhibitable increment of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) phosphatase activity) in the presence of aqueous sulfur mustard or its hydrolysis product, bis(hydroxyethyl)sulfide (TDG). Sulfur mustard inhibited p-NPP hydrolysis. However, inhibition correlated with the time elapsed between thawing and the addition of mustard to the enzyme preparation, not with concentration. TDG exhibited a direct, concentration-related inhibition of p-NPP hydrolysis between 30 and 300 1LM. We conclude that sulfur mustard also has an inhibitory effect on protein serinelthreonine phosphatases. However, the inhibition is an effect of its non-alkykating hydrolysis product TDG, not of sulfur mustard itself.

  12. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sulfur-Containing 1,1-Bisphosphonic Acids as Antiparasitic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Recher, Marion; Barboza, Alejandro P.; Li, Zhu-Hong; Galizzi, Melina; Ferrer-Casal, Mariana; Szajnman, Sergio H.; Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N. J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of our efforts aimed at searching for new antiparasitic agents, 2-alkylmercaptoethyl-1,1-bisphosphonate derivatives were synthesized and evaluated against Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, and Toxoplasma gondii, the responsible agent for toxoplasmosis. Many of these sulfur-containing bisphosphonates were potent inhibitors against the intracellular form of T. cruzi, the clinically more relevant replicative form of this parasite, and tachyzoites of T. gondii targeting T. cruzi or T. gondii farnesyl diphosphate synthases (FPPSs), which constitute valid targets for the chemotherapy of these parasitic diseases. Interestingly, long chain length sulfur-containing bisphosphonates emerged as relevant antiparasitic agents. Taking compounds 37, 38, and 39 as representative members of this class of drugs, they exhibited ED50 values of 15.8 μM, 12.8 μM, and 22.4 μM, respectively, against amastigotes of T. cruzi. These cellular activities matched the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of the target enzyme (TcFPPS) having IC50 values of 6.4 μM, 1.7 μM, and 0.097 μM, respectively. In addition, these compounds were potent anti-Toxoplasma agents. They had ED50 values of 2.6 μM, 1.2 μM, and 1.8 μM, respectively, against T. gondii tachyzoites, while they exhibited a very potent inhibitory action against the target enzyme (TgFPPS) showing IC50 values of 0.024 μM, 0.025 μM, and 0.021 μM, respectively. Bisphosphonates bearing a sulfoxide unit at C-3 were also potent anti-Toxoplasma agents, particularly those bearing long aliphatic chains such as 43–45, which were also potent antiproliferative drugs against tachyzoites of T. gondii. These compounds inhibited the enzymatic activity of the target enzyme (TgFPPS) at the very low nanomolar range. These bisphosphonic acids have very good prospective not only as lead drugs but also as potential chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:23318904

  13. Protection of chymotrypsin from inactivation by a N-mustard analog.

    PubMed

    Brecher, A S; Koenig, M J

    1995-02-01

    Chymotrypsin activity is rapidly inactivated by the N-mustard anti-tumor drug, chlorambucil. Since mustards react with thiols, amines, carboxyls, imidazoles, and sulfide sites on proteins, N-acetylcysteine, 2 proprietary protein hydrolyzates, beta-mercaptoethanol, ethanolamine, and sodium lactate were tested for their capacity to protect chymotrypsin from inactivation by the mustard. In each instance, protection was afforded to chymotrypsin. In as much as N-acetylcysteine protected chymotrypsin from inactivation by chlorambucil, it is suggested that this thiol compound may serve as a detoxication agent and may not require prior transformation into glutathione by cells in order to reduce mustard levels within the cells, as suggested by Smith and Gross (Proceedings of the NATO Panel VIII meeting, Grenoble, France, 1991.) It is further suggested that amino acids present as biosynthetic and degradative components of cells may detoxify mustards. PMID:7701511

  14. The footprint of TGF-β in airway remodeling of the mustard lung.

    PubMed

    Shahriary, Alireza; Seyedzadeh, Mir Hadi; Ahmadi, Ali; Salimian, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Mustard lung is a major pulmonary complication in individuals exposed to sulfur mustard (SM) gas during the Iran-Iraq war. It shares common pathological and clinical features with some chronic inflammatory lung disorders, particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airway remodeling, which is one of the main causes of lung dysfunction and the dominant phenomenon of chronic pulmonary diseases, is seen in the mustard lung. Among all mediators involved in the remodeling process, the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β plays a pivotal role in lung fibrosis and consequently in the airway remodeling. Regarding the high levels of this mediator detected in mustard lung patients, in the present study, we have discussed the possible roles of TGF-β in airway remodeling (including epithelial layer damage, subepithelial fibrosis and angiogenesis). Finally, based on TGF-β targeting, we have reviewed new airway remodeling therapeutic approaches. PMID:26606948

  15. Interaction of cyanocobalamin with sulfur-containing reducing agents in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikov, D. S.; Dereven'kov, I. A.; Artyushina, E. N.; Makarov, S. V.

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of cyanocobalamin reduction by sodium hydroxymethanesulfinate and dithionite in alkaline media are studied. It is established that the character of the rate-determining step depends on the concentration of the reducing agents: when they are in excess, it is a step of elimination of cyanocobalamin, at lower concentrations of reducing agents a rate-determining is a step of their addition to cobalamin.

  16. An examination of sulfur polymer cement as a waste encapsulation agent

    SciTech Connect

    McNew, E.B.

    1995-12-31

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a unique material having potential applications for hazardous and radioactive waste encapsulation. This material was originally developed by the US Bureau of Mines as an acid and chemical resistant construction cement and has since been applied in tie waste encapsulation field. The material is easily prepared from elemental sulfur and organic dienes. It is an easy to use low-viscosity thermoplastic, and has many favorable properties such as low porosity, high compressive strength, and resistance to chemical attack. The results of several invetigations on this material will be discussed, and include: (1) the chemical form and physical structure of the material, (2) the compressive strength of cylindrical test samples after gamma radiation testing, (3) the aqueous leaching behavior of lead, cerium, cesium, cobalt, and strontium from SPC-ash mixtures at room and elevated temperatures, (4) the casting compatibility of mixtures of SPC with different waste materials, (5) the ability of SPC to encapsulate elemental mercury contaminated soils, (6) laboratory and field studies of SPC biocorrosion by Thiobacillus bacteria, (7) small scale (10 kg) SPC-ash monolith casting studies, and (8) methods for the formulation of a grade of SPC more applicable to the encapsulation of aggregate waste materials.

  17. Limitations and challenges in treatment of acute chemical warfare agent poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz; Kehe, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Recent news from Syria on a possible use of chemical warfare agents made the headlines. Furthermore, the motivation of terrorists to cause maximal harm shifts these agents into the public focus. For incidents with mass casualties appropriate medical countermeasures must be available. At present, the most important threats arise from nerve agents and sulfur mustard. At first, self-protection and protection of medical units from contamination is of utmost importance. Volatile nerve agent exposure, e.g. sarin, results in fast development of cholinergic crisis. Immediate clinical diagnosis can be confirmed on-site by assessment of acetylcholinesterase activity. Treatment with autoinjectors that are filled with 2mg atropine and an oxime (at present obidoxime, pralidoxime, TMB-4 or HI-6) are not effective against all nerve agents. A more aggressive atropinisation has to be considered and more effective oximes (if possible with a broad spectrum or a combination of different oximes) as well as alternative strategies to cope with high acetylcholine levels at synaptic sites should be developed. A further gap exists for the treatment of patients with sustained cholinergic crisis that has to be expected after exposure to persistent nerve agents, e.g. VX. The requirement for long-lasting artificial ventilation can be reduced with an oxime therapy that is optimized by using the cholinesterase status for guidance or by measures (e.g. scavengers) that are able to reduce the poison load substantially in the patients. For sulfur mustard poisoning no specific antidote is available until now. Symptomatic measures as used for treatment of burns are recommended together with surgical or laser debridement. Thus, huge amounts of resources are expected to be consumed as wound healing is impaired. Possible depots of sulfur mustard in tissues may aggravate the situation. More basic knowledge is necessary to improve substantially therapeutic options. The use of stem cells may provide a new

  18. Glutathione-garlic sulfur conjugates: slow hydrogen sulfide releasing agents for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Ashif Iqbal; Papajani, Vilma Toska; Paci, Maurizio; Melino, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Natural organosulfur compounds (OSCs) from Allium sativum L. display antioxidant and chemo-sensitization properties, including the in vitro inhibition of tumor cell proliferation through the induction of apoptosis. Garlic water- and oil-soluble allyl sulfur compounds show distinct properties and the capability to inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we optimized a new protocol for the extraction of water-soluble compounds from garlic at low temperatures and the production of glutathionyl-OSC conjugates during the extraction. Spontaneously, Cys/GSH-mixed-disulfide conjugates are produced by in vivo metabolism of OSCs and represent active molecules able to affect cellular metabolism. Water-soluble extracts, with (GSGaWS) or without (GaWS) glutathione conjugates, were here produced and tested for their ability to release hydrogen sulfide (H2S), also in the presence of reductants and of thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase (TST) enzyme. Thus, the TST catalysis of the H2S-release from garlic OSCs and their conjugates has been investigated by molecular in vitro experiments. The antiproliferative properties of these extracts on the human T-cell lymphoma cell line, HuT 78, were observed and related to histone hyperacetylation and downregulation of GAPDH expression. Altogether, the results presented here pave the way for the production of a GSGaWS as new, slowly-releasing hydrogen sulfide extract for potential therapeutic applications. PMID:25608858

  19. Poisoning of a silica supported cobalt catalyst due to the presence of sulfur impurities in syngas during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Effect of chelating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Bambal, A.S.; Gardner, T.H.; Kugler, E.L.; Dadyburjor, D.B.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur compounds that are generally found in syngas derived from coal and biomass are a poison to Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts. The presence of sulfur impurities in the ppm range can limit the life of a FT catalyst to a few hours or a few days. In this study, FT synthesis was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor at 230 °C, 20 bar, and 13,500 Ncm3/h/gcat for 72 h using syngas with H2/CO = 2.0. Cobalt-based catalysts were subjected to poisoning by 10 and 50 ppm sulfur in the syngas. The performance of FT catalyst was compared in context of syngas conversion, product selectivities and yields, during the poisoning as well as post-poisoning stages. At both the impurity concentrations, the sulfur was noted to cause permanent loss in the activity, possibly by adsorbing irreversibly on the surface. The sulfur poison affects the hydrogenation and the chain-propagation ability of the catalysts, and shifts the product selectivity towards short-chain hydrocarbons with higher percentages of olefins. Additional diffusion limitations caused due to sulfur poisoning are thought to alter the product selectivity. The shifts in product selectivities suggest that the sulfur decreases the ability of the catalyst to form C-C bonds to produce longer-chain hydrocarbons. The selective blocking of sulfur is thought to affect the hydrogenation ability on the catalyst, resulting in more olefins in the product after sulfur poisoning. The sulfur poisoning on the cobalt catalyst is expected to cause an increase in the number of sites responsible for WGS or to influence the Boudouard reaction, resulting in a higher CO2 selectivity. Both the sites responsible for CO adsorptions as well as the sites for chain growth are poisoned during the poisoning. Additionally, the performance of a base-case cobalt catalyst is compared with that of catalysts modified by chelating agents (CAs). The superior performance of CA-modified catalysts during sulfur poisoning is attributed to the presence of smaller

  20. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. PMID:25791923

  1. The fate of the chemical warfare agent during DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Della A; Hulst, Albert G; de Reuver, Leo P J; van Krimpen, Simon H; van Baar, Ben M L

    2007-11-01

    Forensic laboratories do not have the infrastructure to process or store contaminated DNA samples that have been recovered from a crime scene contaminated with chemical or biological warfare agents. Previous research has shown that DNA profiles can be recovered from blood exposed to several chemical warfare agents after the agent has been removed. The fate of four toxic agents, sulfur mustard, sodium 2-fluoroacetate, sarin, and diazinon, in a lysis buffer used in Promega DNA IQ extraction protocol was studied to determine if extraction would render the samples safe. Two independent analytical methods were used per agent, selected from GC-MS, 1H NMR, 19F NMR, (31)P NMR, or LC-ES MS. The methods were validated before use. Determinations were carried out in a semi-quantitative way, by direct comparison to standards. Agent levels in the elution buffer were found to be below the detectable limits for mustard, sarin, sodium 2-fluoroacetate or low (<0.02 mg/mL) for diazinon. Therefore, once extracted these DNA samples could be safely processed in a forensic laboratory. PMID:18093062

  2. Protocol for determination of chemical warfare agent simulant movement through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Merriweather, R.; Ilgner, R.H.; Gayle, T.M.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Watson, A.P.

    1992-07-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical warfare agent during any phase of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), a (small) potential exists for contamination of buildings and materials used in their construction. Guidelines for unrestricted access to potentially agent-contaminated private and public property are presently undefined due to uncertainties regarding the adequacy of decontaminating porous surfaces such as wood, masonry and gypsum wall board. Persistent agents such as VX or mustard are particularly problematic. The report which follows documents a measurement protocol developed in a scoping investigation characterizing the permeation of chemical warfare agent simulants (diisopropylmethyl phosphonate (DIMP) for warfare agent GB, dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP) for warfare agent VX and chlorethylethyl sulfide (CEES) for warfare agent sulfur mustard) through several, common porous, construction materials. The porous media'' selected for examination were wood, brick, cinder block, and gypsum wall board. Simulants were tested rather than actual warfare agents because of their low toxicity, commercial availability, and the lack of surety capability at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The present work is considered a protocol for confirmation testing with live'' agents.

  3. Protocol for determination of chemical warfare agent simulant movement through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Merriweather, R.; Ilgner, R.H.; Gayle, T.M.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Watson, A.P.

    1992-07-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical warfare agent during any phase of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), a (small) potential exists for contamination of buildings and materials used in their construction. Guidelines for unrestricted access to potentially agent-contaminated private and public property are presently undefined due to uncertainties regarding the adequacy of decontaminating porous surfaces such as wood, masonry and gypsum wall board. Persistent agents such as VX or mustard are particularly problematic. The report which follows documents a measurement protocol developed in a scoping investigation characterizing the permeation of chemical warfare agent simulants [diisopropylmethyl phosphonate (DIMP) for warfare agent GB, dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP) for warfare agent VX and chlorethylethyl sulfide (CEES) for warfare agent sulfur mustard] through several, common porous, construction materials. The ``porous media`` selected for examination were wood, brick, cinder block, and gypsum wall board. Simulants were tested rather than actual warfare agents because of their low toxicity, commercial availability, and the lack of surety capability at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The present work is considered a protocol for confirmation testing with ``live`` agents.

  4. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  5. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Five Odor Reducing Agents for Sewer System Odors Using an On-Line Total Reduced Sulfur Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Il; Lee, Hyunjoo; Shin, Joungdu; Kim, Hyunook

    2012-01-01

    Sewer odors have been a concern to citizens of the Metropolitan Seoul region, which has installed combined sewer systems (CSSs) in 86% of its area. Although a variety of odorants are released from sewers, volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) have been recognized as major ones. A number of technologies have been proposed to monitor or control odors from sewers. One of the most popular strategies adopted for the control of sewage odor is by applying a commercial odor-reducing agent into the sewer. In this study, the effectiveness of five different commercial odor-reducing agents (i.e., an odor masking agent, an alkaline solution, two microbial agents, and a chemical oxidant) was evaluated by continuously monitoring VSCs released from the sewer with an on-line total reduced sulfur (TRS) analyzer before and after each agent was sprayed into CSSs at five different locations of the city. In short, when the effectiveness of odor treatment was tested in the sewer system using five commercial odor reducing treatments, only the chemical oxidant was good enough to reduce the odor in terms of TRS levels measured before and after the application (p < 0.01). PMID:23223148

  6. Down-regulation of TGF-b1, TGF-b receptor 2, and TGF-b-associated microRNAs, miR-20a and miR-21, in skin lesions of sulfur mustard-exposed Iranian war veterans.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Mohadeseh; Mirzaei, Behnaz; Tavallaei, Mahmood; Noorani, Mohammad Reza; Amiri, Mojtaba; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) affects divergent cellular pathways including cell cycle, apoptosis, necrosis, and inflammatory responses. SM-induced lesions in skin include late-onset hyper-pigmentation, xerosis, and atrophy. It seems that TGF-b signaling pathway is a major player for SM pathogenesis. Here, we have employed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach to evaluate the expression alterations of all TGF-b variants and their receptors in skin biopsies obtained from 10 Iran-Iraq war veterans. Using specific LNA primers, the expression alteration of a TGF-bR2 regulator, miR-20a, and TGF-b downstream target, miR-21, was also assessed in the same samples Our real-time PCR data revealed a significant down-regulation of TGF-b1 and TGF-bR2, the major mediators of TGF-b signaling pathway, in skin biopsies of SM-exposed patients (p = 0.0015 and p = 0.0115, respectively). Down-regulation of TGF-b signaling pathway seems to contribute in severe inflammation observed in SM-exposed patients' tissues. MiR-20a and miR-21, as two important TGF-b associated microRNAs (miRNAs), were also down-regulated in SM-exposed skin lesions, compared to those of control group (p = 0.0003). Based on our findings, these miRNAs could be directly or indirectly involve in the pathogenesis of SM. Altogether, our data suggest the suitability of TGF-b1, TGF-bR2, as well as miR-20a and miR-21 as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment of SM-exposed patients. PMID:26498464

  7. Evaluation of the vesicating properties of neutralized chemical agent identification sets. Final report, November 1995-August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Olajos, E.J.; Salem, H.; Gieseking, J.K.

    1997-08-01

    Vesication and skin irritation studies were conducted in hairless guinea-pigs to determine the vesicant and skin irritation potential of Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS). Guinea-pigs were topically dosed with `test article` NEAT HD, 10% agent/chloroform solutions, or product solutions (wastestreams) and evaluated for skin-damaging effects (gross and light microscopic). Product solutions from the chemical neutralization of neat sulfur mustard resulted in microvesicle formation (vesication). All agent-dosed (agent/chloroform solutions or HD) sites exhibited microblisters, as well as other histopathologic lesions of the skin. Wastestreams from the neutalization of agent (agent/chloroform; agent on charcoal) were devoid of microvesicant activity. Dermal irritant effects (erythema and edema) were consistent with the skin-injurious activity associated with the neutralizing reagent 1,3-dichloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DCDMH).

  8. Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions (Joseph F. Bunnett and Marian Mikotajczyk, Eds.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Benjamin

    1999-10-01

    What do Knute Rockne, Notre Dame's famed football coach, and Lewisite, a chemical warfare agent dubbed "the dew of death", have in common? Both owe their discovery to Father Julius Arthur Nieuwland.1 Rockne's legacy lives on in the Fighting Irish and their tradition of excellence on the gridiron. Lewisite, together with other arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents, provide a legacy that lives on, too, but with less cheerful consequences. The book Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions makes clear the challenges faced in dealing with those consequences. This book documents the proceedings of a workshop devoted to arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents and their associated munitions. The workshop, held in Poland in 1996, included nine lectures, eight posters, and three discussion groups; and the contents of all these are presented. Major support for the workshop came from the Scientific Affairs Division of NATO as part of on ongoing series of meetings, cooperative research projects, and related efforts dealing with problems leftover from the Cold War and, in the case of the arsenicals and mustards, from conflicts dating to World War I. These problems can be seen in contemporary accounts, including a January 1999 news report that the U.S. Department of Defense intends to survey Washington, DC, areas near both American University and the Catholic University of America (CUA), site of the original synthesis of Lewisite, for chemical warfare agents and other materials disposed at the end of World War I.2 The first nine chapters of the book present the workshop's lectures. Of these, readers interested in chemical weapon destruction might find especially useful the first chapter, in which Ron Mansley of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons presents a scholarly overview covering historical aspects of the arsenicals and mustards; their production and use; prospective destruction

  9. Sulphur mustard injuries of the skin. Pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Rice, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Sulphur mustard is a vesicant (blistering agent), which produces chemical burns with widespread blistering. It was used extensively as a chemical warfare agent in the First World War, and has allegedly been employed in a number of conflicts since then, most recently by Iraq against Iran (1984-1987). The potential further use of mustard in military conflicts and by terrorists remains a significant threat that if realised in practice would result in a large number of casualties with severely incapacitating, partial thickness burns. Such injuries clearly present a huge potential wound care problem. The development and healing of mustard-induced cutaneous injuries has not only been observed in human casualties, but has been studied recently at the microscopic and ultrastructural levels in several animal models. Vesication generally begins on the second day after exposure, and may progress for up to 2 weeks. Wound healing is considerably slower than for a comparable thermal burn, and patients often require extended hospital treatment. The current management strategy is essentially symptomatic and supportive. Recently, two techniques for removing damaged tissue and improving wound healing have been investigated. Mechanical dermabrasion and laser debridement ('lasablation') both produced an increased rate of wound healing in animal models, and may be of benefit in a clinical context. PMID:15071821

  10. μ-PADs for detection of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Pardasani, Deepak; Tak, Vijay; Purohit, Ajay K; Dubey, D K

    2012-12-01

    Conventional methods of detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) based on chromogenic reactions are time and solvent intensive. The development of cost, time and solvent effective microfluidic paper based analytical devices (μ-PADs) for the detection of nerve and vesicant agents is described. The detection of analytes was based upon their reactions with rhodamine hydroxamate and para-nitrobenzyl pyridine, producing red and blue colours respectively. Reactions were optimized on the μ-PADs to produce the limits of detection (LODs) as low as 100 μM for sulfur mustard in aqueous samples. Results were quantified with the help of a simple desktop scanner and Photoshop software. Sarin achieved a linear response in the two concentration ranges of 20-100 mM and 100-500 mM, whereas the response of sulfur mustard was found to be linear in the concentration range of 10-75 mM. Results were precise enough to establish the μ-PADs as a valuable tool for security personnel fighting against chemical terrorism. PMID:23086107

  11. Nrf2 Regulates the Sensitivity of Mouse Keratinocytes to Nitrogen Mustard via Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 (Mrp1).

    PubMed

    Udasin, Ronald G; Wen, Xia; Bircsak, Kristin M; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Shakarjian, Michael P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur mustard and nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine, HN2) are potent vesicants developed as chemical warfare agents. These electrophilic, bifunctional alkylating agents cause skin injury, including inflammation, edema, and blistering. HN2 covalently modifies macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins or is scavenged by glutathione, forming adducts that can contribute to toxicity. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (Mrp1/MRP1) is a transmembrane ATPase known to efflux glutathione-conjugated electrophiles. In the present studies, we examined the effects of modulating Mrp1-mediated transport activity on the sensitivity of primary and PAM212 mouse keratinocytes to HN2. Primary keratinocytes, and to a lesser extent, PAM212 cells, express Mrp1 mRNA and protein and possess Mrp1 functional activity, as measured by calcein efflux. Sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2, increased Mrp1 mRNA, protein, and functional activity in primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells and decreased their sensitivity to HN2-induced growth inhibition (IC(50) = 1.4 and 4.8 µM in primary keratinocytes and 1 and 13 µM in PAM212 cells, in the absence and presence of sulforaphane, respectively). The Mrp1 inhibitor, MK-571, reversed the effects of sulforaphane on HN2-induced growth inhibition in both primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells. In primary keratinocytes from Nrf2(-/-) mice, sulforaphane had no impact on Mrp1 expression or activity, or on sensitivity to HN2, demonstrating that its effects depend on Nrf2. These data suggest that Mrp1-mediated efflux is important in regulating HN2-induced keratinocyte growth inhibition. Enhancing HN2 efflux from keratinocytes may represent a novel strategy for mitigating vesicant-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26454883

  12. Hemicholinium mustard derivatives: preliminary assessment of cholinergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tagari, P C; Maysinger, D; Cuello, A C

    1986-07-01

    We have attempted to design novel neurotoxins based on the use of hemicholinium derivatives. Three compounds were tested for their neurochemical effects on cholinergic, gabaergic and catecholaminergic markers in the hippocampus, striatum and cortex following intracerebroventricular administration. The effects were compared with those of the non-specific alkylating agent (nitrogen mustard) and the previously reported ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF 64A). The results indicate that only one of these derivatives (HcM-9) exhibits comparable neurotoxic effects on cholinergic markers with a similar pattern of specificity to that of AF 64A. In addition, HcM-9 showed less overall toxicity, this being reflected in a higher survival rate. The present results indicate that hemicholinium derivatives could be good substrates for further molecular modifications, thus a step towards the design of a more specific cholinergic neurotoxin. PMID:3748277

  13. DESI-MS/MS of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Paul A.

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used to headspace ­sample chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products from glass vials and glass vials containing spiked media, including Dacron swabs, office carpet, paper and fabric. The interface of the Z-spray source was modified to permit safe introduction of the SPME fibers for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (DESI-MS) analysis. A "dip and shoot" method was also developed for the rapid sampling and DESI-MS analysis of chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products in liquid samples. Sampling was performed by simply dipping fused silica, stainless steel or SPME tips into the organic or aqueous samples. Replicate analyses were completed within several minutes under ambient conditions with no sample pre-treatment, resulting in a significant increase in sample throughput. The developed sample handling and analysis method was applied to the determination of chemical warfare agent content in samples containing unknown chemical and/or biological warfare agents. Ottawa sand was spiked with sulfur mustard, extracted with water and autoclaved to ensure sterility. Sulfur mustard was completely hydrolysed during the extraction/autoclave step and thiodiglycol was identified by DESI-MS, with analyses generally being completed within 1 min using the "dip and shoot" method.

  14. Poisoning of a Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalyst due to Presence of Sulfur Impurities in Syngas during Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Effects of Chelating Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Bambal, Ashish S.; Guggilla, Vidya S.; Kugler, Edwin L.; Gardner, Todd H.; Dadyburjor, Dady B.

    2014-04-09

    The effects of sulfur impurities on the performance of cobalt-based Fischer–Tropsch catalysts are evaluated under industrially relevant operating conditions of temperature, pressure, and impurity levels. Chelating agents (CAs) were used to modify the SiO2 support, and the performances of the CA-modified catalysts are compared with conventional Co/SiO2 catalysts. For both the Co/SiO2 and CA-modified catalysts, the presence of sulfur in the inlet syngas results in a notable drop in the CO conversion, an undesired shift in the hydrocarbon selectivity toward short-chain hydrocarbons, more olefins in the products, and lower product yields. In the post-poisoning stage, i.e., after termination of sulfur introduction in the inlet syngas, the CA-modified catalysts recover activity and selectivity (to some extent at least), whereas such trends are not observed for the base-case, i.e., unmodified Co/SiO2 catalyst. Finally, the improved performance of the CA-modified catalysts in the presence of sulfur is attributed to higher densities of active sites.

