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Sample records for agents tested resistance

  1. Test for desorption of Agents HD and gd from chemical-agent-resistant coating (CARC). Final report, March 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Sturdivan, L.M.; Thomas, J.; Bodt, B.A.

    1990-08-01

    A method of measuring the desorbed residual agent from chemical agent resistant coating (CARC) paint, after exposure and rinsing, is thoroughly examined in a round-robin test. The test showed that some CARC formulations met the agent-resistance specifications desorbed excess agent, but other formulations met the agent-resistance specification. There is evidence showing that those paints that do not meet specification for agent resistance do so because of excess porosity (in the mesopore range) due to the paint, as applied, being above the critical pigment volume concentration (CPVC). That is, the ratio of pigment-to-liquid component is greater than that proportion at which the liquid component, after complete polymerization and evaporation of all residual solvent, is not sufficient to fill all the voids between the pigment particles. CARC must be formulated near the CPVC to have the necessary surface roughness to meet the specification for low sheen and spectral reflectance required in the camouflage colors. Limitations of the round-robin test are presented with suggestions for an improved test. A statistical determination of acceptability, using thetest in a two-stage experimental determination of the amount of agent desorbed to accept or reject prospective lots of CARC, is presented.

  2. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  3. Halide test agent replacement study

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, E.M.; Freeman, W.P.; Kovach, B.J.

    1995-02-01

    The intended phaseout of the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from commercial use required the evaluation of substitute materials for the testing for leak paths through both individual adsorbers and installed adsorbent banks. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (CONAGT) is in charge of maintaining the standards and codes specifying adsorbent leak test methods for the nuclear safety related air cleaning systems. The currently published standards and codes cite the use of R-11, R-12 and R-112 for leak path test agents. All of these compounds are CFCs. There are other agencies and organizations (USDOE, USDOD and USNRC) also specifying testing for leak paths or in some cases for special life tests using the above compounds. The CONAGT has recently developed criteria for the suitability evaluation of substitute test agents. On the basis of these criteria, several compounds were evaluated for their acceptability as adsorbent bed leak and life test agents. The ASME CONAGT Test Agent Qualification Criteria. The test agent qualification is based on the following parameters: (1) Similar retention times on activated carbons at the same concentration levels as one of the following: R-11, R-12, R-112 or R-112a. (2) Similar lower detection limit sensitivity and precision in the concentration range of use as R-11, R-12, R-112 and R-112a. (3) Gives the same in-place leak test results as R-11, R-12, R-112, or R-112a. (4) Chemical and radiological stability under the use conditions. (5) Causes no degradation of the carbon and its impregnant or of the other NATS components under the use conditions. (6) Is listed in the USEPA Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) inventory for commercial use.

  4. Cross-institute evaluations of inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for direct testing of aerosol and blood samples containing biological warfare agent DNA.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Timothy D; Rachwal, Phillip A; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W; Weller, Simon A

    2014-02-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples-which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR.

  5. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  6. Model Based Testing for Agent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Thangarajah, John; Padgham, Lin

    Although agent technology is gaining world wide popularity, a hindrance to its uptake is the lack of proper testing mechanisms for agent based systems. While many traditional software testing methods can be generalized to agent systems, there are many aspects that are different and which require an understanding of the underlying agent paradigm. In this paper we present certain aspects of a testing framework that we have developed for agent based systems. The testing framework is a model based approach using the design models of the Prometheus agent development methodology. In this paper we focus on model based unit testing and identify the appropriate units, present mechanisms for generating suitable test cases and for determining the order in which the units are to be tested, present a brief overview of the unit testing process and an example. Although we use the design artefacts from Prometheus the approach is suitable for any plan and event based agent system.

  7. Testing Tools for Glyphosate Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are multiple tools available for testing for glyphosate resistance. Whole plant screens, whether in the field or greenhouse, should be used as an initial method to determine if a biotype is glyphosate resistant. Screening for resistance using seedling assays such as in Petri plates, sand cul...

  8. MATE: The multi-agent test environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Cindy L.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we present the Multi-Agent Test Environment, MATE. MATE is a collection of experiment management tools for assisting in the design, testing, and evaluation of distributed problem-solvers. It provides the experimenter with an automated tool for executing and monitoring experiments choosing among rule bases, number of agents, communication strategies, and inference engines. Using MATE the experimenter can run a series of distributed problem-solving experiments without human intervention.

  9. Agents of Last Resort: Polymyxin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Keith S; Pogue, Jason M; Tran, Thien B; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Polymyxin resistance is a major public health threat, as the polymyxins represent "last-line" therapeutics for Gram-negative pathogens resistant to essentially all other antibiotics. Improved understanding of mechanisms of, and risk factors for, polymyxin resistance, as well as infection prevention and stewardship strategies, together with optimization of dosing of polymyxins including in combination regimens, can help to limit the emergence and dissemination of polymyxin resistance. PMID:27208765

  10. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of six broad-spectrum beta-lactam antimicrobial agents tested against over 2,000 clinical isolates from 22 medical centers in Japan. Japan Antimicrobial Resistance Study Group.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mathai, D; Biedenbach, D J; Lewis, M T; Gales, A C; Jones, R N

    1999-06-01

    Numerous broad-spectrum beta-lactam antimicrobial agents have been introduced into medical practice since 1985. Although several of these compounds have advanced, infectious disease therapy resistances to them has also emerged world-wide. In 1997, a Japanese 22 medical center investigation was initiated to assess the continued utility of these agents (oxacillin or piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, cefpirome, cefoperazone/sulbactam [C/S], imipenem). The participating medical centers represented a wide geographic distribution, and a common protocol and reagents were applied. Three control strains and a set of challenge organisms were provided to participant centers. Etest (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden) strips were used in concurrent tests of these organisms and a qualitative determination of participant skills in the identification of resistant and susceptible phenotypes was established. The quantitative controls demonstrated 97.7-99.2% of MIC values within established QC limits, and the qualitative (susceptibility category) controls documented a 97.3% agreement of participant results with that of reference values (1,320 total results). Only 0.2% of values were false-susceptible errors. After the participant quality was assured, a total of 2,015 clinical strains were tested (10 strains from 10 different organism groups including methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci [CoNS], Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter spp., indole-positive Proteae, Serratia spp., Acinetobacter spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The staphylococci were uniformly susceptible to all drugs tested except ceftazidime (MIC90, 24 micrograms/ml) that had a potency six- to 12-fold less than either cefepime or cefpirome. Only 3.7 and 45.1% of S. aureus and CoNS were susceptible to ceftazidime, respectively. Among E. coli and Klebsiella spp. the rank order of antimicrobial spectrum was imipenem = "fourth

  11. Resistance to antifungal agents in the critical care setting: problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Martins, M D; Rex, J H

    1996-08-01

    As is the case with antibacterial agents, the increasing use of antifungal agents has led to development of antifungal resistance, the most clinically important of which is the resistance of Candida to fluconazole. While mutation to high-level fluconazole resistance is possible, the most important aspect of fluconazole resistance for patients in the ICU is the possibility of an epidemiologic shift away from such susceptible species as C. albicans and C. parapsilosis toward the most resistant species, such as C. glabrata and C. krusei. Resistance to amphotericin B by Candida is also possible, but less frequent. Strategies for treating invasive Candida infections must consider the relative rates of non-C. albicans Candida infection and the likelihood of antifungal resistance. The agents that cause invasive mold infections in the ICU are intrinsically moderately resistant to the available antifungal agents, and therapy depends less on the choice of antifungal therapy than on the correction of predisposing factors. The role of susceptibility testing as a guide in selecting appropriate therapy for all of these infections is as yet incompletely defined, but testing for resistance to fluconazole may soon be ready for clinical use. PMID:8856751

  12. Tumor resistance to vascular disrupting agents: mechanisms, imaging, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) is a significant advance in the treatment of solid tumors. VDAs induce rapid and selective shutdown of tumor blood flow resulting in massive necrosis. However, a viable marginal tumor rim always remains after VDA treatment and is a major cause of recurrence. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the resistance of solid tumors to VDAs. Hypoxia, tumor-associated macrophages, and bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells all may contribute to resistance. Resistance can be monitored using magnetic resonance imaging markers. The various solutions proposed to manage tumor resistance to VDAs emphasize combining these agents with other approaches including antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radioimmunotherapy, and sequential dual-targeting internal radiotherapy. PMID:26812886

  13. Mechanistic basis for overcoming platinum resistance using copper chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng D; Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Fu, Siqing; Kurzrock, Razelle; Gagea-Iurascu, Mihai; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Helen H W; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2012-11-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Drug resistance is a major obstacle to the successful use of these agents because once drug resistance develops, other effective treatment options are limited. Recently, we conducted a clinical trial using a copper-lowering agent to overcome platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients and the preliminary results are encouraging. In supporting this clinical study, using three pairs of cisplatin (cDDP)-resistant cell lines and two ovarian cancer cell lines derived from patients who had failed in platinum-based chemotherapy, we showed that cDDP resistance associated with reduced expression of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1), which is also a cDDP transporter, can be preferentially resensitized by copper-lowering agents because of enhanced hCtr1 expression, as compared with their drug-sensitive counterparts. Such a preferential induction of hCtr1 expression in cDDP-resistant variants by copper chelation can be explained by the mammalian copper homeostasis regulatory mechanism. Enhanced cell-killing efficacy by a copper-lowering agent was also observed in animal xenografts bearing cDDP-resistant cells. Finally, by analyzing a public gene expression dataset, we found that ovarian cancer patients with elevated levels of hCtr1 in their tumors, but not ATP7A and ATP7B, had more favorable outcomes after platinum drug treatment than those expressing low hCtr1 levels. This study reveals the mechanistic basis for using copper chelation to overcome cDDP resistance in clinical investigations.

  14. [Antibibiotic resistance by nosocomial infections' causal agents].

    PubMed

    Salazar-Holguín, Héctor Daniel; Cisneros-Robledo, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la resistencia a antimicrobianos por agentes causales de infección nosocomial (IN) constituye un grave problemática global que involucra al HGR 1 del IMSS en Chihuahua, México; si bien con particularidades que requirieron especificarla y evaluarla, a fin de concretar una terapéutica eficaz. Métodos: estudio observacional, descriptivo y prospectivo; se llevó a cabo mediante vigilancia activa durante 2014 para la detección de infecciones nosocomiales, su estudio epidemiológico, cultivo y antibiograma para identificar al agente causal y su resistencia a los antibióticos. Resultados: de 13527 egresos hospitalarios, 1079 presentaron IN (8 por 100 egresos) y de ellas destacaron: de líneas vasculares, quirúrgicas, neumonía y de vías urinarias; sumando dos tercios del total. Se realizó cultivo y antibiograma en 300 de ellas (27.8 %); identificando 31 especies bacterianas, siendo siete las principales (77.9 %): Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus y epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae y Enterobacter cloacae; mostrando multirresistencia a 34 antibióticos probados, excepto en siete con baja o nula resistencia: vancomicina, teicoplanina, linezolid, quinupristina-dalfopristina, piperacilina–tazobactam, amikacina y carbapenémicos. Conclusiones: al contrastar tales resultados ante las recomendaciones de las guías de práctica clínica, surgieron contradicciones; por lo que deben tomarse con reserva y ser probadas en cada hospital, mediante cultivos y antibiogramas en prácticamente todos los casos de infección nosocomial.

  15. Resistance to reinfection with a chlamydial agent (guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis agent).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A; Dawson, C R; Yoneda, C; Togni, B; Schachter, J

    1977-06-01

    Although most chlamydial infections are chronic or recurrent, infection of the guinea pig's eye with guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) agent induces a marked resistance to reinfection. To characterize this resistance to GPIC agent, we compared the disease and infection in previously infected guinea pigs with that in animals infected for the first time. In animals experiencing primary infection, even the lowest dose (10 egg-lethal doses [ELD50]) produced the disease and chlamydial inclusions in conjunctival smears, but the incubation period became progressively shorter with the highest inocula (10(4) and 10(5) ELD50). In animals with previous infection only these two highest inocula produced disease and infection, but the disease was short-lived, and replication of the agent was severely limited. The mechanism of this resistance may be due to secretory antibody in the tears, cellular immunity, or other local factors.

  16. Reduced VOC chemical agent resistant coating (CARC). Progress report, October 1993-September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    MIL-C-46168 is the basic camouflage topcoat required on all Army combat, combat support and essential ground support equipment, plus tactical wheeled vehicles and aircraft. Federal and local regulations resulting from the Clean Air Act and its amendments restrict the amount of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted during the application of surface coatings and there will be lower limits in the future. This report summarizes an effort to develop a lower-VOC CARC using recent technology advances in water-dispersable polyesters and polyisocyanates. While low-VOC, quality finishes have been developed, none has successfully passed live chemical agent resistance testing. Chemical Agent Resistant Coating, CARC, VOC.

  17. Activity of quinone alkylating agents in quinone-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A; Leith, M K

    1990-05-15

    The role of the quinone group in the antitumor activity of quinone alkylating agents, such as mitomycin C and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,5-bis(carboethoxyamino)-1,4-benzoquinone, is still uncertain. The quinone group may contribute to antitumor activity by inducing DNA strand breaks through the formation of free radicals and/or by influencing the alkylating activity of the quinone alkylators. The cytotoxic activity and DNA damage produced by the model quinone alkylating agents, benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard, were compared in L5178Y murine lymphoblasts sensitive and resistant to the model quinone antitumor agent, hydrolyzed benzoquinone mustard. The resistant cell lines, L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10, have increased concentrations of glutathione and elevated catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and DT-diaphorase activity. L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells were 7.4- and 8.5-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone mustard and 1.7- and 4.3-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone dimustard, respectively, compared with sensitive cells, but showed no resistance to the non-quinone alkylating agent, aniline mustard. The formation of DNA double strand breaks by benzoquinone mustard was reduced by 2- and 8-fold in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, while double strand break formation by benzoquinone dimustard was reduced only in the L5178Y/HBM10 cells. The number of DNA-DNA cross-links produced by benzoquinone mustard was 3- and 6-fold lower, and the number produced by benzoquinone dimustard was 35% and 2-fold lower in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, compared with L5178Y parental cells. In contrast, cross-linking by aniline mustard was unchanged in sensitive and resistant cells. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, increased the cytotoxic activity of both benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard in L5178Y/HBM10 cells. This study provides evidence that elevated DT-diaphorase activity in the resistant cells

  18. Automatic insulation resistance testing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wyant, Francis J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for automatic measurement of insulation resistances of a multi-conductor cable. In one embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, a plurality of input relay controlled contacts, a plurality of output relay controlled contacts, a relay controller and a computer. In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, an input switching unit, an output switching unit and a control unit/data logger. Embodiments of the apparatus of the invention may also incorporate cable fire testing means. The apparatus and methods of the present invention use either voltage or current for input and output measured variables.

  19. Subscale Testing of Prompt Agent Defeat Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milby, Christopher; Stamatis, Demitrios; Daniels, Amber; Svingala, Forrest; Lightstone, Jim; Miller, Kendra; Bensman, Misty; Bohmke, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    There is a need to improve the current bioagent defeat systems with formulations that produce lower peak pressure, impulse, sustained high temperatures, and release of biocidal species for prompt defeat applications. In this work, explosive charge configurations similar to fuel-air explosives were detonated in a semi-enclosed chamber configuration. Binder type and fuel-to-oxidizer ratios were varied to observe the effects on combustion performance. Thermocouple measurements and high-speed video were used to monitor the combustion of the dispersed formulation. The down-selected formulations were then tested in a sub-scale vented agent defeat system developed to evaluate performance of formulations against aerosolized Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) spores. Diagnostics such as thermocouples, piezoelectric pressure gauges, and pyrometry were utilized to characterize the detonation event. Biological sampling with surface coupons, liquid impingement, and filters of the post detonation environment were utilized to determine spore survivability and rank the relative effectiveness of each formulation. Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited

  20. Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

  1. Discovery of Antivirulence Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Khodaverdian, Varandt; Pesho, Michelle; Truitt, Barbara; Bollinger, Lucy; Patel, Parita; Nithianantham, Stanley; Yu, Guanping; Delaney, Elizabeth; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    Antivirulence agents inhibit the production of disease-causing virulence factors but are neither bacteriostatic nor bactericidal. Antivirulence agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain USA300, the most widespread community-associated MRSA strain in the United States, were discovered by virtual screening against the response regulator AgrA, which acts as a transcription factor for the expression of several of the most prominent S. aureus toxins and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Virtual screening was followed by similarity searches in the databases of commercial vendors. The small-molecule compounds discovered inhibit the production of the toxins alpha-hemolysin and phenol-soluble modulin α in a dose-dependent manner without inhibiting bacterial growth. These antivirulence agents are small-molecule biaryl compounds in which the aromatic rings either are fused or are separated by a short linker. One of these compounds is the FDA-approved nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diflunisal. This represents a new use for an old drug. Antivirulence agents might be useful in prophylaxis and as adjuvants in antibiotic therapy for MRSA infections. PMID:23689713

  2. Strategies for the management of resistance in mosquitoes to the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Zahiri, Nayer S; Su, Tianyun; Mulla, Mir S

    2002-05-01

    Bacillus sphaericus (B.spi) strain 2362 has been recognized as a promising mosquito larvicide, and various preparations of this strain have been tested and used in mosquito control programs worldwide. This control agent has advantages of high efficacy, specificity, persistence, and environmental safety. However, resistance in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes to Bsph has occurred in both laboratory and field populations, necessitating development of resistance management strategies. Studies were initiated aiming at reversing previously established Bsph resistance in a laboratory colony of Culex quinque fasciatus Say by selections with Bti alone, Bti and Bsph in rotation, or mixture. Partial restoration of susceptibility to Bsph was achieved by selection of resistant colony for 10 generations with Bti alone at LC80). After this colony was switched back to Bsph selection for 20 generations, resistance to Bsph partially increased to a stable level. Selections of Basph-resistant colonies with Bti and Bsph in rotation or mixture resulted in steady decline of resistance over 30 generations, with rapid decline in resistance noted in the initial 10-15 generations. It is interesting to note that selections with Bti and Bsph in rotation increased susceptibility to Bti in Bsph-resistant colony. It is promising that selection with Bti alone, Bsph and Bti in rotation, or mixture have a potential for developing practical strategies to overcome acquired resistance to Bsph in Cx. quinquefasciatus populations.

  3. Role of copper transporters in resistance to platinating agents

    PubMed Central

    Rabik, Cara A.; Maryon, Edward B.; Kasza, Kristen; Shafer, John T.; Bartnik, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Copper transporters have been proposed to be involved in cellular import and export of platinating agents. Expression of the human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is thought to result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, whereas expression of ATP7A and ATP7B are thought to be involved in resistance to cisplatin either by sequestering drug away from its targets (ATP7A) or by exporting the drug from the cell (ATP7B). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of cells expressing copper transporters to cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. We also examined whether O6-benzylguanine, a modulator of platinating agent cytotoxicity, enhanced sensitivity of cells with or without the transporters to cisplatin. Overexpression of hCtr1 in the HEK293 cell line did not result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, either alone or following treatment with O6-benzylguanine. In contrast, overexpression of ATP7A and ATP7B in Me32a fibroblasts resulted in increased resistance to cisplatin, but not to carboplatin or oxaliplatin. ATP7A-expressing cells (MeMNK) showed a significant enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity following O6-benzylguanine treatment, but ATP7B-expressing cells (MeWND) did not. Notably, expression of either ATP7A or ATP7B did not result in a change in total cytoplasmic platinum levels following treatment with BG plus cisplatin. The mechanism of BG enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity is not likely through regulation of copper transporters. PMID:18998134

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in campylobacter: susceptibility testing methods and resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beilei; Wang, Fei; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2013-10-01

    Most Campylobacter infections are self-limiting but antimicrobial treatment (e.g., macrolides, fluoroquinolones) is necessary in severe or prolonged cases. Susceptibility testing continues to play a critical role in guiding therapy and epidemiological monitoring of resistance. The methods of choice for Campylobacter recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) are agar dilution and broth microdilution, while a disk diffusion method was recently standardized by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Macrolides, quinolones, and tetracyclines are among the common antimicrobials recommended for testing. Molecular determination of Campylobacter resistance via DNA sequencing or PCR-based methods has been performed. High levels of resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin are frequently reported by many national surveillance programs, but resistance to erythromycin and gentamicin in Campylobacter jejuni remains low. Nonetheless, variations in susceptibility observed over time underscore the need for continued public health monitoring of Campylobacter resistance from humans, animals, and food.

  5. Cusp Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Premolars Restored with the Bonded Amalgam Technique Using Various Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Marchan, Shivaughn M.; Coldero, Larry; White, Daniel; Smith, William A. J.; Rafeek, Reisha N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study uses measurements of fracture resistance to compare maxillary premolars restored with the bonded amalgam technique using a new resin luting cement, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass ionomer as the bonding agents. Materials. Eighty-five sound maxillary premolars were selected and randomly assigned to one of five test groups of 17 teeth each. One group of intact teeth served as the control. The remaining groups were prepared to a standard cavity form relative to the dimensions of the overall tooth and restored with amalgam alone or a bonded amalgam using one of three luting agents: RelyX Arc (a new resin luting cement), RelyX luting (a resin-modified glass ionomer), or Ketac-Cem μ (a glass ionomer) as the bonding agents. Each tooth was then subjected to compressive testing until catastrophic failure occurred. The mean loads at failure of each group were statistically compared using ANOVA with a post hoc Bonferroni test. Results. It was found that regardless of the luting cement used for the amalgam bonding technique, there was little effect on the fracture resistance of teeth. Conclusion. Cusp fracture resistance of premolars prepared with conservative MOD cavity preparations is not improved by using an amalgam-bonding technique compared to similar cavities restored with amalgam alone. PMID:20339450

  6. Distribution of drug-resistant bacteria and rational use of clinical antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, CHENLIANG; CHEN, XIAOBING; WU, LIWEN; QU, JING

    2016-01-01

    Open wound may lead to infection in patients. Due to overuse of medication, certain bacteria have become resistant to drugs currently available. The aim of the present study was to provide a guide to ameliorate the appropriate and rational use of clinical antimicrobial agents by analyzing the distribution of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria in patients. Between October 2013 and January 2015, 126 patients were selected at the Department of Orthopedics. Wound secretion samples were collected, and the pathogen bacteria isolated and identified. Identification was performed using an automated identification instrument and the Kirby-Bauer antibiotic method was used to evaluate the bacterial resistance. Of the 126 patients, 118 patients were infected (infection rate, 93.65%). Additionally, 47 strains of gram-positive pathogenic bacteria (39.83%) and 71 strains of pathogenic-gram negative bacteria (60.17%) were identified. The bacteria were most likely to be resistant to penicillin while sensitive to vancomycin and imipenem. Some bacteria were resistant to several antibacterial agents. The results showed that existing risk factors at the Department of Orthopedics were complex and any non-standard procedures were able to cause bacterial infection. There were obvious dissimilarities among infectious bacteria with regard to their sensitivity to various antibacterial agents. Manipulation techniques during the treatment process were performed in a sterile manner and the use of antibacterial agents was required to be strictly in accordance with the results of drug sensitivity tests to provide effective etiologic information and a treatment plan for clinical trials and to reduce the risk of infection by multi-resistant bacteria. PMID:27313667

  7. Polycyclic amines as chloroquine resistance modulating agents in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jacques; Kapp, Erika; Taylor, Dale; Smith, Peter J; Malan, Sarel F

    2016-02-15

    Pentacycloundecylamines (PCUs) and adamantane amines, such as NGP1-01 (1) and amantadine, have shown significant channel blocking activities. They are postulated to act as chemosensitizers and circumvent the resistance of the plasmodia parasite against chloroquine (CQ) by inhibiting the p-glycoprotein efflux pump and enabling the accumulation of CQ inside the parasite digestive vacuole. Twelve polycyclic amines containing either a PCU or adamantane amine moiety conjugated to different aromatic functionalities through various tethered linkers were selected based on their channel blocking abilities and evaluated as potential chemosensitizers. Compounds 2, 4, 5 and 10 showed significant voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocking ability (IC50=0.27-35 μM) and were able to alter the CQ IC50 in differing degrees (45-81%) in the multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum Dd2 isolate. Among them, the PCU-dansyl amine compound (4) displayed the best potential to act as a chemosensitizer against the Dd2 strain at a 1 μM concentration (RMI=0.19) while displaying moderate antiplasmodial activity (Dd2 IC50=6.25 μM) and low in vitro cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line (CHO, IC50=119 μM). Compounds 2 and 10 also showed some promising chemosensitizing abilities (RMI=0.36 and 0.35 respectively). A direct correlation was found between the VGCC blocking ability of these polycyclic amines and their capacity to act as CQ resistance modulating agents.

  8. Development of high temperature resistant graphite fiber coupling agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    Surface treatments were investigated as potential coupling agents to improve the elevated temperature shear strength retention of polyimide/graphite and polyphenylquinoxaline/graphite composites. The potential coupling agents were evaluated by fiber strand tensile tests, fiber and composite weight losses at 533 and 588K, and by interlaminar shear strength retention at 533 and 588K. The two surface treatments selected for more extensive evaluation were a coating of Ventromer T-1, a complex organometallic reaction product of titanium tetrachloride and trimethyl borate, and a polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) sizing which was pyrolyzed in nitrogen to form a carbonaceous layer on the fiber. Pyrolyzed polyphenylquinoxaline is a satisfactory coupling agent for polyimide/Thornel 300 graphite fiber composites. During 1000 hours aging at 588K such composites lose a little over half their transverse tensile strength, and suffer a slight loss in flexural modulus. No degradation of flexural strength or interlaminar shear strength occured during 1000 hours aging at 588K. None of the coupling agents examined had a markedly beneficial effect with polyphenylquinoxaline composites.

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Laure; Oliveira, Catarina; Fournier, Carole; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; Dubuisson, Jean; Brochot, Etienne; Francois, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Helle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs), including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26871442

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Laure; Oliveira, Catarina; Fournier, Carole; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; Dubuisson, Jean; Brochot, Etienne; Francois, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Helle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs), including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26871442

  11. Dairy farm age and resistance to antimicrobial agents in Escherichia coli isolated from dairy topsoil.

    PubMed

    Jones, Suzanna E; Burgos, Jonathan M; Lutnesky, Marvin M F; Sena, Johnny A; Kumar, Sanath; Jones, Lindsay M; Varela, Manuel F

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial agent usage is common in animal agriculture for therapeutic and prophylactic purposes. Selective pressure exerted by these antimicrobials on soil bacteria could result in the selection of strains that are resistant due to chromosomal- or plasmid-derived genetic components. Multiple antimicrobial resistances in Escherichia coli and the direct relationship between antimicrobial agent use over time has been extensively studied, yet the relationship between the age of an animal agriculture environment such as a dairy farm and antibiotic resistance remains unclear. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that antimicrobial-resistance profiles of E. coli isolated from dairy farm topsoil correlate with dairy farm age. E. coli isolated from eleven dairy farms of varying ages within Roosevelt County, NM were used for MIC determinations to chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin, tetracycline, ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, gentamicin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of four antibiotics ranged 0.75 to >256 μg/ml, 1 to >256 μg/ml, 12 to >256 μg/ml, and 0.75 to >256 μg/ml for chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin, and tetracycline, respectively. The study did not show a direct relationship between antibiotic resistance and the age of dairy farms. PMID:21153729

  12. Multidrug resistance pattern of bacterial agents isolated from patient with chronic sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Pourmousa, Rostam; Dadashzadeh, Roksana; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of chronic sinusitis is complicated due to increase of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the multidrug resistance (MDR) pattern of the bacteria causing chronic sinusitis in north of Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on patients with chronic sinusitis. Bacterial susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined according to the CLSI 2013 standards. Double-disk synergy (DDS) test was performed for the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria; also methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) strains were identified by MRSA screen agar. The MDR isolates were defined as resistant to 3 or more antibiotics. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the features of the data in this study. Results: The rate of ESBL-producing bacteria was 28.75-37.03% among enterobacteriaceae and the rate of MRSA was 42.75%-60% among Staphylococcus strains. The most detectable rate of the MDR bacterial isolates was Gram-negative bacteria 39 (76.47%) and Enterobacter spp. 19(70.37%) was the most multidrug resistant isolate among Gram negative bacteria. Also 36 (73.46%) of the gram positive bacterial isolated were multidrug resistance and Staphylococcus aureus 9(90%) was the most MDR among Gram positive bacteria. Conclusion: Antimicrobial resistance is increasing in chronic bacterial sinusitis. The emergence of MRSA and ESBL bacteria causing chronic sinusitis is increasing. PMID:27386063

  13. Synthesis and testing of radioprotective agents

    SciTech Connect

    Blickenstaff, R.T.; Brandstadter, S.; Reddy, S.; Witt, R.; Lipkowitz, K.B.

    1993-12-31

    A series of homologs of melatonin has been synthesized and tested, along with substituted anilines, for radioprotective activity in male Swiss type mice. Compounds were dissolved or suspended in soybean oil and injected ip thirty minutes prior to irradiation with 950 cGy of 6 mv photons. In a series of homologs of melatonin, radioprotection was observed for all compounds, and passed through a maximum with the hexanoic and octanoic amides of 5-methoxytryptamine. In a series of a substituted anilines, electronegative groups such as Br, NO{sub 2} CN and acyl in the m or p position give rise to highly active compounds (80-100% protection), while p-amino, amide, hydroxyl and F groups decrease activity. 2-Amino-5-chloro- and 5-amino-2-chloropyridine are also very active. Within a restricted class, there is a good correlation between radioprotection and the difference in heats of formation between the neutral molecule and radical ion, but when all the data were used, there was no correlation as with other descriptors.

  14. Echinocandin resistance, susceptibility testing and prophylaxis: implications for patient management.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S

    2014-09-01

    This article addresses the emergence of echinocandin resistance among Candida species, mechanisms of resistance, factors that promote resistance and confounding issues surrounding standard susceptibility testing. Fungal infections remain a significant cause of global morbidity and mortality, especially among patients with underlying immunosupression. Antifungal therapy is a critical component of patient management for acute and chronic diseases. Yet, therapeutic choices are limited due to only a few drug classes available to treat systemic disease. Moreover, the problem is exacerbated by the emergence of antifungal resistance, which has resulted in difficult to manage multidrug resistant strains. Echinocandin drugs are now the preferred choice to treat a range of candidiasis. These drugs target and inhibit the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures involving acquisition of resistance among susceptible organisms like Candida albicans is largely a rare event. However, in recent years, there is an alarming trend of increased resistance among strains of Candida glabrata, which in many cases are also resistant to azole drugs. Echinocandin resistance is always acquired during therapy and the mechanism of resistance is well established to involve amino acid changes in "hot-spot" regions of the Fks subunits carrying the catalytic portion of glucan synthase. These changes significantly decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug resulting in higher MIC values. A range of drug responses, from complete to partial refractory response, is observed depending on the nature of the amino acid substitution, and clinical responses are recapitulated in pharmacodynamic models of infection. The cellular processes promoting the formation of resistant Fks strains involve complex stress response pathways, which yield a variety of adaptive compensatory genetic responses. Stress-adapted cells

  15. Drug Susceptibility Testing of 31 Antimicrobial Agents on Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria Isolates from China

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hui; Li, Guilian; Zhao, Xiuqin; Liu, Haican; Wan, Kanglin; Yu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Several species of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are now recognized as human pathogens. However, limited data on effective drug treatments against these organisms exists. Here, we describe the species distribution and drug susceptibility profiles of RGM clinical isolates collected from four southern Chinese provinces from January 2005 to December 2012. Methods. Clinical isolates (73) were subjected to in vitro testing with 31 antimicrobial agents using the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth microdilution method. The isolates included 55 M. abscessus, 11 M. fortuitum, 3 M. chelonae, 2 M. neoaurum, and 2 M. septicum isolates. Results. M. abscessus (75.34%) and M. fortuitum (15.07%), the most common species, exhibited greater antibiotic resistance than the other three species. The isolates had low resistance to amikacin, linezolid, and tigecycline, and high resistance to first-line antituberculous agents, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, rifapentine, dapsone, thioacetazone, and pasiniazid. M. abscessus and M. fortuitum were highly resistant to ofloxacin and rifabutin, respectively. The isolates showed moderate resistance to the other antimicrobial agents. Conclusions. Our results suggest that tigecycline, linezolid, clofazimine, and cefmetazole are appropriate choices for M. abscessus infections. Capreomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tigecycline, clofazimine, and cefmetazole are potentially good choices for M. fortuitum infections. Our drug susceptibility data should be useful to clinicians. PMID:26351633

  16. Resistance mechanisms and drug susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Boeree, Martin J; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W

    2012-06-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized as causative agents of opportunistic infections in humans. For most NTM infections the therapy of choice is drug treatment, but treatment regimens differ by species, in particular between slow (e.g. Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium kansasii) and rapid growers (e.g. Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium fortuitum). In general, drug treatment is long, costly, and often associated with drug-related toxicities; outcome of drug treatment is poor and is likely related to the high levels of natural antibiotic resistance in NTM. The role of drug susceptibility testing (DST) in the choice of agents for antimicrobial treatment of NTM disease, mainly that by slow growers, remains subject of debate. There are important discrepancies between drug susceptibility measured in vitro and the activity of the drug observed in vivo. In part, these discrepancies derive from laboratory technical issues. There is still no consensus on a standardized method. With the increasing clinical importance of NTM disease, DST of NTM is again in the spotlight. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the mechanisms of drug resistance in NTM, phenotypic methods for testing susceptibility in past and current use for DST of NTM, as well as molecular approaches to assess drug resistance.

  17. Novel agents for castration-resistant prostate cancer: Early experience and beyond.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Naohiro

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the initial treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer. Almost all these patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer despite an initial favorable response. Docetaxel was the first agent to show a survival benefit in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. After cancer progression on docetaxel, patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer had few therapeutic options. A better understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to androgen deprivation therapy has led to the development of novel agents with distinct mechanisms of action. Prospective, large-scale clinical trials have shown overall survival benefits with the hormonal agents abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, the immunotherapeutic agent sipuleucel T, the chemotherapeutic agent cabazitaxel, and bone-targeted Ra-223. Although these agents provided clinical benefit, treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer remains a major clinical challenge. We recognize many questions, such as methods to select patients for specific treatments, optimal sequencing and drug combinations, and means to overcome drug resistance. There is an urgent need to answer these questions and to establish better treatment strategies. The development of biomarkers that are predictive of treatment results is also required. The present article reviews new castration-resistant prostate cancer treatments, and discusses possible resistant mechanisms as well as potential drug combinations and optimal sequencing.

  18. Effects of pharmacological agents on subcortical resistance shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klivington, K. A.

    1975-01-01

    Microliter quantities of tetrodotoxin, tetraethylammonium chloride, and picrotoxin injected into the inferior colliculus and superior olive of unanesthetized cats differentially affect the amplitude and waveform of click-evoked potentials and evoked resistance shifts. Tetrodotoxin simultaneously reduces the negative phase of the evoked potential and eliminates the evoked resistance shift. Tetraethylammonium enhances the negative evoked potential component, presumably of postsynaptic origin, without significantly altering evoked resistance shift amplitude. Picrotoxin also enhances the negative evoked potential wave but increases evoked resistance shift amplitude. These findings implicate events associated with postsynaptic membrane depolarization in the production of the evoked resistance shift.

  19. Thai ethnomedicinal plants as resistant modifying agents for combating Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. Methods Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs) of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay. Results At 250 μg/ml, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Punica granatum, Quisqualis indica, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia sp. that possessed low intrinsic antibacterial activity significantly enhanced the activity of novobiocin at 1 μg/ml (1/8xminimum inhibitory concentration) against this pathogen. Holarrhena antidysenterica at 7.8 μg/ml demonstrated remarkable resistant modifying ability against A. baumannii in combination with novobiocin. The phytochemical study revealed that constituents of this medicinal plant contain alkaloids, condensed tannins, and triterpenoids. Conclusion The use of Holarrhena antidysenterica in combination with novobiocin provides an effective alternative treatment for multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections. PMID:22536985

  20. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  1. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  2. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  3. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  4. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  5. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  6. Telomerase activity and telomere length in human tumor cells with acquired resistance to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Dai, F; Spitz, M; Peters, G J; Fiebig, H H; Hussain, A; Burger, A M

    2009-11-01

    Telomeres and telomerase are targets for anticancer drug development and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. However, it has been reported that standard cytotoxic agents can affect telomere length and telomerase activity suggesting that they also have of a role in drug resistance. in this study, telomere lengths and telomerase activity as well as drug efflux pump expression, glutathione (GSH) levels and polyadenosine-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage were assessed in a panel of human tumor cell lines made resistant to vindesine, gemcitabine and cisplatin. these included two lung cancer cell lines resistant to vindesine (LXFL 529L/Vind, LXFA 526L/Vind), a renal cancer cell line (RXF944L/Gem) and an ovarian cancer cell line (AG6000) resistant to gemcitabine, and one resistant to cisplatin (ADDP). The resistant clones were compared to their parental lines and evaluated for cross resistance to other cytotoxic agents. Several drug specific resistance patterns were found, and various complex patterns of cross resistance emerged from some cell lines, but these mechanisms of resistance could not be related to drug efflux pump expression, GSH levels or pARp cleavage. However, all displayed changes in telomerase activity and/or telomere length. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics.

  7. Strengthening Theoretical Testing in Criminology Using Agent-based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Groff, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency (JRCD) has published important contributions to both criminological theory and associated empirical tests. In this article, we consider some of the challenges associated with traditional approaches to social science research, and discuss a complementary approach that is gaining popularity—agent-based computational modeling—that may offer new opportunities to strengthen theories of crime and develop insights into phenomena of interest. Method: Two literature reviews are completed. The aim of the first is to identify those articles published in JRCD that have been the most influential and to classify the theoretical perspectives taken. The second is intended to identify those studies that have used an agent-based model (ABM) to examine criminological theories and to identify which theories have been explored. Results: Ecological theories of crime pattern formation have received the most attention from researchers using ABMs, but many other criminological theories are amenable to testing using such methods. Conclusion: Traditional methods of theory development and testing suffer from a number of potential issues that a more systematic use of ABMs—not without its own issues—may help to overcome. ABMs should become another method in the criminologists toolbox to aid theory testing and falsification. PMID:25419001

  8. Emergence of resistance and resistance management in field populations of tropical Culex quinquefasciatus to the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Mir S; Thavara, Usavadee; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Chomposri, Jakkrawarn; Su, Tianyun

    2003-03-01

    In recent years, highly potent mosquitocidal strains of the microbial agent Bacillus sphaericus (Bsph) have been isolated and developed for the control of mosquito larvae around the world. Laboratory selection experiments with the most active strains and their use in large-scale operational mosquito control programs resulted in the emergence of resistance in larvae of the Culex pipiens complex. This generated great concern among vector control agencies around the world, who feared reduced efficacy of this highly active larvicidal agent. To address this issue, the current studies were started to find practical strategies for controlling resistant mosquitoes and more importantly to develop resistance management strategies that would prevent or delay development of resistance. We initiated field studies in 3 low-income communities in Nonthaburi Province, Thailand. In 1 of the communities, larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus that were highly resistant (>125,000-fold) to Bsph strain 2362 were successfully controlled with applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) alone or in combination with Bsph. To prevent or delay resistance to Bsph, 2 other sites were selected, 1 treated with Bsph 2362 alone and the other treated with a mixture of Bsph 2362 and Bti. Mosquitoes treated with Bsph 2362 alone showed some resistance by the 9th treatment and almost complete failure of control occurred by the 17th treatment. After 9 treatments with the mixture over a 9-month period at another site, no noticeable change in susceptibility to Bsph was detected. During this period, the site treated with Bsph alone required 19 treatments, whereas the site treated with mixtures took only 9 treatments because of slower resurgence of larvae at the site treated with the mixture than at the site treated with Bsph alone. This is the 1st field evidence for delay or prevention of resistance to microbial agents in larval Cx. quinquefasciatus by using mixtures of Bti and Bsph. Further

  9. In vitro synergistic effect of Psidium guineense (Swartz) in combination with antimicrobial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tiago Gomes; de Mesquita, Amanda Rafaela Carneiro; Randau, Karina Perrelli; Franchitti, Adelisa Alves; Ximenes, Eulália Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of aqueous extract of Psidium guineense Swartz (Araçá-do-campo) and five antimicrobials (ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem) against twelve strains of Staphylococcus aureus with a resistant phenotype previously determined by the disk diffusion method. Four S. aureus strains showed resistance to all antimicrobial agents tested and were selected for the study of the interaction between aqueous extract of P. guineense and antimicrobial agents, by the checkerboard method. The criteria used to evaluate the synergistic activity were defined by the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). All S. aureus strains were susceptible to P. guineense as determined by the microdilution method. The combination of the P. guineense extract with the antimicrobial agents resulted in an eight-fold reduction in the MIC of these agents, which showed a FICI ranging from 0.125 to 0.5, suggesting a synergistic interaction against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. The combination of the aqueous extract of P. guineense with cefoxitin showed the lowest FICI values. This study demonstrated that the aqueous extract of P. guineense combined with beta lactamics antimicrobials, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems, acts synergistically by inhibiting MRSA strains.

  10. In Vitro Synergistic Effect of Psidium guineense (Swartz) in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Gomes; de Mesquita, Amanda Rafaela Carneiro; Randau, Karina Perrelli; Franchitti, Adelisa Alves; Ximenes, Eulália Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of aqueous extract of Psidium guineense Swartz (Araçá-do-campo) and five antimicrobials (ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem) against twelve strains of Staphylococcus aureus with a resistant phenotype previously determined by the disk diffusion method. Four S. aureus strains showed resistance to all antimicrobial agents tested and were selected for the study of the interaction between aqueous extract of P. guineense and antimicrobial agents, by the checkerboard method. The criteria used to evaluate the synergistic activity were defined by the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). All S. aureus strains were susceptible to P. guineense as determined by the microdilution method. The combination of the P. guineense extract with the antimicrobial agents resulted in an eight-fold reduction in the MIC of these agents, which showed a FICI ranging from 0.125 to 0.5, suggesting a synergistic interaction against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. The combination of the aqueous extract of P. guineense with cefoxitin showed the lowest FICI values. This study demonstrated that the aqueous extract of P. guineense combined with beta lactamics antimicrobials, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems, acts synergistically by inhibiting MRSA strains. PMID:22619603

  11. Graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite as a promising biocidal agent against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Ana Carolina Mazarin; Lima, Bruna Araujo; de Faria, Andreia Fonseca; Brocchi, Marcelo; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been responsible for serious hospital infections worldwide. Nanomaterials are an alternative to conventional antibiotic compounds, because bacteria are unlikely to develop microbial resistance against nanomaterials. In the past decade, graphene oxide (GO) has emerged as a material that is often used to support and stabilize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for the preparation of novel antibacterial nanocomposites. In this work, we report the synthesis of the graphene-oxide silver nanocomposite (GO-Ag) and its antibacterial activity against relevant microorganisms in medicine. Materials and methods GO-Ag nanocomposite was synthesized through the reduction of silver ions (Ag+) by sodium citrate in an aqueous GO dispersion, and was extensively characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by microdilution assays and time-kill experiments. The morphology of bacterial cells treated with GO-Ag was investigated via transmission electron microscopy. Results AgNPs were well distributed throughout GO sheets, with an average size of 9.4±2.8 nm. The GO-Ag nanocomposite exhibited an excellent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli. All (100%) MRSA cells were inactivated after 4 hours of exposure to GO-Ag sheets. In addition, no toxicity was found for either pristine GO or bare AgNPs within the tested concentration range. Transmission electronic microscopy images offered insights into how GO-Ag nanosheets interacted with bacterial cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that the GO-Ag nanocomposite is a promising antibacterial agent against common nosocomial bacteria, particularly antibiotic-resistant MRSA. Morphological injuries on MRSA cells

  12. Enterobacter and Klebsiella species isolated from fresh vegetables marketed in Valencia (Spain) and their clinically relevant resistances to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Falomir, María Pilar; Rico, Hortensia; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Occurrence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic or commensal enterobacteria in marketed agricultural foodstuffs may contribute to their incorporation into the food chain and constitutes an additional food safety concern. In this work, we have determined the clinically relevant resistances to 11 common chemotherapeutic agents in Enterobacter and Klebsiella isolates from fresh vegetables from various sources (supermarkets and greengrocers' shops in Valencia, Spain). A total of 96 isolates were obtained from 160 vegetables analyzed (50% positive samples): 68 Enterobacter isolates (59 E. cloacae, two E. aerogenes, two E. cancerogenus, one E. gergoviae, and four E. sakazakii, currently Cronobacter spp.), and 28 Klebsiella isolates (19 K. oxytoca and 9 K. pneumoniae). Only seven isolates were susceptible to all agents tested, and no resistances to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol were detected. Most isolates were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (74 [58 Enterobacter and 16 Klebsiella]) or to ampicillin (80 [55/25]). Other resistances were less frequent: nitrofurantoin (13 isolates [12/1]), tetracycline (6 [5/1]), co-trimoxazole (3 [3/0]), cefotaxime (1 [1/0]), and streptomycin (2 [1/1]). Multiresistant isolates to two (56 [41/15]), three (10 E. cloacae isolates), four (one E. cloacae and one K. pneumoniae isolate), and five (two E. cloacae isolates) chemotherapeutic agents were also detected. The presence of potential pathogens points to marketed fresh produce, which often is eaten raw, as a risk factor for consumer health. In addition, these results support the usefulness of these bacterial species as indicators of the spreading of antibiotic resistances into the environment, particularly in the food chain, and suggest their role as carriers of resistance determinants from farms to consumers, which may constitute an additional "silent" food safety concern. Therefore, there is a need to improve the hygienic quality of marketed fresh

  13. 42 CFR 84.122 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Masks § 84.122 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to airflow will be... each test conducted in accordance with §§ 84.124, 84.125, and 84.126, with air flowing at a...

  14. 42 CFR 84.203 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.203 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to... mounted on a test fixture with air flowing at a continuous rate of 85 liters per minute, both before...

  15. 42 CFR 84.203 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.203 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to... mounted on a test fixture with air flowing at a continuous rate of 85 liters per minute, both before...

  16. 42 CFR 84.203 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.203 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to... mounted on a test fixture with air flowing at a continuous rate of 85 liters per minute, both before...

  17. 42 CFR 84.203 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.203 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to... mounted on a test fixture with air flowing at a continuous rate of 85 liters per minute, both before...

  18. 42 CFR 84.122 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Masks § 84.122 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to airflow will be... each test conducted in accordance with §§ 84.124, 84.125, and 84.126, with air flowing at a...

  19. 42 CFR 84.122 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Masks § 84.122 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to airflow will be... each test conducted in accordance with §§ 84.124, 84.125, and 84.126, with air flowing at a...

  20. 42 CFR 84.203 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.203 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to... mounted on a test fixture with air flowing at a continuous rate of 85 liters per minute, both before...

  1. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A. K.; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  2. Hypogonadism in males with chronic kidney disease: another cause of resistance to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents?

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Bárány, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Anemia, inflammation, resistance to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) and hypogonadism (testosterone deficiency) are highly prevalent conditions, which heralds poor prognosis, in chronic kidney disease (CKD). It has been speculated that testosterone stimulates erythropoiesis via production of hematopoietic growth factors and possibly improvement of iron bioavailability. Where as inflammation stimulates synthesis of the liver-derived iron regulatory protein hepcidin, a recent study suggests that testosterone inhibits hepcidin synthesis, thus offering a possible novel mechanism for testosterone-induced erythropoiesis. As any agent that lowers hepcidin may be an effective strategy to normalize iron homeostasis and overcome renal anemia, testosterone deficiency should be considered in this patient group. Indeed, a recent study in males with CKD showed that hypogonadism may be an additional cause of anemia and reduced ESA responsiveness. Thus, a randomized controlled trial is needed to test the possibility that restoration of testosterone levels in hypogonadal CKD males may translate into lower prevalence of anemia, better ESA responsiveness and better quality of life.

  3. Induced systemic resistance and plant responses to fungal biocontrol agents.

    PubMed

    Shoresh, Michal; Harman, Gary E; Mastouri, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    Biocontrol fungi (BCF) are agents that control plant diseases. These include the well-known Trichoderma spp. and the recently described Sebacinales spp. They have the ability to control numerous foliar, root, and fruit pathogens and even invertebrates such as nematodes. However, this is only a subset of their abilities. We now know that they also have the ability to ameliorate a wide range of abiotic stresses, and some of them can also alleviate physiological stresses such as seed aging. They can also enhance nutrient uptake in plants and can substantially increase nitrogen use efficiency in crops. These abilities may be more important to agriculture than disease control. Some strains also have abilities to improve photosynthetic efficiency and probably respiratory activities of plants. All of these capabilities are a consequence of their abilities to reprogram plant gene expression, probably through activation of a limited number of general plant pathways.

  4. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  5. Biocontrol agent Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LJ02 induces systemic resistance against cucurbits powdery mildew

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunlong; Gu, Yilin; Li, Juan; Xu, Mingzhu; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuanhong

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew is a fungal disease found in a wide range of plants and can significantly reduce crop yields. Bacterial strain LJ02 is a biocontrol agent (BCA) isolated from a greenhouse in Tianjin, China. In combination of morphological, physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic analyses, strain LJ02 was classified as a new member of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Greenhouse trials showed that LJ02 fermentation broth (LJ02FB) can effectively diminish the occurrence of cucurbits powdery mildew. When treated with LJ02FB, cucumber seedlings produced significantly elevated production of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase as compared to that of the control. We further confirmed that the production of free salicylic acid (SA) and expression of one pathogenesis-related (PR) gene PR-1 in cucumber leaves were markedly elevated after treating with LJ02FB, suggesting that SA-mediated defense response was stimulated. Moreover, LJ02FB-treated cucumber leaves could secrete resistance-related substances into rhizosphere that inhibit the germination of fungi spores and the growth of pathogens. Finally, we separated bacterium and its fermented substances to test their respective effects and found that both components have SA-inducing activity and bacterium plays major roles. Altogether, we identified a BCA against powdery mildew and its mode of action by inducing systemic resistance such as SA signaling pathway. PMID:26379654

  6. Studies of a novel agent possessing resistance to moist heat and disinfectants: parallels with Creutzfeldt-Jakob agent.

    PubMed

    Dyas, A C; Burdon, D W

    1990-04-01

    The resistance to sterilization and disinfection of a novel replicating agent (IFDO) with similarities to Creutzfeldt-Jakob agent (CJA) was investigated. Moist heat at 121 degrees C for 30 min did not kill the agent. Increasing the temperature to 140 degrees C, and the length of the autoclave cycle to 120 min also failed to guarantee sterilization, although some samples were sterilized after these treatments. Dry heat at 160 degrees C for 1 h sterilized 24 of 25 samples. Overnight disinfection with 10% Stericol or 1.2% chlorhexidine left few detectable survivors. Samples pretreated with these disinfectants and then autoclaved at 134 degrees C for 20 min were sterilized. Disinfection with hypochlorite (500 ppm available chlorine) was very effective if organic matter derived from spent culture medium was removed. We have adopted overnight Stericol disinfection, followed by autoclaving at 134 degrees C for 1 h for sterilization of glassware contaminated by IFDO. The agent may provide a valid model for sterilization of items contaminated with CJA and, if so, our data suggest that current disinfection guidelines for CJA by autoclaving at 134 degrees C for 1 h are inadequate. PMID:1971633

  7. Interaction between chloroquine and diverse pharmacological agents in chloroquine resistant Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Puri, S K

    2000-11-01

    The effect of a number of pharmacological agents on the enhancement of antimalarial activity of chloroquine was evaluated against chloroquine resistant line of Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis (N-67). The response after combination therapy was monitored on the basis of alteration in the course of parasitaemia, the extension of mean survival time and the percent cure rate in different groups. The study was designed to compare the in vivo efficacy of a number of resistance modulating agents found effective in several in vitro studies against chloroquine resistant P. falciparum isolates. Based on their efficacy in this rodent model, the response of combination of chloroquine with agents representing diverse chemical moieties has been categorised as curative, moderately active and inactive. Out of the 22 agents evaluated, only cyproheptadine-chloroquine combination produced curative response. Ketotifen, azatadine, pheniramine, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, verapamil, penfluridol and trifluoperazine demonstrated moderate activity while loratadine, terfenadine, promethazine, ranitidine, nifedipine, diltiazem, chlorpromazine, amiodarone, tamoxifen, dipyridamol, propranolol, acyclovir and amantidine were inactive. The study advocates the suitability of proposed rodent model to shortlist potential resistance reversal agents. PMID:11080509

  8. Trends in the resistance to antimicrobial agents of Streptococcus suis isolates from Denmark and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Rasmussen, S R; Artursson, K; Jensen, N E

    1998-08-28

    This study was conducted to determine the MIC values of historical and contemporary Streptoccocus suis (serotypes 2 and 7) from Denmark and S. suis (serotype 2) from Sweden. A total of 52 isolates originating from 1967 through 1981 and 156 isolates from 1992 through 1997 in Denmark and 13 isolates from Sweden were examined for their MICs against 20 different antimicrobial agents. Most antimicrobials were active against most isolates. A frequent occurrence of resistance to sulphamethoxazole was observed, with most resistance among historic isolates of serotype 7 and least resistance among isolates from Sweden. A large number of the isolates was resistant to macrolides. However, all historic serotype 2 isolates from Denmark were susceptible, whereas 20.4% of the contemporary isolates were resistant. Among serotype 7 isolates 23.3% of the historic isolates were resistant to macrolides, whereas resistance was found in 44.8% of the contemporary isolates. All isolates from Sweden were susceptible to macrolides. Time-associated frequency of resistance to tetracycline was also found. Only a single historic isolate of serotype 2 was resistant to tetracycline, whereas 43.9% of the contemporary serotype 2 isolates and 15.5% of the contemporary serotype 7 isolates were resistant. Only one (7.7%) of the isolates from Sweden was resistant. The differences in resistance between historic and contemporary isolates from Denmark were statistically significant. This study demonstrated a significant serotype-associated difference in the susceptibility to macrolides and tetracycline and demonstrated that an increase in resistance among S. suis isolates has taken place during the last 15 years to the two most commonly used antimicrobial agents (tylosin and tetracycline) in pig production in Denmark. PMID:9810623

  9. Effect of blowing agents on the oxidation resistance of carbon foams prepared from molten sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimman, R.; Prabhakaran, K.

