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Sample records for ages experiment case

  1. Increasing age and experience: are both protective against motorcycle injury? A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, B.; Jackson, R.; Langley, J.; Norton, R.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To assess the associations between age, experience, and motorcycle injury. Setting—Motorcycle riding on non-residential roads between 6 am and midnight over a three year period from February 1993 in Auckland, New Zealand. Methods—A population based case-control study was conducted. Cases were 490 motorcycle drivers involved in a crash and controls were 1518 drivers identified at random roadside surveys. Crash involvement was defined in terms of a motorcycle crash resulting in either a driver or pillion passenger being killed, hospitalised, or presenting to a public hospital emergency department with an injury severity score ≥5. Results—There was a strong and consistent relationship between increasing driver age and decreasing risk of moderate to fatal injury. In multivariate analyses, drivers older than 25 years had more than 50% lower risk than those aged from 15–19 years (odds ratio (OR) 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 0.81). In univariate analyses, a protective effect from riding more than five years compared with less than two years was observed. However, this protection was not sustained when driver age and other potential confounding variables were included in the analyses. Familiarity with the specific motorcycle was the only experience measure associated with a strong protective effect (OR (≥10 000 km experience) 0.52; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.79) in multivariate analyses. Conclusions—Current licensing regulations should continue to emphasise the importance of increased age and might consider restrictions that favour experience with a specific motorcycle. PMID:10728539

  2. Surgical experience with persistent truncus arteriosus in symptomatic infants under 1 year of age. Report of 13 consecutive cases.

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, F; Piccoli, G P; Dickinson, D F; Hamilton, D I

    1981-01-01

    Between January 1974 and November 1980, 13 symptomatic infants under 1 year of age with persistent truncus arteriosus type I or II underwent surgery. Pulmonary artery banding was performed in 10 cases, with five deaths. Among the survivors, one developed severe pulmonary vascular disease and only two underwent late intracardiac repair. Primary total correction was performed in three infants and all are well, though one required conduit replacement five and a half years after the initial procedure. Recently, antibiotic sterilised homograft conduits, rather than heterografts, have been preferred as extracardiac conduits in infancy. Early intracardiac repair followed, if necessary, by later conduit replacement appears to have significant advantages over "conventional" pulmonary artery banding and late total correction. Concern remains on the treatment of choice in infants under 3 months of age. Images PMID:7272128

  3. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  4. THE CLUSTER AGES EXPERIMENT (CASE). V. ANALYSIS OF THREE ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M4

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J.; Rozyczka, M.; Krzeminski, W.; Pych, W.; Thompson, I. B.; Burley, G. S.; Shectman, S. A.; Dotter, A.; Rucinski, S. M. E-mail: mnr@camk.edu.pl E-mail: batka@camk.edu.pl E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: shec@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-02-01

    We use photometric and spectroscopic observations of the eclipsing binaries V65, V66, and V69 in the field of the globular cluster M4 to derive masses, radii, and luminosities of their components. The orbital periods of these systems are 2.29, 8.11, and 48.19 days, respectively. The measured masses of the primary and secondary components (M{sub p} and M{sub s} ) are 0.8035 {+-} 0.0086 and 0.6050 {+-} 0.0044 M{sub Sun} for V65, 0.7842 {+-} 0.0045 and 0.7443 {+-} 0.0042 M{sub Sun} for V66, and 0.7665 {+-} 0.0053 and 0.7278 {+-} 0/0048 M{sub Sun} for V69. The measured radii (R{sub p} and R{sub s} ) are 1.147 {+-} 0.010 and 0.6110 {+-} 0.0092 R{sub Sun} for V66, 0.9347 {+-} 0.0048 and 0.8298 {+-} 0.0053 R{sub Sun} for V66, and 0.8655 {+-} 0.0097 and 0.8074 {+-} 0.0080 R{sub Sun} for V69. The orbits of V65 and V66 are circular, whereas that of V69 has an eccentricity of 0.38. Based on systemic velocities and relative proper motions, we show that all three systems are members of the cluster. We find that the distance to M4 is 1.82 {+-} 0.04 kpc-in good agreement with recent estimates based on entirely different methods. We compare the absolute parameters of V66 and V69 with two sets of theoretical isochrones in mass-radius and mass-luminosity diagrams, and for assumed [Fe/H] = -1.20, [{alpha}/Fe] = 0.4, and Y = 0.25 we find the most probable age of M4 to be between 11.2 and 11.3 Gyr. Color-magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting with the same parameters yields an age close to, or slightly in excess of, 12 Gyr. However, considering the sources of uncertainty involved in CMD fitting, these two methods of age determination are not discrepant. Age and distance determinations can be further improved when infrared eclipse photometry is obtained.

  5. THE CLUSTER AGES EXPERIMENT (CASE). VII. ANALYSIS OF TWO ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6362

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J.; Rozyczka, M.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Mazur, B.; Thompson, I. B.; Dotter, A.; Burley, G. S.; Rucinski, S. M. E-mail: alex@camk.edu.pl E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: greg.burley@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    We use photometric and spectroscopic observations of the detached eclipsing binaries V40 and V41 in the globular cluster NGC 6362 to derive masses, radii, and luminosities of the component stars. The orbital periods of these systems are 5.30 and 17.89 days, respectively. The measured masses of the primary and secondary components (M{sub p}, M{sub s}) are (0.8337 ± 0.0063, 0.7947 ± 0.0048) M{sub ⊙} for V40 and (0.8215 ± 0.0058, 0.7280 ± 0.0047) M{sub ⊙} for V41. The measured radii (R{sub p}, R{sub s}) are (1.3253 ± 0.0075, 0.997 ± 0.013) R{sub ⊙} for V40 and (1.0739 ± 0.0048, 0.7307 ± 0.0046) R{sub ⊙} for V41. Based on the derived luminosities, we find that the distance modulus of the cluster is 14.74 ± 0.04 mag—in good agreement with 14.72 mag obtained from color–magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting. We compare the absolute parameters of component stars with theoretical isochrones in mass–radius and mass–luminosity diagrams. For assumed abundances [Fe/H] = −1.07, [α/Fe] = 0.4, and Y = 0.25 we find the most probable age of V40 to be 11.7 ± 0.2 Gyr, compatible with the age of the cluster derived from CMD fitting (12.5 ± 0.5 Gyr). V41 seems to be markedly younger than V40. If independently confirmed, this result will suggest that V41 belongs to the younger of the two stellar populations recently discovered in NGC 6362. The orbits of both systems are eccentric. Given the orbital period and age of V40, its orbit should have been tidally circularized some ∼7 Gyr ago. The observed eccentricity is most likely the result of a relatively recent close stellar encounter.

  6. Urethral duplication: Experience of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Ramareddy, Raghu S.; Alladi, Anand; Siddappa, O. S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Our experience of 4 cases of urethral duplication is reported here. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review. Results: The age at presentation varied from newborn to 10 years. The clinical presentation ranged from prepubic sinus to diphallus urethra. There were 2 each incomplete duplication with only external openings (Type IA) and complete duplication of Effmann Type IIA2. All underwent complete excision of accessory urethra and corrections of associated anomalies. Conclusions: Urethral duplications have a varied presentation. At follow up, all are asymptomatic with good cosmetic result. PMID:22869976

  7. Reusable experiment controllers, case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brian A.; Gaasbeck, Jim Van

    1996-03-01

    Congress has given NASA and the science community a reality check. The tight and ever shrinking budgets are trimming the fat from many space science programs. No longer can a Principal Investigator (PI) afford to waste development dollars on re-inventing spacecraft controllers, experiment/payload controllers, ground control systems, or test sets. Inheritance of the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) from one program to another is not a significant re-use of technology to develop a science mission in these times. Reduction of operational staff and highly autonomous experiments are needed to reduce the sustaining cost of a mission. The re-use of an infrastructure from one program to another is needed to truly attain the cost and time savings required. Interface and Control Systems, Inc. (ICS) has a long history of re-usable software. Navy, Air Force, and NASA programs have benefited from the re-use of a common control system from program to program. Several standardization efforts in the AIAA have adopted the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) architecture as a point solution to satisfy requirements for re-use and autonomy. The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) has been a long-standing customer of ICS and are working on their 4th generation system using SCL. Much of the hardware and software infrastructure has been re-used from mission to mission with little cost for re-hosting a new experiment. The same software infrastructure has successfully been used on Clementine, and an end-to-end system is being deployed for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) for Johns Hopkins University. A case study of the ERIM programs, Clementine and FUSE will be detailed in this paper.

  8. Congenital muscular torticollis: experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, B K; Matin, A; Hassan, G Z; Hossain, M Z; Zaman, M A

    2010-10-01

    Congenital Muscular Torticollis (CMT) is a postural deformity of head and neck detected at birth or shortly after birth, primarily resulting from unilateral shortening of Sternocleidomastoid Muscle (SCM). In neonates and infants, patient may cure conservatively by physiotherapy but surgery is the treatment of choice for children and adolescents. There are various techniques of surgery. Here we show our experience regarding management of congenital muscular torticollis. In the present retrospective case series, fourteen patients of congenital muscular torticollis were treated. The cases were enrolled between Nov' 2005 to Oct' 2007 in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Gonosasthaya Somaj Vittik Medical College Hospital, Dhaka and different private clinics of Dhaka city of Bangladesh. Neonates and infants were treated conservatively with physiotherapy and others treated surgically by transection of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM under general anesthesia. Operated patients were released on following post operative day with advised to do physiotherapy. Patients age range from 7 days to 15 years of which ten were female and four male. SCM was shortened in all cases (8 on right side and 6 on left side). Eleven were female and three male. Of 14 patients, 2 neonates, 7 infants and 5 were more than 1 year age. There was no associated anomaly. Out of 9 neonates and infants 8 cured conservatively with physiotherapy and another one significantly improved. Six were treated surgically including one failed physiotherapy. Post operative period was uneventful and there was no complication. Results were evaluated clinically and comments of peers. Most of the patient of congenital muscular torticollis can be treated conservatively during infancy. Division of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM is easy and safe surgical technique for the treatment of CMT of older children and adolescents.

  9. Advocacy and Age: Issues, Experiences, Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschner, Paul A., Ed.

    This monograph seeks to bring understanding to one component of the advocacy field, that of advocacy and the aged, by overviewing this component through a series of articles. (Advocacy is an activity by which changes can be effected in a power structure to improve a subgroup's situation.) There are four parts to the document: part 1, entitled…

  10. [Laparoscopy. Experience in 307 cases].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Rodríguez, L; Grau Cobos, L M; Pulido Moncayo, M; Padilla Monroy, F

    1990-01-01

    We performed 307 laparoscopies in 8 years. Most common indications were: Hepatic disorders 53% neoplasms 17%; therapeutical studies 7%. We made the first 4 cholecystectomies by laparoscopy in Mexico, without serious problems; 8 Tenckhoff catheters were collocated without surgical intervention; drainage of amebic abscess were done in 8 cases. In 18 patients the procedure was because of acute abdomen, being excluded this possibility in 8. Percutaneous cholangiography was done in 6. Our complications were minimal, non required surgical intervention. We did not have mortality among our patients by the procedure.

  11. Continuity and Discontinuity: The Case of Second Couplehood in Old Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koren, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Continuity and discontinuity are controversial concepts in social theories on aging. The aim of this article is to explore these concepts using the experiences of older persons living in second couplehood in old age as a case in point. Design and Method: Based on a larger qualitative study on second couplehood in old age, following the…

  12. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts. PMID:26318797

  13. Poetry Efforts by Aged Deaf: Expression of Life Cycle Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Teena M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a day-long Aging Awareness workshop in which a group of 12 elderly were involved in a poetry-writing exercise focusing on meaningful life change. Ramifications of this positive experience are discussed in view of the cultural/language barrier and traditional aging awareness issues such as reminiscence. (JAC)

  14. Lived Experiences of College-Age Transsexual Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the lived experiences of 4 college-age transsexual individuals. A qualitative study using grounded theory was conducted to investigate their experiences influencing their later educational persistence. Results suggested that level of discomfort, perceived social supports, level of secrecy, and academic achievement all affected…

  15. Age and Gender Differences in Adolescents' Homework Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kackar, Hayal Z.; Shumow, Lee; Schmidt, Jennifer A.; Grzetich, Janel

    2011-01-01

    Extant data collected through the Experience Sampling Method were analyzed to describe adolescents' subjective experiences of homework. Analyses explored age and gender differences in the time adolescents spend doing homework, and the situational variations (location and companions) in adolescents' reported concentration, effort, interest,…

  16. Spontaneous hypnotic age regression: case report.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, D; Rosenfeld, A

    1984-12-01

    Age regression--reliving the past as though it were occurring in the present, with age appropriate vocabulary, mental content, and affect--can occur with instruction in highly hypnotizable individuals, but has rarely been reported to occur spontaneously, especially as a primary symptom. The psychiatric presentation and treatment of a 16-year-old girl with spontaneous age regressions accessible and controllable with hypnosis and psychotherapy are described. Areas of overlap and divergence between this patient's symptoms and those found in patients with hysterical fugue and multiple personality syndrome are also discussed.

  17. Selection Experiments in the Penna Model for Biological Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, G.; Idiart, M. A.; de Almeida, R. M. C.

    We consider the Penna model for biological aging to investigate correlations between early fertility and late life survival rates in populations at equilibrium. We consider inherited initial reproduction ages together with a reproduction cost translated in a probability that mother and offspring die at birth, depending on the mother age. For convenient sets of parameters, the equilibrated populations present genetic variability in what regards both genetically programmed death age and initial reproduction age. In the asexual Penna model, a negative correlation between early life fertility and late life survival rates naturally emerges in the stationary solutions. In the sexual Penna model, selection experiments are performed where individuals are sorted by initial reproduction age from the equilibrated populations and the separated populations are evolved independently. After a transient, a negative correlation between early fertility and late age survival rates also emerges in the sense that populations that start reproducing earlier present smaller average genetically programmed death age. These effects appear due to the age structure of populations in the steady state solution of the evolution equations. We claim that the same demographic effects may be playing an important role in selection experiments in the laboratory.

  18. Formerly homeless, older women's experiences with health, housing, and aging.

    PubMed

    Waldbrook, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    The perspectives of formerly homeless, older women are absent in the academic literature on aging and homelessness. In this study, a group of formerly homeless women, aged 45 years and older were surveyed (N = 15) and interviewed (n = 11) about their experiences with health, housing, and aging. The qualitative themes to be explored include the women's perceptions of their current health, coping with low incomes, dealing with addictions to alcohol and drugs, and the importance of supportive housing and other community services. The female participants' views on adapting to home, planning for their elderly years, and views on growing older are also explored.

  19. Narcolepsy in pediatric age - Experience of a tertiary pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Barreto, Maria Inês; Clemente, Vanda; Vasconcelos, Mónica; Estêvão, Maria Helena; Madureira, Núria

    2014-03-01

    Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the sleep-wake cycle of multifactorial etiology, is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, often associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Both early clinical suspicion and therapeutic approach are essential for promotion of cognitive development and social integration of these children. The authors present a descriptive retrospective study of a series of eight children in whom symptoms first started between 6.8 and 10.5 years of age. Diagnostic delay ranged from 4 months to 2 years. One child had H1N1 flu vaccination eight months before the clinical onset. The first multiple sleep latency test was positive in 6 of 8 cases. All cases were treated with methylphenidate, and venlafaxine was associated in 4 of them. In one case the initial therapy was exclusively behavioral. In all cases, symptomatic improvement, better school performance and social integration were achieved after therapeutic adjustment. PMID:26483902

  20. Active Ageing and Active Citizenship in Liguria: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palumbo, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Liguria has the oldest age structure in Europe because of a low birth rate and long lifespans and therefore is a very interesting laboratory region in which to experiment with active ageing policies. The generations that are now approaching retirement hold a high level of personal and professional resources; so the "new" elderly people…

  1. [Cardiac tumors. Experience with two cases].

    PubMed

    García Martínez, E; Torres Borrego, J; Méndez Vidal, Maria J; Beaudoin Perron, A; Peña Rosa, Maria J

    2004-07-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare neoplasms with an incidence of 0.027 cases per 100. Up to 90 % of these tumors are benign but, because of their location, they can be lethal, despite their histology. Most appear in infants aged less than 1 year. Teratomas, which are relatively frequent in the pediatric age group, are usually located in the ovaries, sacrococcygeal area, thorax, and retroperitoneal area. Intrapericardial location is less frequent. In this localization, the clinical manifestation depends on compression of adjacent structures and determines the therapeutic attitude in each case. Imaging studies should be performed and the definitive diagnosis is obtained after surgical resection, which is the treatment of choice. The differential diagnosis should include other tumors of the anterior mediastinum, thymus hypertrophy, pericardial effusion and primary cardiac disorders such as pericardial mesothelioma, Ebstein malformation, and intrapericardial bronchogenic cysts. We present two patients who were diagnosed in the first year of life in our hospital. Both children developed pericardial tumours. In one patient, the mass decreased and disappeared while in the other, who received a later diagnosis, surgical treatment was required.

  2. Aging assessment of reactor instrumentation and protection system components. Aging-related operating experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, A.C.; Hagen, E.W.