  15. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, Stephen; Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L.; Vasquez, Karen M.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ► 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ► This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ► 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  16. Niobium(V) saponite clay for the catalytic oxidative abatement of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Carniato, Fabio; Bisio, Chiara; Psaro, Rinaldo; Marchese, Leonardo; Guidotti, Matteo

    2014-09-15

    A Nb(V)-containing saponite clay was designed to selectively transform toxic organosulfur chemical warfare agents (CWAs) under extremely mild conditions into nontoxic products with reduced environmental impact. Thanks to the insertion of Nb(V) sites within the saponite framework, a bifunctional catalyst with strong oxidizing and acid properties was obtained. Remarkable activity and high selectivity were observed for the oxidative abatement of (2-chloroethyl)ethyl sulfide (CEES), a simulant of sulfur mustard, at room temperature with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. This performance was significantly better compared to a conventional commercial decontamination powder. PMID:25056451

  17. Clinically-Relevant Cutaneous Lesions by Nitrogen Mustard: Useful Biomarkers of Vesicants Skin Injury in SKH-1 Hairless and C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    A paucity of clinically applicable biomarkers to screen therapies in laboratory is a limitation in the development of countermeasures against cutaneous injuries by chemical weapon, sulfur mustard (SM), and its analog nitrogen mustard (NM). Consequently, we assessed NM-caused progression of clinical cutaneous lesions; notably, skin injury with NM is comparable to SM. Exposure of SKH-1 hairless and C57BL/6 (haired) mice to NM (3.2 mg) for 12–120 h caused clinical sequelae of toxicity, including microblister formation, edema, erythema, altered pigmentation, wounding, xerosis and scaly dry skin. These toxic effects of NM were similar in both mouse strains, except that wounding and altered pigmentation at 12–24 h and appearance of dry skin at 24 and 72 h post-NM exposure were more pronounced in C57BL/6 compared to SKH-1 mice. Conversely, edema, erythema and microblister formation were more prominent in SKH-1 than C57BL/6 mice at 24–72 h after NM exposure. In addition, 40–60% mortality was observed following 120 h of NM exposure in the both mouse strains. Overall, these toxic effects of NM are comparable to those reported in humans and other animal species with SM, and thus represent clinically-relevant cutaneous injury endpoints in screening and optimization of therapies for skin injuries by vesicating agents. PMID:23826320

  18. Corneal toxicity induced by vesicating agents and effective treatment options.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dinesh G; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    The vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and lewisite (LEW) are potent chemical warfare agents that primarily cause damage to the ocular, skin, and respiratory systems. However, ocular tissue is the most sensitive organ, and vesicant exposure results in a biphasic injury response, including photophobia, corneal lesions, corneal edema, ulceration, and neovascularization, and may cause loss of vision. There are several reports on ocular injury from exposure to SM, which has been frequently used in warfare. However, there are very few reports on ocular injury by LEW, which indicate that injury symptoms appear instantly after exposure and faster than SM. In spite of extensive research efforts, effective therapies for vesicant-induced ocular injuries, mainly to the most affected corneal tissue, are not available. Hence, we have established primary human corneal epithelial cells and rabbit corneal organ culture models with the SM analog nitrogen mustard, which have helped to test the efficacy of potential therapeutic agents. These agents will then be further evaluated against in vivo SM- and LEW-induced corneal injury models, which will assist in the development of potential broad-spectrum therapies against vesicant-induced ocular injuries. PMID:27327041

  19. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  20. Inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from rabbit skin lesions produced in vivo by sulfur mustard. III. Electrophoretic protein fractions, trypsin-inhibitory capacity, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, and alpha 1- and alpha 2-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors of culture fluids and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, S.; Dannenberg, A. M.; Vogt, R. F.; Myrick, J. E.; Tanaka, F.; Redding, L. C.; Merkhofer, R. M.; Pula, P. J.; Scott, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    This is the third report in a series on the inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from skin lesions of various ages, which were produced in vivo in rabbits by the military vesicant, sulfur mustard (SM). It describes the electrophoretic protein fractions and trypsin-inhibitory capacities of the various culture fluids and the amounts of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in these fluids. With one-dimensional electrophoresis, the albumin and beta-globulin fractions of protein in culture fluids varied little with the development and healing of the SM lesions. These fractions proportionally resembled the corresponding fractions found in serum. The alpha 1-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum as the lesions healed. The alpha 2-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum at all stages of lesion development and healing. The gamma-globulin fraction was proportionally larger as the lesions healed. With two-dimensional electrophoresis, about 68%, 46%, and 35% of the protein spots in culture fluids from representative 1-day and 6-day SM lesions and normal skin, respectively, matched those from serum. In each case, the large, diffuse, serum albumin spot represented about two-thirds of the protein present. Thus, gravimetrically, in normal skin and in both developing and healing lesions, the extracellular proteins were 80-90% of serum origin. The trypsin-inhibitory capacity (TIC) per milligram protein in the culture fluids of healing lesions was markedly less than the TIC per milligram protein in the fluids of peak lesions. This decrease correlates well with the decrease found in the alpha 1-globulin fraction, which contains alpha 1-antiproteinase (alpha 1-PI) (and alpha 1-macroglobulin [alpha 1M] in rabbits). The alpha 1PI and the alpha 1M-alpha 2M proteinase inhibitors were identified in the culture fluids by means of

  1. Absence of a p53 allele delays nitrogen mustard-induced early apoptosis and inflammation of murine skin

    PubMed Central

    Inturi, Swetha; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Roy, Srirupa; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Bifunctional alkylating agent sulfur mustard (SM) and its analog nitrogen mustard (NM) cause DNA damage leading to cell death, and potentially activating inflammation. Transcription factor p53 plays a critical role in DNA damage by regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Earlier studies by our laboratory demonstrated phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and an increase in total p53 in epidermal cells both in vitro and in vivo following NM exposure. To elucidate the role of p53 in NM-induced skin toxicity, we employed SKH-1 hairless mice harboring wild type (WT) or heterozygous p53 (p53+/−). Exposure to NM (3.2 mg) caused a more profound increase in epidermal thickness and apoptotic cell death in WT relative to p53+/− mice at 24 h. However, by 72 h after exposure, there was a comparable increase in NM-induced epidermal cell death in both WT and p53+/− mice. Myeloperoxidase activity data showed that neutrophil infiltration was strongly enhanced in NM-exposed WT mice at 24 h persisting through 72 h of exposure. Conversely, robust NM-induced neutrophil infiltration (comparable to WT mice) was seen only at 72 h after exposure in p53+/− mice. Similarly, NM-exposure strongly induced macrophage and mast cell infiltration in WT, but not p53+/− mice. Together, these data indicate that early apoptosis and inflammation induced by NM in mouse skin are p53-dependent. Thus, targeting this pathway could be a novel strategy for developing countermeasures against vesicants-induced skin injury. PMID:23845566

  2. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways in response to nitrogen mustard-induced DNA damage and toxicity in skin keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inturi, Swetha; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a structural analog of chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM), forms adducts and crosslinks with DNA, RNA and proteins. Here we studied the mechanism of NM-induced skin toxicity in response to double strand breaks (DSBs) resulting in cell cycle arrest to facilitate DNA repair, as a model for developing countermeasures against vesicant-induced skin injuries. NM exposure of mouse epidermal JB6 cells decreased cell growth and caused S-phase arrest. Consistent with these biological outcomes, NM exposure also increased comet tail extent moment and the levels of DNA DSB repair molecules phospho H2A.X Ser139 and p53 Ser15 indicating NM-induced DNA DSBs. Since DNA DSB repair occurs via non homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) or homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways, next we studied these two pathways and noted their activation as defined by an increase in phospho- and total DNA-PK levels, and the formation of Rad51 foci, respectively. To further analyze the role of these pathways in the cellular response to NM-induced cytotoxicity, NHEJ and HRR were inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 and Rad51 inhibitor BO2, respectively. Inhibition of NHEJ did not sensitize cells to NM-induced decrease in cell growth and cell cycle arrest. However, inhibition of the HRR pathway caused a significant increase in cell death, and prolonged G2M arrest following NM exposure. Together, our findings, indicating that HRR is the key pathway involved in the repair of NM-induced DNA DSBs, could be useful in developing new therapeutic strategies against vesicant-induced skin injury. PMID:24732344

  3. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways in response to nitrogen mustard-induced DNA damage and toxicity in skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Swetha; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a structural analog of chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM), forms adducts and crosslinks with DNA, RNA and proteins. Here we studied the mechanism of NM-induced skin toxicity in response to double strand breaks (DSBs) resulting in cell cycle arrest to facilitate DNA repair, as a model for developing countermeasures against vesicant-induced skin injuries. NM exposure of mouse epidermal JB6 cells decreased cell growth and caused S-phase arrest. Consistent with these biological outcomes, NM exposure also increased comet tail extent moment and the levels of DNA DSB repair molecules phospho H2A.X Ser139 and p53 Ser15 indicating NM-induced DNA DSBs. Since DNA DSB repair occurs via non homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) or homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways, next we studied these two pathways and noted their activation as defined by an increase in phospho- and total DNA-PK levels, and the formation of Rad51 foci, respectively. To further analyze the role of these pathways in the cellular response to NM-induced cytotoxicity, NHEJ and HRR were inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 and Rad51 inhibitor BO2, respectively. Inhibition of NHEJ did not sensitize cells to NM-induced decrease in cell growth and cell cycle arrest. However, inhibition of the HRR pathway caused a significant increase in cell death, and prolonged G2M arrest following NM exposure. Together, our findings, indicating that HRR is the key pathway involved in the repair of NM-induced DNA DSBs, could be useful in developing new therapeutic strategies against vesicant-induced skin injury. PMID:24732344

  4. Covalent adduction of nitrogen mustards to model protein nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Vanessa R; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2013-08-19

    Protein adducts have the potential to serve as unique biomarkers of exposure to compounds of interest. Many xenobiotics (or their metabolites) are electrophilic and therefore reactive with nucleophilic amino acid residues on proteins. Nitrogen mustards are reactive xenobiotics with potential use as chemical warfare agents (CWA) or agents of terrorist attack, in addition to being employed as chemotherapeutic agents. The present study utilized cysteine-, lysine-, and histidine-containing model peptides to characterize in vitro adduction of the nitrogen mustards mechloroethamine (HN-2) and tris-(2-chlorethyl)amine (HN-3) to these nucleophilic amino acid residues by means of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The study assessed the structure of adducts formed, the time course of adduct formation, concentration-response relationships, and temporal stability of adducts. Adduction was hypothesized to occur on all three model peptides via initial formation of a reactive aziridinium intermediate for both mechloroethamine and tris-(2-chlorethyl)amine, followed by covalent adduction to nucleophilic residues. While adduction was found to occur most readily with cysteine, it was also observed at lysine and histidine, demonstrating that adduction by mechloroethamine and tris-(2-chlorethyl)amine is possible at multiple nucleophilic sites. Following solid phase extraction cleanup, adducts formed with mechloroethamine were stable for up to three weeks. Adducts formed with tris-(2-chlorethyl)amine were less stable; however, hydrolyzed secondary adducts were observed throughout the three week period. This study demonstrates that the nitrogen mustards mechloroethamine and tris-(2-chlorethyl)amine form stable adducts with reactive protein nucleophiles other than cysteine. PMID:23859065

  5. Natural occurrence of bisphenol F in mustard

    PubMed Central

    Zoller, Otmar; Brüschweiler, Beat J.; Magnin, Roxane; Reinhard, Hans; Rhyn, Peter; Rupp, Heinz; Zeltner, Silvia; Felleisen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bisphenol F (BPF) was found in mustard up to a concentration of around 8 mg kg−1. Contamination of the raw products or caused by the packaging could be ruled out. Also, the fact that only the 4,4ʹ-isomer of BPF was detected spoke against contamination from epoxy resin or other sources where technical BPF is used. Only mild mustard made of the seeds of Sinapis alba contained BPF. In all probability BPF is a reaction product from the breakdown of the glucosinolate glucosinalbin with 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol as an important intermediate. Hot mustard made only from brown mustard seeds (Brassica juncea) or black mustard seeds (Brassica nigra) contained no BPF. BPF is structurally very similar to bisphenol A and has a similar weak estrogenic activity. The consumption of a portion of 20 g of mustard can lead to an intake of 100–200 µg of BPF. According to a preliminary risk assessment, the risk of BPF in mustard for the health of consumers is considered to be low, but available toxicological data are insufficient for a conclusive evaluation. It is a new and surprising finding that BPF is a natural food ingredient and that this is the main uptake route. This insight sheds new light on the risk linked to the family of bisphenols. PMID:26555822

  6. Natural occurrence of bisphenol F in mustard.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Otmar; Brüschweiler, Beat J; Magnin, Roxane; Reinhard, Hans; Rhyn, Peter; Rupp, Heinz; Zeltner, Silvia; Felleisen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol F (BPF) was found in mustard up to a concentration of around 8 mg kg(-1). Contamination of the raw products or caused by the packaging could be ruled out. Also, the fact that only the 4,4'-isomer of BPF was detected spoke against contamination from epoxy resin or other sources where technical BPF is used. Only mild mustard made of the seeds of Sinapis alba contained BPF. In all probability BPF is a reaction product from the breakdown of the glucosinolate glucosinalbin with 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol as an important intermediate. Hot mustard made only from brown mustard seeds (Brassica juncea) or black mustard seeds (Brassica nigra) contained no BPF. BPF is structurally very similar to bisphenol A and has a similar weak estrogenic activity. The consumption of a portion of 20 g of mustard can lead to an intake of 100-200 µg of BPF. According to a preliminary risk assessment, the risk of BPF in mustard for the health of consumers is considered to be low, but available toxicological data are insufficient for a conclusive evaluation. It is a new and surprising finding that BPF is a natural food ingredient and that this is the main uptake route. This insight sheds new light on the risk linked to the family of bisphenols. PMID:26555822

  7. Suppression of Hyperactive Immune Responses Protects against Nitrogen Mustard Injury

    PubMed Central

    Au, Liemin; Meisch, Jeffrey P; Das, Lopa M; Binko, Amy M; Boxer, Rebecca S; Wen, Amy M; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Lu, Kurt Q

    2015-01-01

    DNA alkylating agents like nitrogen mustard (NM) are easily absorbed through the skin and exposure to such agents manifest not only in direct cellular death but also in triggering inflammation. We show that toxicity resulting from topical mustard exposure is mediated in part by initiating exaggerated host innate immune responses. Using an experimental model of skin exposure to NM we observe activation of inflammatory dermal macrophages that exacerbate local tissue damage in an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent manner. Subsequently these activated dermal macrophages reappear in the bone marrow to aid in disruption of hematopoiesis and contribute ultimately to mortality in an experimental mouse model of topical NM exposure. Intervention with a single dose of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D) is capable of suppressing macrophage-mediated iNOS production resulting in mitigation of local skin destruction, enhanced tissue repair, protection from marrow depletion, and rescue from severe precipitous wasting. These protective effects are recapitulated experimentally using pharmacological inhibitors of iNOS or by compounds that locally deplete skin macrophages. Taken together, these data highlight a critical unappreciated role of the host innate immune system in exacerbating injury following exposure to NM and support the translation of 25(OH)D in the therapeutic use against these chemical agents. PMID:26288355

  8. Free radical production from the interaction of 2-chloroethyl vesicants (mustard gas) with pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein electron transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A. Mancebo, A.M.; Mason, R.P.; Jiang, J.J.; Siraki, A.G.; Novak, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The biochemical sequelae to chloroethyl mustard exposure correspond very well to toxic processes initiated by free radicals. Additionally, mustard solutions contain spontaneously formed cyclic onium ions which produce carbon free radicals when reduced electrochemically. Therefore, we hypothesized that the onium ions of sulfur or nitrogen mustards might produce carbon free radicals upon being reduced enzymatically, and that these radicals might constitute a metabolic activation. We set out to document radical production using an in vitro metabolic system and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Our system consisted of NADPH, one of several pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein reductases, cytochrome c as a terminal electron acceptor, various sulfur or nitrogen mustards and the spin trap {alpha}-[4-pyridyl-1-oxide]-N-tert-butylnitrone in buffer. Reactions were started by adding the reductase to the other materials, vortexing and immediately transferring the mixture to a 10 mm EPR flat cell. Repeated scans on a Bruker ESP 300E EPR spectrometer produced a triplet of doublets with hyperfine splitting constants of a{sub N} = 15.483 G and a{sub H} = 2.512 G. The outcome supported our hypothesis that carbon-centered free radicals are produced when mustard-related onium ions are enzymatically reduced. The EPR results varied little with the chloroethyl compound used or with porcine or human cytochrome P450 reductase, the reductase domain of rat brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase or rat liver thioredoxin reductase. Our results offer new insight into the basis for mustard-induced vesication and the outcome of exposure to different mustards. The free radical model provides an explanation for similarities in the lesions arising from mustard exposure and energy-based lesions such as those from heat, ultraviolet and nuclear radiation as well as damage across tissue types such as skin, eyes or airway epithelium.

  9. Review of the U.S. Army's health risk assessments for oral exposure to six chemical-warfare agents. Introduction.

    PubMed

    2000-03-01

    The U.S. Army is under a congressional mandate and the Chemical Weapons Convention of January 1993 to destroy its entire stockpile of chemical munitions. In addition to stockpiled munitions, nonstockpile chemical materiel (NSCM) has been identified for destruction. NSCM includes a host of lethal wastes from past disposal efforts, unserviceable munitions, chemically contaminated containers, chemical-production facilities, newly located chemical munitions, known sites containing substantial quantities of buried chemical weapons and wastes, and binary weapons and components. There are eight stockpile sites located in the continental United States and one on an island in the Pacific Ocean, and 82 NSCM locations have been identified. There are concerns, based on storage and past disposal practices, about soil and groundwater contamination at those sites. Six of the most commonly found chemical-warfare agents at stockpile and NSCM sites are the nerve agents GA, GB, GD, and VX and the vesicating (blistering) agents sulfur mustard and lewisite. To ensure that chemical contamination is reduced to safe concentrations at stockpile and NSCM sites before they are used for residential, occupational, or wildlife purposes, the U.S. Army requested that health-based exposure limits for GA, GB, GD, VX, sulfur mustard, and lewisite be developed to protect the public and the environment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was asked to conduct the health risk assessments and propose chronic oral reference doses (RfDs) and, where appropriate, oral slope factors (SFs) for the six agents. RfDs are toxicological values developed for noncancer effects and used as reference points to limit human oral exposure to potentially hazardous concentrations of chemicals thought to have thresholds for their effects. RfDs are estimates (with uncertainty spanning an order of magnitude or greater) of daily oral chemical exposures that are unlikely to have deleterious effects during a human lifetime. For

  10. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of nitrogen mustard-induced cutaneous effects in SKH-1 hairless and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Orlicky, David J; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicant warfare agent which causes severe skin injuries. Currently, we lack effective antidotes against SM-induced skin injuries, in part due to lack of appropriate animal model(s) that can be used for efficacy studies in laboratory settings to identify effective therapies. Therefore, to develop a relevant mouse skin injury model, we examined the effects of nitrogen mustard (NM), a primary vesicant and a bifunctional alkylating agent that induces toxic effects comparable to SM. Specifically, we conducted histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of several applicable cutaneous pathological lesions following skin NM (3.2mg) exposure for 12-120h in SKH-1 and C57BL/6 mice. NM caused a significant increase in epidermal thickness, incidence of microvesication, cell proliferation, apoptotic cell death, inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) and myleoperoxidase activity in the skin of both mouse strains. However, there was a more prominent NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, and macrophages and mast cell infiltration, in SKH-1 mice relative to what was seen in C57BL/6 mice. NM also caused collagen degradation and edema at early time points (12-24h); however, at later time points (72 and 120h), dense collagen staining was observed, indicating either water loss or start of integument repair in both the mouse strains. This study provides quantitative measurement of NM-induced histopathological and immunohistochemical cutaneous lesions in both hairless and haired mouse strains that could serve as useful tools for screening and identification of effective therapies for treatment of skin injuries due to NM and SM. PMID:24373750

  11. Sulphur mustard degradation on zirconium doped Ti-Fe oxides.

    PubMed

    Štengla, Václav; Grygar, Tomáš Matys; Opluštil, František; Němec, Tomáš

    2011-09-15

    Zirconium doped mixed nanodispersive oxides of Ti and Fe were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of sulphate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized nanodispersive metal oxide hydroxides were characterised as the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and acid-base titration. These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (chemical warfare agent HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide). The presence of Zr(4+) dopant tends to increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides in such a manner that it can contribute to enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface and thus accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. The addition of Zr(4+) to the hydrolysis of ferric sulphate with urea shifts the reaction route and promotes formation of goethite at the expense of ferrihydrite. We discovered that Zr(4+) doped oxo-hydroxides of Ti and Fe exhibit a higher degradation activity towards sulphur mustard than any other yet reported reactive sorbents. The reaction rate constant of the slower parallel reaction of the most efficient reactive sorbents is increased with the increasing amount of surface base sites. PMID:21775058

  12. Synthesis of a duplex oligonucleotide containing a nitrogen mustard interstrand DNA-DNA cross-link.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, J O; Grueneberg, D A; Loechler, E L

    1989-12-01

    Many cancer chemotherapeutic agents react with DNA and give adducts that block DNA replication, which is thought to result in cytotoxicity, especially in rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells. One class of these agents is bifunctionally reactive (e.g., the nitrogen mustards) and forms DNA-DNA cross-links. It is unknown whether inter- or intrastrand cross-links are more effective at blocking DNA replication. To evaluate this, a DNA shuttle vector is being constructed with an interstrand cross-link at a unique site. In the first step of this project, a duplex oligonucleotide containing an interstrand cross-link is isolated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from the reaction of nitrogen mustard with two partially complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. The purified oligonucleotide product is characterized and shown to be cross-linked in a 5'-GAC-3' 3'-CTG-5' sequence by a nitrogen mustard moiety that is bound at the N(7)-position of the guanines in the opposing strands; the glycosylic bonds of these guanine adducts are stabilized in their corresponding imidazole ring-opened form. Nitrogen mustard is shown to react with a variety of oligonucleotides and, based upon these results, its preferred targets for interstrand cross-linking are 5'-GXC-3' sequences, where X can be any of the four deoxyribonucleotide bases. PMID:2819709

  13. Interactions of Sulfur-Containing Acridine Ligands with DNA by ESI-MS

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Suncerae; Guziec, Frank S.; Guziec, Lynn; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The alkylating proficiency of sulfur-containing mustards may be increased by using an acridine moiety to guide the sulfur mustard to its cellular target. In this study, the interactions of a new series of sulfur-containing acridine ligands, some that also function as alklyating mustards, with DNA were evaluated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Relative binding affinities were estimated from the ESI-MS data based on the fraction of bound DNA for DNA/acridine mixtures. The extent of binding observed for the series of sulfur-containing acridines was similar, presumably because the intercalating acridine moiety was identical. Upon infrared multiphoton dissociation of the resulting oligonucleotide/sulfur-containing acridine complexes, ejection of the ligand was the dominant pathway for most of the complexes. However, for AS4, an acridine sulfide mustard, and AN1, an acridine nitrogen mustard, strand separation with the ligand remaining on one of the single strands was observed. At higher irradiation times, a variety of sequence ions were observed, some retaining the AS4/AN1 ligand, which was indicative of covalent binding. PMID:19768213

  14. Mustard Gas: Its Pre-World War I History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchovic, Ronald J.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2007-01-01

    The Meyer-Clarke synthetic method was used in the German process for large scale production of mustard gas during World War I, which clearly shows the historical connection of synthesis of mustard gas.

  15. Environmental chemistry of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    MacNaughton, M.G.; Brewer, J.H.; Ledbetter-Ferrill, J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper summarizes the approach used in the preparation of a Handbook for the Corps of Engineers, Huntsville Division, on the environmental chemistry of chemical warfare agents. The agents GB and HD will be used to illustrate the type of information in the report. Those readers interested in the full report should contact Mr. Arkie Fanning, Huntsville Corps of Engineers at (505) 955-5256. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) has identified approximately 7,200 formerly used defense sites (FUDS) in the United States, some of which are suspected to be contaminated with chemical warfare agents (CWA). The ACE has responsibility for environmental clean-up of FUDS, including site characterization, evaluation and remediation of the site. Thirty-four FUDS and 48 active DOD installations that may contain CWA were identified in an Interim Survey and Analysis Report by the USACMDA Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Material (NSCM). The chemical agents listed include sulfur mustard (H), lewisite (L), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), VX, hydrogen cyanide (AC), cyanogen chloride (CK), phosgene (CG), BZ, and CS.

  16. Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith; Watson, Annetta Paule; Hauschild, Veronique; Munro, Nancy B; King, J.

    2007-02-01

    The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid identification of practical and effective decontamination approaches, this paper reviews pathways of CWA degradation by natural means as well as those resulting from deliberately applied solutions and technologies; these pathways and technologies are compared and contrasted. We then review various technologies, both traditional and recent, with some emphasis on decontamination materials used for surfaces that are difficult to clean. Discussion is limited to the major threat CWA, namely sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate), and the G-series nerve agents. The principal G-agents are GA (tabun, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), GB (sarin, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and GD (soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate). The chemical decontamination pathways of each agent are outlined, with some discussion of intermediate and final degradation product toxicity. In all cases, and regardless of the CWA degradation pathway chosen for decontamination, it will be necessary to collect and analyze pertinent environmental samples during the treatment phase to confirm attainment of clearance levels.

  17. Sulfur and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aquin, Gerard E.; Fell, Robert C.

    Sulfur is one of the few elements that is found in its elemental form in nature. Typical sulfur deposits occur in sedimentary limestone/gypsum formations, in limestone/anhydrite formations associated with salt domes, or in volcanic rock.1 A yellow solid at normal temperatures, sulfur becomes progressively lighter in color at lower temperatures and is almost white at the temperature of liquid air. It melts at 114-119°C (depending on crystalline form) to a transparent light yellow liquid as the temperature is increased. The low viscosity of the liquid begins to rise sharply above 160°C, peaking at 93 Pa·s at 188°C, and then falling as the temperature continues to rise to its boiling point of 445°C. This and other anomalous properties of the liquid state are due to equilibria between the various molecular species of sulfur, which includes small chains and rings.

  18. Mesoporous titanium-manganese dioxide for sulphur mustard and soman decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stengl, Vaclav; Bludska, Jana; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} New nano-dispersive materials for warfare agents decontamination. {yields} 95% decontamination activities for sulphur mustard. {yields} New materials base on titanium and manganese oxides. -- Abstract: Titanium(IV)-manganese(IV) nano-dispersed oxides were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of potassium permanganate and titanium(IV) oxo-sulphate with 2-chloroacetamide. Synthesised samples were characterised using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide) and soman (GD or (3,3'-dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate). Mn{sup 4+} content affects the decontamination activity; with increasing Mn{sup 4+} content the activity increases for sulphur mustard and decreases for soman. The best decontamination activities for sulphur mustard and soman were observed for samples TiMn{sub 3}7 with 18.6 wt.% Mn and TiMn{sub 5} with 2.1 wt.% Mn, respectively.

  19. Discrimination between ricin and sulphur mustard toxicity in vitro using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Notingher, I.; Green, C.; Dyer, C.; Perkins, E.; Hopkins, N.; Lindsay, C.; Hench, L. L.

    2004-01-01

    A Raman spectroscopy cell-based biosensor has been proposed for rapid detection of toxic agents, identification of the type of toxin and prediction of the concentration used. This technology allows the monitoring of the biochemical properties of living cells over long periods of time by measuring the Raman spectra of the cells non-invasively, rapidly and without use of labels (Notingher et al. 2004 doi:10.1016/j.bios.2004.04.008). Here we show that this technology can be used to distinguish between changes induced in A549 lung cells by the toxin ricin and the chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard. A multivariate model based on principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used for the analysis of the Raman spectra of the cells. The leave-one-out cross-validation of the PCA-LDA model showed that the damaged cells can be detected with high sensitivity (98.9%) and high specificity (87.7%). High accuracy in identifying the toxic agent was also found: 88.6% for sulphur mustard and 71.4% for ricin. The prediction errors were observed mostly for the ricin treated cells and the cells exposed to the lower concentration of sulphur mustard, as they induced similar biochemical changes, as indicated by cytotoxicity assays. The concentrations of sulphur mustard used were also identified with high accuracy: 93% for 200 microM and 500 microM, and 100% for 1,000 microM. Thus, biological Raman microspectroscopy and PCA-LDA analysis not only distinguishes between viable and damaged cells, but can also discriminate between toxic challenges based on the cellular biochemical and structural changes induced by these agents and the eventual mode of cell death. PMID:16849154

  20. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators. PMID:25133545

  1. Mustard (Sinapis alba) Seed Meal Suppresses Weeds in Container Grown Ornamentals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meal is a byproduct of mustard (Sinapis alba L.) grown and oil production. Developing new uses for mustard seed meal could increase the profitability of growing mustard. Seed meal of mustard, var. ‘IdaGold’ was applied to the soil surface to evaluate its effect on several common weeds...