    2013-06-01

    We have prepared low density carbon foams from molten sucrose using aluminium nitrate and boric acid blowing agents. A comparative study of the oxidation resistance of the carbon foams prepared using the two blowing agents are reported in the present paper. Oxidation of the carbon foams was evaluated under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions in air atmosphere using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). We have observed that the alumina produced from the aluminium nitrate blowing agent acts as a catalyst whereas the boron produced from boric acid inhibits the oxidation of the carbon foams. The oxidation resistance of carbon foams increases with boron concentration. The oxidation onset temperature for the carbon foams prepared using boric acid blowing agent was nearly 60°C higher than that prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent. Carbon foams prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent undergoes complete oxidation at temperature less than 700°C. Whereas that prepared using boric acid blowing agent leave ˜ 50 wt.% residue at 900°C. Further evidence is provided by the kinetic analysis of the TGA using Coats-Redfern (CR) equation.

  10. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  11. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91 Breathing resistance test; exhalation. (a) Resistance to exhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece of open-circuit apparatus with air flowing at...

  12. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests. 84.180 Section 84.180... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will...

  13. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91 Breathing resistance test; exhalation. (a) Resistance to exhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece of open-circuit apparatus with air flowing at...

  14. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91 Breathing resistance test; exhalation. (a) Resistance to exhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece of open-circuit apparatus with air flowing at...

  15. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests. 84.180 Section 84.180... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will...

  16. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91 Breathing resistance test; exhalation. (a) Resistance to exhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece of open-circuit apparatus with air flowing at...

  17. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests. 84.180 Section 84.180... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will...

  18. Appropriateness of gram-negative agent use at a tertiary care hospital in the setting of significant antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Vora, Neil M; Kubin, Christine J; Furuya, E Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Practicing antimicrobial stewardship in the setting of widespread antimicrobial resistance among gram-negative bacilli, particularly in urban areas, is challenging. Methods.  We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study at a tertiary care hospital with an established antimicrobial stewardship program in New York, New York to determine appropriateness of use of gram-negative antimicrobials and to identify factors associated with suboptimal antimicrobial use. Adult inpatients who received gram-negative agents on 2 dates, 1 June 2010 or 1 December 2010, were identified through pharmacy records. Clinical data were collected for each patient. Use of gram-negative agents was deemed optimal or suboptimal through chart review and according to hospital guidelines. Data were compared using χ(2) or Fischer's exact test for categorical variables and Student t test or Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables. Results.  A total of 356 patients were included who received 422 gram-negative agents. Administration was deemed suboptimal in 26% of instances, with the most common reason being spectrum of activity too broad. In multivariable analysis, being in an intensive care unit (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], .49; 95% confidence interval [CI], .29-.84), having an infectious diseases consultation within the previous 7 days (aOR, .52; 95% CI, .28-.98), and having a history of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli within the past year (aOR, .24; 95% CI, .09-.65) were associated with optimal gram-negative agent use. Beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combination drug use (aOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.35-5.16) was associated with suboptimal use. Conclusions.  Gram-negative agents were used too broadly despite numerous antimicrobial stewardship program activities.

  19. Contact-resistance test probes: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, C. H.; Maxwell, J. H.; Mc Dermott, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Devices are used in inspection of contact resistance in plated connectors after assembly into cables. System permits rapid inspection of connectors when mating connectors or special apparatus are not available, and enables source of excessive resistance to be precisely determined.

  20. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will be... inhalation shall not exceed 35 mm water column height pressure and upon initial exhalation shall not exceed 25 mm water column height pressure....

  1. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will be... inhalation shall not exceed 35 mm water column height pressure and upon initial exhalation shall not exceed 25 mm water column height pressure....

  2. Pharmacotherapeutic Management of Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in the Elderly: Focus on Non-Chemotherapy Agents

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Tomasz M.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 4 years, five new agents have been approved for metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer. Four of them are non-chemotherapeutic and generally well tolerated. However, each has toxicities that can negatively impact patients, particularly the elderly. This review covers the epidemiology of prostate cancer in elderly men. It discusses the efficacy data for sipuleucel-T, abiraterone in chemotherapy-naïve patients, enzalutamide in chemotherapy-naïve patients and radium-223 and presents any additional studies done for those over 75 years of age. Disease burden, such as the presence or absence of visceral disease, and comorbid conditions weigh into the selection of therapy and are discussed here. Drug–drug interactions between these agents and other drugs commonly used in the elderly population are also considered. The emerging therapies tasquinimod and ipilimumab are reviewed. With the arrival of so many agents for prostate cancer, selection of the most appropriate agent can be perplexing, particularly because these agents were tested against placebo, not one another. Furthermore, the study population differs significantly from those seen in clinical practice. This review addresses these issues. PMID:25387443

  3. 33 CFR 159.117 - Chemical resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical resistance test. 159.117...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.117 Chemical resistance test. (a... disinfectant that is required in the operation of the device. (3) Any chemical compound in solid, liquid...

  4. 33 CFR 159.117 - Chemical resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chemical resistance test. 159.117...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.117 Chemical resistance test. (a... disinfectant that is required in the operation of the device. (3) Any chemical compound in solid, liquid...

  5. 33 CFR 159.117 - Chemical resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chemical resistance test. 159.117...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.117 Chemical resistance test. (a... disinfectant that is required in the operation of the device. (3) Any chemical compound in solid, liquid...

  6. 49 CFR 40.341 - Must service agents comply with DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Must service agents comply with DOT drug and... Responsibilities of Service Agents § 40.341 Must service agents comply with DOT drug and alcohol testing... requirements of this part and the DOT agency drug and alcohol testing regulations. (b) If you do not...

  7. Emerging agents to combat complicated and resistant infections: focus on ceftobiprole

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, César; Del Pozo, Jose L

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global concern. Over the past few years, considerable efforts and resources have been expended to detect, monitor, and understand at the basic level the many different facets of emerging and increasing resistance. Development of new antimicrobial agents has been matched by the development of new mechanisms of resistance by bacteria. Current antibiotics act at a variety of sites within the target bacteria, including the cross-linking enzymes in the cell wall, various ribosomal enzymes, nucleic acid polymerases, and folate synthesis. Ceftobiprole is a novel parenteral cephalosporin with high affinity for most penicillin-binding proteins, including the mecA product penicillin-binding protein 2a, rendering it active against methicillin-resistant staphylococci. Its in vitro activity against staphylococci and multiresistant pneumococci, combined with its Gram-negative spectrum comparable to that of other extended-spectrum cephalosporins, its stability against a wide range of beta-lactamases, and its pharmacokinetic and safety profiles make ceftobiprole an attractive and well tolerated new antimicrobial agent. The US Food and Drug Administration granted ceftobiprole medocaril fast-track status in 2003 for the treatment of complicated skin infections and skin structure infections due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci, and subsequently extended this to treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia, including ventilator-associated pneumonia due to suspected or proven methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:21694889

  8. Plants as sources of new antimicrobials and resistance-modifying agents.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana Cristina; McBain, Andrew J; Simões, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are an increasing problem due to the emergence and propagation of microbial drug resistance and the lack of development of new antimicrobials. Traditional methods of antibiotic discovery have failed to keep pace with the evolution of resistance. Therefore, new strategies to control bacterial infections are highly desirable. Plant secondary metabolites (phytochemicals) have already demonstrated their potential as antibacterials when used alone and as synergists or potentiators of other antibacterial agents. The use of phytochemical products and plant extracts as resistance-modifying agents (RMAs) represents an increasingly active research topic. Phytochemicals frequently act through different mechanisms than conventional antibiotics and could, therefore be of use in the treatment of resistant bacteria. The therapeutic utility of these products, however, remains to be clinically proven. The aim of this article is to review the advances in in vitro and in vivo studies on the potential chemotherapeutic value of phytochemical products and plant extracts as RMAs to restore the efficacy of antibiotics against resistant pathogenic bacteria. The mode of action of RMAs on the potentiation of antibiotics is also described.

  9. In vitro potency and combination testing of antimicrobial agents against Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Amrita; Martin, Irene; Zhanel, George G; Mulvey, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Antimicrobial resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major concern to public health due to decreased susceptibility to frontline antimicrobials. To find agents that are active against N. gonorrhoeae, we tested antimicrobials alone or in combination by Etest gradient strips. The potencies (as assessed by minimum inhibitory concentrations) of twenty-five antimicrobials were evaluated against nine reference strains of N. gonorrhoeae (WHO F, G, K, L, M, N, O, P and ATCC 49226). Potency was greatest for netilmicin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. Combinations of azithromycin, moxifloxacin, or gentamicin with ceftriaxone, doripenem, or aztreonam were tested against reference isolates and the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was calculated. All nine combinations resulted in indifference (>0.5 FICI ≤ 4). Combinations with FICI < 1 were further evaluated in nine clinical isolates which supported the finding of indifference. No antagonism was observed in any of the combinations tested. This is the first report in which the six combinations of azithromycin, moxifloxacin or gentamcin in combination with doripenem or aztreonam were tested in N. gonorrhoeae. These data on antimicrobials with higher potency and combinations that did not show antagonism can help to guide larger scale susceptibility studies for antimicrobial resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

  10. ATM regulates 3-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A.; Clarke, Ian D.; Barszczyk, Mark S.; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W.; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T.; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a frontline therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed; increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using a siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. PMID:25100205

  11. Systematic Review of the Performance of Rapid Rifampicin Resistance Testing for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arentz, Matthew; Sorensen, Bess; Horne, David J.; Walson, Judd L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance may be useful for identifying isolates at high risk of drug resistance, including multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). However, choice of diagnostic test and prevalence of rifampicin resistance may both impact a diagnostic strategy for identifying drug resistant-TB. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the performance of WHO-endorsed rapid tests for rifampicin resistance detection. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library through January 1, 2012. For each rapid test, we determined pooled sensitivity and specificity estimates using a hierarchical random effects model. Predictive values of the tests were determined at different prevalence rates of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB. Results We identified 60 publications involving six different tests (INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, Genotype MTBDR assay, Genotype MTBDRplus assay, Colorimetric Redox Indicator (CRI) assay, Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA) and MODS tests): for all tests, negative predictive values were high when rifampicin resistance prevalence was ≤ 30%. However, positive predictive values were considerably reduced for the INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, the MTBDRplus assay and MODS when rifampicin resistance prevalence was < 5%. Limitations In many studies, it was unclear whether patient selection or index test performance could have introduced bias. In addition, we were unable to evaluate critical concentration thresholds for the colorimetric tests. Discussion Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance alone cannot accurately predict rifampicin resistance or MDR-TB in areas with a low prevalence of rifampicin resistance. However, in areas with a high prevalence of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB, these tests may be a valuable component of an MDR-TB management strategy. PMID:24098523

  12. Cytotoxicity testing of topical antimicrobial agents on human keratinocytes and fibroblasts for cultured skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S T; Warden, G D; Holder, I A

    1995-01-01

    Cultured epidermal skin has become an adjunctive therapy for treatment of major burn injuries, but its effectiveness is greatly limited because of destruction by microbial contamination. To evaluate candidate antimicrobial agents for use with cultured skin, a combined cytotoxicity-antimicrobial assay system was developed for determination of toxicity to cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts and for determination of susceptibility or resistance of common burn wound organisms. Candidate agents including chlorhexidine gluconate, polymyxin B, mupirocin, sparfloxacin, or nitrofurazone were tested separately for inhibition of growth of human cells and for inhibitory activity to microorganisms with the wet disk assay. The data showed that (1) chlorhexidine gluconate (0.05%) was uniformly toxic to both cultured human cells and microorganisms; (2) nitrofurazone (0.02%) had dose-dependent toxicity to human cells and limited effectiveness against gram-negative microorganisms; (3) sparfloxacin (30 micrograms/ml) had low toxicity to human cells and retained antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; (4) polymyxin B (400 U/ml) was not toxic to human cells and had intermediate effectiveness on gram-negative bacteria; and (5) mupirocin (48 micrograms/ml) had no toxicity to skin cells and had uniform effectiveness against Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Selection of topical antimicrobial drugs by these assays may improve effectiveness of cultured skin for burns and may be used to control other surgical wound infections.

  13. Cytotoxicity testing of topical antimicrobial agents on human keratinocytes and fibroblasts for cultured skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S T; Warden, G D; Holder, I A

    1995-01-01

    Cultured epidermal skin has become an adjunctive therapy for treatment of major burn injuries, but its effectiveness is greatly limited because of destruction by microbial contamination. To evaluate candidate antimicrobial agents for use with cultured skin, a combined cytotoxicity-antimicrobial assay system was developed for determination of toxicity to cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts and for determination of susceptibility or resistance of common burn wound organisms. Candidate agents including chlorhexidine gluconate, polymyxin B, mupirocin, sparfloxacin, or nitrofurazone were tested separately for inhibition of growth of human cells and for inhibitory activity to microorganisms with the wet disk assay. The data showed that (1) chlorhexidine gluconate (0.05%) was uniformly toxic to both cultured human cells and microorganisms; (2) nitrofurazone (0.02%) had dose-dependent toxicity to human cells and limited effectiveness against gram-negative microorganisms; (3) sparfloxacin (30 micrograms/ml) had low toxicity to human cells and retained antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; (4) polymyxin B (400 U/ml) was not toxic to human cells and had intermediate effectiveness on gram-negative bacteria; and (5) mupirocin (48 micrograms/ml) had no toxicity to skin cells and had uniform effectiveness against Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Selection of topical antimicrobial drugs by these assays may improve effectiveness of cultured skin for burns and may be used to control other surgical wound infections. PMID:7775517

  14. Four-terminal electrical testing device. [initiator bridgewire resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Robert L. (Inventor); Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Hoffman, William C., III (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention relates to a four-terminal electrical connector device for testing and measuring unknown resistances of initiators used for starting pyrotechnic events aboard the space shuttle. The testing device minimizes contact resistance degradation effects and so improves the reliability of resistance measurements taken with the device. Separate and independent voltage sensing and current supply circuits each include a pair of socket contacts for mating engagement with the pins of the initiator. The unknown resistance that is measured by the device is the resistance of the bridgewire of the initiator which is required to be between 0.95 and 1.15 ohms.

  15. Overcoming chloroquine resistance in malaria: Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel chemoreversal agents.

    PubMed

    Boudhar, Aicha; Ng, Xiao Wei; Loh, Chiew Yee; Chia, Wan Ni; Tan, Zhi Ming; Nosten, Francois; Dymock, Brian W; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-08-25

    Malaria remains a significant infectious disease with even artemisinin-based therapies now facing resistance in the field. Development of new therapies is urgently needed, either by finding new compounds with unique modes of action, or by reversing resistance towards known drugs with 'chemosensitizers' or 'chemoreversal' agents (CRA). Concerning the latter, we have focused on the resistance mechanisms developed against chloroquine (CQ). We have synthesized a series of compounds related to previously identified CRAs, and found promising novel compounds. These compounds show encouraging results in a coumarin labeled chloroquine uptake assay, exhibiting a dose response in resensitising parasites to the antimalarial effects of chloroquine. Selected compounds show consistent potency across a panel of chloroquine and artemisinin sensitive and resistant parasites, and a wide therapeutic window. This data supports further study of CRAs in the treatment of malaria and, ultimately, their use in chloroquine-based combination therapies. PMID:27173385

  16. Technical considerations regarding toxicity testing of commercial bioremediation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bidwell, J.R.; Cavender, R.C.; Cherry, D.S.; Merski, A.T.; Cianciarulo, F.L.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicological evaluation of commercial bioremediation agents (CBAs) for use on oil spills is under consideration by the USEPA. Currently, acute and chronic bioassays are conducted with the CBA alone and with CBA that has been diluted with the water soluble fraction (WSF) of a crude oil. Endpoints are expressed as a concentration of the CBA. This approach may not address the toxicological issue of CBA use since it (1) does not determine if the CBA affects toxicity of the oil itself, and (2) does not consider temporal aspects associated with byproducts of oil degradation. The present study was conducted to address these issues. A CBA was mixed with unweathered crude oil from 1 to 42 days. The WSF of the mixture was then drawn off and acute bioassays were conducted with silverside minnows, Menidia beryllina, and mysid shrimp, Mysidopsis bahia. For silversides, 96-hr LC50 values ranged from 42.7% WSF after 1 day mixing to 10.5% after 42 days. Toxicity increased sharply between days 4 and 7 when the 96-hr LC50 dropped from 39.0 to 18.2% WSF. A similar trend occurred for mysid shrimp. The presence of the CBA caused a more rapid increase in the toxicity of the oil as compared to bioassays in which oil was mixed alone and then tested. These data indicate that the interaction of CBAs with oil, and associated temporal trends in toxicity, are important aspects to consider in hazard evaluation of these products. The current proposed CBA toxicity testing protocol does not effectively address these issues.

  17. Molecular genetic basis of antimicrobial agent resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: 1998 update.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Musser, J M

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of resistance to antituberculous agents has advanced rapidly since we reviewed this topic 3 years ago. Virtually all isolates resistant to rifampin and related rifamycins have a mutation that alters the sequence of a 27-amino-acid region of the beta subunit of ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase. Resistance to isoniazid (INH) is more complex. Many resistant organisms have mutations in the katG gene encoding catalase-peroxidase that result in altered enzyme structure. These structural changes apparently result in decreased conversion of INH to a biologically active form. Some INH-resistant organisms also have mutations in the inhA locus or a recently characterized gene (kasA) encoding a beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase. Streptomycin resistance is due mainly to mutations in the 16S rRNA gene or the rpsL gene encoding ribosomal protein S12. Resistance to pyrazinamide in the great majority of organisms is caused by mutations in the gene (pncA) encoding pyrazinamidase that result in diminished enzyme activity. Ethambutol resistance in approximately 60% of organisms is due to amino acid replacements at position 306 of an arabinosyltransferase encoded by the embB gene. Amino acid changes in the A subunit of deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase cause fluoroquinolone resistance in most organisms. Kanamycin resistance is due to nucleotide substitutions in the rrs gene encoding 16S rRNA. Multidrug resistant strains arise by sequential accumulation of resistance mutations for individual drugs. Limited evidence exists indicating that some drug resistant strains with mutations that severely alter catalase-peroxidase activity are less virulent in animal models. A diverse array of strategies is available to assist in rapid detection of drug resistance-associated gene mutations. Although remarkable advances have been made, much remains to be learned about the molecular genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is

  18. Drug Development for Hypertension: Do We Need Another Antihypertensive Agent for Resistant Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Calhoun, David A

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension is seemingly much lower than had been reported in early studies. Recent analyses suggest that <5 % of treated hypertensive patients remain uncontrolled if fully adherent to an optimized antihypertensive treatment. However, these patients do have increased cardiovascular risk and need effective therapeutic approaches. Drug development is a high-risk, complex, lengthy, and very expensive process. In this article, we discuss the factors that should be considered in the process of developing a new agent for treatment of resistant hypertension.

  19. Drug Development for Hypertension: Do We Need Another Antihypertensive Agent for Resistant Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Calhoun, David A

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension is seemingly much lower than had been reported in early studies. Recent analyses suggest that <5 % of treated hypertensive patients remain uncontrolled if fully adherent to an optimized antihypertensive treatment. However, these patients do have increased cardiovascular risk and need effective therapeutic approaches. Drug development is a high-risk, complex, lengthy, and very expensive process. In this article, we discuss the factors that should be considered in the process of developing a new agent for treatment of resistant hypertension. PMID:26949263

  20. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed.

  1. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain.

  2. Antimicrobial agent of susceptibilities and antiseptic resistance gene distribution among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from patients with impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Norihisa; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Nishijima, Setsuko; Kurokawa, Ichiro; So, Hiromu; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2006-06-01

    The susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents of and distributions of antiseptic resistance genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated between 1999 and 2004 in Japan were examined. The data of MRSA strains that are causative agents of impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) were compared with those of MRSA strains isolated from patients with other diseases. The susceptibilities to antiseptic agents in MRSA isolates from patients with impetigo and SSSS were higher than those in MRSA isolates from patients with other diseases. The distribution of the qacA/B genes in MRSA strains isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS (1.3%, 1/76) was remarkably lower than that in MRSA strains isolated from patients with other diseases (45.9%, 95/207). Epidemiologic typings of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that MRSA strains isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS had type IV SCCmec (75/76), except for one strain, and 64.5% (49/76) of the strains had different PFGE types. In addition, the patterns of restriction digestion of all tested qacA/B plasmid in MRSA isolates having different PFGE types were identical. The results showed that a specific MRSA clone carrying qacA/B was not prevalent, but qacA/B was spread among health care-associated MRSA strains. Therefore, it was concluded that the lower distribution rate of qacA/B resulted in higher susceptibilities to cationic antiseptic agents in MRSA isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS.

  3. Severe systemic reaction to diphosphonate bone imaging agents: skin testing to predict allergic response and a safe alternative agent

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Gabatin, A.; Orzel, J.A.; Maloney, T.R.; Murnane, J.E.; Borchert, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    We describe a severe systemic reaction which occurred in a patient on two occasions after i.v. injection of chemically related diphosphonate bone imaging agents. Skin testing showed reactivity to multiple commercially available diphosphonate compounds but no significant response to pyrophosphates. A subsequent pyrophosphate bone scan resulted in no adverse reaction. Severe systemic reactions to diphosphonates can occur, skin testing may prove useful in evaluating allergic reactions, and pyrophosphates appear to be a safe alternative agent in patients proven or suspected allergic to diphosphonates.

  4. Alternative disease control agents induce resistance to blue mold in harvested 'red delicious' apple fruit.

    PubMed

    de Capdeville, Guy; Wilson, Charles L; Beer, Steven V; Aist, James R

    2002-08-01

    ABSTRACT Alternative control agents, including UV-type C (254 nm) irradiation, yeasts antagonistic to fungal growth, chitosan and harpin, were evaluated for their ability to induce resistance in cv. Red Delicious apple fruit against postharvest blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum. Freshly harvested and controlled atmosphere (CA)-stored fruit were treated with these agents at different doses and concentrations or with paired combinations of the agents. Treated fruit were inoculated with P. expansum 24, 48, or 96 h following treatment, and stored at 24 degrees C in the dark. The fruit were evaluated for development of disease every 2 days for 14 days by measuring the diameter of lesions that formed. The area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) was calculated and analyzed statistically. All treatments were effective in reducing the AUDPC; UV-C was most effective, followed by harpin, chitosan, and the yeasts, respectively. Regardless of treatment, fresh fruit were more responsive to treatments than CA-stored fruit. There was a clear time-dependent response of the fruit to the treatments, in which treatments applied 96 h before inoculation provided the best results. In a few situations, the combinations of agents did provide an additive effect, but no synergistic effects were detected. Moreover, disease severity in fruit treated by any combination was markedly better than that in the controls. Although the combinations of treatments was overall less effective than the single treatments, they did provide significant reductions of the progress of disease in comparison with the controls. Because the fungus did not come into contact with any of the control agents, this study showed conclusively that the agents studied were able to induce resistance in the fruit rather than merely inhibit the pathogen directly. It also showed, for the first time, that harpin is able to induce resistance in harvested apple fruit. The use of these control agents may minimize the

  5. 30 CFR 7.48 - Acid resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acid resistance test. 7.48 Section 7.48 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.48 Acid resistance test. (a... solution of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) by mixing 853 ml of water with 199 ml of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) with...

  6. 30 CFR 7.48 - Acid resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acid resistance test. 7.48 Section 7.48 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.48 Acid resistance test. (a... solution of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) by mixing 853 ml of water with 199 ml of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) with...

  7. 30 CFR 7.48 - Acid resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acid resistance test. 7.48 Section 7.48 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.48 Acid resistance test. (a... solution of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) by mixing 853 ml of water with 199 ml of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) with...

  8. 30 CFR 7.48 - Acid resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acid resistance test. 7.48 Section 7.48 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.48 Acid resistance test. (a... solution of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) by mixing 853 ml of water with 199 ml of sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) with...

  9. Update from the Laboratory: Clinical Identification and Susceptibility Testing of Fungi and Trends in Antifungal Resistance.

    PubMed

    Albataineh, Mohammad T; Sutton, Deanna A; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of new diagnostic assays and broad-spectrum antifungal agents, invasive fungal infections remain a significant challenge to clinicians and are associated with marked morbidity and mortality. In addition, the number of etiologic agents of invasive mycoses has increased accompanied by an expansion in the immunocompromised patient populations, and the use of molecular tools for fungal identification and characterization has resulted in the discovery of several cryptic species. This article reviews various methods used to identify fungi and perform antifungal susceptibility testing in the clinical laboratory. Recent developments in antifungal resistance are also discussed. PMID:26739605

  10. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agent resistance and mortality in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Responsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) varies widely among dialysis patients. ESA resistance has been associated with mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients data is limited. Therefore we assessed the relation between ESA resistance in both HD and PD patients. Methods NECOSAD is a Dutch multi-center prospective cohort study of incident dialysis patients who started dialysis between January 1997 and January 2007. ESA resistance was defined as hemoglobin level < 11 g/dL with an above median ESA dose (i.e. 8,000 units/week in HD and 4,000 units/week in PD patients). Unadjusted and adjusted Cox regression analysis for all-cause 5-year mortality was performed for HD and PD patients separately. Results 1013 HD and 461 PD patients were included in the analysis. ESA resistant HD patients had an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.37 (95% CI 1.04-1.80) and ESA resistant PD patients had an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.41 (1.27-4.57) as compared to patients with a good response. Conclusions ESA resistance, as defined by categories of ESA and Hb, is associated with increased mortality in both HD and PD patients. The effect of ESA resistance, ESA dose and hemoglobin are closely related and the exact mechanism remains unclear. Our results strengthen the need to investigate and treat causes of ESA resistance not only in HD, but also in PD patients. PMID:24066978

  11. Dry and wet arc track propagation resistance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    The wet arc-propagation resistance test for wire insulation provides an assessment of the ability of an insulation to prevent damage in an electrical environment. Results of an arc-propagation test may vary slightly due to the method of arc initiation; therefore a standard test method must be selected to evaluate the general arc-propagation resistance characteristics of an insulation. This test method initiates an arc by dripping salt water over pre-damaged wires which creates a conductive path between the wires. The power supply, test current, circuit resistances, and other variables are optimized for testing 20 guage wires. The use of other wire sizes may require modifications to the test variables. The dry arc-propagation resistance test for wire insulation also provides an assessment of the ability of an insulation to prevent damage in an electrical arc environment. In service, electrical arcs may originate form a variety of factors including insulation deterioration, faulty installation, and chafing. Here too, a standard test method must be selected to evaluate the general arc-propagation resistance characteristics of an insulation. This test method initiates an arc with a vibrating blade. The test also evaluates the ability of the insulation to prevent further arc-propagation when the electrical arc is re-energized.

  12. Initial Testing (Stage 1) of the Anti-Microtubule Agents Cabazitaxel and Docetaxel, by the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, C. Patrick; Kang, Min H.; Maris, John M.; Kolb, E. Anders; Gorlick, Richard; Wu, Jianrong; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Houghton, Peter J.; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2016-01-01

    Background While microtubule destabilizing agents (principally vincristine) are in common use in pediatric oncology, the microtubule stabilizing taxanes are uncommonly used to treat childhood cancers. Cabazitaxel has been reported to have activity superior to that of docetaxel in preclinical models of multidrug-resistant adult cancers, and it was active in patients who had progressed on or after docetaxel. The PPTP conducted a comparison of these two agents against the PPTP in vitro panel and against a limited panel of solid tumor xenografts. Procedures Cabazitaxel and docetaxel were tested against the PPTP in vitro cell line panel at concentrations from 0.01 nM to 0.1 µM and in vivo against a subset of the PPTP solid tumor xenograft models at a dose of 10 or 7.5 mg/kg on an every 4 days × 3 I.V. schedule. Results In vitro both cabazitaxel and docetaxel had similar potency (median rIC50 0.47 nM and 0.88 nM, respectively) and a similar activity profile, with Ewing sarcoma cells being significantly more sensitive to both agents. In vitro sensitivity to docetaxel inversely correlated with mRNA expression for ABCB1, but the correlation with ABCB1 expression was weaker for cabazitaxel. In vivo cabazitaxel demonstrated significantly greater activity than docetaxel in 5 of 12 tumor models, inducing regressions in 6 models compared with 3 models for docetaxel. Conclusions Cabazitaxel demonstrated superior activity compared to docetaxel. The lower cabazitaxel systemic exposure tolerated in humans compared to mice needs to be considered when extrapolating these results to the clinical setting. PMID:26154614

  13. Modeling the Population Dynamics of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria:. AN Agent-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James T.; Walshe, Ray; Devocelle, Marc

    The response of bacterial populations to antibiotic treatment is often a function of a diverse range of interacting factors. In order to develop strategies to minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria, a sound theoretical understanding of the systems of interactions taking place within a colony must be developed. The agent-based approach to modeling bacterial populations is a useful tool for relating data obtained at the molecular and cellular level with the overall population dynamics. Here we demonstrate an agent-based model, called Micro-Gen, which has been developed to simulate the growth and development of bacterial colonies in culture. The model also incorporates biochemical rules and parameters describing the kinetic interactions of bacterial cells with antibiotic molecules. Simulations were carried out to replicate the development of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonies growing in the presence of antibiotics. The model was explored to see how the properties of the system emerge from the interactions of the individual bacterial agents in order to achieve a better mechanistic understanding of the population dynamics taking place. Micro-Gen provides a good theoretical framework for investigating the effects of local environmental conditions and cellular properties on the response of bacterial populations to antibiotic exposure in the context of a simulated environment.

  14. The E-beam resist test facility: performance testing and benchmarking of E-beam resists for advanced mask writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Jang, Il Yong; Mellish, Mac; Litt, Lloyd C.; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John

    2012-11-01

    With each new generation of e-beam mask writers comes the ability to write leading edge photomasks with improved patterning performance and increased throughput. However, these cutting-edge e-beam tools are often used with older generation resists, preventing the end-user from taking full advantage of the tool's potential. The generation gap between tool and resist will become even more apparent with the commercialization of multi-beam mask writers, which are expected to be available for pilot line use around 2015. The mask industry needs resists capable of meeting the resolution, roughness, and sensitivity requirements of these advanced tools and applications. The E-beam Resist Test Facility (ERTF) has been established to fill the need for consortium-based testing of e-beam resists for mask writing applications on advanced mask writers out to the 11nm half-pitch node and beyond. SEMATECH and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) began establishing the ERTF in early 2012 to test e-beam resist samples from commercial suppliers and university labs against the required performance metrics for each application at the target node. Operations officially began on June 12, 2012, at which time the first e-beam resist samples were tested. The ERTF uses the process and metrology infrastructure available at CNSE, including a Vistec VB300 Vectorscan e-beam tool adjusted to operate at 50kv. Initial testing results show that multiple resists already meet, or are close to meeting, the resolution requirements for mask writing at the 11nm node, but other metrics such as line width roughness still need improvement. An overview of the ERTF and its capabilities is provided here. Tools, baseline processes, and operation strategy details are discussed, and resist testing and benchmarking results are shown. The long-term outlook for the ERTF and plans to expand capability and testing capacity, including resist testing for e-beam direct write lithography, are also

  15. An Empirical Test of a Model of Resistance to Persuasion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Burgoon, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Tests a model of resistance to persuasion based upon variables not considered by earlier congruity and inoculation models. Supports the prediction that the kind of critical response set induced and the target of the criticism are mediators of resistance to persuasion. (JMF)

  16. Development of novel antibacterial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Lee, Su-Lin; Kapuriya, Naval; Wang, Dasheng; Chen, Yi-Ru; Yu, Sung-Liang; Kulp, Samuel K.; Teng, Lee-Jeng; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious threat to public health because of its resistance to multiple antibiotics most commonly used to treat infection. In this study, we report the unique ability of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib to kill Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA with modest potency. We hypothesize that the anti-Staphylococcus activity of celecoxib could be pharmacologically exploited to develop novel anti-MRSA agents with a distinct mechanism. Examination of an in-house, celecoxib-based focused compound library in conjunction with structural modifications led to the identification of compound 46 as the lead agent with high antibacterial potency against a panel of Staphylococcus pathogens and different strains of MRSA. Moreover, this killing effect is bacteria-specific, as human cancer cells are resistant to 46. In addition, a single intraperitoneal administration of compound 46 at 30 mg/kg improved the survival of MRSA-infected C57BL/6 mice. In light of its high potency in eradicating MRSA in vitro and its in vivo activity, compound 46 and its analogues warrant continued preclinical development as a potential therapeutic intervention against MRSA. PMID:22750009

  17. Resistance to High-Stakes Testing Spreads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Bob

    2012-01-01

    A rising tide of protest is sweeping across the nation as growing numbers of parents, teachers, administrators and academics take action against high-stakes testing. Instead of test-and-punish policies, which have failed to improve academic performance or equity, the movement is pressing for broader forms of assessment. From Texas to New York and…

  18. Age-correlated stress resistance improves fitness of yeast: support from agent-based simulations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to stress is often heterogeneous among individuals within a population, which helps protect against intermittent stress (bet hedging). This is also the case for heat shock resistance in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, the resistance appears to be continuously distributed (vs. binary, switch-like) and correlated with replicative age (vs. random). Older, slower-growing cells are more resistant than younger, faster-growing ones. Is there a fitness benefit to age-correlated stress resistance? Results Here this hypothesis is explored using a simple agent-based model, which simulates a population of individual cells that grow and replicate. Cells age by accumulating damage, which lowers their growth rate. They synthesize trehalose at a metabolic cost, which helps protect against heat shock. Proteins Tsl1 and Tps3 (trehalose synthase complex regulatory subunit TSL1 and TPS3) represent the trehalose synthesis complex and they are expressed using constant, age-dependent and stochastic terms. The model was constrained by calibration and comparison to data from the literature, including individual-based observations obtained using high-throughput microscopy and flow cytometry. A heterogeneity network was developed, which highlights the predominant sources and pathways of resistance heterogeneity. To determine the best trehalose synthesis strategy, model strains with different Tsl1/Tps3 expression parameters were placed in competition in an environment with intermittent heat shocks. Conclusions For high severities and low frequencies of heat shock, the winning strain used an age-dependent bet hedging strategy, which shows that there can be a benefit to age-correlated stress resistance. The study also illustrates the utility of combining individual-based observations and modeling to understand mechanisms underlying population heterogeneity, and the effect on fitness. PMID:24529069

  19. 30 CFR 7.48 - Acid resistance test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.48 Acid resistance test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare one sample each of the insulated surfaces of the battery box and of the... insulation plus the battery cover or box material. The insulation thickness shall be representative of...

  20. Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests of improved fire-resistant materials, test series 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, R. N.; Bricker, R. W.; Kuminecz, J. F.; Supkis, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Full-scale aircraft flammability tests in which the effectiveness of new fire-resistant materials was evaluated by comparing their burning characteristics with those of other fire-resistant aircraft materials were described. New-fire-resistant materials that are more economical and better suited for aircraft use than the previously tested fire-resistant materials were tested. The fuel ignition source for one test was JP-4; a smokeless fuel was used for the other test. Test objectives, methods, materials, and results are presented and discussed. The results indicate that, similar to the fire-resistant materials tested previously, the new materials decompose rather than ignite and do not support fire propagation. Furthermore, the new materials did not produce a flash fire.

  1. Emergence of resistance to antibacterial agents: the role of quaternary ammonium compounds--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Buffet-Bataillon, Sylvie; Tattevin, Pierre; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2012-05-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are widely distributed in hospitals, industry and cosmetics. Little attention has been focused on the potential impact of QACs on the emergence of antibiotic resistance in patients and the environment. To assess this issue, we conducted a literature review on QAC chemical structure, fields of application, mechanism of action, susceptibility testing, prevalence, and co- or cross-resistance to antibiotics. Special attention was paid to the effects of QACs on microflora; in particular, the issue of the potential of QACs for applying selective pressure on multiple-antibiotic-resistant organisms was raised. It was found that there is a lack of standardised procedures for interpreting susceptibility test results. QACs have different impacts on the minimum inhibitory concentrations of antibacterials depending on the antibacterial compound investigated, the resistance genes involved, the measuring methodology and the interpretative criteria. The unmet needs for adequate detection of reduced susceptibility to QACs and antibiotics include (i) a consensus definition for resistance, (ii) epidemiological cut-off values and (iii) clinical resistance breakpoints. This review advocates the design of international guidelines for QAC use.

  2. [Resistance to antimicrobial agents, hemolytic activity and plasmids in Aeromonas species].

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Watanabe, N; Kanamori, M

    1990-06-01

    A total of 174 Aeromonas isolates consisting of 100 strains from patients with diarrhea being mainly overseas travellers nd healthy subjects, and 74 strains from environmental sources including foods, fish, fresh water, sea water and river soil collected in the area of Tokyo Metropolis and Kanagawa Prefecture was examined for the antimicrobial resistance, presence of plasmids and hemolytic activity. Almost all the isolates (99.4%) were resistant to aminobenzyl penicillin. The isolation frequency of chloramphenicol- or tetracycline-resistant strain was low. Most environmental isolates of A. hydrophila were resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. Thirty-seven percent of environmental isolates and 39% of human fecal ones carried plasmids. In environmental isolates, seven A. hydrophila and three A. sobria strains carried 63- to 150-kilobase pair (kb) conjugative R plasmids. Two A. hydrophila strains from both the healthy subject and domestic case with diarrhea carried 58- to 90-kb conjugative R plasmids, respectively. None of the isolates from the feces of overseas traveller's diarrhea carried the plasmid. Irrespective of the sources. A. hydrophila showed the highest hemolytic activity among three Aeromonas species. Eighty percent or more of A. hydrophila isolates were of hemolysin positive. The hemolytic titer of A. hydrophila strains from human feces was higher than that of the strains from environmental sources. PMID:2401817

  3. The Risk of Some Veterinary Antimicrobial Agents on Public Health Associated with Antimicrobial Resistance and their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Sander, Pascal; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Yulian; Cheng, Guyue; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The risk of antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals on public health associated with antimicrobial resistance continues to be a current topic of discussion as related to animal and human public health. In the present review, resistance monitoring data, and risk assessment results of some important antimicrobial agents were cited to elucidate the possible association of antimicrobial use in food animals and antimicrobial resistance in humans. From the selected examples, it was apparent from reviewing the published scientific literature that the ban on use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., avoparcin, fluoroquinolone, tetracyclines) did not change drug resistance patterns and did not mitigate the intended goal of minimizing antimicrobial resistance. The use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., virginiamycin, macrolides, and cephalosporins) in food animals may have an impact on the antimicrobial resistance in humans, but it was largely depended on the pattern of drug usage in different geographical regions. The epidemiological characteristics of resistant bacteria were closely related to molecular mechanisms involved in the development, fitness, and transmission of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27803693

  4. Engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells—metastases suppressor factors as change agents

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Mann, Anita; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Kumar, Maneesh; Roy, Sumitabho Deb; Pore, Subrata Kumar; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Building molecular correlates of drug resistance in cancer and exploiting them for therapeutic intervention remains a pressing clinical need. To identify factors that impact drug resistance herein we built a model that couples inherent cell-based response toward drugs with transcriptomes of resistant/sensitive cells. To test this model, we focused on a group of genes called metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that influence aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancers. Interestingly, modeling of 84 000 drug response transcriptome combinations predicted multiple MSGs to be associated with resistance of different cell types and drugs. As a case study, on inducing MSG levels in a drug resistant breast cancer line resistance to anticancer drugs caerulomycin, camptothecin and topotecan decreased by more than 50–60%, in both culture conditions and also in tumors generated in mice, in contrast to control un-induced cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells based on a model that exploits inherent cellular response profiles. PMID:24157835

  5. Test for bacterial resistance build-up against plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J. L.; Shimizu, T.; Schmidt, H.-U.; Li, Y.-F.; Morfill, G. E.; Isbary, G.

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that the evolution of resistance of microorganisms to a range of different antibiotics presents a major problem in the control of infectious diseases. Accordingly, new bactericidal ‘agents’ are in great demand. Using a cold atmospheric pressure (CAP) plasma dispenser operated with ambient air, a more than five orders of magnitude inactivation or reduction of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; resistant against a large number of the tested antibiotics) was obtained in less than 10 s. This makes CAP the most promising candidate for combating nosocomial (hospital-induced) infections. To test for the occurrence and development of bacterial resistance against such plasmas, experiments with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus mundtii) were performed. The aim was to determine quantitative limits for primary (naturally) or secondary (acquired) resistance against the plasma treatment. Our results show that E. coli and E. mundtii possess no primary resistance against the plasma treatment. By generating four generations of bacteria for every strain, where the survivors of the plasma treatment were used for the production of the next generation, a lower limit to secondary resistance was obtained. Our results indicate that CAP technology could contribute to the control of infections in hospitals, in outpatient care and in disaster situations, providing a new, fast and efficient broad-band disinfection technology that is not constrained by bacterial resistance mechanisms.

  6. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  7. The Epothilones: New Therapeutic Agents for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dorff, Tanya B.

    2011-01-01

    The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) presents a clinical challenge because of limitations in efficacy and durability with currently available therapeutics. The epothilones represent a novel class of anticancer therapy that stabilizes microtubules, causing cell death and tumor regression in preclinical models. The structure of the tubulin-binding site for epothilones is distinct from that of the taxanes. Moreover, preclinical studies suggest nonoverlapping mechanisms of resistance between epothilones and taxanes. In early-phase studies in patients with CRPC, treatment with ixabepilone, a semisynthetic analog of epothilone B, induced objective responses and prostate-specific antigen declines in men previously progressing on docetaxel-based regimens. Clinical activity has been observed in nonrandomized trials for patients with CRPC using ixabepilone in the first- and second-line settings as a single agent and in combination with estramustine. Patupilone and sagopilone were also shown to have promising efficacy in phase II clinical trials of patients with CRPC. All three epothilones appear to be well tolerated, with modest rates of neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy. The lack of crossresistance between epothilones and taxanes may allow sequencing of these agents. Evaluating epothilones in phase III comparative trials would provide much-needed insight into their potential place in the management of patients with CRPC. PMID:21964003

  8. A color test for the convenient identification of an ingested surface activating agent.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Jamal, Mostofa; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tobiume, Tadashi; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Color tests are easy, simple and inexpensive methods for the qualitative identification of chemicals. A color test was applied to the stomach contents of a forensic autopsy case. The result of the test, using bromophenol blue reagent, indicated the ingestion of a commercial cleaning product containing a cationic surface activating agent. Our findings suggest that forensic investigators should consider the additives used in commercial chemical products, such as surface activating agents, when determining the cause of death. PMID:26419519

  9. Five-year assessment of causative agents and antibiotic resistances in urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Çoban, Bayram; Ülkü, Nesrin; Kaplan, Halit; Topal, Burhan; Erdoğan, Haluk; Baskın, Esra

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To show the distribution and changes of causative agents of urinary tract infections in children and resistance rates by years and select the most appropriate antibiotics. Material and Methods: In this study, the Başkent University Alanya Research and Application Hospital automation system microbiology recording book was screened retrospectively. Growth of a single microorganism above 105 colonies (cfu/mL) was included in the assessment. Throughout the study, 10 691 urinary cultures were studies and growth was found in 392 (3.7%). Results: Three hundred and nine (78.8%) of the samples with growth belonged to girls. Growth was found in the neonatal period in 32 patients (8.2%). The most commonly isolated microorganism was Escherichia coli (E. coli) which was found in 68.4% of the patients. Klebsiella spp. were found with a rate of 12.0%; Enterobacter spp. were found with a rate of 10.7% and proteus spp. were found with a rate of 5.1%. Resistance to cefalotin (62.1%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxasole (43.1%), amoxycillin-clavulanate (34.8%), ampicillin (30.4%), cefixim (26.3%) and nitrofurantoin (3.6%) was found in E. coli species. The antibiotic which had the highest resistance rate was ampicillin with a rate of 93.2% for klebsiella and 83.4% for enterobacter. Klebsiella spp. were the most commonly grown pathogens in newborns (40.6%). In a follow-up period of 5 years, the resistance of E. coli to amoxycillin-clavulanate regressed from 40.3% to 31.3%, while the resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxasole (TMP-SMX) regressed from 45.6% to 34.7%. Conclusions: A high resistance against first-generation cephalosporins, ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and TMP-SMX which are the first-line antibiotics in childhood urinary tract infections was found. Carbapenem (meropenem, imipenem) resistance was not found in our center. Nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides and cefixime can be recommended for empirical treatment in our hospital because of low resistance. Antibiotic

  10. POISON RESISTANT CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew W. Wang

    2001-03-29

    The Alternative Fuels Field Test Unit (AFFTU) is a portable laboratory designed specifically to provide on-site evaluation of potential feedstocks for processes that produce alternative fuels from indigenous raw materials such as coal, natural gas or environmentally disadvantaged carbonaceous feedstocks. Since conversion of these raw materials into feed gas streams can produce a variety of bulk gas compositions, which furthermore can contain a myriad of trace components, it is necessary to evaluate each new feedstock on an individual basis. While it is possible to prepare blended gas mixtures to simulate the bulk composition of a known feedstock, it is neither possible nor cost-effective to simulate adequately the variety of trace chemicals present in that feedstock--some of which may not even be detected by routine analysis. Additionally, the transient composition of the gas during upsets or routine process changes may have an impact on the proposed process that is not foreseen in standard design. To address these concerns, the AFFTU was constructed with the following experimental capabilities: (1) A state-of-the-art gas chromatograph system to perform semi-continuous monitoring of both bulk composition and the concentration of key trace poisons down to one part per billion (ppb). (2) A 30-mL reactor system that can accept up to two feed streams from the customer, allowing a true life test with the actual gas projected for use in the proposed facility. (3) A manifold of four adsorbent beds, located upstream of the reactor, which permits the testing of adsorbents for the removal of contaminants from the feed stream. The effectiveness of these adsorbents may be evaluated either by analysis of the gas upstream and downstream of the bed (or at an intermediate point within the bed) or by observing the impact of the presence or absence of that bed on the actual stability of the catalyst activity. To achieve portability, the AFFTU was constructed in a commercial 48-foot

  11. Next-generation fire extinguishing agent. Phase 2: Laboratory tests and scoping trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapscott, Robert E.; May, John H.; Moore, Joanne P.; Lee, Michael E.; Walker, Joseph L.

    1990-04-01

    Concepts were orginated for next-generation fire extinguishing agents. In Phase 2, laboratory tests and scoping trials were performed to initiate a program for replacement of halon fire extinguishants in Air Force fire protection and firefighter training. Facilities were also established to perform laser Raman spectroscopic investigations of flame suppression halon agents, and initial, baseline Raman studies were carried out.

  12. Overcoming platinum resistance through the use of a copper-lowering agent.

    PubMed

    Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Fu, Caroline; Kuo, Macus Tien; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2012-06-01

    Low levels of human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) mRNA are associated with a shorter progression-free survival after platinum-based therapy. Pretreatment with a copper-lowering agent such as trientine enhanced hCtr1-mediated platinum uptake. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study (NCT01178112) of carboplatin and trientine with the goal of resensitizing patients with advanced cancer to platinum chemotherapy. This case report reviews the outcomes of 5 patients with platinum-resistant high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer enrolled on the study to date. Overall, they tolerated treatment well. Severe adverse events that occurred in 2 patients were myelosuppression, notably anemia requiring transfusion. Dose-limiting toxicity was not observed within the first 28 days (cycle 1). After 2 cycles of therapy, partial remission was achieved in 1 patient (10+ months), stable disease in 3 patients (2, 3.5+, and 5 months, respectively), and 1 patient had progressive disease. These cases provide preliminary clinical evidence that the role of decreasing copper levels in reversing platinum resistance merits additional clinical investigation. Evaluation of this novel strategy is warranted in larger studies to assess the efficacy of this approach for treating platinum-resistant advanced epithelial ovarian cancer in patients with high copper levels.

  13. Marinopyrrole Derivatives as Potential Antibiotic Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (II)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chunwei; Liu, Yan; Song, Hao; Pan, Lili; Li, Jerry; Qin, Yong; Li, Rongshi

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a major problem, causing severe and intractable infections worldwide. MRSA is resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics, and alternative treatments are limited. A very limited number of new antibiotics have been discovered over the last half-century, novel agents for the treatment of MRSA infections are urgently needed. Marinopyrrole A was reported to show antibiotic activity against MRSA in 2008. After we reported the first total synthesis of (±)-marinopyrrole A, we designed and synthesized a series of marinopyrrole derivatives. Our structure activity relationship (SAR) studies of these novel derivatives against a panel of Gram-positive pathogens in antibacterial assays have revealed that a para-trifluoromethyl analog (33) of marinopyrrole A is ≥63-, 8-, and 4-fold more potent than vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, respectively. The results provide valuable information in the search for new-generation antibiotics. PMID:23955285

  14. Marinopyrrole derivatives as potential antibiotic agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (II).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chunwei; Liu, Yan; Song, Hao; Pan, Lili; Li, Jerry; Qin, Yong; Li, Rongshi

    2013-08-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a major problem, causing severe and intractable infections worldwide. MRSA is resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics, and alternative treatments are limited. A very limited number of new antibiotics have been discovered over the last half-century, novel agents for the treatment of MRSA infections are urgently needed. Marinopyrrole A was reported to show antibiotic activity against MRSA in 2008. After we reported the first total synthesis of (±)-marinopyrrole A, we designed and synthesized a series of marinopyrrole derivatives. Our structure activity relationship (SAR) studies of these novel derivatives against a panel of Gram-positive pathogens in antibacterial assays have revealed that a para-trifluoromethyl analog (33) of marinopyrrole A is ≥ 63-, 8-, and 4-fold more potent than vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, respectively. The results provide valuable information in the search for new-generation antibiotics.

  15. The Anticancer Agent Prodigiosin Is Not a Multidrug Resistance Protein Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Elahian, Fatemeh; Moghimi, Bahareh; Dinmohammadi, Farideh; Ghamghami, Mahsa; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    The brilliant red pigments prodiginines are natural secondary metabolites that are produced by select species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These molecules have received significant attention due to their reported antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and anticancer activities. In this study, a Serratia marcescens SER1 strain was isolated and verified using 16s rDNA. The prodigiosin was purified using silica chromatography and was analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The cell cytotoxic effects of the purified prodigiosin on multiple drug resistant cell lines that overexpress MDR1, BCRP, or MRP2 pumps were analyzed. Prodigiosin had nearly identical cytotoxic effects on the resistant cells in comparison to their parental lines. In agreement with the same prodigiosin cytotoxicity, FACS analysis of prodigiosin accumulation and efflux in MDR overexpressing cell lines also indicated that this pro-apoptotic agent operates independently of the presence of the MDR1, BCRP, or MRP transporter and may be a potential treatment for malignant cancer cells that overexpress multidrug resistance transporters. PMID:23373476

  16. The anticancer agent prodigiosin is not a multidrug resistance protein substrate.

    PubMed

    Elahian, Fatemeh; Moghimi, Bahareh; Dinmohammadi, Farideh; Ghamghami, Mahsa; Hamidi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Seyed Abbas

    2013-03-01

    The brilliant red pigments prodiginines are natural secondary metabolites that are produced by select species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These molecules have received significant attention due to their reported antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and anticancer activities. In this study, a Serratia marcescens SER1 strain was isolated and verified using 16s rDNA. The prodigiosin was purified using silica chromatography and was analyzed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The cell cytotoxic effects of the purified prodigiosin on multiple drug resistant cell lines that overexpress MDR1, BCRP, or MRP2 pumps were analyzed. Prodigiosin had nearly identical cytotoxic effects on the resistant cells in comparison to their parental lines. In agreement with the same prodigiosin cytotoxicity, FACS analysis of prodigiosin accumulation and efflux in MDR overexpressing cell lines also indicated that this pro-apoptotic agent operates independently of the presence of the MDR1, BCRP, or MRP transporter and may be a potential treatment for malignant cancer cells that overexpress multidrug resistance transporters.