    1992-07-01

    A study of the aging-related operating experiences throughout a five-year period (1984--1988) of six generic instrumentation modules (indicators, sensors, controllers, transmitters, annunciators, and recorders) was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The effects of aging from operational and environmental stressors were characterized from results depicted in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The data are graphically displayed as frequency of events per plant year for operating plant ages from 1 to 28 years to determine aging-related failure trend patterns. Three main conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) Instrumentation and control (I&C) modules make a modest contribution to safety-significant events: 17% of LERs issued during 1984--1988 dealt with malfunctions of the six I&C modules studied, and 28% of the LERs dealing with these I&C module malfunctions were aging related (other studies show a range 25--50%); (2) Of the six modules studied, indicators, sensors, and controllers account for the bulk (83%) of aging-related failures; and (3) Infant mortality appears to be the dominant aging-related failure mode for most I&C module categories (with the exception of annunciators and recorders, which appear to fail randomly).

  3. The effects of age and experience on accidents with injuries: should the licensing age be raised?

    PubMed

    Laberge-Nadeau, C; Maag, U; Bourbeau, R

    1992-04-01

    In Canadian Provinces and in several states of the United States the minimal legal age to drive a motor vehicle is 16 years old and in some, it is 15. The excess mortality and morbidity registered by 15 to 24-year-old drivers is well known. Several studies have reported that accident rates decrease with experience, but the effect of the age of new drivers has not been well documented. The objective is to study injury accident rates in terms of the age and experience factors. The data sources are computer files of the Government Insurance Corporation (Société de l'assurance automobile du Québec), which covers all Quebec drivers. For each driver, the file contains birth date, sex, year and month of first license, involvement in accidents, and other parameters. The yearly rates (1970-1984) of new permits per age last birthday and sex show an increase over time, particularly for 16-year-old men. For the period 1979-1984, injury accident involvement rates were computed for all Quebec drivers by age, sex, and driving experience. An experienced driver has been defined as a person who has been licensed for at least one year. The results show, for experienced as well as inexperienced young men (16-18), a high injury accident rate that decreases with age. For women, the rates are much lower and decrease more gradually than for men. This study does not take into account the kilometers driven. Since young drivers (16-18) have the highest accident rates, the question of regulating access to first licensing for such drivers must be examined as a possible strategy for injury prevention. PMID:1558618

  4. Moulding Faces at an Early Age-A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sunny, Sunil; Mathew, Neethu; Parambath, Anvar Kizhakke; Madhusudanan, Amla

    2016-01-01

    Certain malocclusions have to be treated at an early age to avoid surgeries for the correction in the future. Introduction of functional appliances has reduced the elimination and correction of skeletal as well as dental discrepancies. Proper case selection taking into consideration skeletal and dental age with the use of various diagnostic aids helps us to identify and treat the malocclusions before it is too late. In this case series, we report three patients with skeletal jaw malrelationship treated with functional and orthopaedic appliances. PMID:27656599

  5. Moulding Faces at an Early Age-A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Sunny, Sunil; Thomas, Rinu; Mathew, Neethu; Parambath, Anvar Kizhakke; Madhusudanan, Amla

    2016-08-01

    Certain malocclusions have to be treated at an early age to avoid surgeries for the correction in the future. Introduction of functional appliances has reduced the elimination and correction of skeletal as well as dental discrepancies. Proper case selection taking into consideration skeletal and dental age with the use of various diagnostic aids helps us to identify and treat the malocclusions before it is too late. In this case series, we report three patients with skeletal jaw malrelationship treated with functional and orthopaedic appliances. PMID:27656599

  6. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Capacitor Health Monitoring and Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose Ramon; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental setups for health monitoring and prognostics of electrolytic capacitors under nominal operation and accelerated aging conditions. Electrolytic capacitors have higher failure rates than other components in electronic systems like power drives, power converters etc. Our current work focuses on developing first-principles-based degradation models for electrolytic capacitors under varying electrical and thermal stress conditions. Prognostics and health management for electronic systems aims to predict the onset of faults, study causes for system degradation, and accurately compute remaining useful life. Accelerated life test methods are often used in prognostics research as a way to model multiple causes and assess the effects of the degradation process through time. It also allows for the identification and study of different failure mechanisms and their relationships under different operating conditions. Experiments are designed for aging of the capacitors such that the degradation pattern induced by the aging can be monitored and analyzed. Experimental setups and data collection methods are presented to demonstrate this approach.

  7. Aging reduces experience-induced sensorimotor plasticity. A magnetoencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Mary, Alison; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Wens, Vincent; Op de Beeck, Marc; Leproult, Rachel; De Tiège, Xavier; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of the mu-alpha and mu-beta spontaneous rhythms reflects plastic neural changes within the primary sensorimotor cortex (SM1). Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we investigated how aging modifies experience-induced plasticity after learning a motor sequence, looking at post- vs. pre-learning changes in the modulation of mu rhythms during the execution of simple hand movements. Fifteen young (18-30 years) and fourteen older (65-75 years) right-handed healthy participants performed auditory-cued key presses using all four left fingers simultaneously (Simple Movement task - SMT) during two separate sessions. Following both SMT sessions, they repeatedly practiced a 5-elements sequential finger-tapping task (FTT). Mu power calculated during SMT was averaged across 18 gradiometers covering the right sensorimotor region and compared before vs. after sequence learning in the alpha (9/10/11Hz) and the beta (18/20/22Hz) bands separately. Source power maps in the mu-alpha and mu-beta bands were localized using Dynamic Statistical Parametric Mapping (dSPM). The FTT sequence was performed faster at retest than at the end of the learning session, indicating an offline boost in performance. Analyses conducted on SMT sessions revealed enhanced rebound after learning in the right SM1, 3000-3500ms after the initiation of movement, in young as compared to older participants. Source reconstruction indicated that mu-beta is located in the precentral gyrus (motor processes) and mu-alpha is located in the postcentral gyrus (somatosensory processes) in both groups. The enhanced post-movement rebound in young subjects potentially reflects post-training plastic changes in SM1. Age-related decreases in post-training modulatory effects suggest reduced experience-dependent plasticity in the aging brain.

  8. Trichomycosis (Trichobacteriosis): Clinical and Microbiological Experience with 56 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Váquez-González, Denisse; Fierro, Leonel; Araiza, Javier; Ponce, Rosa María

    2013-01-01

    Background: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic bacterial infection of the axillary hairs caused by Corynebacterium sp. Objective: to bring a series of cases of trichomycosis, its clinical and microbiological experience. Materials and Methods: This report consists in a linear and observational retrospective study of 15 years of cases of trichomycosis confirmed clinically and microbiologically. Results: Fifty six confirmed cases of trichomycosis were included in this report. The majority were men 53/56 (94.6%), mean age was 32.5 years. The most commonly affected area was the axilla (92%), trichomycosis flava was the principal variant 55/56 (98.2%) and signs and symptoms associated were hyperhidrosis (87.5%), hairs’ texture change (57.1%) and odor (35.7%). Bacterial concretions were observed in all cases, and the predominant causative agent in 89.3% of all cases was Corynebacterium sp. Thirty patients were included in therapeutic portion of the study, and 28 (93.3%) of them experienced a clinical and microbiological cure. Conclusion: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic, superficial infection, which primarily affects axillary hairs. PMID:23960390

  9. Emotional experience improves with age: evidence based on over 10 years of experience sampling.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Laura L; Turan, Bulent; Scheibe, Susanne; Ram, Nilam; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R; Brooks, Kathryn P; Nesselroade, John R

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory.

  10. Emotional experience improves with age: evidence based on over 10 years of experience sampling.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Laura L; Turan, Bulent; Scheibe, Susanne; Ram, Nilam; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R; Brooks, Kathryn P; Nesselroade, John R

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory. PMID:20973600

  11. Emotional Experience Improves With Age: Evidence Based on Over 10 Years of Experience Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Laura L.; Turan, Bulent; Scheibe, Susanne; Ram, Nilam; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Nesselroade, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory. PMID:20973600

  12. A controlled experiment to evaluate the impact of summer research experiences on attitudes towards science in high school aged students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. A.; Tcherednichenko, I.; Hamar, M.; Taylor, M. J.; Litizzette, L.

    2006-12-01

    United States funding agencies increasingly are supporting activities designed to increase the enrollment of United States high school students in science, math, or engineering careers. However, in many cases, the likely outcomes of educational activities are unknown. A common approach within the physical and natural sciences is to provide high school aged students with a summer research experience, with the expectation that such experiences will increase student interest in science, possibly as a career choice. With funding support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration New Investigator Grant program, we conducted a controlled experiment to test this assumption. In collaboration with Mountain Crest High School in Logan, UT, we recruited 40 students currently enrolled in science courses, assessed attitudes towards science (with informed consent), and randomly assigned 20 students to a control group and 20 students to an experimental group. Students in the experimental group were paired with faculty and graduate students in a wide range of field and laboratory research groups in natural resources and biology. Students were employed in at least two different research groups for an average of 30-40 hours per week for eight weeks in the summer of 2006. Following the completion of the summer work experience, we again assessed attitudes towards science in both groups and gathered additional information from the experimental group on satisfaction with the work experience and reasons for participating. Results are presented and discussed.

  13. Spondyloarthropathy presenting at a young age: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Golda H; Renaud, Deborah L; Sundaram, Murali; Reed, Ann M

    2007-02-01

    The diagnosis of juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSA) is rarely entertained in young children who present with back and leg pain. We present a case of a 6-year-old male who presented with a 3-year history of severe back and leg pain and a positive Gower's sign, and was given a presumed diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. Presenting serologic evaluation included a mildly elevated sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP). Computed tomography of the pelvis demonstrated large erosions affecting both sacro-iliac joints. Despite the unusually young age of this patient, ankylosing spondylitis seemed the most plausible diagnosis. Following rheumatological evaluation and treatment for JSA, he showed significant clinical improvement. His disease, however, has not entirely remitted with signs of enthesitis at the Achilles tendon and knees. We present this case to illustrate that JSA could account for symptoms at an early age and not considering it could lead to multiple medical visits and diagnoses. To our knowledge, based on a search of the World literature, this would appear to be the youngest case of JSA reported with demonstrable severe sacroiliitis.

  14. Aging and inhibition processes: the case of metaphor treatment.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Isabella; Declercq, Christelle; Novella, Jean-Luc; Besche, Chrystel

    2010-09-01

    The inhibitory deficit hypothesis has often been cited as a possible explanation for cognitive changes related to age. The aim of this study was to develop a new procedure for evaluating effortful inhibition on the basis of the comprehension of metaphors. Our experiment was carried out on younger and older adults, in whom we also measured inhibitory capacity, working memory, and processing speed. The results show that older participants required a longer time and made more frequent errors in rejecting metaphors versus literally false statements. The interference effect was predicted by the psychometric tests designed to evaluate inhibition.

  15. Tomographic Gamma Scanner Experience: Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, David J.

    2014-06-30

    This is a summary of field applications of tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). Three cases are shown: enriched uranium scanning at Rocky Flats, heat-source plutonium at LANL, and plutonium-bearing pyrochemical salts at Rocky Flats. Materials are taken from the references shown below.

  16. Dating, Sex, and Substance Use as Correlates of Adolescents' Subjective Experience of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbeau, Kelly J.; Galambos, Nancy L.; Jansson, S. Mikael

    2007-01-01

    This study examined in a random community-based sample of 664 12-19-year-olds, the relation of subjective experience of age (SEA) with chronological age, dating experience, sexual activity, and substance use. The results revealed a positive linear relation between SEA and chronological age: individuals who were chronologically older felt…

  17. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: our experience in 5,000 cases].

    PubMed

    Krayannis, A; Kostakopoulos, A; Deliveliotis, C; Delakas, D; Goulandris, N; Dimopoulos, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors report their experience on 7,500 patients who underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL1). The first 6,800 were treated with the standard Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, while the remaining 700 were treated with the modified HM-3 machine equipped with the new ellipsoid (and the double-shot generator). The authors present the results and conclusions from their experience with 5,000 ESWL treatments which were performed at their Urology Department. An analysis is made on patient age, sex, stone site, duration of sessions, average number of shock waves used, exposure time, number of electrodes per session, retreatments, and results achieved relative to stone size. Furthermore, the authors report on the complications and treatment in special cases; i. e., patients with horseshoe kidneys, solitary kidneys, spinal cord lesions, radiolucent calculi, hemophilia, and staghorn stones. The mean duration of treatment was 37 minutes. The average number of shock waves used was 1,703. The mean radiation exposure time was 1.9 minutes. Two electrodes per session were required in 48% of the patients. Three months following lithotripsy, 72% of the patients were stone-free, 19% had small remaining stone fragments, and 9% had unimportant stone particles.

  18. Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania in paediatric age: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Samuela; Vollono, Catello; Capuano, Alessandro; Vigevano, Federico; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2011-04-01

    Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) is a rare primary headache syndrome, which is classified along with hemicrania continua and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) as trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TACs). CPH is characterised by short-lasting (2-30 min), severe and multiple (more than 5/day) pain attacks. Headache is unilateral, and fronto-orbital-temporal pain is combined with cranial autonomic symptoms. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, the attacks are absolutely responsive to indomethacin. CPH has been only rarely and incompletely described in the developmental age. Here, we describe two cases concerning a 7-year-old boy and a 11-year-old boy with short-lasting, recurrent headache combined with cranial autonomic features. Pain was described as excruciating, and was non-responsive to most traditional analgesic drugs. The clinical features of our children's headache and the positive response to indomethacin led us to propose the diagnosis of CPH. Therefore, our children can be included amongst the very few cases of this trigeminal autonomic cephalgia described in the paediatric age.

  19. DataPlay: Experiments in the Ludic Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macklin, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    DataPlay is a research project inspired by the concept of a "ludic age" (Chaplin & Zimmerman, 2008), where the challenges of extracting knowledge from the "data deluge" of the information age (Economist, 2010) are met with game-based approaches to information design. This paper examines Mannahatta: The Game in order to…

  20. School-Based Asthma Case Finding: The Arkansas Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Perla A.; Magee, James S.; Bushmiaer, Margo; Simpson, Pippa M.; Jones, Craig A.; Feild, Charles R.; Jones, Stacie M.

    2006-01-01

    This population-based case-finding study sought to determine asthma prevalence and characterize disease severity and burden among school-aged children in the Little Rock School District. Asthma cases were identified by validated algorithm and parental report of asthma diagnosis. The overall response rate was low. Among schools with greater than…

  1. Semantic Development in Spanish-English Bilingual Children: Effects of Age and Language Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Li; Bedore, Lisa M.; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Fiestas, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This study examines semantic development in 60 Spanish-English bilingual children, ages 7 years 3 months to 9 years 11 months, who differed orthogonally in age (younger, older) and language experience (higher English experience [HEE], higher Spanish experience [HSE]). Children produced 3 associations to 12 pairs of translation equivalents. Older…

  2. Hiding its age: the case for a younger bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, M.; Di Matteo, P.; Snaith, O.; Calamida, A.

    2016-09-01

    The determination of the age of the bulge has led to two contradictory results. On the one side, the color-magnitude diagrams in different bulge fields seem to indicate a uniformly old (>10 Gyr) population. On the other side, individual ages derived from dwarfs observed through microlensing events seem to indicate a wide spread, from ~2 to ~13 Gyr. Because the bulge is now recognised as being mainly a boxy peanut-shaped bar, it is suggested that disk stars are one of its main constituents, and therefore also stars with ages significantly younger than 10 Gyr. Other arguments also point out that the bulge cannot be exclusively old, and in particular cannot be a burst population, as is usually expected if the bulge were the fossil remnant of a merger phase in the early Galaxy. In the present study, we show that given the range of metallicities observed in the bulge, a uniformly old population would be reflected in a significant spread in color at the turn-off, which is not observed. We demonstrate that the correlation between age and metallicity expected to hold for the inner disk would instead conspire to form a color-magnitude diagram with a remarkably narrow spread in color, thus mimicking the color-magnitude diagram of a uniformly old population. If stars younger than 10 Gyr are part of the bulge, as must be the case if the bulge has been mainly formed through dynamical instabilities in the disk, then a very narrow spread at the turn-off is expected, as seen in the observations.

  3. [Extravasation injuries in newborns: our experience about 15 cases].