  2. Mustard meal as an organic herbicide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard meal (MM) is phytotoxic and a potential pre-emergent and preplant-incorporated organic herbicide for controlling germinating and emerging weed seedlings: unfortunately, MM may also adversely impact seedling survival of certain direct-seeded vegetable crops. Field research was conducted in s...

  3. Use of acid whey and mustard seed to replace nitrites during cooked sausage production.

    PubMed

    Wójciak, Karolina M; Karwowska, Małgorzata; Dolatowski, Zbigniew J

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to determine the effects of sea salt, acid whey, native and autoclaved mustard seed on the physico-chemical properties, especially colour formation, microbial stability and sensory evaluation of non-nitrite cooked sausage during chilling storage. The cooked pork sausages were divided into 4 groups (group I--control sausages with curing salt (2.8%) and water (5%) added; group II--sausages with sea salt (2.8%) and acid whey (5%) added; group III--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and mustard seed (1%) added; group IV--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and autoclaved mustard seed (1%) added). Instrumental colour (L*, a*, b*), oxygenation index (ΔR), 650/570 nm ratio, heme iron, pH value and water activity (aw) were determined 1 day after production and after 10, 20 and 30 days of refrigerated storage (4 °C). Sensory analysis was conducted immediately after production (day 1). Microbial analysis (lactic acid bacteria, total viable count, Clostridium spp.) was determinated at the end of storage (30 days). The autoclaved mustard with acid whey can be used at 1.0% (w/w) of model cooked sausages with beneficial effect on physico-chemical and sensory qualities of no-nitrite sausage. This product can be stored at refrigeration temperature for up to 30 days, in vacuum, with good acceptability. The colour, visual appearance and overall quality of samples with autoclaved mustard seed and acid whey were similar to the control with curing agent. PMID:24200566

  4. 'Dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method for fast detection of nerve and vesicant chemical warfare agent metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Igor; Braun, Arcady; Stavrianidi, Andrey; Baygildiev, Timur; Shpigun, Oleg; Oreshkin, Dmitry; Rybalchenko, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive screening method based on fast liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (RSLC-MS-MS) has shown the feasibility of separation and detection of low concentration β-lyase metabolites of sulfur mustard and of nerve agent phosphonic acids in urine. The analysis of these compounds is of interest because they are specific metabolites of the chemical warfare agents (CWAs), sulfur mustard (HD), sarin (GB), soman (GD), VX and Russian VX (RVX). The 'dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method provides a sensitive and direct approach for determining CWA exposure in non-extracted non-derivatized samples from urine. Chromatographic separation of the metabolites was achieved using a reverse phase column with gradient mobile phases consisting of 0.5% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Identification and quantification of species were achieved using electrospray ionization-tandem mass-spectrometry monitoring two precursor-to-product ion transitions for each compound. The method demonstrates linearity over at least two orders of magnitude and had detection limits of 0.5 ng/mL in urine. PMID:25326204

  5. Soil biotransformation of thiodiglycol, the hydrolysis product of mustard gas: understanding the factors governing remediation of mustard gas contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Muir, Robert; McFarlane, Neil R; Soilleux, Richard J; Yu, Xiaohong; Thompson, Ian P; Jackman, Simon A

    2013-02-01

    Thiodiglycol (TDG) is both the precursor for chemical synthesis of mustard gas and the product of mustard gas hydrolysis. TDG can also react with intermediates of mustard gas degradation to form more toxic and/or persistent aggregates, or reverse the pathway of mustard gas degradation. The persistence of TDG have been observed in soils and in the groundwater at sites contaminated by mustard gas 60 years ago. The biotransformation of TDG has been demonstrated in three soils not previously exposed to the chemical. TDG biotransformation occurred via the oxidative pathway with an optimum rate at pH 8.25. In contrast with bacteria isolated from historically contaminated soil, which could degrade TDG individually, a consortium of three bacterial strains isolated from the soil never contaminated by mustard gas was able to grow on TDG in minimal medium and in hydrolysate derived from an historical mustard gas bomb. Exposure to TDG had little impacts on the soil microbial physiology or on community structure. Therefore, the persistency of TDG in soils historically contaminated by mustard gas might be attributed to the toxicity of mustard gas to microorganisms and the impact to soil chemistry during the hydrolysis. TDG biodegradation may form part of a remediation strategy for mustard gas contaminated sites, and may be enhanced by pH adjustment and aeration. PMID:22752796

  6. A mediational model of PTSD in World War II veterans exposed to mustard gas.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M Kay; Schnurr, Paula P; Adams, Gary A; Green, Bonnie L; Ford, Julian D; Friedman, Matthew J

    2004-08-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine associations among trauma-related contextual factors, initial psychological reactions, social support, and subsequent disclosure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of World War II (WWII) veterans exposed to mustard gas (N = 305). A structural model suggested that initial psychological reaction mediated the relationship between variables related to the context of mustard gas exposure and severity of PTSD symptoms 50 years later. Unexpectedly, social support appeared to be positively related to PTSD symptoms, and not related to the contextual variables or initial psychological reactions. These findings contribute to our understanding of PTSD in older veterans, and have relevance for early intervention services to prevent PTSD among those at risk for exposure to toxic agents. PMID:15462537

  7. Novel Hybrids of Natural Oridonin-Bearing Nitrogen Mustards as Potential Anticancer Drug Candidates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel hybrids from natural product oridonin and nitrogen mustards were designed and synthesized to obtain more efficacious and less toxic antitumor agents. The antiproliferative evaluation showed that most conjugates were more potent than their parent compounds oridonin and clinically used nitrogen mustards against four human cancer cell lines (K562, MCF-7, Bel-7402, and MGC-803). Furthermore, the representative compounds 16a–c exhibited antiproliferative activities against the multidrug resistant cell lines (SW620/AD300 and NCI-H460/MX20). It was shown that the most effective compound 16b possesses a strong inhibitory activity with an IC50 value 21-fold lower than that of oridonin in MCF-7 cells and also exhibits selective cytotoxicity toward the cancer cells. Intriguingly, compound 16b has been demonstrated to significantly induce apoptosis and affect cell cycle progression in human hepatoma Bel-7402 cells. PMID:25050168

  8. Novel hybrids of natural oridonin-bearing nitrogen mustards as potential anticancer drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengtao; Pei, Lingling; Wang, Chengqian; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Li, Dahong; Yao, Hequan; Wu, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Sun, Yijun; Xu, Jinyi

    2014-07-10

    A series of novel hybrids from natural product oridonin and nitrogen mustards were designed and synthesized to obtain more efficacious and less toxic antitumor agents. The antiproliferative evaluation showed that most conjugates were more potent than their parent compounds oridonin and clinically used nitrogen mustards against four human cancer cell lines (K562, MCF-7, Bel-7402, and MGC-803). Furthermore, the representative compounds 16a-c exhibited antiproliferative activities against the multidrug resistant cell lines (SW620/AD300 and NCI-H460/MX20). It was shown that the most effective compound 16b possesses a strong inhibitory activity with an IC50 value 21-fold lower than that of oridonin in MCF-7 cells and also exhibits selective cytotoxicity toward the cancer cells. Intriguingly, compound 16b has been demonstrated to significantly induce apoptosis and affect cell cycle progression in human hepatoma Bel-7402 cells. PMID:25050168

  9. Putting Some Mustard into Economic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    On September 27, 2012, the University of Toronto launched the Fraser Mustard Institute for Human Development – an appropriate recognition of an extraordinary individual. Fraser was a keen student of the science of human development and, most particularly, of early child development (ECD). He was also a powerful and tireless advocate for translating science into action. His institute must do both. Action is needed also because 25% of Canadians lack the competencies to function effectively in a modern economy. Other countries do much better. Facing a low-growth future, we cannot afford to waste this untapped potential. Although Prime Minister Harper's personal ideology has no place for ECD, the Mustard Institute can help keep the flame alive. PMID:23968611

  10. Mustard bran in lactating dairy cow diets.

    PubMed

    Maiga, H A; Bauer, M L; Dahlen, C R; Badaruddin, M; Scholljegerdes, E J

    2011-06-01

    Two trials using lactating Holstein cows were conducted to evaluate effects of a diet containing oriental mustard bran on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, milk components, and organoleptic properties. In experiment 1, 34 lactating cows (24 multiparous and 10 primiparous; days in milk ≥ 50 d) were used in a switchback design to determine the lactational response and organoleptic quality of milk when the diet contained 8% oriental mustard bran (MB) versus a control diet (CON). Mustard bran replaced a portion of soybean meal and all the beet pulp in the CON diet. Milk yields were greater for cows fed the MB diet; however, no differences were found in DMI, 3.5% fat- (FCM) or solids-corrected milk. Milk components and components production were not affected by treatment. Milk organoleptic qualities were not affected by diet. In experiment 2, 22 lactating cows (16 multiparous and 6 primiparous; days in milk ≥ 21 d) were assigned randomly within parity to receive MB or CON from wk 4 to 19 postpartum in a randomized complete block design. Cows were fed CON wk 1 to 3 postpartum. The MB diet contained the same ingredients as the CON, except sunflower seed and a portion of soybean meal were replaced with mustard bran. Milk and components data were collected during wk 3 postpartum and used as covariates to adjust treatment means. Intake was greater for cows fed the MB diet; however, daily milk, 3.5% FCM, and solids-corrected milk yields were not different between diets. Milk components and component yields were not affected by treatment. Milk urea concentration was less for cows fed the MB diet. Although cows fed the MB diet had greater DMI, this was not translated into a higher milk 3.5% FCM/DMI production efficiency ratio. During experiment 2, many cows fed MB experienced minor to severe hemolysis with bloody urine. This hemolysis believed to be caused by the S-methyl-cysteine sulfoxide contained in mustard bran could have affected milk production efficiency

  11. Chemical warfare agents: estimating oral reference doses.

    PubMed

    Opresko, D M; Young, R A; Faust, R A; Talmage, S S; Watson, A P; Ross, R H; Davidson, K A; King, J

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainty Factors, including (1) a UFH < or = 10 to ensure that the resulting RfD protects segments of the human population that may be more sensitive to the chemical than the average person; (2) a UFA < or = 10 to extrapolate from the experimental animal species to humans; (3) a UFS < or = 10 to extrapolate from an experimental subchronic exposure study to a potential chronic exposure; and (4) a UFD < or = 10 to ensure that the resulting RfD is protective for all possible adverse effects, particularly those that may not have been adequately evaluated in the available studies. A Modifying Factor (MF), based on a qualitative professional assessment of the data, may also be used to account for other factors (e.g., deficiencies in the critical study) that are not adequately covered by the standard Uncertainty Factors. 1. Agent HD (Sulfur Mustard). RfDe = 7 x 10(-6) mg kg-1 d-1. A LOAEL was identified in a two-generation reproductive toxicity study conducted in rats. A total uncertainty factor of 3000 was applied to account for protection of sensitive subpopulations (10), animal-to-human extrapolation (10), LOAEL-to-NOAEL extrapolation (3), and extrapolation from a subchronic to chronic exposure (10). A LOAEL-to-NOAEL UF of 3, instead of the default value of 10, was used because the critical effect (stomach lesions) was considered to be "mild" in severity and may have been enhanced by the vehicle used (sesame oil in which sulfur mustard is fully soluble) and the route of administration (gavage), which is more likely to result in localized irritant effects. The key study did identify a toxic effect that is consistent with the vesicant properties of sulfur mustard. In none of the other available studies was there any indication of a different effect occurring at a lower exposure level. PMID:9597943

  12. Detection and monitoring of early airway injury effects of half-mustard (2-chloroethylethylsulfide) exposure using high-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuter, Kelly A.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David S.; Su, Jianping; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Narula, Navneet; Guo, Shuguang; Wakida, Nicole; Raub, Chris; Berns, Michael W.; George, Steven C.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, high-resolution imaging technology capable of delivering real-time, near-histologic images of tissues. Mustard gas is a vesicant-blistering agent that can cause severe and lethal damage to airway and lungs. The ability to detect and assess airway injury in the clinical setting of mustard exposure is currently limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability to detect and monitor progression of half-mustard [2-chloroethylethylsulfide (CEES)] airway injuries with OCT techniques. A ventilated rabbit mustard exposure airway injury model is developed. A flexible fiber optic OCT probe is introduced into the distal trachea to image airway epithelium and mucosa in vivo. Progression of airway injury is observed over eight hours with OCT using a prototype time-domain superluminescent diode OCT system. OCT tracheal images from CEES exposed animals are compared to control rabbits for airway mucosal thickening and other changes. OCT detects the early occurrence and progression of dramatic changes in the experimental group after exposure to CEES. Histology and immunofluorescence staining confirms this finding. OCT has the potential to be a high resolution imaging modality capable of detecting, assessing, and monitoring treatment for airway injury following mustard vesicant agent exposures.

  13. Detection and monitoring of early airway injury effects of half-mustard (2-chloroethylethylsulfide) exposure using high-resolution optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Kelly A.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David S.; Su, Jianping; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Narula, Navneet; Guo, Shuguang; Wakida, Nicole; Raub, Chris; Berns, Michael W.; George, Steven C.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, high-resolution imaging technology capable of delivering real-time, near-histologic images of tissues. Mustard gas is a vesicant-blistering agent that can cause severe and lethal damage to airway and lungs. The ability to detect and assess airway injury in the clinical setting of mustard exposure is currently limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability to detect and monitor progression of half-mustard [2-chloroethylethylsulfide (CEES)] airway injuries with OCT techniques. A ventilated rabbit mustard exposure airway injury model is developed. A flexible fiber optic OCT probe is introduced into the distal trachea to image airway epithelium and mucosa in vivo. Progression of airway injury is observed over eight hours with OCT using a prototype time-domain superluminescent diode OCT system. OCT tracheal images from CEES exposed animals are compared to control rabbits for airway mucosal thickening and other changes. OCT detects the early occurrence and progression of dramatic changes in the experimental group after exposure to CEES. Histology and immunofluorescence staining confirms this finding. OCT has the potential to be a high resolution imaging modality capable of detecting, assessing, and monitoring treatment for airway injury following mustard vesicant agent exposures. PMID:19725748

  14. Effect of Greens and Soil Type, Sulfur Addition and Lithium Level on Leaf Constituents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  15. Harmful Effects of Mustard Bio-fumigants on Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green manures, particularly mustards tilled into the soil preceding potato crops act as bio-fumigants that are toxic to plant parasitic nematodes, providing an alternative to synthetic soil fumigants. It is not known if mustard green manures also kill beneficial entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) tha...

  16. Mesoporous iron–manganese oxides for sulphur mustard and soman degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Štengl, Václav; Grygar, Tomáš Matys; Bludská, Jana; Opluštil, František; Němec, Tomáš

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► New nanodispersive materials based on Fe and Mn oxides for degradations of warfare agents. ► The best activities for the degradation of sulphur mustard (97.9% in 64 min) and soman (97.9% in 64 min). ► One pot synthesis with friendly transformed to industrial conditions. -- Abstract: Substituted iron(III)–manganese(III, IV) oxides, ammonio-jarosite and birnessite, were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of potassium permanganate and iron(III) sulphate with 2-chloroacetamide and urea, respectively. Synthesised oxides were characterised using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett–Joiner–Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity against sulphur mustard (HD) and soman (GD). When ammonio-jarosite formation is suppressed by adding urea to the reaction mixture, the reaction products are mixtures of goethite, schwertmannite and ferrihydrite, and their degradation activity against soman considerably increases. The best activities for the degradation of sulphur mustard (97.9% in 64 min) and soman (97.9% in 64 min) were observed for FeMn{sub 7}5 with 32.6 wt.% Fe (36.8 wt.% Mn) and FeMn{sub 3}7U with 60.8 wt.% Fe (10.1 wt.% Mn) samples, respectively.

  17. Iron oxide functionalized graphene nano-composite for dispersive solid phase extraction of chemical warfare agents from aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Tak, Vijay; Goud, D Raghavender; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2015-05-15

    Present study deals with the preparation and evaluation of graphene based magnetic nano-composite for dispersive solid phase extraction of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) relevant chemicals from aqueous samples. Nano-composite, Fe3O4@SiO2-G was synthesized by covalently bonding silica coated Fe3O4 onto the graphene sheets. Nerve agents (NA), Sulfur mustard (SM) and their non-toxic environmental markers were the target analytes. Extraction parameters like amount of sorbent, extraction time and desorption conditions were optimized. Dispersion of 20 milligram of sorbent in 200mL of water sample for 20min. followed by methanol/chloroform extraction produced average to good recoveries (27-94%) of targeted analytes. Recoveries of real agents exhibited great dependency upon sample pH and ionic strength. Sarin produced maximum recovery under mild acidic conditions (56% at pH 5) while VX demanded alkaline media (83% at pH 9). Salts presence in the aqueous samples was found to be advantageous, raising the recoveries to as high as 94% for SM. Excellent limits of detection (LOD) for sulphur mustard and VX (0.11ngmL(-1) and 0.19ngmL(-1) respectively) proved the utility of the developed method for the off-site analysis of CWC relevant chemicals. PMID:25828545

  18. The treatment of sulphur mustard burns with laser debridement.

    PubMed

    Evison, D; Brown, R F R; Rice, P

    2006-01-01

    The chemical warfare agent, sulphur mustard (SM), is a potent blistering agent in man. Skin exposure can produce partial-thickness burns which take up to three months to heal. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of early laser ablation as a means of accelerating this exceptionally slow rate of healing. Four circular partial-thickness SM burns were induced on the dorsum of nine large white pigs (under general anaesthesia). At 72 h post-exposure, three burns per animal were ablated with a single pass of an UltraPulse 5000C CO(2) laser, at a fluence of 5-6 J cm(-2). All the burns were dressed with silver sulphadiazine and a semi-occlusive dressing. At one, two and three weeks post-surgery three animals were culled and all lesions excised for histological analysis. Burn depth was confirmed and measurements of the radii of regenerative epithelium were performed allowing the area of the zone of re-epithelialisation in each lesion to be calculated. Laser-treated lesions showed a significant increase (350%) in healing rates compared to controls (p<0.005). At two weeks, the laser-treated sites were 95% healed in comparison with control sites (28% healed). These data suggest that laser ablation may be effective in the treatment of partial-thickness SM-induced skin injury. PMID:16996434

  19. [Clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents. (Part 1) Introduction, alkylating agents and platinum compounds].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H

    1991-11-01

    Pharmacokinetic concepts as to absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of anticancer agents, and how drugs reach to the site of action were reviewed. Then, roles of the liver and kidney to the excretion and metabolism, intracellular pharmacokinetics, and relationships between drug response and cell proliferation kinetics or cell cycle phase were explained. Drug development, mode of action and pharmacokinetics of alkylating agents and platinum compounds were reviewed. This includes: alkylating agents: nitrogen mustard, phenylalanine mustard, estracyte, cyclophosphamide, carboquone, busulfan, nitrosourea, etc., and platinum compounds: cisplatin, carboplatin, 254-S, DWA-2114 R, NK-121. PMID:1952967

  20. Technical support for recovery phase decision-making in the event of a chemical warfare agent release

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.; Shugart, L.; Buchanan, M.; Jenkins, R.; Kistner, S.; Halbrook, R.

    1995-12-31

    Persistent chemical warfare agents such as the nerve agent VX and sulfur mustard were originally designed as terrain denial materials on the chemical battlefield. As a consequence, they do not rapidly degrade. In the course of preparedness planning for disposal of the US unitary stockpile of chemical warfare agents, communities have raised the issue of determining environmental concentrations and the potential health consequences of persistent agents following any agent event. This issue is common to several chemical warfare munition and materiel disposal activities in the United States, as well as for developing verification and compliance monitoring programs integral to the international Chemical Weapons Convention. Experimental research supporting the development of environmental monitoring protocols are summarized. They include the development of blood cholinesterase activity as a biomonitor of nerve agent exposure in domestic beef and dairy cattle, horses and sheep; measuring the permeation rates of construction materials such as unpainted wood and gypsum wall board to agent simulants; and developing an experimental monitoring protocol for agents in meat and grain.

  1. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  2. Technical support for recovery phase decision-making in the event of a chemical warfare agent release

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.; Kistner, S.; Halbrook, R.

    1995-12-31

    In late 1985, Congress mandated that the U.S. stockpile of lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions be destroyed by the Department of the Army in a manner that provides maximum protection to the environment, the general public and personnel involved in the disposal program (Public Law 99-1, Section 1412, Title 14, Part b). These unitary munitions were last manufactured in the late 1960`s. The stockpiled inventory is estimated to approximate 25,000-30,000 tons, an includes organophosphate ({open_quotes}nerves{close_quotes}) agents such as VX [O-ethylester of S-(diisopropyl aminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate, C{sub 11}H{sub 26}NO{sub 2}PS] and vesicant ({open_quotes}blister{close_quotes}) agents such as Hd [sulfur mustard; bis (2-chloroethyl sulfide), C{sub 4}H{sub 8}Cl{sub 2}S]. The method of agent destruction selected by the Department of the Army is combined high-temperature and high-residence time incineration at secured military installations where munitions are currently stockpiled. This program supports the research program to address: the biomonitoring of nerve agent exposure; agent detection limits in foods and milk; and permeation of agents through porous construction materials.

  3. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  4. Models of invasion and establishment of African Mustard (Brassica tournefortii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Kristin H.; Gowan, Timothy A.; Miller, David M.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduced exotic plants can drive ecosystem change. We studied invasion and establishment ofBrassica tournefortii (African mustard), a noxious weed, in the Chemehuevi Valley, western Sonoran Desert, California. We used long-term data sets of photographs, transects for biomass of annual plants, and densities of African mustard collected at irregular intervals between 1979 and 2009. We suggest that African mustard may have been present in low numbers along the main route of travel, a highway, in the late 1970s; invaded the valley along a major axial valley ephemeral stream channel and the highway; and by 2009, colonized 22 km into the eastern part of the valley. We developed predictive models for invasibility and establishment of African mustard. Both during the initial invasion and after establishment, significant predictor variables of African mustard densities were surficial geology, proximity to the highway and axial valley ephemeral stream channel, and number of small ephemeral stream channels. The axial valley ephemeral stream channel was the most vulnerable of the variables to invasions. Overall, African mustard rapidly colonized and quickly became established in naturally disturbed areas, such as stream channels, where geological surfaces were young and soils were weakly developed. Older geological surfaces (e.g., desert pavements with soils 140,000 to 300,000 years old) were less vulnerable. Microhabitats also influenced densities of African mustard, with densities higher under shrubs than in the interspaces. As African mustard became established, the proportional biomass of native winter annual plants declined. Early control is important because African mustard can colonize and become well established across a valley in 20 yr.

  5. Silibinin, dexamethasone, and doxycycline as potential therapeutic agents for treating vesicant-inflicted ocular injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A.; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Enzenauer, Robert W.; Petrash, J. Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 μg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. -- Highlights: ► Established injury biomarkers in rabbit corneal culture with nitrogen mustard (NM) ► This NM model is a cost effective

  6. Pityriasis rosea-like eruptions due to mustard oil application.

    PubMed

    Zawar, Vijay

    2005-01-01

    A young man employed in a construction company, presented with cutaneous lesions clinically simulating pityriasis rosea. Satisfactory and complete response to corticosteroids and antihistamines was followed by recurrence. Multiple recurrences within a short span of time arose a suspicion of alternative diagnosis. Site visit helped us to rule out occupational contact dermatitis. Further history taking revealed that he was recently using mustard oil for body massage. Subsequent patch testing confirmed contact hypersensitivity to mustard oil. Avoidance of the contact with mustard oil arrested appearance of further skin lesions. We stress the importance of taking a good history in clinical practice in disclosing a possible contactant. PMID:16394442

  7. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  8. DNA damage in internal organs after cutaneous exposure to sulphur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Wartelle, Julien; Bérard, Izabel

    2014-07-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the formation and persistence of guanine and adenine monoadducts and guanine biadducts in the DNA of brain, lungs, kidneys, spleen, and liver of SKH-1 mice cutaneously exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM. SM-DNA adducts were detected in all studied organs, except in liver at the two lowest doses. Brain and lungs were the organs with the highest level of SM-DNA adducts, followed by kidney, spleen and liver. Monitoring the level of adducts for three weeks after cutaneous exposure showed that the lifetime of adducts were not the same in all organs, lungs being the organ with the longest persistence. Diffusion from skin to internal organs was much more efficient at the highest compared to the lowest dose investigated as the result of the loss of the skin barrier function. These data provide novel information on the distribution of SM in tissues following cutaneous exposures and indicate that brain is an important target. - Highlights: • Sulphur mustard reaches internal organs after skin exposure • Adducts are detected in the DNA of internal organs • Brain is the organ with the highest level of DNA damage • The barrier function of skin is lost at high dose of sulphur mustard • DNA adducts persist in organs for 2 or 3 weeks.

  9. Removal of sulphur mustard, sarin and simulants on impregnated silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amit; Srivastava, Avanish K; Singh, Beer; Goyal, Anshu

    2012-04-15

    Silica nanoparticles of diameter, 24-75 nm and surface area, 875 m(2)/g were synthesized using aero-gel route. Thereafter, nanoparticles were impregnated with reactive chemicals, and used as reactive adsorbent to study the removal of toxic nerve and blister chemical warfare agents and their simulants from solutions. Trichloroisocyanuric acid impregnated silica nanoparticles showed the best performance and indicated physisorption followed by chemisorption/degradation of toxicants. This indicated their suitability as universal decontaminant for nerve and blister agents. This system showed a decrease in t(1/2) from 1210 to 2.8 min for the removal of king of chemical warfare agents, i.e., sulphur mustard. Hydrolysis, dehydrohalogenation and oxidation reactions were found to be the route of degradation of toxicants over impregnated silica nanoparticles. PMID:21871717

  10. Screening of nitrogen mustards and their degradation products in water and decontamination solution by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chua, Hoe-Chee; Lee, Hoi-Sim; Sng, Mui-Tiang

    2006-01-13

    Analysing nitrogen mustards and their degradation products in decontamination emulsions posed a significant challenge due to the different phases present in such matrices. Extensive sample preparation may be required to isolate target analytes. Furthermore, numerous reaction products are formed in the decontamination emulsion. A fast and effective qualitative screening procedure was developed for these compounds, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This eliminated the need for additional sample handling and derivatisation that are required for gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. A liquid chromatograph with mixed mode column and isocratic elution gave good chromatography. The feasibility of applying this technique for detecting these compounds in spiked water and decontamination emulsion was demonstrated. Detailed characterisation of the degradation products in these two matrices was carried out. The results demonstrated that N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), N-ethyldiethanolamine (EDEA) and triethanolamine (TEA) are not the major degradation products of their respective nitrogen mustards. Degradation profiles of nitrogen mustards in water were also established. In verification analysis, it is important not only to develop methods for the identification of the actual chemical agents; the methods must also encompass degradation products of the chemical agents as well so as to exclude false negatives. This study demonstrated the increasingly pivotal role that LC-MS play in verification analysis. PMID:16310795

  11. Ionic dependence of sulphur mustard cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Thomas W. Nelson, Peggy; Bjarnason, Stephen; Vair, Cory; Shei Yimin; Tenn, Catherine; Lecavalier, Pierre; Burczyk, Andrew

    2010-09-15

    The effect of ionic environment on sulphur mustard (bis 2-chloroethyl sulphide; HD) toxicity was examined in CHO-K1 cells. Cultures were treated with HD in different ionic environments at constant osmolar conditions (320 mOsM, pH 7.4). The cultures were refed with fresh culture medium 1 h after HD exposure, and viability was assessed. Little toxicity was apparent when HD exposures were carried out in ion-free sucrose buffer compared to LC{sub 50} values of {approx} 100-150 {mu}M when the cultures were treated with HD in culture medium. Addition of NaCl to the buffer increased HD toxicity in a salt concentration-dependent manner to values similar to those obtained in culture medium. HD toxicity was dependent on both cationic and anionic species with anionic environment playing a much larger role in determining toxicity. Substitution of NaI for NaCl in the treatment buffers increased HD toxicity by over 1000%. The activity of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE) in recovering from cytosolic acidification in salt-free and in different chloride salts did not correlate with the HD-induced toxicity in these buffers. However, the inhibition by HD of intracellular pH regulation correlated with its toxicity in NaCl, NaI and sucrose buffers. Analytical chemical studies and the toxicity of the iodine mustard derivative ruled out the role of chemical reactions yielding differentially toxic species as being responsible for the differences in HD toxicity observed. This work demonstrates that the early events that HD sets into motion to cause toxicity are dependent on ionic environment, possibly due to intracellular pH deregulation.