  17. Susceptibilities of ampicillin-resistant strains of Salmonella other than S. typhi to 10 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Alós, J I; Gómez-Garcés, J L; Cogollos, R; Amor, E; Pérez-Rivilla, A

    1992-01-01

    Ampicillin-resistant strains of Salmonella other than S. typhi constitute a health problem. We tested the antimicrobial susceptibilities to 10 antibiotics of 57 of these strains isolated in a 30-month period. The rates of resistance were as follows: chloramphenicol, 40.3%; tetracycline, 33.3%; gentamicin, 5.3%; co-trimoxazole, 5.3%; nalidixic acid, 1.8%; and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, aztreonam, and ciprofloxacin, 0%. In our experience, there are alternative antibiotics with excellent in vitro activities. PMID:1416869

  18. Mitigation of human-pathogenic fungi that exhibit resistance to medical agents: can clinical antifungal stewardship help?

    PubMed

    Hull, Claire M; Purdy, Nicola J; Moody, Suzy C

    2014-01-01

    Reducing indiscriminate antimicrobial usage to combat the expansion of multidrug-resistant human-pathogenic bacteria is fundamental to clinical antibiotic stewardship. In contrast to bacteria, fungal resistance traits are not understood to be propagated via mobile genetic elements, and it has been proposed that a global explosion of resistance to medical antifungals is therefore unlikely. Clinical antifungal stewardship has focused instead on reducing the drug toxicity and high costs associated with medical agents. Mitigating the problem of human-pathogenic fungi that exhibit resistance to antimicrobials is an emergent issue. This article addresses the extent to which clinical antifungal stewardship could influence the scale and epidemiology of resistance to medical antifungals both now and in the future. The importance of uncharted selection pressure exerted by agents outside the clinical setting (agricultural pesticides, industrial xenobiotics, biocides, pharmaceutical waste and others) on environmentally ubiquitous spore-forming molds that are lesserstudied but increasingly responsible for drug-refractory infections is considered.

  19. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis drug susceptibility and molecular diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Shafiq, Majid; Lee, James C; Ray, Susan M; Wang, Yun F; Metchock, Beverly; Anderson, Albert M; Nguyen, Minh Ly T

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB), defined by resistance to the 2 most effective first-line drugs, isoniazid and rifampin, is on the rise globally and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the increasing availability of novel rapid diagnostic tools for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) drug susceptibility testing, the clinical applicability of these methods is unsettled. In this study, the mechanisms of action and resistance of Mtb to isoniazid and rifampin, and the utility, advantages and limitations of the available Mtb drug susceptibility testing tools are reviewed, with particular emphasis on molecular methods with rapid turnaround including line probe assays, molecular beacon-based real-time polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. The authors conclude that neither rapid molecular drug testing nor phenotypic methods are perfect in predicting Mtb drug susceptibility and therefore must be interpreted within the clinical context of each patient.

  20. In vitro detection of benzimidazole resistance in Haemonchus contortus: egg hatch test versus larval development test.

    PubMed

    Várady, M; Cudeková, P; Corba, J

    2007-10-21

    The present study was designed to compare the egg hatch test (EHT) and the larval development test (LDT) as in vitro tools for detection of benzimidazole (BZ) resistance in Haemonchus contortus, a nematode parasite of small ruminants. Comparisons were made during a course of infection and changes in both EHT and LDT were monitored to measure the correlation between resistance and susceptibility in different parasite stages (eggs and larvae). In addition, mixed doses of known numbers of susceptible and BZ-resistant H. contortus eggs were used to assess the sensitivity of LDT for the detection of low levels of resistance. The degree of resistance for each test was expressed as resistance factor (RF). The LDT showed a greater ability to distinguish between four susceptible and four resistant isolates of H. contortus with higher resistance factors compared to the EHT. For the EHT the RF by using ED(50) criterion ranged from 3.2 to 13.3 and from 7.4 to 25.2 by using LC(99). For LDT the resistant isolates were 4.3-63.1 times more tolerant than the susceptible isolates using the ED(50) criterion and 91.1-1411.0 times more tolerant using the LC(99) criterion. The LDT was also able to clearly indicate the presence of low level (4%) of resistant larvae amongst a susceptible background population.

  1. Growth factor signalling networks in breast cancer and resistance to endocrine agents: new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, R I; Hutcheson, I R; Britton, D; Knowlden, J M; Jones, H E; Harper, M E; Hiscox, S E; Barrow, D; Gee, J M W

    2005-02-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that growth factor networks are highly interactive with the estrogen receptor (ER) in the control of breast cancer growth and development. As such, tumor responses to anti-hormones are likely to be a composite of the ER and growth factor inhibitory activity of these agents, with alterations/aberrations in growth factor signalling providing a mechanism for the development of anti-hormone resistance. In this light, the current article focuses on illustrating the relationship between growth factor signalling and anti-hormone failure in our in-house tumor models of breast cancer and describes how we are now beginning to successfully target their actions to improve the effects of anti-hormonal drugs and to block aggressive disease progression.

  2. Modification of silicone sealant to improve gamma radiation resistance, by addition of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Giovanni; Burillo, Guillermina

    2013-09-01

    Poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealant (SS) was modified with the addition of different protective compounds to conserve its physical-chemical properties during gamma irradiation. 2-Vinyl naphthalene (2-VN), bisphenol-A (BPA) and poly (vinyl carbazole) (PVK) were used to evaluate radiation protection through the crosslinking effect of radiation. The samples were irradiated with doses from 100 kGy to 500 kGy at room temperature in air, with a 60Co gamma source, and the changes in molecular weight, thermal behavior, elastic properties and infrared spectra (FTIR-ATR) absorbance analysis were determined. The molecular weight of unmodified silicone sealant increases with the absorbed dose because of crosslinking as predominant effect. However, the crosslinking effect was inhibited with the addition of protective agent due to the aromatic compounds present. Modified silicone sealant films present better radiation resistance than unmodified system.

  3. Emerging Resistance, New Antimicrobial Agents  …  but No Tests! The Challenge of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing in the Current US Regulatory Landscape.

    PubMed

    Humphries, R M; Hindler, J A

    2016-07-01

    Accurate and timely performance of antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) by the clinical laboratory is paramount to combating antimicrobial resistance. The ability of laboratories in the United States to effectively perform ASTs is challenged by several factors. Some, such as new resistance mechanisms and the associated evolution of testing recommendations and breakpoints, are inevitable. Others are entirely man-made. These include unnecessarily strict US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) limitations on how commercial AST systems can be used for diagnostic testing, the absence of up-to-date performance data on these systems, and the lack of commercially available FDA-cleared tests for newer antimicrobial agents or for older agents with updated breakpoints. This viewpoint will highlight contemporary AST challenges faced by the clinical laboratory, and propose some solutions. PMID:27025822

  4. Current perspectives on tigecycline resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: susceptibility testing issues and mechanisms of resistance.

    PubMed

    Pournaras, Spyros; Koumaki, Vasiliki; Spanakis, Nicholas; Gennimata, Vasiliki; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2016-07-01

    During the past decades, rates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and carbapenem-resistant (CR) Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates, mainly Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter spp., Proteus spp. and Serratia marcescens, have increased, considerably restricting effective antimicrobial treatments. Tigecycline, the first member of the glycylcyclines, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of complicated skin and soft-tissue, complicated intra-abdominal and community-acquired bacterial respiratory infections and is increasingly administered against MDR Enterobacteriaceae. Although resistance has gradually appeared, tigecycline still remains relatively active among Enterobacteriaceae, with resistance rates largely <10% in most wide-scale surveillance studies. Tigecycline resistance has been reported in some studies to be elevated among extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing, MDR, extensively drug-resistant and CR isolates. Broth microdilution (BMD) is the reference method for tigecycline susceptibility testing, but disagreements have been reported between the methods applied for routine tigecycline susceptibility testing. Therefore, confirmation of daily tigecycline susceptibility testing with BMD appears important in order to avoid misclassification of isolates. Various mechanisms have been reported to confer tigecycline resistance, with RND-type transporters, mainly the AcrAB efflux pump, playing an important role. Other pumps and various control pathways are also implicated in tigecycline resistance. Overall, tigecycline is a potent therapeutic option for enterobacterial infections. Accurate detection of tigecycline susceptibility status and surveillance of resistant organisms in the hospital environment is necessary in order to optimise its use and to preserve tigecycline in our therapeutic arsenal.

  5. New agents for the treatment of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hoagland, Daniel T; Liu, Jiuyu; Lee, Robin B; Lee, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Inadequate dosing and incomplete treatment regimens, coupled with the ability of the tuberculosis bacilli to cause latent infections that are tolerant of currently used drugs, have fueled the rise of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Treatment of MDR-TB infections is a major clinical challenge that has few viable or effective solutions; therefore patients face a poor prognosis and years of treatment. This review focuses on emerging drug classes that have the potential for treating MDR-TB and highlights their particular strengths as leads including their mode of action, in vivo efficacy, and key medicinal chemistry properties. Examples include the newly approved drugs bedaquiline and delaminid, and other agents in clinical and late preclinical development pipeline for the treatment of MDR-TB. Herein, we discuss the challenges to developing drugs to treat tuberculosis and how the field has adapted to these difficulties, with an emphasis on drug discovery approaches that might produce more effective agents and treatment regimens. PMID:27151308

  6. Coral-Associated Bacteria as a Promising Antibiofilm Agent against Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Gowrishankar, Shanmugaraj; Duncun Mosioma, Nyagwencha; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2012-01-01

    The current study deals with the evaluation of two coral-associated bacterial (CAB) extracts to inhibit the biofilm synthesis in vitro as well as the virulence production like hemolysin and exopolysaccharide (EPS), and also to assess their ability to modify the adhesion properties, that is cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Out of nine CAB screened, the ethyl acetate extract of CAB-E2 (Bacillus firmus) and CAB-E4 (Vibrio parahemolyticus) have shown excellent antibiofilm activity against S. aureus. CAB-E2 reduced the production of EPS (57–79%) and hemolysin (43–70%), which ultimately resulted in the significant inhibition of biofilms (80–87%) formed by both MRSA and MSSA. Similarly, CAB-E4 was also found to decrease the production of EPS (43–57%), hemolysin (43–57%) and biofilms (80–85%) of test pathogens. CLSM analysis also proved the antibiofilm efficacy of CAB extracts. Furthermore, the CAB extracts strongly decreased the CSH of S. aureus. Additionally, FT-IR analysis of S. aureus treated with CAB extracts evidenced the reduction in cellular components compared to their respective controls. Thus, the present study reports for the first time, B. firmus—a coral-associated bacterium, as a promising source of antibiofilm agent against the recalcitrant biofilms formed by multidrug resistant S. aureus. PMID:22988476

  7. Perceiving the agency of harmful agents: A test of dehumanization versus moral typecasting accounts.

    PubMed

    Khamitov, Mansur; Rotman, Jeff D; Piazza, Jared

    2016-01-01

    It is clear that harmful agents are targets of severe condemnation, but it is much less clear how perceivers conceptualize the agency of harmful agents. The current studies tested two competing predictions made by moral typecasting theory and the dehumanization literature. Across six studies, harmful agents were perceived to possess less agency than neutral (non-offending) and benevolent agents, consistent with a dehumanization perspective but inconsistent with the assumptions of moral typecasting theory. This was observed for human targets (Studies 1-2b and 4-5) and corporations (Study 3), and across various gradations of harmfulness (Studies 3 and 4). Importantly, denial of agency to harmful agents occurred even when controlling for perceptions of the agent's likeability (Studies 2a and 2b) and while using two different operationalizations of agency (Study 2a). Study 5 showed that harmful agents are denied agency primarily through an inferential process, and less through motivations to see the agent punished. Across all six studies, harmful agents were deemed less worthy of moral standing as a consequence of their harmful conduct and this reduction in moral standing was mediated through reductions in agency. Our findings clarify a current tension in the moral cognition literature, which have direct implications for the moral typecasting framework.

  8. Antibiotic-loaded, silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Ding, Xiali; Chen, Yuan; Guo, Mingquan; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xiaokui; Gu, Hongchen

    2016-09-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections have become one of the most serious risks in public health as they make the conventional antibiotics less efficient. There is an urgent need for developing new generations of antibacterial agents in this field. In this work, a nanoplatform of LEVO-loaded and silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles (Ag@MSNs@LEVO) is demonstrated as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of the inner Ag core and the loaded antibiotic drug in mesopores endows the single-particle nanoplatform with a synergistic effect on killing the drug-resistant bacteria. The nanoplatform of Ag@MSNs@LEVO exhibits superior antibacterial activity to LEVO-loaded MSNs (MSNs@LEVO) and silver core-embedded MSNs (Ag@MSNs) in vitro. In the in vivo acute peritonitis model, the infected drug-resistant Escherichia coli GN102 in peritoneal cavity of the mice is reduced by nearly three orders of magnitude and the aberrant pathological feature of spleen and peritoneum disappears after treatment with Ag@MSNs@LEVO. Importantly, this nanopaltform renders no obvious toxic side effect to the mice during the tested time. There is no doubt that this study strongly indicates a promising potential of Ag@MSNs@LEVO as a synergistic and safety therapy tool for the clinical drug-resistant infections. PMID:27294538

  9. Bitter melon extracts enhance the activity of chemotherapeutic agents through the modulation of multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Venugopal, Anand; Standing, David; Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Dhar, Animesh; Mitra, Ashim; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that extracts of bitter melon (BME) can be used as a preventive/therapeutic agent in colon cancers. Here, we determined BME effects on anticancer activity and bioavailability of doxorubicin (DOX) in colon cancer cells. BME enhanced the effect of DOX on cell proliferation and sensitized the cells toward DOX upon pretreatment. Furthermore, there was both increased drug uptake and reduced drug efflux. We also observed a reduction in the expression of multidrug resistance conferring proteins (MDRCP) P-glycoprotein, MRP-2, and BCRP. Further BME suppressed DOX efflux in MDCK cells overexpressing the three efflux proteins individually, suggesting that BME is a potent inhibitor of MDR function. Next, we determined the effect of BME on PXR, a xenobiotic sensing nuclear receptor and a transcription factor that controls the expression of the three MDR genes. BME suppressed PXR promoter activity thereby suppressing its expression. Finally, we determined the effect of AMPK pathway on drug efflux because we have previously demonstrated that BME affects the pathway. However, inhibiting AMPK did not affect drug resistance, suggesting that BME may use different pathways for the anticancer and MDR modulating activities. Together, these results suggest that BME can enhance the bioavailability and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy.

  10. 42 CFR 84.122 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84.122 Section 84.122 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  11. 42 CFR 84.122 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84.122 Section 84.122 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  12. Rolling resistance of electric vehicle tires from track tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Slavik, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Special low-rolling-resistance tires were made for DOE's ETV-1 electric vehicle. Tests were conducted on these tires and on a set of standard commercial automotive tires to determine the rolling resistance as a function of time during both constant-speed tires and SAE J227a driving cycle tests. The tests were conducted on a test track at ambient temperatures that ranged from 15 to 32 C (59 to 89 F) and with tire pressures of 207 to 276 kPa (30 to 40 psi). At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 207 kPa (30 psi) the rolling resistances of the electric vehicle tires and the standard commercial tires, respectively, were 0.0102 and 0.0088 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight. At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 276 kPa (40 psi) the rolling resistances were 0.009 and 0.0074 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight, respectively.

  13. Thermal-Interaction Matrix For Resistive Test Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Dhiman, Jaipal K.; Zamani, Nasser

    1990-01-01

    Linear mathematical model predicts increase in temperature in each segment of 15-segment resistive structure used to test electromigration. Assumption of linearity based on fact: equations that govern flow of heat are linear and coefficients in equations (heat conductivities and capacities) depend only weakly on temperature and considered constant over limited range of temperature.

  14. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-07-02

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs.

  15. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs. PMID:26167668

  16. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  17. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Frenkel, Lisa M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole L; Gupta, Ravindra K; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E; Wainberg, Mark A; Richman, Douglas D; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  18. In vitro susceptibility testing of nonsporing anaerobes to ten antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Shivananda, P G

    2000-07-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility was performed on sixty clinical isolates of nonsporing anaerobes against ten antimicrobial agents. The test was performed on Muller Hinton Agar and Wilkins Chalgren blood agar by preparing suspension of freshly isolated colonies in BHI broth. Apart from Metronidazole and Chloramphenicol newer antibiotics like Minocycline, Secnidazole, Tinidazole, Clarithromycin, Roxithromycin were also tried. Antimicrobial agents like Metronidazole, Secnidazole, Tinidazole and Minocycline were 100% sensitive, followed by Chloramphenicol, Clarithromycin and Roxithromycin. These newer agents can be good alternatives for the treatment of non sporing anaerobes. PMID:11218673

  19. In vitro susceptibility testing of nonsporing anaerobes to ten antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Shivananda, P G

    2000-04-01

    Antibiotic Susceptibility was performed on sixty clinical isolates of nonsporing anaerobes against ten antimicrobial agents. The test was performed on Muller Hinton Agar and Wilkins Chalgren blood agar by preparing suspension of freshly isolated colonies in BHI broth. Apart from Metronidazole and Chloramphenicol newer antibiotics like Minocycline, Secnidazole, Tinidazole, Clarithromycin, Roxithromycin were also tried. Antimicrobial agents like metronidazole, Secnidazole, Tinidazole and Minocycline were 100% sensitive, followed by Chloramphenicol, Clarithromycin and Roxithromycin. These newer agents can be good alternatives for the treatment of non sporing anaerobes. PMID:11217270

  20. Novel quorum-quenching agents promote methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) wound healing and sensitize MRSA to β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kuo, David; Yu, Guanping; Hoch, Wyatt; Gabay, Dean; Long, Lisa; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Nagy, Nancy; Harding, Clifford V; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Shoham, Menachem

    2015-03-01

    The dwindling repertoire of antibiotics to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) calls for novel treatment options. Quorum-quenching agents offer an alternative or an adjuvant to antibiotic therapy. Three biaryl hydroxyketone compounds discovered previously (F1, F12, and F19; G. Yu, D. Kuo, M. Shoham, and R. Viswanathan, ACS Comb Sci 16:85-91, 2014) were tested for efficacy in MRSA-infected animal models. Topical therapy of compounds F1 and F12 in a MRSA murine wound infection model promotes wound healing compared to the untreated control. Compounds F1, F12, and F19 afford significant survival benefits in a MRSA insect larva model. Combination therapy of these quorum-quenching agents with cephalothin or nafcillin, antibiotics to which MRSA is resistant in monotherapy, revealed additional survival benefits. The quorum-quenching agents sensitize MRSA to the antibiotic by a synergistic mode of action that also is observed in vitro. An adjuvant of 1 μg/ml F1, F12, or F19 reduces the MIC of nafcillin and cephalothin about 50-fold to values comparable to those for vancomycin, the antibiotic often prescribed for MRSA infections. These findings suggest that it is possible to resurrect obsolete antibiotic therapies in combination with these novel quorum-quenching agents.

  1. Novel Quorum-Quenching Agents Promote Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Wound Healing and Sensitize MRSA to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, David; Yu, Guanping; Hoch, Wyatt; Gabay, Dean; Long, Lisa; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Nagy, Nancy; Harding, Clifford V.; Viswanathan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The dwindling repertoire of antibiotics to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) calls for novel treatment options. Quorum-quenching agents offer an alternative or an adjuvant to antibiotic therapy. Three biaryl hydroxyketone compounds discovered previously (F1, F12, and F19; G. Yu, D. Kuo, M. Shoham, and R. Viswanathan, ACS Comb Sci 16:85–91, 2014) were tested for efficacy in MRSA-infected animal models. Topical therapy of compounds F1 and F12 in a MRSA murine wound infection model promotes wound healing compared to the untreated control. Compounds F1, F12, and F19 afford significant survival benefits in a MRSA insect larva model. Combination therapy of these quorum-quenching agents with cephalothin or nafcillin, antibiotics to which MRSA is resistant in monotherapy, revealed additional survival benefits. The quorum-quenching agents sensitize MRSA to the antibiotic by a synergistic mode of action that also is observed in vitro. An adjuvant of 1 μg/ml F1, F12, or F19 reduces the MIC of nafcillin and cephalothin about 50-fold to values comparable to those for vancomycin, the antibiotic often prescribed for MRSA infections. These findings suggest that it is possible to resurrect obsolete antibiotic therapies in combination with these novel quorum-quenching agents. PMID:25534736

  2. Chemical Agent Monitor (CAM) follow-on operational test and evaluation simulant test strategy. Final report, May 1988-April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzinger, A.T.; Grasso, P.S.; Guelta, M.A.

    1990-06-01

    This report was intended to provide technical guidance to the U.S. Army Armor and Engineering (A E) Board in the area of simulant use for the Chemical Agent Monitor (CAM) Follow-on Operational Test and Evaluation (FOT E). The Operational Science Branch (Op Sci Br) was requested to support the A E Board in their effort to design an FOT E for the CAM using methyl salicylate (MS) as the H mode (mustard agent) simulant. Personnel from Op Sci Br were asked to design contamination technology and monitoring methods to test the machine/man interface and use doctrine, and analyze how well data is collected and evaluated.

  3. History and evolution of antibiotic resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci: Susceptibility profiles of new anti-staphylococcal agents.

    PubMed

    John, Joseph F; Harvin, Alexander M

    2007-12-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a heterogenous group of Gram-positive cocci that are widespread commensals among mammalia. Unlike their coagulase-positive counterpart, Staphylococcus aureus, CNS produce few virulence patterns and normally refrain from invading tissue. Yet, not only can CNS cause infections in normal host tissue, but modern medicine has also seen their rise as opportunists that display adherence to medical device materials to produce a protective biofilm. CNS have historically been more resistant to antimicrobials, including the beta-lactam antibiotics, than S. aureus and some hospitals reveal rates of oxacillin resistance in CNS approaching 90%. Cross resistance to non-beta-lactam agents has been a recurrent theme over the past 40 years in the CNS. Thus, there has been a pressing need for newer antimicrobial agents with good antistaphylococcal activity. Those new agents tend to have excellent antistaphylococcal activity include daptomycin, linezolid, oritavancin, telavancin, tigecycline, dalbavancin, new quinolones, and ceftibiprole, several of which have unique mechanisms of action. The MIC₉₀ for these new compounds typically ranges from 0.5-4 mug/mL. Staphylococcal biofilm formation is quite common in CNS infections and markedly increases the MIC for most older antimicrobials. Several of the newer agents offer some promise of penetration of biofilm to inhibit or kill adherent staphylococci. CNS will likely remain a major cause of infections in the modern age, evolve further antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and require development of newer antimicrobials for curative therapy.

  4. Prevalence of multi-antimicrobial-agent resistant, shiga toxin and enterotoxin producing Escherichia coli in surface waters of river Ganga.

    PubMed

    Ram, Siya; Vajpayee, Poornima; Shanker, Rishi

    2007-11-01

    The consumption of polluted surface water for domestic and recreational purposes by large populations in developing nations is a major cause of diarrheal disease related mortality. The river Ganga and its tributaries meet 40% of the water requirement for drinking and irrigation in India. In this study, Escherichia coli isolates (n=75) of the river Ganga water were investigated for resistance to antimicrobial agents (n=15) and virulence genes specific to shiga toxin (STEC) and enterotoxin producing E. coli (ETEC). E. coli isolates from the river Ganga water exhibit resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. The distribution of antimicrobial agent resistance in E. colivaries significantly (chi2: 81.28 at df = 24, p < 0.001) between the sites. Both stx1 and stx2 genes were present in 82.3% of STEC (n=17) while remaining isolates possess either stxl (11.8%) or stx2 (5.9%). The presence of eaeA, hlyA, and chuA genes was observed in 70.6, 88.2, and 58.8% of STEC, respectively. Both LT1 and ST1 genes were positive in 66.7% of ETEC (n=15) while 33.3% of isolates harbor only LT1 gene. The prevalence of multi-antimicrobial-agent resistant E. coli in the river Ganga water poses increased risk of infections in the human population.

  5. Prevalence of multi-antimicrobial-agent resistant, shiga toxin and enterotoxin producing Escherichia coli in surface waters of river Ganga.

    PubMed

    Ram, Siya; Vajpayee, Poornima; Shanker, Rishi

    2007-11-01

    The consumption of polluted surface water for domestic and recreational purposes by large populations in developing nations is a major cause of diarrheal disease related mortality. The river Ganga and its tributaries meet 40% of the water requirement for drinking and irrigation in India. In this study, Escherichia coli isolates (n=75) of the river Ganga water were investigated for resistance to antimicrobial agents (n=15) and virulence genes specific to shiga toxin (STEC) and enterotoxin producing E. coli (ETEC). E. coli isolates from the river Ganga water exhibit resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. The distribution of antimicrobial agent resistance in E. colivaries significantly (chi2: 81.28 at df = 24, p < 0.001) between the sites. Both stx1 and stx2 genes were present in 82.3% of STEC (n=17) while remaining isolates possess either stxl (11.8%) or stx2 (5.9%). The presence of eaeA, hlyA, and chuA genes was observed in 70.6, 88.2, and 58.8% of STEC, respectively. Both LT1 and ST1 genes were positive in 66.7% of ETEC (n=15) while 33.3% of isolates harbor only LT1 gene. The prevalence of multi-antimicrobial-agent resistant E. coli in the river Ganga water poses increased risk of infections in the human population. PMID:18044515

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of using antiretroviral drug resistance testing.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Angeletti, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients failing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have a substantially lower chance of clinical success than naive patients given their first antiretroviral therapy. This suggests that HAART failure is a determinant for an increase in the cost of treatment. A review of the literature regarding cost and impact of antiretroviral drug-resistance testing was performed. Examination of existing methods to execute a cost-effectiveness analysis on the use of these tests in clinical practice was also undertaken. The cost of treatment failure in HIV-infected patients has been quantified in several retrospective studies. The cost of care for patients with virological suppression was significantly lower than those with a single virological failure. Moreover, the latter group had lower costs than patients with multiple failures. The result of the cost-effective analysis based on a specific model application using genotypic resistance assays to guide the choice of a subsequent therapy in HIV disease, is cost-effective under a wide range of assumptions regarding effectiveness and costs. The available studies on the cost-effective evaluation of genotypic tests are limited, and the respective studies supply important indications on cost-effective evaluations. Despite its demonstrated benefits, antiretroviral drug resistance testing presents features and limitations that also restrict the cost-effectiveness analysis. PMID:15000585

  7. Rig for testing the relative wear resistance of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Berdikov, V.F.; Diulin, A.I.; Efimchuk, V.P.; Pushkarev, O.I.; Finogenov, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple and compact rig for studying the relative wear resistance of materials subjected to mechanical abrasion and friction. The rig has an electronic control system. It was used to test the relative wear resistance of a wide range of superhard and brittle materials under mechanical abrasion against a counterbody. The counterbody was made of modified iron and the test medium was a diamond suspension in oil. The results showed that specimen wear exhibits a linear relationship with abrasion time (in the range of 0.5-20 min.) at unit pressure from 0.01 to 0.10 MPa. That a standard wear pattern exists within a wide range of parameters indicates that abrasive conditions are highly stable and makes it possible to control conditions. The rig was used to establish the relative wear resistance of several abrasives, minerals, and refractory compounds. The very large difference (15.2 times) between the most and least-resistant materials (tungsten carbide and fluoride) illustrates the sensitivity of the methodology.

  8. The Mobile Agents Integrated Field Test: Mars Desert Research Station April 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Alena, Rick; Crawford, Sekou; Dowding, John; Graham, Jeff; Kaskiris, Charis; Tyree, Kim S.; vanHoof, Ron

    2003-01-01

    The Mobile Agents model-based, distributed architecture, which integrates diverse components in a system for lunar and planetary surface operations, was extensively tested in a two-week field "technology retreat" at the Mars Society s Desert Research Station (MDRS) during April 2003. More than twenty scientists and engineers from three NASA centers and two universities refined and tested the system through a series of incremental scenarios. Agent software, implemented in runtime Brahms, processed GPS, health data, and voice commands-monitoring, controlling and logging science data throughout simulated EVAs with two geologists. Predefined EVA plans, modified on the fly by voice command, enabled the Mobile Agents system to provide navigation and timing advice. Communications were maintained over five wireless nodes distributed over hills and into canyons for 5 km; data, including photographs and status was transmitted automatically to the desktop at mission control in Houston. This paper describes the system configurations, communication protocols, scenarios, and test results.

  9. Dam-break flows with resistance as agents of sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmett, M.; Moodie, T. B.

    2008-08-01

    When a semi-infinite body of fluid initially at rest behind a vertical retaining wall is suddenly released by the removal of the barrier, the resulting flow over either a horizontal or a sloping bed is referred to as a dam-break flow. When resistance to the flow is neglected, the exact solution in the case of a horizontal bed with or without "tail water" may be obtained on the basis of shallow-water theory via the method of characteristics, and the results are well known. The inclusion of the effects of resistance in the form of basal friction that are needed in order to bring the mathematical solutions into closer harmony with the experimental results modifies the wave speed and flow profile near the head of the wave significantly and the simple exact solution of the shallow-water equations can no longer be employed as a reasonable description of the flow field. It is our intention here to study dam-break flows as agents of sediment transport taking into account basal friction and the attendant changes in depth profiles near the head, as well as the effects of particle concentrations on the flow dynamics including both erosion and deposition of particles arising through the interaction of the flow with the bed material. We shall consider shallow flows over dry beds and investigate the effects of changes in the depositional and erosional models employed as well as in the nature of the drag acting on the flow. These models offer some insight into the transport of sediment in the worst case scenario of complete and instantaneous collapse of a dam. They are also anticipated to provide information on other sheet flow events where particle transport plays a significant role in the flow dynamics.

  10. Activity of faropenem tested against Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates including fluoroquinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Critchley, Ian A; Whittington, William L H; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pottumarthy, Sudha

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the anti-gonococcal potency of faropenem along with 7 comparator reference antimicrobials against a preselected collection of clinical isolates. The 265 isolates were inclusive of 2 subsets: 1) 76 well-characterized resistant phenotypes of gonococcal strains (53 quinolone-resistant strains--31 with documented quinolone resistance-determining region changes from Japan, 15 strains resistant to penicillin and tetracycline, and 8 strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin) and 2) 189 recent isolates from clinical specimens in 2004 from 6 states across the United States where quinolone resistance is prevalent. Activity of faropenem was adversely affected by l-cysteine hydrochloride in IsoVitaleX (4-fold increase in [minimal inhibitory concentration] MIC50; 0.06 versus 0.25 microg/mL). The rank order of potency of the antimicrobials for the entire collection was ceftriaxone (MIC90, 0.06 microg/mL) > faropenem (0.25 microg/mL) > azithromycin (0.5 microg/mL) > cefuroxime (1 microg/mL) > tetracycline (2 microg/mL) > penicillin = ciprofloxacin = levofloxacin (4 microg/mL). Using MIC90 for comparison, faropenem was 4-fold more potent than cefuroxime (0.25 versus 1 microg/mL), but was 4-fold less active than ceftriaxone (0.25 versus 0.06 microg/mL). Although the activity of faropenem was not affected by either penicillinase production (MIC90, 0.12 microg/mL, penicillinase-positive) or increasing ciprofloxacin MIC (0.25 microg/mL, ciprofloxacin-resistant), increasing penicillin MIC was associated with an increase in MIC90 values (0.016 microg/mL for penicillin-susceptible to 0.25 microg/mL for penicillin-resistant strains). Among the recent (2004) clinical gonococcal isolates tested, reduced susceptibility to penicillins, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones was high (28.0-94.2%). Geographic distribution of the endemic resistance rates of gonococci varied considerably, with 16.7-66.7% of the gonococcal isolates being ciprofloxacin-resistant in Oregon

  11. 49 CFR 234.267 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... STATE ACTION PLANS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.267 Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation resistance tests shall be made when wires...

  12. 49 CFR 234.267 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... STATE ACTION PLANS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.267 Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation resistance tests shall be made when wires...

  13. Comparison of minimum inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution testing versus standard disc diffusion testing in the detection of penicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin resistance in viridans group streptococci.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasunori; Goldsmith, Colin E; Coulter, Wilson A; Mason, Charlene; Dooley, James S G; Lowery, Colm J; Millar, B Cherie; Moore, John E

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of disc diffusion testing with penicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin within the viridans group streptococci (VGS). In total, the antibiotic susceptibilities of 167 VGS isolates were compared by standard disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods, and these phenotypic data were compared to the carriage of the respective gene resistance determinants [ermB and mefA/E (macrolides); QRDR, gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE (quinolones)]. Overall, there were 35 discrepancies [resistant by MIC and susceptible by zone diameter (21.0%)] between MIC and disc diameter when penicillin susceptibility was interpreted by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute criteria. Scattergrams showed a bimodal distribution between non-susceptible and susceptible strains when erythromycin susceptibility was tested by both methods. Thirty-four (20.4%) isolates were categorized as resistant by MIC breakpoints, while disc diameter defined these as having intermediate resistance. With ciprofloxacin, three isolates (1.8%) showed minor discrepancies between MIC breakpoints and disc diameter. Isolates non-susceptible to all three antimicrobial agents tested were reliably distinguished from susceptible isolates by disc diffusion testing, except for the detection of low-level resistance to penicillin, where broth microdilution or an alternative quantitative MIC method should be used. Otherwise, we conclude that disc diffusion testing is a reliable method to detect strains of VGS non-susceptible to penicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, as demonstrated with their concordance to their gene resistance characteristics.

  14. [In vitro tests of internal tooth whitening agents on colored solutions do not replace tests on teeth].

    PubMed

    Bäumler, Marc A; Schug, Jens; Schmidlin, PatrickR; Imfeld, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Two in vitro tests for the assessment of whitening agents were evaluated. A simple, reproducible and cost-effective model using coloured solutions was compared to a tooth model. The following bleaching agents were investigated: 1) Sodium perborate tetrahydrate/30% H2O2, 2) sodium perborate tetrahydrate/3% H2O2, 3) thermocatalytic procedure with 30% H2O2 and 4) Opal-escence Endo. In the model using coloured solutions, the light absorption of the solutions was assessed one and 24 hours after application of the whitening agents. In discoloured teeth, whitening agents were placed in a simulated access cavity. In groups 1, 2, and 4, the agents were left in the cavity for three days, whereas in group 3 the substance was applied three times for 30 seconds. Bleaching processes were repeated three times. All bleaching agents proved effective in the model with coloured solutions, as well as in the tooth model. The effect was most pronounced after the first bleaching step. The results showed, however, that the simplified experiment with coloured solutions cannot replace the tooth model.

  15. Short communication: Streptococcus species isolated from mastitis milk samples in Germany and their resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Minst, K; Märtlbauer, E; Miller, T; Meyer, C

    2012-12-01

    Mastitis is one of the most frequent infectious diseases in dairy cattle and is a reason for antimicrobial drug usage in dairy cows. The bacteria involved in bovine mastitis are mainly Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and coliforms. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance among Streptococcus spp. isolated from bovine mastitis milk. Antimicrobial resistance in Strep. uberis (n=227), Strep. dysgalactiae (n=49), and Strep. agalactiae (n=3) was determined for 9 antimicrobial agents using the broth microdilution method in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Of all Streptococcus spp., 13% were multidrug resistant. The rate of multidrug resistance was higher among Strep. uberis (15%) than among Strep. dysgalactiae (6%) and Strep. agalactiae (0%). Resistance to tetracycline was the most common, followed by resistance to erythromycin, pirlimycin, and gentamicin. Resistance rates were higher on farms with more than 80 cows compared with those with fewer than 20 cows. β-Lactams should remain the drugs of choice in the treatment of streptococcal mastitis. The slightly elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations determined for these antibiotics may indicate, however, the emergence of resistant streptococci. To identify such changes in susceptibility as early as possible, antimicrobial resistance in streptococci should be surveyed regularly. PMID:22999286

  16. [Antiplatelet therapy: resistance to traditional antiaggregation drugs and role of new antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    del Castillo-Carnevali, Hugo; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2014-09-01

    Platelet aggregation plays a key role in the development of major cardiovascular events (MACE) related to atherothrombosis. Since the appearance of coronary stenting, the importance of measuring and modulating platelet activity has considerably increased in the scientific literature during the last decade. Double antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel administrated to stent carriers has widely demonstrated its efficacy in the prevention of MACE compared with aspirin alone. These benefits are also present when a conservatory approach is chosen for acute coronary syndrome management. However, there are an important number of patients who develop MACE despite optimal dual antiplatelet therapy, most likely related to an incomplete platelet activity inhibition. Many studies suggest an important inter-individual variability in the response to the drugs, maybe related, at least in part, to the use of different assessment techniques of platelet aggregation. Other authors suggest an incomplete platelet inhibition as a possible explanation for the presence of MACE in patients under optimal antiplatelet therapy. Resistance to usual drugs has become a clinically relevant issue that requires an individual approach where new antiplatelet agents, such as prasugrel or ticagrelor, could play an important role as stated in current consensus documents. PMID:24342012

  17. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Wyatt I.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Gaskin, John F.; Norton, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others.

  18. Potential of immunomodulatory agents as adjunct host-directed therapies for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Rao, Martin; Dodoo, Ernest; Maeurer, Markus

    2016-06-15

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is extremely challenging due to the virulence of the etiologic strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), the aberrant host immune responses and the diminishing treatment options with TB drugs. New treatment regimens incorporating therapeutics targeting both M. tb and host factors are urgently needed to improve the clinical management outcomes of MDR-TB. Host-directed therapies (HDT) could avert destructive tuberculous lung pathology, facilitate eradication of M. tb, improve survival and prevent long-term functional disability. In this review we (1) discuss the use of HDT for cancer and other infections, drawing parallels and the precedent they set for MDR-TB treatment, (2) highlight preclinical studies of pharmacological agents commonly used in clinical practice which have HDT potential, and (3) outline developments in cellular therapy to promote clinically beneficial immunomodulation to improve treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary MDR-TB. The use of HDTs as adjuncts to MDR-TB therapy requires urgent evaluation.

  19. Potential of immunomodulatory agents as adjunct host-directed therapies for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Rao, Martin; Dodoo, Ernest; Maeurer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is extremely challenging due to the virulence of the etiologic strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), the aberrant host immune responses and the diminishing treatment options with TB drugs. New treatment regimens incorporating therapeutics targeting both M. tb and host factors are urgently needed to improve the clinical management outcomes of MDR-TB. Host-directed therapies (HDT) could avert destructive tuberculous lung pathology, facilitate eradication of M. tb, improve survival and prevent long-term functional disability. In this review we (1) discuss the use of HDT for cancer and other infections, drawing parallels and the precedent they set for MDR-TB treatment, (2) highlight preclinical studies of pharmacological agents commonly used in clinical practice which have HDT potential, and (3) outline developments in cellular therapy to promote clinically beneficial immunomodulation to improve treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary MDR-TB. The use of HDTs as adjuncts to MDR-TB therapy requires urgent evaluation. PMID:27301245

  20. [Antiplatelet therapy: resistance to traditional antiaggregation drugs and role of new antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    del Castillo-Carnevali, Hugo; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2014-09-01

    Platelet aggregation plays a key role in the development of major cardiovascular events (MACE) related to atherothrombosis. Since the appearance of coronary stenting, the importance of measuring and modulating platelet activity has considerably increased in the scientific literature during the last decade. Double antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel administrated to stent carriers has widely demonstrated its efficacy in the prevention of MACE compared with aspirin alone. These benefits are also present when a conservatory approach is chosen for acute coronary syndrome management. However, there are an important number of patients who develop MACE despite optimal dual antiplatelet therapy, most likely related to an incomplete platelet activity inhibition. Many studies suggest an important inter-individual variability in the response to the drugs, maybe related, at least in part, to the use of different assessment techniques of platelet aggregation. Other authors suggest an incomplete platelet inhibition as a possible explanation for the presence of MACE in patients under optimal antiplatelet therapy. Resistance to usual drugs has become a clinically relevant issue that requires an individual approach where new antiplatelet agents, such as prasugrel or ticagrelor, could play an important role as stated in current consensus documents.

  1. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Wyatt I; Friedman, Jonathan M; Gaskin, John F; Norton, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others. PMID:24665340

  2. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TESTING OF ENZYMATIC TEST KITS FOR WARFARE AGENTS AND PESTICIDES IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymatic test kits, generally designed to be handheld and portable, detect the presence of chemical agents, carbamate pesticides, and/or organophosphate pesticides by relying on the reaction of the cholinesterase enzyme. Under normal conditions, the enzyme reacts as expected wi...

  3. Optimizing testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Baker, C N; Huang, M B; Tenover, F C

    1994-07-01

    Selection of the appropriate NaCl concentration for test medium for oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci has been problematic when using different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. Broth microdilution, using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth + 2% NaCl, is the currently recommended reference method. There is currently no recommendation for the addition of NaCl to agar for dilution susceptibility tests when Staphylococcus species are tested with oxacillin. We examined the effects of adding 0, 2%, 4%, and 5% NaCl to Mueller-Hinton agar and broth for agar dilution, Etest, and broth microdilution tests. The results of these tests were compared with the reference broth microdilution results and with the results of a hybridization assay using a mec gene probe. We tested 223 strains of staphylococci, 128 of which were mec gene positive and had oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) > or = 4 micrograms/ml. Seven strains of S. aureus were mec probe negative but were oxacillin resistant. Seven coagulase-negative strains (three S. epidermidis, one S. haemolyticus, and three S. simulans) were mec probe positive and were oxacillin susceptible. The MICs for oxacillin-resistant strains increased two- to fourfold with the addition of 2% NaCl, but the MICs for oxacillin-susceptible strains were unchanged. Major and very major interpretative rates ranged from 18.2% to 20.2% for agar dilution and Etest without NaCl added to the medium, and these rates decreased to < 1% with the addition of 2% NaCl to the medium. The addition of 4% or 5% NaCl caused major error rates of > 17% for all test methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Optimizing testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Baker, C N; Huang, M B; Tenover, F C

    1994-07-01

    Selection of the appropriate NaCl concentration for test medium for oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci has been problematic when using different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. Broth microdilution, using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth + 2% NaCl, is the currently recommended reference method. There is currently no recommendation for the addition of NaCl to agar for dilution susceptibility tests when Staphylococcus species are tested with oxacillin. We examined the effects of adding 0, 2%, 4%, and 5% NaCl to Mueller-Hinton agar and broth for agar dilution, Etest, and broth microdilution tests. The results of these tests were compared with the reference broth microdilution results and with the results of a hybridization assay using a mec gene probe. We tested 223 strains of staphylococci, 128 of which were mec gene positive and had oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) > or = 4 micrograms/ml. Seven strains of S. aureus were mec probe negative but were oxacillin resistant. Seven coagulase-negative strains (three S. epidermidis, one S. haemolyticus, and three S. simulans) were mec probe positive and were oxacillin susceptible. The MICs for oxacillin-resistant strains increased two- to fourfold with the addition of 2% NaCl, but the MICs for oxacillin-susceptible strains were unchanged. Major and very major interpretative rates ranged from 18.2% to 20.2% for agar dilution and Etest without NaCl added to the medium, and these rates decreased to < 1% with the addition of 2% NaCl to the medium. The addition of 4% or 5% NaCl caused major error rates of > 17% for all test methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7820997

  5. Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Cows with Mastitis in Eastern Poland and Analysis of Susceptibility of Resistant Strains to Alternative Nonantibiotic Agents: Lysostaphin, Nisin and Polymyxin B

    PubMed Central

    SZWEDA, Piotr; SCHIELMANN, Marta; FRANKOWSKA, Aneta; KOT, Barbara; ZALEWSKA, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in the eastern part of Poland to a set of 20 antibiotics and three alternative agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B. Eighty-six out of 123 examined isolates were susceptible to all 20 tested antibiotics (70%). The highest percentage of resistance was observed in the case of β-lactam antibiotics: amoxicillin (n=22, 17.9%), ampicillin (n=28, 22.8%), penicillin (n=29, 23.6%) and streptomycin (n=13; 10.6%). Twenty-five of the penicillin-resistant strains were found to carry the blaZ gene coding for β-lactamases. Two strains were found to be mecA positive and a few strains were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR), one of them was simultaneously resistant to six antibiotics. All strains, resistant to at least one antibiotic (n=37) and two control strains, were susceptible to lysostaphin with MIC values of 0.008–0.5 µg/ml (susceptibility breakpoint 32 µg/ml). Twenty-one (54%) isolates were susceptible to nisin. The MIC value of this agent for 17 (44%) strains was 51.2 µg/ml and was not much higher than the susceptibility breakpoint value (32 µg/ml). Polymyxin B was able to inhibit the growth of the strains only at a high concentration (32–128 µg/ml). The presented results confirmed the observed worldwide problem of spreading antibiotic resistance among staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis; on the other hand, we have indicated a high level of bactericidal activity of nisin and especially lysostaphin. PMID:24212507

  6. Antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cows with mastitis in eastern Poland and analysis of susceptibility of resistant strains to alternative nonantibiotic agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Piotr; Schielmann, Marta; Frankowska, Aneta; Kot, Barbara; Zalewska, Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in the eastern part of Poland to a set of 20 antibiotics and three alternative agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B. Eighty-six out of 123 examined isolates were susceptible to all 20 tested antibiotics (70%). The highest percentage of resistance was observed in the case of β-lactam antibiotics: amoxicillin (n=22, 17.9%), ampicillin (n=28, 22.8%), penicillin (n=29, 23.6%) and streptomycin (n=13; 10.6%). Twenty-five of the penicillin-resistant strains were found to carry the blaZ gene coding for β-lactamases. Two strains were found to be mecA positive and a few strains were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR), one of them was simultaneously resistant to six antibiotics. All strains, resistant to at least one antibiotic (n=37) and two control strains, were susceptible to lysostaphin with MIC values of 0.008-0.5 µg/ml (susceptibility breakpoint 32 µg/ml). Twenty-one (54%) isolates were susceptible to nisin. The MIC value of this agent for 17 (44%) strains was 51.2 µg/ml and was not much higher than the susceptibility breakpoint value (32 µg/ml). Polymyxin B was able to inhibit the growth of the strains only at a high concentration (32-128 µg/ml). The presented results confirmed the observed worldwide problem of spreading antibiotic resistance among staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis; on the other hand, we have indicated a high level of bactericidal activity of nisin and especially lysostaphin.

  7. Antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cows with mastitis in eastern Poland and analysis of susceptibility of resistant strains to alternative nonantibiotic agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Piotr; Schielmann, Marta; Frankowska, Aneta; Kot, Barbara; Zalewska, Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in the eastern part of Poland to a set of 20 antibiotics and three alternative agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B. Eighty-six out of 123 examined isolates were susceptible to all 20 tested antibiotics (70%). The highest percentage of resistance was observed in the case of β-lactam antibiotics: amoxicillin (n=22, 17.9%), ampicillin (n=28, 22.8%), penicillin (n=29, 23.6%) and streptomycin (n=13; 10.6%). Twenty-five of the penicillin-resistant strains were found to carry the blaZ gene coding for β-lactamases. Two strains were found to be mecA positive and a few strains were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR), one of them was simultaneously resistant to six antibiotics. All strains, resistant to at least one antibiotic (n=37) and two control strains, were susceptible to lysostaphin with MIC values of 0.008-0.5 µg/ml (susceptibility breakpoint 32 µg/ml). Twenty-one (54%) isolates were susceptible to nisin. The MIC value of this agent for 17 (44%) strains was 51.2 µg/ml and was not much higher than the susceptibility breakpoint value (32 µg/ml). Polymyxin B was able to inhibit the growth of the strains only at a high concentration (32-128 µg/ml). The presented results confirmed the observed worldwide problem of spreading antibiotic resistance among staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis; on the other hand, we have indicated a high level of bactericidal activity of nisin and especially lysostaphin. PMID:24212507

  8. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  9. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53, a potent biocontrol agent resists Rhizoctonia disease on Chinese cabbage through hormonal and antioxidants regulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang-Mo; Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani is one of the causal agents of numerous diseases that affect crop growth and yield. The aim of this present investigation was to identify a biocontrol agent that acts against R. solani and to determine the agent's protective effect through phytohormones and antioxidant regulation in experimentally infected Chinese cabbage plants. Four rhizospheric soil bacterial isolates GR53, GR169, GR786, and GR320 were tested for their antagonistic activity against R. solani. Among these isolates, GR53 significantly suppressed fungal growth. GR53 was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum by phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence. The biocontrol activity of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 was tested in Chinese cabbage plants under controlled conditions. Results showed that R. solani inhibited plant growth (length, width, fresh and dry weight of leaves) by reducing chlorophyll and total phenolic content, as well as by increasing the levels of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid, and DPPH scavenging activity. By regulating the levels of these compounds, the co-inoculation of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 heightened induced systemic resistance in infected Chinese cabbage, effectively mitigating R. solani-induced damaging effects and improving plant growth. The results obtained from this study suggest that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 is an effective biocontrol agent to prevent the damage caused by R. solani in Chinese cabbage plants.

  10. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53, a potent biocontrol agent resists Rhizoctonia disease on Chinese cabbage through hormonal and antioxidants regulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang-Mo; Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani is one of the causal agents of numerous diseases that affect crop growth and yield. The aim of this present investigation was to identify a biocontrol agent that acts against R. solani and to determine the agent's protective effect through phytohormones and antioxidant regulation in experimentally infected Chinese cabbage plants. Four rhizospheric soil bacterial isolates GR53, GR169, GR786, and GR320 were tested for their antagonistic activity against R. solani. Among these isolates, GR53 significantly suppressed fungal growth. GR53 was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum by phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence. The biocontrol activity of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 was tested in Chinese cabbage plants under controlled conditions. Results showed that R. solani inhibited plant growth (length, width, fresh and dry weight of leaves) by reducing chlorophyll and total phenolic content, as well as by increasing the levels of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid, and DPPH scavenging activity. By regulating the levels of these compounds, the co-inoculation of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 heightened induced systemic resistance in infected Chinese cabbage, effectively mitigating R. solani-induced damaging effects and improving plant growth. The results obtained from this study suggest that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 is an effective biocontrol agent to prevent the damage caused by R. solani in Chinese cabbage plants. PMID:26160009

  11. Test method to measure resistance towards fragmentation by studded tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viman, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the Nordic countries most cars are equipped with studded tires during the winter. The studs increase the wear on the road surfaces and a special test method has been developed to measure the aggregates' resistance towards fragmentation by studded tires. The method has proven to correlate very well with the actual wear on the road surfaces. The Nordic countries Sweden, Norway and Finland have agreed to propose this method as a European Standard test method. One reason is to be able to set requirements on aggregates to be used in countries where studded tires are allowed. A cross-testing project regarding this Nordic abrasion test for studded tires was set up in order to determine the repeatability and the reproducibility of the methods to become European Standard.

  12. Skeletal metastases and impact of anticancer and bone-targeted agents in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vignani, Francesca; Bertaglia, Valentina; Buttigliero, Consuelo; Tucci, Marcello; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Di Maio, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Incidence of bone metastases is very high in advanced prostate cancer patients. Bone metastases likely have a significant impact on functional status and quality of life, not only related to pain, but also to the relevant risk of skeletal-related events. A better understanding of mechanisms associated with bone metastatic disease secondary to prostate cancer and more specifically to the cross-talk between tumor cells and bone microenvironment in metastatic progression represented the background for the development of new effective bone-targeted therapies. Furthermore, a better knowledge of biological mechanisms driving disease progression led to significant advances in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer, with the development and approval of new effective drugs. Aim of this review is to outline the physiopathology of bone metastases in prostate cancer and summarize the main results of clinical trials conducted with different drugs to control morbidity induced by skeletal metastases and bone disease progression. For each agent, therapeutic effect on bone metastases has been measured in terms of pain control and/or incidence of skeletal-related events, usually defined as a composite endpoint, including the need for local treatment (radiation therapy or surgery), spinal cord compression, pathological bone fractures. In details, data obtained with chemotherapy (mitoxantrone, docetaxel, cabazitaxel), new generation hormonal agents (abiraterone, enzalutamide), radium-223, bone-targeted agents (zoledronic acid, denosumab) and with several experimental agents (cabozantinib, dasatinib, anti-endothelin and other agents) in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer are reviewed.