    PubMed

    Nandiolo-Anelone, K R; Allah, K C; Cissé, L; Bankolé, S R; Oulaï, M; Aké, A Y L

    2014-02-01

    Extravasation injuries are common complications that occur during infusion for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes by the peripheral or central venous catheters. In pediatric settings, iatrogenic extravasations are serious. When they are viewed late, they are sources of functional sequelae. The purpose of this study was to report our experience with the management of iatrogenic extravasations for therapeutic purposes. Between January 2010 and December 2012, fifteen newborns were supported for accidents of infusion of the upper and the lower limbs. The male was mostly affected. The mean age was 3.6days, with extremes of one and nine days. The average birth weight was 2900g. The range was 1200g and 3550g. Serum 10 % glucose and calcium chloride were implicated in all cases. The lesions were seen in the late stages III in six cases and IV in nine cases. The upper limbs were frequently affected. Nine lesions were in the upper limbs and six in the lower limbs. The dorsal surfaces, feet and hands were frequently affected in six and five cases, respectively. Two lesions were in the anterior aspect of the forearm and elbow. Elbows lesions were circular and realized a tourniquet effect. Treatment was conservative in eleven cases: five pro-inflammatory fatty dressings and six alcoholic dressings. The surgery was delayed in four cases. It combined excision-full thickness skin graft, excision-dressing-thin skin grafting, debridement and two-full thickness skin graft for retractable wrist scars. Two deaths were related to associate pathologies. One patient was lost for follow-up. Our results were satisfactory in functional, aesthetic and psychological aspects. Extravasation injuries are serious iatrogenic lesions. If the lesions are seen at an early stage in usual circumstances, in extreme exercise, they are seen late, sometimes at the stage of functional, psychological and cosmetic sequelae. The difficulty of the therapeutic management of these lesions requires prevention

  4. An auditory event related potential evaluation of sonar task experience and age.

    PubMed

    Merrill, L L; Kobus, D A; McGuigan, F J

    1995-06-01

    To gauge the interaction of real-world sonar-task experience and age on brain electrical activity, the effect of sonar experience and age on event related potentials (ERP) was examined. A three-group design was used and the results suggest that sonar experience and age affect the amplitude and distribution of the ERP component. The results concerning age and ERPs support and extend the results of previous studies and suggest that age-related differences occur at a much younger age than is reported elsewhere. Attentional and stimulus evaluation processes which have been linked to parameters of the ERP component may be enhanced with real-world auditory task experience. Research on ERP should control for the possible confounds of auditory-task experience and age.

  5. Telecare for diabetes mellitus: case managers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Ting-Ting; Chou, Chun-Chen; Mills, Mary Etta

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that, if not treated promptly and appropriately, can cause complex health complications and mortality. Changes in societal structure have fostered an increase in the incidence of diabetes and made the traditional hospital visit model less efficient for meeting the care needs of these patients. The care models that apply technology, such as telecare or so-called telehealth, may be useful in working with diabetes patients. The current study applied qualitative research methodology through interviews with nine diabetes case managers involved in telecare services. To identify the participants' acceptance and perceived effectiveness of telecare services, content analysis of the interview data was used. The following four major themes were identified in the study results: (1) improved case management, (2) setting appropriate expectations for care outcome, (3) acknowledging patients' sense of losing privacy, and (4) disease prevention and interdisciplinary cooperation. The study findings may serve as an indicator of the need for further promotion, appraisal, and validation of the telecare services model, to enhance the comprehensiveness of diabetes care.

  6. Experiences with physical conditioning programs in middle-aged men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, B.; Stanley, E.

    1969-01-01

    Long term effects of physical exercise and conditioning in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease are studied. Some aspects of the problem are outlined and difficulties encountered in a group of middle aged business executives using a carefully prescribed, but non-regimented and loosely supervised conditioning program employing commonly used forms of exercise (bicycling and jogging), are described.

  7. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  8. Learning Wellness: How Ageing Australians Experience Health Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Christine; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Given identified synergies between information use and health status greater understanding is needed about how people use information to learn about their health. This paper presents the findings of preliminary research into health information literacy. Analysis of data from semi-structured interviews revealed six different ways ageing Australians…

  9. AGE (Argon Geochronology Experiment): An Instrument for Geochronology on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Boynton, W. V.; Kring, D. A.; Williams, M.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M. R.; Cremers, D. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Baldwin, S. L.

    2003-01-01

    As our knowledge of the planet Mars continues to grow, one parameter that remains elusive is the absolute chronology of the planet s geological history. Although crater counts have provided a robust relative chronology, impactor fluxes are poorly enough known that there are places on Mars where the absolute age is uncertain by a factor of two or more. To resolve these uncertainties, it will be necessary to either analyze well-documented samples returned to the Earth from the Martian surface or to perform in situ measurements with sufficient precision. Sample return is still at least a decade away, and even then it might be from a biologically interesting area that might be geologically complex. Hence an in situ measurement, within an uncertainty of 20% or better, could greatly improve our knowledge of the history of Mars. With funding from the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP), we have been working on an instrument to perform potassium-argon (K-Ar) and cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) dating in situ on the surface of Mars. For either of these techniques, it is necessary to measure the abundance of one or more major or minor elements (K in the case of KAr; all majors and minors in the case of CRE) and the abundance and isotopes composition of a noble gas (Ar in the case of K-Ar; He, Ne and Ar for CRE dating). The technology for either of these types of measurements exists, but has never before been integrated for a spacecraft. We refer to the instrument as AGE, the Argon Geochronology Experiment (although we will measure the noble gases He and Ne as well for CRE ages). We report here on the basic components that go into such an instrument, both those that use existing technology and those that had to be developed to create the integrated package.

  10. Urethral duplication in males: our experience in ten cases.

    PubMed

    Arena, Salvatore; Arena, Carmela; Scuderi, Maria Grazia; Sanges, Giuseppe; Arena, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo

    2007-08-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly, affecting mainly boys. Clinical presentation varies because of the different anatomical patterns of this abnormality. We report our experience in ten males affected by urethral duplication. We retrospectively reviewed the records of ten males affected by urethral duplication. Mild cases of distal type I duplications as well as "Y-type" duplication associated to anorectal malformation were excluded. Evaluation included voiding cystourethrography, retrograde urethrography, intravenous urography and urethrocystoscopy. Mean age at diagnosis was 46.7 +/- 32.3 months A blind ending duplicated urethra (type I) was present in three patients, two urethras originating from a common bladder neck (type II A2) in three, an "Y-type" duplication in three and a complete bladder with incomplete urethral duplication in one. Surgical management included excision of the duplicated urethra in four patients while a displacement of the ventral urethra (in "Y-type" duplication) in perineal-scrotal or scrotal position was performed in two patients as first stage of urethral reconstruction. Good cosmetical and functional results were achieved in all six treated boys while surgical management was not required in four. Urethral duplication is often associated with genito-urinary and gastro-intestinal abnormalities. Embryology is unclear and a lot of hypotheses have been proposed. We believe that the same embryological explanation cannot be applied to all subtypes of urethral duplication. Management must be evaluated for each case. The overall prognosis is good, in spite of the presence of other severe associate congenital anomalies. PMID:17576574

  11. Experience-Based Mitigation of Age-Related Performance Declines: Evidence from Air Traffic Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes, Ashley; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has found age-related deficits in a variety of cognitive processes. However, some studies have demonstrated age-related sparing on tasks where individuals have substantial experience, often attained over many decades. Here, the authors examined whether decades of experience in a fast-paced demanding profession, air traffic…

  12. Kenyan Student-Teacher Counsellors' Creativity and Its Relationship with Their Gender, Age, and Teaching Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinai, Theresia Kavuli

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was: (1) assess creativity of postgraduate student-teacher counselors whose age range was 25-54 years old, and teaching experience of 4-25 years; and (2) to find out whether age, gender, and teaching experience influence creativity. Seventy-two participants (43 females and 29 males) responded to the ICAS (Ibadan Creativity…

  13. Wizards and scientists: the pharmacologic experience in the Middle Ages.

    PubMed

    Rossi, F; Mangrella, M; Loffreda, A; Lampa, E

    1994-01-01

    During the Dark ages, Greco-Roman science survived in the eastern Roman Empire and the most important advances in pharmacology and pharmacy were made in Byzantium. As the Arab empires spread in the 7th and 8th centuries, they incorporated earlier learning, and the most important contribution of Arabic medical writers was probably the introduction of formularies to aid in the preparation of medicines. In turn, the later spread of Arabic knowledge to the West introduced little-known plants and fostered an interest in collecting and cultivating them, and also introduced the palatable dose forms preferred by the Arabic doctors. In the West, however, the Christian Church taught a doctrine of unquestioning faith, and despite the centers of learning, e.g. at Salerno, most ordinary people depended on the healing power of faith, religious relics and traditional folk medicine. Hydrology was also well developed in the Middle Ages. The formularia that survive describe many indigenous plants, but with few illustrations. Their gathering and preparation is generally guided by magic ceremonies and ritual, and plants often took their properties from their habitat, e.g. the wayside plantain was thought good for tired or wounded feet. Concepts of therapeutic plants were also influenced by alchemy and were linked to related metals and planets. PMID:7847474

  14. [Juvenile arthritis reevaluated in rheumatology in adult age. 30 cases].

    PubMed

    Meyer, O; Kahn, M F; Bourgeois, P; Vinceneux, P; Kaplan, G

    1978-06-01

    The authors describe and comment on 30 observations of peripheral polyarthritis starting before puberty and reveluated in an adult rheumatologoy service at the average age of 29 and during an observation period of about 16 years. The actual classification of juvenile polyarthritis proves to be valid in this group since the clinical forms are still observed in adulthood. However, during the evolution, there is a shifting from one form to another. The systemic forms can reoccur in adulthood even after several years of quiescence, accompanied by visceral complications. The pauciarticular forms as a rule remain benign. As in childhood, they frequently show antinuclear factors. Some forms, initially peripheral, can show axial signs. The presence of HLA B27 antigens allow them to be linked up with ankylosing spondylarthritis. But this is not the case for all the forms with sacroiliac functions. The evolution since childhood is often characterized by long remissions which can still persist by the time of the visit, which is then motivated by resulting mechanical and local arthrotic problems. Despite often severe anatomical symptoms, the functional handicap is limited, allowing quite a remarkable adaptation. Most of the patients lead an active professional life. Yet despite this and despite an often satisfactory sex life, half of the patients have a psychological handicap which makes it necessary for them to be placed under special carl. No therapeutic conclusion, particularly about the efficiency of the basic therapy, can be drawn from this study. PMID:308253

  15. Use of Facebook: A Case Study of Singapore Students' Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hew, Khe Foon; Cheung, Wing Sum

    2012-01-01

    Facebook has become one of the most popular social network sites among many students. However, current research on Facebook use has focused mainly on Anglo-American students. Relatively little is known about Facebook use in Singapore. Data were collected from 83 students (ages ranged from 15 to 23). This study uses a naturalistic case study…

  16. The Subtlety of Age, Gender, and Race Barriers: A Case Study of Early Career African American Female Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jean-Marie, Gaetane

    2013-01-01

    While all educational leaders face challenges in achieving success, African American female principals often face a unique set of challenges associated with the complexity of their gender, race, and, as examined in this study, age. This case study investigates the experiences of two highly visible, early career African American female principals…

  17. Elementary-aged children's aesthetic experiences with music.

    PubMed

    Paul, Phyllis M

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the perceived aesthetic experiences of elementary school children. Sixty 4th graders, from 3 intact public school classes that included students identified as gifted and with special needs, listened to 'Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43, Variation 18,' by Rachmaninoff and simultaneously indicated responses by manipulating a Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI) dial. One week later, participants repeated the listening activity under identical experimental conditions. As in similar studies with adults, aggregated graphic analyses showed that many of the children's highest and lowest reactions tended to cluster at the same places, and test-retest reliability showed a high positive correspondence between the two listening sessions (r = .99). Although it is impossible to know if these 4th graders actually had aesthetic experiences, it seems clear that they did respond to this music. It was determined that 57 students, including most of those with special needs, successfully used the CRDI dial to indicate their reactions and 58 expressed comfort with the simplicity of its use. Additional analyses, which compared responses based on developmental statuses, found a wide range of correlations between children who were categorized as normally developing, gifted, or having special needs.

  18. Young Children's Learning of Novel Digital Interfaces: How Technology Experience, Age, and Design Come into Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilutz, Shuli

    2009-01-01

    This study looks at the relationship between age, technology experience, and design factors in determining young children's comprehension of novel digital interfaces. In Experiment 1, 35 preschoolers played three games that varied in complexity and familiarity. Parental questionnaires were used to assess children's previous technology experience.…

  19. [Life expectancy at older ages and alternative approach to aging measurement (the case of St. Petersburg)].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, L V; Safarova, G L; Lisenenkov, F I; Mikhaĭlova, O N

    2009-01-01

    St. Petersburg Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology, NWB of RAMS, 3 pr. Dinamo, St. Petersburg 197110; For St. Petersburg, aging issues are of great importance as values of many aging indicators for St. Petersburg are higher than for Russia as a whole. Taper aims at analyzing the dynamics of life expectancy at older ages and comparing traditional (proportion of the elderly, average age, median age) and new (proportion of population with a remaining life expectancy 15 years or less, population average remaining years of life) aging indicators for St. Petersburg in 1990-2006.

  20. Case-study experiments in the introductory physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arion, D. N.; Crosby, K. M.; Murphy, E. A.

    2000-09-01

    Carthage College added inquiry-based case study activities to the traditional introductory physics laboratory. Student teams designed, constructed, and executed their own experiments to study real-world phenomena, through which they gained understanding both of physic principles and methods of physics research. Assessment results and student feedback through teacher evaluations indicate that these activities improved student attitudes about physics as well as their ability to solve physics problems relative to previous course offerings that did not include case study.

  1. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry-the 2015 Experience.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Lynn A; Rhyee, Sean H; Campleman, Sharan L; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Weigand, Timothy; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology established the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry in 2010. The Registry contains all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry has continued to grow since its inception, and as of December 31, 2015, contains 43,099 cases. This is the sixth annual report of the ToxIC Registry, summarizing the additional 8115 cases entered in 2015. Cases were identified by a query of the Registry for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2015. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, race, gender), source of consultation, reason for consultation, agents and agent classes involved in exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. By the end of 2015, there were 50 active sites, consisting of 101 separate health-care facilities; 51.2 % of cases involved females. Adults between the ages of 19 and 65 made up the majority (64.2 %) of Registry cases. Caucasian race was the most commonly reported (55.6 %); 9.6 % of cases were identified as Hispanic ethnicity. Inpatient and emergency department referrals were by far the most common referral sources (92.9 %). Intentional pharmaceutical exposures remained the most frequent reason for consultation, making up 52.3 % of cases. Of these intentional pharmaceutical exposures, 69 % represented an attempt at self-harm, and 85.6 % of these were a suicide attempt. Nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and antidepressant agents were the most commonly reported agent classes in 2015. Almost one-third of Registry cases involved a diagnosed toxidrome (32.8 %), with a sedative-hypnotic toxidrome being the most frequently described. Significant vital sign abnormalities were recorded in 25.3 % of cases. There were 98 fatalities reported in the Registry (1.2 %). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 4.3 % of cases. Toxicological treatment was given in 65.3 % of cases, with 33.0

  2. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry-the 2015 Experience.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Lynn A; Rhyee, Sean H; Campleman, Sharan L; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Weigand, Timothy; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology established the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry in 2010. The Registry contains all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry has continued to grow since its inception, and as of December 31, 2015, contains 43,099 cases. This is the sixth annual report of the ToxIC Registry, summarizing the additional 8115 cases entered in 2015. Cases were identified by a query of the Registry for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2015. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, race, gender), source of consultation, reason for consultation, agents and agent classes involved in exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. By the end of 2015, there were 50 active sites, consisting of 101 separate health-care facilities; 51.2 % of cases involved females. Adults between the ages of 19 and 65 made up the majority (64.2 %) of Registry cases. Caucasian race was the most commonly reported (55.6 %); 9.6 % of cases were identified as Hispanic ethnicity. Inpatient and emergency department referrals were by far the most common referral sources (92.9 %). Intentional pharmaceutical exposures remained the most frequent reason for consultation, making up 52.3 % of cases. Of these intentional pharmaceutical exposures, 69 % represented an attempt at self-harm, and 85.6 % of these were a suicide attempt. Nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and antidepressant agents were the most commonly reported agent classes in 2015. Almost one-third of Registry cases involved a diagnosed toxidrome (32.8 %), with a sedative-hypnotic toxidrome being the most frequently described. Significant vital sign abnormalities were recorded in 25.3 % of cases. There were 98 fatalities reported in the Registry (1.2 %). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 4.3 % of cases. Toxicological treatment was given in 65.3 % of cases, with 33.0

  3. Synthesis of iron fertilization experiments: From the Iron Age in the Age of Enlightenment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baar, Hein J. W.; Boyd, Philip W.; Coale, Kenneth H.; Landry, Michael R.; Tsuda, Atsushi; Assmy, Philipp; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Bozec, Yann; Barber, Richard T.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Buesseler, Ken O.; Boyé, Marie; Croot, Peter L.; Gervais, Frank; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Harrison, Paul J.; Hiscock, William T.; Laan, Patrick; Lancelot, Christiane; Law, Cliff S.; Levasseur, Maurice; Marchetti, Adrian; Millero, Frank J.; Nishioka, Jun; Nojiri, Yukihiro; van Oijen, Tim; Riebesell, Ulf; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Saito, Hiroaki; Takeda, Shigenobu; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Veldhuis, Marcel J. W.; Waite, Anya M.; Wong, Chi-Shing

    2005-09-01

    Comparison of eight iron experiments shows that maximum Chl a, the maximum DIC removal, and the overall DIC/Fe efficiency all scale inversely with depth of the wind mixed layer (WML) defining the light environment. Moreover, lateral patch dilution, sea surface irradiance, temperature, and grazing play additional roles. The Southern Ocean experiments were most influenced by very deep WMLs. In contrast, light conditions were most favorable during SEEDS and SERIES as well as during IronEx-2. The two extreme experiments, EisenEx and SEEDS, can be linked via EisenEx bottle incubations with shallower simulated WML depth. Large diatoms always benefit the most from Fe addition, where a remarkably small group of thriving diatom species is dominated by universal response of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. Significant response of these moderate (10-30 μm), medium (30-60 μm), and large (>60 μm) diatoms is consistent with growth physiology determined for single species in natural seawater. The minimum level of "dissolved" Fe (filtrate < 0.2 μm) maintained during an experiment determines the dominant diatom size class. However, this is further complicated by continuous transfer of original truly dissolved reduced Fe(II) into the colloidal pool, which may constitute some 75% of the "dissolved" pool. Depth integration of carbon inventory changes partly compensates the adverse effects of a deep WML due to its greater integration depths, decreasing the differences in responses between the eight experiments. About half of depth-integrated overall primary productivity is reflected in a decrease of DIC. The overall C/Fe efficiency of DIC uptake is DIC/Fe ˜ 5600 for all eight experiments. The increase of particulate organic carbon is about a quarter of the primary production, suggesting food web losses for the other three quarters. Replenishment of DIC by air/sea exchange tends to be a minor few percent of primary CO2 fixation but will continue well after observations have stopped. Export of