  12. Release of allyl isothiocyanate from mustard seed meal powder.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruyan; Lim, Loong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is a wide-spectrum antimicrobial compound found in mustard seeds, produced when their tissues are disrupted. The formation of AITC in mustard seed is mediated by the myrosinase enzyme which catalyzes the release of volatile AITC from a glucosinolate-sinigrin. Since water is a substrate in the reaction, humidity from the air can be used to activate the release of AITC from mustard seed. In this study, defatted and partially defatted mustard seed meals were ground into powders with particle size ranging from 5 to 300 μm. The mustard seed meal powder (MSMP) samples were enclosed within hermetically sealed glass jars wherein the headspace air was adjusted to 85% or 100% relative humidity at 5, 20, or 35 °C. Data from gas chromatography analysis showed that AITC release rate and amount increased with increasing relative humidity and temperature. Moreover, the release rate can be manipulated by particle size and lipid content of the MSMP samples. The amount of AITC released ranged from 2 to 17 mg/g MSMP within 24 h under the experimental conditions tested. In view of the antimicrobial properties of AITC, the mustard meal powder may be used as a natural antimicrobial material for extending the shelf life of food products. PMID:24313968

  13. Method for Derivatization and Detection of Chemical Weapons Convention Related Sulfur Chlorides via Electrophilic Addition with 3-Hexyne.

    PubMed

    Goud, D Raghavender; Pardasani, Deepak; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2) and sulfur dichloride (SCl2) are important precursors of the extremely toxic chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard and classified, respectively, into schedule 3.B.12 and 3.B.13 of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Hence, their detection and identification is of vital importance for verification of CWC. These chemicals are difficult to detect directly using chromatographic techniques as they decompose and do not elute. Until now, the use of gas chromatographic approaches to follow the derivatized sulfur chlorides is not reported in the literature. The electrophilic addition reaction of sulfur monochloride and sulfur dichloride toward 3-hexyne was explored for the development of a novel derivatization protocol, and the products were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. Among various unsaturated reagents like alkenes and alkynes, symmetrical alkyne 3-hexyne was optimized to be the suitable derivatizing agent for these analytes. Acetonitrile was found to be the suitable solvent for the derivatization reaction. The sample preparation protocol for the identification of these analytes from hexane spiked with petrol matrix was also optimized. Liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization was employed for the identification of these analytes from petrol matrix. Under the established conditions, the detection and quantification limits are 2.6 μg/mL, 8.6 μg/mL for S2Cl2 and 2.3 μg/mL, 7.7 μg/mL for SCl2, respectively, in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The calibration curve had a linear relationship with y = 0.022x - 0.331 and r(2) = 0.992 for the working range of 10 to 500 μg/mL for S2Cl2 and y = 0.007x - 0.064 and r(2) = 0.991 for the working range of 10 to 100 μg/mL for SCl2, respectively. The intraday RSDs were between 4.80 to 6.41%, 2.73 to 6.44% and interday RSDs were between 2.20 to 7.25% and 2.34 to 5.95% for S2Cl2 and SCl2, respectively. PMID:26054007

  14. Development and validation of a real-time PCR method for the simultaneous detection of black mustard (Brassica nigra) and brown mustard (Brassica juncea) in food.

    PubMed

    Palle-Reisch, Monika; Wolny, Martina; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Hochegger, Rupert

    2013-05-01

    The paper presents a real-time PCR method allowing the simultaneous detection of traces of black mustard (Brassica nigra) and brown mustard (Brassica juncea) in food. The primers and the probe target the B. nigra partial RT gene for reverse transcriptase from gypsy-like retroelement 13G42-26. The real-time PCR method does not show any cross-reactivity with other Brassicaceae species with the exception of white mustard. Low cross-reactivities with cinnamon, cumin, fenugreek, ginger, rye and turmeric can be ignored because in common mustard containing foodstuffs these biological species are present in very low amounts. By analysing serially diluted DNA extracts from black and brown mustard, the DNA of both mustard species could be detected down to 0.1 pg. With 10 ng DNA per PCR tube the real-time PCR method allows the detection of 5 ppm black and brown mustard in brewed sausages. PMID:23265498

  15. Comparison of cake compositions, pepsin digestibility and amino acids concentration of proteins isolated from black mustard and yellow mustard cakes.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Ashish Kumar; Saha, Dipti; Begum, Hasina; Zaman, Asaduz; Rahman, Md Mashiar

    2015-01-01

    As a byproduct of oil production, black and yellow mustard cakes protein are considered as potential source of plant protein for feed applications to poultry, fish and swine industries. The protein contents in black and yellow mustard cakes were 38.17% and 28.80% and their pepsin digestibility was 80.33% and 77.43%, respectively. The proteins were extracted at different pH and maximum proteins (89.13% of 38.17% and 87.76% of 28.80% respectively) isolated from black and yellow mustard cakes at pH 12. The purity of isolated proteins of black and yellow mustard cakes was 89.83% and 91.12% respectively and their pepsin digestibility was 89.67% and 90.17% respectively which assigned the absence of antinutritional compounds. It was found that essential amino acids isoleucine, lysine, methionine, threonine and tryptophan and non essential amino acids arginine and tyrosine were present in greater concentration in black mustard cake protein whereas other amino acids were higher in yellow mustard cake protein. PMID:25859422

  16. Immunochemical analysis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HaCaT keratinocytes induced by the mono-alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES): Impact of experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Debiak, Malgorzata; Lex, Kirsten; Ponath, Viviane; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent with a long history of use as a chemical weapon. Although its last military use is dated for the eighties of the last century, a potential use in terroristic attacks against civilians remains a significant threat. Thus, improving medical therapy of mustard exposed individuals is still of particular interest. PARP inhibitors were recently brought into the focus as a potential countermeasure for mustard-induced pathologies, supported by the availability of efficient compounds successfully tested in cancer therapy. PARP activation after SM treatment was reported in several cell types and tissues under various conditions; however, a detailed characterization of this phenomenon is still missing. This study provides the basis for such studies by developing and optimizing experimental conditions to investigate poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) in HaCaT keratinocytes upon treatment with the monofunctional alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide ("half mustard", CEES). By using an immunofluorescence-based approach, we show that optimization of experimental conditions with regards to the type of solvent, dilution factors and treatment procedure is essential to obtain a homogenous PAR staining in HaCaT cell cultures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different CEES treatment protocols significantly influence the cytotoxicity profiles of treated cells. Using an optimized treatment protocol, our data reveals that CEES induces a dose- and time-dependent dynamic PARylation response in HaCaT cells that could be completely blocked by treating cells with the clinically relevant pharmacological PARP inhibitor ABT888 (also known as veliparib). Finally, siRNA experiments show that CEES-induced PAR formation is predominantly due to the activation of PARP1. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to study the

  17. Survey: Destruction of chemical agent simulants in supercritical water oxidation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process exhibits distinct advantages for destruction of toxic wastes. Examples of these wastes are two chemical agent simulants, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and thiodiglycol (2,2'-thiodiethanol). DMMP is similar to the nerve agent GB Sarin in structure, and thiodiglycol is a hydrolysis product of the blister agent HD Sulfur Mustard. Both simulants are miscible in water and relatively non-toxic in comparison to the actual chemical agents. Using a Laboratory-scale, batch three temperatures were investigated: 425 deg C, 450 deg C, and 500 deg C with an initial concentration of one percent by volume, 11,450 mg/L for DMMP and 12,220 mg/L for thiodiglycol. Residence times investigated were: 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 minutes. Reactor beat-up (H.U.) was determined to be one minute. Both pyrolysis and oxidation tests were conducted. Oxygen levels were uniformly set at 200% of stoichiometric requirements for the parent compounds.

  18. Zirconium doped nano-dispersed oxides of Fe, Al and Zn for destruction of warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Stengl, Vaclav; Houskova, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Marikova, Monika; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2010-11-15

    Zirconium doped nano dispersive oxides of Fe, Al and Zn were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of the respective sulfate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized metal oxide hydroxides were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulfur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), soman (GD or (3,3'-Dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate) and VX agent (S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl-methylphosphonothionate). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant can increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides, decreases their crystallites' sizes thereby it may contribute in enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface thus it can accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. Addition of Zr{sup 4+} converts the product of the reaction of ferric sulphate with urea from ferrihydrite to goethite. We found out that doped oxo-hydroxides Zr-FeO(OH) - being prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of ferric and zirconium oxo-sulfates mixture in aqueous solutions - exhibit a comparatively higher degradation activity towards chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Degradation of soman or VX agent on Zr-doped FeO(OH) containing ca. 8.3 wt.% of zirconium proceeded to completion within 30 min.

  19. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  20. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of mustard in foods.

    PubMed

    Lee, P-W; Hefle, S L; Taylor, S L

    2008-05-01

    Undeclared mustard residues in food products could trigger allergic reactions in mustard-allergic consumers. Our objective was to develop and validate a sandwich-type ELISA for the detection of mustard residues in foods. A mixture of yellow, brown, and oriental mustard seeds was used to immunize 3 rabbits and 1 sheep. Two mustard ELISAs were developed by utilizing the reciprocal combination of rabbit and sheep polyclonal antimustard sera as the capture and detector reagents. Binding was visualized by addition of rabbit antisheep or goat antirabbit IgG antibody labeled with alkaline phosphatase and subsequent addition of substrate. The optimized ELISAs have limits of quantification (LOQ) of 1 and 3 ppm (mug of ground, whole mustard seeds/mL) for the sheep capture and rabbit capture formats, respectively. Only rapeseed cross-reacted in the rabbit and sheep capture mustard ELISAs at a level equivalent to 12300 and 16900 ppm of mustard. The mean percent recovery for cooked frankfurters spiked with 0 to 1000 ppm mustard flour was 95.3%+/- 10.7%. A limited retail survey of 29 foods revealed that, of 15 samples having mustard declared on the ingredient list, 2 baked bean products contained no detectable mustard, possibly owing to a decrease in extractability and detectability of mustard proteins after subjecting to thermal processing. For the remaining 14 samples without mustard declared on the label, 3 samples contained detectable mustard, presumably due to the labeling of mustard as "spice" or inadvertent cross-contamination. This sandwich-type ELISA can serve as a powerful tool for food manufacturers and regulatory agencies to detect and quantify mustard residues in processed foods. PMID:18460147

  1. Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

  2. Direct gas-phase detection of nerve and blister warfare agents utilizing active capillary plasma ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J-C; Schaer, M; P Siegenthaler, P; Zenobi, R

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasensitive direct gas-phase detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) is demonstrated utilizing active capillary plasma ionization and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Four G- agents, two V-agents and various blistering agents [including sulfur mustard (HD)] were detected directly in the gas phase with limits of detection in the low parts per trillion (ng m(-3)) range. The direct detection of HD was shown for dry carrier gas conditions, but signals vanished when humidity was present, indicating a possible direct detection of HD after sufficient gas phase pretreatment. The method provided sufficient sensitivity to monitor directly the investigated volatile CWAs way below their corresponding minimal effect dose, and in most cases even below the eight hours worker exposure concentration. In general, the ionization is very soft, with little to no in-source fragmentation. Especially for the G-agents, some dimer formation occurred at higher concentrations. This adds complexity, but also further selectivity, to the corresponding mass spectra. Our results show that the active capillary plasma ionization is a robust, sensitive, "plug and play" ambient ionization source suited (but not exclusively) to the very sensitive detection of CWAs. It has the potential to be used with portable MS instrumentation. PMID:26307710

  3. [Mustard gas bombs found astray in the Faxaflói bay. Mustard gas: usage and poisonings].

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Jakop; Jóhannesson, Thorkell

    2009-05-01

    The finding in 1972 of two World War II mustard gas artillery shells in crushed shell sediment dredged in the Faxaflói Bay and transported as raw material for cement production at Akranes (Western Iceland) is reported. One of the shells was wedged in a stone crusher in the raw material processing line and was ruptured. As a result dark fluid with a garlic like smell seeped out from the metal canister. The attending employees believed the metal object to be inert and tried to cut it out with a blow torch. This resulted in the explosion of the shell charge and in the exposure of four employees to mustard gas. All suffered burns on their hands and two of them in the eyes also. The second shell was detonated in the open at a distance from the factory. Emphasis is given to the fact that instant, or at least as soon as possible, cleansing and washing is the most efficient measure to be taken against the debilitating effects of mustard gas. It is also pointed out that the active principle in mustard gas (dichlorodiethyl sulphide) can easily be synthesized and none of the precursor substances are subjected to any restrictions of use. The authors conclude that mustard gas bombs may still be found in the arsenals of some military powers in spite of an international convention that prohibits the production, stockpiling and the use of chemical weapons. Terrorist groups have also seemingly tried to aquire mustard gas bombs and other chemical weapons. Therefore cases of mustard gas poisoning might still occur. PMID:19430031

  4. Pacific Northwest Condiment Yellow Mustard (Sinapis alba L.) Grower Guide: 2000-2002

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.; Davis, J. B.; Esser, A.

    2005-07-01

    This report is a grower guide for yellow mustard. Yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.), synonymous with white mustard, is a spring annual crop and well adapted to hot, dry growing conditions. It has shown potential as an alternative crop in rotations with small grain cereals and has fewer limitations compared to other traditional alternative crops.

  5. Mustard seed meal for management of root-knot nematode and weeds in tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meals of indian mustard [InM (Brassica juncea)] and yellow mustard [YeM (Sinapis alba)], alone and combined, were tested for effects on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and for suppression of southern root-knot nematode [RKN (Meloidogyne incognita)] and weed populations. In the gree...

  6. Long-term effects of mustard gas on respiratory system of Iranian veterans after Iraq-Iran war: a review.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Seyed-Mansour; Ghanei, Mostafa; Salamati, Payman; Safiabadi, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    To review long-term respiratory effects of mustard gas on Iranian veterans having undergone Iraq-Iran war. Electronic databases of Scopus, Medline, ISI, IranMedex, and Irandoc sites were searched. We accepted articles published in scientific journals as a quality criterion.The main pathogenic factors are free radical mediators. Prevalence of pulmonary involvement is approximately 42.5%. The most common complaints are cough and dyspnea. Major respiratory complications are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and asthma. Spirometry results can reveal restrictive and obstructive pulmonary disease. Plain chest X-ray does not help in about 50% of lung diseases. High-resolution CT of the lung is the best modality for diagnostic assessment of parenchymal lung and bronchi. There is no definite curative treatment for mustard lung. The effective treatment regimens consist of oxygen administration, use of vaporized moist air, respiratory physiotherapy, administration of mucolytic agents, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and long-acting beta-2 agonists, antioxidants, surfactant, magnesium ions, therapeutic bronchoscopy, laser therapy, placement of respiratory stents, early tracheostomy in laryngospasm, and ultimately lung transplantation. High-resolution CT of the lung is the most accurate modality for the evaluation of the lung parenchyma and bronchi. The treatment efficacy of patients exposed to mustard gas depends on patient conditions (acute or chronic, upper or lower respiratory tract involvement). There are various treatment protocols, but unfortunately none of them is definitely curable. PMID:23735551

  7. Lipid Biosynthesis in Developing Mustard Seed

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kumar D.

    1983-01-01

    Cotyledons of developing mustard (Sinapis alba L.) seed have been found to synthesize lipids containing the common plant fatty acids and very long-chain monounsaturated (icosenoic, erucic, and tetracosenic) and saturated (icosanoic, docosanoic, and tetracosanoic) fatty acids from various radioactive precursors. The in vivo pattern of labeling of acyl lipids, either from fatty acids synthesized `endogenously' from radioactive acetate or malonate, or from radioactive fatty acids added `exogenously', indicates the involvement of the following pathways in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerols. Palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid, synthesized in the acyl carrier protein-track, are channeled to the Coenzyme A (CoA)-track and converted to triacylglycerols via the glycerol-3-phosphate pathway. Pools of stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA are elongated to very long-chain saturated and monounsaturated acyl-CoA, respectively. Most of the very long-chain saturated acyl-CoAs acylate preformed diacylglycerols. Very long-chain monounsaturated acyl-CoAs are converted to triacylglycerols, partly via phosphatidic acids and diacylglycerols, and partly by acylation of preformed diacylglycerols. PMID:16663345

  8. The activation of phosphoramide mustard anticancer drugs from ab initio simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allesch, Markus; Schwegler, Eric; Colvin, Mike; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    The nitrogen mustard based DNA alkylating agents were the first nonhormonal drugs to be used effectively in the treatment of cancer and remain one of the most important drugs for the chemotherapeutic management of many common malignancies today. An understanding of the activation of these compounds is, in itself, of scientific interest, but also critical in designing improved analogs of greater selectivity and efficacy. We have investigated the activation pathways of one of the most active metabolites, phosphoramide mustard (PM), and its methylated ester (PMME). In particular, we have examined the activation barrier and reaction free energy for the intramolecular cyclization reaction using first principles molecular dynamics simulations with explicit and continuum solvation models. Structural, dynamical and electronic properties along the reaction path have been computed mainly to address the question why de-esterification is required to activate these drugs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  9. Selective cytotoxicity of a system L specific amino acid nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed

    Haines, D R; Fuller, R W; Ahmad, S; Vistica, D T; Marquez, V E

    1987-03-01

    The synthesis and characterization of DL-2-amino-7-bis[(2-chloroethyl)amino]-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and DL-2-amino-5-bis[(2-chloroethyl)amino]-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-napthoic+ ++ acid were accomplished. The correct assignment of the site of attachment of the bis(2-chloroethyl)amino side chain was ascertained by selective proton decoupling of the 13C NMR spectra performed on the corresponding nitrospirohydantoin precursors 2 and 3, which were obtained from the nitration of beta-tetralone hydantoin. The two target compounds 6 and 7 were designed as tumor-specific agents capable of being selectively transported into tumor cells by the leucine-preferring transport system (system L). Inhibition analysis of the initial rate of transport of the system L specific substrate 2-amino-bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) by 6 and 7 indicated that the 7-substituted isomer 6 was an extremely potent competitive inhibitor of that transport system in murine L1210 leukemic cells (Ki = 0.2 microM). Evaluation of the selectivity of this compound indicated that it possessed enhanced in vitro antitumor activity and reduced myelosuppressive activity when compared to its prototype amino acid nitrogen mustard, L-phenylalanine mustard (L-PAM). In addition to being more selectively toxic to tumor cells, this compound differs from L-PAM in having a 2-3-fold shorter half-life (t1/2). PMID:3820226

  10. Novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for sensitive determination of the mustard allergen Sin a 1 in food.

    PubMed

    Posada-Ayala, Maria; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S; Maes, Xavier; Muñoz-Garcia, Esther; Villalba, Mayte; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Perez-Gordo, Marina; Vivanco, Fernando; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier

    2015-09-15

    Mustard is a condiment added to a variety of foodstuffs and a frequent cause of food allergy. A new strategy for the detection of mustard allergen in food products is presented. The methodology is based on liquid chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Mustard allergen Sin a 1 was purified from yellow mustard seeds. Sin a 1 was detected with a total of five peptides showing a linear response (lowest LOD was 5ng). Sin a 1 was detected in mustard sauces and salty biscuit (19±3mg/kg) where mustard content is not specified. Sin a 1, used as an internal standard, allowed quantification of this mustard allergen in foods. A novel LC/MS/MS SRM-based method has been developed to detect and quantify the presence of mustard. This method could help to detect mustard allergen Sin a 1 in processed foods and protect mustard-allergic consumers. PMID:25863610

  11. Treating exposure to chemical warfare agents: implications for health care providers and community emergency planning.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, N B; Watson, A P; Ambrose, K R; Griffin, G D

    1990-01-01

    Current treatment protocols for exposure to nerve and vesicant agents found in the U.S. stockpile of unitary chemical weapons are summarized, and the toxicities of available antidotes are evaluated. The status of the most promising of the new nerve agent antidotes is reviewed. In the U.S. atropine and pralidoxime compose the only approved antidote regimen for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning. Diazepam may also be used if necessary to control convulsions. To avoid death, administration must occur within minutes of substantial exposure together with immediate decontamination. Continuous observation and repeated administration of antidotes are necessary as symptoms warrant. Available antidotes do not necessarily prevent respiratory failure or incapacitation. The toxicity of the antidotes themselves and the individualized nature of medical care preclude recommending that autoinjectors be distributed to the general public. In addition, precautionary administration of protective drugs to the general population would not be feasible or desirable. No antidote exists for poisoning by the vesicant sulfur mustard (H, HD, HT); effective intervention can only be accomplished by rapid decontamination followed by palliative treatment of symptoms. British anti-Lewisite (BAL) (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanolol) is the antidote of choice for treatment of exposure to Lewisite, another potent vesicant. Experimental water-soluble BAL analogues have been developed that are less toxic than BAL. Treatment protocols for each antidote are summarized in tabular form for use by health care providers. PMID:2088748

  12. Treating exposure to chemical warfare agents: implications for health care providers and community emergency planning.

    PubMed

    Munro, N B; Watson, A P; Ambrose, K R; Griffin, G D

    1990-11-01

    Current treatment protocols for exposure to nerve and vesicant agents found in the U.S. stockpile of unitary chemical weapons are summarized, and the toxicities of available antidotes are evaluated. The status of the most promising of the new nerve agent antidotes is reviewed. In the U.S. atropine and pralidoxime compose the only approved antidote regimen for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning. Diazepam may also be used if necessary to control convulsions. To avoid death, administration must occur within minutes of substantial exposure together with immediate decontamination. Continuous observation and repeated administration of antidotes are necessary as symptoms warrant. Available antidotes do not necessarily prevent respiratory failure or incapacitation. The toxicity of the antidotes themselves and the individualized nature of medical care preclude recommending that autoinjectors be distributed to the general public. In addition, precautionary administration of protective drugs to the general population would not be feasible or desirable. No antidote exists for poisoning by the vesicant sulfur mustard (H, HD, HT); effective intervention can only be accomplished by rapid decontamination followed by palliative treatment of symptoms. British anti-Lewisite (BAL) (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanolol) is the antidote of choice for treatment of exposure to Lewisite, another potent vesicant. Experimental water-soluble BAL analogues have been developed that are less toxic than BAL. Treatment protocols for each antidote are summarized in tabular form for use by health care providers. PMID:2088748

  13. Volatile anesthetics give a false-positive reading in chemical agent monitors in the "H" mode.

    PubMed

    Risk, D; Verpy, D; Conley, J D; Jacobson, T; Sawyer, T W

    2001-08-01

    Chemical agent monitors (CAMs) are routinely used by the armed forces and emergency response teams of many countries for the detection of the vesicant sulfur mustard (HD) and the G series of organophosphate nerve agents. Ambient operating room isoflurane levels were found to produce strong positive signals in the "H" mode when the CAM was used to monitor the efficacy of decontamination procedures during routine surgical procedures on HD-poisoned animals requiring up to 8 hours of general anesthesia. Subsequent testing showed that isoflurane, as well as desflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and methoxyflurane, produce two ionization peaks in the CAM response. One of these peaks is interpreted by the CAM processing software as HD, resulting in a CAM "H" mode bar response. No interference was encountered with isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane when the CAM was set to the "G" mode, although extremely high (nonclinical) concentrations of halothane and methoxyflurane yielded a weakly positive bar response. These findings have potentially serious ramifications for the medical management of patients resulting from terrorist, military, or chemical agent decommissioning activity when concomitant chemical injuries are also possible. PMID:11515322

  14. Treating exposure to chemical warfare agents: Implications for health care providers and community emergency planning

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, N.B.; Watson, A.P.; Ambrose, K.R.; Griffin, G.D. )

    1990-11-01

    Current treatment protocols for exposure to nerve and vesicant agents found in the US stockpile of unitary chemical weapons are summarized, and the toxicities of available antidotes are evaluated. The status of the most promising of the new nerve agent antidotes is reviewed. In the US, atropine and pralidoxime compose the only approved antidote regimen for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning. Diazepam may also be used if necessary to control convulsions. To avoid death, administration must occur within minutes of substantial exposure together with immediate decontamination. Continuous observation and repeated administration of antidotes are necessary as symptoms warrant. Available antidotes do not necessarily prevent respiratory failure or incapacitation. The toxicity of the antidotes themselves and the individualized nature of medical care preclude recommending that autoinjectors be distributed to the general public. In addition, precautionary administration of protective drugs to the general population would not be feasible or desirable. No antidote exists for poisoning by the vesicant sulfur mustard (H, HD, HT); effective intervention can only be accomplished by rapid decontamination followed by palliative treatment of symptoms. British anti-Lewisite (BAL) (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol) is the antidote of choice for treatment of exposure to Lewisite, another potent vesicant. Experimental water-soluble BAL analogues have been developed that are less toxic than BAL. Treatment protocols for each antidote are summarized in tabular form for use by health care providers.