  13. Resistance to DNA Damaging Agents Produced Invasive Phenotype of Rat Glioma Cells-Characterization of a New in Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Sonja; Podolski-Renić, Ana; Dinić, Jelena; Pavković, Željko; Ayuso, Jose M; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pérez-García, Victor M; Pešić, Vesna; Pešić, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance and invasion properties are severe limitations to efficient glioma therapy. Therefore, development of glioma in vivo models that more accurately resemble the situation observed in patients emerges. Previously, we established RC6 rat glioma cell line resistant to DNA damaging agents including antiglioma approved therapies such as 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and temozolomide (TMZ). Herein, we evaluated the invasiveness of RC6 cells in vitro and in a new orthotopic animal model. For comparison, we used C6 cells from which RC6 cells originated. Differences in cell growth properties were assessed by real-time cell analyzer. Cells' invasive potential in vitro was studied in fluorescently labeled gelatin and by formation of multicellular spheroids in hydrogel. For animal studies, fluorescently labeled cells were inoculated into adult male Wistar rat brains. Consecutive coronal and sagittal brain sections were analyzed 10 and 25 days post-inoculation, while rats' behavior was recorded during three days in the open field test starting from 25th day post-inoculation. We demonstrated that development of chemoresistance induced invasive phenotype of RC6 cells with significant behavioral impediments implying usefulness of orthotopic RC6 glioma allograft in preclinical studies for the examination of new approaches to counteract both chemoresistance and invasion of glioma cells. PMID:27355941

  14. Resistance to DNA Damaging Agents Produced Invasive Phenotype of Rat Glioma Cells-Characterization of a New in Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Sonja; Podolski-Renić, Ana; Dinić, Jelena; Pavković, Željko; Ayuso, Jose M; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pérez-García, Victor M; Pešić, Vesna; Pešić, Milica

    2016-06-27

    Chemoresistance and invasion properties are severe limitations to efficient glioma therapy. Therefore, development of glioma in vivo models that more accurately resemble the situation observed in patients emerges. Previously, we established RC6 rat glioma cell line resistant to DNA damaging agents including antiglioma approved therapies such as 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and temozolomide (TMZ). Herein, we evaluated the invasiveness of RC6 cells in vitro and in a new orthotopic animal model. For comparison, we used C6 cells from which RC6 cells originated. Differences in cell growth properties were assessed by real-time cell analyzer. Cells' invasive potential in vitro was studied in fluorescently labeled gelatin and by formation of multicellular spheroids in hydrogel. For animal studies, fluorescently labeled cells were inoculated into adult male Wistar rat brains. Consecutive coronal and sagittal brain sections were analyzed 10 and 25 days post-inoculation, while rats' behavior was recorded during three days in the open field test starting from 25th day post-inoculation. We demonstrated that development of chemoresistance induced invasive phenotype of RC6 cells with significant behavioral impediments implying usefulness of orthotopic RC6 glioma allograft in preclinical studies for the examination of new approaches to counteract both chemoresistance and invasion of glioma cells.

  15. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26266047

  16. Loss of functional E-cadherin renders cells more resistant to the apoptotic agent taxol in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Paulo; Oliveira, Maria Jose; Beraldi, Eliana; Mateus, Ana Rita; Nakajima, Takashi; Gleave, Martin; Yokota, Jun; Carneiro, Fatima; Huntsman, David; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo . E-mail: gsuriano@ipatimup.pt

    2005-10-15

    Experimental evidence supports a role for E-cadherin in suppressing invasion, metastasis, and proliferation. Germline mutations of the E-cadherin represent the genetic cause of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this type of tumor, isolated cancer cells permeate the basal membrane and paradoxically survive in the gastric wall in the absence of contact with neighbor epithelial cells or with the extracellular matrix. This suggests that upon E-cadherin deregulation, cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. To test this hypothesis, CHO cells stably expressing either wild-type E-cadherin or the HDGC-related germline mutations T340A and V832M were seeded either on a thin layer of collagen type I or on plastic and then subjected to the apoptotic agent taxol. We found that in vitro functional E-cadherin renders cells more sensitive to the effect of taxol. Our results also indicate that this effect is associated to decreased level of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein.

  17. 49 CFR 234.267 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Inspections and Tests § 234.267 Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation... thereafter. (b) Insulation resistance tests shall be made between all conductors and ground,...

  18. 49 CFR 234.267 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Inspections and Tests § 234.267 Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation... thereafter. (b) Insulation resistance tests shall be made between all conductors and ground,...

  19. 49 CFR 234.267 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Inspections and Tests § 234.267 Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation... thereafter. (b) Insulation resistance tests shall be made between all conductors and ground,...

  20. Induction of systemic resistance in plants by biochar, a soil-applied carbon sequestering agent.

    PubMed

    Elad, Yigal; David, Dalia Rav; Harel, Yael Meller; Borenshtein, Menahem; Kalifa, Hananel Ben; Silber, Avner; Graber, Ellen R

    2010-09-01

    Biochar is the solid coproduct of biomass pyrolysis, a technique used for carbon-negative production of second-generation biofuels. The biochar can be applied as a soil amendment, where it permanently sequesters carbon from the atmosphere as well as improves soil tilth, nutrient retention, and crop productivity. In addition to its other benefits in soil, we found that soil-applied biochar induces systemic resistance to the foliar fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea (gray mold) and Leveillula taurica (powdery mildew) on pepper and tomato and to the broad mite pest (Polyphagotarsonemus latus Banks) on pepper. Levels of 1 to 5% biochar in a soil and a coconut fiber-tuff potting medium were found to be significantly effective at suppressing both diseases in leaves of different ages. In long-term tests (105 days), pepper powdery mildew was significantly less severe in the biochar-treated plants than in the plants from the unamended controls although, during the final 25 days, the rate of disease development in the treatments and controls was similar. Possible biochar-related elicitors of systemic induced resistance are discussed.

  1. Tests for bactericidal effects of antimicrobial agents: technical performance and clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L R; Shanholtzer, C J

    1992-01-01

    Bactericidal testing has been used for several decades as a guide for antimicrobial therapy of serious infections. Such testing is most frequently performed when bactericidal antimicrobial agent therapy is considered necessary (such as when treating infectious endocarditis or infection in an immunocompromised host). It has also been used to ensure that the infecting organism is killed by (not tolerant to) usually bactericidal compounds. However, few data are available to support the role of such tests in direct patient care. Several important variables affect the reproducibility of the test results; however, proposed reference methods are now available for performing the MBC test. With minor modifications, these can provide a standardized approach for laboratories that need to perform them. Currently, little evidence is available to support the routine use of such testing for the care of individual patients. However, testing of new (investigational) antimicrobial agents can be beneficial in determining their potential to provide bactericidal antimicrobial activity during clinical use. New methods to assess bactericidal activity are being developed, but as yet none have been rigorously tested in patient care settings; further, for most of these methods, little information is available as to which technical parameters affect their results. In clinical laboratories, all bactericidal tests must be performed with rigorously standardized techniques and adequate controls, bearing in mind the limitations of the currently available test procedures. PMID:1423219

  2. InChIKey collision resistance: an experimental testing.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, Igor; Erin, Andrey; McNaught, Alan; Blinov, Kirill; Tchekhovskoi, Dmitrii; Heller, Steve

    2012-01-01

    InChIKey is a 27-character compacted (hashed) version of InChI which is intended for Internet and database searching/indexing and is based on an SHA-256 hash of the InChI character string. The first block of InChIKey encodes molecular skeleton while the second block represents various kinds of isomerism (stereo, tautomeric, etc.). InChIKey is designed to be a nearly unique substitute for the parent InChI. However, a single InChIKey may occasionally map to two or more InChI strings (collision). The appearance of collision itself does not compromise the signature as collision-free hashing is impossible; the only viable approach is to set and keep a reasonable level of collision resistance which is sufficient for typical applications.We tested, in computational experiments, how well the real-life InChIKey collision resistance corresponds to the theoretical estimates expected by design. For this purpose, we analyzed the statistical characteristics of InChIKey for datasets of variable size in comparison to the theoretical statistical frequencies. For the relatively short second block, an exhaustive direct testing was performed. We computed and compared to theory the numbers of collisions for the stereoisomers of Spongistatin I (using the whole set of 67,108,864 isomers and its subsets). For the longer first block, we generated, using custom-made software, InChIKeys for more than 3 × 1010 chemical structures. The statistical behavior of this block was tested by comparison of experimental and theoretical frequencies for the various four-letter sequences which may appear in the first block body.From the results of our computational experiments we conclude that the observed characteristics of InChIKey collision resistance are in good agreement with theoretical expectations. PMID:23256896

  3. Reduced Susceptibility to Rifampicin and Resistance to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents among Brucella abortus Isolates from Cattle in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Pauletti, Rebeca; Reinato Stynen, Ana Paula; Pinto da Silva Mol, Juliana; Seles Dorneles, Elaine Maria; Alves, Telma Maria; de Sousa Moura Souto, Monalisa; Minharro, Silvia; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the susceptibility profile of Brazilian Brucella abortus isolates from cattle to eight antimicrobial agents that are recommended for the treatment of human brucellosis and to correlate the susceptibility patterns with origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotype of the strains. Screening of 147 B. abortus strains showed 100% sensitivity to doxycycline and ofloxacin, one (0.68%) strain resistant to ciprofloxacin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to streptomycin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and five strains (3.40%) resistant to gentamicin. For rifampicin, three strains (2.04%) were resistant and 54 strains (36.73%) showed reduced sensitivity. Two strains were considered multidrug resistant. In conclusion, the majority of B. abortus strains isolated from cattle in Brazil were sensitive to the antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of human brucellosis; however, a considerable proportion of strains showed reduced susceptibility to rifampicin and two strains were considered multidrug resistant. Moreover, there was no correlation among the drug susceptibility pattern, origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotypes of these strains.

  4. Reduced Susceptibility to Rifampicin and Resistance to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents among Brucella abortus Isolates from Cattle in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa Pauletti, Rebeca; Reinato Stynen, Ana Paula; Pinto da Silva Mol, Juliana; Seles Dorneles, Elaine Maria; Alves, Telma Maria; de Sousa Moura Souto, Monalisa; Minharro, Silvia; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the susceptibility profile of Brazilian Brucella abortus isolates from cattle to eight antimicrobial agents that are recommended for the treatment of human brucellosis and to correlate the susceptibility patterns with origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotype of the strains. Screening of 147 B. abortus strains showed 100% sensitivity to doxycycline and ofloxacin, one (0.68%) strain resistant to ciprofloxacin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to streptomycin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and five strains (3.40%) resistant to gentamicin. For rifampicin, three strains (2.04%) were resistant and 54 strains (36.73%) showed reduced sensitivity. Two strains were considered multidrug resistant. In conclusion, the majority of B. abortus strains isolated from cattle in Brazil were sensitive to the antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of human brucellosis; however, a considerable proportion of strains showed reduced susceptibility to rifampicin and two strains were considered multidrug resistant. Moreover, there was no correlation among the drug susceptibility pattern, origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotypes of these strains. PMID:26181775

  5. Evaluation of antibacterial effects of pulp capping agents with direct contact test method

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Muhammet; Arslan, Ugur; Dundar, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Calcium hydroxide has been used in dentistry as a major capping material having the capacity to introduce the formation of a mineralized dentin bridge, but it has no direct inducing effect to the pulp cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of three different pulp capping agents using a direct contact test (DCT). Materials and Methods: The antibacterial properties of three pulp capping agents were evaluated a DCT. For the DCT, wells (n = 12) of 96-microtiter plates were coated with the tested cements (Dycal, Dentsply, USA; DiaRoot BioAggregate, Diadent, Holland; Calcimol LC, Voco, Germany) and Kalzinol (zinc oxide/eugenol cement, Dentsply, USA) was used as control material. A Lactobacillus casei suspension was placed on the surface of each specimen for 1 h at 37°C. Bacterial growth was monitored for 16 h with a temperature-controlled microplate spectrophotometer. The kinetics of the outgrowth in each well were recorded continuously at 650 nm every 30 min. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, and Tamhane's T2 multiple comparison test. The level of significance was determined as P < 0.05. Results: All pulp capping agents showed an increase in the logarithmic growth rate of L. casei when compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Therefore, all pulp capping agents did not show antibacterial activity. Conclusions: The tested pulp capping agents haven't got antibacterial properties. Therefore, they should be used carefully when pulp is exposed or only very thin dentin remained over the pulp to avoid bacterial contamination. PMID:24966754

  6. Ambivalence toward imposed change: the conflict between dispositional resistance to change and the orientation toward the change agent.

    PubMed

    Oreg, Shaul; Sverdlik, Noga

    2011-03-01

    Following an analysis of the concept of "imposed change," we propose 2 factors that jointly contribute to an individual's experience of ambivalence to imposed change. In a secondary analysis of data (N = 172) and 2 field studies (N = 104, N = 89), we showed that individuals' personal orientation toward change interacts with their orientation toward the change agent and yields ambivalence. Specifically, among employees with a positive orientation toward the change agent (i.e., high trust in management, identification with the organization), the relationship between employees' dispositional resistance to change and ambivalence was positive. The opposite pattern emerged among employees with a negative orientation toward the change agent (Studies 2 and 3). Our findings suggest that researchers may have been misinterpreting employees' reactions to change, neglecting the possibility that some may simultaneously hold strong, yet conflicting, views about the change. By accounting for, and predicting, ambivalence, these studies provide a more accurate explanation of employees' responses to change.

  7. Towards a genetics-based adaptive agent to support flight testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbs, Henry Brown, III

    Although the benefits of aircraft simulation have been known since the late 1960s, simulation almost always entails interaction with a human test pilot. This "pilot-in-the-loop" simulation process provides useful evaluative information to the aircraft designer and provides a training tool to the pilot. Emulation of a pilot during the early phases of the aircraft design process might provide designers a useful evaluative tool. Machine learning might emulate a pilot in a simulated aircraft/cockpit setting. Preliminary work in the application of machine learning techniques, such as reinforcement learning, to aircraft maneuvering have shown promise. These studies used simplified interfaces between machine learning agent and the aircraft simulation. The simulations employed low order equivalent system models. High-fidelity aircraft simulations exist, such as the simulations developed by NASA at its Dryden Flight Research Center. To expand the applicational domain of reinforcement learning to aircraft designs, this study presents a series of experiments that examine a reinforcement learning agent in the role of test pilot. The NASA X-31 and F-106 high-fidelity simulations provide realistic aircraft for the agent to maneuver. The approach of the study is to examine an agent possessing a genetic-based, artificial neural network to approximate long-term, expected cost (Bellman value) in a basic maneuvering task. The experiments evaluate different learning methods based on a common feedback function and an identical task. The learning methods evaluated are: Q-learning, Q(lambda)-learning, SARSA learning, and SARSA(lambda) learning. Experimental results indicate that, while prediction error remain quite high, similar, repeatable behaviors occur in both aircraft. Similar behavior exhibits portability of the agent between aircraft with different handling qualities (dynamics). Besides the adaptive behavior aspects of the study, the genetic algorithm used in the agent is shown to

  8. Partner choice promotes cooperation: the two faces of testing with agent-based models.

    PubMed

    Campennì, Marco; Schino, Gabriele

    2014-03-01

    Reciprocity is one of the most debated among the mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the evolution of cooperation. While a distinction can be made between two general processes that can underlie reciprocation (within-pair temporal relations between cooperative events, and partner choice based on benefits received), theoretical modelling has concentrated on the former, while the latter has been often neglected. We developed a set of agent-based models in which agents adopted a strategy of obligate cooperation and partner choice based on benefits received. Our models tested the ability of partner choice both to reproduce significant emergent features of cooperation in group living animals and to promote the evolution of cooperation. Populations formed by agents adopting a strategy of obligate cooperation and partner choice based on benefits received showed differentiated "social relationships" and a positive correlation between cooperation given and received, two common phenomena in animal cooperation. When selection across multiple generations was added to the model, agents adopting a strategy of partner choice based on benefits received outperformed selfish agents that did not cooperate. Our results suggest partner choice is a significant aspect of cooperation and provides a possible mechanism for its evolution.

  9. 30 CFR 14.22 - Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. 14..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.22 Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. (a) Test procedures. The...

  10. 30 CFR 14.22 - Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. 14..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.22 Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. (a) Test procedures. The...

  11. 30 CFR 14.22 - Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. 14..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.22 Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. (a) Test procedures. The...

  12. 30 CFR 14.22 - Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. 14..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.22 Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. (a) Test procedures. The...

  13. 30 CFR 14.22 - Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. 14..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.22 Test for flame resistance of conveyor belts. (a) Test procedures. The...

  14. 49 CFR 236.108 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation resistance of wires and cables, except wires connected directly to track rails, shall be tested when wires, cables, and insulation...

  15. 49 CFR 236.108 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation resistance of wires and cables, except wires connected directly to track rails, shall be tested when wires, cables, and insulation...

  16. 49 CFR 236.108 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation resistance of wires and cables, except wires connected directly to track rails, shall be tested when wires, cables, and insulation...

  17. 49 CFR 236.108 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation resistance of wires and cables, except wires connected directly to track rails, shall be tested when wires, cables, and insulation...

  18. 49 CFR 236.108 - Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and... Insulation resistance tests, wires in trunking and cables. (a) Insulation resistance of wires and cables, except wires connected directly to track rails, shall be tested when wires, cables, and insulation...

  19. Mechanism of Adefovir, Tenofovir and Entecavir Resistance: Molecular Modeling Studies of How A Novel Anti-HBV Agent (FMCA) Can Overcome the Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rawal, R K; Konreddy, A K; Chu, C K

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of significant improvement in the area of anti-HBV therapy, resistance and cross-resistance against available therapeutic agents are the major consideration in drug discovery of new agents. The present study is to obtain the insight of the molecular basis of drug resistance conferred by the B and C domain mutations of HBV-polymerase on the binding affinity of four anti-HBV agents [Adefovir (ADV), Tenofovir (TNF), Entecavir (ETV) & 2'-Fluoro-6'-methylene-carbocyclic adenosine (FMCA)]. In this regard, homology modeled structure of HBV polymerase was used for minimization, conformational search and Glide XP docking followed by binding energy calculation on wild-type as well as on mutant HBV-polymerases (N236T, L180M+M204V+S202G & A194T). Our studies suggest a significant correlation between the fold resistances and the binding affinity of anti-HBV nucleosides. The domain B residue, L180 is indirectly associated with other active-site hydrophobic residues such as A87, F88 and M204, whereas the domain C residue, M204 is closely associated with sugar/pseudosugar ring positioning in the active site. These hydrophobic residues can directly influence the interaction of the incoming nucleoside triphosphates and change the binding efficacy. The carbohydrate ring part of natural substrate dATP, dGTP, FMCA and ETV, are occupied in similar passion in the grooves of HBV polymerase active site. The exocyclic double bond of Entecavir and FMCA occupies in the backside hydrophobic pocket (made by residues A87, F88, L180and M204), which enhances the overall binding affinity. Additional hydrogen bonding interaction of 2'-fluorine of FMCA with R41 residue of polymerase promotes a positive binding in wild-type as well as in ADVr, ETVr and TNFr with respect to that of entecavir. PMID:26336997

  20. Effect of abolishment of the use of antimicrobial agents for growth promotion on occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in fecal enterococci from food animals in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Seyfarth, A M; Emborg, H D; Pedersen, K; Hendriksen, R S; Bager, F

    2001-07-01

    From 1995 to 2000, a total of 673 Enterococcus faecium and 1,088 Enterococcus faecalis isolates from pigs together with 856 E. faecium isolates from broilers were isolated and tested for susceptibility to four classes of antimicrobial agents used for growth promotion as part of the Danish program of monitoring for antimicrobial resistance. The four antimicrobials were avilamycin, erythromycin, vancomycin, and virginiamycin. Major changes in the use of antimicrobial agents for growth promotion have occurred during the last 6 years in Denmark. The government banned the use of avoparcin in 1995 and of virginiamycin in 1998. Furthermore, the producers have voluntarily stopped all use beginning in 1999. The avoparcin ban in 1995 was followed by a decrease in the occurrence of glycopeptide-resistant E. faecium (GRE) in broilers, from 72.7% in 1995 to 5.8% in 2000. The occurrence of glycopeptide resistance among isolates from pigs remained constant at around 20% from 1995 to 1997. It was shown that, in GRE from pigs, the genes encoding macrolide and glycopeptide resistance were genetically linked and that, following the decrease in the use of tylosin during 1998 and 1999, the occurrence of GRE in pigs decreased to 6.0% in 2000. From 1995 to 1997 the occurrence of erythromycin resistance among E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates from pigs was almost 90%. Use of tylosin decreased considerably during 1998 and 1999, and this decrease was followed by decreases in the occurrence of resistance to 46.7 and 28.1% among E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates from pigs, respectively. Erythromycin resistance among E. faecium isolates from broilers reached a maximum of 76.3% in 1997 but decreased to 12.7% in 2000 concomitantly with more limited use of virginiamycin. Use of virginiamycin increased from 1995 to 1997 and was followed by an increased occurrence of virginiamycin resistance among E. faecium isolates in broilers, from 27.3% in 1995 to 66.2% in 1997. In January 1998 the use of

  1. Mutation of Rv2887, a marR-like gene, confers Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to an imidazopyridine-based agent.

    PubMed

    Winglee, Kathryn; Lun, Shichun; Pieroni, Marco; Kozikowski, Alan; Bishai, William

    2015-11-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in Mycobacterium tuberculosis control, and it is critical to identify novel drug targets and new antimycobacterial compounds. We have previously identified an imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-4-carbonitrile-based agent, MP-III-71, with strong activity against M. tuberculosis. In this study, we evaluated mechanisms of resistance to MP-III-71. We derived three independent M. tuberculosis mutants resistant to MP-III-71 and conducted whole-genome sequencing of these mutants. Loss-of-function mutations in Rv2887 were common to all three MP-III-71-resistant mutants, and we confirmed the role of Rv2887 as a gene required for MP-III-71 susceptibility using complementation. The Rv2887 protein was previously unannotated, but domain and homology analyses suggested it to be a transcriptional regulator in the MarR (multiple antibiotic resistance repressor) family, a group of proteins first identified in Escherichia coli to negatively regulate efflux pumps and other mechanisms of multidrug resistance. We found that two efflux pump inhibitors, verapamil and chlorpromazine, potentiate the action of MP-III-71 and that mutation of Rv2887 abrogates their activity. We also used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify genes which are differentially expressed in the presence and absence of a functional Rv2887 protein. We found that genes involved in benzoquinone and menaquinone biosynthesis were repressed by functional Rv2887. Thus, inactivating mutations of Rv2887, encoding a putative MarR-like transcriptional regulator, confer resistance to MP-III-71, an effective antimycobacterial compound that shows no cross-resistance to existing antituberculosis drugs. The mechanism of resistance of M. tuberculosis Rv2887 mutants may involve efflux pump upregulation and also drug methylation. PMID:26303802

  2. Local tests of parallel electrical resistivity in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimeter measures the local magnetic field pitch angle, proportional to the ratio of the poloidal to toroidal magnetic fields, in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The authors have used the polarimeter to measure the temporal evolution of the local value of the magnetic field pitch angle during large changes in the current profile such as during a current ramp or discharge initiation. The measured evolution is compared to the evolution predicted by classical and neoclassical resistivity models. The neoclassical resistivity model is a better predictor of the local pitch angle temporal evolution than the classical model.

  3. Comparison of feeding strategies in acute toxicity tests of crude oil and commercial bioremediation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cavender, R.C.; Cherry, D.S.; Yeager, M.M.; Bidwell, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Proposed modifications to the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan have prompted examinations of the methodology used in toxicity testing of the water soluble fraction (WSF) of oil, commercial bioremediation agents (CBA), and a combination of the two. The organisms currently used in acute (96 hr) testing of these agents are the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, and an estuarine mysid, Mysidopsis bahia. The mysid is a carnivorous species that must be fed during a test in order to prevent predation within the test chambers. Currently proposed methodology for silverside testing also includes feeding. The high oxygen demand of CBAs and the WSF of oil causes dissolved oxygen to be a factor in toxicity. This effect can be intensified by the addition of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) to the test chambers. The purpose of this study was to compare the toxicity of CBAs in combination with the WSF of oil to silversides with and without the addition of food. Tests were conducted using both 24-hour and 14-day spinning times for the CBA/WSF mixture. With the 24-hour spinning time, LC50 values from each day of the 4-day test were consistently lower in the Artemia fed test (47.8--22.6%) as compared to the unfed test (72.1--43.0%). A similar trend was seen in the 24 and 48 hour LC50`s in the 14-day spinning time. Overall, low dissolved oxygen was found to be most relevant at the highest CBA/WSF concentrations where D.O. dropped below 2 mg/l in Artemia fed tests.

  4. Phase Ib-IIa study to reverse platinum resistance by the use of a hypomethylating agent azacitidine in platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Siqing; Hu, Wei; Iyer, Revathy; Kavanagh, John J.; Coleman, Robert L.; Levenback, Charles F.; Sood, Anil K.; Wolf, Judith K.; Gershenson, David M.; Markman, Maurie; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Bast, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequential treatment with azacitidine can induce re-expression of epigenetically silenced genes through genomic DNA hypomethylation and reverse carboplatin resistance of epithelial ovarian cancer cells. We initiated a phase Ib-IIa clinical trial of this sequential combination of azacitidine and carboplatin in platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Patients with pathologically confirmed intermediate- or high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer who had disease progression within 6 months (resistant, n = 18) or during a platinum-based therapy (refractory, n = 12) were eligible. All patients had measurable disease. Results Thirty patients received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. This regimen produced 1 CR, 3 PR (ORR: 13.8%), and 10 SD among 29 evaluable patients. For those who achieved clinical benefits, the median duration of the treatment was 7.5 months. The median PFS and OS for all patients were 3.7 months and 14 months, respectively. Patients with platinum resistant disease achieved an ORR of 22%, with a median PFS of 5.6 months and a median OS of 23 months. The predominant toxicities were fatigue and myelosuppression. Correlative studies showed that DR4 methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes was decreased during treatment in 3 of 4 objective responders (75%), but in only 5 of 13 non-responders (38%). Conclusions To our knowledge, this study provides the first clinical evidence that a hypomethylating agent may partially reverse platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Further clinical evaluation of hypomethylating agents in combination with carboplatin is warranted. PMID:21472713

  5. Testing of detector papers with CW liquid-agent droplets of known diameter. Droplets generator, calibration, and procedures. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Thoraval, D.; Bovenkamp, J.W.; Bets, R.W.; Preston, J.M.; Hart, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The droplet generator used at DREO to test the color-producing ability of detector papers with CW-agent droplets of known diameter is described. The calibration of the equipment, the droplet size consistency and the procedure used to test the CW-agent-detector papers are discussed.

  6. 49 CFR 40.15 - May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT... Responsibilities § 40.15 May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements? (a... DOT agency drug and alcohol testing regulations, consistent with the requirements of Subpart Q...

  7. Improvement of the fungal biocontrol agent Trichoderma atroviride to enhance both antagonism and induction of plant systemic disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Kurt; Zeilinger, Susanne; Ciliento, Rosalia; Woo, Sheridian L; Lorito, Matteo; Kubicek, Christian P; Mach, Robert L

    2005-07-01

    Biocontrol agents generally do not perform well enough under field conditions to compete with chemical fungicides. We determined whether transgenic strain SJ3-4 of Trichoderma atroviride, which expresses the Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase-encoding gene, goxA, under a homologous chitinase (nag1) promoter had increased capabilities as a fungal biocontrol agent. The transgenic strain differed only slightly from the wild-type in sporulation or the growth rate. goxA expression occurred immediately after contact with the plant pathogen, and the glucose oxidase formed was secreted. SJ3-4 had significantly less N-acetylglucosaminidase and endochitinase activities than its nontransformed parent. Glucose oxidase-containing culture filtrates exhibited threefold-greater inhibition of germination of spores of Botrytis cinerea. The transgenic strain also more quickly overgrew and lysed the plant pathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum. In planta, SJ3-4 had no detectable improved effect against low inoculum levels of these pathogens. Beans planted in heavily infested soil and treated with conidia of the transgenic Trichoderma strain germinated, but beans treated with wild-type spores did not germinate. SJ3-4 also was more effective in inducing systemic resistance in plants. Beans with SJ3-4 root protection were highly resistant to leaf lesions caused by the foliar pathogen B. cinerea. This work demonstrates that heterologous genes driven by pathogen-inducible promoters can increase the biocontrol and systemic resistance-inducing properties of fungal biocontrol agents, such as Trichoderma spp., and that these microbes can be used as vectors to provide plants with useful molecules (e.g., glucose oxidase) that can increase their resistance to pathogens.

  8. Identification of common and distinctive mechanisms of resistance to different anti-IGF-IR agents in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Cecilia; Mancarella, Caterina; Grilli, Andrea; Manara, Maria Cristina; Astolfi, Annalisa; Marino, Maria Teresa; Conte, Alexia; Sigismund, Sara; Carè, Alessandra; Belfiore, Antonino; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia

    2012-09-01

    IGF system contributes significantly to many human malignancies. Targeting IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) has been reported to be active against several tumors, but particular efficacy was observed only against a minority of Ewing's sarcoma patients. Identification of mechanisms of acquired resistance to anti-IGF-IR agents is mandatory to individualize their use in clinics and optimize cure costs. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles of cells made resistant with three different anti-IGF-IR drugs (human antibodies AVE1642, Figitumumab, or tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541) to highlight common and distinctive mechanisms of resistance. Among common mechanisms, we identified two molecular signatures that distinguish sensitive from resistant cells. Annotation analysis indicated some common altered pathways, such as insulin signaling, MAPK pathway, endocytosis, and modulation of some members of the interferon-induced transmembrane protein family. Among distinctive pathways/processes, resistance to human antibodies involves mainly genes regulating neural differentiation and angiogenesis, whereas resistance to NVP-AEW541 is mainly associated with alterations in genes concerning inflammation and antigen presentation. Evaluation of the common altered pathways indicated that resistant cells seem to maintain intact the IGF-IR internalization/degradation route of sensitive cells but constantly down-regulated its expression. In resistant cells, the loss of proliferative stimulus, normally sustained by IGF-I/IGF-IR autocrine loop in Ewing's sarcoma cells, is compensated by transcriptional up-regulation of IGF-II and insulin receptor-A; this signaling seems to favor the MAPK pathway over the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 pathway. Overall, complexity of IGF system requires analytical evaluation of its components to select those patients that may really benefit from this targeted therapy and support the idea of cotargeting IGF-IR and insulin receptor-A to

  9. Web Resources for HIV Type 1 Genotypic-Resistance Test Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tommy F.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Interpreting the results of plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genotypic drug-resistance tests is one of the most difficult tasks facing clinicians caring for HIV-1–infected patients. There are many drug-resistance mutations, and they arise in complex patterns that cause varying levels of drug resistance. In addition, HIV-1 exists in vivo as a virus population containing many genomic variants. Genotypic-resistance testing detects the drug-resistance mutations present in the most common plasma virus variants but may not detect drug-resistance mutations present in minor virus variants. Therefore, interpretation systems are necessary to determine the phenotypic and clinical significance of drug-resistance mutations found in a patient's plasma virus population. We describe the scientific principles of HIV-1 genotypic-resistance test interpretation and the most commonly used Web-based resources for clinicians ordering genotypic drug-resistance tests. PMID:16652319

  10. [THE DEVELOPMENT OF IMMUNE ENZYME AND IMMUNE CHROMATOGRAPHIC MONOCLONAL TEST-SYSTEM FOR DETECTING TULAREMIA AGENT].

    PubMed

    Eremkin, A V; Elagin, G D; Petchenkin, D V; Fomenkov, O O; Bogatcheva, N V; Kitmanov, A A; Kuklina, G V; Tikhvinskaya, O V

    2016-03-01

    The immune enzyme and immunochromatographic test-systems for detecting tularemia agent were developed on the basis of selected set of monoclonal antibodies having immunochemical activity to antigens Francisella tularensis. The evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of developed test-systems demonstrated that samples provided detection of strains of F. tularensis in concentration from 5.0 x 105 mkxcm-3 to 1.0 x 106 mkxcm-3 and gave no false positive results in analysis of heterologous microorganisms in concentration of 1.0 x 108 mkxcm-3. PMID:27506111

  11. [THE DEVELOPMENT OF IMMUNE ENZYME AND IMMUNE CHROMATOGRAPHIC MONOCLONAL TEST-SYSTEM FOR DETECTING TULAREMIA AGENT].

    PubMed

    Eremkin, A V; Elagin, G D; Petchenkin, D V; Fomenkov, O O; Bogatcheva, N V; Kitmanov, A A; Kuklina, G V; Tikhvinskaya, O V

    2016-03-01

    The immune enzyme and immunochromatographic test-systems for detecting tularemia agent were developed on the basis of selected set of monoclonal antibodies having immunochemical activity to antigens Francisella tularensis. The evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of developed test-systems demonstrated that samples provided detection of strains of F. tularensis in concentration from 5.0 x 105 mkxcm-3 to 1.0 x 106 mkxcm-3 and gave no false positive results in analysis of heterologous microorganisms in concentration of 1.0 x 108 mkxcm-3.

  12. Deep resistivity structure of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asch, Theodore H.; Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sampson, Jay A.; Wallin, Erin L.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office are addressing groundwater contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area project. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area adjacent to a nuclear test. Ground water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, supported by the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from 51 magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) stations at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in that area. The primary purpose was to refine the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (late Devonian - Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale) in the Yucca Flat area. The MT and AMT data have been released in separate USGS Open File Reports. The Nevada Test Site magnetotelluric data interpretation presented in this report includes the results of detailed two-dimensional (2 D) resistivity modeling for each profile (including alternative interpretations) and gross inferences on the three dimensional (3 D) character of the geology beneath each station. The character, thickness, and lateral extent of the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation that comprise the Upper Clastic Confining Unit are generally well determined in the upper 5 km. Inferences can be made regarding the presence of the Lower Clastic Confining Unit at depths below 5 km. Large fault

  13. Deep Resistivity Structure of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore H. Asch, Brian D. Rodriguez; Jay A. Sampson; Erin L. Wallin; and Jackie M. Williams.

    2006-09-18

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office are addressing groundwater contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area project. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area adjacent to a nuclear test. Ground water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, supported by the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from 51 magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) stations at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in that area. The primary purpose was to refine the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (late Devonian – Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale) in the Yucca Flat area. The MT and AMT data have been released in separate USGS Open File Reports. The Nevada Test Site magnetotelluric data interpretation presented in this report includes the results of detailed two-dimensional (2 D) resistivity modeling for each profile (including alternative interpretations) and gross inferences on the three dimensional (3 D) character of the geology beneath each station. The character, thickness, and lateral extent of the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation that comprise the Upper Clastic Confining Unit are generally well determined in the upper 5 km. Inferences can be made regarding the presence of the Lower Clastic Confining Unit at depths below 5 km. Large

  14. Response of MTX-resistant V79 cells to some DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Sengupta, S; Bhattacharyya, N P; Dey, S K; Bhattacharjee, S B

    1993-02-01

    Three methotrexate (MTX)-resistant clones selected at 200 nM MTX have been isolated from UV-irradiated V79 cells and were marked M1, M2 and M3. Two further clones were also isolated by gradually exposing M1 to higher concentrations of MTX and marked M4 and M5, isolated at 1200 nM and 2400 nM MTX respectively. The frequency of the induction of MTX-resistant clones by UV light was found to increase significantly on treatment of the irradiated cells with either 3-aminobenzamide or caffeine. The resistant clones had the same sensitivity as the parental cells to UV light, but were resistant to gamma-rays, MNNG and H2O2. In MTX-resistant cells low-dose H2O2-induced repair function was absent. UV-induced mutation at the HGPRT locus was the same in MTX-resistant as sensitive cells, whereas for MNNG-induced mutation it was higher in resistant cells. The rate of SCE induction by UV light was higher in MTX-resistant cells compared to the parental ones, but was not significantly different for induction by MNNG and H2O2. PMID:7678892

  15. Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis operating irrespective of multidrug resistance in breast cancer cells by the anticancer agent prodigiosin.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Llagostera, Esther; Montaner, Beatriz; Scheffer, George L; Perez-Tomas, Ricardo

    2004-10-01

    Prodigiosin (PG) is a red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens with pro-apoptotic activity in haematopoietic and gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, but no marked toxicity in non-malignant cells. Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women in the European Union and better therapies are needed, especially for metastatic tumors. Moreover, multidrug resistance is a common phenomenon that appears during chemotherapy, necessitating more aggressive treatment as prognosis worsens. In this work, we extend our experiments on PG-induced apoptosis to breast cancer cells. PG was potently cytotoxic in both estrogen receptor positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. Cytochrome c release, activation of caspases-9, -8 and -7 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein typified the apoptotic event and caspase inhibition revealed that PG acts via the mitochondrial pathway. In a multidrug-resistant subline of MCF-7 cells that over-expresses the breast cancer resistance protein, the cytotoxic activity of PG was slightly reduced. However, flow-cytometry analysis of PG accumulation and efflux in MCF-7 sublines showed that PG is not a substrate for this resistance protein. These results suggest that PG is an interesting and potent new pro-apoptotic agent for the treatment of breast cancer even when multidrug resistance transporter molecules are present.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones as novel agents against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Meng; Guo, Hui; Li, Zai-Shun; Song, Fu-Hang; Wang, Wei-Min; Dai, Huan-Qin; Zhang, Li-Xin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-08-28

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have caused an increasing mortality rate, which means that antibiotic resistance is becoming an important health issue. In the course to screen new agents for resistant bacteria, we identified that a series of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones (IBTs) could inhibit the growth of MRSA and VRE. This was the first time that the "familiar" IBT compounds exhibited significant anti Gram-positive pathogen activity. Against a clinical isolated MRSA strain, 20 of the 51 synthesized compounds showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 0.78 mg/L and another 12 novel compounds had MICs of 0.39 mg/L. Moreover, these compounds also inhibited Enterococcus faecalis and VRE at similar levels, indicating that IBTs might have different mode of action compared with vancomycin. For these IBTs, comparative field analysis (CoMFA) models were further established to understand the structure-activity relationships in order to design new compounds from steric and electrostatic contributions. This work has suggested that IBTs can be considered as potential lead compounds to discover antibacterial inhibitors to combat drug resistance.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones as novel agents against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Meng; Guo, Hui; Li, Zai-Shun; Song, Fu-Hang; Wang, Wei-Min; Dai, Huan-Qin; Zhang, Li-Xin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-08-28

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have caused an increasing mortality rate, which means that antibiotic resistance is becoming an important health issue. In the course to screen new agents for resistant bacteria, we identified that a series of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones (IBTs) could inhibit the growth of MRSA and VRE. This was the first time that the "familiar" IBT compounds exhibited significant anti Gram-positive pathogen activity. Against a clinical isolated MRSA strain, 20 of the 51 synthesized compounds showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 0.78 mg/L and another 12 novel compounds had MICs of 0.39 mg/L. Moreover, these compounds also inhibited Enterococcus faecalis and VRE at similar levels, indicating that IBTs might have different mode of action compared with vancomycin. For these IBTs, comparative field analysis (CoMFA) models were further established to understand the structure-activity relationships in order to design new compounds from steric and electrostatic contributions. This work has suggested that IBTs can be considered as potential lead compounds to discover antibacterial inhibitors to combat drug resistance. PMID:26185006

  18. Scopolamine provocation-based pharmacological MRI model for testing procognitive agents.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Nikolett; Laszy, Judit; Gyertyán, István; Kocsis, Pál; Gajári, Dávid; Dávid, Szabolcs; Deli, Levente; Pozsgay, Zsófia; Tihanyi, Károly

    2015-04-01

    There is a huge unmet need to understand and treat pathological cognitive impairment. The development of disease modifying cognitive enhancers is hindered by the lack of correct pathomechanism and suitable animal models. Most animal models to study cognition and pathology do not fulfil either the predictive validity, face validity or construct validity criteria, and also outcome measures greatly differ from those of human trials. Fortunately, some pharmacological agents such as scopolamine evoke similar effects on cognition and cerebral circulation in rodents and humans and functional MRI enables us to compare cognitive agents directly in different species. In this paper we report the validation of a scopolamine based rodent pharmacological MRI provocation model. The effects of deemed procognitive agents (donepezil, vinpocetine, piracetam, alpha 7 selective cholinergic compounds EVP-6124, PNU-120596) were compared on the blood-oxygen-level dependent responses and also linked to rodent cognitive models. These drugs revealed significant effect on scopolamine induced blood-oxygen-level dependent change except for piracetam. In the water labyrinth test only PNU-120596 did not show a significant effect. This provocational model is suitable for testing procognitive compounds. These functional MR imaging experiments can be paralleled with human studies, which may help reduce the number of false cognitive clinical trials.

  19. "Social" robots are psychological agents for infants: a test of gaze following.

    PubMed

    Meltzoff, Andrew N; Brooks, Rechele; Shon, Aaron P; Rao, Rajesh P N

    2010-01-01

    Gaze following is a key component of human social cognition. Gaze following directs attention to areas of high information value and accelerates social, causal, and cultural learning. An issue for both robotic and infant learning is whose gaze to follow. The hypothesis tested in this study is that infants use information derived from an entity's interactions with other agents as evidence about whether that entity is a perceiver. A robot was programmed so that it could engage in communicative, imitative exchanges with an adult experimenter. Infants who saw the robot act in this social-communicative fashion were more likely to follow its line of regard than those without such experience. Infants use prior experience with the robot's interactions as evidence that the robot is a psychological agent that can see. Infants want to look at what the robot is seeing, and thus shift their visual attention to the external target.

  20. Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis—A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rivina, Leena; Schiestl, Robert

    2012-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:23271302

  1. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test... Test 1. This test procedure is designed to verify the integrity of new or untried tank-head puncture-resistance systems and to test for system survivability after coupler-to-tank-head impacts at relative...

  2. 30 CFR 27.39 - Tests to determine resistance to vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests to determine resistance to vibration. 27... determine resistance to vibration. (a) Laboratory tests for reliability and durability. Components... two separate vibration tests, each of one-hour duration. The first test shall be conducted at...

  3. 30 CFR 27.39 - Tests to determine resistance to vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests to determine resistance to vibration. 27... determine resistance to vibration. (a) Laboratory tests for reliability and durability. Components... two separate vibration tests, each of one-hour duration. The first test shall be conducted at...

  4. 30 CFR 27.39 - Tests to determine resistance to vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests to determine resistance to vibration. 27... determine resistance to vibration. (a) Laboratory tests for reliability and durability. Components... two separate vibration tests, each of one-hour duration. The first test shall be conducted at...

  5. 30 CFR 27.39 - Tests to determine resistance to vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests to determine resistance to vibration. 27... determine resistance to vibration. (a) Laboratory tests for reliability and durability. Components... two separate vibration tests, each of one-hour duration. The first test shall be conducted at...

  6. 30 CFR 27.39 - Tests to determine resistance to vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests to determine resistance to vibration. 27... determine resistance to vibration. (a) Laboratory tests for reliability and durability. Components... two separate vibration tests, each of one-hour duration. The first test shall be conducted at...

  7. Functional gold nanoparticles as potent antimicrobial agents against multi-drug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Robinson, Sandra M; Gupta, Akash; Saha, Krishnendu; Jiang, Ziwen; Moyano, Daniel F; Sahar, Ali; Riley, Margaret A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-10-28

    We present the use of functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to combat multi-drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Tuning of the functional groups on the nanoparticle surface provided gold nanoparticles that were effective against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, including multi-drug-resistant pathogens. These AuNPs exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, and bacterial resistance was not observed after 20 generations. A strong structure-activity relationship was observed as a function of AuNP functionality, providing guidance to activity prediction and rational design of effective antimicrobial nanoparticles.

  8. Lab scale testing of novel natural analog in situ stabilization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the laboratory-scale test results on several novel in situ treatment and stabilization agents for buried hazardous and radioactive waste. Paraffin, hematite and phosphate materials were examined when combined with soil and other wastes representative of what might be present at buried waste DOE sites. Hematite was made from the reaction of agricultural iron and lime slurries to form gypsum and iron oxide/hydroxide. Common household paraffin was melted, both with and without a zeolitic additive, waste added and then cooled. Magnesium phosphate was made from the reaction of magnesium oxide and phosphoric acid or potassium biphosphate to form, magnesium phosphate. All were tested with soil and some with additional waste sumulants such as ash, machine oil and nitrate salts. The following laboratory-generated data indicate that all waste encapsulation materials tested are appropriate materials, for field in situ testing. Compressive strengths of treated Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory (INEEL) soil and the waste encapsulation material were sufficient to prevent collapse of the void space in waste, i.e., greater than the NRC 60 psi minimum. The mineralogy and microstructure of hematite was amorphous but should progress to an interlocking crystalline solid. Phosphate was crystalline with characteristics of higher temperature ceramics. Paraffin is non crystalline but encapsulates even very fine grained INEEL soils. Each agent appears to be chemically and physically inert to possible waste materials such as, nitrates and machine cutting oil. Two of the agents hematite and phosphate react favorably with ash increasing the metals retention at higher waste loadings than Portland cement. Hematite, phosphate and zeolite decrease leaching of most hazardous metals from waste when compared to untreated waste and soil. Solution pH, time for reaction initiation, and viscosity values are conducive to jet-grouting application.

  9. The antibiotic resistance crisis: part 2: management strategies and new agents.

    PubMed

    Ventola, C Lee

    2015-05-01

    Controlling antibiotic-resistant bacteria calls for widespread adoption of antibiotic stewardship programs; better diagnosis, tracking and prescribing practices; optimized therapeutic regimens; prevention of infection transmission-and new drugs. PMID:25987823

  10. Effect of culture conditions on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms to disinfecting agents.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marwan; Benoliel, Corinne; Ferreira-Theret, Pauline; Drider, Djamel; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and resistance to disinfectants was studied. Anti-biofilm assays were performed against biofilms grown at 20, 30 and 37°C on stainless steel and polycarbonate, over 24 and 48 h. A rise in growth temperature increased the resistance of 24 h biofilms to disinfectants containing didecyldimethylammonium chloride and decreased it to a disinfectant containing alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride. The increase in growth temperature coupled with an incubation time of 24 h promoted increases in both matrix production and the membrane rigidity of sessile cells. An increase in incubation time also increased both matrix production and the membrane rigidity of sessile cells. Such phenomena resulted in an increased resistance to disinfectants of biofilms grown at 20 and 30°C. The resistance of 48 h biofilms to disinfectants decreased with an increase in growth temperature despite the increase in matrix production and the membrane rigidity of sessile cells.

  11. Resistance of three implant-abutment interfaces to fatigue testing

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Cleide Gisele; MAIA, Maria Luiza Cabral; SCHERRER, Susanne S.; CARDOSO, Antonio Carlos; WISKOTT, H. W. Anselm

    2011-01-01

    The design and retentive properties of implant-abutment connectors affect the mechanical resistance of implants. A number of studies have been carried out to compare the efficacy of connecting mechanisms between abutment and fixture. Objectives The aims of this study were: 1) to compare 3 implant-abutment interfaces (external hexagon, internal hexagon and cone-in-cone) regarding the fatigue resistance of the prosthetic screw, 2) to evaluate the corresponding mode of failure, and 3) to compare the results of this study with data obtained in previous studies on Nobel Biocare and Straumann connectors. Materials and Methods In order to duplicate the alternating and multivectorial intraoral loading pattern, the specimens were submitted to the rotating cantilever beam test. The implants, abutments and restoration analogs were spun around their longitudinal axes while a perpendicular force was applied to the external end. The objective was to determine the force level at which 50% of the specimens survived 106 load cycles. The mean force levels at which 50% failed and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals were determined using the staircase procedure. Results The external hexagon interface presented better than the cone-in-cone and internal hexagon interfaces. There was no significant difference between the cone-in-cone and internal hex interfaces. Conclusion Although internal connections present a more favorable design, this study did not show any advantage in terms of strength. The external hexagon connector used in this study yielded similar results to those obtained in a previous study with Nobel Biocare and Straumann systems. However, the internal connections (cone-in-cone and internal hexagon) were mechanically inferior compared to previous results. PMID:21710094

  12. Deep Resistivity Structure of Mid Valley, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallin, Erin L.; Rodriguez, Brian D.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2009-01-01

    -Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal was to define the extent of the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU). The UCCU is composed of late Devonian to Mississippian siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale (National Security Technologies, 2007). The UCCU underlies the Yucca Flat area and extends southwestward toward Shoshone Mountain, westward toward Buckboard Mesa, and northwestward toward Rainier Mesa. Late in 2005 we collected data at an additional 14 MT stations in Mid Valley, CP Hills, and northern Yucca Flat. That work was done to better determine the extent and thickness of the UCCU near the boundary between the southeastern RM-SM CAU and the southwestern YF CAU, and also in the northern YF CAU. The MT data have been released in a separate U.S. Geological Survey report (Williams and others, 2007). The Nevada Test Site magnetotelluric data interpretation presented in this report includes the results of detailed two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity modeling for each profile and inferences on the three-dimensional (3-D) character of the geology within the region.

  13. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive ovarian carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kimiko; Zhu, Yong-Lian; Lin, Z. Ping; Penketh, Philip G.; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Zhu, Rui; Baumann, Raymond P.; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Ratner, Elena S.

    2016-01-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) are initially treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, EOCs vary in platinum responsiveness. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive EOC cell lines is valuable for development of therapeutic strategies to avoid platinum inefficacy and to exploit platinum sensitivity. TOV-21G devoid of FANCF expression, OV-90 and SKOV-3 were employed as examples of platinum-sensitive, platinum-intermediate and platinum-resistant cell lines, respectively. Antineoplastic agents examined included mitomycin C, doxorubicin, etoposide, gemcitabine, chlorambucil, paclitaxel, triapine and X-rays. Their effectiveness against cell lines was analyzed by clonogenic assays. Cytotoxic profiles of mitomycin C and carboplatin were similar, with mitomycin C exhibiting greater potency and selectivity against TOV-21G than carboplatin. Cytotoxic profiles of doxorubicin, etoposide and X-rays overlapped with that of carboplatin, while OV-90 overexpressing Rad51 was more resistant to chlorambucil than SKOV-3. The efficacy of paclitaxel and triapine was independent of platinum sensitivity or resistance. Consistent with these cytotoxic profiles, cisplatin/mitomycin C, triapine, and paclitaxel differed in the capacity to induce phosphorylation of H2AX, and produced unique inhibitory patterns of DNA/RNA syntheses in HL-60 human leukemia cells. Paclitaxel and triapine in combination produced additive antitumor effects in M109 murine lung carcinoma. In conclusion, mitomycin C is potentially more effective against Fanconi anemia pathway-deficient EOCs than carboplatin. Doxorubicin and etoposide, because of their overlapping cytotoxic properties with carboplatin, are unlikely to be efficacious against platinum-refractory EOCs. Paclitaxel and triapine are effective regardless of platinum sensitivity status, and promising in combination for both platinum-sensitive and platinum-refractory EOCs

  14. Conspiracies and Test Compromise: An Evaluation of the Resistance of Test Systems to Small-Scale Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Jing; Tay, Louis; Drasgow, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Test compromise is a concern in cognitive ability testing because such tests are widely used in employee selection and administered on a continuous basis. In this study, the resistance of cognitive tests, deployed in different test systems, to small-scale cheating conspiracies, was evaluated regarding the accuracy of ability estimation.…

  15. Multiplex method for initial complex testing of antibodies to blood transmitted diseases agents.

    PubMed

    Poltavchenko, Alexander G; Nechitaylo, Oleg V; Filatov, Pavel V; Ersh, Anna V; Gureyev, Vadim N

    2016-10-01

    Initial screening of donors and population at high risk of infection with blood transmitted diseases involves a number of analyses using monospesific diagnostic systems, and therefore is expensive labor- and time-consuming process. The goal of this work is to construct a multiplex test enabling to carry out rapid initial complex testing at a low price. The paper describes a kit making it possible to detect simultaneously antibodies to six agents of the most significant blood transmitted diseases: HIV virus, hepatitis B and C viruses, cytomegalovirus, T. pallidum and T. gondii in blood products. The kit comprises multiplex dot-immunoassay based on plane protein arrays (immune chips) using colloidal gold conjugates and silver development. It provides an opportunity to carry out complex analysis within 70min at room temperature, and there is no need of well-qualified personnel. We compared laboratory findings of the kit with monospecific kits for ELISA produced by two Russian commercial companies. Dot-assay results correlate well with data obtained using commercial kits for ELISA. Furthermore, multiplex analysis is quicker and cheaper in comparison with ELISA and can be carried out in non-laboratory conditions. The kit for multiplex dot-immunoassay of antibodies to blood transmitted agents can significantly simplify initial complex testing. PMID:27497868

  16. [Drug resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from sputum in Chad].