  4. Appetite and falls: Old age and lived experiences

    PubMed Central

    Sarvimäki, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Falling among older adults is a well-known public health problem but the association between falling and appetite is seldom studied although poor nutritional status is accepted as a risk factor for falls. On this background the aim of this study was to understand how older adults, who have fallen several times within a year, related their experiences of appetite as a phenomenon in everyday life. In narrative in-depth interviews, eight women and four men contributed with their stories. Using interpretative phenomenology the thematic analysis resulted in three main themes: appetite for food; appetite for social relations and appetite for influence. Eating was not trivial everyday routine and required self-regimentation. Meals were not an object of desire, but of discipline out of the wish to survive. Feelings, reflections and ambivalence were bound to the lack of appetite on food. The participants were oriented towards the forbidden, the delicious and to everyday food as a strengthener and as medicine. In their dependency on help, home was the framework for establishing social relations as means of social support. As well as family and neighbours, the significant others were persons on whom the participants were dependent. Personal relationships and mutual dependencies may ensure social security in lives characterised by contingency and maintain influence in daily life. Falling is both a dramatic and a trivial incident where life and death could be at stake. From this perspective, connectedness was prominent in all fall stories. The quest for influence and a sense of social connectedness was the incentive to re-enter local community arenas and to express solidarity. In health-care practice multi-factorial fall-prevention should be complemented with a multi-dimensional approach in order to balance the medical approach with humanistic and societal approaches towards fall-prevention. PMID:22389651

  5. Evidence for reduced experience-dependent dendritic spine plasticity in the aging prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bloss, Erik B.; Janssen, William G.; Ohm, Daniel T.; Yuk, Frank J.; Wadsworth, Shannon; Saardi, Karl M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive functions that require the prefrontal cortex are highly sensitive to aging in humans, non-human primates, and rodents, although the neurobiological correlates of this vulnerability remain largely unknown. It has been proposed that dendritic spines represent the primary site of structural plasticity in the adult brain, and recent data have supported the hypothesis that aging is associated with alterations of dendritic spine morphology and plasticity in prefrontal cortex. However, no study to date has directly examined whether aging alters the capacity for experience-dependent spine plasticity in aging prefrontal neurons. To address this possibility we used young, middle-aged, and aged rats in a behavioral stress paradigm known to produce spine remodeling in prefrontal cortical neurons. In young rats, stress resulted in dendritic spine loss and altered patterns of spine morphology; in contrast, spines from middle-aged and aged animals were remarkably stable and did not show evidence of remodeling. The loss of stress-induced spine plasticity observed in aging rats occurred alongside robust age-related reductions in spine density and shifts in remaining spine morphology. Taken together, the data presented here provide the first evidence that experience-dependent spine plasticity is altered by aging in prefrontal cortex, and support a model in which dendritic spines become progressively less plastic in the aging brain. PMID:21613496

  6. Correlates of Root Caries Experience in Middle-Aged and Older Adults within the Northwest PRECEDENT

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Donald L.; Berg, Joel H.; Kim, Amy S.; Scott, JoAnna

    2014-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Background We examined the correlates of root caries experience for middle-aged (ages 45–64 years) and older adults (ages 65+ years) to test the hypothesis that the factors related to root caries are different for middle-aged versus older adults. Methods This observational cross-sectional study focused on adult patients ages 45–97 years recruited from the Northwest PRECEDENT (N=775 adults). The outcome variable was any root caries experience (no/yes). Sociodemographic, intraoral, and behavioral factors were hypothesized as potential root caries correlates. We used Poisson regression models to generate overall and age-stratified prevalence ratios (PR) of root caries and Generalized Estimating Equations to account for practice-level clustering of participants. Results About 20% of adults had any root caries. Dentists’ assessment that the patient was at high risk for any caries was associated with greater prevalence of root caries experience in both middle-aged adults (PR=2.70, 95% CI: 1.63,4.46) and older adults (PR=1.87, 95% CI: 1.19,2.95). The following factors were significantly associated with increased root caries prevalence, but only for middle-aged adults: male sex (P=.02), self-reported dry mouth (P<.0001), exposed roots (P=.03), and increased frequency of eating or drinking between meals (P=.03). No other covariates were related to root caries experience for older adults. Conclusions Within a practice-based research network, the factors associated with root caries experience were different for middle-aged and older adults. Future work should identify relevant root caries correlates for adults ages 65+ years. Clinical Implications Interventions aimed at preventing root caries are likely to be different for middle-aged and older adults. Root caries prevention programs should address the appropriate aged-based risk factors. PMID:23633699

  7. Childhood Parasomnias and Psychotic Experiences at Age 12 Years in a United Kingdom Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Helen L.; Lereya, Suzet Tanya; Thompson, Andrew; Lewis, Glyn; Zammit, Stanley; Wolke, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine associations between specific parasomnias and psychotic experiences in childhood. Design: Birth cohort study. Information on the presence of frequent nightmares in children was obtained prospectively from mothers during multiple assessments conducted when children were aged between 2.5 and 9 y. Children were interviewed at age 12 y about nightmares, night terrors, sleepwalking, and psychotic experiences (delusions, hallucinations, and thought interference) occurring in the previous 6 mo. Setting: Assessments were completed in participants' homes or a University clinic within the UK. Patients or Participants: There were 6,796 children (3,462 girls, 50.9%) who completed the psychotic experiences interview. Measurements and Results: Children who were reported by their mothers as experiencing frequent nightmares between 2.5 and 9 y of age were more likely to report psychotic experiences at age 12 y, regardless of sex, family adversity, emotional or behavioral problems, IQ and potential neurological problems (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, [95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.00, 1.35], P = 0.049). Children reporting any of the parasomnias at age 12 y also had higher rates of concurrent psychotic experiences than those without such sleeping problems, when adjusting for all confounders (OR = 3.62 [95% CI = 2.57, 5.11], P < 0.001). Difficulty getting to sleep and night waking were not found to be associated with psychotic experiences at age 12 y when controlling for confounders. Conclusion: Nightmares and night terrors, but not other sleeping problems, in childhood were associated with psychotic experiences at age 12 years. These findings tentatively suggest that arousal and rapid eye movement forms of sleep disorder might be early indicators of susceptibility to psychotic experiences. Citation: Fisher HL; Lereya ST; Thompson A; Lewis G; Zammit S; Wolke D. Childhood parasomnias and psychotic experiences at age 12 years in a United Kingdom birth cohort

  8. Large block migration experiments: INTRAVAL phase 1, Test Case 9

    SciTech Connect

    Gureghian, A.B.; Noronha, C.J. . Office of Waste Technology Development); Vandergraaf, T.T. )

    1990-08-01

    The development of INTRAVAL Test Case 9, as presented in this report, was made possible by a past subsidiary agreement to the bilateral cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) encompassing various aspects of nuclear waste disposal research. The experimental aspect of this test case, which included a series of laboratory experiments designed to quantify the migration of tracers in a single, natural fracture, was undertaken by AECL. The numerical simulation of the results of these experiments was performed by the Battelle Office of Waste Technology Development (OWTD) by calibrating an in-house analytical code, FRACFLO, which is capable of predicting radionuclide transport in an idealized fractured rock. Three tracer migration experiments were performed, using nonsorbing uranine dye for two of them and sorbing Cs-137 for the third. In addition, separate batch experiments were performed to determine the fracture surface and rock matrix sorption coefficients for Cs-137. The two uranine tracer migration experiment were used to calculate the average fracture aperture and to calibrate the model for the fracture dispersivity and matrix diffusion coefficient. The predictive capability of the model was then tested by simulating the third, Cs-137, tracer test without changing the parameter values determined from the other experiments. Breakthrough curves of both the experimental and numerical results obtained at the outlet face of the fracture are presented for each experiment. The reported spatial concentration profiles for the rock matrix are based solely on numerical predictions. 22 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. International Exchange as a Transformative Learning Experience: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sheena; Slaubaugh, Michael; Kim, Ae-Sook

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the role of international exchange programs on the transformative learning of English-speaking students. A student exchange program at a South Korean university is used for this case study. It explores how learning experiences are translated by participants onto their perceptions about the host country. An analysis of a pre-…

  10. Case Study of the California Experience in Library Collection Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Melvin J.

    A variety of examples of collection development in a university system is provided by this case study. The University of California's nine campuses provide a wide variety of library acquisition experience. A retrospective view of their development reflects the changing pace and pattern of library collection building over the years. The University…

  11. The effects of age and experience on memory for visually presented music.

    PubMed

    Meinz, E J; Salthouse, T A

    1998-01-01

    Increased age is often associated with lower levels of performance in tests of memory for spatial information. The primary question in the current study was whether this relationship could be moderated as a function of one's relevant experience and/or knowledge. Stimulus materials consisted of short (7-11 note), visually presented musical melodies and structurally equivalent nonmusical stimuli. Participants (N = 128) were recruited from a wide range of age and experience levels. Although there were strong main effects of age and experience on memory for music, there was no evidence that the age-related differences in memory for these stimuli were smaller for individuals with moderate to large amounts of experience with music. PMID:9469173

  12. Experiences in the Bilingual Education of a Child of Pre-School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zierer, Ernesto

    1977-01-01

    This article reports on experiences in the bilingual education, psychologically and pedagogically planned, of a child who died of brain cancer at age 5. Conclusions are drawn regarding order and method of language learning. (CHK)

  13. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  14. Empathetic Responses and Attitudes about Older Adults: How Experience with the Aging Game Measures up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Beverly W.; Ozier, Amy D.; Johnson, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of pre-professional education on students' knowledge and attitudes about aging, including the option of a simulated learning activity. Using a mixed design, groups of nursing and nutrition students (n = 127) were randomly assigned to experience the Aging Game. Pre- and posttest observations included measures…

  15. Adolescents' Definitions of Bullying: The Contribution of Age, Gender, and Experience of Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Hollie; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Amanda; Dolphin, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to examine adolescents' definitions of bullying in a nationally representative sample of adolescents in Ireland. Definitions of bullying were examined according to age, gender, and bullying experiences. A sample of 4358 adolescents aged 12-19 years (M = 14.99 years, SD = 1.63) provided their definitions of…

  16. Relationship of Age, Marital Status, and Work Experience of Community College Nursing Students to Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frerichs, Marian L.

    To investigate differences in academic success due to age (younger or older than age 23), marital status, and nursing experience, a three-way analysis of variance was performed on the grade point averages of 1,435 female nursing students enrolled in 22 Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs in Illinois. The sample, representing over 90 percent of…

  17. Modeling experiments that simulate fragment attacks on cased munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Roberts and Field (1993) have conducted experiments to observe the behavior of a cased high explosive (HE) charge subject to fragment attack at impact velocities below those needed for shock initiation. Two and three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been done to model these experiments. Questions about the degree of confinement of the HE and about the condition of the HE during the impact were addressed. The calculations indicate that the HE was not strongly confined in this experiment, primarily due to the lateral expansion of polycarbonate blocks on the sides of the target during the impact. HE was not ejected from the hole in the casing made by the projectile up to 30 {micro}s after the impact. There are hints from these calculations of how initiation of a homogeneous sample of HE might occur in the experiment. The first involves the reshock of a small amount of HE at {approximately} 20 {micro}s as a result of the impact of the sabot on the target. The second involves the heating of the HE from plastic work during the impact. The maximum temperature rise of the HE (exclusive of the small region that was reshocked) was {approximately} 80 k. However, this is the average temperature of a region the size of a computational cell, and phenomena such as shear bands or cracks could result in higher temperatures on a smaller scale than the cell size. The third involves heating of the HE from contact with the casing material. The maximum temperature rise of the casing material from plastic work is {approximately} 870 k. This temperature occurs at the edge of a plug of casing material sheared off by the projectile. Other parts of the casing are shock heated to higher energies but may not contact the HE.

  18. Spinal dorsal dermal sinus tract: An experience of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ishwar; Rohilla, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal dorsal dermal sinus is a rare entity, which usually comes to clinical attention by cutaneous abnormalities, neurologic deficit, and/or infection. The present study was undertaken to know the clinical profile of these patients, to study associated anomalies and to assess the results of surgical intervention. Methods: Medical records of 21 patients treated for spinal dorsal dermal sinus from September 2007 to December 2013 were reviewed. Results: We had 21 patients with male: female ratio of 13:8. Only 2 patients were below 1-year of age, and most cases (15) were between 2 and 15 years (mean age = 8.2 years). Lumbar region (11 cases) was most frequently involved, followed by thoracic (4 cases), lumbosacral, and cervical region in 3 patients each. All of our patients presented with neurological deficits. Three patients were admitted with acute meningitis with acute onset paraplegia and had intraspinal abscess. The motor, sensory, and autonomic deficits were seen in 14, 6, and 8 patients, respectively. Scoliosis and congenital talipes equinovarus were the common associated anomalies. All patients underwent surgical exploration and repair of dysraphic state and excision of the sinus. Overall, 20 patients improved or neurological status stabilized and only 1 patient deteriorated. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 2 cases. Conclusions: All patients with spinal dorsal dermal sinuses should be offered aggressive surgical treatment in the form of total excision of sinus tract and correction of spinal malformation, as soon as diagnosed. PMID:26539316

  19. Computer simulations and experiments: The case of the Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimi, Michela; Bhimji, Wahid

    2015-08-01

    Simulations have been at the center of an important literature that has debated the extent to which they count as epistemologically on a par with traditional experiments. Critics have raised doubts about simulations being genuine experiments, on the ground that simulations seem to lack a distinctive feature of traditional experiments: i.e., the ability to causally interact with a target system. In this paper, we defend the view that simulations are indeed epistemologically on a par with traditional experiments. We first identify three possible ways of understanding the causal interaction claim. We then focus on the use of simulation in the discovery of the Higgs boson to show that in this paradigmatic case, simulations satisfy all three possible readings of the causal interaction claim.

  20. Aging effect on Zn retention on a calcareous soil: column experiments and synchrotron X-ray micro-spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Sayen, Stéphanie; Guillon, Emmanuel

    2014-07-15

    In this study, a combination of column experiments and micro-analytical techniques exploiting synchrotron generated X-rays was used to assess the effect of aging time on Zn retention and mobility in the specific case of calcareous soils (high pH value, ≈ 8). The samples were subjected to aging for 2, 6, 17, and 63 days. Freshly added Zn mainly existed as an exchangeable form, and this metal fraction decreased over time due to Zn redistribution to stronger binding sites. Thus, after aging for 63 days, 45% of Zn is remobilized from exchangeable sites to stronger binding sites. μ-XRF maps were used to find correlations among elements in the sample, and μ-XANES spectra were recorded to precise Zn speciation. These analyses evidenced an increasing partitioning of Zn from organic matter to iron oxy(hydr)oxides over time. The occurrence of hydrozincite is evidenced in all samples.

  1. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Adult Risk Factors for Age-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Andrea; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Harrington, HonaLee; Milne, Barry J.; Polanczyk, Guilherme; Pariante, Carmine M.; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand why children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences are at elevated risk for age-related disease, such as cardiovascular disease, by testing whether adverse childhood experiences predict enduring abnormalities in stress-sensitive biological systems, namely, the nervous, immune, and endocrine/metabolic systems. Design A 32-year prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Setting New Zealand. Participants A total of 1037 members of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study. Main Exposures During their first decade of life, study members were assessed for exposure to 3 adverse psychosocial experiences: socioeconomic disadvantage, maltreatment, and social isolation. Main Outcome Measures At age 32 years, study members were assessed for the presence of 3 age-related-disease risks: major depression, high inflammation levels (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level >3 mg/L), and the clustering of metabolic risk biomarkers (overweight, high blood pressure, high total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high glycated hemoglobin, and low maximum oxygen consumption levels. Results Children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences were at elevated risk of depression, high inflammation levels, and clustering of metabolic risk markers. Children who had experienced socioeconomic disadvantage (incidence rate ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.36–2.62), maltreatment (1.81; 1.38–2.38), or social isolation (1.87; 1.38–2.51) had elevated age-related-disease risks in adulthood. The effects of adverse childhood experiences on age-related-disease risks in adulthood were nonredundant, cumulative, and independent of the influence of established developmental and concurrent risk factors. Conclusions Children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences have enduring emotional, immune, and metabolic abnormalities that contribute to explaining their elevated risk for age-related disease. The

  2. Semantic Development in Spanish-English Bilingual Children: Effects of Age and Language Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Li; Bedore, Lisa M.; Peña, Elizabeth D.; Fiestas, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This study examines semantic development in 60 Spanish-English bilingual children, ages 7 years 3 months to 9 years 11 months, who differed orthogonally in age (younger, older) and language experience (HEE: higher English experience, HSE: higher Spanish experience). Children produced three associations to 12 pairs of translation equivalents. Older children produced more semantic responses and code-switched more often from Spanish to English than younger children. Within each group, children demonstrated better performance in the more frequently used than the less used language. The HEE children outperformed the HSE children in English and the HSE children outperformed the HEE children in Spanish. These effects of age and language experience are consistent with predictions of the Revised Hierarchical Model of bilingual lexical organization. PMID:23163772

  3. The Relative Age Effect in Elite Sport: The French Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delorme, Nicolas; Boiche, Julie; Raspaud, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is considered a common phenomenon in elite sport. However, it has not been examined systematically in previous research, and the mechanisms likely to generate or to limit such an effect are little understood. This paper investigates the prevalence of the RAE in French professional championship-level players, taking…

  4. [Experience in thyroglossal duct pathology: clinical case series].