  15. Efficacy of liquid and foam decontamination technologies for chemical warfare agents on indoor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Love, Adam H; Bailey, Christopher G; Hanna, M Leslie; Hok, Saphon; Vu, Alex K; Reutter, Dennis J; Raber, Ellen

    2011-11-30

    Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of four decontamination formulations on typical indoor surfaces following exposure to the liquid chemical warfare agents sarin (GB), soman (GD), sulfur mustard (HD), and VX. Residual surface contamination on coupons was periodically measured for up to 24h after applying one of four selected decontamination technologies [0.5% bleach solution with trisodium phosphate, Allen Vanguard Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF™), U.S. military Decon Green™, and Modec Inc. and EnviroFoam Technologies Sandia Decontamination Foam (DF-200)]. All decontamination technologies tested, except for the bleach solution, performed well on nonporous and nonpermeable glass and stainless-steel surfaces. However, chemical agent residual contamination typically remained on porous and permeable surfaces, especially for the more persistent agents, HD and VX. Solvent-based Decon Green™ performed better than aqueous-based bleach or foams on polymeric surfaces, possibly because the solvent is able to penetrate the polymer matrix. Bleach and foams out-performed Decon Green for penetrating the highly polar concrete surface. Results suggest that the different characteristics needed for an ideal and universal decontamination technology may be incompatible in a single formulation and a strategy for decontaminating a complex facility will require a range of technologies. PMID:21944706

  16. Architectural and Biochemical Expressions of Mustard Gas Keratopathy: Preclinical Indicators and Pathogenic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McNutt, Patrick; Lyman, Megan; Swartz, Adam; Tuznik, Kaylie; Kniffin, Denise; Whitten, Kim; Milhorn, Denise; Hamilton, Tracey

    2012-01-01

    A subset of victims of ocular sulfur mustard (SM) exposure develops an irreversible, idiotypic keratitis with associated secondary pathologies, collectively referred to as mustard gas keratopathy (MGK). MGK involves a progressive corneal degeneration resulting in chronic ocular discomfort and impaired vision for which clinical interventions have typically had poor outcomes. Using a rabbit corneal vapor exposure model, we previously demonstrated a clinical progression with acute and chronic sequelae similar to that observed in human casualties. However, a better understanding of the temporal changes that occur during the biphasic SM injury is crucial to mechanistic understanding and therapeutic development. Here we evaluate the histopathologic, biochemical and ultrastructural expressions of pathogenesis of the chronic SM injury over eight weeks. We confirm that MGK onset exhibits a biphasic trajectory involving corneal surface regeneration over the first two weeks, followed by the rapid development and progressive degeneration of corneal structure. Preclinical markers of corneal dysfunction were identified, including destabilization of the basal corneal epithelium, basement membrane zone abnormalities and stromal deformation. Clinical sequelae of MGK appeared abruptly three weeks after exposure, and included profound anterior edema, recurring corneal erosions, basement membrane disorganization, basal cell necrosis and stromal degeneration. Unlike resolved corneas, MGK corneas exhibited frustrated corneal wound repair, with significantly elevated histopathology scores. Increased lacrimation, disruption of the basement membrane and accumulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in the aqueous humor provide several mechanisms for corneal degeneration. These data suggest that the chronic injury is fundamentally distinct from the acute lesion, involving injury mechanisms that operate on different time scales and in different corneal tissues. Corneal edema appears to be the

  17. Impacts of mustard gas exposure on veterans mental health: A study on the role of education

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Gholam-Reza; Ameli, Javad; Roeintan, Rahim; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Saburi, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Background: The mustard gas (MG) exposure can impair physical health and therefore increase the probability of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychological disorders. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate long-term effects of MG exposure on veterans’ mental health. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. In order to assess prevalence of mental health and PTSD of 100 MG victims 25 years after the exposure to MG in Iran-Iraq conflict, the general health questionnaire (GHQ-28) and Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively was administered. Results: The mean (±standard deviation (SD)) age of participants was 40.63 (±5.86) years. The mean GHQ-28 (47.34) of the study group was higher compared to standardized cutoff point (23) of the Iranian community. Also, it was found that 38 participants (38%) suffer from PTSD. The results of this study showed that academic education in the PTSD group was less than that in the non-PTSD group (P=0.03). In addition, in multivariate analysis it was found that only education level of the veterans and their wives were effective on the mental health score (adjusted P=0.036 and 0.041, respectively). The mean score of depression and psychosocial activity subscale in patients at higher education level was lower than patients at lower education level (P<0.05). Conclusion: This study found that sulfur mustard (SM) exposure can be effect on mental health even 25 years after exposure. Therefore, the psychological state should be more considered in chemical injured veterans and it is important that providing more mental health centers for this community. PMID:24459369

  18. Mugwort-Mustard Allergy Syndrome due to Broccoli Consumption

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS) is a relatively rare form of food allergy which develops in individuals who are sensitized to pollen. Tree pollens, especially birch pollen, frequently induce PFAS; however, the incidence of PFAS due to grass or weed pollens such as ragweed or mugwort is relatively rare. Mugwort-mustard allergy syndrome (MMAS) is an example of a PFAS in which individuals sensitized to mugwort may develop an allergy to mustard and experience severe reactions. We herein describe a case of MMAS due to broccoli consumption. PMID:27478657

  19. Mugwort-Mustard Allergy Syndrome due to Broccoli Consumption.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yuri; Makino, Teruhiko; Mizawa, Megumi; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2016-01-01

    Pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS) is a relatively rare form of food allergy which develops in individuals who are sensitized to pollen. Tree pollens, especially birch pollen, frequently induce PFAS; however, the incidence of PFAS due to grass or weed pollens such as ragweed or mugwort is relatively rare. Mugwort-mustard allergy syndrome (MMAS) is an example of a PFAS in which individuals sensitized to mugwort may develop an allergy to mustard and experience severe reactions. We herein describe a case of MMAS due to broccoli consumption. PMID:27478657

  20. Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases: Important roles in the metabolism of naturally occurring sulfur and selenium-containing compounds, xenobiotics and anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V.; Pinto, John T.; Callery, Patrick S.; Villar, Maria T.; Artigues, Antonio; Bruschi, Sam A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-containing enzymes that catalyze β-elimination reactions with cysteine S-conjugates that possess a good leaving group in the β-position. The end products are aminoacrylate and a sulfur-containing fragment. The aminoacrylate tautomerizes and hydrolyzes to pyruvate and ammonia. The mammalian cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases thus far identified are enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism that catalyze β-lyase reactions as non-physiological side reactions. Most are aminotransferases. In some cases the lyase is inactivated by reaction products. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are of much interest to toxicologists because they play an important key role in the bioactivation (toxication) of halogenated alkenes, some of which are produced on an industrial scale and are environmental contaminants. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases have been reviewed in this journal previously [Cooper and Pinto, 2006]. Here we focus on more recent findings regarding: 1) the identification of enzymes associated with high-Mr cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of rat liver and kidney; 2) the mechanism of syncatalytic inactivation of rat liver mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase by the nephrotoxic β-lyase substrate S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene); 3) toxicant channeling of reactive fragments from the active site of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to susceptible proteins in the mitochondria; 4) the involvement of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism/bioactivation of drugs and natural products; and 5) the role of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism of selenocysteine Se-conjugates. This review emphasizes the fact that the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are biologically more important than hitherto appreciated. PMID:20306345

  1. Characterization of mustard seeds and paste by DART ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Jana; Kovařík, František; Ševčík, Rudolf; Čížková, Helena; Rajchl, Aleš

    2014-09-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a novel technique with great potential for rapid screening analysis. The DART ionization method coupled with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) has been used for characterization of mustard seeds and table mustard. The possibility to use DART to analyse glucosinolates was confirmed on determination of sinalbin (4-hydroxybenzyl glucosinolate). The DART-TOF-MS method was optimized and validated. A set of samples of mustard seeds and mustard products was analyzed. High-performance liquid chromatography and DART-TOF-MS were used to determine glucosinolates in mustard seeds and compared. The correlation equation between these methods was DART = 0.797*HPLC + 6.987, R(2)  = 0.972. The DART technique seems to be a suitable method for evaluation of the quality of mustard seeds and mustard products. PMID:25230177

  2. Cyclic process for the removal of sulfur dioxide and the recovery of sulfur from gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.L.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from a gas containing sulfur dioxide. It comprises contacting a gas containing sulfur dioxide with an aqueous solution comprising water, ferric chloride and a salt selected from the group consisting of barium chloride and calcium chloride to form ferrous chloride, hydrochloric acid and a precipitate selected from the group consisting of barium sulfate and calcium sulfate; and treating the aqueous solution with an oxidizing agent to convert ferrous chloride to ferric chloride.

  3. Measurement of breakthrough volumes of volatile chemical warfare agents on a poly(2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide)-based adsorbent and application to thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-09-01

    To establish adequate on-site solvent trapping of volatile chemical warfare agents (CWAs) from air samples, we measured the breakthrough volumes of CWAs on three adsorbent resins by an elution technique using direct electron ionization mass spectrometry. The trapping characteristics of Tenax(®) TA were better than those of Tenax(®) GR and Carboxen(®) 1016. The latter two adsorbents showed non-reproducible breakthrough behavior and low VX recovery. The specific breakthrough values were more than 44 (sarin) L/g Tenax(®) TA resin at 20°C. Logarithmic values of specific breakthrough volume for four nerve agents (sarin, soman, tabun, and VX) showed a nearly linear correlation with the reciprocals of their boiling points, but the data point of sulfur mustard deviated from this linear curve. Next, we developed a method to determine volatile CWAs in ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography (TD-GC/MS). CWA solutions that were spiked into the Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes were analyzed by a two-stage TD-GC/MS using a Tenax(®) TA-packed cold trap tube. Linear calibration curves for CWAs retained in the resin tubes were obtained in the range between 0.2pL and 100pL for sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard; and between 2pL and 100pL for VX and Russian VX. We also examined the stability of CWAs in Tenax(®) TA tubes purged with either dry or 50% relative humidity air under storage conditions at room temperature or 4°C. More than 80% sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard were recovered from the tubes within 2 weeks. In contrast, the recoveries of VX and Russian VX drastically reduced with storage time at room temperature, resulting in a drop to 10-30% after 2 weeks. Moreover, we examined the trapping efficiency of Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes for vaporized CWA samples (100mL) prepared in a 500mL gas sampling cylinder. In the concentration range of 0.2-2.5mg/m(3), >50% of sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and HD were

  4. Quantitation of biomarkers of exposure to nitrogen mustards in urine from rats dosed with nitrogen mustards and from an unexposed human population.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Sharon W; Barr, John R; Ashley, David L; Olson, Carl T; Hayes, Timothy L

    2004-01-01

    The nitrogen mustards bis(2-chloroethyl)ethylamine (HN1), bis(2-chloroethyl)methylamine (HN2), and tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) have the potential to be used as chemical terrorism agents because of their extreme vesicant properties. We modified a previously reported method to incorporate automated solid-phase extraction, improve chromatography, and include the urinary metabolite for HN3. The improved method was used to measure levels of the urinary metabolites N-ethyldiethanolamine (EDEA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and triethanolamine (TEA) in rats dosed with HN1, HN2, and HN3, respectively, and to establish background levels of EDEA, MDEA, and TEA in human urine samples from a population with no known exposure to nitrogen mustards. Rat dosing experiments confirmed that EDEA, MDEA, and TEA could be detected in urine for at least 48 h after exposure to HN1, HN2, and HN3, respectively. Substantial amounts of EDEA (89 ng/mL), MDEA (170 ng/mL), and TEA (1105 ng/mL) were measured in the urine of rats exposed to 10 mg HN1, HN2, and HN3, respectively, 48 h after exposure. The background concentrations for TEA in the human population ranged from below the limit of detection (LOD 3 ng/mL) to approximately 6500 ng/mL. Neither EDEA (LOD 0.4 ng/mL) nor MDEA (LOD 0.8 ng/mL) was detected above the LOD in the human samples. PMID:15239850

  5. Identification of chemical warfare agents from vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hisayuki; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagoya, Tomoki; Ikeda, Toru; Kurimata, Naoko; Unoke, Shohei; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    A field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Hapsite ER system) was evaluated for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the vapor phase. The system consisted of Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler (trapping time: 3s(-1)min), a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary gas chromatography column capable of raising temperatures up to 200°C, a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump for data acquisition, and a personal computer for data analysis. Sample vapors containing as little as 22μg sarin (GB), 100μg soman (GD), 210μg tabun (GA), 55μg cyclohexylsarin (GF), 4.8μg sulfur mustard, 390μg nitrogen mustard 1, 140μg of nitrogen mustard 2, 130μg nitrogen mustard 3, 120μg of 2-chloroacetophenone and 990μg of chloropicrin per cubic meter could be confirmed after Tri-Bed micro-concentration (for 1min) and automated AMDIS search within 12min. Using manual deconvolution by background subtraction of neighboring regions on the extracted ion chromatograms, the above-mentioned CWAs could be confirmed at lower concentration levels. The memory effects were also examined and we found that blister agents showed significantly more carry-over than nerve agents. Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the detection of GB and GD, raising the concentration limits for confirmation in the presence of gasoline by both AMDIS search and manual deconvolution; however, GA and GF were not subject to interference by gasoline. Lewisite 1, and o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile could also be confirmed by gas chromatography, but it was hard to quantify them. Vapors of phosgene, chlorine, and cyanogen chloride could be confirmed by direct mass spectrometric detection at concentration levels higher than 2, 140, and 10mg/m(3) respectively, by bypassing the micro-concentration trap and gas chromatographic separation. PMID:26118803

  6. Covalent DNA-Protein Cross-Linking by Phosphoramide Mustard and Nornitrogen Mustard in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Groehler, Arnold; Villalta, Peter W; Campbell, Colin; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2016-02-15

    N,N-Bis-(2-chloroethyl)-phosphorodiamidic acid (phosphoramide mustard, PM) and N,N-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-amine (nornitrogen mustard, NOR) are the two biologically active metabolites of cyclophosphamide, a DNA alkylating drug commonly used to treat lymphomas, breast cancer, certain brain cancers, and autoimmune diseases. PM and NOR are reactive bis-electrophiles capable of cross-linking cellular biomolecules to form covalent DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach was employed to characterize PM- and NOR-mediated DNA-protein cross-linking in human cells. Following treatment of human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) with cytotoxic concentrations of PM, over 130 proteins were found to be covalently trapped to DNA, including those involved in transcriptional regulation, RNA splicing/processing, chromatin organization, and protein transport. HPLC-ESI(+)-MS/MS analysis of proteolytic digests of DPC-containing DNA from NOR-treated cells revealed a concentration-dependent formation of N-[2-[cysteinyl]ethyl]-N-[2-(guan-7-yl)ethyl]amine (Cys-NOR-N7G) conjugates, confirming that it cross-links cysteine thiols of proteins to the N7 position of guanines in DNA. Cys-NOR-N7G adduct numbers were higher in NER-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XPA) as compared with repair proficient cells. Furthermore, both XPA and FANCD2 deficient cells were sensitized to PM treatment as compared to that of wild type cells, suggesting that Fanconi anemia and nucleotide excision repair pathways are involved in the removal of cyclophosphamide-induced DNA damage. PMID:26692166

  7. Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items. For use in reentry decision-making

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

  8. 7 CFR 457.168 - Mustard crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... have limited or additional levels of coverage, as specified in 7 CFR part 400, subpart T, and pay an... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mustard crop insurance provisions. 457.168 Section 457.168 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP...

  9. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.56-3 Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). Kinds of seed: Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage...) Germination habit: Epigeal dicot. (2) Food reserves: Cotyledons which expand and become thin, leaf-like...

  10. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.56-3 Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). Kinds of seed: Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage...) Germination habit: Epigeal dicot. (2) Food reserves: Cotyledons which expand and become thin, leaf-like...

  11. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.56-3 Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). Kinds of seed: Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage...) Germination habit: Epigeal dicot. (2) Food reserves: Cotyledons which expand and become thin, leaf-like...

  12. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.56-3 Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). Kinds of seed: Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage...) Germination habit: Epigeal dicot. (2) Food reserves: Cotyledons which expand and become thin, leaf-like...

  13. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.56-3 Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). Kinds of seed: Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage...) Germination habit: Epigeal dicot. (2) Food reserves: Cotyledons which expand and become thin, leaf-like...

  14. functional analysis of nonlinearity in garlic mustard demographic parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb.) Cavara and Grande) invades and degrades woodland habitats in North America. Coupled-plant herbivore population models will be helpful in the design and implementation of effective biological control strategies for this species. Such models will be most u...

  15. 14. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE (BUILDING 729) FROM CHEMICAL STORAGE TANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. 87. EAST SECTION OF SOUTH PLANT, SHOWING MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. EAST SECTION OF SOUTH PLANT, SHOWING MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AT LEFT AND INCINERATOR/PRECIPITATOR (BUILDING 724) AT CENTER, FROM CHEMICAL STORAGE TANK. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  17. Onion and weed response to mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion and weed response to mustard seed meal (MSM) were tested in greenhouse and field trials in 2007-2009. MSM was applied to the soil surface at rates of 1.1, 2.2, and 4.4 MT/ha. In greenhouse trials, onions were severely injured and stands reduced with all rates of MSM applied prior to onion emer...

  18. Onion and weed response to mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in organic onion production is often difficult and expensive, requiring numerous cultivations and extensive hand-weeding. Onion safety and weed control with mustard seed meal (MSM) derived from Sinapis alba was evaluated in greenhouse and field trials. MSM applied at 110, 220, and 440 g...

  19. 23. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE (BUILDING 729) FROM ROOF OF TON CONTAINER RECONDITIONING BUILDING, SHOWING FACILITIES MAINTENANCE BUILDING AT FOREGROUND AND BUILDING 741, 742 AND 743 AT CENTER BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  20. Mustard Seed Meal suppresses Weeds in Potato and Peppermint

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed meal is a co-product remaining after pressing mustard seed to remove the oil. Seed meals containing high glucosinolates have been reported to have herbicidal activity. Weed suppression with seed meal of Sinapis alba, variety Ida Gold was evaluated in field trials on potatoes and peppermint in ...

  1. Effects of sulfur-based hemostatic agents and gingival retraction cords handled with latex gloves on the polymerization of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Carlos Eduardo Palhares; GUEDES, Carlos Gramani

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the possible interactions between three addition silicone materials (Express®, Aquasil Ultra® and Adsil®), three hemostatic agents (ferric sulfate, StatGel FS®; aluminum sulfate, GelCord®; and aluminum chloride, Hemostop®) and gingival retraction cords previously handled with latex gloves to determine whether direct contact with medicaments or indirect contamination by latex in conditions similar to those found in clinical practice inhibit or affect the setting of the impression materials. Material and Methods A portable device for the simultaneous test of several specimens was specifically developed for this study. Polymerization inhibition was analyzed by examination of the impressions and the molded surface. Ten trials were performed for each addition silicone material used in the study, at a total of 240 study samples. Results All the samples tested (N=240) were nonreactive regardless of the type of combination used. Conclusions Aluminum sulfate, ferric sulfate and aluminum chloride hemostatic solutions did not show any inhibitory potential on the addition silicone samples under study, and there were no changes in polymerization as a result of contact between addition silicone and retraction cords handled with latex gloves. PMID:22230998

  2. Effects of native herbs and light on garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips-Mao, Laura; Larson, Diane L.; Jordan, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    The degree to which invasive species drive or respond to environmental change has important implications for conservation and invasion management. Often characterized as a driver of change in North American woodlands, the invasive herb garlic mustard may instead respond to declines in native plant cover and diversity. We tested effects of native herb cover, richness, and light availability on garlic mustard invasion in a Minnesota oak woodland. We planted 50 garlic mustard seeds into plots previously planted with 0 to 10 native herb species. We measured garlic mustard seedling establishment, survival to rosette and adult stages, and average (per plant) and total (per plot) biomass and silique production. With the use of structural equation models, we analyzed direct, indirect, and net effects of native cover, richness, and light on successive garlic mustard life stages. Native plant cover had a significant negative effect on all life stages. Species richness had a significant positive effect on native cover, resulting in indirect negative effects on all garlic mustard stages, and net negative effects on adult numbers, total biomass, and silique production. Light had a strong negative effect on garlic mustard seedling establishment and a positive effect on native herb cover, resulting in significant negative net effects on garlic mustard rosette and adult numbers. However, light's net effect on total garlic mustard biomass and silique production was positive; reproductive output was high even in low-light/high-cover conditions. Combined effects of cover, richness, and light suggest that native herbs provide biotic resistance to invasion by responding to increased light availability and suppressing garlic mustard responses, although this resistance may be overwhelmed by high propagule pressure. Garlic mustard invasion may occur, in part, in response to native plant decline. Restoring native herbs and controlling garlic mustard seed production may effectively reduce

  3. The development of immunoassays for detection of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, D.E.; Brimfield, A.A.; Cook, L.

    1996-10-01

    With the advent of enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assays (ELISA) and monoclonal antibodies in the last two decades, there has been considerable effort devoted to the development of antibodies to detect and quantify low molecular weight toxic substances in environmental or biological fluids. Polyclonal antibodies against paraoxon (the toxic metabolite of parathion) were capable of detecting paraoxon in body fluids at a level of 10{sup -9} M ({approximately}260 pg/mL) when used in a competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA). Monoclonal antibodies developed against a structural analogue of the chemical warfare agent soman were capable of detection soman in buffer solutions at a level of 10{sup -6} M ({approximately}180 ng/mL). In addition these antibodies were found to be highly specific for soman even in the presence of its major hydrolysis product. Subsequent studies with antisoman monoclonal antibodies extended the level of sensitivity to {approximately}80 ng/mL. Furthermore these antibodies did not cross react with other chemical warfare nerve agents such as sarin or tabun. In all cases, the time for a confirmatory test was two hours or less. Immunoassays for T-2 micotoxins have also been reported with a minimal detection range of 2 pg/assay to 50 ng/assay for the polyclonal and monoclonal T-2 antibodies respectively. These reagents offer a sensitive, rapid and low cost approach to the diagnosis or detection of the presence of toxic chemical substances. More recent efforts have focussed on developing antibodies specific for sulfur mustard a highly reactive vesicating agent.

  4. [Preparation, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of cataplasm of white mustard seed varnish to prevent asthma].

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Na; Zhu, Wei-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Wen-Yang; Yu, Xiang; Li, Miao; Jin, Yi-Guang

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the manuscript was to optimize formulations and preparation technologies of cataplasm of white mustard seed varnish, and to evaluate its anti-asthma effect on rats. The single factor experiments included spreading thickness, types of crosslinking agents, dihydroxyaluminum aminoacetate amount, sodium polyacrylate amount, types of adhesive agents with human sense as the evaluation index. Blank cataplasm matrix was optimized by the orthogonal experiment with the amount of glycerine, citric acid, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose as the major influential factors. Initial adhesive force, peeling strength and human sense were as the evaluation index. The optimized formulation of blank cataplasm were as followings: glycerine-water-ethanol-PEG400-dihydroxyaluminum aminoacetate-citric acid-sodium carboxymethylcellulose-sodium carboxymethylcellulose 2 : 8 : 0.8 : 0.4 : 0.07: 0.15 : 0.1 : 0.5. The active ingredients of white mustard seed, corydalis, and gansui root were extracted by alcohol extraction method. Asiasarum volatile oil was extracted by oil extractor. The optimized drug loading amount was 11% with initial adhesive force, peeling strength and human sense as the evaluation index. Asthma rats model were established by sensitized with ovalbumin and nose-scratching time as the evaluation index. High dose (17%) group of drug-loaded cataplasm had the obvious inhibition effect on nose-scratching time of rats (P = 0.037 < 0.05). In comparison, middle dose (11%), low dose (4%) and positive-control groups had no obvious inhibitive effect on rats. White mustard seed cataplasm supplied a novel choice for anti-asthma therapy. And the overall pharmacodynamics assessment will be carried out on molecular level in near future. PMID:25911808

  5. The action of mono- and di-functional sulphur mustards on the ribonucleic acid-containing bacteriophage μ2

    PubMed Central

    Shooter, K. V.; Edwards, P. A.; Lawley, P. D.

    1971-01-01

    Bacteriophage μ2 is inactivated by both mono- and di-functional sulphur mustards at relatively low extents of alkylation. No degradation of alkylated RNA was detected. Cross-linking of RNA to protein was observed with the difunctional agent, but this reaction was only a minor contribution to the inactivation. Analyses of the reaction products in bacteriophage RNA showed that, at the mean lethal doses, more than one mono-alkylation of guanine had occurred but the sum total of other types of RNA alkylation was close to a single event. The results therefore suggest that inactivation results from the mono-alkylation of adenine or cytosine. In experiments with the difunctional agent cross-linking of RNA bases or of RNA to protein also prevented replication, the existence of these reactions accounting for the greater sensitivity of the bacteriophage to this agent. PMID:5145907

  6. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  7. The effects of atorvastatin on mustard-gas-exposed patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghobadi, Hassan; Lari, Shahrzad M.; Pourfarzi, Farhad; Mahmoudpour, Afsoun; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Statins have anti-inflammatory effects in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study designed to evaluate the effects of atorvastatin on serum highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and pulmonary function in sulfur mustard exposed patients with COPD. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease due to sulfur mustard and high serum hs-CRP entered in this study. Participants were randomized to receive 40 mg atorvastatin or placebo in a double-blind clinical trial. Forty-five patients completed the study (n = 23 atorvastatin and n = 22 placebo). Pulse oximetry (SpO2), pulmonary function test (PFT), and 6 min walk distance test (6MWD) was measured. COPD assessment test (CAT) and St. George's respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) were also completed by patients at the beginning of trial and after 9 weeks of prescription of 40 mg/day atorvastatin or placebo. At fourth week, SpO2, PFT, and 6MWD were again measured. After 9 weeks serum hs-CRP was re-measured. Results: There was no significant difference between atorvastatin and the placebo group in SpO2, FEV1, and 6MWD after fourth week (P = 0.79, P = 0.12, P = 0.12, respectively). The difference between baseline and ninth week was calculated for two groups of trial and control in term of serum hs-CRP, SpO2, FEV1, and 6MWD. Significant improvement was not observed between two groups in above mentioned variables (P = 0.35, P = 0.28, P = 0.94, P = 0.43, respectively). However, the quality of life was improved by administration of atorvastatin using the CAT score (P < 0.001) and SGRQ total score (P = 0.004). Conclusion: Atorvastatin does not alter serum hs-CRP and lung functions but may improve quality of life in SM-injured patients with COPD. PMID:24778661

  8. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  9. Surface studies of aminoferrocene derivatives on gold: electrochemical sensors for chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad A K; Long, Yi-Tao; Schatte, Gabriele; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2007-04-01

    The cystamine conjugate [(BocNH)Fc(CO)CSA]2 was prepared by coupling cystamine with the N-protected ferrocene amino acid derivative BocHN-Fc-COOH and was fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cystamine conjugate forms films on gold substrates, which upon deprotection of the amino group, react with chemical warfare agent (CWA) mimics, upon which the redox properties of the Fc group are affected significantly. Cyclic voltammetry shows 50(5) mV anodic shifts of the Fc redox potentials after exposure to EtSCH2CH2Cl, a simulant for sulfur mustard HD (MA), and (NC)(EtO)2P(O), a simulant for nerve agent Tabun (NA). Exposure to MA and NA causes an increase in 2.3 and 4.5 ng mass, respectively, in QCM which indicates ca. 70% efficiency in Boc-deprotection. Ellipsometry measured a film thickness increase from 6(+/-1) A for the deprotected film to 10(+/-4) A for the film modified with MA and to 7(+/-2) A for the film modified with NA. AFM measurements show changes in the thickness and morphology of the film after reaction with MA and NA. The surfaces were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and clearly show the attachment of the cystamine conjugate on the surface and its reaction with CWA mimics. PMID:17319647

  10. Competitive Interactions of Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) and Damesrocket (Hesperis matronalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Adams, Jean V.

    2012-01-01

    Competitive interactions between native plants and nonnative, invasive plant species have been extensively studied; however, within degraded landscapes, the effect of interspecific interactions among invasive plants is less explored. We investigated a competitive interaction between two sympatric, invasive mustard species that have similar life history strategies and growth forms: garlic mustard and damesrocket. Greenhouse experiments using a full range of reciprocal density ratios were conducted to investigate interspecific competition. Garlic mustard had a negative effect on the final biomass, number of leaves, and relative growth rate in height of damesrocket. Survival of damesrocket was not negatively affected by interspecific competition with garlic mustard; however, garlic mustard showed higher mortality because of intraspecific competition. These results indicated that although garlic mustard has been observed to be the dominant species in this landscape, it may not completely outcompete damesrocket in all situations. Studies of invasive species in competition are important in degraded landscapes because this is the common situation in many natural areas.

  11. The design, synthesis and anticancer activity of new nitrogen mustard derivatives of natural indole phytoalexin 1-methoxyspirobrassinol.