    PubMed

    Abdelhadi, O; Ndokaïn, J; Ali, M Moussa; Friocourt, V; Mortier, E; Heym, B

    2012-02-01

    Culture and resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are not regularly performed in Chad. Sputa were obtained from three different categories of hospitals (district, regional and national) in Chad. All examined sputa were smear-positive and were investigated by culture and drug resistance testing for first-line antituberculosis drugs. From 232 sputa positive for acid-fast bacilli, 135 isolates of M. tuberculosis from different patients (46 women, 89 men, mean age 34 years) were analyzed. All the patients except one corresponded to new cases of tuberculosis. In total, 27 out of 135 isolates (20%) were resistant to at least one major antituberculosis drug. Resistance to isoniazid was the most frequent resistance observed, with 18 isolates (13%) presenting at least this resistance. Three isolates (2.2%) were resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin (multidrug resistance MDR) including one isolate being concomitantly resistant to streptomycin and ethambutol. The resistance rate differed in relation to the category of the hospital; the most important resistance rate was observed in regional hospitals (33%), while it was 16% and 14% in the national and district hospitals, respectively. HIV serology was performed in 81 patients, among whom 20 (25%) were positive. This is the first study that shows that drug resistance of M. tuberculosis is present in Chad. Besides single drug-resistant isolates, multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis could also be identified. This result highlights the urgency of initiating actions to detect drug resistance and limit the spread of drug-resistant strains.

  17. Probing the dry weight by bioimpedance: the resistance stabilization test.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo; Libutti, Pasquale; Lisi, Piero; Rossi, Luigi; Lomonte, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    Probing dry weight (DW) was largely dependent on clinical subjective estimate until recently. New bedside non-invasive tools have been developed with the aim of providing more objective information on volume status and guiding physicians in the quest for DW. Among them, bioimpedance appears to be very promising in the achievement of this goal. We have developed a test aimed to assess DW in complicated hemodialysis (HD) patients and named it "RE.sistance S.tabilization T.est" (RE.S.T.). It is based on the following four items: 1. one or more HD sessions lasting 6 h with ultrafiltration (UF) rate ≤0.5 kg/h are planned; 2. bioimpedance measurements are determined injecting 800 μA at 50 kHz alternating sinusoidal current with a standard tetrapolar technique. Resistance (R) is recorded at the start of the treatment (R0) and every 15 min (Rt) during HD until the end of the 6-h session; 3. DW is defined as that achieved at the time point at which three consecutive R0/Rt ratios show in-between changes ±1% despite ongoing UF; 4. if at the end of the 6-h HD session R stabilization is not attained, a new 6-h HD treatment with UF rate ≤0.5 kg/h is planned until a bioimpedance DW (according to the item 3) is obtained. As said, we are applying RE.S.T. to assess DW in complicated HD patients. Here we report a paradigmatic case which illustrates quite brilliantly its clinical usefulness. The patient was admitted to our nephrology ward with a hypertensive crisis, a very large drug regimen notwithstanding. His DW was reduced by 5 kg after four 6-h HD sessions probing his DW by means of RE.S.T. He was discharged with a normal blood pressure and no need for anti-hypertensive drugs. In conclusion, RE.S.T. appears to be a (the) brilliant solution in solving the old problem of DW in HD patients.

  18. Emergence in Vietnam of Streptococcus pneumoniae Resistant to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents as a Result of Dissemination of the Multiresistant Spain23F-1 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Christopher M.; Duong, Nguyen Minh; Zhou, Jiaji; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Diep, To Song; Thinh, Le Quoc; Wain, John; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Griffiths, David; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Hien, Tran Tinh; Spratt, Brian G.; Farrar, Jeremy J.

    2002-01-01

    Surveillance for Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to penicillin and other antimicrobial agents is necessary to define the optimal empirical antibiotic therapy for meningitis in resource-poor countries such as Vietnam. The clinical and microbiological features of 100 patients admitted to the Centre for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, between 1993 and 2002 with invasive pneumococcal disease were studied. A penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococcus (MIC, ≥0.1 μg/ml) was isolated from the blood or cerebrospinal fluid of 8% of patients (2 of 24) between 1993 and 1995 but 56% (20 of 36) during 1999 to 2002 (P < 0.0001). Pneumococcal isolates resistant to penicillin (MIC, ≥2.0 μg/ml) increased from 0% (0 of 24) to 28% (10 of 36) (P = 0.002). Only one isolate was ceftriaxone resistant (MIC, 2.0 μg/ml). Penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci were isolated from 78% of children younger than 15 years (28 of 36) compared with 25% of adults (16 of 64) (P = 0.0001). Isolation of a penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococcus in adults with meningitis was independently associated with referral from another hospital (P = 0.005) and previous antibiotic therapy (P = 0.025). Multilocus sequence typing showed that 86% of the invasive penicillin-resistant pneumococcus isolates tested (12 of 14) were of the Spain23F-1 clone. The serotypes of >95% of the penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci were included in the currently available pneumococcal vaccines. Our findings point to the recent introduction and spread of the Spain23F-1 clone of penicillin-resistant pneumococci in Vietnam. Simple clinical predictors can be used to guide empirical antibiotic therapy of meningitis. Pneumococcal vaccination may help to control this problem. PMID:12384358

  19. Testing the Efficacy of Pharmacological Agents in a Pericardial Target Delivery Model in the Swine.

    PubMed

    Iles, Tinen L; Howard, Brian; Howard, Stephen; Quallich, Stephen; Rolfes, Christopher; Richardson, Eric; Iaizzo, Hanna R; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    To date, many pharmacological agents used to treat or prevent arrhythmias in open-heart cases create undesired systemic side effects. For example, antiarrhythmic drugs administered intravenously can produce drops in systemic pressure in the already compromised cardiac patient. While performing open-heart procedures, surgeons will often either create a small port or form a pericardial cradle to create suitable fields for operation. This access yields opportunities for target pharmacological delivery (antiarrhythmic or ischemic preconditioning agents) directly to the myocardial tissue without undesired side effects. We have developed a swine model for testing pharmacological agents for target delivery within the pericardial fluid. While fully anesthetized, each animal was instrumented with a Swan-Ganz catheter as well as left and right ventricle pressure catheters, and pacing leads were placed in the right atrial appendage and the right ventricle. A medial sternotomy was then performed and a pericardial access cradle was created; a plunge pacing lead was placed in the left atrial appendage and a bipolar pacing lead was placed in the left ventricle. Utilizing a programmer and a cardiac mapping system, the refractory period of the atrioventricular node (AVN), atria and ventricles was determined. In addition, atrial fibrillation (AF) induction was produced utilizing a Grass stimulator and time in AF was observed. These measurements were performed prior to treatment, as well as 30 min and 60 min after pericardial treatment. Additional time points were added for selected studies. The heart was then cardiopleged and reanimated in a four chamber working mode. Pressure measurements and function were recorded for 1 hr after reanimation. This treatment strategy model allowed us to observe the effects of pharmacological agents that may decrease the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and/or ischemic damage, during and after open-heart surgery. PMID:27500319

  20. [Resistance to cytostatic agents in patients with refractory multiple myeloma and possible ways to control it].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Vorlícek, J

    1993-04-01

    At present several mechanisms responsible for the resistance of tumour cells to cytostatics are known. Most explored is the resistance conditioned by glycoprotein-P. Under laboratory conditions it proved possible to inhibit the resistance caused by glycoprotein-P by many substances which, however, on clinical administration have serious adverse side-effects. In practice verapamil was used, its effect was most marked in haematological malignant diseases. Side-effects of verapamil, however, do not permit to attain the necessary concentration. Obviously better results will be achieved by cyclosporin A which can attain a concentration in the organism which is necessary to inhibit glycoprotein-P without serious undesirable consequences. In the submitted paper the author reviews clinical studies concerned with possible inhibition of glycoprotein-P in patients with refractory myeloma.

  1. Molecular Basis of Resistance to Selected Antimicrobial Agents in the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Mamata; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Moon, Dong Chan; Kim, Su-Ran; Jeong, Jin-Ha; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Park, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of 227 Streptococcus suis strains isolated from pigs during 2010 to 2013 showed high levels of resistance to clindamycin (95.6%), tilmicosin (94.7%), tylosin (93.8%), oxytetracycline (89.4%), chlortetracycline (86.8%), tiamulin (72.7%), neomycin (70.0%), enrofloxacin (56.4%), penicillin (56.4%), ceftiofur (55.9%), and gentamicin (55.1%). Resistance to tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolone was attributed to the tet gene, erm(B), erm(C), mph(C), and mef(A) and/or mef(E) genes, aph(3′)-IIIa and aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia genes, and single point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of ParC and GyrA, respectively. PMID:25903569

  2. Bedaquiline: A Novel Antitubercular Agent for the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sankalp; Rawal, Gautam; Baxi, Mudit

    2016-08-01

    The developing countries are having an abruptly growing number of drug resistant tuberculosis cases. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a type of TB in which the strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is resistant to at least Isoniazid and Rifampicin, the two most effective of the four first-line TB drugs (the other two drugs being Ethambutol and Pyrazinamide). The management of such cases is complex and requires a treatment for 24-27 months. The current guidelines available for the management of this type of TB are largely based on the second line TB drugs which are relatively costly, less efficacious and are associated with greater side-effects. The introduction of newer drugs to cater to the high mortality and early sputum culture conversion in the MDR-TB cases is an absolute essential. In the present article, the authors discuss about the introduction of a newer drug named Bedaquiline for the control of MDR-TB. PMID:27656462

  3. 30 CFR 7.27 - Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. 7... Ventilation Tubing § 7.27 Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare 6... impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at the outermost tip of the flame....

  4. 30 CFR 7.27 - Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. 7... Ventilation Tubing § 7.27 Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare 6... impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at the outermost tip of the flame....

  5. 30 CFR 7.27 - Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. 7... Ventilation Tubing § 7.27 Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare 6... impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at the outermost tip of the flame....

  6. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test...) Set the methane-fueled impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at...

  7. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test...) Set the methane-fueled impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at...

  8. 30 CFR 7.27 - Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. 7... Ventilation Tubing § 7.27 Test for flame resistance of brattice cloth. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare 6... impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at the outermost tip of the flame....

  9. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test...) Set the methane-fueled impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at...

  10. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test...) Set the methane-fueled impinged jet burner to yield a flame height of 12 inches as measured at...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 178 - Flame Penetration Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... penetration is observed. (5) When testing ceiling liner panels, record the peak temperature measured 4 inches... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flame Penetration Resistance Test E Appendix E to.... 178, App. E Appendix E to Part 178—Flame Penetration Resistance Test (a) Criteria for Acceptance....

  12. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 178 - Flame Penetration Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... penetration is observed. (5) When testing ceiling liner panels, record the peak temperature measured 4 inches... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flame Penetration Resistance Test E Appendix E to.... 178, App. E Appendix E to Part 178—Flame Penetration Resistance Test (a) Criteria for Acceptance....

  13. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 178 - Flame Penetration Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... penetration is observed. (5) When testing ceiling liner panels, record the peak temperature measured 4 inches... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flame Penetration Resistance Test E Appendix E to.... 178, App. E Appendix E to Part 178—Flame Penetration Resistance Test (a) Criteria for Acceptance....

  14. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 178 - Flame Penetration Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... penetration is observed. (5) When testing ceiling liner panels, record the peak temperature measured 4 inches... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flame Penetration Resistance Test E Appendix E to.... 178, App. E Appendix E to Part 178—Flame Penetration Resistance Test (a) Criteria for Acceptance....

  15. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-resistance systems and to test for system survivability after coupler-to-tank-head impacts at relative speeds... contact with the impacted test car. b. The impacted test car must be loaded with water at six percent... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Pt. 179, App. A Appendix A to Part 179—Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test 1. This test procedure is designed to verify the integrity of new or untried tank-head...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Pt. 179, App. A Appendix A to Part 179—Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test 1. This test procedure is designed to verify the integrity of new or untried tank-head...

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Pharmacist Interventions in Patients Treated with Anti-methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Agents in a Hematological Ward.

    PubMed

    Okada, Naoto; Fushitani, Shuji; Azuma, Momoyo; Nakamura, Shingen; Nakamura, Toshimi; Teraoka, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroyoshi; Abe, Masahiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ishizawa, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) agents, vancomycin (VCM), teicoplanin (TEIC), and arbekacin (ABK), depend on their concentrations in blood. Therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is important when these antibiotics are used. In the hematological ward at Tokushima University Hospital, pharmacists have ordered the measurement of blood VCM, TEIC, and ABK concentrations to promote the use of TDM in accordance with an agreed protocol since 2013. Moreover, the infection control team includes several medical disciplines and has advised on the optimal treatment using VCM, TEIC, and ABK since 2013. This study aimed to investigate the clinical effectiveness of these pharmacist interventions. We retrospectively studied 145 cases in which patients were treated with VCM, TEIC, or ABK between January 2012 and December 2013 in the hematological ward at Tokushima University Hospital. The patients were divided into a control group (71 cases) and an intervention group (74 cases), and their clinical outcomes were compared. The rate of achievement of effective drug concentrations significantly increased in the intervention group (74%), compared to the rate in the control group (55%). Moreover, univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression revealed that pharmacist intervention and appropriate concentrations of anti-MRSA agents were independent factors associated with reduced hospitalization periods in patients with lymphoma. Our study revealed that proactive pharmacist intervention may improve the therapeutic effect of anti-MRSA agents in hematology ward patients.

  19. In vitro mutagenicity testing. II. Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, mixture of Sylgard 184 with Encapsulating Resin and Curing Agent, and dimethylbenzanthracene. [Ames test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.Y.; Smith, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    Four materials, Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, Sylgard 184 with Encapsulating Resin and Curing Agent, and 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), were tested for in vitro mutagenicity by the Ames Salmonella assay method. Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, and Sylgard 184 Encapsulating Resin with Curing Agent were not mutagenic; the mutagenicity of DMBA was corroborated.

  20. Clonidine as a sensitizing agent in the forced swimming test for revealing antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Colombel, M C; Malinge, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-11-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) in mice has failed to predict antidepressant activity for drugs having beta adrenoreceptor agonist activity and for serotonin uptake inhibitors. We investigated the potential for clonidine to render the FST sensitive to antidepressants by using a behaviorally inactive dose of this agent (0.1 mg/kg). All antidepressants studied (tricyclics, 5-HT uptake inhibitors, iprindole, mianserin, viloxazine, trazodone) showed either activity at lower doses or activity at previously inactive doses. The effect appeared specific because it did not appear with drugs other than antidepressants (diazepam, chlorpromazine, sulpiride, atropine), except for amphetamine and apomorphine which have a strong effect on the dopaminergic system. The use of behaviorally subactive doses of clonidine may thus provide an important means of increasing the sensitivity of the forced swimming test.

  1. [A new approach to overcoming the drug resistance of the causative agents of malaria].

    PubMed

    Orlov, V S; Rabinovich, S A

    1990-01-01

    Progressively expanding area of multiresistant falciparum malaria and the profile of its resistance to drugs successively implemented into practice necessitate the elaboration of approaches to the "revival" of the drugs used. As with neoplastic cells, a correlation between plasmodium multiresistance with increased "outflow" of specific drugs from the cell is suggested, which is blocked by inhibition of Ca2+ transport. Reversion of resistance to chloroquine by a combination with Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil, tricyclic antidepressants (desipramine, protritreline, etc.), tricyclic antihistamine drugs (cyproheptadine), and reversion of resistance to sulfadoxine in combination with the antihistamine drug ketodiphene have been shown in vivo and in vitro. The function of Ca2+ channels is directly related to Ca2(+)-, Mg2(+)-dependent ATPase. Ph-metric techniques elaborated in the USSR make it possible to evaluate its activity, determine the inhibitors, differentiate them according to the effect. The authors have established reversion of P. berghei resistance to chloroquine, with the tricyclic antidepressants azaphen, aminazin, triftazin correlating with the degree of Ca2+, Mg2(+)-ATPase inhibition and to praziquantel, whose effect might be associated with the increased permeability of the cellular membrane to Ca2+. The inhibitors of Ca2+ transport have various parasitocidal activities which might be accounted for by the deficiency of this cation necessary for plasmodium development. The task is to elaborate safe optimum antimalarial drug/modulator of Ca2+ transport combinations. Multiresistance (genetically predetermined multifactorial cellular changes) may be associated with enhanced synthesis of transmembrane glycoprotein with varying molecular mass depending on the direction of resistance. PMID:2266896

  2. Resistance to antimicrobial agents among enterococci isolated from fecal samples of wild marine species in the southern coast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Prichula, Janira; Pereira, Rebeca Inhoque; Wachholz, Guilherme Raffo; Cardoso, Leonardo Almansa; Tolfo, Neidimar Cezar Correa; Santestevan, Naiara Aguiar; Medeiros, Aline Weber; Tavares, Maurício; Frazzon, Jeverson; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate species distribution, antimicrobial resistance profiles, and presence of resistance genes in enterococci isolated from fecal samples of wild marine species, including seabirds (n=12), sea turtles (n=8), and mammals (n=3) found alive or dead in southern coast of Brazil. Enterococci were classified based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, tested for antibiotic susceptibility, and the presence of tet(S), tet(M), tet(L), mrsC, and erm(B) genes by PCR. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were the most common species. Single (37.09%), double (25.80%), and multiple (16.12%) antibiotic resistance patterns were observed. Resistance to rifampicin occurred most frequently. The msrC, tet(M), and/or tet(L) genes were detected in 60.15%, 73.07%, and 23.07% of the resistant strains, respectively. In conclusion, the presence of antibiotic resistant strains in these species could be related to food web interactions and aquatic pollutants or linked to environmental resistome. PMID:26952995

  3. Influence of groove count on slip resistance using NTL test feet.

    PubMed

    Joganich, Tim; Mc Cuen, Len

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, walkway slip-resistance testing with grooved NTL (Neolite Test Liners) has been the subject of research, as well as used in field investigation practices. Recent research shows that differences between non-grooved and grooved test feet do exist, especially under wet conditions. It is not known how the number of grooves influences the slip resistance. This study investigates the influence of groove count on slip resistance under both wet and dry conditions using the PIAST tribometer. Test feet with 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 grooves and a non-grooved test foot were used. Polished granite and vinyl composition tile were used as test surfaces. Results for both test surfaces show markedly higher slip resistance for increasing groove counts under wet conditions, while under dry conditions, the results show slight increases in slip resistance. Implications of these results are discussed.

  4. Direct Binding of Ledipasvir to HCV NS5A: Mechanism of Resistance to an HCV Antiviral Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Xing, Weimei; Chan, Katie; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Brendza, Katherine M.; Kirschberg, Thorsten; Kato, Darryl; Link, John O.; Cheng, Guofeng; Liu, Xiaohong; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Ledipasvir, a direct acting antiviral agent (DAA) targeting the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A protein, exhibits picomolar activity in replicon cells. While its mechanism of action is unclear, mutations that confer resistance to ledipasvir in HCV replicon cells are located in NS5A, suggesting that NS5A is the direct target of ledipasvir. To date co-precipitation and cross-linking experiments in replicon or NS5A transfected cells have not conclusively shown a direct, specific interaction between NS5A and ledipasvir. Using recombinant, full length NS5A, we show that ledipasvir binds directly, with high affinity and specificity, to NS5A. Ledipasvir binding to recombinant NS5A is saturable with a dissociation constant in the low nanomolar range. A mutant form of NS5A (Y93H) that confers resistance to ledipasvir shows diminished binding to ledipasvir. The current study shows that ledipasvir inhibits NS5A through direct binding and that resistance to ledipasvir is the result of a reduction in binding affinity to NS5A mutants. PMID:25856426

  5. The frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in homes differing in their use of surface antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Bonnie M; Robleto, Eduardo; Dumont, Theresa; Levy, Stuart B

    2012-10-01

    Antibacterial agents are common in household cleaning and personal care products, but their long-range impacts on commensal and pathogenic household bacteria are largely unknown. In a one-time survey of 38 households from Boston, MA [19] and Cincinnati, OH [18], 13 kitchen and bathroom sites were sampled for total aerobic bacteria and screened for gram phenotype and susceptibility to six antibiotic drug families. The overall bacterial titers of both user (2 or more antibacterial cleaning or personal care products) and non-user (0 or 1 product) rooms were similar with sponges and sink drains consistently showing the highest overall titers and relatively high titers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The mean frequency of resistant bacteria ranged from ≤20 % to as high as 45 % and multi-drug resistance was common. However, no significant differences were noted between biocide users and non-users. The frequency of pathogen recovery was similar in both user and non-user groups. PMID:22752336

  6. Achyrofuran is an antibacterial agent capable of killing methicillin-resistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus in the nanomolar range.

    PubMed

    Casero, Carina; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Ravelo, Angel G; Demo, Mirta; Méndez-Álvarez, Sebastián; Machín, Félix

    2013-01-15

    Currently, there is a pressing need for novel antibacterial agents against drug-resistant bacteria, especially those which have been common in our communities and hospitals, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The South American plant Achyrocline satureioides ("Marcela") has been widely used in traditional medicine for a number of diseases, including infections. Several crude extracts from this plant have shown good antimicrobial activities in vitro. In the search for the active principle(s) that confers these antimicrobial activities, we have processed the dichloromethane extract from the aerial parts of the plant. One of the isolated compounds showed extraordinary antibacterial activities against a set of clinically relevant Gram-positive strains that widely differ in their antibiogram profiles. This compound was identified as achyrofuran on the basis of its spectroscopic and physical data. We determined the MIC to be around 0.1 μM (0.07 μg/ml) for the reference methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strain NRS402. Moreover, nanomolar concentrations of achyrofuran killed 10(6) bacteria within 12 h. Based on the presence of the 2,2'-biphenol core, we further studied whether achyrofuran killed bacteria through a mechanism of action similar to that reported for the naturally occurring antibiotic MC21-A. Indeed, we found that achyrofuran was not bacteriolytic by itself although it greatly compromised membrane impermeability as determined by increased SYTOX Green uptake.

  7. Evaluation of Surrogate Disk Tests for Detection of Ciprofloxacin and Levofloxacin Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Eszter; Skov, Robert; Hindler, Janet A.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica has become increasingly difficult due to evolving resistance mechanisms to this antimicrobial class in this organism. We evaluated two quinolone disks and five fluoroquinolone disks for their ability to act as a surrogate agent for the detection of fluoroquinolone resistance in a collection of 136 S. enterica isolates, including 111 with intermediate or resistant ciprofloxacin MICs mediated by a variety of resistance mechanisms. Ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and pefloxacin disks detected all isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin (0% very major error) and yielded false resistance (major error) in 8, 4, and 12% of susceptible isolates, respectively. Ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin provided clearer differentiation of susceptible and resistant isolates. PMID:26292293

  8. The IL-8/IL-8R Axis: A Double Agent in Tumor Immune Resistance

    PubMed Central

    David, Justin M.; Dominguez, Charli; Hamilton, Duane H.; Palena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) is a pro-inflammatory chemokine produced by various cell types to recruit leukocytes to sites of infection or tissue injury. Acquisition of IL-8 and/or its receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 are known to be a relatively common occurrence during tumor progression. Emerging research now indicates that paracrine signaling by tumor-derived IL-8 promotes the trafficking of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) into the tumor microenvironment, which have the ability to dampen anti-tumor immune responses. Furthermore, recent studies have also shown that IL-8 produced by the tumor mass can induce tumor cells to undergo the transdifferentiation process epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in which tumor cells shed their epithelial characteristics and acquire mesenchymal characteristics. EMT can increase metastatic dissemination, stemness, and intrinsic resistance, including to killing by cytotoxic immune cells. This review highlights the dual potential roles that the inflammatory cytokine IL-8 plays in promoting tumor resistance by enhancing the immunosuppressive microenvironment and activating EMT, and then discusses the potential for targeting the IL-8/IL-8 receptor axis to combat these various resistance mechanisms. PMID:27348007

  9. A Protein Aggregation Based Test for Screening of the Agents Affecting Thermostability of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eronina, Tatyana; Borzova, Vera; Maloletkina, Olga; Kleymenov, Sergey; Asryants, Regina; Markossian, Kira; Kurganov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    To search for agents affecting thermal stability of proteins, a test based on the registration of protein aggregation in the regime of heating with a constant rate was used. The initial parts of the dependences of the light scattering intensity (I) on temperature (T) were analyzed using the following empiric equation: I = Kagg(T−T0)2, where Kagg is the parameter characterizing the initial rate of aggregation and T0 is a temperature at which the initial increase in the light scattering intensity is registered. The aggregation data are interpreted in the frame of the model assuming the formation of the start aggregates at the initial stages of the aggregation process. Parameter T0 corresponds to the moment of the origination of the start aggregates. The applicability of the proposed approach was demonstrated on the examples of thermal aggregation of glycogen phosphorylase b from rabbit skeletal muscles and bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase studied in the presence of agents of different chemical nature. The elaborated approach to the study of protein aggregation may be used for rapid identification of small molecules that interact with protein targets. PMID:21760963

  10. A comparative study of different contact resistance test structures dedicated to the power process technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oussalah, Slimane; Djezzar, Boualem; Jerisian, Robert

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents different contact test structures intended to characterize the metal-semiconductor interface (aluminum-silicon) for power integrated circuits fabricated in the Application Specific Discrete (ASD™) process technologies. For this study, three contact test structures have been selected, transfer length method (TLM), cross bridge Kelvin resistance (CBKR), and contact end resistance (CER). The characterization is achieved by extracting the specific contact resistance ( ρC) from contact test structures by measuring the contact resistance ( RC). To validate the results, spreading resistance was used to determine the surface doping concentration ( CS) of the diffused layer that gives ρC from a well know standard abacus. From the experimental results, we conclude that only the TLM test structure is able to give correct values of the specific contact resistance for both n and p type diffused layers that are compatibles with the manufacturer specifications.

  11. Resistance to discodermolide, a microtubule-stabilizing agent and senescence inducer, is 4E-BP1-dependent.

    PubMed

    Chao, Suzan K; Lin, Juan; Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Smith, Amos B; Horwitz, Susan Band; McDaid, Hayley M

    2011-01-01

    Discodermolide is a microtubule-stabilizing agent that induces accelerated cell senescence. A discodermolide-resistant cell line, AD32, was generated from the human lung cancer cell line A549. We hypothesize that the major resistance mechanism in these cells is escape from accelerated senescence. AD32 cells have decreased levels of 4E-BP1 mRNA and protein, relative to the parental discodermolide-sensitive A549 cells. Lentiviral-mediated re-expression of wild-type 4E-BP1 in AD32 cells increased the proliferation rate and reverted resistance to discodermolide via restoration of discodermolide-induced accelerated senescence. Consistent with this, cell growth and response to discodermolide was confirmed in vivo using tumor xenograft models. Furthermore, reintroduction of a nonphosphorylatable mutant (Thr-37/46 Ala) of 4E-BP1 was able to partially restore sensitivity and enhance proliferation in AD32 cells, suggesting that these effects are independent of phosphorylation by mTORC1. Microarray profiling of AD32-resistant cells versus sensitive A549 cells, and subsequent unbiased gene ontology analysis, identified molecular pathways and functional groupings of differentially expressed mRNAs implicated in overcoming discodermolide-induced senescence. The most statistically significant classes of differentially expressed genes included p53 signaling, G2/M checkpoint regulation, and genes involved in the role of BRCA1 in the DNA damage response. Consistent with this, p53 protein expression was up-regulated and had increased nuclear localization in AD32 cells relative to parental A549 cells. Furthermore, the stability of p53 was enhanced in AD32 cells. Our studies propose a role for 4E-BP1 as a regulator of discodermolide-induced accelerated senescence.

  12. Tetracycline-resistance encoding plasmids from Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood disease, isolated from commercial honeys.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Adriana M; León, Ignacio E; López, Ana C

    2014-03-01

    Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood disease in honeybees, acquires tetracycline-resistance via native plasmids carrying known tetracycline-resistance determinants. From three P. larvae tetracycline-resistant strains isolated from honeys, 5-kb-circular plasmids with almost identical sequences, designated pPL373 in strain PL373, pPL374 in strain PL374, and pPL395 in strain PL395, were isolated. These plasmids were highly similar (99%) to small tetracycline-encoding plasmids (pMA67, pBHS24, pBSDMV46A, pDMV2, pSU1, pAST4, and pLS55) that replicate by the rolling circle mechanism. Nucleotide sequences comparisons showed that pPL373, pPL374, and pPL395 mainly differed from the previously reported P. larvae plasmid pMA67 in the oriT region and mob genes. These differences suggest alternative mobilization and/or conjugation capacities. Plasmids pPL373, pPL374, and pPL395 were individually transferred by electroporation and stably maintained in tetracycline-susceptible P. larvae NRRL B-14154, in which they autonomously replicated. The presence of nearly identical plasmids in five different genera of gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Bhargavaea, Bacillus, Lactobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Sporosarcina, inhabiting diverse ecological niches provides further evidence of the genetic transfer of tetracycline resistance among environmental bacteria from soils, food, and marine habitats and from pathogenic bacteria such as P. larvae.

  13. Tetracycline-resistance encoding plasmids from Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood disease, isolated from commercial honeys.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Adriana M; León, Ignacio E; López, Ana C

    2014-03-01

    Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood disease in honeybees, acquires tetracycline-resistance via native plasmids carrying known tetracycline-resistance determinants. From three P. larvae tetracycline-resistant strains isolated from honeys, 5-kb-circular plasmids with almost identical sequences, designated pPL373 in strain PL373, pPL374 in strain PL374, and pPL395 in strain PL395, were isolated. These plasmids were highly similar (99%) to small tetracycline-encoding plasmids (pMA67, pBHS24, pBSDMV46A, pDMV2, pSU1, pAST4, and pLS55) that replicate by the rolling circle mechanism. Nucleotide sequences comparisons showed that pPL373, pPL374, and pPL395 mainly differed from the previously reported P. larvae plasmid pMA67 in the oriT region and mob genes. These differences suggest alternative mobilization and/or conjugation capacities. Plasmids pPL373, pPL374, and pPL395 were individually transferred by electroporation and stably maintained in tetracycline-susceptible P. larvae NRRL B-14154, in which they autonomously replicated. The presence of nearly identical plasmids in five different genera of gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Bhargavaea, Bacillus, Lactobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Sporosarcina, inhabiting diverse ecological niches provides further evidence of the genetic transfer of tetracycline resistance among environmental bacteria from soils, food, and marine habitats and from pathogenic bacteria such as P. larvae. PMID:25296446

  14. Proteomic analysis of human glioblastoma cell lines differently resistant to a nitric oxide releasing agent.

    PubMed

    Leone, Roberta; Giussani, Paola; De Palma, Sara; Fania, Chiara; Capitanio, Daniele; Vasso, Michele; Brioschi, Loredana; Riboni, Laura; Viani, Paola; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive astrocytoma characterized by the development of resistant cells to various cytotoxic stimuli. Nitric oxide (NO) is able to overcome tumor resistance in PTEN mutated rat C6 glioma cells due to its ability to inhibit cell growth by influencing the intracellular distribution of ceramide. The aim of this study is to monitor the effects of NO donor PAPANONOate on ceramide trafficking in human glioma cell lines, CCF-STTG1 (PTEN-mutated, p53-wt) and T98G (PTEN-harboring, p53-mutated), together with the assessment of their differential molecular signature by 2D-DIGE and MALDI mass spectrometry. In the CCF-STTG1 cell line, the results indicate that treatment with PAPANONOate decreased cell proliferation (<50%) and intracellular trafficking of ceramide, assessed by BODIPY-C5Cer, while these events were not observed in the T98G cell line. Proteomic results suggest that CCF-STTG1 cells are characterized by an increased expression of proteins involved in NO-associated ER stress (i.e. protein disulfide-isomerase A3, calreticulin, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein), which could compromise ceramide delivery from ER to Golgi, leading to ceramide accumulation in ER and partial growth arrest. Conversely, T98G cell lines, resistant to NO exposure, are characterized by increased levels of cytosolic antioxidant proteins (i.e. glutathione-S-transferase P, peroxiredoxin 1), which might buffer intracellular NO. By providing differential ceramide distribution after NO exposure and differential protein expression of two high grade glioma cell lines, this study highlights specific proteins as possible markers for tumor aggressiveness. This study demonstrates that, in two different high grade glioma cell lines, NO exposure results in a different ceramide distribution and protein expression. Furthermore, this study highlights specific proteins as possible markers for tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25797839

  15. Saliva, supragingival biofilm and root canals can harbor gene associated with resistance to lactamic agents.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Ludmila Coutinho; Fatturi-Parolo, Clarissa Cavalcanti; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Montagner, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the presence of Prevotella strains and genes associated with resistance to lactamics in different oral niches from patients with/without primary endodontic infections. Saliva (S) and supragingival biofilm (SB) were collected from three patient groups: Group I - no endodontic infection (n = 15); Group II - acute endodontic infection (n = 12); and Group III - chronic endodontic infection (n = 15). Root canal (RC) samples were collected from Groups II and III. The presence of P. intermedia, P nigrescens, P. tannerae and cfxA/cfxA2 gene was assessed by PCR. The cfxA/cfxA2 gene was not detected in all environments within the same patient. The cfxA/cfxA2 gene was present in 23.81% of S samples, 28.57% of SB samples, and 7.41% of RC samples. Prevotella species were detected in 53.97%, 47.62% and 34.56% of the S, SB, and RC samples, respectively. P. intermedia had a high frequency in saliva samples from Group 3. Saliva samples from Group 1 had higher detection rates of P. nigrescens than did Groups 2 and 3. Patients without endodontic disease had high frequencies of P. nigrescens in the SB samples. The presence or absence of spontaneous symptoms was not related to the detection rates for resistance genes in the RC samples. Saliva, supragingival biofilm and root canals can harbor resistant bacteria. The presence of symptomatology did not increase the presence of the cfxA/cfxA2 gene in the supragingival biofilm and inside root canals. PMID:25789508

  16. Structure-activity relationship studies of the tricyclic indoline resistance-modifying agent.

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Podoll, Jessica D; Wang, Wei; Walls, Shane; O'Rourke, Courtney P; Wang, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    Previously we discovered a tricyclic indoline, N-[2-(6-bromo-4-methylidene-2,3,4,4a,9,9a-hexahydro-1H-carbazol-4a-yl)ethyl]-4-chlorobenzene-1-sulfonamide (1, Of1), from bioinspired synthesis of a highly diverse polycyclic indoline alkaloid library, that selectively resensitizes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains to β-lactam antibiotics. Herein, we report a thorough structure-activity relationship investigation of 1, which identified regions of 1 that tolerate modifications without compromising activity and afforded the discovery of a more potent analogue with reduced mammalian toxicity. PMID:24694192

  17. The hypoxia-mimetic agent CoCl₂ induces chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanglei; Xu, Shuqing; Peng, Lintao; Li, Hui; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Yanfang

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia, which is an important factor that mediates tumor progression and poor treatment response, is particularly associated with tumor chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced colorectal cancer chemoresistance remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying hypoxia‑induced chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells. LOVO cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment simulated by cobalt chloride (CoCl2), which is a chemical inducer of hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α). HIF‑1α is a transcription factor that has an important role in tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia, and controls the expression of several genes. Various CoCl2 concentrations are often used to simulate degrees of hypoxia. In the present study, following treatment with CoCl2, an MTT assay was conducted to determine the growth and drug sensitivity of LOVO cells. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF‑1α and factors associated with chemotherapy resistance, including multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and multidrug resistant 1 (MDR1), which encodes the major transmembrane efflux transporter P‑glycoprotein (P‑gp). In addition, the expression levels of apoptosis‑related proteins, including B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl‑2‑associated agonist of cell death (Bad) were detected by western blotting. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to visually observe Adriamycin (ADR) accumulation and retention, thus analyzing intracellular drug transportation in cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. CoCl2‑simulated hypoxia was able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and upregulate the expression levels of HIF‑1α, MDR1/P‑gp and MRP. In addition, proapoptotic members of the Bcl‑2 protein family, Bax and Bad, were downregulated. The anti‑apoptotic member Bcl‑2

  18. Comparison of two versions of larval development test to detect anthelmintic resistance in Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Várady, Marián; Corba, Július; Letková, Valéria; Kovác, Gabriel

    2009-03-23

    Larval development (LDT) and micro-agar larval development tests (MALDT) were used to compare the reliability and sensitivity of two methods for detecting anthelmintic resistance in Haemonchus contortus. The tests were conducted using three resistant and four susceptible isolates of H. contortus. Both versions of the tests provided comparable results with regard to the characterization of benzimidazole and levamisole susceptibility but neither test was sufficiently sensitive to discrimination between an ivermectin (IVM) susceptible and an IVM resistant isolate. Each test has its own merits with the LDT having the advantage of being less time-consuming.

  19. Emerging Rapid Resistance Testing Methods for Clinical Microbiology Laboratories and Their Potential Impact on Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Frickmann, Hagen; Zautner, Andreas E.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical and multidrug resistance, especially ESBL and carbapenemase expressing Enterobacteriaceae, is globally spreading. Therefore, it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve therapeutic success by calculated antibiotic therapy. Consequently, rapid antibiotic resistance testing is essential. Various molecular and mass spectrometry-based approaches have been introduced in diagnostic microbiology to speed up the providing of reliable resistance data. PCR- and sequencing-based approaches are the most expensive but the most frequently applied modes of testing, suitable for the detection of resistance genes even from primary material. Next generation sequencing, based either on assessment of allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms or on the detection of nonubiquitous resistance mechanisms might allow for sequence-based bacterial resistance testing comparable to viral resistance testing on the long term. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), based on specific binding of fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes, provides a less expensive molecular bridging technique. It is particularly useful for detection of resistance mechanisms based on mutations in ribosomal RNA. Approaches based on MALDI-TOF-MS, alone or in combination with molecular techniques, like PCR/electrospray ionization MS or minisequencing provide the fastest resistance results from pure colonies or even primary samples with a growing number of protocols. This review details the various approaches of rapid resistance testing, their pros and cons, and their potential use for the diagnostic laboratory. PMID:25343142

  20. Emerging rapid resistance testing methods for clinical microbiology laboratories and their potential impact on patient management.

    PubMed

    Frickmann, Hagen; Masanta, Wycliffe Omurwa; Zautner, Andreas E

    2014-01-01

    Atypical and multidrug resistance, especially ESBL and carbapenemase expressing Enterobacteriaceae, is globally spreading. Therefore, it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve therapeutic success by calculated antibiotic therapy. Consequently, rapid antibiotic resistance testing is essential. Various molecular and mass spectrometry-based approaches have been introduced in diagnostic microbiology to speed up the providing of reliable resistance data. PCR- and sequencing-based approaches are the most expensive but the most frequently applied modes of testing, suitable for the detection of resistance genes even from primary material. Next generation sequencing, based either on assessment of allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms or on the detection of nonubiquitous resistance mechanisms might allow for sequence-based bacterial resistance testing comparable to viral resistance testing on the long term. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), based on specific binding of fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes, provides a less expensive molecular bridging technique. It is particularly useful for detection of resistance mechanisms based on mutations in ribosomal RNA. Approaches based on MALDI-TOF-MS, alone or in combination with molecular techniques, like PCR/electrospray ionization MS or minisequencing provide the fastest resistance results from pure colonies or even primary samples with a growing number of protocols. This review details the various approaches of rapid resistance testing, their pros and cons, and their potential use for the diagnostic laboratory.

  1. Current antiplatelet agents: place in therapy and role of genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eugene

    2015-04-01

    Antiplatelet therapies play a central role in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. While aspirin, a cyclo-oxygenase-1 inhibitor has been the cornerstone of antithrombotic treatment for several decades, P2Y12 receptor inhibitors cangrelor, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor and protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist vorapaxar, have emerged as additional therapies to reduce the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. Recent clinical trials evaluating the role of these agents and major society guideline updates for use of antiplatelet therapies for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events will be examined. The latest studies regarding the appropriate duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention will be presented. The current state of genetic and platelet function testing will be reviewed.

  2. Evaluation and testing of sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Romanovski, V.V.; Veeck, A.C.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate and test the complexing ability of a variety of promising new complexing agents synthesized by Professor Kenneth Raymond`s group at the University of California, Berkeley (ESP-CP TTP Number SF16C311). Some of these derivatives have already shown the potential for selectivity binding Pu(IV) in a wide range of solutions in the presence of other metals. Professor Raymond`s group uses molecular modeling to design and synthesize ligands based on modification of natural siderophores, or their analogs, for chelation of actinides. The ligands are then modified for use as liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extractants. The authors` group at the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science (ITS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory determines the complex formation constants between the ligands and actinide ions, the capacity and time dependence for uptake on the resins, and the effect of other metal ions and pH.

  3. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2012-09-30

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding. It involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing has shown that the diffusion rate of Zn through the FeCrAl alloy is much faster than through the nickel superalloys. This means that the FeCrAl will serve as a sink for the Zn bonding alloy during the evaporative metal bonding process. Also, the testing has shown that the Zn diffusion mechanism is bulk diffusion, and not intergranular. This is a surprise. However, it means that quantification of the Zn diffusivities in these samples will be significantly simpler than would have been the case if grain boundary diffusion dominated. In addition to the laboratory testing, gas impinger and particulate samples are being collected from a combustor firing syngas and natural gas to determine what types of microcontaminants may reach a turbine firing syngas. The syngas is created in one of two different pilot-scale pressurized coal gasifiers. The initial analysis of the impinger solutions was for standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 determination of hazardous metals and did not include major element analysis. When syngas is fired, the amount of Mn in the combustor gas increases substantially. Halogens (Br2 and Cl2) and hydrogen

  4. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  5. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  9. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  10. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  11. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  12. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  13. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  14. Semi-synthetic ocotillol analogues as selective ABCB1-mediated drug resistance reversal agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Si, Rui; Patel, Bhargav A.; Xu, Jinyi; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-Binding Cassette transporters leads to multidrug resistance in cancer cells and results in the failure of chemotherapy. In this in-vitro study, we investigated whether or not (20S, 24R/S)-epoxy-12β, 25-dihydroxy-dommarane-3β-amine (ORA and OSA), a pair of semi-synthetic ocotillol analogue epimers, could inhibit the ABCB1 transporter. ORA (1 μM and 3 μM) significantly reversed the resistance to paclitaxel and vincristine in ABCB1-overexpressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cells, whereas OSA had no significant effects. In addition, ORA (3 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by suppressing the efflux function of ABCB1. Meanwhile, both ORA (3 μM) and OSA (3 μM) did not significantly alter the expression level or the subcellular location of ABCB1 protein. Moreover, the ABCB1 ATPase study suggested that ORA had a stronger stimulatory effect on the ATPase activity than OSA. ORA also exhibited a higher docking score as compared with OSA inside transmembrane domain of ABCB1. Overall, we concluded that ORA reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR by competitively inhibiting the ABCB1 drug efflux function. PMID:26296969

  15. Rhamnolipids as emulsifying agents for essential oil formulations: antimicrobial effect against Candida albicans and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Haba, Ester; Bouhdid, Samira; Torrego-Solana, Noelia; Marqués, A M; Espuny, M José; García-Celma, M José; Manresa, Angeles

    2014-12-10

    This work examines the influence of essential oil composition on emulsification with rhamnolipids and their use as therapeutic antimicrobial agents against two opportunistic pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Candida albicans. Rhamnolipids, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with waste frying oil as the carbon source, were composed of eight rhamnolipid homologues. The rhamnolipid mixture was used to produce emulsions containing essential oils (EOs) of Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum verum, Origanum compactum and Lavandula angustifolia using the titration method. Ternary phase diagrams were designed to evaluate emulsion stability, which differed depending on the essential oil. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs alone and the emulsions was evaluated. The antimicrobial activity presented by the essential oils alone increased with emulsification. The surface properties of rhamnolipids contribute to the positive dispersion of EOs and thus increase their availability and antimicrobial activity against C. albicans and S. aureus. Therefore, rhamnolipid-based emulsions represent a promising approach to the development of EO delivery systems.

  16. Development of quantitative infrared analysis for monitoring water and emulsifying agents in fire-resistant microemulsion diesel fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.

    1983-04-01

    The Army has developed a Fire-Resistant Fuel (FRF) which consists of 10 volume percent (vol %) water, 6 volume percent amide/amine/soap emulsifying agent (EA) and 84 volume percent Diesel Fuel (DF-2). It is necessary to have methods of monitoring the volume percent of each component in the blending of FRF from FRF field mixer unit. A quantitative infrared (IR) analysis for monitoring water and EA in FRF has been developed. The differential IR technique was applied to minimize the interference of weak DF-2 absorption in the regions of analytical wave number chosen. The IR method would determine volume percent of water in the range of 4 to 10 volume percent and volume percent of EA in the range of 4 to 8 volume percent of FRF with fair accuracy.

  17. Update of contemporary antimicrobial resistance rates across China: reference testing results for 12 medical centers (2011).

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana; Hu, Bijie; Ni, Yuxing; Lin, Stephen S F; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Wang, Yao

    2013-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (R) surveillance across Asia and especially in China has documented unique patterns and mechanisms. This 2011 study reports results for 2278 isolates from 12 hospitals in China (94-216 strains/site); most from bacteremia (20.4%), pneumonias (29.1%), or skin and skin structure infections (20.9%). Samples were tested by reference broth microdilution methods, interpreted by published susceptibility (S) breakpoints. The most common species were Staphylococcus aureus (343, 45.8% MRSA), Escherichia coli (EC; 288), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSA; 221), Klebsiella spp. (KSP; 208), acinetobacters (ACB; 178), enterobacters (155), Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN; 154, 46.8% penicillin-S), and enterococci (ENT; 137). Among 849 Gram-positive (GP) cocci, linezolid, tigecycline (TIG), daptomycin, and vancomycin provided best antimicrobial coverage (≥99.7% S). Resistance patterns of concern were 0.3% VISA, 15.4% teicoplanin non-S coagulase-negative staphylococci, 1.5% vancomycin-R ENT (all Enterococcus faecium), 1.9% levofloxacin-R β-haemolytic streptococci, and 35.1 and 12.7% ceftriaxone-non-S rates for SPN and viridans group streptococci, respectively. For Gram-negative bacilli, R among Enterobacteriaceae was highest against β-lactams (extended spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains at 73.6 and 42.8% in EC and KSP, respectively; carbapenem-R was only 2.1-4.3% with KPC and IMP type enzymes detected in KSP). The widest spectrum agents were cefoperazone/sulbactam (79.5-86.1%), piperacillin/tazobactam (88.9-92.0%), TIG (98.6-100%), amikacin (AMK; 91.8-93.7%), and meropenem (95.7-97.1% S). PSA was most inhibited by AMK (90.5% S) and colistin (COL; 99.5%), with cefepime (67.9%) best among the tested β-lactams. Only COL (100% S) and TIG (MIC90, 2 μg/mL) showed significant potencies against ACB. In conclusion, R among pathogens from 12 Chinese hospitals illustrates several agents active against GP pathogens, but more serious R problems were noted among

  18. Bacteriophage: Time to Re-Evaluate the Potential of Phage Therapy as a Promising Agent to Control Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri Ghannad, Masoud; Mohammadi, Avid

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays the most difficult problem in treatment of bacterial infections is the appearance of resistant bacteria to the antimicrobial agents so that the attention is being drawn to other potential targets. In view of the positive findings of phage therapy, many advantages have been mentioned which utilizes phage therapy over chemotherapy and it seems to be a promising agent to replace the antibiotics. This review focuses on an understanding of phages for the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases as a new alternative treatment of infections caused by multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria. Therefore, utilizing bacteriophage may be accounted as an alternative therapy. It is appropriate time to re-evaluate the potential of phage therapy as an effective bactericidal and a promising agent to control multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:23494063

  19. Effect of protective agents and previous acclimation on ethanol resistance of frozen and freeze-dried Lactobacillus plantarum strains.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Ferrada, Bárbara Mercedes; Brizuela, Natalia; Gerbino, Esteban; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Semorile, Liliana; Tymczyszyn, E Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the protective effect of sucrose, trehalose and glutamate during freezing and freeze-drying of three oenological Lactobacillus plantarum strains previously acclimated in the presence of ethanol. The efficiency of protective agents was assessed by analyses of membrane integrity and bacterial cultivability in a synthetic wine after the preservation processes. No significant differences in the cultivability, with respect to the controls cells, were observed after freezing at -80 °C and -20 °C, and pre-acclimated cells were more resistant to freeze-drying than non-acclimated ones. The results of multiparametric flow cytometry showed a significant level of membrane damage after freeze-drying in two of the three strains. The cultivability was determined after incubation in wine-like medium containing 13 or 14% v/v ethanol at 21 °C for 24 h and the results were interpreted using principal component analysis (PCA). Acclimation was the most important factor for preservation, increasing the bacterial resistance to ethanol after freezing and freeze-drying. Freeze-drying was the most drastic method of preservation, followed by freezing at -20 °C. The increase of ethanol concentration from 6 to 10% v/v in the acclimation medium improved the recovery of two of the three strains. In turn, the increase of ethanol content in the synthetic wine led to a dramatic decrease of viable cells in the three strains investigated. The results of this study indicate that a successful inoculation of dehydrated L. plantarum in wine depends not only on the use of protective agents, but also on the cell acclimation process prior to preservation, and on the ethanol content of wine.

  20. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT®, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding and involves placing a thin foil of zinc between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the zinc melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The zinc then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. During this annual reporting period, the finite element model was completed and used to design clamping jigs to hold the APMT plate to the larger blocks of superalloys during the bonding process. The clamping system was machined from titanium–zirconium–molybdenum and used to bond the APMT plate to the superalloy blocks. The bond between the APMT plate was weak for one of each of the superalloy blocks. We believe that this occurred because enough oxidation had occurred on the surface of the parts as a result of a 1-month time period between sandblasting to prepare the parts and the actual bonding process. The other blocks were, therefore, bonded within 1 day of preparing the parts for bonding, and their joints appear strong. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of representative joints showed that no zinc remained in the alloys after bonding. Also, phases rich in hafnium and tantalum had precipitated near the bond line in the APMT. Iron from the APMT had diffused into the superalloys during bonding, more extensively in the CM247LC than in the Rene 80. Nickel from the superalloys had diffused into the APMT, again more extensively in the joint with the CM247LC than

  1. PREPARATION AND TESTING OF CORROSIONAND SPALLATION-RESISTANT COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2014-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT®, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding and involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing to determine the diffusion rate of Zn through the alloys has been completed. However, an analytical solution does not exist to model the diffusion of zinc through the alloys. For this reason, a finite difference algorithm using MATLAB was developed. It makes use of the hopscotch algorithm. The model allows the user to specify the dimensions of the metal parts, the Zn concentration at the bondline, the mesh size, time step, and Zn diffusivity. The experimentally measured values of diffusivity for Zn in APMT and Rene 80/CM 247LC are approximately 2.7 × 10-12 and 4 × 10-14 m2/s, respectively. While the qualitative behavior of the model appears correct, a comparison of the diffusion predictions with the experimental results from earlier in the project indicates that the expected Zn concentration is significantly higher than that measured experimentally. The difference depends on the assumed initial concentration, which is difficult to quantify exactly under experimental conditions for t = 0. In addition to the diffusion work, the coefficients of thermal expansions were determined for each of the alloys as a function of temperature. This information

  2. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 2. Appendix A: Resistance measurements. Appendix B: Lightning test data plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Resistance measurements are given in graphical for when a simulated lightning discharge strikes on an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was to measure the electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case.

  3. Integration and validation testing for PhEDEx, DBS and DAS with the PhEDEx LifeCycle agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeser, C.; Chwalek, T.; Giffels, M.; Kuznetsov, V.; Wildish, T.