    PubMed

    Cieri, Patricio; Udaquiola, Julia E; Calello, Santiago E; Libero, Daniel H

    2016-10-01

    The thyroglossal duct cyst pathology represents the second cause of bening cervical anomalies in childhood. Diagnosis is mainly clinical. Sistrunk (1920) proposed a surgical technique that is still considered the gold standard for definitive treatment of this condition. A retrospective study was made including patients who underwent surgery for thyroglossal duct cyst pathology in our department between June 2008 and August 2015. In this period, we performed 54 procedures in 45 patients (39 primary cases). Median age was 4.7 years; 14/39 patients (31.1%) had pre-operative infection. All patients were studied with neck ultrasound. A Sistrunk's procedure was performed in all cases. The global recurrence rate was 17.8% (8/45).

  5. [Experience in thyroglossal duct pathology: clinical case series].

    PubMed

    Cieri, Patricio; Udaquiola, Julia E; Calello, Santiago E; Libero, Daniel H

    2016-10-01

    The thyroglossal duct cyst pathology represents the second cause of bening cervical anomalies in childhood. Diagnosis is mainly clinical. Sistrunk (1920) proposed a surgical technique that is still considered the gold standard for definitive treatment of this condition. A retrospective study was made including patients who underwent surgery for thyroglossal duct cyst pathology in our department between June 2008 and August 2015. In this period, we performed 54 procedures in 45 patients (39 primary cases). Median age was 4.7 years; 14/39 patients (31.1%) had pre-operative infection. All patients were studied with neck ultrasound. A Sistrunk's procedure was performed in all cases. The global recurrence rate was 17.8% (8/45). PMID:27606652

  6. The toxicology investigators consortium case registry-the 2013 experience.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Wiegand, Timothy; Smith, Eric A; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. This report summarizes the Registry data for 2013. A query of the ToxIC Registry was carried out for the dates of January 1 through December 31, 2013. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms and clinical findings, and treatment. A total of 8,598 cases were entered into the Registry in 2013. Females accounted for 49.2 % of cases, males for 47.7 %, and gender was not reported in 3.1 %. The majority of patients (63.4 %) were adults between the ages of 19 and 65 years. There were 93 fatalities (1.1 %). Most referrals for medical toxicology consultation originated from the emergency department (59.7 %) or inpatient services (16.7 %). Exposures to pharmaceutical products (intentional and unintentional) made up 50.0 % of cases. Illicit drug abuse (8.0 %) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (4.8 %) were the next most frequent reasons for consultation. Similar to past years, nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Symptoms or clinical findings were documented in 71.1 % of patients. Of all cases, 54.6 % required some form of medical treatment (antidotes, antivenom, chelation, specific types of supportive care). This report serves as a comprehensive survey of medical toxicology practice within participating institutions. Prior trends continued to apply this year and indicate analgesic (opioid and nonopioid), sedative-hypnotic/muscle relaxant agents, illicit drug use, and ADRs continue to be major toxicological problems. Cases requiring medical toxicology consultation in 2013 predominantly involved pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs. Reasons for these drug

  7. The toxicology investigators consortium case registry-the 2013 experience.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Wiegand, Timothy; Smith, Eric A; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. This report summarizes the Registry data for 2013. A query of the ToxIC Registry was carried out for the dates of January 1 through December 31, 2013. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms and clinical findings, and treatment. A total of 8,598 cases were entered into the Registry in 2013. Females accounted for 49.2 % of cases, males for 47.7 %, and gender was not reported in 3.1 %. The majority of patients (63.4 %) were adults between the ages of 19 and 65 years. There were 93 fatalities (1.1 %). Most referrals for medical toxicology consultation originated from the emergency department (59.7 %) or inpatient services (16.7 %). Exposures to pharmaceutical products (intentional and unintentional) made up 50.0 % of cases. Illicit drug abuse (8.0 %) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (4.8 %) were the next most frequent reasons for consultation. Similar to past years, nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Symptoms or clinical findings were documented in 71.1 % of patients. Of all cases, 54.6 % required some form of medical treatment (antidotes, antivenom, chelation, specific types of supportive care). This report serves as a comprehensive survey of medical toxicology practice within participating institutions. Prior trends continued to apply this year and indicate analgesic (opioid and nonopioid), sedative-hypnotic/muscle relaxant agents, illicit drug use, and ADRs continue to be major toxicological problems. Cases requiring medical toxicology consultation in 2013 predominantly involved pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs. Reasons for these drug

  8. Cases of acute gastroenteritis due to calicivirus in outbreaks: clinical differences by age and aetiological agent.

    PubMed

    Sala, M R; Broner, S; Moreno, A; Arias, C; Godoy, P; Minguell, S; Martínez, A; Torner, N; Bartolomé, R; de Simón, M; Guix, S; Domínguez, A

    2014-08-01

    The Caliciviridae family includes norovirus and sapovirus, which both cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Currently, norovirus is the most common cause of AGE in all age groups in many countries. We analysed clinical differences in reported cases of acute gastroenteritis caused by caliciviruses (AGC) by age group and agent involved. We conducted a descriptive study of AGE outbreaks reported to the Public Health Agency of Catalonia (Spain) in 2010 and 2011. The odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the association between clinical symptoms and age. Clinical differences between the <15 years and ≥15 years age groups were statistically significant: children more frequently presented with vomiting (OR, 3.25; 95% CI, 2.56-4.13), abdominal pain (OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 2.60-4.12), fever (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.17-1.96) and nausea (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.19-1.85). Comparing clinical manifestations of sapovirus and norovirus infection in children aged <15 years, cases caused by norovirus more frequently presented with vomiting and fever (p <0.001), and cases caused by sapovirus more frequently presented with diarrhoea (p 0.013). Determination of the clinical differences associated with cases in outbreaks according to the age of the majority of cases and the symptoms most frequently detected may aid decision making and guide aetiological investigations and the adoption of prevention and control measures.

  9. Age of Diagnosis of Squamous Cell Cervical Carcinoma and Early Sexual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Zoe R.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Hughes, James P.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Galloway, Denise A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Given the established links between young age at first intercourse (AFI), number of sex partners, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC), we hypothesized that women diagnosed with SCC at younger ages would be more likely to report young AFI than women diagnosed later in life. Methods We performed a population-based investigation among invasive SCC cases who were diagnosed between 1986 and 2004, were 22 to 53 years old, and lived in the metropolitan Seattle-Puget Sound region (n=333). Using multivariate linear regression, we estimated coefficients and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between age at SCC diagnosis and AFI (<15, 15–18, ≥19) and number of sex partners before age 20 (0, 1, 2–4, 5–14, 15+), accounting for birth year and other factors. Interactions were assessed using the likelihood ratio test. Results The interval between AFI and SCC diagnosis ranged from 4 to 35 years. In a multivariate model, compared to SCC cases reporting AFI≥19, the mean age of diagnosis was 3.1 years younger for SCC cases reporting AFI<15 (CI: −5.8, −0.5) and 2.6 years younger for SCC cases reporting AFI 15–18 years (CI: −4.6, −0.6). Although number of sex partners before age 20 was associated with age at SCC diagnosis in a crude analysis, the association was not independent of AFI. However, in the AFI≥19 and AFI<15 groups, differences in effect were seen by number of sex partners before age 20 (p for interaction=0.08), with the association remaining strong and significant only in the AFI<15 group that had 2 or more partners before age 20 (coefficient: −4.2, CI: −6.3, −2.1). Conclusion Among younger and middle-aged women with SCC, early age of diagnosis was associated with early AFI, though the effect appeared to be modified by number of sex partners before age 20. PMID:19318437

  10. Effects of age and experience on contest behavior in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Victoria E; Head, Megan L; Carter, Mauricio J; Royle, Nick J

    2014-01-01

    Contest behavior forms an important part of reproductive investment. Life-history theory predicts that as individuals age and their residual reproductive value decreases, they should increase investment in contest behavior. However, other factors such as social experience may also be important in determining age-related variation in contest behavior. To understand how selection acts on contest behavior over an individual's lifetime, it is therefore important to tease apart the effects of age per se from other factors that may vary with age. Here, we independently manipulate male age and social experience to examine their effects on male contest behavior in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We found that social experience, but not age, influenced male contest behavior but that these changes in behavior did not alter contest outcomes. Male size (relative to his opponent) was overwhelmingly the most important factor determining contest outcome. Our results suggest that in systems with high variation in fighting ability among males, there may be little opportunity for selection to act on factors that influence contest outcomes by altering motivation to win.

  11. Musical experience and the aging auditory system: implications for cognitive abilities and hearing speech in noise.

    PubMed

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Strait, Dana L; Anderson, Samira; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Much of our daily communication occurs in the presence of background noise, compromising our ability to hear. While understanding speech in noise is a challenge for everyone, it becomes increasingly difficult as we age. Although aging is generally accompanied by hearing loss, this perceptual decline cannot fully account for the difficulties experienced by older adults for hearing in noise. Decreased cognitive skills concurrent with reduced perceptual acuity are thought to contribute to the difficulty older adults experience understanding speech in noise. Given that musical experience positively impacts speech perception in noise in young adults (ages 18-30), we asked whether musical experience benefits an older cohort of musicians (ages 45-65), potentially offsetting the age-related decline in speech-in-noise perceptual abilities and associated cognitive function (i.e., working memory). Consistent with performance in young adults, older musicians demonstrated enhanced speech-in-noise perception relative to nonmusicians along with greater auditory, but not visual, working memory capacity. By demonstrating that speech-in-noise perception and related cognitive function are enhanced in older musicians, our results imply that musical training may reduce the impact of age-related auditory decline. PMID:21589653

  12. Social work faculty interest in aging: impact of education, knowledge, comfort, and experience.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donna; Ihara, Emily; Chonody, Jill; Krase, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    As the need for gerontological social workers increases, it is important to assess faculty interest in strengthening and bolstering this area in the classroom and curriculum. This study sought to compare training and experience of social work faculty that identified aging as a teaching or research interest with faculty who did not, and to identify predictors of aging interest among faculty. A national sample of social work faculty members was recruited, and a total of 609 individuals participated in the study. The findings reveal that faculty with an interest in aging differed from nonaging faculty in the areas of knowledge of older adults, personal and paid experience, and graduate and continuing education. In addition, predictors of interest in aging included taking a graduate course, continuing education units, having paid and volunteer experience, level of knowledge of older adults, and comfort level of covering content on aging in the classroom. The connection between social work faculty and student interest in aging are discussed as implications for further social work research and education.

  13. Musical Experience and the Aging Auditory System: Implications for Cognitive Abilities and Hearing Speech in Noise

    PubMed Central

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Strait, Dana L.; Anderson, Samira; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Much of our daily communication occurs in the presence of background noise, compromising our ability to hear. While understanding speech in noise is a challenge for everyone, it becomes increasingly difficult as we age. Although aging is generally accompanied by hearing loss, this perceptual decline cannot fully account for the difficulties experienced by older adults for hearing in noise. Decreased cognitive skills concurrent with reduced perceptual acuity are thought to contribute to the difficulty older adults experience understanding speech in noise. Given that musical experience positively impacts speech perception in noise in young adults (ages 18–30), we asked whether musical experience benefits an older cohort of musicians (ages 45–65), potentially offsetting the age-related decline in speech-in-noise perceptual abilities and associated cognitive function (i.e., working memory). Consistent with performance in young adults, older musicians demonstrated enhanced speech-in-noise perception relative to nonmusicians along with greater auditory, but not visual, working memory capacity. By demonstrating that speech-in-noise perception and related cognitive function are enhanced in older musicians, our results imply that musical training may reduce the impact of age-related auditory decline. PMID:21589653

  14. Case detection rates of impetigo by gender and age.

    PubMed

    Kiriakis, Kyriakos P; Tadros, Aline; Dimou, Anastasia; Karamanou, Marianna; Banaka, Fotini; Alexoudi, Iliana

    2012-06-01

    A cross sectional study was carried out (impetigo cases n=265, relative prevalence 5.3%, among 50,237 outpatients). Males predominated in childhood, adulthood and overall (OR 2.0) and exhibited a more protracted susceptibility. Impetigo was more prevalent in summer months. Lesions were located on the head and neck (65.4%), followed by 19.6% on an upper extremity and by 7.5% each on the trunk and a lower extremity.

  15. HEMIPELVECTOMY: ERASTO GAERTNER HOSPITAL'S EXPERIENCES WITH 32 CASES IN 10 YEARS

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Rosyane Rena de; Crivellaro, André Luiz Soares; Mello, Glauco José Pauka; Neto, Múrio Armani; Filho, Geraldo de Freitas; Silva, Letícia Viani da

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To show the experience of the Erasto Gaertner Hospital with hemipelvectomy surgery over a 10-year period. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 32 patients who underwent hemipelvectomy at Erasto Gaertner Hospital between 1998 and 2008, assessing clinical and surgical characteristics. Results: Among the 32 patients, 15 were female and 17 were male. The mean age was 37.94 years. Eight cases showed involvement of the neurovascular bundle: three were located in the iliac and extended to the thigh, two were in the acetabulum and extended to the thigh and three were in the acetabulum and pubis. Twenty-three cases presented a neurovascular bundle free from neoplasia: 11 were restricted to the iliac, six were in the acetabular region, two were in the pubic ramus and four extended to the whole hemipelvis bone. One case involved the iliac-femoral vessels: one in the pubic ramus. Seven cases of chondrosarcoma and four cases of Ewing's sarcoma represented the majority. Eight cases underwent external hemipelvectomy and 24 underwent internal hemipelvectomy (11 were type I; four were type II; two were type II + III; three were type III and four were type IV). Of these 24 cases, 13 did not have any reconstruction, 10 had a fibular graft and one had an iliacfemoral vein and artery prosthesis. Twenty-six surgeries were curative and six were palliative. There were 14 deaths. Survival of two and five years was seen in 11 and 10 cases, respectively. For six cases, less than two years had passed since the operation. Three cases were lost during follow-up. Conclusion: This study shows the experiences of an oncology reference service specializing in highly complex surgical treatment. PMID:27022573

  16. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

  17. Aging With Schizophrenia: A Lifelong Experience of Multidimensional Losses and Suffering.

    PubMed

    Avieli, Hila; Mushkin, Peli; Araten-Bergman, Tal; Band-Winterstein, Tova

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the subjective experience of suffering in aging individuals with schizophrenia. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 participants aged 60-69. Phenomenological content analysis was performed. Nine dimensions of suffering emerged: social rejection; familial rejection; the symptoms of schizophrenia; hospitalisation; the side effects of medication; loss of employment potential; loss of independent accommodation; loss of social life, and loss of hope to be a partner and a parent. The suffering of aging people with schizophrenia is cumulative and ongoing and thus evokes issues such as existential loneliness and feelings of homelessness. PMID:26992876

  18. Multiple-case depth research: bringing experience-near closer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K J

    1999-12-01

    The term "experience-near" has become associated with a variety of alternatives to mainstream clinical research. These alternatives converge on one basic methodological goal-faithfulness to clinical phenomena as lived. This article presents one approach to lived clinical phenomena that I term multiple-case depth research or MCDR. MCDR is a novel and highly sensitive methodology that combines both in-depth case investigation with experiential therapeutic principles. To illustrate the power of MCDR, I present a hypothetical process and outcome study involving three client cohorts (those who undergo respectively cognitive-behavioral therapy, intersubjective psychoanalytic therapy, and existential-humanistic therapy). I detail the structure of this hypothetical study, the steps by which it proceeds, and the yield that it portends. I conclude that, if conducted properly, MCDR can provide rich, valid, and unprecedented insight into effective psychotherapy.