    PubMed

    Mezencev, R; Kutschy, P; Salayova, A; Updegrove, T; McDonald, J F

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards cis-1-methoxy-2-deoxy-2-[N,N-bis(2 -chloroethyl)amino]spirobrassinol (4) and trans-1-methoxy-2-deoxy-2-[N,N-bis(2 -chloroethyl)amino]spirobrassinol (5) derived from 1-methoxyspirobrassinol, an indole phytoalexin produced by the Japanese radish Raphanus sativus var. hortensis were designed as prospective dual-action compounds with DNA-alkylating effect and glutathione-depleting effects that may sensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents. Both new compounds demonstrated cytostatic/cytotoxic effects on various leukemia and ovarian cancer cell lines and dsDNA-destabilizing effects in vitro. Compound 4, the more promising of the two compounds, exerts earlier onset of anticancer effects on Jurkat cells via induction of apoptosis compared to the traditional alkylating anticancer agent melphalan. In addition, it demonstrated higher potency on ovarian cancer OVCAR-3 cell line and lower fold resistance between Jurkat and Jurkat-M cells selected for the resistance to melphalan. Therefore, compound 4 may be less affected by certain cancer drug resistance mechanisms than melphalan and it may become a prototype of a new class of anticancer active nitrogen mustards that combine DNA-damaging and DNA-damage-sensitizing properties. PMID:19473057

  12. Potent antitumor 9-anilinoacridines and acridines bearing an alkylating N-mustard residue on the acridine chromophore: synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsann-Long; Lin, Yi-Wen; Chou, Ting-Chao; Zhang, Xiuguo; Bacherikov, Valeriy A; Chen, Ching-Huang; Liu, Leroy F; Tsai, Tsong-Jen

    2006-06-15

    A series of 9-anilinoacridine and acridine derivatives bearing an alkylating N-mustard residue at C4 of the acridine chromophore were synthesized. The N-mustard pharmacophore was linked to the C4 of the acridine ring with an O-ethyl (O-C(2)), O-propyl (O-C(3)), or O-butyl (O-C(4)) spacer. It revealed that all newly synthesized compounds were very potent cytotoxic agents against human leukemia and various solid tumors in vitro. These agents did not exhibit cross-resistance against vinblastine-resistant (CCRF-CEM/VBL) or taxol-resistant (CCRF-CEM/taxol) cells. It also showed that these agents were DNA cross-linking agents rather than topoisomerase II inhibitors. Of these agents, compounds 27a and 27c were shown to have potent antitumor activity in nude mice bearing the human breast carcinoma MX-1 xenograft. The therapeutic efficacies of these two agents are comparable to that of taxol. PMID:16759114

  13. Occurrence and possible sources of arsenic in seafloor sediments surrounding sea-disposed munitions and chemical agents near O´ahu, Hawai´i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, Michael S.; De Carlo, Eric Heinen

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Defense disposed of conventional and chemical munitions as well as bulk containers of chemical agents in US coastal waters including those surrounding the State of Hawai´i. The Hawai´i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment has been collecting biota, water, and sediment samples from two disposal areas south of the island of O´ahu in waters 500 to 600 m deep known to have received both conventional munitions and chemical agents (specifically sulfur mustard). Unlike a number of other sea-disposed munitions investigations which used grabs or corers lowered from surface vessels, we used manned submersibles to collect the samples. Using this approach, we were able to visually identify the munitions and precisely locate our samples in relation to the munitions on the seafloor. This paper focuses on the occurrence and possible sources of arsenic found in the sediments surrounding the disposed military munitions and chemical agents. Using nonparametric multivariate statistical techniques, we looked for patterns in the chemical data obtained from these sediment samples in order to determine the possible sources of the arsenic found in these sediments. The results of the ordination technique nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicate that the arsenic is associated with terrestrial sources and not munitions. This was not altogether surprising given that: (1) the chemical agents disposed of in this area supposedly did not contain arsenic, and (2) the disposal areas studied were under terrestrial influence or served as dredge spoil disposal sites. The sediment arsenic concentrations during this investigation ranged from <1.3 to 40 mg/kg-dry weight with the lower concentrations typically found around control sites and munitions (not located in dredge disposal areas) and the higher values found at dredge disposal sites (with or without munitions). During the course of our investigation we did, however, discover that mercury appears to be loosely associated

  14. Sensory evaluation of dry-fermented sausage containing ground deodorized yellow mustard.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuliu; Aliani, Michel; Holley, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Ground deodorized yellow mustard is used as a binder and meat protein substitute in cooked processed meat products. Recent studies have shown that it has the potential to be used in uncooked processed meat products because of its natural antimicrobial properties. In the present study, ground deodorized yellow mustard was added to uncooked dry-fermented sausage during manufacture at 1% to 4% (w/w) and analyzed for its effects on starter cultures, physico-chemical properties, and consumer acceptability. Mustard had a nondose-dependent inhibitory effect on the Staphylococcus starter culture, had no effect on water activity or instrumental texture, and tended to accelerate sausage pH reduction. At 3% and 4% mustard, consumer scores on all sensory attributes as well as overall acceptability were significantly lower. The appearance and color of 3% and 4% mustard-treated sausages were liked slightly, whereas flavor, texture, and overall acceptability scores were reduced. The control without mustard and 1% mustard-treated sausages had similar sensory properties and were the most acceptable, while 2% mustard-treated sausages were given "like moderately" and "like slightly" descriptors. Sensory results mean that at concentrations necessary for mandated regulatory control of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in dry sausages, mustard may have a negative effect on consumer acceptance. PMID:24025044

  15. Effect of temperature on the desorption and decomposition of mustard from activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, C.J.; Buchanan, J.H.; Mahle, J.J.; Buettner, L.C.; Wagner, G.W.

    1999-12-07

    Experimental data are reported for the desorption of bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, (a sulfur mustard or HD) and its decomposition products from activated coconut shell carbon (CSC). The results show that under equilibrium conditions changes in the HD partial pressure are affected primarily by its loading and temperature of the adsorbent. The partial pressure of adsorbed HD is found to increase by about a decade for each 25 C increase in temperature for CSC containing 0.01--0.1 g/g HD. Adsorption equilibria of HD appear to be little affected by coadsorbed water. Although complicated by its decomposition, the distribution of adsorbed HD (of known amount) appears to occupy pores of similar energy whether dry or in the presence of adsorbed water. On dry CSC adsorbed HD appears stable, while in the presence of water its decomposition is marked by hydrolysis at low temperature and thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures. The principal volatile products desorbed are 1,4-thioxane, 2-chloroethyl vinyl sulfide and 1,4-dithiane, with the latter favoring elevated temperatures.

  16. Early indicators of survival following exposure to mustard gas: Protective role of 25(OH)D.

    PubMed

    Das, Lopa M; Binko, Amy M; Traylor, Zachary P; Duesler, Lori R; Dynda, Scott M; Debanne, Sara; Lu, Kurt Q

    2016-04-25

    The use of sulfur mustard (SM) as a chemical weapon for warfare has once again assumed center stage, endangering civilian and the military safety. SM causes rapid local skin vesication and late-onset systemic toxicity. Most studies on SM rely on obtaining tissue and blood for characterizing burn pathogenesis and assessment of systemic pathology, respectively. However the present study focuses on developing a non-invasive method to predict mortality from high dose skin SM exposure. We demonstrate that exposure to SM leads to a dose dependent increase in wound area size on the dorsal surface of mice that is accompanied by a progressive loss in body weight loss, blood cytopenia, bone marrow destruction, and death. Thus our model utilizes local skin destruction and systemic outcome measures as variables to predict mortality in a novel skin-based model of tissue injury. Based on our recent work using vitamin D (25(OH)D) as an intervention to treat toxicity from SM-related compounds, we explored the use of 25(OH)D in mitigating the toxic effects of SM. Here we show that 25(OH)D offers protection against SM and is the first known demonstration of an intervention that prevents SM-induced mortality. Furthermore, 25(OH)D represents a safe, novel, and readily translatable potential countermeasure following mass toxic exposure. PMID:26940683

  17. Volcanic sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    Although I may be overly demanding in expecting a member of the Eos staff to be familiar with recent articles in AGU journals, I am moved to make a mild protest concerning attribution in the “Volcanic Sulfur Dynamics” news item by Mario E. Godinez (Eos, June 14, 1983, p. 411).Since the news story stated that an important result of the RAVE experiment was to estimate the SO2 flux from Mount St. Helens on just one day, I must point out that both my research group and USGS scientists have monitored the emissions from Mount St. Helens and estimated SO2 (and other) fluxes over extended periods of time. Our results, which were based on in situ airborne measurements carried out over a period of a year, include estimates of the flux rates of SO2, H2S, H2O, sulfates, halides, and various other particles, prior to, during, and after the explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 [Hobbs et al., 1983]. The USGS measurements, which are made remotely through use of an airborne correlation spectrometer, also commenced in 1980 a n d have provided data several times a week since that time [Casadevall et al., 1981]. We have also estimated the fluxes of various materials (including SO2) from eight other volcanos [Radke et al.., 1976; Stith et al.., 1978; Radke, 1982].

  18. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  19. Effect of mustard seed meal on early weed emergence in peppermint and potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed meal is the by-product remaining after pressing/crushing mustard seed to remove the majority of the oil. Trials to evaluate weed suppression were conducted at several locations on peppermint and potatoes using seed meal obtained from Sinapis alba, variety Ida Gold. White mustard seed meal appl...

  20. Suppression of bacterial blight on mustard greens with host plant resistance and Acibenzolar-S-Methyl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, attacks the leaves of most brassica vegetables, including mustard greens (Brassica juncea). ‘Carolina Broadleaf,’ a new mustard cultivar, is resistant to bacterial blight. Acibenzolar-S-methyl (trade name Actigard) has been used to m...

  1. Phenolic component profiles of mustard greens, yu choy and 15 other Brassica vegatables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling method was used to characterize the phenolic components of 17 leafy vegetables from Brassica species other than Brassica oleracea. The vegetables studied were mustard green, baby mustard green, gai choy, baby gai choy, yu choy, yu choy tip...

  2. Non-invasive quantification of skin injury resulting from exposure to sulphur mustard and Lewisite vapours.

    PubMed

    Chilcott, R P; Brown, R F; Rice, P

    2000-05-01

    The severity and progression of skin lesions resulting from exposure to the chemical warfare agents Lewisite (L) and sulphur mustard (SM) have been investigated using the non-invasive biophysical methods of evaporimetry and reflectance spectroscopy in large white pigs in vivo. Erythema (redness) expressed immediately after exposure to L or SM vapours appeared to be related to the lesion severity as demonstrated by histopathological analysis. Skin brightness correlated well with scab formation whereas blueness (cyanosis) did not appreciably alter throughout the study. Rates of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) changed both with occlusion (during vapour exposure) and also mirrored the progression of macroscopic skin injury after 12 h. Whilst no single parameter could be used in isolation to ascertain the severity and subsequent progression of the skin lesions, measurement of erythema, skin brightness and TEWL could provide quantitative, non-invasive methods for determining the efficacy of antidotes or therapies to prevent the toxic effects of chemical warfare agents. However, neither colourimetry or TEWL provided a clinical evaluation of such lesions that were comparable with the prognostic capabilities of laser Doppler imaging. PMID:10741590

  3. Checkpoint kinase 1 is activated and promotes cell survival after exposure to sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Jowsey, Paul A; Blain, Peter G

    2015-01-22

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a vesicating agent that has been used several times as a weapon during military conflict and continues to pose a threat as an agent of warfare/terrorism. After exposure, SM exerts both acute and delayed long-term toxic effects principally to the skin, eyes and respiratory system. These effects are thought to be mediated, at least in part, by direct interaction of SM with DNA, forming a myriad of DNA lesions and initiating effects on cell cycle and cell death pathways. Previous studies have demonstrated that a complex network of cellular DNA damage response pathways are utilised in cells exposed to SM, consistent with SM causing multiple forms of DNA damage. The present study focused on the role of Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), a protein with putative roles in homologous recombination repair, p53 activation and the initiation of cell cycle checkpoints after certain forms of DNA damage. The data showed that SM caused robust activation of CHK1, monitored by multi-site phosphorylation analysis and that this activation was dependent on the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) protein kinase. Furthermore, specific inhibition of CHK1 increased SM toxicity in multiple human cell lines, with concomitant increases in markers of apoptosis, DNA damage and mitosis. Finally, the effect of CHK1 inhibition on SM toxicity was much more marked in cells with non-functional p53. PMID:25448276

  4. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage. PMID:25395009

  5. The Cytotoxicity of Benzaldehyde Nitrogen Mustard-2-Pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone Being Involved in Topoisomerase IIα Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun; Zhou, Sufeng; Liu, Youxun; Yang, Yingli; Sun, Xingzhi; Li, Changzheng

    2014-01-01

    The antitumor property of iron chelators and aromatic nitrogen mustard derivatives has been well documented. Combination of the two pharmacophores in one molecule in drug designation is worth to be explored. We reported previously the syntheses and preliminary cytotoxicity evaluation of benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard pyridine carboxyl acid hydrazones (BNMPH) as extended study, more tumor cell lines (IC50 for HepG2: 26.1 ± 3.5 μM , HCT-116: 57.5 ± 5.3 μM, K562: 48.2 ± 4.0 μM, and PC-12: 19.4 ± 2.2 μM) were used to investigate its cytotoxicity and potential mechanism. In vitro experimental data showed that the BNMPH chelating Fe2+ caused a large number of ROS formations which led to DNA cleavage, and this was further supported by comet assay, implying that ROS might be involved in the cytotoxicity of BNMPH. The ROS induced changes of apoptosis related genes, but the TFR1 and NDRG1 metastatic genes were not obviously regulated, prompting that BNMPH might not be able to deprive Fe2+ of ribonucleotide reductase. The BNMPH induced S phase arrest was different from that of iron chelators (G1) and alkylating agents (G2). BNMPH also exhibited its inhibition of human topoisomerase IIα. Those revealed that the cytotoxic mechanism of the BNMPH could stem from both the topoisomerase II inhibition, ROS generation and DNA alkylation. PMID:24995306

  6. Evaluating mustard as a potential companion crop for collards to control the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae): outdoor and olfactometer experiments.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three varieties of mustard (giant red mustard, tender green mustard and ragged leaf mustard) were evaluated as possible repellent companion crops for collards against the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii in outdoor potted experiments and through laboratory studies using a Y-tube olfactomete...

  7. Consumer acceptability and sensory profile of cooked broccoli with mustard seeds added to improve chemoprotective properties.

    PubMed

    Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Shen, Yuchi; Niranjan, Keshavan; Methven, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Broccoli, a rich source of glucosinolates, is a commonly consumed vegetable of the Brassica family. Hydrolysis products of glucosinolates, isothiocyanates, have been associated with health benefits and contribute to the flavor of Brassica. However, boiling broccoli causes the myrosinase enzyme needed for hydrolysis to denature. In order to ensure hydrolysis, broccoli must either be mildly cooked or active sources of myrosinase, such as mustard seed powder, can be added postcooking. In this study, samples of broccoli were prepared in 6 different ways; standard boiling, standard boiling followed by the addition of mustard seeds, sous vide cooking at low temperature (70 °C) and sous vide cooking at higher temperature (100 °C) and sous vide cooking at higher temperature followed by the addition of mustard seeds at 2 different concentrations. The majority of consumers disliked the mildly cooked broccoli samples (70 °C, 12 min, sous vide) which had a hard and stringy texture. The highest mean consumer liking was for standard boiled samples (100 °C, 7 min). Addition of 1% mustard seed powder developed sensory attributes, such as pungency, burning sensation, mustard odor, and flavor. One cluster of consumers (32%) found mustard seeds to be a good complement to cooked broccoli; however, the majority disliked the mustard-derived sensory attributes. Where the mustard seeds were partially processed, doubling the addition to 2% led to only the same level of mustard and pungent flavors as 1% unprocessed seeds, and mean consumer liking remained unaltered. This suggests that optimization of the addition level of partially processed mustard seeds may be a route to enhance bioactivity of cooked broccoli without compromising consumer acceptability. PMID:25156799

  8. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  9. Diffusion of sulfuric acid in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Umino, S.; Newman, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Aqueous sulfuric acid is an economically important chemical reagent. It is one of the largest volume chemical commodities, finding uses in fertilizer production, petroleum refining, extraction of metals from their ores, production of inorganic pigments, pickling of iron and steel, synthesis of surface-active agents, and as a reactant in the lead-acid storage battery. The restricted diffusion method was used to measure the differential diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid in water at 25 C for the concentration range from 0.3 to 7.5 molar. The concentration gradients of diffusing species were observed by Rayleigh interferometry. Experimental transport data are analyzed with concentrated solution theory of electrolytes in order to elucidate macroscopic transport characteristics of sulfuric acid in terms of specific binary interactions in solution. Results indicate that the transport properties of sulfuric acid are determined by the hydrogen ion-water molecule.

  10. Mid-wave infrared hyperspectral imaging of unknown chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clewes, Rhea J.; Howle, Chris R.; Guicheteau, Jason; Emge, Darren; Ruxton, Keith; Robertson, Gordon; Miller, William; Malcolm, Graeme; Maker, Gareth T.

    2013-05-01

    The ability of a stand-off chemical detector to distinguish two different chemical warfare agents is demonstrated in this paper. Using Negative Contrast Imaging, based upon IR absorption spectroscopy, we were able to detect 1 μl of VX, sulfur mustard and water on a subset of representative surfaces. These experiments were performed at a range of 1.3 metres and an angle of 45° to the surface. The technique employed utilises a Q-switched intracavity MgO:PPLN crystal that generated 1.4 - 1.8 μm (shortwave) and 2.6 - 3.6 μm (midwave) infrared radiation (SWIR and MWIR, respectively). The MgO:PPLN crystal has a fanned grating design which, via translation through a 1064 nm pump beam, enables tuning through the SWIR and MWIR wavelength ranges. The SWIR and MWIR beams are guided across a scene via a pair of raster scanned mirrors allowing detection of absorption features within these spectral regions. This investigation exploited MWIR signatures, as they provided sufficient molecular information to distinguish between toxic and benign chemicals in these proof-of-concept experiments.

  11. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  12. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  13. System for recovering sulfur from gases, especially natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gryka, G.E.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and operate a laboratory reactor to convert hydrogen sulfide into liquid sulfur, using a patented PIPco process as a basis. Reaction conditions will be studied, continuous regenerative operation demonstrated, and data necessary to design a field test system will be collected. The subject process is a regenerative buffered water circulating system with two primary steps: (1) loading of the solution with SO[sub 2] (which can be generated by buming sulfur or H[sub 2]S), and (2) H[sub 2]S separation - reaction to form sulfur - and sulfur separation. Many regenerative liquid redox sulfur recovery systems offer potential for combining H[sub 2]S separation and sulfur formation into one step. PIPco's data and engineering study suggest the process may have advantages over other liquid systems: Use of potassiurti citrate buffer increases sulfur dioxide (oxidizing agent) loading by a factor of 8 or more, up to 160 grams SO[sub 2]/liter of solution can be carried to the separator - reactor, thereby reducing liquid circulating rates and equipment size. The separator - reactor is operated at a temperature above 120[degrees]C (the melting point of elemental sulfur). Therefore, sulfur is produced and separated in liquid form. This eliminates sulfur plugging and separation problems by avoiding the production of solid sulfur.

  14. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  15. Thermal and pressure stability of myrosinase enzymes from black mustard (Brassica nigra L. W.D.J. Koch. var. nigra), brown mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern. var. juncea) and yellow mustard (Sinapsis alba L. subsp. maire) seeds.

    PubMed

    Okunade, Olukayode Adediran; Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Methven, Lisa; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2015-11-15

    This study investigates the effects of temperature and pressure on inactivation of myrosinase extracted from black, brown and yellow mustard seeds. Brown mustard had higher myrosinase activity (2.75 un/mL) than black (1.50 un/mL) and yellow mustard (0.63 un/mL). The extent of enzyme inactivation increased with pressure (600-800 MPa) and temperature (30-70° C) for all the mustard seeds. However, at combinations of lower pressures (200-400 MPa) and high temperatures (60-80 °C), there was less inactivation. For example, application of 300 MPa and 70 °C for 10 min retained 20%, 80% and 65% activity in yellow, black and brown mustard, respectively, whereas the corresponding activity retentions when applying only heat (70° C, 10 min) were 0%, 59% and 35%. Thus, application of moderate pressures (200-400 MPa) can potentially be used to retain myrosinase activity needed for subsequent glucosinolate hydrolysis. PMID:25977054

  16. Isophosphoramide mustard, a metabolite of ifosfamide with activity against murine tumours comparable to cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed Central

    Struck, R. F.; Dykes, D. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Suling, W. J.; Trader, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    Isophosphoramide mustard was synthesized and was found to demonstrate activity essentially comparable to cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide against L1210 and P388 leukaemia. Lewis lung carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma 16/C, ovarian sarcoma M5076, and colon tumour 6A, in mice and Yoshida ascitic sarcoma in rats. At doses less than, or equivalent to, the LD10, isophosphoramide mustard retained high activity against cyclophosphamide-resistant L1210 and P388 leukaemias, but was less active against intracerebrally-implanted P388 leukaemia while cyclophosphamide produced a 4 log10 tumour cell reduction. It was also less active (one log10 lower cell kill) than cyclophosphamide against the B16 melonoma. Metabolism studies on ifosfamide in mice identified isophosphoramide mustard in blood. In addition, unchanged drug, carboxyifosfamide, 4-ketoifosfamide, dechloroethyl cyclophosphamide, dechloroethylifosfamide, and alcoifosfamide were identified. The latter 4 metabolites were also identified in urine from an ifosfamide-treated dog. In a simulated in vitro pharmacokinetic experiment against L1210 leukaemia in which drugs were incubated at various concentrations for various times, both 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and isophosphoramide mustard exhibited significant cytoxicity at concentration times time values of 100-1000 micrograms X min ml-1, while acrolein was significantly cytotoxic at 10 micrograms X min ml-1. Treatment of mice with drug followed by L1210 cells demonstrated a shorter duration of effective levels of cytotoxic activity for isophosphoramide mustard and phosphoramide mustard in comparison with cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide. Isophosphoramide mustard and 2-chloroethylamine, a potential hydrolysis product of isophosphoramide mustard and carboxyifosfamide, were less mutagenic in the standard Ames test than the 2 corresponding metabolites of cyclophosphamide [phosphoramide mustard and bis(2-chloroethyl)amine]. PMID:6821629

  17. Mustard catch crop enhances denitrification in shallow groundwater beneath a spring barley field.

    PubMed

    Jahangir, M M R; Minet, E P; Johnston, P; Premrov, A; Coxon, C E; Hackett, R; Richards, K G

    2014-05-01

    Over-winter green cover crops have been reported to increase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in groundwater, which can be used as an energy source for denitrifiers. This study investigates the impact of a mustard catch crop on in situ denitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from an aquifer overlain by arable land. Denitrification rates and N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) mole fractions were measured in situ with a push-pull method in shallow groundwater under a spring barley system in experimental plots with and without a mustard cover crop. The results suggest that a mustard cover crop could substantially enhance reduction of groundwater nitrate NO3--N via denitrification without significantly increasing N2O emissions. Mean total denitrification (TDN) rates below mustard cover crop and no cover crop were 7.61 and 0.002 μg kg(-1) d(-1), respectively. Estimated N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) ratios, being 0.001 and 1.0 below mustard cover crop and no cover crop respectively, indicate that denitrification below mustard cover crop reduces N2O to N2, unlike the plot with no cover crop. The observed enhanced denitrification under the mustard cover crop may result from the higher groundwater DOC under mustard cover crop (1.53 mg L(-1)) than no cover crop (0.90 mg L(-1)) being added by the root exudates and root masses of mustard. This study gives insights into the missing piece in agricultural nitrogen (N) balance and groundwater derived N2O emissions under arable land and thus helps minimise the uncertainty in agricultural N and N2O-N balances. PMID:24374183

  18. Synthesis and in vitro cytotoxicity of 9-anilinoacridines bearing N-mustard residue on both anilino and acridine rings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Zhang, Xiuguo; Chou, Ting-Chao; Tsai, Tsong-Jen; Kapuriya, Naval; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Su, Tsann-Long

    2009-07-01

    A series of 9-anilinoacridines having an alkylating N-mustard pharmacophore on both anilino (C-3' or C-4') and acridine (C-4) rings with O-ethyl (O-C(2)) or O-butyl (O-C(4)) spacer were synthesized to evaluate their cytotoxicity against human lymphoblastic leukemia (CCRF-CEM) cell growth in vitro. It was revealed that these conjugates exhibited significant in vitro cytotoxicity. Among these agents, compound 13 was the most cytotoxic with IC(50) value of 1.3 nM and is as potent as taxol (IC(50)=1.1 nM). The structure-activity relationship study showed that the length of the spacer and the position of the substituent do affect their cytotoxicity. PMID:18752869

  19. Assessment of apoptosis occurring in spleen cells from nitrogen mustard-treated or gamma-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Hugel, B; Weltin, D; Holl, V; Marchal, J; Dufour, P; Freyssinet, J M; Bischoff, P L

    1998-01-01

    The short-term consequences on spleen cells of the intraperitoneal administration of nitrogen mustard (HN-2) to mice or of a whole-body gamma irradiation have been evaluated. Experiments were designed to assess the induction of apoptosis in spleen cells following exposure to these agents. The occurrence of this type of cell death was analysed by several methods, in particular the quantification in the blood of phosphotidylserine-bearing microparticles shed by apoptotic cells. In response to HN-2 or radiations, spleens undergo a rapid involution of their weight and cellularity. Ex vivo apoptosis occurs within 24 hours in cultured lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner after both treatments. As compared with untreated controls, circulating microparticles increased 3-fold after the injection of 5 mg/kg of HN-2. PMID:9858897

  20. Exogenous salicylic acid improves photosynthesis and growth through increase in ascorbate-glutathione metabolism and S assimilation in mustard under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Rahat; Umar, Shahid; Khan, Nafees A.