    2014-06-01

    The ever-increasing amount of data handled by the CMS dataflow and workflow management tools poses new challenges for cross-validation among different systems within CMS experiment at LHC. To approach this problem we developed an integration test suite based on the LifeCycle agent, a tool originally conceived for stress-testing new releases of PhEDEx, the CMS data-placement tool. The LifeCycle agent provides a framework for customising the test workflow in arbitrary ways, and can scale to levels of activity well beyond those seen in normal running. This means we can run realistic performance tests at scales not likely to be seen by the experiment for some years, or with custom topologies to examine particular situations that may cause concern some time in the future. The LifeCycle agent has recently been enhanced to become a general purpose integration and validation testing tool for major CMS services. It allows cross-system integration tests of all three components to be performed in controlled environments, without interfering with production services. In this paper we discuss the design and implementation of the LifeCycle agent. We describe how it is used for small-scale debugging and validation tests, and how we extend that to large-scale tests of whole groups of sub-systems. We show how the LifeCycle agent can emulate the action of operators, physicists, or software agents external to the system under test, and how it can be scaled to large and complex systems.

  4. Testing of selected pharmacological agents for capturing waterfowl [Annual Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cline, D.R.

    1970-01-01

    The response of game-farm mallards (Frost strain) to seven pharmacological immobilizing agents was evaluated in Phase I of a planned four-phase study. A limited amount of testing was also done with wild mallards. Single dosages were administered to determine the mean effective dose (ED50) and mean lethal dose (LD50), The therapeutic index, or safety factor (LD50/ED50), and palatability were also established. Optimum dosage rates of compounds administered orally on baits were not considered in this phase of the study. Compounds were-administered by intubation and calculated in terms of mg/kg. All except one compound produced narcosis within 5 minutes at the effective dose rate.Immobilization periods for the seven compounds ranged from 7-24 minutes, and recovery periods from 1.0-6.5 hours. Such wide variations in actions of the compounds can be attributed to a compound's rate of absorption, the ease with which it passes the blood-brain barrier, its solubility in tissues, and its rate of metabolism in the liver and kidneys. Length of both the immobilization and recovery periods were extended when dosages were increased. There was no delayed mortality among survivors with any of the seven compounds at either the ED50 or LD50. Females were generally more sensitive to the anesthetizing agents than males. The ED50 for wild mallards was substantially higher than that for the experimental game-farm birds for the two compounds on which this was tested.Tribromoethanol (Avertin of Winthrop Laboratories) satisfied all test criteria an Phase I and will be subjected to more intensive investigation in ensuing tests. Thiopental sodium (Pentothal of Amdal Company) and pentobarbital sodium (Nembutal of Abbott Laboratories) were judged to be marginal. Although their therapeutic indexes were good (5.00), recovery periods were prolonged and toxic convulsions occurred at medium to high dose rates as the LD50 was approached.Alpha-chloralose (Fisher Scientific) proved least promising of

  5. Candida Infections, Causes, Targets, and Resistance Mechanisms: Traditional and Alternative Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The genus Candida includes about 200 different species, but only a few species are human opportunistic pathogens and cause infections when the host becomes debilitated or immunocompromised. Candida infections can be superficial or invasive. Superficial infections often affect the skin or mucous membranes and can be treated successfully with topical antifungal drugs. However, invasive fungal infections are often life-threatening, probably due to inefficient diagnostic methods and inappropriate initial antifungal therapies. Here, we briefly review our current knowledge of pathogenic species of the genus Candida and yeast infection causes and then focus on current antifungal drugs and resistance mechanisms. An overview of new therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of Candida infections is also provided. PMID:23878798

  6. Marinopyrrole Derivatives as Potential Antibiotic Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (III)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Haste, Nina M.; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Li, Jerry; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary; Li, Rongshi

    2014-01-01

    The marine natural product, marinopyrrole A (1), was previously shown to have significant antibiotic activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although compound (1) exhibits a significant reduction in MRSA activity in the presence of human serum, we have identified key modifications that partially restore activity. We previously reported our discovery of a chloro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1a) featuring a 2–4 fold improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against MRSA, significantly less susceptibility to serum inhibition and rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA. Here, we report a novel fluoro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1e) showing an improved profile of potency, less susceptibility to serum inhibition, as well as rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA. PMID:24796304

  7. Marinopyrrole derivatives as potential antibiotic agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (III).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Haste, Nina M; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Li, Jerry; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary; Li, Rongshi

    2014-04-30

    The marine natural product, marinopyrrole A (1), was previously shown to have significant antibiotic activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although compound (1) exhibits a significant reduction in MRSA activity in the presence of human serum, we have identified key modifications that partially restore activity. We previously reported our discovery of a chloro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1a) featuring a 2-4 fold improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against MRSA, significantly less susceptibility to serum inhibition and rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA. Here, we report a novel fluoro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1e) showing an improved profile of potency, less susceptibility to serum inhibition, as well as rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA.

  8. Sensitivity tests of tumors to cytostatic agents. I. Comparative investigations on transplanted tumors in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Volm, M; Faufmann, M; MAttern, J; Wayss, K

    1975-01-01

    With series of transplanted tumors, the activities of different cytostatic agents which directly influence the metabolism of nucleic acids (Actinomycin D, adriamycin, daunomycin, 5-fluorouracil, procarbazine, trenimon) was measured by determining 3-H-uridine incorporation in short-term (3hrs) incubations of tumor cell suspensions. Data obtained could be used to predict the response of each tumor to particular cytostatic agents in vivo. The activities of the cytostatic agents as determined using long-term tissue cultures (time of exposure of tumor cells to cytostatic agent 48 hrs were comparable to those obtained with the short-term test. In long-term cultures, determination of cell numbers gave results similar to those obtained by morphological evaluation. In SHORt-term test, differing sensitivities of tumors to cytostatics could be detected.

  9. Infectious titres of sheep scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy agents cannot be accurately predicted from quantitative laboratory test results.

    PubMed

    González, Lorenzo; Thorne, Leigh; Jeffrey, Martin; Martin, Stuart; Spiropoulos, John; Beck, Katy E; Lockey, Richard W; Vickery, Christopher M; Holder, Thomas; Terry, Linda

    2012-11-01

    It is widely accepted that abnormal forms of the prion protein (PrP) are the best surrogate marker for the infectious agent of prion diseases and, in practice, the detection of such disease-associated (PrP(d)) and/or protease-resistant (PrP(res)) forms of PrP is the cornerstone of diagnosis and surveillance of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Nevertheless, some studies question the consistent association between infectivity and abnormal PrP detection. To address this discrepancy, 11 brain samples of sheep affected with natural scrapie or experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy were selected on the basis of the magnitude and predominant types of PrP(d) accumulation, as shown by immunohistochemical (IHC) examination; contra-lateral hemi-brain samples were inoculated at three different dilutions into transgenic mice overexpressing ovine PrP and were also subjected to quantitative analysis by three biochemical tests (BCTs). Six samples gave 'low' infectious titres (10⁶·⁵ to 10⁶·⁷ LD₅₀ g⁻¹) and five gave 'high titres' (10⁸·¹ to ≥ 10⁸·⁷ LD₅₀ g⁻¹) and, with the exception of the Western blot analysis, those two groups tended to correspond with samples with lower PrP(d)/PrP(res) results by IHC/BCTs. However, no statistical association could be confirmed due to high individual sample variability. It is concluded that although detection of abnormal forms of PrP by laboratory methods remains useful to confirm TSE infection, infectivity titres cannot be predicted from quantitative test results, at least for the TSE sources and host PRNP genotypes used in this study. Furthermore, the near inverse correlation between infectious titres and Western blot results (high protease pre-treatment) argues for a dissociation between infectivity and PrP(res).

  10. Resistance to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents is associated with arterial microcalcification in early hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Won, Hye Sung; Choi, Su Jin; Yun, Yu Seon; Shin, Ok-Ran; Ko, Yoon Ho; Kim, Young Soo; Yoon, Sun Ae; Kim, Young Ok

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between arterial microcalcification (AMiC) and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) hyporesponsiveness in hemodialysis patients. The presence of AMiC was confirmed by pathologic examination of von Kossa-stained arterial specimens acquired during vascular access surgery. We assessed the ESA hyporesponsiveness index (EHRI), defined as the weekly ESA dose per kilogram body weight divided by the hemoglobin level. AMiC was detected in 33 (40.2%) of 82 patients. Patients with diabetes had a higher incidence of AMiC than patients without diabetes. The serum levels of albumin and cholesterol were higher in patients without AMiC than in patients with AMiC. The serum levels of intact parathyroid hormone were lower in patients with AMiC than in patients without AMiC. The serum levels of phosphate and calcium-phosphorus product did not differ between the two groups. The mean EHRI value was higher in patients with AMiC than in patients without AMiC. In multivariate analyses, ESA hyporesponsiveness and diabetes showed a significant association with AMiC. In conclusion, ESA hyporesponsiveness may be a clinical relevant parameters related to AMiC in hemodialysis patients.

  11. Anti-biofilm agents: recent breakthrough against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Pooi Y; Toh, Yien S

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen that causes potentially life-threatening nosocomial- and community-acquired infections, such as osteomyelitis and endocarditis. Staphylococcus aureus has the ability to form multicellular, surface-adherent communities called biofilms, which enables it to survive in various sources of stress, including antibiotics, nutrient limitations, heat shock, and immune responses. Biofilm-forming capacity is now recognized as an important virulence determinant in the development of staphylococcal device-related infections. In light of the projected increase in the numbers of elderly patients who will require semi-permanent indwelling medical devices such as artificial knees and hips, we can anticipate an expanded need for new agents and treatment options to manage biofilm-associated infections in an expanding at-risk population. With better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and growth, novel strategies that target biofilm-associated infections caused by S. aureus have recently been described and seem promising as future anti-biofilm therapies. PMID:24453168

  12. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  13. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 25 mm. (1 inch) water-column height. (c) The exhalation resistance of pressure-demand apparatus shall not exceed the static pressure in the facepiece by more than 51 mm. (2 inches) water-column height. (d) The static pressure (at zero flow) in the facepiece shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches)...

  14. Comparison of genomic and antimicrobial resistance features of latex agglutination test-positive and latex agglutination test-negative Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Moser, A; Stephan, R; Corti, S; Johler, S

    2013-01-01

    The dairy industry suffers massive economic losses due to staphylococcal mastitis in cattle. The Staphaureux latex agglutination test (Oxoid, Basel, Switzerland) was reported to lead to negative results in 54% of bovine Staphylococcus aureus strains, and latex-negative strains are thought to be less virulent than Staphaurex latex-positive strains. However, comparative information on virulence and resistance profiles of these 2 groups of Staph. aureus is scarce. Our objective was to associate the latex agglutination phenotype of Staph. aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis milk with data on clonal complexes, virulence genes, and antibiotic resistance to (1) determine the virulence profiles of the Staphaureux test positive and Staphaurex test negative groups, and (2) provide data needed to improve treatment of bovine mastitis and to identify potential vaccine targets. Seventy-eight Staph. aureus strains isolated from 78 cows on 57 Swiss farms were characterized. Latex agglutination was tested by Staphaureux kit, and resistance profiles were generated by disk diffusion. A DNA microarray was used to assign clonal complexes (CC) and to determine virulence and resistance gene profiles. By the Staphaureux test, 49% of the isolates were latex-positive and 51% were latex-negative. All latex-negative strains were assigned to CC151, whereas latex-positive strains were assigned to various clonal complexes, including CC97 (n=16), CC8 (n=10), CC479 (n=5), CC20 (n=4), CC7 (n=1), CC9 (n=1), and CC45 (n=1). Although the latex-negative isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents tested, 24% of latex-positive isolates were classified as intermediate with regard to cefalexin-kanamycin and 13% were resistant to both ampicillin and penicillin. Microarray profiles of latex-negative isolates were highly similar, but differed largely from those of latex-positive isolates. Although the latex-negative group lacked several enterotoxin genes and sak, it exhibited significantly

  15. Environmental stability of chemically amplified resists: proposing an industry standard methodology for testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Kim R.; Kishkovich, Oleg P.

    2000-06-01

    The authors propose the establishment of a new industry standard methodology for testing the environmental stability of chemically amplified chemical resists. Preparatory to making this proposal, they developed a pertinent test apparatus and test procedure that might be used uniformly as an industry-wide best practice. To demonstrate and validate their proposed methodology, the authors subjected two different 193 nm chemically amplified photoresists to test conditions in the 'torture chamber,' simulating actual lithographic environmental scenarios. Depending on the variables of each test run (e.g., different resists, different resist thicknesses, different pollutants, different concentrations, and different humidity levels), a variety of defects were noted and described quantitatively. Of the three contaminants tested, ammonia had the strongest effect. The thin resists were more strongly affected by the contamination.

  16. 30 CFR 27.41 - Test to determine resistance to moisture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to moisture. 27.41 Section 27.41 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.41 Test...

  17. 30 CFR 27.40 - Test to determine resistance to dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to dust. 27.40 Section 27.40 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.40 Test...

  18. 30 CFR 27.40 - Test to determine resistance to dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to dust. 27.40 Section 27.40 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.40 Test...

  19. 30 CFR 27.40 - Test to determine resistance to dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to dust. 27.40 Section 27.40 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.40 Test...

  20. 30 CFR 27.41 - Test to determine resistance to moisture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to moisture. 27.41 Section 27.41 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.41 Test...

  1. 30 CFR 27.41 - Test to determine resistance to moisture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to moisture. 27.41 Section 27.41 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.41 Test...

  2. [Influence of different bonding agents on traction resistance of metal alloys to dentin].

    PubMed

    Adabo, G L; da Silva Filho, F P; de Sá, D N; Rettondini, W C; dos Santos Cruz, C A

    1990-01-01

    They were casted pieces using three kinds of alloy (Ni-Cr, Ag-Sn and Cu-Al) with circular and smooth surface. They were cemented to human teeth, on occlusal surface, grounded at dentin level, through three different materials kind (zinc polycarboxylate cement, glassionomer cement and composite). After 24 hours storing, the samples were subjected to the tensile test. The results showed that the samples cemented with composite and the casts made with Ag-Sn alloy had higher bond strength.

  3. Effects of sweetening agents on morphine-induced analgesia in mice by formalin test.

    PubMed

    Nikfar, S; Abdollahi, M; Etemad, F; Sharifzadeh, M

    1997-10-01

    1. There is evidence that sweet-tasting substances such as sucrose and saccharin can interact with endogenous opioid systems. Further evidence showed that feeding mice different concentrations of sucrose and saccharin alter the latency in the tail-flick test. 2. In the current study, the effects of a 12-day regimen of different sweetening agents [sucrose (32%), saccharin (0.08%) and aspartame (0.16%)] on morphine-induced analgesia with the formalin test were investigated. 3. Male albino mice (20-27 g) were used for the experiments. Animals were given 12 days to adapt to dietary conditions. Animals were first given saline or morphine subcutaneously (1.5, 3.0, 6.0, or 9.0 mg/kg) 30 min before the observation period. The recording of the early phase started immediately and lasted for 10 min. The recording of the late response started 20 min after formalin injection and lasted for 10 min. Statistical analysis was performed by using analysis of variance followed by Newman-Keuls test, and P < or = 0.05 was considered significant. 4. Sucrose and aspartame increased morphine analgesia in the early phase, but saccharin had no effect on the early phase. On the other hand, saccharin and sucrose decreased the effect of morphine in the late phase, but aspartame increased the effect of morphine-induced analgesia. 5. In conclusion, the present data provide further evidence for an important role for dietary variables in determining the effects of exogenous opioids on pain sensitivity.

  4. Exploring Mechanisms of Resistance to Respiratory Inhibitors in Field Strains of Botrytis cinerea, the Causal Agent of Gray Mold ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Pierre; Gredt, Michel; Leroch, Michaela; Walker, Anne-Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory inhibitors are among the fungicides most widely used for disease control on crops. Most are strobilurins and carboxamides, inhibiting the cytochrome b of mitochondrial complex III and the succinate dehydrogenase of mitochondrial complex II, respectively. A few years after the approval of these inhibitors for use on grapevines, field isolates of Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of gray mold, resistant to one or both of these classes of fungicide were recovered in France and Germany. However, little was known about the mechanisms underlying this resistance in field populations of this fungus. Such knowledge could facilitate resistance risk assessment. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of resistance occurring in B. cinerea populations. Highly specific resistance to strobilurins was correlated with a single mutation of the cytb target gene. Changes in its intronic structure may also have occurred due to an evolutionary process controlling selection for resistance. Specific resistance to carboxamides was identified for six phenotypes, with various patterns of resistance levels and cross-resistance. Several mutations specific to B. cinerea were identified within the sdhB and sdhD genes encoding the iron-sulfur protein and an anchor protein of the succinate dehydrogenase complex. Another as-yet-uncharacterized mechanism of resistance was also recorded. In addition to target site resistance mechanisms, multidrug resistance, linked to the overexpression of membrane transporters, was identified in strains with low to moderate resistance to several respiratory inhibitors. This diversity of resistance mechanisms makes resistance management difficult and must be taken into account when developing strategies for Botrytis control. PMID:20693447

  5. Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests of improved fire-resistant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, R. N.; Surpkis, D. E.; Price, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests to evaluate the effectiveness of new fire-resistant materials by comparing their burning characteristics with those of older aircraft materials are described. Three tests were conducted and are detailed. Test 1, using pre-1968 materials, was run to correlate the procedures and to compare the results with previous tests by other organizations. Test 2 included newer, improved fire-resistant materials. Test 3 was essentially a duplicate of test 2, but a smokeless fuel was used. Test objectives, methods, materials, and results are presented and discussed. Results indicate that the pre-1968 materials ignited easily, allowed the fire to spread, produced large amounts of smoke and toxic combustion products, and resulted in a flash fire and major fire damage. The newer fire-resistant materials did not allow the fire to spread. Furthermore, they produced less, lower concentrations of toxic combustion products, and lower temperatures. The newer materials did not produce a flash fire.

  6. Insulin resistance in the oral glucose tolerance test--a link with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cederholm, J; Wibell, L

    1991-03-01

    Insulin resistance was evaluated in 807 middle-aged subjects at a health survey, with use of an index measured in 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests. The mean value of insulin resistance was higher in a hypertensive group than among the normotensives, independent of body mass index, physical activity, smoking sex, age, and thiazide treatment. One-third of the hypertensives had a high resistance value. Another third of the hypertensives, and also about one-third of the normotensives, had a slightly increased resistance. The remaining third of the hypertensives had a normal-low resistance. A high resistance was also independently related to obesity, low physical leisure time activity, and a family history of NIDDM, but not to a family history of hypertension. The statistical analysis implied a sequence of events: low physical activity might cause high resistance, which in turn might cause high blood pressure.

  7. Superhydrophobic powder additives to enhance chemical agent resistant coating systems for military equipment for the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) Corrosion Prevention and Control (CPAC) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Haynes, James A.

    2015-07-01

    The primary goal of the CPAC program at ORNL was to explore the feasibility of introducing various silica-based superhydrophobic (SH) powder additives as a way to improve the corrosion resistance of US Department of Defense (DOD) military-grade chemical agent resistant coating (CARC) systems. ORNL had previously developed and patented several SH technologies of interest to the USMC, and one of the objectives of this program was to identify methods to incorporate these technologies into the USMC’s corrosion-resistance strategy. This report discusses findings of the CPAC and their application.

  8. Ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam: two novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination agents for the treatment of resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liscio, Jordan L; Mahoney, Monica V; Hirsch, Elizabeth B

    2015-09-01

    The rise in resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a major concern and has led to difficulty in treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections. Two recently approved combination antibiotics, ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam, may be effective in treating these resistant infections. Ceftolozane is a novel cephalosporin that has been developed in combination with tazobactam, a recognised β-lactamase inhibitor (BLI). Avibactam is a novel BLI combined with ceftazidime, a cephalosporin with an established history. Both of these β-lactam/BLI combination agents have been shown to retain in vitro activity against selected resistant Gram-negative pathogens, including Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; notably, ceftazidime/avibactam has demonstrated consistent activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing organisms. Both agents have been approved for the indications of complicated intra-abdominal infection (with metronidazole) and complicated urinary tract infection, and have ongoing phase 3 trials for the treatment of ventilator-associated and nosocomial pneumonia. This manuscript will review current data available regarding the spectrum of activity and clinical trials that led to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of these agents. Both agents appear to be well tolerated and show promise in the treatment of MDR Gram-negative infections.

  9. Dynamics of the erythropoiesis stimulating agent resistance index in incident hemodiafiltration and high-flux hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Daniele; Bayh, Inga; Merello, José I; Ponce, Pedro; Heaton, Alex; Kircelli, Fatih; Chazot, Charles; Di Benedetto, Attilio; Marelli, Cristina; Ladanyi, Erzsebet; Kroczak, Miroslaw; Stuard, Stefano; Grassmann, Aileen; Scatizzi, Laura; Brand, Katharina; Canaud, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Hyporesponsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy in dialysis patients is poorly understood. Some studies report an improvement in the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent resistance index (ERI) with hemodiafiltration (HDF) versus high-flux hemodialysis (HD). We explored ERI dynamics in 38,340 incident HDF and HD patients treated in 22 countries over a 7-year period. Groups were matched by propensity score at baseline (6 months after dialysis initiation). The follow-up period (mean of 1.31 years) was stratified into 1 month intervals with delta analyses performed for key ERI-related parameters. Dialysis modality, time interval, and polycystic kidney disease were included in a linear mixed model with the outcome ERI. Baseline ERI was nonsignificantly higher in HDF versus HD treatment. ERI decreased significantly faster in HDF-treated patients than in HD-treated patients, was decreased in both HD and HDF when patients were treated with intravenous darbepoetin alfa, but only in HDF when treated with intravenous recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). A clear difference between HD- and HDF-treated patients could only be found for patients with high baseline ERI and assigned to intravenous rHuEPO treatment. A significant advantage in terms of lower ERI for patients treated by HDF was found. Sensitivity analysis limited this advantage for HDF to those patients treated with intravenous rHuEPO (not darbepoetin alfa or subcutaneous rHuEPO) and to patients with a high baseline ERI. Thus, our results allow more accurate planning for future clinical trials addressing anemia management in dialysis patients. PMID:27178833

  10. Novel drug candidates for blast phase chronic myeloid leukemia from high-throughput drug sensitivity and resistance testing

    PubMed Central

    Pietarinen, P O; Pemovska, T; Kontro, M; Yadav, B; Mpindi, J P; Andersson, E I; Majumder, M M; Kuusanmäki, H; Koskenvesa, P; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C A; Mustjoki, S; Porkka, K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis (CML BC) remains a challenging disease to treat despite the introduction and advances in tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. In this study we set out to identify novel candidate drugs for CML BC by using an unbiased high-throughput drug testing platform. We used three CML cell lines representing different types of CML blast phases (K562, EM-2 and MOLM-1) and primary leukemic cells from three CML BC patients. Profiling of drug responses was performed with a drug sensitivity and resistance testing platform comprising 295 anticancer agents. Overall, drug sensitivity scores and the drug response profiles of cell line and primary cell samples correlated well and were distinct from other types of leukemia samples. The cell lines were highly sensitive to TKIs and the clinically TKI-resistant patient samples were also resistant ex vivo. Comparison of cell line and patient sample data identified new candidate drugs for CML BC, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors. Our results indicate that these drugs in particular warrant further evaluation by analyzing a larger set of primary patient samples. The results also pave way for designing rational combination therapies. PMID:25933373

  11. A case study of preservation of semi-solid preparations using the European Pharmacopoeia test: comparative efficacy of antimicrobial agents in zinc gelatin.

    PubMed

    Favet, J; Chappuis, M L; Doelker, E

    2001-09-01

    The present study was undertaken with the aim of finding an alternative preservative system to methyl parahydroxybenzoate in zinc gelatin, which was described in the monographs of the Swiss Pharmacopoeia (until Ph. Helv. 8) and in previous editions of the German Pharmacopoeia (until DAB 7). This antimicrobial agent has now been withdrawn in the DAB, because of its potential allergy risks. As for the USP and DAB-DDR zinc gelatin preparations, they have always been devoid of any preservative agent, probably relying on the mild antimicrobial activity of zinc. A literature survey did not reveal if such an aqueous preparation containing the water-insoluble zinc oxide shows efficacious antimicrobial activity by itself. Thus, a comparative evaluation of differently preserved zinc gelatin preparations was performed using a test for the efficacy of antimicrobial preservation that has been modified with regard to the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) test to take into account the solid state of the preparations and the bactericidal effect of the zinc. Three zinc gelatin preparations were checked, either: (i), without any agent; or (ii), with 0.1% methyl parahydroxybenzoate; or (iii), with 0.5% phenoxyethanol, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent almost devoid of allergy risks. The three preparations behave quite differently, in particular with respect to fungi. All three preparations passed the modified EP test as far as bacteria are concerned. Even zinc gelatin without preservative is very effective, not only because of the mild antimicrobial activity of zinc (the soluble fraction of zinc oxide in the liquid phase of zinc gelatin was determined to be 13 microg/ml), but most probably because of the low water activity of the preparation (measured as around 0.81), as shown by the absence of growth of a zinc-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Zinc gelatin preserved with methyl parahydroxybenzoate has a weak, although satisfactory, activity against Staphylococcus aureus

  12. Microcolonies in fluoroquinolone agar proportion susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: an indicator of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, A.; May, S.; Devasia, R. A.; Maruri, F.; Stratton, C.

    2014-01-01

    Microcolony growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on agar proportion susceptibility testing is neither well-defined nor previously reported with fluoroquinolone susceptibility testing. We describe here M. tuberculosis microcolony growth with fluoroquinolones, and assess its clinical significance. We screened 797M. tuberculosis isolates for ofloxacin resistance (2.0 µg/mL) by agar proportion; 19 ofloxacin-resistant and 38 ofloxacin-susceptible isolates were selected for more detailed susceptibility testing with ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin (all at 2.0 µg/mL) and moxifloxacin (0.5 µg/mL). The 57 isolates were also tested at two concentrations both above and below the critical concentrations. Microcolonies were defined as colonies 0.2–0.4 mm in diameter; confirmed microcolonies were present on repeat testing. Of the 57 isolates tested in detail, 7 grew microcolonies, of which 2 (0.3% of all isolates tested) had confirmed microcolonies on repeat testing (6 tests performed, and microcolonies were present on at least 4). Both M. tuberculosis isolates were ofloxacin-resistant on screening, and had ofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >8 µg/mL. The five other isolates were ofloxacin-susceptible on screening, but had regular colony growth (i.e., resistance) at the drug concentration that initially resulted in microcolonies (ofloxacin 0.5 or 1.0 µg/mL). Microcolonies were observed infrequently with fluoroquinolone susceptibility testing, but when confirmed, they were associated with drug resistance. PMID:22322359

  13. HemaSpot, a Novel Blood Storage Device for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, K; DeLong, A; Balamane, M; Schreier, L; Orido, M; Chepkenja, M; Kemboi, E; D'Antuono, M; Chan, P A; Emonyi, W; Diero, L; Coetzer, M; Kantor, R

    2016-01-01

    HemaSpot, a novel dried-blood storage filter device, was used for HIV-1 pol resistance testing in 30 fresh United States blood samples and 54 previously frozen Kenyan blood samples. Genotyping succeeded in 79% and 58% of samples, respectively, improved with shorter storage and higher viral load, and had good (86%) resistance mutation concordance to plasma.

  14. GENETIC VARIATION FOR COPPER RESISTANCE IN FATHEAD MINNOW TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unexplained variation in the results of aquatic organism toxicity tests is a consistently observed and troubling phenomenon. Possible sources of variation include differences in condition or nutritional status of the population prior to the test, as well as age, density and hand...

  15. Resistance to prooxidant agent paraquat in the short- and long-lived lines of the seed beetle (Acanthoscelides obtectus).

    PubMed

    Lazarević, Jelica; Dorđević, Mirko; Stojković, Biljana; Tucić, Nikola

    2013-04-01

    In the present study we test whether variation in resistance to paraquat (PQ), a free radical generator, correlates with variation in longevity in two sets of seed beetles (Acanthoscelides obtectus) experimental lines that were selected either for early reproduction and short-life or late reproduction and long-life. Long-lived late reproduction lines (L) showed increased resistance to PQ, while opposite was true for short-lived early reproduction line (E). Striking outcome of the selection for early and late reproduction in A. obtectus is asymmetry of responses to alternate mating schedules. The intensity of response depended on selection regime, sex and PQ dose. Evolution of longevity and PQ resistance was faster in L than E selection regime, and in females than males. To understand how age-specific mortality rates are affected by PQ we decomposed post-stress mortality data (using Gompertz mortality model) into initial mortality rate, which reflects basal vulnerability to stresses and age-specific mortality rate, which concerns the rate of increase in stress vulnerability, i.e. the rate of senescence. By estimating the parameters of the Gompertz mortality model we have shown that longevity reduction caused by PQ was the consequence of the increased baseline mortality rather than a speed up of the rate of ageing. PMID:23515831

  16. 30 CFR 7.408 - Test for flame resistance of signaling cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of signaling cables... touch the test specimen. The specimen shall be maintained at this height for the duration of the flame... currents during testing. (4) Adjust the gas burner to give an overall blue flame 5 inches high with a...

  17. 30 CFR 27.40 - Test to determine resistance to dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to dust. 27.40 Section 27.40 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... might be affected by dust, such as coal or rock dust, shall be tested in an atmosphere containing...

  18. 30 CFR 27.40 - Test to determine resistance to dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to dust. 27.40 Section 27.40 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... might be affected by dust, such as coal or rock dust, shall be tested in an atmosphere containing...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 178 - Thermal Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corners using fire brick or other suitable means. The bottom surface of the outer package must be exposed....2Place the package or generator onto supporting bricks or a stand inside the test oven in such a...

  20. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  1. Rhamnolipids as emulsifying agents for essential oil formulations: antimicrobial effect against Candida albicans and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Haba, Ester; Bouhdid, Samira; Torrego-Solana, Noelia; Marqués, A M; Espuny, M José; García-Celma, M José; Manresa, Angeles

    2014-12-10

    This work examines the influence of essential oil composition on emulsification with rhamnolipids and their use as therapeutic antimicrobial agents against two opportunistic pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Candida albicans. Rhamnolipids, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with waste frying oil as the carbon source, were composed of eight rhamnolipid homologues. The rhamnolipid mixture was used to produce emulsions containing essential oils (EOs) of Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum verum, Origanum compactum and Lavandula angustifolia using the titration method. Ternary phase diagrams were designed to evaluate emulsion stability, which differed depending on the essential oil. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs alone and the emulsions was evaluated. The antimicrobial activity presented by the essential oils alone increased with emulsification. The surface properties of rhamnolipids contribute to the positive dispersion of EOs and thus increase their availability and antimicrobial activity against C. albicans and S. aureus. Therefore, rhamnolipid-based emulsions represent a promising approach to the development of EO delivery systems. PMID:25269010

  2. Construction of Zinc Oxide into Different Morphological Structures to Be Utilized as Antimicrobial Agent against Multidrug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Elkady, M. F.; Shokry Hassan, H.; Hafez, Elsayed E.; Fouad, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Nano-ZnO has been successfully implemented in particles, rods, and tubes nanostructures via sol-gel and hydrothermal techniques. The variation of the different preparation parameters such as reaction temperature, time, and stabilizer agents was optimized to attain different morphological structures. The influence of the microwave annealing process on ZnO crystallinity, surface area, and morphological structure was monitored using XRD, BET, and SEM techniques, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide produced in nanotubes structure was examined against four different multidrug resistant bacteria: Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) strains. The activity of produced nano-ZnO was determined by disc diffusion technique and the results revealed that ZnO nanotubes recorded high activity against the studied strains due to their high surface area equivalent to 17.8 m2/g. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ZnO nanotubes showed that the low concentrations of ZnO nanotubes could be a substitution for the commercial antibiotics when approached in suitable formula. Although the annealing process of ZnO improves the degree of material crystallinity, however, it declines its surface area and consequently its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26451136

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori in times of increasing antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sinéad M; O'Morain, Colm; McNamara, Deirdre

    2014-08-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) causes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Treatment is recommended in all symptomatic patients. The current treatment options for H. pylori infection are outlined in this review in light of the recent challenges in eradication success, largely due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of H. pylori. Antibiotic resistance is a constantly evolving process and numerous studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori antibiotic resistance varies significantly from country to country, and even between regions within the same country. In addition, recent data has shown that previous antibiotic use is associated with harbouring antibiotic resistant H. pylori. Local surveillance of antibiotic resistance is warranted to guide clinicians in their choice of therapy. Antimicrobial resistance is assessed by H. pylori culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Recently developed molecular tests offer an attractive alternative to culture and allow for the rapid molecular genetic identification of H. pylori and resistance-associated mutations directly from biopsy samples or bacterial culture material. Accumulating evidence indicates that surveillance of antimicrobial resistance by susceptibility testing is feasible and necessary to inform clinicians in their choice of therapy for management of H. pylori infection.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori in times of increasing antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sinéad M; O’Morain, Colm; McNamara, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) causes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Treatment is recommended in all symptomatic patients. The current treatment options for H. pylori infection are outlined in this review in light of the recent challenges in eradication success, largely due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of H. pylori. Antibiotic resistance is a constantly evolving process and numerous studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori antibiotic resistance varies significantly from country to country, and even between regions within the same country. In addition, recent data has shown that previous antibiotic use is associated with harbouring antibiotic resistant H. pylori. Local surveillance of antibiotic resistance is warranted to guide clinicians in their choice of therapy. Antimicrobial resistance is assessed by H. pylori culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Recently developed molecular tests offer an attractive alternative to culture and allow for the rapid molecular genetic identification of H. pylori and resistance-associated mutations directly from biopsy samples or bacterial culture material. Accumulating evidence indicates that surveillance of antimicrobial resistance by susceptibility testing is feasible and necessary to inform clinicians in their choice of therapy for management of H. pylori infection. PMID:25110421

  5. GridAgents DER Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-265

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.

    2012-04-01

    The project objectives are to perform research, development, and pilot-scale testing of advanced, next-generation distribution operational strategies using ConEdison's 3G: Distribution System of the Future and associated infrastructure for the real-world Test Bed (demonstration network) combined with the Infotility GridAgents: Secure Agent Framework for Energy as the software platform for advanced operational strategies development. The objective is to accelerate high-payoff technologies that, because of their risk, are unlikely to be developed in a timely manner without a partnership between industry and the Federal government. NREL will be responsible for the evaluation of equipment design and control methods for DER integration and testing of prototype DER technologies and control equipment at the NREL test facility.

  6. Molecular and biological diagnostic tests for monitoring benzimidazole resistance in human soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Aïssatou; Schwenkenbecher, Jan M; Kaplan, Ray M; Prichard, Roger K

    2013-06-01

    In endemic countries with soil-transmitted helminths mass drug administration with albendazole or mebendazole are being implemented as a control strategy. However, it is well known in veterinary helminths that the use of the same benzimidazole drugs can place selection on the β-tubulin gene, leading to resistance. Given the concern that resistance could arise in human soil-transmitted helminths, there is an urgent need to develop accurate diagnostic tools for monitoring resistance. In this study, we developed molecular assays to detect putative resistance genetic changes in Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms, and we optimized an egg hatch assay for the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and applied it to Necator americanus. Both assays were tested on field samples. The molecular assays demonstrated their reproducibility and capacity to detect the presence of worms carrying putative resistance-associated genetic changes. However, further investigations are needed to validate our molecular and biological tests on additional field isolates.

  7. Predictive value of molecular drug resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Valle del Cauca, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Beatriz E; García, Pamela K; Nieto, Luisa Maria; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-07-01

    Previous evaluations of the molecular GenoType tests have promoted their use to detect resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs in different geographical regions. However, there are known geographic variations in the mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and especially in South America, there is a paucity of information regarding the frequencies and types of mutations associated with resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs. We therefore evaluated the performance of the GenoType kits in this region by testing 228 M. tuberculosis isolates in Colombia, including 134 resistant and 94 pansusceptible strains. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the GenoType MTBDRplus test ranged from 92 to 96% and 97 to 100%, respectively; the agreement index was optimal (Cohen's kappa, >0.8). The sensitivity of the GenoType MTBDRsl test ranged from 84 to 100% and the specificity from 88 to 100%. The most common mutations were katG S315T1, rpoB S531L, embB M306V, gyrA D94G, and rrs A1401G. Our results reflect the utility of the GenoType tests in Colombia; however, as some discordance still exists between the conventional and molecular approaches in resistance testing, we adhere to the recommendation that the GenoType tests serve as early guides for therapy, followed by phenotypic drug susceptibility testing for all cases.

  8. Predictive Value of Molecular Drug Resistance Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Valle del Cauca, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    García, Pamela K.; Nieto, Luisa Maria; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Previous evaluations of the molecular GenoType tests have promoted their use to detect resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs in different geographical regions. However, there are known geographic variations in the mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and especially in South America, there is a paucity of information regarding the frequencies and types of mutations associated with resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs. We therefore evaluated the performance of the GenoType kits in this region by testing 228 M. tuberculosis isolates in Colombia, including 134 resistant and 94 pansusceptible strains. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the GenoType MTBDRplus test ranged from 92 to 96% and 97 to 100%, respectively; the agreement index was optimal (Cohen's kappa, >0.8). The sensitivity of the GenoType MTBDRsl test ranged from 84 to 100% and the specificity from 88 to 100%. The most common mutations were katG S315T1, rpoB S531L, embB M306V, gyrA D94G, and rrs A1401G. Our results reflect the utility of the GenoType tests in Colombia; however, as some discordance still exists between the conventional and molecular approaches in resistance testing, we adhere to the recommendation that the GenoType tests serve as early guides for therapy, followed by phenotypic drug susceptibility testing for all cases. PMID:23658272

  9. The development and use of a test to identify resistance to the anticoagulant difenacoum in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed Central

    Redfern, R.; Gill, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Feeding tests were carried out in the laboratory to obtain basic data on the susceptibility of wild Norway rats to difenacoum. The results were used to derive a standard test procedure for the identification of difenacoum resistance in warfarin-susceptible and resistant rats. Details are given of tests on rats from suspected difenacoum-resistant infestations on farms. PMID:731023

  10. The development and use of a test to identify resistance to the anticoagulant difenacoum in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Redfern, R; Gill, J E

    1978-12-01

    Feeding tests were carried out in the laboratory to obtain basic data on the susceptibility of wild Norway rats to difenacoum. The results were used to derive a standard test procedure for the identification of difenacoum resistance in warfarin-susceptible and resistant rats. Details are given of tests on rats from suspected difenacoum-resistant infestations on farms. PMID:731023

  11. Influence of inspiratory resistance on performance during graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Heus, Ronald; den Hartog, Emiel A; Kistemaker, Lyda J A; van Dijk, Walter J; Swenker, Gerard

    2004-11-01

    Due to more stringent requirements to protect personnel against hazardous gasses, the inspiratory resistance of the present generation of respiratory protective devices tends to increase. Therefore an important question is to what extent inspiratory resistance may increase without giving problems during physical work. In this study the effects of three levels (0.24; 1.4 and 8.3 kPa s l(-1)) of inspiratory resistance were tested on maximal voluntary performance. Nine male subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer with and without these three levels of inspiratory resistance. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, time to exhaustion and external work were measured. The results of these experiments showed that increasing inspiratory resistance led to a reduction of time to exhaustion (TTE) on a graded exercise test(GXT). Without inspiratory resistance the mean TTE was 11.9 min, the three levels of resistance gave the following mean TTE's: 10.7, 7.8 and 2.7 min. This study showed that TTE on a GXT can be predicted when physical fitness (VO2-max) of the subject and inspiratory resistance are known. The metabolic rate of the subjects was higher with inspiratory resistance, but no differences were found between the three selected inspiratory loads. Other breathing parameters as minute ventilation, tidal volume, expiration time and breathing frequency showed no or minor differences between the inspiratory resistances. The most important conclusion of these experiments is that the overall workload increases due to an increase in inspiratory resistance by wearing respiratory protective devices.

  12. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of glanders) determined by broth microdilution and E-test.

    PubMed

    Heine, H S; England, M J; Waag, D M; Byrne, W R

    2001-07-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 28 antibiotics were determined for 11 strains of Burkholderia mallei by the broth microdilution method. The B. mallei strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, doxycycline, piperacillin, ceftazidime, and imipenem. For comparison and evaluation, 17 antibiotic susceptibilities were also determined by the E-test. E-test values were always lower than the broth dilution values. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of specific B. mallei strains will provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents.

  13. Field tests of a new 2 MHz resistivity tool for slimhole formation-evaluation while drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Heysse, D.R.; Jackson, C.E.; Merchant, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new 2 MHz resistivity tool for logging-while-drilling (LWD) in slim holes has been developed and field-tested. The Slim Compensated Wave Resistivity (SCWR) provides four formation-evaluation resistivity measurements in all mud types and in boreholes as small as 5-7/8 inches. Dual transmitter-receiver spacings measuring both phase and attenuation produce four resistivities, sufficient to determine formation resistivity and evaluate invasion. Since many slim holes are drilled in lower-porosity reservoirs, where pay-zone resistivities are often higher than 20 ohm-m, the SCWR tool was designed to provide improved measurement accuracy at these higher resistivities. Similarly, slim holes tend to be hotter than larger boreholes, and the symmetrical design of the SCWR antenna array provides excellent temperature stability. Finally, slim holes are often associated with medium-radius drilling, so the SCWR tool was designed to operate reliably in wells with bends as great as 19{degrees}/100ft (rotating) or 36{degrees}/100ft (sliding). Field tests have been conducted in a wide range of formation types and drilling conditions. These tests have been used to refine the mechanical design and antenna array, and have confirmed both measurement quality and reliability. This paper describes the features and capabilities of the SCWR tool, and presents several log examples from the field tests.

  14. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

    PubMed

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen.

  15. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae

    PubMed Central

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen. PMID:27494134

  16. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

    PubMed

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen. PMID:27494134

  17. An extensible simulation environment and movement metrics for testing walking behavior in agent-based models

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M. Torrens; Atsushi Nara; Xun Li; Haojie Zhu; William A. Griffin; Scott B. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Human movement is a significant ingredient of many social, environmental, and technical systems, yet the importance of movement is often discounted in considering systems complexity. Movement is commonly abstracted in agent-based modeling (which is perhaps the methodological vehicle for modeling complex systems), despite the influence of movement upon information exchange and adaptation in a system. In particular, agent-based models of urban pedestrians often treat movement in proxy form at the expense of faithfully treating movement behavior with realistic agency. There exists little consensus about which method is appropriate for representing movement in agent-based schemes. In this paper, we examine popularly-used methods to drive movement in agent-based models, first by introducing a methodology that can flexibly handle many representations of movement at many different scales and second, introducing a suite of tools to benchmark agent movement between models and against real-world trajectory data. We find that most popular movement schemes do a relatively poor job of representing movement, but that some schemes may well be 'good enough' for some applications. We also discuss potential avenues for improving the representation of movement in agent-based frameworks.

  18. Field evaluation of a test for praziquantel resistance in Schistosoma sp.

    PubMed

    Kenworthy, J D; Ye, P; Wu, G C; Yu, H; Shi, Y J; Li, H; Coles, G C

    2003-04-01

    A simple rapid test for detecting praziquantel resistance in Schistosoma sp., involving change in shape of miracidia on exposure to praziquantel, was evaluated in China. Tests on miracidia hatched from eggs collected from naturally infected goats were run in a field laboratory in Jiangxi Province and a research laboratory in Shanghai. The mean values in the two laboratories were not significantly different, but the variation between individual samples in the two laboratories suggests that a delineating dose will be required for routine diagnosis of resistance. Confirmation that resistance would have been detected in Schistosoma japonicum must await the isolation of a resistant isolate. The tests suggested that the infection in the goats was susceptible to praziquantel as did chemotherapy of water buffaloes with 25mg/kg. This gave a 95% cure rate on the first treatment and 100% with a second treatment, similar to that found previously in human patients.

  19. Zinc and copper in animal feed – development of resistance and co-resistance to antimicrobial agents in bacteria of animal origin

    PubMed Central

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Rudi, Knut; Bernhoft, Aksel

    2014-01-01

    Farmed animals such as pig and poultry receive additional Zn and Cu in their diets due to supplementing elements in compound feed as well as medical remedies. Enteral bacteria in farmed animals are shown to develop resistance to trace elements such as Zn and Cu. Resistance to Zn is often linked with resistance to methicillin in staphylococci, and Zn supplementation to animal feed may increase the proportion of multiresistant E. coli in the gut. Resistance to Cu in bacteria, in particular enterococci, is often associated with resistance to antimicrobial drugs like macrolides and glycopeptides (e.g. vancomycin). Such resistant bacteria may be transferred from the food-producing animals to humans (farmers, veterinarians, and consumers). Data on dose-response relation for Zn/Cu exposure and resistance are lacking; however, it seems more likely that a resistance-driven effect occurs at high trace element exposure than at more basal exposure levels. There is also lack of data which could demonstrate whether Zn/Cu-resistant bacteria may acquire antibiotic resistance genes/become antibiotics resistant, or if antibiotics-resistant bacteria are more capable to become Zn/Cu resistant than antibiotics-susceptible bacteria. Further research is needed to elucidate the link between Zn/Cu and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. PMID:25317117

  20. Comparison of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Blood Cultures as a True Bacteremia Agent and Contaminant in Terms of Slime Production and Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Uyanik, Muhammet Hamidullah; Yazgi, Halil; Ozden, Kemalettin; Erdil, Zeynep; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the species distribution, slime activity, and methicillin resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolated from blood cultures as either contaminants or true bacteremia agents. Materials and Methods: In this study, 13.268 blood culture samples sent to our laboratory from various clinics during a two-year period were examined in terms of the presence of CoNS to clarify whether the isolates are true bacteremia agents, as defined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The slime activities of true bacteremia agents (58 CoNS strains) and contaminants (50 randomly selected CoNS strains) were investigated by the Christensen method. The methicillin susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the disk diffusion method. Results: Although the frequency of slime production was 39.7% among the true bacteremia CoNS agents, it was 18% in CoNS that were judged to be contaminants (p<0.05). S. epidermidis was the most frequently isolated species for both the true bacteremia agent group (56.9%) and contaminant group (74%). Additionally, S. epidermidis was the bacterium most frequently characterized as slime producing in both groups. The methicillin resistance of slime-producing CoNS was determined to be 82.6% for the true bacteremia agent group and 77.8% for the contaminant group. Conclusion: The presence of slime activity in CoNS isolated from blood culture samples is supportive evidence that they are most likely the agents of true bacteremia cases. PMID:25610309

  1. New Screening Test Developed for the Blanching Resistance of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's extensive efforts towards more efficient, safer, and more affordable space transportation include the development of new thrust-cell liner materials with improved capabilities and longer lives. For rocket engines fueled with liquid hydrogen, an important metric of liner performance is resistance to blanching, a phenomenon of localized wastage by cycles of oxidation-reduction due to local imbalance in the oxygen-fuel ratio. The current liner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine combustion chamber, a Cu-3Ag-0.5Zr alloy (NARloy-Z) is degraded in service by blanching. Heretofore, evaluating a liner material for blanching resistance involved elaborate and expensive hot-fire tests performed on rocket test stands. To simplify that evaluation, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a screening test that uses simple, in situ oxidation-reduction cycling in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The principle behind this test is that resistance to oxidation or to the reduction of oxide, or both, implies resistance to blanching. Using this test as a preliminary tool to screen alloys for blanching resistance can improve reliability and save time and money. In this test a small polished coupon is hung in a TGA furnace at the desired (service) temperature. Oxidizing and reducing gases are introduced cyclically, in programmed amounts. Cycle durations are chosen by calibration, such that all copper oxides formed by oxidation are fully reduced in the next reduction interval. The sample weight is continuously acquired by the TGA as usual.

  2. [Backup support from the independent laboratory to the hospital for infection control of antimicrobial agent-resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    Because commercial laboratories have far less opportunity for direct communication with clinicians in comparison with hospitals, they need to maintain closer contact regarding the evaluation of prophlogistic bacterial isolates through such communication tools as the telephone, and need to include more comments in reports to avoid misunderstandings by clinicians. Commercial laboratories handle enormous numbers of strains of microorganisms that have been isolated from various regions and, therefore, they have a great deal of information important for public health that relates to pathogens causing community-acquired and healthcare associated infection. Returning such information to society provides useful data for selecting antibacterial agents and taking measures against healthcare-associated infection. Many medical facilities that outsource microorganism tests to commercial laboratories do not have a resident specialist in clinical microbiology, and it is difficult for such facilities to centrally manage test data within the facility, possibly causing increased incidents of delay in the early detection of a mass outbreak of healthcare-associated infection; therefore, commercial laboratories should immediately develop a resource of experts in their organization. Although there are professional certification systems in Japan such as the Infection Control Microbiological Technologist (ICMT) and over 500 technicians are certified, the majority of these technicians belong to hospitals. In the future, support of the clinical education of technicians working in laboratories should be considered at the society level.

  3. Specific Resistance. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    A commonly used test for determining filterability of conditioned sludge is the specific resistance (Buchner funnel) test. The sludge is filtered through filter paper using a Buchner funnel, and the time needed to obtain a given volume of filtrate (or for cake residue to begin to crack) is measured. The shorter the time, the better the…

  4. Test methodology for elemental sulfur resistant advanced materials for oil and gas field equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbeck, G.; Bruckhoff, W.; Koehler, M.; Schlerkmann, H.; Schmitt, G.

    1995-10-01

    The great variety of methodologies for testing the performance of advanced materials for resistance to elemental sulfur in oil and gas industry prompted the Technical Committee for Corrosion of the German Iron and Steel Institute (VDEh) to define recommended test procedures. These procedures have already found wide acceptance in the German materials and oil and gas industry.

  5. Materials screening chamber for testing materials resistance to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Carruth, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    A unique test chamber for exposing material to a known flux of oxygen atoms is described. The capabilities and operating parameters of the apparatus include production of an oxygen atom flux in excess of 5 x 10 to the 16th atoms/sq cm-sec, controlled heating of the sample specimen, RF circuitry to contain the plasma within a small volume, and long exposure times. Flux measurement capabilities include a calorimetric probe and a light titration system. Accuracy and limitations of these techniques are discussed. An extension to the main chamber to allow simultaneous ultraviolet and atomic oxygen exposure is discussed. The oxygen atoms produced are at thermal energies. Sample specimens are maintained at any selected temperature between ambient and 200 C, to within + or - 2 C. A representative example of measurements made using the chamber is presented.

  6. Semantic network mapping of religious material: testing multi-agent computer models of social theories against real-world data.

    PubMed

    Lane, Justin E

    2015-11-01

    Agent-based modeling allows researchers to investigate theories of complex social phenomena and subsequently use the model to generate new hypotheses that can then be compared to real-world data. However, computer modeling has been underutilized in regard to the understanding of religious systems, which often require very complex theories with multiple interacting variables (Braxton et al. in Method Theory Study Relig 24(3):267-290, 2012. doi: 10.1163/157006812X635709 ; Lane in J Cogn Sci Relig 1(2):161-180, 2013). This paper presents an example of how computer modeling can be used to explore, test, and further understand religious systems, specifically looking at one prominent theory of religious ritual. The process is continuous: theory building, hypothesis generation, testing against real-world data, and improving the model. In this example, the output of an agent-based model of religious behavior is compared against real-world religious sermons and texts using semantic network analysis. It finds that most religious materials exhibit unique scale-free small-world properties and that a concept's centrality in a religious schema best predicts its frequency of presentation. These results reveal that there adjustments need to be made to existing models of religious ritual systems and provide parameters for future models. The paper ends with a discussion of implications for a new multi-agent model of doctrinal ritual behaviors as well as propositions for further interdisciplinary research concerning the multi-agent modeling of religious ritual behaviors.

  7. Semantic network mapping of religious material: testing multi-agent computer models of social theories against real-world data.