  19. Monitoring the Laryngeal Nerves During Thyroidectomy. Initial 115 Cases Experience.

    PubMed

    Popescu, R; Ponoran, D; Ignat, O; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    The lesions of the laryngeal nerves, despite low incidence, are the most severe long term complications after thyroidectomy. Visualization after careful dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is now the golden standard among thyroid surgeons. We assessed traditional landmarks for the identification of RLN and anatomic high risk situation. The study also presented our initial experience using neuro monitoring of RLN (IONM) during surgery. The results show a recognizable Zuckerkandl tubercle in 162 of the 222 cases (72,97%). After dissection RLN was found posterior from TZ in 154 cases (95,06%) and lateral from TZ in 8 cases (4,93%). The identification of the Zuckerkandl tubercle is a useful landmark for RLN localization. As concerning high risk situations we found 2 non recurrent laryngeal nerves (both on the right side). Extra laryngeal ramification of RLN is an anatomical reality with significant incidence (23,8% in our study) and major surgical involvement. Extra laryngeal ramification of RLN occurs more often between the cross point with inferior thyroid artery and larynx entry point. Monitoring the branches of RLN we obtain major EMG signal on the anterior one. The surgical meaning is that the anterior branch carries the most important motor fibers and we have to pay extra care in the correct identification and preservation of it. From a total of 222 visually identified RLN we have 215 nerves (96,84%) with positive EMG signal on monitoring. For 7 nerves (3,15%) we had no EMG signal. In 3 cases (2 total thyroidectomies and 1 lobectomy) involving 5 RLN there was a false negative result caused by electrode malposition or desoldering from endotracheal tube. Our initial experience shows that IONM is harmless, easy to handle and a useful tool for identifying the nerve and confirm its integrity. More extended studies are needed to show if intraoperative monitoring decreases the rate of RLN iatrogenic injury.

  20. Bochdalek hernia: A rare case report of adult age

    PubMed Central

    Yagmur, Yusuf; Yiğit, Ebral; Babur, Mehmet; Gumuş, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bochdalek hernia is the most common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and constitutes 85% of cases. Bochdalek hernia (BH) in adults is extremely rare. We present a BH case in an adult patient and discuss the literature. Presentation 22-year-old female patient with abdominal pain, occasional cramps, dysphagic problems, constipation, shortness of breath and choking for about 2 years applied to our clinic. Diagnosis A defect about 5 cm in the left hemidiaphragm posterior area and herniation of intra-abdominal fat plan in the left hemithorax was seen in intravenous and oral whole abdominal CT. Treatment Patient was operated laparoscopically. Transverse colon and a large portion of the omentum entering into hemidiaphragm were pulled in to intraperitoneal area carefully. Approximately 10 × 8 cm intraabdominal mesh was fixed to the defect area with the help of laparoscopic tacker. Conclusion Adult BH is very rare and when confronted laparoscopic treatment with mesh fixation can be performed safely. PMID:26865978

  1. Bone age assessment by content-based image retrieval and case-based reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Benedikt; Welter, Petra; Grouls, Christoph; Günther, Rolf W.; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2011-03-01

    Skeletal maturity is assessed visually by comparing hand radiographs to a standardized reference image atlas. Most common are the methods by Greulich & Pyle and Tanner & Whitehouse. For computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), local image regions of interest (ROI) such as the epiphysis or the carpal areas are extracted and evaluated. Heuristic approaches trying to automatically extract, measure and classify bones and distances between bones suffer from the high variability of biological material and the differences in bone development resulting from age, gender and ethnic origin. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) provides a robust solution without delineating and measuring bones. In this work, epiphyseal ROIs (eROIS) of a hand radiograph are compared to previous cases with known age, mimicking a human observer. Leaving-one-out experiments are conducted on 1,102 left hand radiographs and 15,428 metacarpal and phalangeal eROIs from the publicly available USC hand atlas. The similarity of the eROIs is assessed by a combination of cross-correlation, image distortion model, and Tamura texture features, yielding a mean error rate of 0.97 years and a variance of below 0.63 years. Furthermore, we introduce a publicly available online-demonstration system, where queries on the USC dataset as well as on uploaded radiographs are performed for instant CAD. In future, we plan to evaluate physician with CBIR-CAD against physician without CBIR-CAD rather than physician vs. CBIR-CAD.

  2. A case of amnesia at an early age.

    PubMed

    Brizzolara, Daniela; Casalini, Claudia; Montanaro, Domenico; Posteraro, Federico

    2003-01-01

    A dissociation between short- and long-term memory (LTM) and between the episodic and the semantic component of LTM is reported in a young girl who became amnesic at the age of 6 after an episode of acute encephalopathy resulting in bilateral frontal, insular, thalamic, ponto-mesencephalic, hippocampal and temporal lesions, as documented by MRI. The girl became amnesic a few months after starting school. A follow-up investigation showed that she was able to learn to read, write and acquire number facts and procedures and to improve her semantic knowledge. Our results show that the features of adult amnesia can also be found in children and that new semantic knowledge can be acquired in spite of an anterograde memory deficit. This dissociation does not agree with theories viewing long-term declarative memory as a unitary process mediated by the hippocampal system, but supports recent hypotheses that the acquisition of semantic knowledge is independent from episodic memory processes, and takes place through spared cortical regions subjacent to the hippocampi (Vargha-Khadem et al., 1997).

  3. A case of amnesia at an early age.

    PubMed

    Brizzolara, Daniela; Casalini, Claudia; Montanaro, Domenico; Posteraro, Federico

    2003-01-01

    A dissociation between short- and long-term memory (LTM) and between the episodic and the semantic component of LTM is reported in a young girl who became amnesic at the age of 6 after an episode of acute encephalopathy resulting in bilateral frontal, insular, thalamic, ponto-mesencephalic, hippocampal and temporal lesions, as documented by MRI. The girl became amnesic a few months after starting school. A follow-up investigation showed that she was able to learn to read, write and acquire number facts and procedures and to improve her semantic knowledge. Our results show that the features of adult amnesia can also be found in children and that new semantic knowledge can be acquired in spite of an anterograde memory deficit. This dissociation does not agree with theories viewing long-term declarative memory as a unitary process mediated by the hippocampal system, but supports recent hypotheses that the acquisition of semantic knowledge is independent from episodic memory processes, and takes place through spared cortical regions subjacent to the hippocampi (Vargha-Khadem et al., 1997). PMID:14584545

  4. Training Habits and Injury Experience in Distance Runners: Age- and Sex-Related Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    An 80-item questionnaire was used to study variations by age and sex in the training habits and injury experience of 688 adult distance runners. The results are analyzed according to these variables. Methodology is discussed. This is part of a longitudinal study of 1,700 runners. (Author/JL)

  5. The Advocacy Experiences of Parents of Elementary Age, Twice-Exceptional Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besnoy, Kevin D.; Swoszowski, Nicole C.; Newman, Jane L.; Floyd, Amanda; Jones, Parrish; Byrne, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    For many parents, successfully advocating for their twice-exceptional child can be intimidating and overwhelming. Using grounded theory, we conducted a study with parents (n = 8) of elementary age, twice-exceptional children to learn about their advocacy experiences. Findings revealed that parents simultaneously advocated for their child's…

  6. How Do People with Learning Disabilities Experience and Make Sense of the Ageing Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newberry, Gayle; Martin, Carol; Robbins, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Not enough is currently known about how people with learning disabilities experience and understand the ageing process. This is particularly important as the population of older people with learning disabilities is growing due to increased life expectancy. This article draws on the first author's doctoral research study, which aimed to…

  7. Ageing-Related Experiences of Adults with Learning Disability Resident in Rural Areas: One Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, Stuart; Canon-Vanry, Miranda; Ryan, Peta; Hussain, Rafat; Knox, Marie; Edwards, Meaghan; Parmenter, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor; Janicki, Matthew; Leggatt-Cook, Chez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to support services in rural areas is known to be problematic both in Australia, and in other countries around the world, but the majority of research on the population of people ageing with learning disability has so far focussed on metropolitan residents. The authors report about select aspects of the lived experience of older…

  8. Age at adoption from institutional care as a window into the lasting effects of early experiences.

    PubMed

    Julian, Megan M

    2013-06-01

    One of the major questions of human development is how early experience impacts the course of development years later. Children adopted from institutional care experience varying levels of deprivation in their early life followed by qualitatively better care in an adoptive home, providing a unique opportunity to study the lasting effects of early deprivation and its timing. The effects of age at adoption from institutional care are discussed for multiple domains of social and behavioral development within the context of several prominent developmental hypotheses about the effects of early deprivation (cumulative effects, experience-expectant developmental programming, and experience-adaptive developmental programming). Age at adoption effects are detected in a majority of studies, particularly when children experienced global deprivation and were assessed in adolescence. For most outcomes, institutionalization beyond a certain age is associated with a step-like increase in risk for lasting social and behavioral problems, with the step occurring at an earlier age for children who experienced more severe levels of deprivation. Findings are discussed in terms of their concordance and discordance with our current hypotheses, and speculative explanations for the findings are offered.

  9. Ethics and Retail Management Professionals: An Examination of Age, Education, and Experience Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.; Cavico, Frank J.; McCartney, Timothy O.; DiPaolo, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical maturity and behavior are of great concern to all educators, firms, and investors, and even more so in a recession. This research surveyed managers and employees in the retail environment to measure their Personal Business Ethics Scores (PBES) to see if age, education, and management experience makes a difference in making more ethical…

  10. The Experience of Religious Fortification: The Coming of Age of Religious Zionist Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapoport, Tamar; Garb, Yoni

    1998-01-01

    The accounts of 37 17-year-old religious Zionist female adolescents in a boarding school in Israel show that they experience adolescence as a intense period of religious fortification and conflict between religious and secular societal values. Implications for female coming of age are discussed. (SLD)

  11. Personal Experience of Aging in the Children of a Parent with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerritsen, Debby; Kuin, Volande; Steverink, Nardi

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether adults with a parent with dementia experience their personal aging differently than adults whose parents do not have dementia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 adults who had a parent with dementia and 25 controls. We found that, although in a general sense the two groups were quite similar in their…

  12. Age at adoption from institutional care as a window into the lasting effects of early experiences

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Megan M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major questions of human development is how early experience impacts the course of development years later. Children adopted from institutional care experience varying levels of deprivation in their early life followed by qualitatively better care in an adoptive home, providing a unique opportunity to study the lasting effects of early deprivation and its timing. The effects of age at adoption from institutional care are discussed for multiple domains of social and behavioral development within the context of several prominent developmental hypotheses about the effects of early deprivation (cumulative effects, experience-expectant developmental programming, and experience-adaptive developmental programming). Age at adoption effects are detected in a majority of studies, particularly when children experienced global deprivation and were assessed in adolescence. For most outcomes, institutionalization beyond a certain age is associated with a step-like increase in risk for lasting social and behavioral problems, with the step occurring at an earlier age for children who experienced more severe levels of deprivation. Findings are discussed in terms of their concordance and discordance with our current hypotheses, and speculative explanations for the findings are offered. PMID:23576122

  13. The Role of Age and Motivation for the Experience of Social Acceptance and Rejection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikitin, Jana; Schoch, Simone; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2014-01-01

    A study with n = 55 younger (18-33 years, M = 23.67) and n = 58 older (61-85 years, M = 71.44) adults investigated age-related differences in social approach and avoidance motivation and their consequences for the experience of social interactions. Results confirmed the hypothesis that a predominant habitual approach motivation in younger adults…

  14. Evaluation of Nontraditional Age Learners' Experiences in Internet-Based Clinical Social Work Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanke, Jayme; Zeman, Laura Dreuth

    2015-01-01

    This study involves an evaluation of online learners' experiences with two Internet-based clinical social work courses. The evaluation sought to discover whether there were differences in learning between traditional (under 25 years old) and nontraditional age learners (25 years and over) who completed the asynchronous online course. The study…

  15. Do Age-Related Increases in Tip-of-the-Tongue Experiences Signify Episodic Memory Impairments?

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy A.; Mandell, Arielle R.

    2015-01-01

    Tip-of-the-tongue experiences (TOTs), in which a name is known but cannot be immediately retrieved from memory, can be a cause of concern if these experiences are viewed as a sign of memory decline. The current study was conducted to investigate the relation between age and TOT frequency, and the influence of episodic memory, which is the type of memory most often assessed to detect memory problems, on that relation. In a sample of adults, increased age was found to be associated with more TOTs across different types of materials, and additional analyses suggested that these relations between age and TOT frequency were not attributable to the use of different response criteria or to different amounts of knowledge. Because statistical control of a measure of episodic memory had little effect on the relation between age and TOT frequency, age-related increases in TOTs and age-related decreases in episodic memory appear to be at least partially independent phenomena. PMID:24104505

  16. Job tenure and work injuries: a multivariate analysis of the relation with previous experience and differences by age

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the increasing flexibility in contemporary labour markets is that individuals change jobs more frequently than in the past. Indeed, in many cases, through collecting a lot of contracts, individuals work in the same economic sector or even in the same company, doing the same job in the same way as existing colleagues. A very long literature has established that newly hired workers – whatever the contract type – are more likely to be injured than those with longer job tenures. The objectives of this paper are: 1) to study the relationship between job tenure and injury risk taking into account past experience as a possible confounder; and 2) to evaluate how the effects of past experience and job tenure are modified by age. Methods Using a longitudinal national database, we considered only job contracts starting in 1998–2003 held by men working as blue collars or apprentices in the non-agricultural private sector. We calculated injury rates stratified by job tenure and age. Multivariate analyses were adjusted for background variables and previous experience accrued in the same economic sector of the current job. Results In the study period 58,271 workers who had experienced 10,260 injuries were observed. These people worked on 115,277 contracts in the six years observed (1.98 contracts per worker). Injury rates decrease with job tenure; the trend is the same in each age group; young workers have both the highest injury rate (9.20; CI 95%: 8.95-9.45) and the highest decrease with job tenure. Previous experience is associated with a decreasing injury rate in all age groups and for all job tenures. Multivariate analyses show that, even after checking for previous experience, workers with job tenure of less than 6 months show always higher relative risks compared with job tenure > 2 years: relative risk is 41% higher among under-thirty workers; it is 22% higher among people over forty. Previous experience is protective

  17. Melody recognition at fast and slow tempos: effects of age, experience, and familiarity.

    PubMed

    Dowling, W Jay; Bartlett, James C; Halpern, Andrea R; Andrews, W Melinda

    2008-04-01

    Eighty-one listeners defined by three age ranges (18-30, 31-59, and over 60 years) and three levels of musical experience performed an immediate recognition task requiring the detection of alterations in melodies. On each trial, a brief melody was presented, followed 5 sec later by a test stimulus that either was identical to the target or had two pitches changed, for a same-different judgment. Each melody pair was presented at 0.6 note/sec, 3.0 notes/sec, or 6.0 notes/sec. Performance was better with familiar melodies than with unfamiliar melodies. Overall performance declined slightly with age and improved substantially with increasing experience, in agreement with earlier results in an identification task. Tempo affected performance on familiar tunes (moderate was best), but not on unfamiliar tunes. We discuss these results in terms of theories of dynamic attending, cognitive slowing, and working memory in aging. PMID:18459260

  18. Musical experience strengthens the neural representation of sounds important for communication in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Anderson, Samira; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Older adults frequently complain that while they can hear a person talking, they cannot understand what is being said; this difficulty is exacerbated by background noise. Peripheral hearing loss cannot fully account for this age-related decline in speech-in-noise ability, as declines in central processing also contribute to this problem. Given that musicians have enhanced speech-in-noise perception, we aimed to define the effects of musical experience on subcortical responses to speech and speech-in-noise perception in middle-aged adults. Results reveal that musicians have enhanced neural encoding of speech in quiet and noisy settings. Enhancements include faster neural response timing, higher neural response consistency, more robust encoding of speech harmonics, and greater neural precision. Taken together, we suggest that musical experience provides perceptual benefits in an aging population by strengthening the underlying neural pathways necessary for the accurate representation of important temporal and spectral features of sound.

  19. Musical experience strengthens the neural representation of sounds important for communication in middle-aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Anderson, Samira; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Older adults frequently complain that while they can hear a person talking, they cannot understand what is being said; this difficulty is exacerbated by background noise. Peripheral hearing loss cannot fully account for this age-related decline in speech-in-noise ability, as declines in central processing also contribute to this problem. Given that musicians have enhanced speech-in-noise perception, we aimed to define the effects of musical experience on subcortical responses to speech and speech-in-noise perception in middle-aged adults. Results reveal that musicians have enhanced neural encoding of speech in quiet and noisy settings. Enhancements include faster neural response timing, higher neural response consistency, more robust encoding of speech harmonics, and greater neural precision. Taken together, we suggest that musical experience provides perceptual benefits in an aging population by strengthening the underlying neural pathways necessary for the accurate representation of important temporal and spectral features of sound. PMID:23189051

  20. Age-Related Decline and Diagnostic Performance of More and Less Prevalent Clinical Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Onge, Christina; Landry, Marjolaine; Xhignesse, Marianne; Voyer, Gilles; Tremblay-Lavoie, Stéphanie; Mamede, Sílvia; Schmidt, Henk; Rikers, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Since cognitive abilities have been shown to decrease with age, it is expected that older physicians would not perform as well as their younger counterparts on clinical cases unless their expertise can counteract the cognitive effects of aging. However, studies on the topic have shown contradictory results. This study aimed to further investigate…

  1. Gender, religion, and the experience of suffering: a case study.

    PubMed

    Black, Helen K

    2013-12-01

    This article explores how gender and religious belief come together in an elderly woman's experience of suffering. It is based on qualitative research that explored experiences of suffering in a group of community-dwelling elders (80+) living in a North American city. We use the case study method to introduce themes that show suffering's uniqueness to the individual whose narrative we report, as well as similarity to themes that emerged in other participants' narratives. In this case, an elderly woman's gender and religious identities merge in her stories of suffering, which include the memory of a childhood disability and an incident of clergy abuse that occurred 70 years previously. A key finding in this paper is that key themes in her story of suffering, which are disablement and clergy abuse, resonate to the general themes of suffering found in our study, which are (1) threats to personal identity; (2) loss of a valued item, quality, or relationship; and (3) a lack of control over self or the circumstances of life.