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbate (AsA)–glutathione (GSH) cycle metabolism has been regarded as the most important defense mechanism for the resistance of plants under stress. In this study the influence of salicylic acid (SA) was studied on ascorbate-glutathione pathway, S-assimilation, photosynthesis and growth of mustard (Brassica juncea L.) plants subjected to 100 mM NaCl. Treatment of SA (0.5 mM) alleviated the negative effects of salt stress and improved photosynthesis and growth through increase in enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione pathway which suggest that SA may participate in the redox balance under salt stress. The increase in leaf sulfur content through higher activity of ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) and serine acetyl transferase (SAT) by SA application was associated with the increased accumulation of glutathione (GSH) and lower levels of oxidative stress. These effects of SA were substantiated by the findings that application of SA-analog, 2,6, dichloro-isonicotinic acid (INA) and 1 mM GSH treatment produced similar results on rubisco, photosynthesis and growth of plants establishing that SA application alleviates the salt-induced decrease in photosynthesis mainly through inducing the enzyme activity of ascorbate-glutathione pathway and increased GSH production. Thus, SA/GSH could be a promising tool for alleviation of salt stress in mustard plants. PMID:25730495

  1. Evaluation of barrier creams against sulphur mustard. I. In vitro studies using human skin.

    PubMed

    Chilcott, Robert P; Jenner, John; Hotchkiss, Sharon A M; Rice, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a range of passive and reactive barrier cream formulations against the chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard (SM) using an in vitro diffusion cell system containing human skin. In general, proprietary formulations were relatively effective under occluded conditions, but ineffective under unoccluded conditions. For example, SM skin absorption rates through occluded control and Stokoderm pre-treated skin were 538 +/- 193 and 200 +/- 51 microg x cm(-2) x h(-1), respectively (p < 0.05). Under unoccluded conditions, control and Stokoderm pre-treated skin absorption rates were 4.41 +/- 1.90 and 36.84 +/- 15.19 microg x cm(-2) x h(-1) (p < 0.05). Novel (perfluorinated) barrier creams were generally more effective under unoccluded conditions; pre-treatment with one formulation led to an 18-fold reduction in skin absorption rate and reduced the total amount of SM penetrated by 95% of the applied dose. Several proprietary formulations also had adverse effects on the effectiveness of the skin decontaminant fuller's earth. The rate (Jss) and total amount (percentage of dose) of SM absorbed through the skin were deemed to be independent parameters of barrier cream performance. These data indicate that (1) perceived conditions of use, (2) compatibility with existing protective equipment and (3) the rate and extent of SM skin absorption must all be taken into account when evaluating barrier creams in vitro. PMID:12218284

  2. Skin decontamination of mustards and organophosphates: comparative efficiency of RSDL and Fuller's earth in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Taysse, L; Daulon, S; Delamanche, S; Bellier, B; Breton, P

    2007-02-01

    Research in skin decontamination and therapy of chemical warfare agents has been a difficult problem due to the simultaneous requirement of rapid action and non-aggressive behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of two decontaminating systems: the Canadian Reactive Skin Decontaminant Lotion (RSDL) and the Fuller's Earth (FE). The experiment was conducted with domestic swine, as a good model for extrapolation to human skin. RSDL and FE were tested against sulphur mustard (SM), a powerful vesicant, and VX, a potent and persistent cholinesterase inhibitor. When used 5 min after contamination, the results clearly showed that both systems were active against SM (10.1 mg/cm(2)) and VX (0.06 mg/cm(2)). The potency of the RSDL/sponge was statistically better than FE against skin injury induced by SM, observed 3 days post-exposure. RSDL was rather more efficient than FE in reducing the formation of perinuclear vacuoles and inflammation processes in the epidermis and dermis. Against a severe inhibition (67%) of plasmatic cholinesterases induced by VX poisoning, the potencies of the RSDL/sponge and FE were similar. Both systems completely prevented cholinesterase inhibition, which indirectly indicates a prevention of toxic absorption through the skin. PMID:17370872

  3. Aircraft sulfur emissions and the formation of visible contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Kolb, C. E.

    Contrail formation in the exhaust plume of the ATTAS aircraft engine burning fuels with 2 ppmm and 266 ppmm sulfur has been studied using an aerosol dynamics model coupled to a 2-dimensional, axisymmetric flow code. For both the low and high sulfur fuels, the model predicted approximately 35% of the available water condenses within 200 m downstream of the exhaust exit. However, particle size distributions for the low sulfur plume are broader and extend to larger sizes. Model results indicate that, for the engine and flight conditions treated, sulfuric acid is a viable soot activating agent when the fuel sulfur mass loading is reduced to 2 ppmm and that differences in the contrail particle size distribution for sulfur mass loadings between 2 ppmm and 266 ppmm would be difficult to detect.

  4. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  5. Cutaneous challenge with chemical warfare agents in the SKH-1 hairless mouse. (I) Development of a model for screening studies in skin decontamination and protection.

    PubMed

    Dorandeu, F; Taysse, L; Boudry, I; Foquin, A; Hérodin, F; Mathieu, J; Daulon, S; Cruz, C; Lallement, G

    2011-06-01

    Exposure to lethal chemical warfare agents (CWAs) is no longer only a military issue due to the terrorist threat. Among the CWAs of concern are the organophosphorus nerve agent O-ethyl-S-(2[di-isopropylamino]ethyl)methyl-phosphonothioate (VX) and the vesicant sulfur mustard (SM). Although efficient means of decontamination are available, most of them lose their efficacy when decontamination is delayed after exposure of the bare skin. Alternatively, CWA skin penetration can be prevented by topical skin protectants. Active research in skin protection and decontamination is thus paramount. In vivo screening of decontaminants or skin protectants is usually time consuming and may be expensive depending on the animal species used. We were thus looking for a suitable, scientifically sound and cost-effective model, which is easy to handle. The euthymic hairless mouse Crl: SKH-1 (hr/hr) BR is widely used in some skin studies and has previously been described to be suitable for some experiments involving SM or SM analogs. To evaluate the response of this species, we studied the consequences of exposing male anaesthetized SKH-1 mice to either liquid VX or to SM, the latter being used in liquid form or as saturated vapours. Long-term effects of SM burn were also evaluated. The model was then used in the companion paper (Taysse et al.(1)). PMID:20547654

  6. Removal of Sulfur Compounds from Coal by the Thermophilic Organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    PubMed Central

    Kargi, Fikret; Robinson, James M.

    1982-01-01

    The thermophilic, reduced-sulfur, iron-oxidizing bacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was used for the removal of sulfur compounds from coal. The inclusion of complex nutrients such as yeast extract and peptone, and chemical oxidizing agents, 0.01 M FeCl3 into leaching medium, reduced the rate and the extent of sulfur removal from coal. The rate of sulfur removal by S. acidocaldarius was strongly dependent on the sulfur content of the coal and on the total external surface area of coal particles. Approximately 96% of inorganic sulfur was removed from a 5% slurry of coal which had an initial total sulfur content of 4% and an inorganic (pyritic S and sulfate) sulfur content of 2.1%. This resulted in removal of 50% of initial total sulfur present in coal. PMID:16346112

  7. DSRP, Direct Sulfur Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization processes for IGCC and other advanced power applications utilize regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from raw coal gas. Regeneration of these sorbents produces an off-gas typically containing I to 3 percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Production of elemental sulfur is a highly desirable option for the ultimate disposal of the SO{sub 2} content of this off-gas. Elemental sulfur, an essential industrial commodity, is easily stored and transported. As shown in Figure 1, the DSRP consists of two catalytic reactors, each followed by a sulfur condenser. Hot regenerator off-gas is mixed with a hot coal-gas slip stream and fed to the first DSRP reactor. Approximately 95 percent of the sulfur gas in the inlet stream of the first reactor is converted to elemental sulfur. The outlet gas of the first DSRP reactor is cooled, condensing out sulfur. The gas could be recycled after the Stage I condenser. Alteratively, by adjusting the proportion of coal gas to regenerator off-gas, the effluent composition of the first reactor can be controlled to produce an H{sub 2}S-to-SO{sub 2} ratio of 2 to 1 at 95 percent sulfur conversion. The cooled gas stream is then passed to the second DSRP reactor where 80 to 90 percent of the remaining sulfur compounds are converted to elemental sulfur via the modified Claus reaction at high pressure. The total efficiency of the two reactors for the conversion of sulfur compounds to elemental sulfur is projected to be about 99.5 percent.

  8. Mustard oils and cannabinoids excite sensory nerve fibres through the TRP channel ANKTM1.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Bautista, Diana M; Chuang, Huai-Hu; McKemy, David D; Zygmunt, Peter M; Högestätt, Edward D; Meng, Ian D; Julius, David

    2004-01-15

    Wasabi, horseradish and mustard owe their pungency to isothiocyanate compounds. Topical application of mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate) to the skin activates underlying sensory nerve endings, thereby producing pain, inflammation and robust hypersensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli. Despite their widespread use in both the kitchen and the laboratory, the molecular mechanism through which isothiocyanates mediate their effects remains unknown. Here we show that mustard oil depolarizes a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons that are also activated by capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in chilli peppers, and by Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana. Both allyl isothiocyanate and THC mediate their excitatory effects by activating ANKTM1, a member of the TRP ion channel family recently implicated in the detection of noxious cold. These findings identify a cellular and molecular target for the pungent action of mustard oils and support an emerging role for TRP channels as ionotropic cannabinoid receptors. PMID:14712238

  9. The presence of Bt-transgenic oilseed rape in wild mustard populations affects plant growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongbo; Stewart, C Neal; Li, Junsheng; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Xitao

    2015-12-01

    The adventitious presence of transgenic plants in wild plant populations is of ecological and regulatory concern, but the consequences of adventitious presence are not well understood. Here, we introduced Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt)-transgenic oilseed rape (Bt OSR, Brassica napus) with various frequencies into wild mustard (Brassica juncea) populations. We sought to better understand the adventitious presence of this transgenic insecticidal crop in a wild-relative plant population. We assessed the factors of competition, resource availability and diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) infestation on plant population dynamics. As expected, Bt OSR performed better than wild mustard in mixed populations under herbivore attack in habitats with enough resources, whereas wild mustard had higher fitness when Bt OSR was rarer in habitats with limited resources. Results suggest that the presence of insect-resistant transgenic plants could decrease the growth of wild mustard and Bt OSR plants and their populations, especially under high herbivore pressure. PMID:26338267

  10. Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-06-15

    Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

  11. Impact of the preparation conditions in the sulfur distribution of a new sulfurized porous adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Guijarro, M.I.; Mendioroz, S. . Inst. Catalisis y Petroleoquimica); Munoz, V. . Dept. de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica)

    1994-02-01

    Fibrous natural silicates (sepiolite), instead of more conventional active carbon, have been sulfurized to be used as remover agents of mercury vapors from contaminated industrial waste gases. The Claus reaction, 2nH[sub 2]S + nSO[sub 2] [r arrow] (3n/x)S[sub x] + 2nH[sub 2]O, at low temperature (<400 K) and reactant concentration (2--3% molar) has been used as the sulfur source, thus being an additional way of eliminating SO[sub 2] from metallurgical processes and urban areas. The process has been carried out in a fluidized bed reactor of the semicontinuous type, and various homogeneous materials with sulfur contents in the range 3--40% S were generated. Sulfur condensation results in catalyst deactivation but, prior to its stabilization as monoclinic sulfur, also acts as cocatalyst of the reaction contributing to its overall kinetics. A study of the operating conditions, temperature, reactant concentration, and textural properties of the solid on the yield of sulfur deposited has been made. Different pore-plugging mechanisms have been applied, and from them, the influence of temperature in sulfur distribution has been concluded. In this paper, TA, N[sub 2] adsorption at 77 K, and mercury-intrusion porosimetry were used to characterize the resulting adsorbents.

  12. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes on bologna sausages by an antimicrobial film containing mustard extract or sinigrin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Lledó, Marta; Olaimat, Amin; Holley, Richard A

    2012-05-01

    The ability of Listeria (L.) monocytogenes to convert glucosinolates into antimicrobial isothiocyanates was investigated. Mustard glucosinolates in pure (sinigrin) or extract forms (sinigrin, oriental; sinalbin, yellow mustard) were used in broth media and in a polyvinyl polyethylene glycol graft copolymer (PPG) packaging film with bologna to examine their value as antimicrobial precursors for the control of L. monocytogenes viability and extension of bologna shelf-life at 4 °C. During broth tests with deodorized (myrosinase-inactivated) mustard extracts (10 d at 20 °C) or with purified sinigrin (21 d at 20 °C) L. monocytogenes was only inhibited when exogenous myrosinase was added. None the less, the organism was able to hydrolyze almost half the pure sinigrin by 21 d in tests without added enzyme. Reductions in sinigrin levels were measured by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, and in the absence of L. monocytogenes or added myrosinase the glucosinolate was stable. When pure sinigrin, oriental or yellow mustard extracts were incorporated in PPG films containing 3, 5 and 6% (w/w) of the corresponding glucosinolate and used to package bologna inoculated with 4 log CFU/g L. monocytogenes, the pathogen became undetectable in bologna packed with the oriental mustard extract at 52 d storage and remained undetectable at 70 d. The yellow mustard extract was less inhibitory and the pure sinigrin was not antimicrobial. L. monocytogenes numbers reached >7 log CFU/g in the film and untreated controls at 17 d storage. At 35 d storage, samples packed with control film contained sufficient numbers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (>7 log CFU/g) to be considered spoiled, whereas treatments containing mustard or sinigrin remained <7 log CFU/g LAB for ≤ 70 d. L. monocytogenes played a key role in exerting control over its own viability in bologna by hydrolysis of the glucosinolate in the oriental mustard film, but other antimicrobials in treatments may have contributed. PMID

  13. Delayed neurological complications of sulphur mustard and tabun poisoning in 43 Iranian veterans.

    PubMed

    Darchini-Maragheh, Emadodin; Nemati-Karimooy, Habibollah; Hasanabadi, Hosein; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2012-12-01

    Delayed neurotoxic complications of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as sulphur mustard (SM) and tabun, in human beings have not been reported in detail. We thus aimed to investigate possible neurotoxic complications of these agents in Iranian veterans 22-27 years after exposure. After co-ordination with the veteran foundation and obtaining the approval of the medical research ethics committee, 43 Iranian veterans with late complications of CWA exposure during the Iran-Iraq conflict were studied after obtaining signed written informed consent. Demographic and clinical findings were recorded on pre-designed forms. Neurological examination was performed by a neurologist. Routine biochemical tests were performed for all the patients. Electromyography (EMG), nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and electroencephalography (EEG) were carried out as clinically indicated. The majority of the patients (38) had been exposed to SM and only five patients to tabun. Hyperaesthesia was the most objective finding (72.1%). Fatigue (93%), paraesthesia (88.3%) and headache (83.7%) were the most common subjective findings in the patients. Sensory nerve impairments, including paraesthesia (88.3%), hyperaesthesia (72.1%) and hypoesthesia (11.6%), were the most common observed clinical complications. EMG and NCV were impaired in seven patients (16.3%) who were all SM-exposed patients but did not show any significant correlation with organ complications. EEG was negative even in the seized patients. Cholesterol, LDL and triglyceride levels were significantly above the normal ranges. Late neurological complications of CWA, particularly SM poisoning, are considerable even after three decades of exposure and require medical attention. PMID:22762514

  14. Evolution of mustard (Brassica juncea Coss) subspecies in China: evidence from the chalcone synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, F B; Liu, H F; Yao, Q L; Fang, P

    2016-01-01

    To explore the phylogenetic relationship, genome donor, and evolutionary history of the polyploid mustard (Brassica juncea) from China, eighty-one sequences of the chalcone synthase gene (Chs) were analyzed in 43 individuals, including 34 B. juncea, 2 B. rapa, 1 B. nigra, 2 B. oleracea, 1 B. napus, 1 B. carinata, and 2 Raphanus sativus. A maximum likelihood analysis showed that sequences from B. juncea were separated into two well-supported groups in accordance with the A and B genomes, whereas the traditional phenotypic classification of B. juncea was not wholly supported by the molecular results. The SplitsTree analysis recognized four distinct groups of Brassicaceae, and the median-joining network analysis recognized four distinct haplotypes of Chs. The estimates of Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D, and Fu and Li's F statistic for the Chs gene in the B genome were negative, while those in the A genome were significant. The results indicated that 1) the Chs sequences revealed a high level of sequence variation in Chinese mustard, 2) both tree and reticulate evolutions existed, and artificial selection played an important role in the evolution of Chinese mustard, 3) the original parental species of Chinese mustard are B. rapa var. sinapis arvensis and B. nigra (derived from China), 4) nucleotide variation in the B genome was higher than that in the A genome, and 5) cultivated mustard evolved from wild mustard, and China is one of the primary origins of B. juncea. PMID:27173323

  15. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Glucosinolate Biosynthesis in White Mustard (A Biochemical Anomaly).

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, R. N.; Kiddle, G.; Wallsgrove, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    One of the first steps in glucosinolate biosynthesis is the conversion of amino acids to their aldoximes. The biochemistry of this process is controversial, and several very different enzyme systems have been described. The major glucosinolate in white mustard (Sinapis alba) is sinalbin, which is derived from tyrosine via its aldoxime, and this conversion is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 (Cyt P450) monooxygenase. Phenylethyl- and alkenylglucosinolates are also present in white mustard leaves, as are the enzymes catalyzing the relevant aldoxime formation from homophenylalanine and methionine homologs, respectively. These enzymes are similar to those found in Brassica sp. and are distinct from the tyrosine-dependent enzyme in that they contain no heme and are unaffected by Cyt P450 inhibitors. They are instead inhibited by the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenylene iodonium and by Cu2+. In both white mustard and oilseed rape (Brassica napus) methyl jasmonate specifically stimulates indolylglucosinolate biosynthesis and yet has no effect on sinalbin accumulation in either cotyledons or leaves of white mustard. White mustard appears to be unique among crucifers in having a Cyt P450 aldoxime-forming enzyme for biosynthesis of one glucosinolate, although it also contains all of the non-Cyt P450 enzyme systems found in other members of the family. Sinalbin biosynthesis in white mustard is therefore an inappropriate model system for the synthesis of other glucosinolates in crucifers, including canola and oilseed rape. PMID:12223771

  16. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Glucosinolate Biosynthesis in White Mustard (A Biochemical Anomaly).

    PubMed

    Bennett, R. N.; Kiddle, G.; Wallsgrove, R. M.

    1997-08-01

    One of the first steps in glucosinolate biosynthesis is the conversion of amino acids to their aldoximes. The biochemistry of this process is controversial, and several very different enzyme systems have been described. The major glucosinolate in white mustard (Sinapis alba) is sinalbin, which is derived from tyrosine via its aldoxime, and this conversion is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 (Cyt P450) monooxygenase. Phenylethyl- and alkenylglucosinolates are also present in white mustard leaves, as are the enzymes catalyzing the relevant aldoxime formation from homophenylalanine and methionine homologs, respectively. These enzymes are similar to those found in Brassica sp. and are distinct from the tyrosine-dependent enzyme in that they contain no heme and are unaffected by Cyt P450 inhibitors. They are instead inhibited by the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenylene iodonium and by Cu2+. In both white mustard and oilseed rape (Brassica napus) methyl jasmonate specifically stimulates indolylglucosinolate biosynthesis and yet has no effect on sinalbin accumulation in either cotyledons or leaves of white mustard. White mustard appears to be unique among crucifers in having a Cyt P450 aldoxime-forming enzyme for biosynthesis of one glucosinolate, although it also contains all of the non-Cyt P450 enzyme systems found in other members of the family. Sinalbin biosynthesis in white mustard is therefore an inappropriate model system for the synthesis of other glucosinolates in crucifers, including canola and oilseed rape. PMID:12223771

  17. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  18. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  19. Distribution of chemical warfare agent, energetics, and metals in sediments at a deep-water discarded military munitions site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Christian; Shjegstad, Sonia M.; Silva, Jeff A. K.; Edwards, Margo H.

    2016-06-01

    There is a strong need to understand the behavior of chemical warfare agent (CWA) at underwater discarded military munitions (DMM) sites to determine the potential threat to human health or the environment, yet few studies have been conducted at sites in excess of 250 m, the depth at which most U.S. chemical munitions were disposed. As part of the Hawai'i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA), sediments adjacent to chemical and conventional DMM at depths of 400-650 m were sampled using human occupied vehicles (HOVs) in order to quantify the distribution of CWA, energetics, and select metals. Sites in the same general area, with no munitions within 50 m in any direction were sampled as a control. Sulfur mustard (HD) and its degradation product 1,4-dithiane were detected at each CWA DMM site, as well as a single sample with the HD degradation product 1,4-thioxane. An energetic compound was detected in sediment to a limited extent at one CWA DMM site. Metals common in munitions casings (i.e., Fe, Cu, and Pb) showed similar trends at the regional and site-wide scales, likely reflecting changes in marine sediment deposition and composition. This study shows HD and its degradation products can persist in the deep-marine environment for decades following munitions disposal.

  20. Ultraviolet Raman scattering from persistent chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Wästerby, Pär.; Landström, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Laser induced Raman scattering at excitation wavelengths in the middle ultraviolet was examined using a pulsed tunable laser based spectrometer system. Droplets of chemical warfare agents, with a volume of 2 μl, were placed on a silicon surface and irradiated with sequences of laser pulses. The Raman scattering from V-series nerve agents, Tabun (GA) and Mustard gas (HD) was studied with the aim of finding the optimum parameters and the requirements for a detection system. A particular emphasis was put on V-agents that have been previously shown to yield relatively weak Raman scattering in this excitation band.

  1. IMS software developments for the detection of chemical warfare agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klepel, ST.; Graefenhain, U.; Lippe, R.; Stach, J.; Starrock, V.

    1995-01-01

    Interference compounds like gasoline, diesel, burning wood or fuel, etc. are presented in common battlefield situations. These compounds can cause detectors to respond as a false positive or interfere with the detector's ability to respond to target compounds such as chemical warfare agents. To ensure proper response of the ion mobility spectrometer to chemical warfare agents, two special software packages were developed and incorporated into the Bruker RAID-1. The programs suppress interferring signals caused by car exhaust or smoke gases resulting from burning materials and correct the influence of variable sample gas humidity which is important for detection and quantification of blister agents like mustard gas or lewisite.

  2. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  3. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  4. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed. PMID:25701621

  5. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  6. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  7. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-04-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. PMID:23325336

  8. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Sorokin, A. A.; Buriko, Y. Y.

    The conversion of fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 + H2SO4) in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. Model results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(VI). It is also shown that, for a high sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is kinetically limited by the level of atomic oxygen. This results in a higher oxidation efficiency at lower sulfur loadings. SO3 is the primary S(VI) oxidation product and calculated H2SO4 emission levels were less than 1% of the total fuel sulfur. This source of S(VI) can exceed the S(VI) source due to gas phase oxidation in the exhaust wake.

  9. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  10. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  11. Attenuation of Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Fibrosis by Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antibody.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Verissimo, Vivianne L; Cervelli, Jessica A; Vayas, Kinal N; Hall, LeRoy; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes acute injury to the lung that progresses to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a prominent infiltration of macrophages into the lung and upregulation of proinflammatory/profibrotic cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of anti-TNFα antibody to mitigate NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody (15 mg/kg, iv, every 9 days) beginning 30 min after intratracheal administration of NM (0.125 mg/kg) reduced progressive histopathologic alterations in the lung including perivascular and peribronchial edema, macrophage/monocyte infiltration, interstitial thickening, bronchiolization of alveolar walls, fibrin deposition, emphysema, and fibrosis. NM-induced damage to the alveolar-epithelial barrier, measured by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and cell content, was also reduced by anti-TNFα antibody, along with expression of the oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1. Whereas the accumulation of proinflammatory/cytotoxic M1 macrophages in the lung in response to NM was suppressed by anti-TNFα antibody, anti-inflammatory/profibrotic M2 macrophages were increased or unchanged. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody also reduced NM-induced increases in expression of the profibrotic mediator, transforming growth factor-β. This was associated with a reduction in NM-induced collagen deposition in the lung. These data suggest that inhibiting TNFα may represent an efficacious approach to mitigating lung injury induced by mustards. PMID:26243812

  12. Sulfuric acid in the Venus clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The extremely dry nature of the Venus upper atmosphere appears to demand the presence of an efficient desiccating agent as the chief constituent of the clouds of Venus. On the basis of polarization measures it is to be expected that this substance is present as spherical droplets, 1 to 2 microns in diameter, with a refractive index n of 1.46 plus or minus 0.02 at 3500A in the observed region of the atmosphere, with T about equal to 235 K. This substance must have ultraviolet, visible, and infrared reflection properties not inconsistent with the observed spectrum of Venus. Sulfuric acid, of about 86% by weight composition, roughly fulfills the first of these properties. The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  13. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  14. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Shen, Jianliang; Reimer, David; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200-225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants.

  15. Use of acetylcholine mustard to study allosteric interactions at the M2 muscarinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Figueroa, Katherine W.; Ehlert, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the interaction of a nitrogen mustard derivative of acetylcholine with the human M2 muscarinic receptor expressed in CHO cells using the muscarinic radioligand, [3H]N-methylscopolamine. Acetylcholine mustard caused a concentration-dependent, first order loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding at 37°C, with the half maximal rate constant occurring at 24 µM and a maximal rate constant of 0.16 min−1. We examined the effects of various ligands on the rate of alkylation of M2 receptors by acetylcholine mustard. N-methylscopolamine and McN-A-343 (4-(trimethylamino)-2-butynyl-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate) competitively slowed the rate of alkylation, whereas the inhibition by gallamine reached a plateau at high concentrations, indicating allosteric inhibition. In contrast, WIN 51708 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-5-α-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) had no effect. We also measured the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by acetylcholine mustard at 0°C, conditions under which there is little or no detectable covalent binding. In these experiments, the dissociation constant of the aziridinium ion of acetylcholine mustard was estimated to be 12.3 µM. In contrast, the parent mustard and alcoholic hydrolysis product of acetylcholine mustard were without effect. Our results show that measurement of the effects of ligands on the rate of inactivation of the orthosteric site by a small site-directed electrophile is a powerful method for discriminating competitive inhibition from allosterism. PMID:18682569

  16. Effects of simulated sulfuric acid rain on yield, growth, and foliar injury of several crops

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Neely, G.E.; Perrigan, S.C.; Grothaus, L.C.

    1980-10-01

    This study was designed to reveal patterns of response of major United States crops to sulfuric acid rain. Potted plants were grown in field chambers and exposed to simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5 or 4.0) or to a control rain (pH 5.6). At harvest, the weights of the marketable portion, total aboveground portion and roots were determined for 28 crops. Of these, marketable yield production was inhibited for 5 crops (radish, beet, carrot, mustard greens, broccoli), stimulated for 6 crops (tomato, green pepper, strawberry, alfalfa, orchardgrass, timothy), and ambiguously affected for 1 crop (potato). In addition, stem and leaf production of sweet corn was stimulated. Visible injury of tomatoes might have decreased their marketability. No statistically significant effects on yield were observed for the other 15 crops. The results suggest that the likelihood of yield being affected by acid rain depends on the part of the plant utilized, as well as on species. Effects on the aboveground portions of crops and on roots are also presented. Plants were regularly examined for foliar injury associated with acid rain. Of the 35 cultivars examined, the foliage of 31 was injured at pH 3.0, 28 at pH 3.5, and 5 at pH 4.0. Foliar injury was not generally related to effects on yield. However, foilar injury of swiss chard, mustard greens and spinach was severe enough to adversely affect marketability.