    PubMed

    Lane, Justin E

    2015-11-01

    Agent-based modeling allows researchers to investigate theories of complex social phenomena and subsequently use the model to generate new hypotheses that can then be compared to real-world data. However, computer modeling has been underutilized in regard to the understanding of religious systems, which often require very complex theories with multiple interacting variables (Braxton et al. in Method Theory Study Relig 24(3):267-290, 2012. doi: 10.1163/157006812X635709 ; Lane in J Cogn Sci Relig 1(2):161-180, 2013). This paper presents an example of how computer modeling can be used to explore, test, and further understand religious systems, specifically looking at one prominent theory of religious ritual. The process is continuous: theory building, hypothesis generation, testing against real-world data, and improving the model. In this example, the output of an agent-based model of religious behavior is compared against real-world religious sermons and texts using semantic network analysis. It finds that most religious materials exhibit unique scale-free small-world properties and that a concept's centrality in a religious schema best predicts its frequency of presentation. These results reveal that there adjustments need to be made to existing models of religious ritual systems and provide parameters for future models. The paper ends with a discussion of implications for a new multi-agent model of doctrinal ritual behaviors as well as propositions for further interdisciplinary research concerning the multi-agent modeling of religious ritual behaviors. PMID:25851082

  8. Exploring the Benefits of Molecular Testing for Gonorrhoea Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance in Remote Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Ben B.; Ryder, Nathan; Su, Jiunn-Yih; Ward, James; Chen, Marcus Y.; Donovan, Basil; Fairley, Christopher K.; Guy, Rebecca J.; Lahra, Monica M.; Law, Mathew G.; Whiley, David M.; Regan, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveillance for gonorrhoea antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is compromised by a move away from culture-based testing in favour of more convenient nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) tests. We assessed the potential benefit of a molecular resistance test in terms of the timeliness of detection of gonorrhoea AMR. Methods and Findings An individual-based mathematical model was developed to describe the transmission of gonorrhoea in a remote Indigenous population in Australia. We estimated the impact of the molecular test on the time delay between first importation and the first confirmation that the prevalence of gonorrhoea AMR (resistance proportion) has breached the WHO-recommended 5% threshold (when a change in antibiotic should occur). In the remote setting evaluated in this study, the model predicts that when culture is the only available means of testing for AMR, the breach will only be detected when the actual prevalence of AMR in the population has already reached 8 – 18%, with an associated delay of ~43 – 69 months between first importation and detection. With the addition of a molecular resistance test, the number of samples for which AMR can be determined increases facilitating earlier detection at a lower resistance proportion. For the best case scenario, where AMR can be determined for all diagnostic samples, the alert would be triggered at least 8 months earlier than using culture alone and the resistance proportion will have only slightly exceeded the 5% notification threshold. Conclusions Molecular tests have the potential to provide more timely warning of the emergence of gonorrhoea AMR. This in turn will facilitate earlier treatment switching and more targeted treatment, which has the potential to reduce the population impact of gonorrhoea AMR. PMID:26181042

  9. Successful use of broth microdilution in susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, C; McDougal, L K

    1983-11-01

    We studied the broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedure to see whether it could be made reliable for determining resistance of staphylococci to methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and cephalothin. With 45 selected strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 selected strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis we found that the addition of 2% NaCl to cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth permitted us to discriminate reliably between resistant and susceptible organisms. A screening test in which resistant staphylococci grew on agar containing 4% NaCl and methicillin (10 micrograms/ml), oxacillin (6 micrograms/ml), or nafcillin (6 micrograms/ml) incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h (additional 24 h if no growth) was also reliable. In vitro cephalothin resistance occurred in heteroresistant S. aureus but usually did not occur in heteroresistant S. epidermidis.

  10. Successful use of broth microdilution in susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, C; McDougal, L K

    1983-11-01

    We studied the broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedure to see whether it could be made reliable for determining resistance of staphylococci to methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and cephalothin. With 45 selected strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 selected strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis we found that the addition of 2% NaCl to cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth permitted us to discriminate reliably between resistant and susceptible organisms. A screening test in which resistant staphylococci grew on agar containing 4% NaCl and methicillin (10 micrograms/ml), oxacillin (6 micrograms/ml), or nafcillin (6 micrograms/ml) incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h (additional 24 h if no growth) was also reliable. In vitro cephalothin resistance occurred in heteroresistant S. aureus but usually did not occur in heteroresistant S. epidermidis. PMID:6643661

  11. Design and Calibration of Rolling Resistance Test Trailer R2Mk.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronowski, G.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes construction and calibration procedures of the rolling resistance test trailer R2 Mk.2. The trailer is design to measure rolling resistance of passenger car tyres in various road conditions on trafficked roads. The trailer utilizes so called angle method also known as vertical arm method. The paper presents also calibration procedures that are necessary to ascertain good precision of the measurements.

  12. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  13. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  14. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  15. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  16. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  17. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  18. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  19. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  20. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  1. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  2. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  3. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) activity against clinical isolates of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) and the effects of moisturizing agents on CHG residue accumulation on the skin.

    PubMed

    Frantz, S W; Haines, K A; Azar, C G; Ward, J I; Homan, S M; Roberts, R B

    1997-10-01

    The effectiveness of skin decontamination by chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in the presence of commonly-used skin moisturizing lotions was evaluated using vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) as a representative nosocomial pathogen. Anti-bacterial efficacy was determined in vitro using pigskin preparations inoculated with five VREF clinical isolates to evaluate Calgon Vestal 2 and 4% (by weight) CHG solutions in comparison with Hibiclens Antiseptic Antimicrobial Cleaner (4% CHG solution). Control inocula were determined for each experiment from recovery of VREF harvested directly from the surface of each control piece of skin. These CHG formulations were evaluated in the presence and absence of Calgon Vestal 'Lotion Soft Skin Conditioner' (LSSC) to determine potential interactions of CHG with LSSC, and also with ¿Vaseline Intensive Care' lotion as a CHG-deactivating agent. The 2% Calgon Vestal CHG alone reduced VREF 10(2)-10(3)-fold, as well as 10(3)-10(4)-fold when LSSC was present, and was as efficacious as either 4% CHG solution when these were tested in the presence of LSSC. Four percent Calgon Vestal CHG produced reductions of 10(3)-10(5)-fold with or without LSSC present. Conversely, ¿Hibiclens' showed similar reductions in the presence of LSSC to that for the Calgon Vestal 4% CHG, but only a 10(1)-10(3)-fold reduction without LSSC. ¿Vaseline Intensive Care' lotion completely inactivated the VREF-killing effects for all of the CHG formulations tested, while LSSC and ¿Vaseline Intensive Care' lotion both showed minimal activity alone against these VREF isolates. These results indicate that the Calgon Vestal 2% CHG solution is as effective against VREF, even in the presence of LSSC, as either the 4% Calgon Vestal or Hibiclens 4% CHG formulations; the use of this lower concentration of CHG may be associated with less irritation, particularly with concomitant use of LSSC.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells adapted to benzalkonium chloride show resistance to other membrane-active agents but not to clinically relevant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, M F; Jones, M V; Lambert, P A

    2002-04-01

    Our objective was to determine whether strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa can adapt to growth in increasing concentrations of the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BKC), and whether co-resistance to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents occurs. Attempts were made to determine what phenotypic alterations accompanied resistance and whether these explained the mechanism of resistance. Strains were serially passaged in increasing concentrations of BKC in static nutrient broth cultures. Serotyping and genotyping were used to determine purity of the cultures. Two strains were examined for cross-resistance to other disinfectants and antibiotics by broth dilution MIC determination. Alterations in outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) expressed were examined by SDS-PAGE. Cell surface hydrophobicity and charge, uptake of disinfectant and proportion of specific fatty acid content of outer and cytoplasmic membranes were determined. Two P. aeruginosa strains showed a stable increase in resistance to BKC. Co-resistance to other quaternary ammonium compounds was observed in both strains; chloramphenicol and polymyxin B resistance were observed in one and a reduction in resistance to tobramycin observed in the other. However, no increased resistance to other biocides (chlorhexidine, triclosan, thymol) or antibiotics (ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin) was detected. Characteristics accompanying resistance included alterations in outer membrane proteins, uptake of BKC, cell surface charge and hydrophobicity, and fatty acid content of the cytoplasmic membrane, although no evidence was found for alterations in LPS. Each of the two strains had different alterations in phenotype, indicating that such adaptation is unique to each strain of P. aeruginosa and does not result from a single mechanism shared by the whole species. PMID:11909837

  5. Testing Taxonomic Predictivity of Foliar and Tuber Resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Wild Relatives of Potato.

    PubMed

    Khiutti, A; Spooner, D M; Jansky, S H; Halterman, D A

    2015-09-01

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete phytopathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease found in potato-growing regions worldwide. Long-term management strategies to control late blight include the incorporation of host resistance to predominant strains. However, due to rapid genetic changes within pathogen populations, rapid and recurring identification and integration of novel host resistance traits is necessary. Wild relatives of potato offer a rich source of desirable traits, including late blight resistance, but screening methods can be time intensive. We tested the ability of taxonomy, ploidy, crossing group, breeding system, and geography to predict the presence of foliar and tuber late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp. Significant variation for resistance to both tuber and foliar late blight was found within and among species but there was no discernable predictive power based on taxonomic series, clade, ploidy, breeding system, elevation, or geographic location. We observed a moderate but significant correlation between tuber and foliar resistance within species. Although previously uncharacterized sources of both foliar and tuber resistance were identified, our study does not support an assumption that taxonomic or geographic data can be used to predict sources of late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp.

  6. Preparation, characterization and technological evaluation of CMC derived from rice-straw as thickening agents in discharge, discharge-resist and burn-out printing.

    PubMed

    Ragheb, A A; Nassar, S H; Abd El-Thalouth, I; Ibrahim, M A; Shahin, A A

    2012-08-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose samples of different D.S. values were prepared from rice straw via pulping followed by etherification with monochloroacetic acid under the catalytic action of sodium hydroxide. The prepared derivatives were assessed for D.S., rheological properties as well as suitability as thickening agents in different printing styles. It was found that carboxymethyl cellulose derived from rice straw is characterized by a non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behavior and its apparent viscosity at any specific rate of shear depends on the D.S. All the prepared derivatives could be used successfully as thickening agents in discharge and/or discharge/resist printing of cotton fabrics. Furthermore, they could be used also as thickening agent for burn-out printing style of wool/polyester blended fabrics using sodium hydroxide. Attractive samples could be obtained via using these techniques.

  7. Assessment of the Phoenix™ automated system and EUCAST breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing against isolates expressing clinically relevant resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Giani, T; Morosini, M I; D'Andrea, M M; García-Castillo, M; Rossolini, G M; Cantón, R

    2012-11-01

    EUCAST breakpoint criteria are being adopted by automatic antimicrobial susceptibility testing systems. The accuracy of the Phoenix Automated System in combination with 2012 EUCAST breakpoints against recent clinical isolates was evaluated. A total of 697 isolates (349 Enterobacteriaceae, 113 Pseudomonas spp., 25 Acinetobacter baumannii, 11 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, 95 Staphylococcus aureus, 6 coagulase negative staphylococci, 77 enterococci and 21 Streptococcus pneumoniae) with defined resistance phenotypes and well-characterized resistance mechanisms recovered in Spain (n = 343) and Italy (n = 354) were tested. Comparator antimicrobial susceptibility testing data were obtained following CLSI guidelines. Experimental agreement (EA), defined as MIC agreement ±1 log(2) dilution, category agreement (CA) and relative discrepancies (minor (mD), major (MD) and very major discrepancies (VMD)) were determined. The overall EA and CA for all organism-antimicrobial agent combinations (n = 6.294) were 97.3% and 95.2%, respectively. mD, MD and VMD were 4.7%, 1.3% and 2.7%, all of them in agreement with the ISO (ISO20776-2:2007) acceptance criteria for assessment of susceptibility testing devices. VMD were mainly observed in amoxicillin-clavulanate and cefuroxime in Enterobacteriaceae and gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas MD were mainly observed in amoxicillin-clavulante in Enterobacteriaceae. mD were mainly observed in Enterobacteriaceae but distributed in different antimicrobials. For S. aureus and enterococci relative discrepancies were low. The Phoenix system showed accuracy assessment in accordance with the ISO standards when using EUCAST breakpoints. Inclusion of EUCAST criteria in automatic antimicrobial susceptibility testing systems will facilitate the implementation of EUCAST breakpoints in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  8. A rapid diagnostic tool for detecting benzimidazole resistance in Cercospora beticola, the causal agent of Cercospora leaf spot in sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance in Cercospora beticola to benzimidazole fungicides was selected in many sugar beet regions of the world due to extensive use of this fungicide class. Practical resistance to benzimidazole in populations of C. beticola was first reported in Greece in 1973. Resistance has subsequently been ...

  9. Resistive shorts characterization in CMOS standard cells for test pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Andrzej; Potrykus, Bartosz

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an extended method of CMOS standard cells characterization for defect based voltage testing. Resistance of a short defect is taken into account while considering faulty behavior caused by this defect and finding the test vectors that detect this fault. Finally, all of found vectors are validated to check their effectiveness in fault covering and the optimal test sequence for all detectable faults is constructed. Experimental results for cells from industrial standard cell library are presented.

  10. Transient resistance to DNA damaging agents is associated with expression of microRNAs-135b and -196b in human leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tsui-Ting; He, Xiaolong; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Beck, William T

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs is widely viewed as a key obstacle to successful cancer therapy. However, detailed knowledge of the initial molecular events in the response of cancer cells to these chemotherapeutic and stress responses, and how these lead to the development of chemoresistance, remains incompletely understood. Using microRNA array and washout and rechallenge experiments, we found that short term treatment of leukemia cells with etoposide led a few days later to transient resistance that was associated with a corresponding transient increase in expression of ABCB1 mRNA, as well as microRNA (miR)-135b and miR-196b. This phenomenon was associated with short-term exposure to genotoxic agents, such as etoposide, topotecan, doxorubicin and ionizing radiation, but not agents that do not directly damage DNA. Further, this appeared to be histiotype-specific, and was seen in leukemic cells, but not in cell lines derived from solid tumors. Treatment of leukemic cells with either 5-aza-deoxycytidine or tricostatin A produced similar increased expression of ABCB1, miR-135b, and miR-196b, suggesting a role for epigenetic regulation of this phenomenon. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that CACNA1E, ARHGEF2, PTK2, SIAH1, ARHGAP6, and NME4 may be involved in the initial events in the development of drug resistance following the upregulation of ABCB1, miR-135b and miR-196b. In summary, we report herein that short-term exposure of cells to DNA damaging agents leads to transient drug resistance, which is associated with elevations in ABCB1, miR-135b and miR-196b, and suggests novel components that may be involved in the development of anticancer drug resistance. PMID:27570640

  11. Transient resistance to DNA damaging agents is associated with expression of microRNAs-135b and -196b in human leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tsui-Ting; He, Xiaolong; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Beck, William T

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs is widely viewed as a key obstacle to successful cancer therapy. However, detailed knowledge of the initial molecular events in the response of cancer cells to these chemotherapeutic and stress responses, and how these lead to the development of chemoresistance, remains incompletely understood. Using microRNA array and washout and rechallenge experiments, we found that short term treatment of leukemia cells with etoposide led a few days later to transient resistance that was associated with a corresponding transient increase in expression of ABCB1 mRNA, as well as microRNA (miR)-135b and miR-196b. This phenomenon was associated with short-term exposure to genotoxic agents, such as etoposide, topotecan, doxorubicin and ionizing radiation, but not agents that do not directly damage DNA. Further, this appeared to be histiotype-specific, and was seen in leukemic cells, but not in cell lines derived from solid tumors. Treatment of leukemic cells with either 5-aza-deoxycytidine or tricostatin A produced similar increased expression of ABCB1, miR-135b, and miR-196b, suggesting a role for epigenetic regulation of this phenomenon. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that CACNA1E, ARHGEF2, PTK2, SIAH1, ARHGAP6, and NME4 may be involved in the initial events in the development of drug resistance following the upregulation of ABCB1, miR-135b and miR-196b. In summary, we report herein that short-term exposure of cells to DNA damaging agents leads to transient drug resistance, which is associated with elevations in ABCB1, miR-135b and miR-196b, and suggests novel components that may be involved in the development of anticancer drug resistance. PMID:27570640

  12. Agent based models for testing city evacuation strategies under a flood event as strategy to reduce flood risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Neiler; Sanchez, Arlex; Nokolic, Igor; Vojinovic, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    This research explores the uses of Agent Based Models (ABM) and its potential to test large scale evacuation strategies in coastal cities at risk from flood events due to extreme hydro-meteorological events with the final purpose of disaster risk reduction by decreasing human's exposure to the hazard. The first part of the paper corresponds to the theory used to build the models such as: Complex adaptive systems (CAS) and the principles and uses of ABM in this field. The first section outlines the pros and cons of using AMB to test city evacuation strategies at medium and large scale. The second part of the paper focuses on the central theory used to build the ABM, specifically the psychological and behavioral model as well as the framework used in this research, specifically the PECS reference model is cover in this section. The last part of this section covers the main attributes or characteristics of human beings used to described the agents. The third part of the paper shows the methodology used to build and implement the ABM model using Repast-Symphony as an open source agent-based modelling and simulation platform. The preliminary results for the first implementation in a region of the island of Sint-Maarten a Dutch Caribbean island are presented and discussed in the fourth section of paper. The results obtained so far, are promising for a further development of the model and its implementation and testing in a full scale city

  13. Development and testing of a new protocol for evaluating the effectiveness of oil spill surface washing agents.

    PubMed

    Koran, Karen Miller; Venosa, Albert D; Luedeker, Christopher C; Dunnigan, Keith; Sorial, George A

    2009-12-01

    As defined by the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), a surface washing agent (SWA) is a product that removes oil from solid surfaces, such as beaches, rocks, and concrete, through a detergency mechanism and that does not involve dispersing or solubilizing the oil into the water column. Commercial products require testing to qualify for listing on the NCP Product Schedule. Such testing is conducted both for toxicity and effectiveness. Protocols currently exist for bioremediation agents and dispersants, but not SWAs. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a laboratory testing protocol to evaluate the effectiveness of SWAs in removing crude oil from a solid substrate. This paper summarizes some of the defining research supporting this new protocol. Multiple variables were tested to determine their effect on SWA performance. The protocol was most sensitive to SWA-to-oil ratio and rotational speed of mixing. Less sensitive variables were contact time, mixing time, and SWA concentration when total applied mass of active product was constant. EPA recommendations for the testing protocol will be made following round robin testing. PMID:19692099

  14. Development and testing of a new protocol for evaluating the effectiveness of oil spill surface washing agents.

    PubMed

    Koran, Karen Miller; Venosa, Albert D; Luedeker, Christopher C; Dunnigan, Keith; Sorial, George A

    2009-12-01

    As defined by the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), a surface washing agent (SWA) is a product that removes oil from solid surfaces, such as beaches, rocks, and concrete, through a detergency mechanism and that does not involve dispersing or solubilizing the oil into the water column. Commercial products require testing to qualify for listing on the NCP Product Schedule. Such testing is conducted both for toxicity and effectiveness. Protocols currently exist for bioremediation agents and dispersants, but not SWAs. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a laboratory testing protocol to evaluate the effectiveness of SWAs in removing crude oil from a solid substrate. This paper summarizes some of the defining research supporting this new protocol. Multiple variables were tested to determine their effect on SWA performance. The protocol was most sensitive to SWA-to-oil ratio and rotational speed of mixing. Less sensitive variables were contact time, mixing time, and SWA concentration when total applied mass of active product was constant. EPA recommendations for the testing protocol will be made following round robin testing.

  15. Evaluation of laboratory tests for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Coudron, P E; Jones, D L; Dalton, H P; Archer, G L

    1986-11-01

    Few studies evaluating susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant staphylococci have included isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, a known pathogen in many types of serious infections. We tested 175 S. epidermidis and 95 Staphylococcus aureus isolates to determine the most sensitive procedures for detecting methicillin-resistant staphylococci. Reference procedures included agar dilution with methicillin and 4% NaCl in the agar and broth microdilution with methicillin and 2% NaCl in cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth. After 24 h of incubation, the results from both methods correlated well and were within 1 log2 dilution for all isolates tested. Only one-half of all resistant isolates (92 of 183) were detected at 18 h by using the standard disk diffusion technique with 5-micrograms methicillin disks, and even fewer were detected with 10-micrograms methicillin disks and newly recommended zone-size criteria. However, the standard disk diffusion method with 4% NaCl in the agar increased the sensitivity and specificity for identification of the proper phenotype to greater than 92%. The spread plate and new spot techniques, both using agar with 4% NaCl, were also sensitive methods. Of 47 S. epidermidis isolates tested against oxacillin, 6 (13%) were oxacillin susceptible but methicillin resistant. Two automated systems, the Automicrobic system (Vitek Systems) and MicroScan (American MicroScan), as well as two broth screening systems available from Remel and Austin Biological Laboratories, failed to detect several resistant isolates, depending on the species.

  16. Evaluation of laboratory tests for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Coudron, P E; Jones, D L; Dalton, H P; Archer, G L

    1986-11-01

    Few studies evaluating susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant staphylococci have included isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, a known pathogen in many types of serious infections. We tested 175 S. epidermidis and 95 Staphylococcus aureus isolates to determine the most sensitive procedures for detecting methicillin-resistant staphylococci. Reference procedures included agar dilution with methicillin and 4% NaCl in the agar and broth microdilution with methicillin and 2% NaCl in cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth. After 24 h of incubation, the results from both methods correlated well and were within 1 log2 dilution for all isolates tested. Only one-half of all resistant isolates (92 of 183) were detected at 18 h by using the standard disk diffusion technique with 5-micrograms methicillin disks, and even fewer were detected with 10-micrograms methicillin disks and newly recommended zone-size criteria. However, the standard disk diffusion method with 4% NaCl in the agar increased the sensitivity and specificity for identification of the proper phenotype to greater than 92%. The spread plate and new spot techniques, both using agar with 4% NaCl, were also sensitive methods. Of 47 S. epidermidis isolates tested against oxacillin, 6 (13%) were oxacillin susceptible but methicillin resistant. Two automated systems, the Automicrobic system (Vitek Systems) and MicroScan (American MicroScan), as well as two broth screening systems available from Remel and Austin Biological Laboratories, failed to detect several resistant isolates, depending on the species. PMID:3639887

  17. Ballistic Resistance of Armored Passenger Vehicles: Test Protocols and Quality Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey M. Lacy; Robert E. Polk

    2005-07-01

    This guide establishes a test methodology for determining the overall ballistic resistance of the passenger compartment of assembled nontactical armored passenger vehicles (APVs). Because ballistic testing of every piece of every component of an armored vehicle is impractical, if not impossible, this guide describes a testing scheme based on statistical sampling of exposed component surface areas. Results from the test of the sampled points are combined to form a test score that reflects the probability of ballistic penetration into the passenger compartment of the vehicle.

  18. Effects of subtherapeutic administration of antimicrobial agents to beef cattle on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter hyointestinalis.

    PubMed

    Inglis, G D; McAllister, T A; Busz, H W; Yanke, L J; Morck, D W; Olson, M E; Read, R R

    2005-07-01

    The influence of antimicrobial agents on the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Campylobacter isolates recovered from 300 beef cattle maintained in an experimental feedlot was monitored over a 315-day period (11 sample times). Groups of calves were assigned to one of the following antimicrobial treatments: chlortetracycline and sulfamethazine (CS), chlortetracycline alone (Ct), virginiamycin, monensin, tylosin phosphate, and no antimicrobial agent (i.e., control treatment). In total, 3,283 fecal samples were processed for campylobacters over the course of the experiment. Of the 2,052 bacterial isolates recovered, 92% were Campylobacter (1,518 were Campylobacter hyointestinalis and 380 were C. jejuni). None of the antimicrobial treatments decreased the isolation frequency of C. jejuni relative to the control treatment. In contrast, C. hyointestinalis was isolated less frequently from animals treated with CS and to a lesser extent from animals treated with Ct. The majority (> or =94%) of C. jejuni isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin, but more isolates with resistance to tetracycline were recovered from animals fed Ct. All of the 1,500 isolates of C. hyointestinalis examined were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. In contrast, 11%, 10%, and 1% of these isolates were resistant to tetracycline, erythromycin, and ampicillin, respectively. The number of animals from which C. hyointestinalis isolates with resistance to erythromycin and tetracycline were recovered differed among the antimicrobial treatments. Only Ct administration increased the carriage rates of erythromycin-resistant isolates of C. hyointestinalis, and the inclusion of CS in the diet increased the number of animals from which tetracycline-resistant isolates were recovered. The majority of C. hyointestinalis isolates with resistance to tetracycline were obtained from cohorts within a single pen, and most of these isolates were recovered from cattle during feeding of

  19. Mortality follow-up of veterans who participated in military chemical and biological warfare agent testing between 1962 and 1972.

    PubMed

    Kang, Han K; Bullman, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Between 1962 and 1972, several thousand U.S. Navy personnel participated in Project SHAD (Shipboard Hazard and Defense). These tests potentially exposed participants to either active chemical or biological warfare agents or their simulants. This study examined mortality risk associated with participating in SHAD tests by comparing the cause-specific mortality of 4927 SHAD veterans to that of 10,927 other Navy veterans. Compared to other Navy veterans, SHAD veterans had an increased risk of overall mortality, which was due primarily to heart disease deaths.

  20. Application of ProTide technology to gemcitabine: a successful approach to overcome the key cancer resistance mechanisms leads to a new agent (NUC-1031) in clinical development.

    PubMed

    Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Lopez, Monica Huerta; Balzarini, Jan; Mason, Malcolm; Jiang, Wen G; Blagden, Sarah; Thompson, Emely; Ghazaly, Essam; McGuigan, Christopher

    2014-02-27

    Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analogue commonly used in cancer therapy but with limited efficacy due to a high susceptibility to cancer cell resistance. The addition of a phosphoramidate motif to the gemcitabine can protect it against many of the key cancer resistance mechanisms. We have synthesized a series of gemcitabine phosphoramidate prodrugs and screened for cytostatic activity in a range of different tumor cell lines. Among the synthesized compounds, one in particular (NUC-1031, 6f) was shown to be potent in vitro. Importantly, compared with gemcitabine, 6f activation was significantly less dependent on deoxycytidine kinase and on nucleoside transporters, and it was resistant to cytidine deaminase-mediated degradation. Moreover, 6f showed a significant reduction in tumor volumes in vivo in pancreatic cancer xenografts. The ProTide 6f is now in clinical development with encouraging efficacy signals in a Phase I/II study, which strongly supports the ProTide approach to generate promising new anticancer agents.

  1. Using Agent-Based Modelling to Predict the Role of Wild Refugia in the Evolution of Resistance of Sea Lice to Chemotherapeutants

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Gregor F.; Groner, Maya L.; Fast, Mark D.; Revie, Crawford W.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for Atlantic salmon farming in the northern hemisphere is infestation by the sea louse parasite Lepeophtheirus salmonis. The most frequent method of controlling these sea louse infestations is through the use of chemical treatments. However, most major salmon farming areas have observed resistance to common chemotherapeutants. In terrestrial environments, many strategies employed to manage the evolution of resistance involve the use of refugia, where a portion of the population is left untreated to maintain susceptibility. While refugia have not been deliberately used in Atlantic salmon farming, wild salmon populations that migrate close to salmon farms may act as natural refugia. In this paper we describe an agent-based model that explores the influence of different sizes of wild salmon populations on resistance evolution in sea lice on a salmon farm. Using the model, we demonstrate that wild salmon populations can act as refugia that limit the evolution of resistance in the sea louse populations. Additionally, we demonstrate that an increase in the size of the population of wild salmon results in an increased effect in slowing the evolution of resistance. We explore the effect of a population fitness cost associated with resistance, finding that in some cases it substantially reduces the speed of evolution to chemical treatments. PMID:26485023

  2. Using Agent-Based Modelling to Predict the Role of Wild Refugia in the Evolution of Resistance of Sea Lice to Chemotherapeutants.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Gregor F; Groner, Maya L; Fast, Mark D; Gettinby, George; Revie, Crawford W

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for Atlantic salmon farming in the northern hemisphere is infestation by the sea louse parasite Lepeophtheirus salmonis. The most frequent method of controlling these sea louse infestations is through the use of chemical treatments. However, most major salmon farming areas have observed resistance to common chemotherapeutants. In terrestrial environments, many strategies employed to manage the evolution of resistance involve the use of refugia, where a portion of the population is left untreated to maintain susceptibility. While refugia have not been deliberately used in Atlantic salmon farming, wild salmon populations that migrate close to salmon farms may act as natural refugia. In this paper we describe an agent-based model that explores the influence of different sizes of wild salmon populations on resistance evolution in sea lice on a salmon farm. Using the model, we demonstrate that wild salmon populations can act as refugia that limit the evolution of resistance in the sea louse populations. Additionally, we demonstrate that an increase in the size of the population of wild salmon results in an increased effect in slowing the evolution of resistance. We explore the effect of a population fitness cost associated with resistance, finding that in some cases it substantially reduces the speed of evolution to chemical treatments. PMID:26485023

  3. Using Agent-Based Modelling to Predict the Role of Wild Refugia in the Evolution of Resistance of Sea Lice to Chemotherapeutants.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Gregor F; Groner, Maya L; Fast, Mark D; Gettinby, George; Revie, Crawford W

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for Atlantic salmon farming in the northern hemisphere is infestation by the sea louse parasite Lepeophtheirus salmonis. The most frequent method of controlling these sea louse infestations is through the use of chemical treatments. However, most major salmon farming areas have observed resistance to common chemotherapeutants. In terrestrial environments, many strategies employed to manage the evolution of resistance involve the use of refugia, where a portion of the population is left untreated to maintain susceptibility. While refugia have not been deliberately used in Atlantic salmon farming, wild salmon populations that migrate close to salmon farms may act as natural refugia. In this paper we describe an agent-based model that explores the influence of different sizes of wild salmon populations on resistance evolution in sea lice on a salmon farm. Using the model, we demonstrate that wild salmon populations can act as refugia that limit the evolution of resistance in the sea louse populations. Additionally, we demonstrate that an increase in the size of the population of wild salmon results in an increased effect in slowing the evolution of resistance. We explore the effect of a population fitness cost associated with resistance, finding that in some cases it substantially reduces the speed of evolution to chemical treatments.

  4. First report on rapid screening of nanomaterial-based antimicrobial agents against β-lactamase resistance using pGLO plasmid transformed Escherichia coli HB 101 K-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, M. Alpha; Muralidhar, Y.; Sravanthi, M.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; Nissipriya, M.; Reddy, P. Sirisha; Neelima, T. Shoba; Reddy, G. Dilip; Adilaxmamma, K.; Kumar, P. Anand; Krishna, T. Giridhara

    2016-08-01

    Combating antibiotic resistance requires discovery of novel antimicrobials effective against resistant bacteria. Herein, we present for the first time, pGLO plasmid transformed Escherichia coli HB 101 K 12 as novel model for screening of nanomaterial-based antimicrobial agents against β-lactamase resistance. E. coli HB 101 was transformed by pGLO plasmid in the presence of calcium chloride (50 mM; pH 6.1) aided by heat shock (0-42-0 °C). The transformed bacteria were grown on Luria-Bertani agar containing ampicillin (amp) and arabinose (ara). The transformed culture was able to grow in the presence of ampicillin and also exhibited fluorescence under UV light. Both untransformed and transformed bacteria were used for screening citrate-mediated nanosilver (CNS), aloin-mediated nanosilver (ANS), 11-α-keto-boswellic acid (AKBA)-mediated nanosilver (BNS); nanozinc oxide, nanomanganese oxide (NMO) and phytochemicals such as aloin and AKBA. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by microplate method using ρ-iodo nitro tetrazolium indicator. All the compounds were effective against transformed bacteria except NMO and AKBA. Transformed bacteria exhibited reverse cross resistance against aloin. ANS showed the highest antibacterial activity with a MIC of 0.32 ppm followed by BNS (10.32 ppm), CNS (20.64 ppm) and NZO (34.83 ppm). Thus, pGLO plasmid can be used to induce resistance against β-lactam antibiotics and the model can be used for rapid screening of new antibacterial agents effective against resistant bacteria.

  5. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  6. Skid resistance and surface roughness testing of historic stone surfaces: advantages and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, Ákos

    2013-04-01

    Skid resistance tests are mostly applied for testing road surfaces and almost never applied for testing stones at cultural heritage sites. The present study focuses on the possibilities of using these techniques in assessing the surface roughness of paving stones at a historic site. Two different methods were used in a comparative way to evaluate the surface properties of various types of stones ranging from travertine to non-porous limestone and granite. The applied techniques included the use of SRT pendulum (Skid Resistance Tester) providing USRV values and a mobile equipment to analyze the surface properties (Floor Slide Control) by surface profiling and providing angle of friction. The main aims of tests were to understand the wearing of stone materials due to intense pedestrian use and to detect surface changes/surface roughness and slip resistance within few year periods. The measured loss in surface slip resistance (i.e. USRV values) was in the order of 20% for granites, while most limestones lost at least 40% in terms of USRV values. An opposite trend was detected for a porous travertine type, where the surface became rougher after years of use. The limitations of these techniques are also addressed in the paper. The tests have shown that the introduction of the use of these equipments in heritage studies provide useful information on the longevity of historic stone pavements that are open for public use.

  7. Interaction between calcium channel blockers and sweetening agents on morphine-induced analgesia in mice by formalin test.

    PubMed

    Nikfar, S; Abdollahi, M; Sarkarati, F; Etemad, F

    1998-09-01

    1. Calcium is known to be an important ion in the modulation of nociception and inflammation. Previous research has shown that mice drinking sweet-tasting solutions such as sucrose, saccharin and aspartame exhibit significant changes in morphine-induced analgesia in both phases of the formalin test. 2. In this study, the role of calcium channel blockers on the effectivity of a 12-day regimen of different sweetening agents (sucrose 32%, saccharin 0.08% and aspartame 0.16%) on the alteration of the morphine response has been investigated. 3. Male albino mice weighing 20-27 g were used for experiments. Animals were given 12 days to adapt to dietary conditions. Animals were given morphine (1.5, 3, 6, 9 mg/kg) subcutaneously 30 min before observation. Nifedipine (5 mg/kg), verapamil (5 mg/kg) and diltiazem (10 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally 20 min before morphine injection. 4. Recording of the early phase started immediately and lasted for 10 min after formalin injection. Recording of the late response started 20 min after formalin injection and lasted for 10 min. 5. Calcium channel blockers potentiated the antinociceptive effects of sweetening agents and diminished the antagonistic effects of these compounds on morphine-induced analgesia in the early and late phases of the formalin test. 6. It is proposed that calcium has a role for the interactive effects of sweetening agents and morphine on pain sensitivity.

  8. Finite element analysis and fracture resistance testing of a new intraradicular post

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Eron Toshio Colauto; PAGANI, Clovis; da SILVA, Eduardo Galera; NORITOMI, Pedro Yoshito; UEHARA, André Yugou; KEMMOKU, Daniel Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to evaluate a prefabricated intraradicular threaded pure titanium post, designed and developed at the São José dos Campos School of Dentistry - UNESP, Brazil. This new post was designed to minimize stresses observed with prefabricated post systems and to improve cost-benefits. Material and methods Fracture resistance testing of the post/core/root complex, fracture analysis by microscopy and stress analysis by the finite element method were used for post evaluation. The following four prefabricated metal post systems were analyzed: group 1, experimental post; group 2, modification of the experimental post; group 3, Flexi Post, and group 4, Para Post. For the analysis of fracture resistance, 40 bovine teeth were randomly assigned to the four groups (n=10) and used for the fabrication of test specimens simulating the situation in the mouth. The test specimens were subjected to compressive strength testing until fracture in an EMIC universal testing machine. After fracture of the test specimens, their roots were sectioned and analyzed by microscopy. For the finite element method, specimens of the fracture resistance test were simulated by computer modeling to determine the stress distribution pattern in the post systems studied. Results The fracture test presented the following averages and standard deviation: G1 (45.63±8.77), G2 (49.98±7.08), G3 (43.84±5.52), G4 (47.61±7.23). Stress was homogenously distributed along the body of the intraradicular post in group 1, whereas high stress concentrations in certain regions were observed in the other groups. These stress concentrations in the body of the post induced the same stress concentration in root dentin. Conclusions The experimental post (original and modified versions) presented similar fracture resistance and better results in the stress analysis when compared with the commercial post systems tested (08/2008-PA/CEP). PMID:23032204

  9. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19–4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance.

  10. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19–4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance. PMID:27652260

  11. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19-4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance. PMID:27652260

  12. The cholesterol-lowering agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin promotes glucose uptake via GLUT4 in adult muscle fibers and reduces insulin resistance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Georgiev, Tihomir; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Espinosa, Alejandra; Hidalgo, Jorge; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-02-15

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in adult skeletal muscle by promoting the translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the transverse tubule (T-tubule) membranes, which have particularly high cholesterol levels. We investigated whether T-tubule cholesterol content affects insulin-induced glucose transport. Feeding mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 wk increased by 30% the T-tubule cholesterol content of triad-enriched vesicular fractions from muscle tissue compared with triads from control mice. Additionally, isolated muscle fibers (flexor digitorum brevis) from HFD-fed mice showed a 40% decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rates compared with fibers from control mice. In HFD-fed mice, four subcutaneous injections of MβCD, an agent reported to extract membrane cholesterol, improved their defective glucose tolerance test and normalized their high fasting glucose levels. The preincubation of isolated muscle fibers with relatively low concentrations of MβCD increased both basal and insulin-induced glucose uptake in fibers from controls or HFD-fed mice and decreased Akt phosphorylation without altering AMPK-mediated signaling. In fibers from HFD-fed mice, MβCD improved insulin sensitivity even after Akt or CaMK II inhibition and increased membrane GLUT4 content. Indinavir, a GLUT4 antagonist, prevented the stimulatory effects of MβCD on glucose uptake. Addition of MβCD elicited ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium signals in isolated fibers, which were essential for glucose uptake. Our findings suggest that T-tubule cholesterol content exerts a critical regulatory role on insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose transport and that partial cholesterol removal from muscle fibers may represent a useful strategy to counteract insulin resistance.

  13. Salicylanilide carbamates: Promising antibacterial agents with high in vitro activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Zadrazilova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Masarikova, Martina; Imramovsky, Ales; Ferriz, Juana Monreal; Vinsova, Jarmila; Cizek, Alois; Jampilek, Josef

    2015-09-18

    A series of twenty-one salicylanilide N-alkylcarbamates was assessed for novel antibacterial characteristics against three clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and S. aureus ATCC 29213 as the reference and quality control strain. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the broth dilution micro-method with subsequent subcultivation of aliquots to assess minimum bactericidal concentration. The bactericidal kinetics was established by time-kill assay. Ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin were used as reference antibacterial drugs. All the tested compounds exhibited highly potent anti-MRSA activity (⩽ 0.008-4 μg/mL) comparable or up to 250× higher than that of vancomycin, the standard in the treatment of serious MRSA infections. 4-Chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl butylcarbamate and 4-chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl ethylcarbamate were the most active compounds. In most cases, compounds provided reliable bacteriostatic activity, except for 4-chloro-2-(4-chlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl decylcarbamate exhibiting bactericidal effect at 8h (for clinical isolate of MRSA 63718) and at 24h (for clinical isolates of MRSA SA 630 and MRSA SA 3202) at 4× MIC. Structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  14. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: possible mechanisms and clinical relevance. Part II: Potential causes and laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Vadász, Dávid; Sztriha, László K; Sas, Katalin; Vécsei, László

    2013-01-30

    Recent meta-analyses have indicated that patients with vascular disease demonstrated by laboratory tests to be aspirin or clopidogrel-resistant are at an increased risk of major vascular events. The suggested mechanisms of aspirin resistance include genetic polymorphism, alternative pathways of platelet activation, aspirin-insensitive thromboxane biosynthesis, drug interactions, or a low aspirin dose. Clopidogrel resistance is likely to develop as a result of a decreased bioavailability of the active metabolite, due to genetic variation or concomitant drug treatment. Additional work is required to improve and validate laboratory tests of platelet function, so that they may become useful tools for selection of the most appropriate antiplatelet therapy for an individual patient. Improvements in antiplatelet treatment strategies in the future should lead to a reduction in premature vascular events. PMID:23607225

  15. Laboratory test reactor for the investigation of liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Peitz, D; Bernhard, A; Elsener, M; Kröcher, O

    2011-08-01

    A test reactor was designed and built for investigating liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process in the laboratory. The design of the experimental setup is described in detail and its performance was evaluated. Using a glass nebulizer, liquid reducing agents were sprayed directly onto a catalyst positioned in a heated glass reactor with a length of 250 mm and an internal diameter of 20.4 mm or 40 mm. Model exhaust gases were mixed from individual gas components and were heated up to 450 °C in a heat exchanger before entering the reactor. The off-gas was analyzed using two complimentary techniques, a multi-component online FTIR gas analysis and a liquid quench gas absorption setup, to detect higher molecular compounds and aerosols. Due to the versatility of construction, processes not related to SCR, but involving three-phase reactions with gases, liquids and a catalyst, can also be investigated.

  16. Laboratory test reactor for the investigation of liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitz, D.; Bernhard, A.; Elsener, M.; Kröcher, O.

    2011-08-01

    A test reactor was designed and built for investigating liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process in the laboratory. The design of the experimental setup is described in detail and its performance was evaluated. Using a glass nebulizer, liquid reducing agents were sprayed directly onto a catalyst positioned in a heated glass reactor with a length of 250 mm and an internal diameter of 20.4 mm or 40 mm. Model exhaust gases were mixed from individual gas components and were heated up to 450 °C in a heat exchanger before entering the reactor. The off-gas was analyzed using two complimentary techniques, a multi-component online FTIR gas analysis and a liquid quench gas absorption setup, to detect higher molecular compounds and aerosols. Due to the versatility of construction, processes not related to SCR, but involving three-phase reactions with gases, liquids and a catalyst, can also be investigated.

  17. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, L. B.; Trandafir, D. L.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Todea, M.; Simon, S.

    2016-11-01

    The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, 29Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T1 and RARE-T2 protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T2-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  18. Laboratory Testing of Foundry Sands as Bulking Agents for Porous Media Filters Used to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Foundry sands are industrial byproducts that may have potential application as bulking agents that when mixed with small amounts of more chemically reactive materials (i.e. sulfur modified iron, fly ash, etc.) can be used to produce porous media filters capable of removing contaminants from agricultural drainage waters. Foundry sand bulking agents are attractive primarily as a low cost means to maintain the hydraulic efficiency of a filter. Secondarily, the foundry sands themselves may have some capacity for removal of agricultural nutrients and pesticides from water. Consequently, a laboratory study was initiated to quantify hydraulic efficiency and agricultural contaminant removal abilities of six foundry sands. Of the six foundry sands tested, all were obtained in central Ohio, three from iron casting foundries, two from steel casting foundries, and one from an aluminum casting foundry. Hydraulic efficiencies of the foundry sands were assessed by measuring hydraulic conductivity with twice replicated falling-head permeability tests. Batch tests were employed to evaluate foundry sand potential to treat water containing nitrate and phosphate nutrients, along with the pesticide, atrazine. Five of the six foundry sand samples had measured hydraulic conductivity values from 7.6 x 10-3 cm/s to 3.8 x 10-2 cm/s, which is in the range of hydraulic conductivity values found for clean sand. The one foundry sand that was an exception had much lower measured hydraulic conductivity values of 2.75 x 10-5 cm/s and 5.76 x 10-5 cm/s. For the batch tests conducted, none of the nitrate was removed by any of the six foundry sands; however, conversely, almost all of the phosphate was removed by each foundry sand. Batch test atrazine removal results were much more varied. Compared with baseline batch tests, one foundry sand removed two thirds of the atrazine, one foundry sand removed about one half of the atrazine, three foundry sands removed about a third of the atrazine, and one

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Genotype Testing for Primary Resistance in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Bethany L.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Losina, Elena; Nakamura, Yoriko M.; Girouard, Michael P.; Sax, Paul E.; Struchiner, Claudio J.; Paltiel, A. David

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HIV genotype-resistance testing can help identify more effective antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens for patients, substantially increasing the likelihood of viral suppression and immune recovery. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of genotype-resistance testing before first-line ART initiation in Brazil. Design: We used a previously published microsimulation model of HIV disease (CEPAC-International) and data from Brazil to compare the clinical impact, costs, and cost-effectiveness of initial genotype testing (Genotype) with no initial genotype testing (No genotype). Methods: Model parameters were derived from the HIV Clinical Cohort at the Evandro Chagas Clinical Research Institute and from published data, using Brazilian sources whenever possible. Baseline patient characteristics included 69% male, mean age of 36 years (SD, 10 years), mean CD4 count of 347 per microliter (SD, 300/µL) at ART initiation, annual ART costs from 2012 US $1400 to US $13,400, genotype test cost of US $230, and primary resistance prevalence of 4.4%. Life expectancy and costs were discounted 3% per year. Genotype was defined as “cost-effective” compared with No Genotype if its incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was less than 3 times the 2012 Brazilian per capita GDP of US $12,300. Results: Compared with No genotype, Genotype increased life expectancy from 18.45 to 18.47 years and reduced lifetime cost from US $45,000 to $44,770; thus, in the base case, Genotype was cost saving. Genotype was cost-effective at primary resistance prevalence as low as 1.4% and remained cost-effective when subsequent-line ART costs decreased to 30% of baseline value. Cost-inefficient results were observed only when simultaneously holding multiple parameters to extremes of their plausible ranges. Conclusions: Genotype-resistance testing in ART-naive individuals in Brazil will improve survival and decrease costs and should be incorporated into HIV treatment guidelines in Brazil

  20. Susceptibility testing methods, resistance and breakpoints: what do these terms really mean?

    PubMed

    Silley, P

    2012-04-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing can be considered the major international contributors to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. In this review, the author considers the differences between the respective organisations, examines the terminology used in antimicrobial susceptibility testing and argues for an urgent need to harmonise these definitions. While this may seem somewhat surprising, the terminology used to define resistance does differ. In this context, attention is given to the trend for 'resistance' to be defined by the epidemiological cut-off value, rather than by the long-established clinical breakpoint. The author goes on to discuss susceptibility testing methodologies and present an approach to setting clinical breakpoints.

  1. Effects of Resistance Training on the Sit-and-Reach Test in Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Aline Rodrigues; Santarem Jose Maria; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Marucci, Maria de Fatima Nunes

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week resistance training program on older women's flexibility (evaluated through the sit- and-reach test performed before and after the training program). Participants were compared to inactive older women. The training program resulted in significant increases in participants' flexibility, suggesting that weight…

  2. 16 CFR 1203.15 - Positional stability test (roll-off resistance).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Positional stability test (roll-off resistance). 1203.15 Section 1203.15 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.15 Positional...

  3. Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

    2011-12-13

    The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

  4. Highly Adaptable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells as a Functional Model for Testing Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Shamsnia, Anna; Raythatha, Milan R.; Milligan, Ryan D.; Cady, Amanda M.; Madan, Simran; Lucci, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance. PMID:25279830

  5. Risk factors associated with resistance to HIV testing among transwomen in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro Júnior, F M L; Kendall, C; Martins, T A; Mota, R M S; Macena, R H M; Glick, J; Kerr-Correa, F; Kerr, L

    2016-01-01

    Transwomen are a high-risk population for HIV/AIDS worldwide. However, many transwomen do not test for HIV. This study aimed to identify factors associated with resistance to HIV testing among transwomen in Fortaleza/CE. A cross-sectional study was conducted between August and December 2008 with a sample of 304 transwomen recruited through respondent-driven sampling. Data analysis utilized Respondent-Driven Sampling Analysis Tool and SPSS 11.0. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses examined risk factors associated with resistance to HIV testing. Less than 18 years of age (OR = 4.221; CI = 2.419-7.364), sexual debut before 10 years of age (OR = 6.760; CI = 2.996-15.256), using illegal drugs during sex (OR = 2.384; CI = 1.310-4.339), experience of discrimination (OR = 3.962; CI = 1.540-10.195) and a belief that the test results were not confidential (OR = 3.763; CI = 2.118-6.688) are independently associated with resistance to testing. Intersectoral and targeted strategies aimed at encouraging the adoption of safer sexual behaviors and testing for HIV among transwomen are required. PMID:26274065

  6. Comparative in vitro activities of enoxacin (CI-919, AT-2266) and eleven antipseudomonal agents against aminoglycoside-susceptible and -resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Bassey, C M; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P; Conley, P E

    1984-09-01

    The in vitro activity of enoxacin (CI 919, AT 2266), a new oral quinolone carboxylic acid compound, was compared with those of gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, azlocillin, piperacillin, aztreonam, moxalactam, imipenem, cefsulodin, ceftazidime, and cefoperazone against 101 aminoglycoside-susceptible and 105 aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Among these 206 P. aeruginosa isolates were 25 strains with known mechanisms of resistance to amikacin. The activity of enoxacin was similar to that of tobramycin against aminoglycoside-susceptible strains, with MICs of 1.0 to 2.0 micrograms/ml and 0.5 to 1.0 microgram/ml, respectively, for 90% of the strains. Enoxacin was the most active agent in this in vitro study against aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa strains, with MICs of 2.0 to 4.0 micrograms/ml for 90% of the strains. Strains with enzymatic resistance to amikacin were more resistant to beta-lactams (except enoxacin and imipenem) than were strains with decreased permeability.

  7. Wittig Derivatization of Sesquiterpenoid Polygodial Leads to Cytostatic Agents with Activity Against Drug Resistant Cancer Cells and Capable of Pyrrolylation of Primary Amines

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C.; Middleton, Kelsey N.; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N. M.; Frolova, Liliya V.; Rossato, Mateus F.; De La Chapa, Jorge J.; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F.; Pillai, Akshita; Kälin, Roland E.; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B.; Calixto, João B.; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C.; van Otterlo, Willem A. L.; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Many types of cancer, including glioma, melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others, are resistant to proapoptotic stimuli and thus poorly responsive to current therapies based on the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The current investigation describes the synthesis and anticancer evaluation of unique C12-Wittig derivatives of polygodial, a terpenenoid dialdehyde isolated from Persicaria hydropiper (L.) Delabre. These compounds were found to undergo an unprecedented pyrrole formation with primary amines in a chemical model system, a reaction that could be relevant in the biological environment and lead to the pyrrolation of lysine residues in the target proteins. The anticancer evaluation of these compounds revealed their promising activity against cancer cells displaying various forms of drug resistance, including resistance to proapoptotic agents. Mechanistic studies indicated that compared to the parent polygodial, which displays fixative general cytotoxic action against human cells, the C12-Wittig derivatives exerted their antiproliferative action mainly through cytostatic effects explaining their activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. The possibility for an intriguing covalent modification of proteins through a novel pyrrole formation reaction, as well as useful activities against drug resistant cancer cells, make the described polygodial-derived chemical scaffold an interesting new chemotype warranting thorough investigation. PMID:26360047

  8. Wittig derivatization of sesquiterpenoid polygodial leads to cytostatic agents with activity against drug resistant cancer cells and capable of pyrrolylation of primary amines.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C; Middleton, Kelsey N; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N M; Frolova, Liliya V; Rossato, Mateus F; De La Chapa, Jorge J; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Pillai, Akshita; Kälin, Roland E; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B; Calixto, João B; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-10-20

    Many types of cancer, including glioma, melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others, are resistant to proapoptotic stimuli and thus poorly responsive to current therapies based on the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The current investigation describes the synthesis and anticancer evaluation of unique C12-Wittig derivatives of polygodial, a sesquiterpenoid dialdehyde isolated from Persicaria hydropiper (L.) Delabre. These compounds were found to undergo an unprecedented pyrrole formation with primary amines in a chemical model system, a reaction that could be relevant in the biological environment and lead to the pyrrolation of lysine residues in the target proteins. The anticancer evaluation of these compounds revealed their promising activity against cancer cells displaying various forms of drug resistance, including resistance to proapoptotic agents. Mechanistic studies indicated that compared to the parent polygodial, which displays fixative general cytotoxic action against human cells, the C12-Wittig derivatives exerted their antiproliferative action mainly through cytostatic effects explaining their activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. The possibility for an intriguing covalent modification of proteins through a novel pyrrole formation reaction, as well as useful activities against drug resistant cancer cells, make the described polygodial-derived chemical scaffold an interesting new chemotype warranting thorough investigation.

  9. Extraneous agents testing for substrates of avian origin and viral vaccines for poultry: current provisions and proposals for future approaches.