  2. Gender, religion, and the experience of suffering: a case study.

    PubMed

    Black, Helen K

    2013-12-01

    This article explores how gender and religious belief come together in an elderly woman's experience of suffering. It is based on qualitative research that explored experiences of suffering in a group of community-dwelling elders (80+) living in a North American city. We use the case study method to introduce themes that show suffering's uniqueness to the individual whose narrative we report, as well as similarity to themes that emerged in other participants' narratives. In this case, an elderly woman's gender and religious identities merge in her stories of suffering, which include the memory of a childhood disability and an incident of clergy abuse that occurred 70 years previously. A key finding in this paper is that key themes in her story of suffering, which are disablement and clergy abuse, resonate to the general themes of suffering found in our study, which are (1) threats to personal identity; (2) loss of a valued item, quality, or relationship; and (3) a lack of control over self or the circumstances of life. PMID:22033671

  3. Experiences of aging among immigrants from India to the United States: social work practice in a global context.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Gauri; Shibusawa, Tazuko

    2009-07-01

    The aging of immigrants is a critical component in the health dynamics of the nation's aging population. To date, few studies have addressed within-group diversity and linked contemporary contexts of global connectedness with the aging experiences of older immigrants. This study aims to conceptually understand the diversity in aging dynamics within a specific immigrant group: Indian immigrants in New York City. The impact of globalization and transnational connection on aging experiences on 2 within groups-Indians who came to the United States at age of 65 or older (LLIs) and those who came at an early age (ELIs) are analyzed. Implications for social work practice, research and policy are discussed.

  4. Effects of age and experience on reproductive performance of wood ducks

    SciTech Connect

    Hepp, G.R. ); Kennamer, R.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Data from a long-term study of Wood Ducks breeding in South Carolina were used to test whether reproductive performance was age specific and to evaluate several hypotheses proposed for age-specific variation. We used known-aged females from 1 through 5 yr of age. Yearling females initiated nests 11-19 d later than older females; heavier females, independent of age, nested earlier than lighter females. One-way analyses of covariance using female body mass and nesting date as covariates indicated that clutch size, mean egg mass, number of ducklings per nest, and the percentage of eggs hatching (hatching success) were independent of female age. Probability of nests producing at least one duckling (nest success) also was not related to female egg. We separately tested effects of breeding experience and female age class (yearling vs. adult) on reproductive performance. In the context of this study, females were considered as experienced if they previously were captured using nest boxes and inexperienced if there was no record of nest box use. Adult females with previous breeding experience initiated nests an average of 26 d earlier than adults without previous experience; body mass of experienced adults was greater than that of inexperienced adults. Adult females designated as [open quotes]inexperienced[close quotes] may have nested previously in natural cavities and were simply changing to nest boxes. Nest-site fidelity is known to affect nesting date, so we also compared nesting dates of inexperienced adults with a subset of of experienced females that changed nest sites.

  5. Experiences of identification and differentiation as functions of leprosy, personality and age.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, N S; Dhar, U; Singh, Y

    1984-01-01

    It is a study of sociogenic need satisfactions that determines the homeostasis of 'being' by remaining contingent conditions of perpetuation or debasement of the social 'self'. The paper has a focus on identification satisfaction and differentiation experience of patients of the highly stigmatized leprosy. The study proceeds with an 'Experimental Group--Control-Group' randomized design. Experimental Groups are two, viz., those of Lepromatous and Non-lepromatous patients. 'Control Group' consists of 'disease-free' normal people. The three independent variables are disease types, age, personality factors. The dependent variables are two, viz., score of identification satisfaction and differentiation experience, measured by standardized tools. Each dependent variable has four '3 X 3 X 2' factorial experiments to test 56 'Null Hypotheses'. The sample consists of 360 elements for each one of the eight experiments. Leprosy elements are drawn from the Central JALMA Institute for Leprosy and the 'Kushta Seva Sadan' (Agra). The 'F' test is run for statistical verification of 'Null hypotheses'. Results show presence of 'role-reversion' and 'role negation' of age and personality factors. The disease possesses 'anti-roles'. It does not allow age and personality factors to promote identification satisfaction and to demote differentiation and experience. The disease actively promotes differentiation and demotes identification through its own 'alien system'. The senescents are the greatest sufferers. 'Social Stigma' works a 'social thanatos' and exposes senescents to substantial 'self-erosion'. PMID:6548499

  6. [Treatment of mandibular condylar hyperplasia in developmental age. Clinical case].

    PubMed

    Silvestri, A; Incisivo, V; Mariani, G

    2000-10-01

    A case of hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle in a growing-up subject, observed at the Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery of the University of Rome "La Sapienza", is described. Hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle is a facial asymmetry due to the unilateral overdevelopment of the mandibular bone. In this study the authors underline how bone scintigraphy, 3D tomography and electrognatographic analysis, associated with standard radiography and cephalometry, are important methods of diagnosis in order to make an early diagnosis of hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle and differential diagnosis with other pathologies. In particular, bone scintigraphy is a useful screening procedure to detect if the pathology is in an active phase or not. The 3D tomography is used in pre-surgery to evaluate precisely morphological and structural alterations of the craniofacial bones on a tridimentional base. Finally, the electrognatographic test records the mandibular activity both in physiological and pathological conditions. All these instrumental techniques allow to make a diagnosis and lead to a possible therapeutical approach. PMID:11268938

  7. Exploring Experiences and Perceptions of Aging and Cognitive Decline Across Diverse Racial and Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa R.; Schuh, Holly; Sherzai, Dean; Belliard, Juan Carlos; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore how older adults from three prominent ethnoracial groups experience cognitive decline and aging. Method Semistructured key informant interviews (KIIs) and focus groups (FGs) were conducted with caregivers, experts, and older adults. Results (N = 75). Fifteen KIIs regarding cognitive aging issues were conducted among health care professionals and community-based agencies serving older adults. Eight FGs included family caregivers and physicians, and six FGs with Latino, African American, and White older adult community members. Major themes included (a) personal expectations about aging, (b) societal value of older adults, (c) model of care preferred, and (d) community concerns. An overarching theme was a sense of loss associated with aging; however, how this loss was experienced and dealt with varied. Discussion Distinct patterns of concerns and views are important to understand for the development of programs aimed at meeting the needs of diverse older adult community members to improve health outcomes. PMID:26925436

  8. On and Off the Mat: Yoga Experiences of Middle-Aged and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Wertman, Annette; Wister, Andrew V; Mitchell, Barbara A

    2016-06-01

    This article explores potential differences in yoga practice between middle-and older-aged adults. A health belief - life course model frames this research, and a mixed-methods analytic strategy is employed to examine life course pathways into yoga and motivations to practice, as well as perceived barriers and health benefits. For the quantitative analyses, a convenience sample of 452 participants was collected using an online questionnaire. For the qualitative analyses, face-to-face interviews were conducted with a sub-set of 20 participants. Unique differences between the age groups (both current age and age when started yoga) as well as by gender were found for selected pathways, reasons/motivations, and barriers to engage in yoga as well as for perceived health benefits. In addition, results underscore the importance of informational cues and social linkages that affect how individuals adopt and experience yoga. Implications for health promotion programs that target older adults are discussed. PMID:27086476

  9. The large area crop inventory experiment: An experiment to demonstrate how space-age technology can contribute to solving critical problems here on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The large area crop inventory experiment is being developed to predict crop production through satellite photographs. This experiment demonstrates how space age technology can contribute to solving practical problems of agriculture management.

  10. Emphysematous pyelonephritis: Our experience in managing these cases

    PubMed Central

    Uruc, Fatih; Yuksel, Ozgur Haki; Sahin, Aytac; Urkmez, Ahmet; Yildirim, Caglar; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare acute necrotising infection of renal parenchyma. We discuss clinical details and treatment strategies of 8 patients with EPN followed at our clinic. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical, laboratory, radiological findings and treatment modalities of 8 patients with EPN followed at our urology clinic between 2012 and 2015. Results: The mean patient age (female: 5; male: 3) was 62 (range: 51–82) years. Based on computed tomographic findings, EPN was classified as class 1 (n = 3), class 2 (n = 3) and class 3a (n = 2). All patients had fever, flank pain, nausea, and vomiting. Five patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus and 3 diabetic patients also had renal stones. Escherichia coli (n = 6), Klebsiella species (n = 1), and Proteus species (n = 1) were grown in urine cultures. All patients had unilateral involvement. Increased white blood cell counts, sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein levels were detected in all cases. In addition to medical treatment, 2 patients underwent a nephrostomy catheter placement and another 2 patients underwent nephrectomy upon deterioration of her general health state. After achieving clinical stabilization with medical treatment, 1 patient underwent endoscopic ureteral stone treatment. The remaining 3 cases were treated only with antibiotherapy. All patients were discharged with clinical cure. Conclusion: Mortality rates of EPN are gradually decreasing. Preservation of renal reserve is possible due to early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotherapy, and drainage. PMID:26279720

  11. Teaching for Transformative Experiences and Conceptual Change: A Case Study and Evaluation of a High School Biology Teacher's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Kevin J.; Linnenbrink-Garcia, Lisa; Koskey, Kristin L. K.; Stewart, Victoria C.; Manzey, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The Teaching for Transformative Experiences in Science (TTES) model is designed to foster transformative experiences (e.g., experiences with science content involving the application of that content in ways that expand perception and value in everyday experience). This study presents a case study of a high school biology teacher learning to…

  12. Natural history of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: experience with 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, A; Carey, J C; Cederholm, P; Viskochil, D H; Brothman, A R; Galasso, C

    1999-04-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a well-known chromosomal disorder attributable to partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p-). Although about 120 cases have been reported so far, there is still very little data on its natural history. Information given to parents at the time of diagnosis tends to be skewed to the extreme negative. To help delineate more thoroughly the natural history of WHS, and to obtain better information to answer parents' questions in a clinical setting, we evaluated 15 patients (12 females, 3 males) in three centers with the 4p- syndrome. Four of the cases had a follow-up spanning 16 years. Thirteen cases were detected by standard cytogenetics (regular G-banding 10, high-resolution banding 3), while the remaining 2 required fluorescence in situ hybridization. A total of 5/15 (33.3%) had heart lesions; 7/15 (46. 6%) had oral facial clefts; 13/15 (86.6%) had a seizure disorder, that tended to disappear with age; and 100% had severe/profound developmental retardation. One Italian patient had sensorineural deafness and 1 Utah patient had a right split hand defect. Of note, 2 Utah patients were able to walk with support (at 4 and 12 years of age, respectively), whereas 3 Italian patients and 1 Utah patient were able to walk unassisted (at 4, 5, 5 years 9 months, and 7 years of age, respectively). Two of the 3 Italian patients also achieved sphincter control (by day). The 8 patients receiving serial electroencephalogram studies showed fairly distinctive abnormalities, usually outlasting seizures. A slow, but constant progress in development was observed in all cases, during the follow-up period. In conclusion, the combined cases of the three centers represent considerable experience, providing new information on several aspects of this important deletion syndrome.

  13. Correlation between biological and physical availabilities of phenanthrene in soils and soil humin in aging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C.; Hunter, M.; Nam, K.; Pignatello, J.J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-08-01

    The bioavailability of an organic compound in a soil or sediment commonly declines with the soil-chemical contact time (aging). A series of parallel desorption and bioavailability experiments was carried out on phenanthrene previously aged up to {approximately}100 d in Mount Pleasant silt loam (Mt. Pleasant, NY, USA) or Pahokee peat soil to determine as a function of the aging period the degree of correlation between the reduction in bioavailability and the rate and extent of desorption and the influence of soil organic matter composition on availability. The mineralization of phenanthrene by two bacteria and the uptake of phenanthrene by earthworms showed expected declines with aging. Likewise, the rate of phenanthrene desorption in the absence of organisms decreased with aging. The decline in initial rate of mineralization or desorption was nearly an order of magnitude after 50 to 60 d of aging. Plots of normalized rates of mineralization or desorption practically coincided. Similarly, plots of normalized fraction mineralized or fraction desorbed during an arbitrary period gave comparable slopes. The partial removal of organic matter from the peat by extraction with dilute NaOH to leave the humin fraction reduced the biodegradation of phenanthrene aged for 38 and 63 d as compared to the nonextracted peat, but the effect disappeared at longer incubation times. The rate of desorption from samples of peat previously extracted with NaOH or Na{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} declined with aging and, for a given aging period, was significantly slower than from nonextracted peat. This work shows that the reduction in bioavailability of phenanthrene over time in soil is directly correlated with reduction of its physical availability due to desorption limitations. In addition, this study shows that removal of extractable humic substances leads to a decline in the rate of desorption and in the bioavailability of the substrate.

  14. Narcolepsy in pediatric ageExperience of a tertiary pediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Barreto, Maria Inês; Clemente, Vanda; Vasconcelos, Mónica; Estêvão, Maria Helena; Madureira, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the sleep–wake cycle of multifactorial etiology, is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, often associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Both early clinical suspicion and therapeutic approach are essential for promotion of cognitive development and social integration of these children. The authors present a descriptive retrospective study of a series of eight children in whom symptoms first started between 6.8 and 10.5 years of age. Diagnostic delay ranged from 4 months to 2 years. One child had H1N1 flu vaccination eight months before the clinical onset. The first multiple sleep latency test was positive in 6 of 8 cases. All cases were treated with methylphenidate, and venlafaxine was associated in 4 of them. In one case the initial therapy was exclusively behavioral. In all cases, symptomatic improvement, better school performance and social integration were achieved after therapeutic adjustment. PMID:26483902

  15. Experiments with Test Case Generation and Runtime Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artho, Cyrille; Drusinsky, Doron; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Mike; Pasareanu, Corina; Rosu, Grigore; Visser, Willem; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Software testing is typically an ad hoc process where human testers manually write many test inputs and expected test results, perhaps automating their execution in a regression suite. This process is cumbersome and costly. This paper reports preliminary results on an approach to further automate this process. The approach consists of combining automated test case generation based on systematically exploring the program's input domain, with runtime analysis, where execution traces are monitored and verified against temporal logic specifications, or analyzed using advanced algorithms for detecting concurrency errors such as data races and deadlocks. The approach suggests to generate specifications dynamically per input instance rather than statically once-and-for-all. The paper describes experiments with variants of this approach in the context of two examples, a planetary rover controller and a space craft fault protection system.

  16. How old am I? Age estimation in living adults: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, C; De Angelis, D; Ruspa, M; Gibelli, D; Cameriere, R; Grandi, M

    2008-12-01

    Age estimation is a common task in forensic medicine. Odontologists are frequently involved in the age assessment of human remains or living juveniles. The need to estimate the age of living individuals is becoming more frequent, because of the increasing number of immigrants (illegal or otherwise) without acceptable identification documents and with missing or uncertain birth dates. Whereas age estimation in subadults is usually performed by methods based on the physiological growth of bones and teeth, in the case of living adults age determination is more difficult, because body maturation has come to an end and the most commonly used procedures in forensics on human remains are too invasive for the living individual. The following case report aims at highlighting the difficulties of performing age estimation in the living adult and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach including forensic odontology: a middle-aged woman from Ethiopia who was supposed to be 62 years old (according to one set of documents), was removed from employment lists as she had reached the retirement age for Italy. However another set of documents indicated a younger age (46 years). Hormonal dosage of E2 (17-β estradiol) and FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone) showed an age close to the begininng of menopause. An experimental dental method, based on the decrease of canine pulp chamber with age, was performed in order to obtain more information: the result was an estimation of a 47-57 age range. Combined results suggested that it was more likely that the actual age of the woman was closer to 46 than to 62.

  17. Children's understanding and experience of mixed emotions: the roles of age, gender, and empathy.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Ruth T; Bloom, Jill Myerow; Fireman, Gary; Larsen, Jeff T

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the development of children's ability report understanding and experiencing allocentric mixed emotions, and explored the relation of gender and empathic ability to these skills. Participants (128 elementary school-aged children [63 boys, 65 girls]) were shown a movie clip with bittersweet themes to elicit mixed emotions. Findings from this study are consistent with prior research (Larsen, To, & Fireman, 2007), supporting a developmental progression in children's ability to both understand and report experiencing mixed emotions, with the two as distinct skills and children reporting understanding earlier than experiencing of emotions. Consistent with previous research, girls performed significantly better on the emotion experience task. Finally, results provided evidence that empathy partially mediates the relationship between age and reports of mixed emotion experience, but no evidence that empathy plays a role in mixed emotional understanding.

  18. Impact of gender, age and experience of pilots on general aviation accidents.

    PubMed

    Bazargan, Massoud; Guzhva, Vitaly S

    2011-05-01

    General aviation (GA) accounts for more than 82% of all air transport-related accidents and air transport-related fatalities in the U.S. In this study, we conduct a series of statistical analyses to investigate the significance of a pilot's gender, age and experience in influencing the risk for pilot errors and fatalities in GA accidents. There is no evidence from the Chi-square tests and logistic regression models that support the likelihood of an accident caused by pilot error to be related to pilot gender. However, evidence is found that male pilots, those older than 60 years of age, and with more experience, are more likely to be involved in a fatal accident.