  17. Characterization of Distinct Macrophage Subpopulations during Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Choi, Hyejeong; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is an alkylating agent known to cause extensive pulmonary injury progressing to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies, we characterized the phenotype of macrophages accumulating in the lung over time following NM exposure. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, intratracheally) resulted in an increase in CD11b(+) macrophages in histologic sections. These cells consisted of inducible nitric oxide synthase(+) (iNOS) proinflammatory M1 macrophages, and CD68(+), CD163(+), CD206(+), YM-1(+), and arginase-II(+)antiinflammatory M2 macrophages. Although M1 macrophages were prominent 1-3 days after NM, M2 macrophages were most notable at 28 days. At this time, they were enlarged and vacuolated, consistent with a profibrotic phenotype. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated lung macrophages identified three phenotypically distinct subpopulations: mature CD11b(-), CD43(-), and CD68(+) resident macrophages, which decreased in numbers after NM; and two infiltrating (CD11b(+)) macrophage subsets: immature CD43(+) M1 macrophages and mature CD43(-) M2 macrophages, which increased sequentially. Time-related increases in M1 (iNOS, IL-12α, COX-2, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-9, matrix metalloproteinase-10) and M2 (IL-10, pentraxin-2, connective tissue growth factor, ApoE) genes, as well as chemokines/chemokine receptors associated with trafficking of M1 (CCR2, CCR5, CCL2, CCL5) and M2 (CX3CR1, fractalkine) macrophages to sites of injury, were also noted in macrophages isolated from the lung after NM. The appearance of M1 and M2 macrophages in the lung correlated with NM-induced acute injury and the development of fibrosis, suggesting a potential role of these macrophage subpopulations in the pathogenic response to NM. PMID:26273949

  18. Pentoxifylline attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced acute lung injury, oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Vayas, Kinal N; Cervelli, Jessica A; Malaviya, Rama; Hall, LeRoy; Massa, Christopher B; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic alkylating agent that causes damage to the respiratory tract. Evidence suggests that macrophages and inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α contribute to pulmonary injury. Pentoxifylline is a TNFα inhibitor known to suppress inflammation. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of pentoxifylline to mitigate NM-induced lung injury and inflammation. Exposure of male Wistar rats (150-174 g; 8-10 weeks) to NM (0.125 mg/kg, i.t.) resulted in severe histopathological changes in the lung within 3d of exposure, along with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell number and protein, indicating inflammation and alveolar-epithelial barrier dysfunction. This was associated with increases in oxidative stress proteins including lipocalin (Lcn)2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung, along with pro-inflammatory/cytotoxic (COX-2(+) and MMP-9(+)), and anti-inflammatory/wound repair (CD163+ and Gal-3(+)) macrophages. Treatment of rats with pentoxifylline (46.7 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3d beginning 15 min after NM significantly reduced NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress, as measured histologically and by decreases in BAL cell and protein content, and levels of HO-1 and Lcn2. Macrophages expressing COX-2 and MMP-9 also decreased after pentoxifylline, while CD163+ and Gal-3(+) macrophages increased. This was correlated with persistent upregulation of markers of wound repair including pro-surfactant protein-C and proliferating nuclear cell antigen by Type II cells. NM-induced lung injury and inflammation were associated with alterations in the elastic properties of the lung, however these were largely unaltered by pentoxifylline. These data suggest that pentoxifylline may be useful in treating acute lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress induced by vesicants. PMID:24886962

  19. Involvement of a volatile metabolite during phosphoramide mustard-induced ovotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Jill A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Devine, Patrick J.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-05-15

    The finite ovarian follicle reserve can be negatively impacted by exposure to chemicals including the anti-neoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide (CPA). CPA requires bioactivation to phosphoramide mustard (PM) to elicit its therapeutic effects however; in addition to being the tumor-targeting metabolite, PM is also ovotoxic. In addition, PM can break down to a cytotoxic, volatile metabolite, chloroethylaziridine (CEZ). The aim of this study was initially to characterize PM-induced ovotoxicity in growing follicles. Using PND4 Fisher 344 rats, ovaries were cultured for 4 days before being exposed once to PM (10 or 30 μM). Following eight additional days in culture, relative to control (1% DMSO), PM had no impact on primordial, small primary or large primary follicle number, but both PM concentrations induced secondary follicle depletion (P < 0.05). Interestingly, a reduction in follicle number in the control-treated ovaries was observed. Thus, the involvement of a volatile, cytotoxic PM metabolite (VC) in PM-induced ovotoxicity was explored in cultured rat ovaries, with control ovaries physically separated from PM-treated ovaries during culture. Direct PM (60 μM) exposure destroyed all stage follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05). VC from nearby wells depleted primordial follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05), temporarily reduced secondary follicle number after 2 days, and did not impact other stage follicles at any other time point. VC was determined to spontaneously liberate from PM, which could contribute to degradation of PM during storage. Taken together, this study demonstrates that PM and VC are ovotoxicants, with different follicular targets, and that the VC may be a major player during PM-induced ovotoxicity observed in cancer survivors. - Highlights: • PM depletes all stage ovarian follicles in a temporal pattern. • A volatile ovotoxic compound is liberated from PM. • The volatile metabolite depletes primordial follicles.

  20. The short-term effect of mustard gas on the serum immunoglobulin levels.

    PubMed

    Keyhani, Abdolhossein; Eslami, Mohammad Bagher; Razavimanesh, Hossein

    2007-03-01

    Mustard gas (MG), as a chemical warfare agent was used by the Iraqi army in Iran-Iraq conflict against military men in the battlefield in 1985.The serum levels of IgG, IgA and IgM of patients exposed to MG in the battlefield were measured by single radial immunodiffusion from day 3 up to one month after exposure to MG. The serum levels of IgG in patients showed significant decrease on day 3 after exposure to MG. However, the levels of IgG in the serum samples collected from the patients during 4-18 days after exposure to MG were found to increase. The increase in serum IgG levels in the sera of patients which were collected during 19-31 days after exposure to MG was found to be highly significant, surpassing those from the controls. The levels of serum IgA in patients during one month after exposure to MG showed alterations similar to those of serum IgG, however the serum alterations of the patients IgA, comparing to those of the normal controls were not significant. The serum levels of IgM in patients did not show marked alterations during one month after exposure to MG comparing to those of the normal controls. The initial decrease in serum levels of IgG in patients is discussed in terms of a possible leakage of IgG into the skin blisters and into other severely affected parts of the body such as respiratory system, whereas the subsequent increase in serum IgG is interpreted as due to (auto) antigenic stimulation of the patients' immune systems. PMID:17303924

  1. Involvement of a volatile metabolite during phosphoramide mustard-induced ovotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Jill A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Devine, Patrick J.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-01-01

    The finite ovarian follicle reserve can be negatively impacted by chemical exposures including the anti-neoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide (CPA). CPA requires bioactivation to phosphoramide mustard (PM) to elicit its therapeutic effects however; in addition to being the tumor-targeting metabolite, PM is also ovotoxic. In addition, PM can break down to a cytotoxic, volatile metabolite, chloroethylaziridine (CEZ). The aim of this study was initially to characterize PM-induced ovotoxicity in growing follicles. Using PND4 Fisher 344 rats, ovaries were cultured for 4 days before being exposed once to PM (10 or 30 μM). Following eight additional days in culture, relative to control (1% DMSO), PM had no impact on primordial, small primary or large primary follicle number, but both PM concentrations induced secondary follicle depletion (P < 0.05). Interestingly, a reduction in follicle number in the control-treated ovaries was observed. Thus, the involvement of a volatile, cytotoxic PM metabolite (VC) in PM-induced ovotoxicity was explored in cultured rat ovaries, with control ovaries physically separated from PM-treated ovaries during culture. Direct PM (60 μM) exposure destroyed all stage follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05). VC from nearby wells depleted primordial follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05), temporarily reduced secondary follicle number after 2 days, and did not impact other stage follicles at any other time point. VC was determined to spontaneously liberate from PM, which could contribute to degradation of PM during storage. Taken together, this study demonstrates that PM and VC are ovotoxicants, with different follicular targets, and that the VC may be a major player during PM-induced ovotoxicity observed in cancer survivors. PMID:24642057

  2. Mitigation of nitrogen mustard mediated skin injury by a novel indomethacin bifunctional prodrug.

    PubMed

    Composto, Gabriella M; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L; Gerecke, Donald R; Casillas, Robert P; Heindel, Ned D; Joseph, Laurie B; Heck, Diane E

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that is highly reactive in the skin causing extensive tissue damage and blistering. In the present studies, a modified cutaneous murine patch model was developed to characterize NM-induced injury and to evaluate the efficacy of an indomethacin pro-drug in mitigating toxicity. NM (20μmol) or vehicle control was applied onto 6mm glass microfiber filters affixed to the shaved dorsal skin of CD-1 mice for 6min. This resulted in absorption of approximately 4μmol of NM. NM caused localized skin damage within 1 d, progressing to an eschar within 2-3 d, followed by wound healing after 4-5 d. NM-induced injury was associated with increases in skin thickness, inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced numbers of sebocytes, basal keratinocyte double stranded DNA breaks, as measured by phospho-histone 2A.X expression, mast cell degranulation and increases in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Wound healing was characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and marked increases in basal cells expressing proliferating cell nuclear antigen. A novel indomethacin-anticholinergic prodrug (4338) designed to target cyclooxygenases and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), was found to markedly suppress NM toxicity, decreasing wound thickness and eschar formation. The prodrug also inhibited mast cell degranulation, suppressed keratinocyte expression of iNOS and COX-2, as well as markers of epidermal proliferation. These findings indicate that a novel bifunctional pro-drug is effective in limiting NM mediated dermal injury. Moreover, our newly developed cutaneous patch model is a sensitive and reproducible method to assess the mechanism of action of countermeasures. PMID:27189522

  3. Electrolyte and Plasma Responses After Pickle Juice, Mustard, and Deionized Water Ingestion in Dehydrated Humans

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Some athletes ingest pickle juice (PJ) or mustard to treat exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMCs). Clinicians warn against this because they are concerned it will exacerbate exercise-induced hypertonicity or cause hyperkalemia. Few researchers have examined plasma responses after PJ or mustard ingestion in dehydrated, exercised individuals. Objective: To determine if ingesting PJ, mustard, or deionized water (DIW) while hypohydrated affects plasma sodium (Na+) concentration ([Na+]p), plasma potassium (K+) concentration ([K+]p), plasma osmolality (OSMp), or percentage changes in plasma volume or Na+ content. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 9 physically active, nonacclimated individuals (age = 25 ± 2 years, height = 175.5 ± 9.0 cm, mass = 78.6 ± 13.8 kg). Intervention(s): Participants exercised vigorously for 2 hours (temperature = 37°C ± 1°C, relative humidity = 24% ± 4%). After a 30-minute rest, a baseline blood sample was collected, and they ingested 1 mL/kg body mass of PJ or DIW. For the mustard trial, participants ingested a mass of mustard containing a similar amount of Na+ as for the PJ trial. Postingestion blood samples were collected at 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were [Na+]p, [K+]p, OSMp, and percentage change in plasma Na+ content and plasma volume. Results: Participants became 2.9% ± 0.6% hypohydrated and lost 96.8 ± 27.1 mmol (conventional unit = 96.8 ± 27.1 mEq) of Na+, 8.4 ± 2 mmol (conventional unit = 8.4 ± 2 mEq) of K+, and 2.03 ± 0.44 L of fluid due to exercise-induced sweating. They ingested approximately 79 mL of PJ or DIW or 135.24 ± 22.8 g of mustard. Despite ingesting approximately 1.5 g of Na+ in the PJ and mustard trials, no changes occurred within 60 minutes postingestion for [Na+]p, [K+]p, OSMp, or percentage changes in plasma volume or Na+ content (P > .05). Conclusions: Ingesting a small bolus of PJ or large

  4. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  5. The sulfur fixing characteristics on calcium-compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Dongyao, X.; Qiaowen, Y.; Jinghua, C.; Qiwen, F.; Peiling, X.

    1999-07-01

    On the basis of a three factor and four level orthogonal experiment, the sulfur fixing characteristic on calcium-compounds has been studied. Three factors include burning temperature, the ratio of calcium versus sulfur and calcium-compounds. The sulfur fixing efficiency of sample was calculated through measuring the sulfur content of slag by means of X-ray fluorescent analysis, and it was found that influence of calcium-compounds on the efficiency is more important than the burning temperature or the ratio, and that Ca(OH){sub 2} has a better efficiency than CaO or CaCO{sub 3}. As the burning temperature is increased, the efficiency is decreased; when the ratio is increased, the efficiency will increase. Sulfur fixing agent and coal powder were mixed, then the mixture obtained was burned, the best efficiency of fixing sulfur was only 33%. As a result, some measures must be adopted to increase the efficiency to a extent that the sulfur fixing agent on the basis of calcium-compounds can be used practically.

  6. Dermabrasion--a novel concept in the surgical management of sulphur mustard injuries.

    PubMed

    Rice, P; Brown, R F; Lam, D G; Chilcott, R P; Bennett, N J

    2000-02-01

    Since its first use on the battlefields of Northern France during the First World War (1914-1918), sulphur mustard has remained a significant chemical threat to military forces around the world. Progress towards an effective treatment for these injuries has been slow due to the lack of suitable animal models upon which to study the toxicology and pathology. However, porcine and human skin are similar in structure and exposures to sulphur mustard vapour have been performed on porcine models to define the development and subsequent resolution of mustard-induced skin injuries. Yucatan miniature (n = 12) and large white (n = 6) pig models were used to assess the usefulness of mechanical dermabrasion in accelerating the naturally slow rate of healing of sulphur mustard vapour-induced injuries to the skin. Burn injuries underwent debridement at 4 days post-exposure and the resulting lesions were assessed at various time points up to 8 weeks post-abrasion. Rates of re-epithelialisation were accelerated in the dermabrasion (treated) vs the control (untreated) group by up to a factor of three (ANOVA: p = .0196, Yucatan; p = 0.165, large white pig). It was concluded that dermabrasion of sulphur mustard burns is a valuable procedure in the surgical management of these injuries. PMID:10630317

  7. Differential atrial filling after Mustard and Senning repairs. Detection by transcutaneous Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Wyse, R K; Macartney, F J; Rohmer, J; Ottenkamp, J; Brom, A G

    1980-01-01

    The dominance of Mustard's operation for transposition of the great arteries has been challenged by the recent revival of Senning's repair because it promises better long-term results in terms of venous obstruction and atrial haemodynamics. These hypotheses were tested by recording jugular venous flow waveforms transcutaneously in 24 postoperative patients with simple complete transposition using a bidirectional Doppler blood velocimeter. Eight patients had undergone Mustard's operation and 16 the Senning alternative; all had previously had a postoperative cardiac catheterisation. Both groups of patients had similar left ventricular, pulmonary arterial, and systemic venous atrial pressures. No child showed any evidence at catheterisation of either mitral regurgitation or of superior vena caval pathway obstruction. These two findings were endorsed by the transcutaneous Doppler recordings. Jugular venous flow in normal children exhibits two maxima, one of atrial filling during ventricular systole, the other of ventricular filling occurs once the tricuspid valve has opened. Both operative procedures diminished the size of the former phase, but the Mustard did so more. After Mustard's operation forward flow during the atrial filling phase was absent in approximately half the cardiac cycles recorded, and severely diminished in the rest. By contrast, there was approximately a 90 per cent appearance of atrial filling waves after Senning's operation which also provided significantly better atrial function than Mustard's procedure in terms of peak velocity of blood entering the atrium and total atrial filling. It is therefore concluded that both procedures compromise atrial volume and compliance but Senning's repair to a much lesser extent. PMID:7459153

  8. Development of web based database on biochemical characteristics of rapeseed-mustard.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Bala, Manju

    2013-01-01

    Rapeseed-mustard oil is an essential dietary component, in India. The modification of rapeseed- mustard for fatty acid composition of seed oil to develop new genotypes having alternative oil and meal characteristics has been an important objective in quality breeding. Moreover, Breeding efforts in India are in progress to develop double low varieties to meet the internationally acceptable standards of oil and seed meal. So, information on the nutritional and anti-nutritional make-up of rapeseed-mustard oil and seed meal of the existing germplasm would be quite useful for the researchers especially breeders involved in the quality improvement programmes. In the present study database on biochemical characteristics of rapeseed-mustard has been developed using open source technology LAMP. The database provides the information on 14 important biochemical characters such as oil, saturated fatty acids, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, eicosenoic, erucic acid, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ω6/ω3 ratio, protein, glucosinolate, phenol, and fiber content. It offers web interface to submit and search data in the database. The database presently comprises biochemical characteristics of germplasm accessions, advance breeding lines and notified varieties of rapeseed-mustard. The database developed will be useful to the breeders in the selection of desired genotype with specific traits. PMID:23861571

  9. Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) Glucosinolate Content Varies Across a Natural Light Gradient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren M

    2015-05-01

    Garlic mustard is a well-known invader of deciduous forests of North America, yet the influence of environmental factors on garlic mustard allelochemical production is not well understood. Three experiments were conducted to detect interactions between one garlic mustard allelochemical (glucosinolate) production and light availability. First, to detect patterns of glucosinolate production across a natural light gradient, leaves and roots of mature plants and first-year rosettes were sampled in patches ranging from 100 to 2 % of full sun within an Indiana forest. Second, to determine whether genetic variation drives observed correlations between glucosinolate content and light, seed collected across light gradients within six sites was grown in a common garden and glucosinolate production was measured. Finally, to understand whether local adaptation occurred in garlic mustard's response to light, seed collected from defined light environments across six sites was grown under four light treatments. Results of the field sampling showed that mature plants' root glucosinolate content was elevated in high compared to low light. In the common garden experiment, however, there was no correlation between light availability at seed origin and constitutive glucosinolate content. Additionally, in the common light treatments, there was no evidence for local adaptation to light environment. Overall, the results indicate that plasticity in response to light, not genetic variation among plants growing in different light environments, generates correlations between glucosinolate content and light in the field. Since mature garlic mustard populations in high light may exhibit increased glucosinolate content, it makes them potential targets for management. PMID:25912227

  10. [Physical and antioxidant characteristics of black (Brassica nigra) and yellow mustard (Brassica alba) seeds and their products].

    PubMed

    Mejia-Garibay, Beatriz; Guerrero-Beltrán, José Ángel; Palou, Enrique; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2015-06-01

    The composition, some physical properties (density, refraction index, and color), antioxidant capacity (DPPH), and fatty acid profile of seeds of black (Brassica nigra) or yellow mustard (Brassica alba) were evaluated, as well as for their oils and residues from oil extraction. Density of the black and yellow mustard oils were 0.912 ± 0.01 and 0.916 ± 0.01 g/mL, respectively; their refraction indexes were 1.4611 ± 0.01 and 1.4617 ± 0.01, respectively; being not significantly different (p > 0.05) between two mustards. Color parameters of the black and yellow mustard oils presented greenish-yellow tones and reddish-yellow tones, respectively; regarding antioxidant activities, these ranged from 25 mg equivalents of Trolox/100 gin the yellow mustard oil to 1,366 mg equivalents of Trolox/100 g in the residues from oil extraction of black seed mustard. The fatty acid profile of the black mustard seed revealed that its predomipant fatty acid is oleic (22.96%), followed by linoleic (6.63%) and linolenic (3.22%), whereas foryellow mustard seed the major fatty acid is erucic (6.87%), followed by oleic (5.08%) and linoleic (1.87%) acids. PMID:26817385

  11. ‘Carolina Broadleaf’ mustard green (Brassica juncea L.) resistant to the bacterial leaf blight pathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A leafy-green mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivar designated ‘Carolina Broadleaf’ has been released by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in 2015. This released cultivar is a narrow-based population of leafy-green mustard derived from a U.S. plant introduction (PI)...

  12. First report of bacterial leaf blight on mustard greens (Brassica juncea) caused by pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2010, a brassica leafy greens grower in Sunflower County, Mississippi, observed scattered outbreaks of a leaf blight disease on mustard greens (Brassica juncea) in a 180-hectare field. A severe outbreak of leaf blight occurred on mustard greens and turnip greens (Brassica rapa) in the same field...

  13. No Effects of an Autumn Mustard Crop on Wireworm Densities or Damaage to Potatoes in the Following Growing Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemicals produced by mustard (Brassica) crops as they are tilled into the soil have been shown especially in laboratory trials to suppress soil-dwelling organisms, including fungal pathogens, nematodes, and some insect pests of crops. Here, I tested in the field whether an autumn mustard crop gro...

  14. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  15. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  16. Reduction and Coordination of Arsenic in Indian Mustard1

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; Prince, Roger C.; George, Martin J.; Smith, Robert D.; George, Graham N.; Salt, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of arsenic by plants may provide a means of removing this element from contaminated soils and waters. However, to optimize this process it is important to understand the biological mechanisms involved. Using a combination of techniques, including x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have established the biochemical fate of arsenic taken up by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). After arsenate uptake by the roots, possibly via the phosphate transport mechanism, a small fraction is exported to the shoot via the xylem as the oxyanions arsenate and arsenite. Once in the shoot, the arsenic is stored as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex. The majority of the arsenic remains in the roots as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex, which is indistinguishable from that found in the shoots and from AsIII-tris-glutathione. The thiolate donors are thus probably either glutathione or phytochelatins. The addition of the dithiol arsenic chelator dimercaptosuccinate to the hydroponic culture medium caused a 5-fold-increased arsenic level in the leaves, although the total arsenic accumulation was only marginally increased. This suggests that the addition of dimercaptosuccinate to arsenic-contaminated soils may provide a way to promote arsenic bioaccumulation in plant shoots, a process that will be essential for the development of an efficient phytoremediation strategy for this element. PMID:10759512

  17. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials. PMID:23872337

  18. Synergisms between yellow mustard mucilage and galactomannans and applications in food products--a mini review.

    PubMed

    Cui, Steve W; Eskin, Michael A N; Wu, Ying; Ding, Shaodong

    2006-12-21

    Yellow or white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is unique in the mustard family by containing large amounts of mucilaginous material in the seed coat. This material was shown to exhibit similar rheological properties to xanthan gum such as shear thinning flow behavior and weak gel structure. This review will discuss the synergistic interactions between yellow mustard mucilage (YMM) and galactomannans, particularly locust bean gum (LBG), and its potential food applications. In addition, synergistic interactions between YMM, with or without LBG, on starch paste viscosity and syneresis will also be reviewed. The thickening, texturizing and stabilizing properties of YMM, and its ability to form gels at very low concentration in the presence of LBG, could lead to many food and industrial applications. PMID:17196539

  19. Antioxidants from defatted Indian Mustard (Brassica Juncea) protect biomolecules against in vitro oxidation.

    PubMed

    Dua, Anita; Chander, Subhash; Agrawal, Sharad; Mahajan, Ritu

    2014-10-01

    Indian mustard seeds were defatted by distillation with hexane and the residue extracted with methanol was analyzed for potential antioxidants; ascorbate, riboflavin, and polyphenols. Gallic acid (129.796 μg), caffeic acid (753.455 μg), quercetin (478.352 μg) and kaempferol (48.060 μg)/g dry seeds were identified by HPLC analysis of the extract. DPPH free radical scavenging activity and protection of lipids, proteins and DNA against metal induced oxidation was examined. Defatted mustard seed remnant had excellent free radical scavenging activity and protects biomolecules with IC50 value 2.0-2.25 mg dry seed weight. Significant content of polyphenols in methanol extract of defatted seeds accounts for high antioxidant potential. We are the first to report the detailed analysis of antioxidant composition and protection of biomolecules against oxidative damage by methanol extract of mustard seed remnant after oil extraction. PMID:25320478

  20. Preparation and performance of a sulfur/graphene composite for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Dong, Yunhui; Huang, Yun; Huang, Gang; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Limin

    2012-01-01

    The lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising electrochemical system that has high theoretical capacity. The sulfur/graphene nanosheets (S/GNS) composite is prepared through thermal reduction between the sulfur (S) and graphene oxide (GO). The morphology and composition of the composite are analyzed by means of x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) characterization. It is found that the element S distributed uniformly between the layers of GNS. Graphene with a two-dimensional structure of carbon atoms is employed as a conductive and absorbing agent for the S cathode materials of rechargeable Li-S battery. The S/GNS composite cathode shows a specific electrochemical capacity, which is about 1598 mAh g-1 S at the initial discharge and remains above 670 mAh g-1 after 80 cycles.

  1. Assessing Natural Isothiocyanate Air Emissions after Field Incorporation of Mustard Cover Crop

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, Donna M.; LePage, Jane; Hebert, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    A regional air assessment was performed to characterize volatile natural isothiocyanate (NITC) compounds in air during soil incorporation of mustard cover crops in Washington State. Field air sampling and analytical methods were developed specific to three NITCs known to be present in air at appreciable concentrations during/after field incorporation. The maximum observed concentrations in air for the allyl, benzyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were respectively 188, 6.1, and 0.7 lg m-3 during mustard incorporation. Based on limited inhalation toxicity information, airborne NITC concentrations did not appear to pose an acute human inhalation exposure concern to field operators and bystanders.

  2. Reevaluation of 1999 Health-Based Environmental Screening Levels (HBESLs) for Chemical Warfare Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Dolislager, Fredrick G

    2007-05-01

    This report evaluates whether new information and updated scientific models require that changes be made to previously published health-based environmental soil screening levels (HBESLs) and associated environmental fate/breakdown information for chemical warfare agents (USACHPPM 1999). Specifically, the present evaluation describes and compares changes that have been made since 1999 to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment models, EPA exposure assumptions, as well as to specific chemical warfare agent parameters (e.g., toxicity values). Comparison was made between screening value estimates recalculated with current assumptions and earlier health-based environmental screening levels presented in 1999. The chemical warfare agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents and the vesicants sulfur mustard (agent HD) and Lewisite (agent L). In addition, key degradation products of these agents were also evaluated. Study findings indicate that the combined effect of updates and/or changes to EPA risk models, EPA default exposure parameters, and certain chemical warfare agent toxicity criteria does not result in significant alteration to the USACHPPM (1999) health-based environmental screening level estimates for the G-series and VX nerve agents or the vesicant agents HD and L. Given that EPA's final position on separate Tier 1 screening levels for indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments has not yet been released as of May 2007, the study authors find that the 1999 screening level estimates (see Table ES.1) are still appropriate and protective for screening residential as well as nonresidential sites. As such, risk management decisions made on the basis of USACHPPM (1999) recommendations do not require reconsideration. While the 1999 HBESL values are appropriate for continued use as general screening criteria, the updated '2007' estimates (presented below) that follow the new EPA protocols currently under development are also

  3. Validation and comparison of two commercial ELISA kits and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays for the detection of potentially allergenic mustard in food.

    PubMed

    Palle-Reisch, Monika; Hochegger, Rupert; Štumr, Stepan; Korycanova, Kveta; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2015-05-01

    The study compares the applicability of two commercial mustard ELISA kits (Mustard ELISA Kit-specific and Mustard ELISA Kit-total) and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays (singleplex assay for white mustard, singleplex assay for black/brown mustard and duplex assay for the detection of white, black and brown mustard). Analyses of raw and brewed model sausages containing white and black/brown mustard in the range from 1 to 50 ppm indicate that both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays allow the detection of traces of mustard in raw and in brewed sausages. The ELISAs were found to be more sensitive than the real-time PCR assays. When the ELISAs and real-time PCR assays were applied to the analysis of 15 commercial foodstuffs differing in their labelling concerning mustard, in one sample mustard was detected with both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays although mustard was not indicated on the food ingredient list. PMID:25529654

  4. Quality characterization of pasta enriched with mustard protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Alireza Sadeghi, M; Bhagya, S

    2008-06-01

    Mustard protein isolate (MPI) prepared by steam injection heating for removal of antinutritional factors was used at different levels, including 0%, 2.5%, 5%, and 10%, for supplementation of pasta products. The effects of supplementation levels on rheological properties of pasta dough and chemical composition, and cooking, nutritional, and color characteristics of dried samples were evaluated. The results showed that as the supplementation level increased, the dough development time (DDT) increased from 3.5 min in the control to 13.8 min in 10% supplementation level. Maximum consistency (MC) increased from 351 farinograph units (FU) in the control to 371 and 386 FU in 2.5% and 5% supplementation levels, respectively, but decreased to 346 FU in 10% supplementation level. Mixing tolerance index (MTI) decreased as the supplementation increased. The most pronounced effect of enrichment on chemical composition was the increase in protein content; the increase was around 4.5% with supplementation of each 5% MPI in pasta formulation. Study of cooking characteristics of enriched pasta samples showed that cooked weight, cooking loss, protein loss, and stickiness decreased and firmness increased as the supplementation level increased. The nutritional properties of sample showed that enrichment of semolina with MPI had a pronounced effect on lysine, cysteine, arginine, and histidine contents. All computed nutritional indices were higher in enriched samples compared to the control. Color measurement of sample showed that a and b values increased and L value decreased as the supplementation level increased. The SEM of different samples shows that enrichment of pasta with MPI increases the matrix around starch granules. PMID:18577015

  5. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Lopez-Ortiz, A.; White, J