    PubMed

    Jungbäck, Carmen; Motitschke, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    In the 1970s the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) established the first requirements for testing starting materials for vaccines and the vaccines themselves. These requirements also cover testing for freedom from extraneous agents of specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken flocks, the embryonated eggs derived from them and viral vaccines for poultry. This was the first common European approach initiated by the Ph. Eur. as an institution of the Council of Europe and it was the beginning of building a scientific basis for vaccine quality. In the following years, the increasingly detailed requirements concerning viral purity also impacted viral vaccines for poultry, SPF chicken flocks and the embryonated eggs derived from them. The core of these requirements is formed by the list of extraneous agents that must be tested for and the accepted test methods. In the early 1990s and in 2004, the next steps were taken towards the harmonization of quality regulations for the production and testing of veterinary immunological products, this time at the level of the European Community. With the first step, good manufacturing practices (GMP) and good laboratory practices (GLP) were introduced, ensuring more consistent production, validation of production procedures and testing. The next step introduced the risk assessment, which covers the evaluation of the quality of production and control. The intention of these efforts is to contribute to the quality, safety and purity of the products placed on the market. It makes sense that, based on the outcome of the risk-evaluation, a reduction of in-process and final product testing may be called for in certain cases. However, despite the fact that the quality of the starting materials and vaccines has been increased over the years, the provisions of the Ph. Eur. have not been adjusted. Progress made by the manufacturers of starting materials and vaccines with respect to increasing the quality of their products should be recognised. This

  10. Activity of telavancin and comparator antimicrobial agents tested against Staphylococcus spp. isolated from hospitalised patients in Europe (2007-2008).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Jones, Ronald N

    2010-10-01

    The activity of telavancin was evaluated against Staphylococcus spp. collected from European hospitals as part of an international surveillance study (2007-2008). A total of 7534 staphylococcal clinical isolates [5726 Staphylococcus aureus and 1808 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS)] were included. Isolates were tested for susceptibility according to reference methods and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were interpreted based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) 2010 and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) 2009 criteria. Telavancin breakpoints approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were applied. Telavancin activity was evaluated against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) displaying several antibiogram resistance patterns, including multidrug-resistant isolates. Telavancin was active against S. aureus [MIC(50/90) values (MICs for 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively)=0.12/0.25mg/L; 100.0% susceptible] and CoNS (MIC(50/90)=0.12/0.25mg/L), inhibiting all isolates at < or =0.5mg/L. Similar results were observed when S. aureus were stratified by year or country of origin (MIC(50/90)=0.12/0.25mg/L). When MRSA isolates were clustered according to 48 different resistance patterns, telavancin showed consistent MIC(90) values (0.25mg/L) regardless of multidrug resistance. Amongst CoNS, telavancin was slightly more active against Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus lugdunensis and Staphylococcus xylosus (MIC(50)=0.12 mg/L) compared with Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Staphylococcus warneri (MIC(50)=0.25mg/L). Overall, telavancin exhibited MIC(90) results two- to eight-fold lower than comparators (daptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, vancomycin and linezolid). Based upon MIC(90) values, telavancin demonstrated potent in vitro activity against a contemporary (2007-2008) collection of Staphylococcus spp

  11. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  12. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  13. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  14. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  15. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  16. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  17. Evaluation of sperm tests as indicators of germ-cell damage in men exposed to chemical or physical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Watchmaker, G.; Gordon, L.

    1983-06-15

    As reviewed here, at least 89 chemical exposures have been studied for their effects on human spermatogenesis using sperm tests, with the majority showing some effect on sperm count, motility, or morphology. Approximately 85% of these exposures were to experimental or therapeutic drugs, 10% to occupational or environmental agents, and 5% to recreational drugs. This paper briefly describes the more common sperm-based methods and reviews some of their applications. It also includes guidelines for undertaking a human sperm study, as well as a discussion of the predictive value of induced sperm changes, an evaluation of the role of animal sperm tests, and a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the sperm tests.

  18. Initial Testing (Stage 1) of the Tubulin Binding Agent Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound (nab) Paclitaxel (Abraxane®) by the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program (PPTP)

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Peter J.; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Kolb, E. Anders; Gorlick, Richard; Maris, John M.; Wu, Jianrong; Tong, Zeen; Arnold, Michael A.; Chatterjee, Moumita; Williams, Terence M.; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel, Abraxane®) is FDA approved for the treatment of several adult cancers. Antimitotic agents are essential components for curative therapy of pediatric solid tumors, although taxanes have shown limited activity. Because of the novel formulation, nab-paclitaxel was evaluated against a limited series of Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program (PPTP) solid tumors. Procedures Nab-paclitaxel was tested against a limited subset of PPTP solid tumor xenograft models at a dose of 50 mg/kg using a q4dx3 schedule intravenously. Results Nab-paclitaxel was well tolerated in vivo, producing maximum weight loss of approximately 10% with recovery to baseline weight in the week following the third dose. All 20 xenograft models tested were considered evaluable for efficacy. Nab-paclitaxel induced statistically significant differences in event-free survival (EFS) distribution compared to control in 19 of 20 (95%) of the solid tumors. Objective responses were observed in 12 of 20 (60%) solid tumor xenografts. Complete responses (CR) or maintained CR were observed in 5 of 8 Ewing sarcoma models and 6 of 8 rhabdomyosarcomas. There were no objective regressions in either neuroblastoma (n=2) or osteosarcoma (n=2) xenograft panels. At the dose tested, systemic exposures of nab-paclitaxel in mice were somewhat greater than those tolerated in humans. Conclusions The high level of activity observed against the rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma PPTP preclinical models makes nab-paclitaxel an interesting agent to consider for pediatric evaluation. PMID:25809532

  19. Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-08

    An integrated lateral flow test strip with electrochemical sensor (LFTSES) device with rapid, selective and sensitive response for quantification of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents has been developed. The principle of this approach is based on parallel measurements of post-exposure and baseline acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity, where reactivation of the phosphorylated AChE is exploited to enable measurement of total amount of AChE (including inhibited and active) which is used as a baseline for calculation of AChE inhibition. Quantitative measurement of phosphorylated adduct (OP-AChE) was realized by subtracting the active AChE from the total amount of AChE. The proposed LFTSES device integrates immunochromatographic test strip technology with electrochemical measurement using a disposable screen printed electrode which is located under the test zone. It shows linear response between AChE enzyme activity and enzyme concentration from 0.05 to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.02 nM. Based on this reactivation approach, the LFTSES device has been successfully applied for in vitro red blood cells inhibition studies using chlorpyrifos oxon as a model OP agent. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure because of individual variation of normal AChE values, but also avoids the problem in overlapping substrate specificity with cholinesterases and avoids potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It is baseline free and thus provides a rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive tool for in-field and point-of-care assessment of exposures to OP pesticides and nerve agents.

  20. The Test and Evaluation of a Non-Chromate Finishing Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulley, H.; Okhio, C. B.; Tacina, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This research is focused on the design, development and implementation of an industry, military and commercial standard testing cell for surface coatings, which focuses on advanced non-chromate materials technology and their commercialization. Currently, within both private and commercial sectors, chromates are used in the corrosion prevention. processes. However, there is a great demand for chromate-free systems that are able to provide equal protection. At the end of this effort, it is intended that a patented alternative to chromate conversion coatings would be tested and processed for commercialization. Thus far, research studies have been concerned primarily with current corrosion knowledge and testing methods. Corrosion can be classified into five categories: The first type is uniform corrosion which is dominated by a uniform thinning due to an even and regular loss of metal. The second type is called localized corrosion in which most of the loss occurs in discrete areas. The third type, metallurgically influenced corrosion is a form of attack where metallurgy plays a significant role. The fourth type, titled mechanically assisted degradation is a form of attack where velocity, abrasion, and hydrodynamics control the corrosion process. The last type of corrosion is defined as environmentally induced cracking which occurs when cracks are produced under specific, premeditated stress. Oddly enough, with these varying classifications, there are not as many standardized corrosion testing sites. Two of the most common testing methods for corrosion are salt spray testing and filiform. Although neither has proven to be absolute, in terms of the resulting observations, our research aims to help provide data that may be used to support the standardization for corrosion testing. We would acquire and use a Singleton Cyclic Corrosion Testing Chamber. Singleton test chambers perform a wide range of commonly used catalytic corrosion tests. They are used throughout the

  1. Experimental evaluation of antifungal and antiseptic agents against Rhodotorula spp.

    PubMed

    Preney, L; Théraud, M; Guiguen, C; Gangneux, J P

    2003-12-01

    We studied the susceptibility of 21 strains of Rhodotorula rubra and nine strains of R. glutinis to eight antifungals and tested eight antiseptic agents on one strain of R. rubra. The tested strains were susceptible to ketoconazole, 5-fluorocytosine, amphotericin B, and nystatin, intermediate to econazole and resistant to fluconazole, itraconazole and miconazole. After 5-min contact, six of the eight antiseptic agents tested showed a fungicidal activity on the tested R. rubra strain.

  2. Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aglan, H.

    2005-08-04

    The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test

  3. Development of a resistive load for PBFA 2 rimfire gas switch simultaneity and laser triggering tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamen, J. F.

    1985-02-01

    Before any useful energy can be delivered to the diode in PBFA II, all 36 rimfire gas switches have to be synchronized with a maximum jitter (one sigma) of 2 ns. In conjunction with the synchronization testing process, the laser system that will trigger all 36 rimfire gas switches will have to be aligned and tested. PBFA-I operations have also shown that being able to test gas switch performance without putting energy into the insulator stack with resistors that will manually be inserted across the first pulse-forming line (PFL1). A schematic of the equivalent circuits test setup and a schematic drawing of Demon are shown. The PFL1 resistors are designed to divert all energy away from the down-line water switches and diode load. The Demon accelerator, which is one module of PBFA II, was used to develop and test the resistive load. Those test results are described.

  4. Nano carriers that enable co-delivery of chemotherapy and RNAi agents for treatment of drug-resistant cancers.

    PubMed

    Tsouris, Vasilios; Joo, Min Kyung; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Won, You-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit drug resistant phenotypes that decrease the efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatments. The drug resistance has a genetic basis that is caused by an abnormal gene expression. There are several types of drug resistance: efflux pumps reducing the cellular concentration of the drug, alterations in membrane lipids that reduce cellular uptake, increased or altered drug targets, metabolic alteration of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis, repair of the damaged DNA, and alteration of the cell cycle checkpoints (Gottesman et al., 2002; Holohan et al., 2013). siRNA is used to silence the drug resistant phenotype and prevent this drug resistance response. Of the listed types of drug resistance, pump-type resistance (e.g., high expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as P-glycoproteins (Pgp; also known as multi-drug resistance protein 1 or MDR1, encoded by the ATP-Binding Cassette Sub-Family B Member 1 (ABCB1) gene)) and apoptosis inhibition (e.g., expression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2) are the most frequently targeted for gene silencing. The co-delivery of siRNA and chemotherapeutic drugs has a synergistic effect, but many of the current projects do not control the drug release from the nanocarrier. This means that the drug payload is released before the drug resistance proteins have degraded and the drug resistance phenotype has been silenced. Current research focuses on cross-linking the carrier's polymers to prevent premature drug release, but these carriers still rely on environmental cues to release the drug payload, and the drug may be released too early. In this review, we studied the release kinetics of siRNA and chemotherapeutic drugs from a broad range of carriers. We also give examples of carriers used to co-deliver siRNA and drugs to drug-resistant tumor cells, and we examine how modifications to the carrier affect the delivery. Lastly, we give our recommendations for the future directions of the co-delivery of si

  5. EVALUATION OF SHEAR RESISTANCE OF PERFOBOND STRIP BASED ON SIMPLE PUSH-OUT TEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Akinori; Koseki, Soichiro; Hashimoto, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nguyen, Minh Hai

    A perfobond strip is generally used as the shear connector in the various steel-concrete hybrid structures and a few design formulas for evaluating the shear resistance of the perfobond strip are proposed. However, these design formulas are not always applicable to the one employed in the steel-concrete rigid frame bridge, since the formulas are established based on the standard push-out specimen for the stud shear connector in which some cracks may occur in the concrete block of the specimen during the test. In this paper, the shear resistance of the perfobond strip are examined experimentally by employing the simple push-out specimen different from the standard one for the stud shear connector. As a result, the design formula is proposed for evaluating the shear resistance of the perfobond strip taking into account the proportion of the concrete block as well as the perforation size and the concrete compressive strength.

  6. Effects of aortic pressure and vasoactive agents on the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum in canine isolated thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Ohhira, A; Ohhashi, T

    1992-01-01

    1. We have developed a new preparation for continuously measuring changes in vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum of the canine isolated thoracic aorta perfused at a constant flow rate with Krebs-bicarbonate solution. 2. An increase of more than 150 mmHg in aortic pressure caused a significant increase in the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum. 3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline and dopamine caused dose-dependent increases in the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum. The decreasing order of potency in the vasoconstrictor responses was as follows: 5-HT >> NA = adrenaline >> dopamine. The 5-HT- and adrenaline-induced vasoconstrictor responses were inhibited by methysergide and by phentolamine plus propranolol, respectively. 4. Acetylcholine (ACh), isoprenaline (ISP), histamine (His), ATP, ADP and adenosine produced dose-related decreases in the vascular resistance of aortic vasa vasorum perfused with the Krebs solution containing 10(-5) M-NA. The decreasing order of potency in the response was as follows: ACh = ISP > His >> adenosine = ATP = ADP. The ACh-, ISP- and His-induced vasodilator responses were antagonized by atropine, propranolol and famotidine, respectively. 5. The results suggest that the preparation described is useful for studying the regulation of vascular resistance of aortic vasa vasorum and that aortic pressure and vasoactive compounds may directly regulate the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum in canine isolated thoracic aorta. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1464829

  7. Performance Comparison of Three Rapid Tests for the Diagnosis of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Antonino; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Catanzaro, Donald G.; Garfein, Richard S.; Jackson, Roberta L.; Seifert, Marva; Georghiou, Sophia B.; Trollip, Andre; Groessl, Erik; Hillery, Naomi; Crudu, Valeriu; Victor, Thomas C.; Rodrigues, Camilla; Lin, Grace Shou-Yean; Valafar, Faramarz; Desmond, Edward; Eisenach, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the performance of several recently developed assays for the detection of multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) in a large, multinational field trial. Methods Samples from 1,128 M/XDR-TB suspects were examined by Line Probe Assay (LPA), Pyrosequencing (PSQ), and Microscopic Observation of Drug Susceptibility (MODS) and compared to the BACTEC MGIT960 reference standard to detect M/XDR-TB directly from patient sputum samples collected at TB clinics in India, Moldova, and South Africa. Results Specificity for all three assays was excellent: 97–100% for isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), moxifloxacin (MOX) and ofloxacin (OFX) and 99–100% for amikacin (AMK), capreomycin (CAP) and kanamycin (KAN) resistance. Sensitivities were lower, but still very good: 94–100% for INH, RIF, MOX and OFX, and 84–90% for AMK and CAP, but only 48–62% for KAN. In terms of agreement, statistically significant differences were only found for detection of RIF (MODS outperformed PSQ) and KAN (MODS outperformed LPA and PSQ) resistance. Mean time-to-result was 1.1 days for LPA and PSQ, 14.3 days for MODS, and 24.7 days for MGIT. Conclusions All three rapid assays evaluated provide clinicians with timely detection of resistance to the drugs tested; with molecular results available one day following laboratory receipt of samples. In particular, the very high specificity seen for detection of drug resistance means that clinicians can use the results of these rapid tests to avoid the use of toxic drugs to which the infecting organism is resistant and develop treatment regiments that have a higher likelihood of yielding a successful outcome. PMID:26322781

  8. Non-Phenotypic Tests to Detect and Characterize Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Agnese; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Sendi, Parham; Bonomo, Robert A.; Endimiani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades, we have observed a rapid increase of infections due to multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Regrettably, these isolates possess genes encoding for extended-spectrum β-lactamases (e.g., blaCTX-M, blaTEM, blaSHV) or plasmid-mediated AmpCs (e.g., blaCMY) that confer resistance to last-generation cephalosporins. Furthermore, other resistance traits against quinolones (e.g., mutations in gyrA and parC, qnr elements) and aminoglycosides (e.g., aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and 16S rRNA methylases) are also frequently co-associated. Even more concerning is the rapid increase of Enterobacteriaceae carrying genes conferring resistance to carbapenems (e.g., blaKPC, blaNDM). Therefore, the spread of these pathogens puts in peril our antibiotic options. Unfortunately, standard microbiological procedures require several days to isolate the responsible pathogen and to provide correct antimicrobial susceptibility test results. This delay impacts the rapid implementation of adequate antimicrobial treatment and infection control countermeasures. Thus, there is emerging interest in the early and more sensitive detection of resistance mechanisms. Modern non-phenotypic tests are promising in this respect, and hence, can influence both clinical outcome and healthcare costs. In this review, we present a summary of the most advanced methods (e.g., next-generation DNA sequencing, multiplex PCRs, real-time PCRs, microarrays, MALDITOF MS, and PCR/ESI MS) presently available for the rapid detection of antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae. Taking into account speed, manageability, accuracy, versatility, and costs, the possible settings of application (research, clinic, and epidemiology) of these methods and their superiority against standard phenotypic methods are discussed. PMID:24091103

  9. Xenograft models for undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified are essential for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Marc; Graf, Claudine; Tonak, Marcus; Radsak, Markus P.; Bopp, Tobias; Bals, Robert; Bohle, Rainer M.; Theobald, Matthias; Rommens, Pol-Maria; Proschek, Dirk; Wehler, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified belongs to the heterogeneous group of soft tissue tumors. It is preferentially located in the upper and lower extremities of the body, and surgical resection remains the only curative treatment. Preclinical animal models are crucial to improve the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. However, this approach has been hampered by the lack of reproducible animal models. The present study established two xenograft animal models generated from stable non-clonal cell cultures, and investigated the difference in chemotherapeutic effects on tumor growth between undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in vivo and in vitro. The cell cultures were generated from freshly isolated tumor tissues of two patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. For the in vivo analysis, these cells were injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The mice were monitored for tumor appearance and treated with the most common or innovative chemotherapeutic agents available to date. Furthermore, the same drugs were administered to in vitro cell cultures. The most effective tumor growth inhibition in vitro was observed with doxorubicin and the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), also known as vorinostat. In the in vivo xenograft mouse model, the combination of doxorubicin and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor pazopanib induced a significant tumor reduction. By contrast, treatment with vorinostat did not reduce the tumor growth. Taken together, the results obtained from drug testing in vitro differed significantly from the in vivo results. Therefore, the novel and reproducible xenograft animal model established in the present study demonstrated that in vivo models are required to test potential chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma prior to clinical use, since animal models are more similar

  10. Detecting resistance to organophosphates and carbamates in the cattle tick Boophilus microplus, with a propoxur-based biochemical test.

    PubMed

    Baxter, G D; Green, P; Stuttgen, M; Barker, S C

    1999-11-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of resistance to insecticides in arthropods is needed. In the cattle tick. Boophilus microplus, resistance to a variety of acaricides is widespread. The most commonly used assay for resistance, the larval packet test, takes at least two, but generally six weeks for a one-host tick like B. microplus to complete and may take up to three months to complete for three-host ticks. Here we describe a test for resistance to organophosphate acaricides that can be used on larvae and adult ticks which takes less than 24 hours. The test measures the difference in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in homogenates of ticks in the presence and absence of propoxur, a carbamate acaricide. We found clear discrimination of organophosphate-susceptible and organophosphate-resistant adults with 100 microM propoxur. AChE from susceptible ticks had almost no activity at this concentration of propoxur whereas AChE from resistant ticks had 67% of its potential activity. AChE from heterozygote ticks could also be distinguished from AChE from homozygous-susceptible and homozygous-resistant ticks. This is the first biochemical test for resistance to an acaricide. Rapid, sensitive tests like ours will allow resistance to organophosphates to be detected soon after it develops in the field, thus, the spread of resistance might be slowed and the useful life of acaricides extended.

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance Testing: a Comparison of Three Sequence-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Erali, Maria; Page, Sam; Reimer, Larry G.; Hillyard, David R.

    2001-01-01

    The use of genotypic assays for determining drug resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients is increasing. These tests lack standardization and validation. The aim of this study was to evaluate several tests used for the determination of HIV-1 drug resistance. Two genotypic tests, the Visible Genetics TruGene HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the Applied Biosystems HIV Genotyping System, were compared using 22 clinical samples. Genotyping results were also obtained from an independent reference laboratory. The Visible Genetics and Applied Biosystems genotyping tests identified similar mutations when differences in the drug databases and reference strains were taken into account, and 19 of 21 samples were equivalent. The concordance between the two assays was 99% (249 of 252 mutation sites). Mutations identified by the reference laboratory varied the most among those identified by the three genotypic tests, possibly because of differences in the databases. The concordance of the reference laboratory results with the results of the other two assays was 80% (201 of 252). Samples with 500 to 750 HIV RNA copies/ml could be sequenced by the Visible Genetics and Applied Biosystems assays using 1 ml of input. The Visible Genetics and Applied Biosystems assays both generated an accurate sequence. However, the throughput of the Visible Genetics assay is more limited and may require additional instruments. The two assays differ technically but are similar in overall complexity. Data analysis in the two assays is straightforward, but only the reports provided by Visible Genetics contain information relating mutations to drug resistance. HIV drug resistance genotyping by sequencing is a complex technology which presents a challenge for analysis, interpretation, and reporting. PMID:11376051

  12. Nanoparticle-Based Immunochromatographic Test Strip with Fluorescent Detector for Quantification of Phosphorylated Acetycholinesterase: An Exposure Biomarker of Organophosphorous Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiying; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Yong; Du, Dan; Liu, Deli; Lin, Yuehe

    2013-09-21

    A nanoparticle-based fluorescence immunochromatographic test strip (FITS) coupled with a hand-held detector for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an exposure biomarker of organophosphate (OP) pesticides and nerve agents, is reported. In this approach, OP-AChE adducts were selectively captured by quantum dot-tagged anti-AChE antibodies (Qdot-anti-AChE) and zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs). The sandwich-like immunoreactions were performed among the Qdot-anti-AChE, OP-AChE and ZrO2 NPs to form Qdot-anti-AChE/OP-AChE/ZrO2 complex, which was detected by recording the fluorescence intensity of Qdot captured on the test line. Paraoxon was used as the model OP pesticides. Under optimal conditions, this portable FITS immunosensor demonstrates a highly linear absorption response over the range of 0.01 nM to 10 nM OP-AChE, with a detection limit of 4 pM, coupled with a good reproducibility. Moreover, the FITS immunosensor has been validated with OP-AChE spiked human plasma samples. This is the first report on the development of ZrO2 NPs-based FITS for detection of OP-AChE adduct. The FITS immunosensor provides a sensitive and low-cost sensing platform for on-site screening/evaluating OP pesticides and nerve agents poisoning.

  13. Impact of medicated feed along with clay mineral supplementation on Escherichia coli resistance to antimicrobial agents in pigs after weaning in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Seyedehameneh; Kabore, Kiswendsida Paul; Fravalo, Philippe; Letellier, Ann; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) phenotype and virulence and AMR gene profiles in Escherichia coli from pigs receiving in-feed antimicrobial medication following weaning and the effect of feed supplementation with a clay mineral, clinoptilolite, on this dynamic. Eighty E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of pigs receiving a diet containing chlortetracycline and penicillin, with or without 2% clinoptilolite, were examined for antimicrobial resistance to 15 antimicrobial agents. Overall, an increased resistance to 10 antimicrobials was observed with time. Supplementation with clinoptilolite was associated with an early increase but later decrease in blaCMY-2, in isolates, as shown by DNA probe. Concurrently, a later increase in the frequency of blaCMY-2 and the virulence genes iucD and tsh was observed in the control pig isolates, being significantly greater than in the supplemented pigs at day 28. Our results suggest that, in the long term, supplementation with clinoptilolite could decrease the prevalence of E. coli carrying certain antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes.

  14. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  15. Both the Jasmonic Acid and the Salicylic Acid Pathways Contribute to Resistance to the Biotrophic Clubroot Agent Plasmodiophora brassicae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lemarié, Séverine; Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Lariagon, Christine; Lemoine, Jocelyne; Marnet, Nathalie; Jubault, Mélanie; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria J; Gravot, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The role of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling in resistance to root pathogens has been poorly documented. We assessed the contribution of SA and JA to basal and partial resistance of Arabidopsis to the biotrophic clubroot agent Plasmodiophora brassicae. SA and JA levels as well as the expression of the SA-responsive genes PR2 and PR5 and the JA-responsive genes ARGAH2 and THI2.1 were monitored in infected roots of the accessions Col-0 (susceptible) and Bur-0 (partially resistant). SA signaling was activated in Bur-0 but not in Col-0. The JA pathway was weakly activated in Bur-0 but was strongly induced in Col-0. The contribution of both pathways to clubroot resistance was then assessed using exogenous phytohormone application and mutants affected in SA or JA signaling. Exogenous SA treatment decreased clubroot symptoms in the two Arabidopsis accessions, whereas JA treatment reduced clubroot symptoms only in Col-0. The cpr5-2 mutant, in which SA responses are constitutively induced, was more resistant to clubroot than the corresponding wild type, and the JA signaling-deficient mutant jar1 was more susceptible. Finally, we showed that the JA-mediated induction of NATA1 drove N(δ)-acetylornithine biosynthesis in infected Col-0 roots. The 35S::NATA1 and nata1 lines displayed reduced or enhanced clubroot symptoms, respectively, thus suggesting that in Col-0 this pathway was involved in the JA-mediated basal clubroot resistance. Overall, our data support the idea that, depending on the Arabidopsis accession, both SA and JA signaling can play a role in partial inhibition of clubroot development in compatible interactions with P. brassicae.

  16. Local residents trained as 'influence agents' most effective in persuading African couples on HIV counseling and testing.

    PubMed

    Lambdin, Barrot Hopkins; Kanweka, William; Inambao, Mubiana; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Shah, Heena Dinesh; Linton, Sabriya; Wong, Frank; Luisi, Nicole; Tichacek, Amanda; Kalowa, James; Chomba, Elwyn; Allen, Susan

    2011-08-01

    Couples in sub-Saharan Africa are the largest group in the world at risk for HIV infection. Couples counseling and testing programs have been shown to reduce HIV transmission, but such programs remain rare in Africa. Before couples counseling and testing can become the norm, it is essential to increase demand for the services. We evaluated the effectiveness of several promotional strategies during a two-year program in Kitwe and Ndola, Zambia. The program attracted more than 7,600 couples through the use of radio broadcasts, billboards, and other strategies. The most effective recruiting technique was the use of local residents trained as "influence agents" to reach out to friends, neighbors, and others in their sphere of influence.

  17. Mechanism Development, Testing, and Lessons Learned for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoreaux, Christopher D.; Landeck, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) has been developed at NASA Johnson Space Center, for the International Space Station (ISS) program. ARED is a multi-exercise, high-load resistive exercise device, designed for long duration, human space missions. ARED will enable astronauts to effectively maintain their muscle strength and bone mass in the micro-gravity environment more effectively than any other existing devices. ARED's resistance is provided via two, 20.3 cm (8 in) diameter vacuum cylinders, which provide a nearly constant resistance source. ARED also has a means to simulate the inertia that is felt during a 1-G exercise routine via the flywheel subassembly, which is directly tied to the motion of the ARED cylinders. ARED is scheduled to fly on flight ULF 2 to the ISS and will be located in Node 1. Presently, ARED is in the middle of its qualification and acceptance test program. An extensive testing program and engineering evaluation has increased the reliability of ARED by bringing potential design issues to light before flight production. Some of those design issues, resolutions, and design details will be discussed in this paper.

  18. High-resolution Electrical Resistivity Tomography monitoring of a tracer test in a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Meldrum, P. I.; Kuras, O.; Chambers, J. E.; Holyoake, S. J.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-04-01

    A permanent geoelectrical subsurface imaging system has been installed at a contaminated land site to monitor changes in groundwater quality after the completion of a remediation programme. Since the resistivities of earth materials are sensitive to the presence of contaminants and their break-down products, 4-dimensional resistivity imaging can act as a surrogate monitoring technology for tracking and visualising changes in contaminant concentrations at much higher spatial and temporal resolution than manual intrusive investigations. The test site, a municipal car park built on a former gasworks, had been polluted by a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dissolved phase contaminants. It was designated statutory contaminated land under Part IIA of the UK Environmental Protection Act due to the risk of polluting an underlying minor aquifer. Resistivity monitoring zones were established on the boundaries of the site by installing vertical electrode arrays in purpose-drilled boreholes. After a year of monitoring data had been collected, a tracer test was performed to investigate groundwater flow velocity and to demonstrate rapid volumetric monitoring of natural attenuation processes. A saline tracer was injected into the confined aquifer, and its motion and evolution were visualised directly in high-resolution tomographic images in near real-time. Breakthrough curves were calculated from independent resistivity measurements, and the estimated seepage velocities from the monitoring images and the breakthrough curves were found to be in good agreement with each other and with estimates based on the piezometric gradient and assumed material parameters.

  19. Genetic Algorithm Based Multi-Agent System Applied to Test Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Anbo; Ye, Luqing; Roy, Daniel; Padilla, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Automatic test generating system in distributed computing context is one of the most important links in on-line evaluation system. Although the issue has been argued long since, there is not a perfect solution to it so far. This paper proposed an innovative approach to successfully addressing such issue by the seamless integration of genetic…

  20. Coagulase negative Staphylococci as causative agents of urinary tract infections-prevalence and resistance status in IGIMS, Patna.

    PubMed

    Kumari, N; Rai, A; Jaiswal, C P; Xess, A; Shahi, S K

    2001-10-01

    Previously considered solely as the laboratory contaminants and normal flora of skin in man, coagulase negative Staphylococci are now a major cause of nosocomial and opportunistic infections. This study was conducted at IGIMS, Patna to find out the coagulase negative Staphylococcus isolates from urine and their antimicrobial resistance. In a period of ten months, the relative frequency of main coagulase negative Staphylococci were as follows--Staphylococcus epidermidis-45.90%, Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34% and Staphylococcus haemolyticus-8.50%. others were 11.60%. most of the Staphylococcus saprophyticus was isolated from young female patients suffering from uncomplicated acute cystitis and Staphylococcus epidermidis was mainly from patients with indwelling catheters and complicated cases. Staphylococcus saprophyticus showed the highest sensitivities to all the antimicrobials whereas Staphylococcus haemolyticus had the highest resistance rates. 66.6% of staphylococcus epidermidis and 60% of staphylococcus haemolyticus were resistant to oxacillin, whereas only 10% of staphylococcus saprophyticus resistant and 90% were sensitive to it. As is in the emerging state, vancomycin resistance was very less but in future it may cause a major problem to treat these cases. So this area needs further exploration.

  1. Resistance to the Antimicrobial Agent Fosmidomycin and an FR900098 Prodrug through Mutations in the Deoxyxylulose Phosphate Reductoisomerase Gene (dxr)

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher M.; Meyers, David J.; Imlay, Leah S.; Freel Meyers, Caren

    2015-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new antimicrobial therapies to combat globally important drug-resistant human pathogens, including Plasmodium falciparum malarial parasites, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli. These organisms all possess the essential methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, which is not found in humans. The first dedicated enzyme of the MEP pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (Dxr), is inhibited by the phosphonic acid antibiotic fosmidomycin and its analogs, including the N-acetyl analog FR900098 and the phosphoryl analog fosfoxacin. In order to identify mutations in dxr that confer resistance to these drugs, a library of E. coli dxr mutants was screened at lethal fosmidomycin doses. The most resistant allele (with the S222T mutation) alters the fosmidomycin-binding site of Dxr. The expression of this resistant allele increases bacterial resistance to fosmidomycin and other fosmidomycin analogs by 10-fold. These observations confirm that the primary cellular target of fosmidomycin is Dxr. Furthermore, cell lines expressing Dxr-S222T will be a powerful tool to confirm the mechanisms of action of future fosmidomycin analogs. PMID:26124156

  2. Mouse model for efficacy testing of antituberculosis agents via intrapulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Woolhiser, Lisa K; Brooks, Elizabeth; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Lenaerts, Anne J

    2012-07-01

    Here we describe an experimental murine model that allows for aerosolized antituberculosis drug efficacy testing. Intrapulmonary aerosol delivery of isoniazid, capreomycin, and amikacin to mice with pulmonary infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis demonstrated efficacy in reducing pulmonary bacterial loads similar to that seen by standard drug delivery methods, even when lower concentrations of drugs and fewer doses were used in the aerosolized drug regimens. Interestingly, intrapulmonary delivery of isoniazid also reduced the bacterial load in the spleen. PMID:22547626

  3. Evaluation tests of platinum resistance thermometers for a cryogenic wind tunnel application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, E. F.; Compton, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-one commercially designed platinum resistance thermometers were evaluated for applicability to stagnation temperature measurements between -190 C and +65 C in the Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility. Evaluation tests included X-ray shadowgraphs, calibrations before and after aging, and time constant measurements. Two wire-wound low thermal mass probes of a conventional design were chosen as most suitable for this cryogenic wind tunnel application.

  4. Comparison of six in vitro tests in determining benzimidazole and levamisole resistance in Haemonchus contortus and Ostertagia circumcincta of sheep.

    PubMed

    Várady, M; Corba, J

    1999-01-14

    Six in vitro methods for the detection of anthelmintic resistance were compared using benzimidazole/levamisole-resistant Haemonchus contortus and benzimidazole/levamisole/ivermectin-resistant Ostertagia circumcincta as well as susceptible strains of both parasite species. The degree of resistance to thiabendazole and levamisole was compared by (1) an egg hatch assay, (2) an egg hatch paralysis assay, (3) a larval development assay, (4) a larval paralysis assay (5) a larval paralysis assay with physostigmine and (6) larval micromotility assay. The degree of resistance for each assay was expressed as resistance factor--RF. For the detection of thiabendazole and levamisole resistance, the larval development test was observed as the most sensitive to measure quantitatively a degree of resistance between susceptible and resistant strains. For this test the RF for thiabendazole and levamisole was 14.3 and >32.5, respectively in H. contortus strains and 21.1 and 3.5 in strains of O. circumcincta. Egg hatch assay was also found to be sensitive and accurate in determining of resistance to benzimidazole. For measurement of levamisole resistance the egg hatch paralysis assay and larval paralysis assay were found to be able to distinguish between strains, but some disadvantages of these techniques make it unsuitable for field detection of levamisole resistance. Other in vitro assays as larval paralysis assay with physostigmine and larval micromotility assay were also investigated. Significant differences in paralysis of the larvae were observed using larval paralysis assay.

  5. Effects of the encapsulation of usnic acid into liposomes and interactions with antituberculous agents against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-Carvalho, Rafaela S; Pereira, Marcela A; Linhares, Leonardo A; Lira-Nogueira, Mariane Cb; Cavalcanti, Isabella Mf; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide S; Montenegro, Lílian Ml

    2016-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has acquired resistance and consequently the antibiotic therapeutic options available against this microorganism are limited. In this scenario, the use of usnic acid (UA), a natural compound, encapsulated into liposomes is proposed as a new approach in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) therapy. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the encapsulation of UA into liposomes, as well as its combination with antituberculous agents such as rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) against MDR-TB clinical isolates. The in vitro antimycobacterial activity of UA-loaded liposomes (UA-Lipo) against MDR-TB was assessed by the microdilution method. The in vitro interaction of UA with antituberculous agents was carried out using checkerboard method. Minimal inhibitory concentration values were 31.25 and 0.98 µg/mL for UA and UA-Lipo, respectively. The results exhibited a synergistic interaction between RIF and UA [fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) = 0.31] or UA-Lipo (FICI = 0.28). Regarding INH, the combination of UA or UA-Lipo revealed no marked effect (FICI = 1.30-2.50). The UA-Lipo may be used as a dosage form to improve the antimycobacterial activity of RIF, a first-line drug for the treatment of infections caused by Mtb.

  6. Effects of the encapsulation of usnic acid into liposomes and interactions with antituberculous agents against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz-Carvalho, Rafaela S; Pereira, Marcela A; Linhares, Leonardo A; Lira-Nogueira, Mariane CB; Cavalcanti, Isabella MF; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide S; Montenegro, Lílian ML

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has acquired resistance and consequently the antibiotic therapeutic options available against this microorganism are limited. In this scenario, the use of usnic acid (UA), a natural compound, encapsulated into liposomes is proposed as a new approach in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) therapy. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the encapsulation of UA into liposomes, as well as its combination with antituberculous agents such as rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) against MDR-TB clinical isolates. The in vitro antimycobacterial activity of UA-loaded liposomes (UA-Lipo) against MDR-TB was assessed by the microdilution method. The in vitro interaction of UA with antituberculous agents was carried out using checkerboard method. Minimal inhibitory concentration values were 31.25 and 0.98 µg/mL for UA and UA-Lipo, respectively. The results exhibited a synergistic interaction between RIF and UA [fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) = 0.31] or UA-Lipo (FICI = 0.28). Regarding INH, the combination of UA or UA-Lipo revealed no marked effect (FICI = 1.30-2.50). The UA-Lipo may be used as a dosage form to improve the antimycobacterial activity of RIF, a first-line drug for the treatment of infections caused by Mtb. PMID:27143488

  7. Human ovarian cancer multicellular spheroids: a model for testing antiproliferation activity of Devil's club (Oplopanax horridus) and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Tai, Joseph; Cheung, Susan S C; Hasman, David

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to employ an ovarian cancer Ovcar 10 three-dimensional model to assess the antiproliferation activity of the medicinal plant Devil's club, Oplopanax horridus, and its active compound, alone and in combination, with chemotherapeutic agents compared to Ovcar 10 two-dimensional cells grown as monolayer cells. Ovcar 10 three-dimensional spheroids were prepared with a rotary cell culture system. Cell counting kit-8 assessed the antiproliferation activity. Apoptosis-related gene expression in three-dimensional spheroids and two- dimensional cells was analyzed with an apoptosis antibody array. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle. Ovcar 10 cells formed compact three-dimensional spheroids after 5 days of culture in a rotary culture system. Ovcar 10 three-dimensional spheroids were significantly more resistant to killing by Devil's club extract, its active compound alone, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel, but not cisplatin compared to two-dimensional cells, with IC50 levels closer to that observed in vivo. Devil's club extract and its active compound alone significantly enhanced the antiproliferation activity of cisplatin and gemcitabine at some concentrations, but did not affect the activity of paclitaxel. A number of apoptosis-related genes were differentially expressed in three-dimensional spheroids, two-dimensional cells, and cells treated with Devil's club extract compared to untreated controls. In three-dimensional spheroids, the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase was slightly increased and the S phase was slightly decreased compared to two-dimensional cells. Ovcar 10 cells in three-dimensional spheroids altered the expression of multiple apoptosis-related genes, which may have contributed to the increased resistance of the cells to some drugs. PMID:24922275

  8. [Recommendations from MENSURA for selection of antimicrobial agents for susceptibility testing and criteria for the interpretation of antibiograms].

    PubMed

    2000-03-01

    This document includes the recommendations from the Spanish antibiogram committee (The MENSURA group, Mesa Española de Normalización de la Sensibilidad y Resistencia a los Antimicrobianos, under the auspices of the Sociedad Española de Quimioterapia and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica) for the selection of antimicrobials for susceptibility testing. Separate tables for each group of organism with proposed susceptibility and resistance breakpoints are updated and comparatively presented with those of other groups, such us NCCLS, CA-SFM and BSAC. The susceptibility breakpoint tends to identify the fully susceptible population, which probably lacks any specific resistance mechanism. The analysis of MIC distributions for different homogeneous populations (same species) is used to define breakpoints for susceptibility. The resistance breakpoint is based on pharmacological and clinical data obtained when the corresponding antibiotic is administered with a conventional schedule. The primary objective of the Spanish MENSURA group is to contribute to the international consensus on the establishment of breakpoints.

  9. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, M; Larivière, S; Higgins, R; Martineau, G P

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial agents using a microdilution method for the minimal inhibitory concentration determinations. These results confirmed the high prevalence of A. pleuropneumoniae strains resistant to antibiotics as reported earlier using the disc diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer method). While 36% of the isolates were resistant to the penicillins, 47% were resistant to chloramphenicol and 68% were resistant to tetracycline. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for the resistant isolates were approximately 32 times higher than those for the susceptible isolates to the above antibacterial agents. The isolates were in general weakly susceptible or resistant to spectinomycin, lincomycin, tiamulin and spiramycin whereas most of them were susceptible to gentamicin, trimethoprim and erythromycin. The susceptibility pattern was similar throughout the 1980 to 1984 period. The 14 serotype 5 isolates were more resistant to tetracycline but less resistant to chloramphenicol and the penicillins than the 28 serotype 1 isolates. PMID:3167716

  10. Antibiotic Resistances of Yogurt Starter Cultures Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, T; Smiley, M B

    1980-11-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and 15 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus were tested for resistance to 35 antimicrobial agents by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Approximately 35% of the isolates had uncharacteristic resistance patterns. PMID:16345654

  11. Fs-laser micro machining for μ-TLM resistivity test structures in photovoltaic TCO multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Stephan; Kaufmann, Kai; Lancaster, Kevin; Naumann, Volker; Großer, Stephan; Hagendorf, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In this work we developed a new approach for resistivity measurements based on fs laser micro machining of μ-TLM test structures. This method is applied to highly resistive interfacial and conductive bulk multilayer systems in photovoltaic TCO thin film devices. Resistivity data has been acquired by a new TLM based method at μm-dimensions (μ-TLM, patent pending, DE 102014211352.0). For this approach, isolating trenches are prepared in the µm range with reasonable effort using fs laser processing. The application of ultrashort pulses with a laser wavelength in the IR range (λ = 1.03 μm) allows selective removal of the top SnO2 layer of the TCO multilayer stack by a reduced thermal influence on the layers beneath and in the adjacent region of the laser trenches. Small effective optical penetration and ablation depth was achieved by an ultrafast thermal ablation mechanism via free carrier absorption at the interface of the SnO2/ITO layers. Therefore the risk of laser induced modification of the electric layer properties is negligible. The μ-TLM test structure results in highly accurate and reproducible resistivity data. Applied to SnO2/ITO/glass double layer stacks, the obtained resistivity values for the SnO2 interfacial layer (ρTO = 40.5 kΩμm) and for the indium tin oxide thin film (ρITO = 1.3 Ωμm) agree with reference data from four-point-probing and from literature.

  12. A randomized phase II trial of azacitidine +/− epoetin-β in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents

    PubMed Central

    Thépot, Sylvain; Ben Abdelali, Raouf; Chevret, Sylvie; Renneville, Aline; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Prébet, Thomas; Park, Sophie; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Cheze, Stéphane; Tertian, Gérard; Choufi, Bachra; Legros, Laurence; Bastié, Jean Noel; Delaunay, Jacques; Chaury, Marie Pierre; Sanhes, Laurence; Wattel, Eric; Dreyfus, Francois; Vey, Norbert; Chermat, Fatiha; Preudhomme, Claude; Fenaux, Pierre; Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of azacitidine in patients with anemia and with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, if relapsing after or resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents, and the benefit of combining these agents to azacitidine in this setting are not well known. We prospectively compared the outcomes of patients, all of them having the characteristics of this subset of lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, if randomly treated with azacitidine alone or azacitidine combined with epoetin-β. High-resolution cytogenetics and gene mutation analysis were performed at entry. The primary study endpoint was the achievement of red blood cell transfusion independence after six cycles. Ninety-eight patients were randomised (49 in each arm). Median age was 72 years. In an intention to treat analysis, transfusion independence was obtained after 6 cycles in 16.3% versus 14.3% of patients in the azacitidine and azacitidine plus epoetin-β arms, respectively (P=1.00). Overall erythroid response rate (minor and major responses according to IWG 2000 criteria) was 34.7% vs. 24.5% in the azacitidine and azacitidine plus epoetin-β arms, respectively (P=0.38). Mutations of the SF3B1 gene were the only ones associated with a significant erythroid response, 29/59 (49%) versus 6/27 (22%) in SF3B1 mutated and unmutated patients, respectively, P=0.02. Detection of at least one “epigenetic mutation” and of an abnormal single nucleotide polymorphism array profile were the only factors associated with significantly poorer overall survival by multivariate analysis. The transfusion independence rate observed with azacitidine in this lower-risk population, but resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents, was lower than expected, with no observed benefit of added epoetin, (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01015352). PMID:27229713

  13. In vitro model of colonization resistance by the enteric microbiota: effects of antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Johnson, Shemedia J; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2008-04-01

    A bioassay was developed to measure the minimum concentration of an antimicrobial drug that disrupts the colonization resistance mediated by model human intestinal microbiota against Salmonella invasion of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The bioassay was used to measure the minimum disruptive concentrations (MDCs) of drugs used in animal agriculture. The MDCs varied from 0.125 microg/ml for some broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs (e.g., streptomycin) to 16 microg/ml for drugs with limited spectra of antimicrobial activity (e.g., lincomycin). The acceptable daily intake (ADI) residue concentration calculated on the basis of the MDCs were higher for erythromycin, lincomycin, and tylosin than the ADI residue concentrations calculated on the basis of the MICs. The MDC-based ADI values for apramycin, bacitracin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin G, streptomycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin were lower than the reported MIC-based ADI values. The effects of antimicrobial drugs at their MDCs on the bacterial composition of the microbiota were observed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA sequences amplified by PCR. Changes in the population composition of the model colonization resistance microbiota occurred simultaneously with reduced colonization resistance. The results of this study suggest that direct assessment of the effects of antimicrobial drugs on colonization resistance in an in vitro model can be useful in determining ADI values. PMID:18227184

  14. Genotoxic evaluation of two oral antidiabetic agents in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Gürbüzel, Mehmet; Çapoğlu, Ilyas; Kızılet, Halit; Halıcı, Zekai; Özçiçek, Fatih; Demirtaş, Levent

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two sulfonylureas--glimepiride and glipizide--commonly used in type 2 diabetes mellitus were investigated for genotoxicity in the Drosophila wing spot test. For this purpose, three-day-old transheterozygous larvae were treated with three mutagenic compounds, and the results obtained were compared with the control group. Mutational or recombinogenic changes were recorded in two recessive genes--multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr (3)). Two recessive markers were located on the left arm of chromosome 3, mwh in map position 0.3, and flare-3 (flr3) at 38.8, while the centromere was located in position 47.7. Wing spot tests are targeted on the loss of heterozygosity, which may be grounded in different genetic mechanisms such as mutation, mitotic recombination, deletion, half-translocation, chromosome loss, or nondisjunction. Genetic changes formatting in somatic cells of the imaginal discs cause nascence different mutant cloning in different body parts of adult flies. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated that glimepiride and glipizide show the genotoxicity, which is especially dependent on homologous somatic recombination. PMID:22914262

  15. Developing a More Rapid Test to Assess Sulfate Resistance of Hydraulic Cements

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara; Stutzman, Paul; Peltz, Max; Winpigler, John

    2005-01-01

    External sulfate attack of concrete is a major problem that can appear in regions where concrete is exposed to soil or water containing sulfates, leading to softening and cracking of the concrete. Therefore, it is important that materials selection and proportioning of concrete in susceptible regions be carefully considered to resist sulfate attack. American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) limits the tricalcium aluminate phase in cements when sulfate exposure is of concern. The hydration products of tricalcium aluminate react with the sulfates resulting in expansion and cracking. While ASTM standard tests are available to determine the susceptibility of cements to sulfate attack, these tests require at least 6 months and often up to a year to perform; a delay that hinders development of new cements. This paper presents a new method for testing cement resistance to sulfate attack that is three to five times faster than the current ASTM tests. Development of the procedure was based upon insights on the degradation process by petrographic examination of sulfate-exposed specimens over time. Also key to the development was the use of smaller samples and tighter environmental control. PMID:27308177

  16. New bolus models for in vivo efficacy testing of mycotoxin-detoxifying agents in relation to EFSA guidelines, assessed using deoxynivalenol in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Devreese, M; Osselaere, A; Goossens, J; Vandenbroucke, V; De Baere, S; Eeckhout, M; De Backer, P; Croubels, S

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three new models were developed for efficacy testing of mycotoxin-detoxifying agents in relation to recent European guidelines. In the first model, deoxynivalenol was given to broiler chickens as an intra-crop bolus together with a mycotoxin-detoxifying agent in order to study the plasma concentration-time profile of deoxynivalenol. In the second model, the same oral bolus was given, preceded by an oral bolus of mycotoxin-detoxifying agent, to make sure the detoxifying agent was present in the whole intestinal tract when the mycotoxin was administered. In the third model, the mycotoxin-detoxifying agent was mixed in the feed of broiler chickens, and after 1 week's feeding, deoxynivalenol was given as an oral bolus. In order to evaluate the efficacy of these agents, plasma concentration-time profiles were set up and the main toxicokinetic parameters were compared. Two commercially available mycotoxin-detoxifying agents were tested, but they were not able to lower the oral availability of deoxynivalenol. As a positive control, activated carbon was used. We showed that activated carbon significantly reduces the absorption and oral availability of deoxynivalenol in all three models. Therefore, it can be concluded that these models are able to demonstrate the efficacy of mycotoxin-detoxifying agents in relation to European Food Safety Authority guidelines.

  17. Sensitivity tests of tumors to cytostatic agents. II. Investigation on human tumors.

    PubMed

    Mattern, J; Kaufmann, M; Hinderer, H; Wayss, K; Volm, M

    1975-01-01

    Certain substances which influenced nucleic acid metabolism were found to have about the same cytostatic activity on human cells when measured in tissue culture experiments (cell numbers) or in short-term cultures (3-H-uridine incorporation in cell suspensions). By treatment with a dose of cytostatics corresponding to 10 times therapeutic dose, chemosensitive tumors can be distinguished from non-responsive tumors. By using this in vitro test system to investigate the sensitivities of 100 human tumors, it is shown that 28 of these tumors were responsive to adriamycin, daunomycin and Actinomycin D. Good agreement was observed between these in vitro results and the literature data on clinical therapy using these particular substances.

  18. Testing Transgenic Aspen Plants with bar Gene for Herbicide Resistance under Semi-natural Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, V G; Faskhiev, V N; Kovalenko, N P; Shestibratov, K A; Miroshnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining herbicide resistant plants is an important task in the genetic engineering of forest trees. Transgenic European aspen plants (Populus tremula L.) expressing the bar gene for phosphinothricin resistance have been produced using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Successful genetic transformation was confirmed by PCR analysis for thirteen lines derived from two elite genotypes. In 2014-2015, six lines were evaluated for resistance to herbicide treatment under semi-natural conditions. All selected transgenic lines were resistant to the herbicide Basta at doses equivalent to 10 l/ha (twofold normal field dosage) whereas the control plants died at 2.5 l/ha. Foliar NH4-N concentrations in transgenic plants did not change after treatment. Extremely low temperatures in the third ten-day period of October 2014 revealed differences in freeze tolerance between the lines obtained from Pt of f2 aspen genotypes. Stable expression of the bar gene after overwintering outdoors was confirmed by RT-PCR. On the basis of the tests, four transgenic aspen lines were selected. The bar gene could be used for retransformation of transgenic forest trees expressing valuable traits, such as increased productivity. PMID:27437143

  19. Testing Transgenic Aspen Plants with bar Gene for Herbicide Resistance under Semi-natural Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, V G; Faskhiev, V N; Kovalenko, N P; Shestibratov, K A; Miroshnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining herbicide resistant plants is an important task in the genetic engineering of forest trees. Transgenic European aspen plants (Populus tremula L.) expressing the bar gene for phosphinothricin resistance have been produced using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Successful genetic transformation was confirmed by PCR analysis for thirteen lines derived from two elite genotypes. In 2014-2015, six lines were evaluated for resistance to herbicide treatment under semi-natural conditions. All selected transgenic lines were resistant to the herbicide Basta at doses equivalent to 10 l/ha (twofold normal field dosage) whereas the control plants died at 2.5 l/ha. Foliar NH4-N concentrations in transgenic plants did not change after treatment. Extremely low temperatures in the third ten-day period of October 2014 revealed differences in freeze tolerance between the lines obtained from Pt of f2 aspen genotypes. Stable expression of the bar gene after overwintering outdoors was confirmed by RT-PCR. On the basis of the tests, four transgenic aspen lines were selected. The bar gene could be used for retransformation of transgenic forest trees expressing valuable traits, such as increased productivity.

  20. Testing Transgenic Aspen Plants with bar Gene for Herbicide Resistance under Semi-natural Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, V. G.; Faskhiev, V. N.; Kovalenko, N. P.; Shestibratov, K. A.; Miroshnikov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining herbicide resistant plants is an important task in the genetic engineering of forest trees. Transgenic European aspen plants (Populus tremula L.) expressing the bar gene for phosphinothricin resistance have been produced using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Successful genetic transformation was confirmed by PCR analysis for thirteen lines derived from two elite genotypes. In 2014–2015, six lines were evaluated for resistance to herbicide treatment under semi-natural conditions. All selected transgenic lines were resistant to the herbicide Basta at doses equivalent to 10 l/ha (twofold normal field dosage) whereas the control plants died at 2.5 l/ha. Foliar NH4-N concentrations in transgenic plants did not change after treatment. Extremely low temperatures in the third ten-day period of October 2014 revealed differences in freeze tolerance between the lines obtained from Pt of f2 aspen genotypes. Stable expression of the bar gene after overwintering outdoors was confirmed by RT-PCR. On the basis of the tests, four transgenic aspen lines were selected. The bar gene could be used for retransformation of transgenic forest trees expressing valuable traits, such as increased productivity. PMID:27437143