  19. The estimation of age-related rates of infection from case notifications and serological data.

    PubMed Central

    Grenfell, B. T.; Anderson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes a maximum-likelihood method for the estimation of age-related changes in the per capita rate of infection, from case notification records or serological data. The methods are applied to records of measles incidence in the UK and USA, for which the estimated rates of infection tend to rise to a maximum value at around 10 years of age and then to decline in the older age-classes. Longer-term and seasonal trends are analysed by reference to changes in the estimated average age at infection; a statistic derived from a knowledge of the age-specific rates of infection. Future data needs in the epidemiological study of directly transmitted viral and bacterial diseases are discussed with reference to the detection and interpretation of age-dependent rates of disease transmission. PMID:4067297

  20. Experiences of drug use and ageing: health, quality of life, relationship and service implications

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Brenda; Beynon, Caryl; Pickering, Lucy; Duffy, Paul

    2010-01-01

    roe b., beynon c., pickering l. & duffy p. (2010)Experiences of drug use and ageing: health, quality of life, relationship and service implications. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(9), 1968–1979. Aim This paper is a report of an exploration of older people’s experiences of substance use in the context of ageing, and its impact on health, quality of life, relationships and service use. Background Use of illicit drugs by older people is a neglected policy, research and service provision and is generally perceived as a lifestyle of younger populations. Method A convenience sample of 11 people aged 49–61 years (mean 57 years) in contact with voluntary sector drug treatment services participated in qualitative semi-structured tape-recorded interviews and thematic content analysis was performed. The data were collected in 2008. Findings Drug use can have negative impacts on health status, quality of life, family relationships and social networks that accrue with age. Participants were identified as early or later onset users of drugs due to the impact of life events and relationships. A range of substances had been used currently and throughout their lives, with no single gateway drug identified as a prelude to personal drug careers. Life review and reflection were common, in keeping with ageing populations, along with regret of ever having started to use drugs. Living alone and their accommodation made them more susceptible to social isolation, and they reported experiences of death and dying of their contemporaries and family members earlier than usual in the life course. Conclusion Older people who continue to use drugs and require the support of services for treatment and care are an important emerging population and their specific needs should recognized. PMID:20626477

  1. The experiences of women of reproductive age regarding health-promoting behaviours: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health promotion is critical for community and family health. Health-promoting behaviours provide solutions for maintaining and promoting health. Although several studies have addressed the frequency and different types of health-promoting behaviours in women, little information is available about their experiences. This study aimed to explore the experiences of women of reproductive age regarding health-promoting behaviours. Methods In the present study, which was conducted in Tehran, Iran, 15 females, who were selected purposefully, participated in individual in-depth, semi-structured interviews. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using conventional content analysis. Results Nine main categories were derived from the analysis, including establishing an appropriate eating pattern, establishing a balanced rest/activity pattern, spirituality, stress management, personal sensitivity and responsibility, establishing an appropriate pattern of social interactions, practicing safe and healthy recreations, feeling improvement in physical-functional health, and feeling improvement in emotional and psychological health. The first 7 categories represent the nature and types of real health-promoting behaviours in women of reproductive age, whereas the last 2 constitute feeling and understanding of the implementation of these behaviours. Conclusion The study findings show that the women experience improvement in physical-functional, emotional, and psychological health by implementing health-promoting behaviours. It is therefore necessary to introduce strategies in the context of the community culture for improving different aspects of health-promoting behaviours in women of reproductive age to maintain and improve their overall health. PMID:22846587

  2. Facilitators and Inhibitors of Health-promoting Behaviors: The Experience of Iranian Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Baheiraei, Azam; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Charandabi, Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is scant information on the facilitators and inhibitors of health-promoting behaviors among reproductive-aged Iranian women. This study aims to explore the experience of factors influencing health-promoting behaviors among Iranian women of reproductive age from a qualitative perspective. Methods: This study was performed in Tehran in 2011, over about 8 months. Qualitative methods, specifically in-depth interviews, were used to gather data on 15 women of reproductive age. Data continued to be collected until introduction of new information ceased. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by conventional content analysis. Results: The reported factors were categorized into four main groups and 12 subgroups: (1) personal barriers (lack of time, school or work duties, lack of preparation or motivation, physical disability); (2) socio-environmental barriers (family responsibilities, environmental pressures, high-costs and financial pressures); (3) personal facilitators (personal interest and motivation, experience of disease); and (4) socio-environmental facilitators (family and social support networks, encouraging and motivating environment, media, and public education). Conclusions: In these women's experience, factors influencing health-promoting behaviors were either facilitators or inhibitors; most were inhibitors. The findings of this study show that, in addition to personal factors, the pursuit of health-promoting behaviors is affected by socio-environmental factors. These results will be useful in designing interventions and plans for women's health promotion that focus on the improvement of their environment and the modification of social factors. PMID:24049620

  3. Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy: experience with 28 cases.

    PubMed

    al-Rabeeah, A; al-Ashwal, A; al-Herbish, A; al-Jurayyan, N; Sakati, N; Abobakr, A

    1995-08-01

    Twenty-eight infants with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) were seen during a 10-year period. There were 13 males and 15 females. Their age at time of presentation ranged from a few hours to 6 months. Consanguinity was reported in 20 cases (71.4%). One family had two affected siblings and two affected cousins, another had three affected siblings and one affected cousin, and three others had lost siblings because of hypoglycemia and seizures. The primary clinical presentation was jitters and seizures in association with hypoglycemia. The diagnosis was suspected when the therapeutic glucose requirement was found to be more than 12 mg/kg/min and also when there was a good response to glucagon after exclusion of metabolic and storage diseases. A high insulin-to-glucose ratio was noted for all patients. Twenty-two had near-total (90%) pancreatectomy; the result was excellent in all but four, who required supplemental medical therapy. Five patients were treated medically, and one patient's family refused treatment. Twelve patients sustained moderate to severe brain injury before referral. There were no deaths, and only one patient had evidence of malabsorption after the pancreatectomy. PHHI correlates well with consanguinity and family history. Clinical awareness is essential to permit early diagnosis and prompt medical and supportive therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Early age of onset in fatal familial insomnia. Two novel cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Harder, A; Gregor, A; Wirth, T; Kreuz, F; Schulz-Schaeffer, W J; Windl, O; Plotkin, M; Amthauer, H; Neukirch, K; Kretzschmar, H A; Kuhlmann, T; Braas, R; Hahne, H H; Jendroska, K

    2004-06-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a prion disease exhibiting the PRNP D178N/129M genotype. Features of this autosomal dominant illness are progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, myoclonus, cognitive decline and motor signs associated with thalamic nerve cell loss and gliosis. In contrast to the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) the onset of FFI is in middle to late adulthood. We report two male patients who belong to a large German FFI kindred. They were examined clinically, and postmortem neuropathological examination was carried out in collaboration with the German reference centre for prion disease. Additionally, the prion protein gene (PRNP) was analysed. To identify further patients with disease onset under 30 years of age a comprehensive literature review was carried out. Two male patients presented with typical symptoms of FFI at the age of 23 and 24 years. In their kindred, the age of onset has never before been under 44 years of age. Our literature review identified five additional early onset cases who died at age 21 to 25 years. In all 22 reviewed FFI families the median manifestation age was 49.5 years. Although phenotypic variability of FFI is common, age of onset under 30 years has been considered to be a hallmark of vCJD with a mean manifestation at 27 years of age. Our findings underline that in addition to vCJD, FFI must be considered in cases of young-onset prion disease. This has considerable impact on clinical management and genetic counselling.

  5. Age-associated epigenetic drift: implications, and a case of epigenetic thrift?

    PubMed

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; West, James; Beck, Stephan

    2013-10-15

    It is now well established that the genomic landscape of DNA methylation (DNAm) gets altered as a function of age, a process we here call 'epigenetic drift'. The biological, functional, clinical and evolutionary significance of this epigenetic drift, however, remains unclear. We here provide a brief review of epigenetic drift, focusing on the potential implications for ageing, stem cell biology and disease risk prediction. It has been demonstrated that epigenetic drift affects most of the genome, suggesting a global deregulation of DNAm patterns with age. A component of this drift is tissue-specific, allowing remarkably accurate age-predictive models to be constructed. Another component is tissue-independent, targeting stem cell differentiation pathways and affecting stem cells, which may explain the observed decline of stem cell function with age. Age-associated increases in DNAm target developmental genes, overlapping those associated with environmental disease risk factors and with disease itself, notably cancer. In particular, cancers and precursor cancer lesions exhibit aggravated age DNAm signatures. Epigenetic drift is also influenced by genetic factors. Thus, drift emerges as a promising biomarker for premature or biological ageing, and could potentially be used in geriatrics for disease risk prediction. Finally, we propose, in the context of human evolution, that epigenetic drift may represent a case of epigenetic thrift, or bet-hedging. In summary, this review demonstrates the growing importance of the 'ageing epigenome', with potentially far-reaching implications for understanding the effect of age on stem cell function and differentiation, as well as for disease prevention.

  6. INEQUITY ISSUES AND MOTHERS' PREGNANCY, DELIVERY AND EARLY-AGE SURVIVAL EXPERIENCES IN ENDE DISTRICT, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Pardosi, Jerico Franciscus; Parr, Nick; Muhidin, Salut

    2015-11-01

    Indonesia's infant mortality rates are among the highest in South-East Asia, and there are substantial variations between its sub-national regions. This qualitative study aims to explore early mortality-related health service provision and gender inequity issues based on mothers' pregnancy, delivery and early-age survival experience in Ende district, Nusa Tenggara Timur province. Thirty-two mothers aged 18-45 years with at least one birth in the previous five years were interviewed in depth in May 2013. The results show most mothers have little knowledge about the danger signs for a child's illness. Mothers with early-age deaths generally did not know the cause of death. Very few mothers had received adequate information on maternal and child health during their antenatal and postnatal visits to the health facility. Some mothers expressed a preference for using a traditional birth attendant, because of their ready availability and the more extensive range of support services they provide, compared with local midwives. Unprofessional attitudes displayed by midwives were reported by several mothers. As elsewhere in Indonesia, the power of health decision-making lies with the husband. Policies aimed at elevating mothers' roles in health care decision-making are discussed as measures that would help to improve early-age survival outcomes. Widening the public health insurance distribution, especially among poorer mothers, and equalizing the geographical distribution of midwives and health facilities are recommended to tackle geographical inequities and to increase early-age survival in Ende district. PMID:25499196

  7. Radiological pitfalls of age estimation in adopted children: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, D; De Angelis, D; Cattaneo, C

    2015-04-01

    Age estimation has a relevant importance in assessing adopted children, also in cases where the age of the minor seems unquestioned, since pathological conditions may radically alter bodily growth. This may lead to an incorrect age evaluation, with consequent social and psychological problems linked to an inadequate collocation in public school. This study aims at exposing a case report concerning age estimation for a newly adopted child from Cambodia; previous clinical documentation reported information suggesting possible malnutrition, which was verified by the observation of a general disalignment of bone and dental structures. This example shows the importance of a thorough forensic evaluation of adopted children from other countries in order to verify the possible environmental modification of physiological growth even where it seems not to be needed, and represents a caveat for clinical and social personnel dealing with adoption procedures.

  8. Effects of Age and Experience on the Production of English Word-Final Stops by Korean Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of second language (L2) age of acquisition and amount of experience on the production of word-final stop consonant voicing by adult native Korean learners of English. Thirty learners, who differed in amount of L2 experience and age of L2 exposure, and 10 native English speakers produced 8 English monosyllabic words…

  9. Anesthetic experience of a patient with tracheomegaly -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Min, Byung Woo; Ban, Jong Suk; Lee, Sang Kon; Lee, Ji Hyang

    2010-01-01

    Tracheomegaly or tracheobronchomegaly is a rare syndrome that consists of marked dilatation of the trachea and the major bronchi, and this is usually due to a congenital defect of the elastic and muscle fibers of the tracheobroncheal tree. Physicians have had only limited experience with performing anesthesia in patients with this type of syndrome. This syndorme is diagnosed by roentenological investigation and this condition is frequently associated with chronic respiratory infection and partial airway obstruction. In this report, we present a case of performing tracheostomy for a patient with tracheomegaly, and this was probably secondary to mechanical ventilator therapy. The regular tracheostomy tube did not provided sufficient length to allow the cuff to lie properly in the trachea in this patient. Because of the peri-cuff air leakgae and hypercapnea after tracheostomy, we needed a longer tracheostomy tube. But we didn't have such a tube and we didn't know any other method, so we couldn't perform tracheostomy. Therefore, we introduced a method of reducing the length of the endotracheal tube to a suitable size until a longer tracheostomy tube can be obtained for those patients having tracheomegaly. PMID:20498800

  10. Neuroprotective effects of yoga practice: age-, experience-, and frequency-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Villemure, Chantal; Čeko, Marta; Cotton, Valerie A.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Yoga combines postures, breathing, and meditation. Despite reported health benefits, yoga’s effects on the brain have received little study. We used magnetic resonance imaging to compare age-related gray matter (GM) decline in yogis and controls. We also examined the effect of increasing yoga experience and weekly practice on GM volume and assessed which aspects of weekly practice contributed most to brain size. Controls displayed the well documented age-related global brain GM decline while yogis did not, suggesting that yoga contributes to protect the brain against age-related decline. Years of yoga experience correlated mostly with GM volume differences in the left hemisphere (insula, frontal operculum, and orbitofrontal cortex) suggesting that yoga tunes the brain toward a parasympatically driven mode and positive states. The number of hours of weekly practice correlated with GM volume in the primary somatosensory cortex/superior parietal lobule (S1/SPL), precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), hippocampus, and primary visual cortex (V1). Commonality analyses indicated that the combination of postures and meditation contributed the most to the size of the hippocampus, precuneus/PCC, and S1/SPL while the combination of meditation and breathing exercises contributed the most to V1 volume. Yoga’s potential neuroprotective effects may provide a neural basis for some of its beneficial effects. PMID:26029093

  11. Learning your own strength: winner and loser effects should change with age and experience

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Tim W.; Johnstone, Rufus A.

    2010-01-01

    Winner and loser effects, in which the outcome of an aggressive encounter influences the tendency to escalate future conflicts, have been documented in many taxa, but we have limited understanding of why they have evolved. One possibility is that individuals use previous victories and defeats to assess their fighting ability relative to others. We explored this idea by modelling a population of strong and weak individuals that do not know their own strength, but keep track of how many fights they have won. Under these conditions, adaptive behaviour generates clear winner and loser effects: individuals who win fights should escalate subsequent conflicts, whereas those who lose should retreat from aggressive opponents. But these effects depend strongly on age and experience. Young, naive individuals should show highly aggressive behaviour and pronounced loser effects. For these inexperienced individuals, fighting is especially profitable because it yields valuable information about their strength. Aggression should then decline as an individual ages and gains experience, with those who lose fights becoming more submissive. Older individuals, who have a better idea of their own strength, should be more strongly influenced by victories than losses. In conclusion, we predict that both aggressiveness and the relative magnitude of winner and loser effects should change with age, owing to changes in how individuals perceive their own strength. PMID:20053644

  12. Neuroprotective effects of yoga practice: age-, experience-, and frequency-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Villemure, Chantal; Čeko, Marta; Cotton, Valerie A; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Yoga combines postures, breathing, and meditation. Despite reported health benefits, yoga's effects on the brain have received little study. We used magnetic resonance imaging to compare age-related gray matter (GM) decline in yogis and controls. We also examined the effect of increasing yoga experience and weekly practice on GM volume and assessed which aspects of weekly practice contributed most to brain size. Controls displayed the well documented age-related global brain GM decline while yogis did not, suggesting that yoga contributes to protect the brain against age-related decline. Years of yoga experience correlated mostly with GM volume differences in the left hemisphere (insula, frontal operculum, and orbitofrontal cortex) suggesting that yoga tunes the brain toward a parasympatically driven mode and positive states. The number of hours of weekly practice correlated with GM volume in the primary somatosensory cortex/superior parietal lobule (S1/SPL), precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), hippocampus, and primary visual cortex (V1). Commonality analyses indicated that the combination of postures and meditation contributed the most to the size of the hippocampus, precuneus/PCC, and S1/SPL while the combination of meditation and breathing exercises contributed the most to V1 volume. Yoga's potential neuroprotective effects may provide a neural basis for some of its beneficial effects. PMID:26029093

  13. Experimenting from a Distance in the Case of Rutherford Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grober, S.; Vetter, M.; Eckert, B.; Jodl, H. -J.

    2010-01-01

    The Rutherford scattering experiment plays a central role in working out atomic models in physics and chemistry. Nevertheless, the experiment is rarely performed at school or in introductory physics courses at university. Therefore, we realized this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL), i.e. the experiment is set up in reality and…

  14. Auricular reconstruction of congenital microtia: personal experience in 225 cases.

    PubMed

    Anghinoni, M; Bailleul, C; Magri, A S

    2015-06-01

    Microtia is a congenital disease with various degrees of severity, ranging from the presence of rudimentary and malformed vestigial structures to the total absence of the ear (anotia). The complex anatomy of the external ear and the necessity to provide good projection and symmetry make this reconstruction particularly difficult. The aim of this work is to report our surgical technique of microtic ear correction and to analyse the short and long term results. From 2000 to 2013, 210 patients affected by microtia were treated at the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Division, Head and Neck Department, University Hospital of Parma. The patient population consisted of 95 women and 115 men, aged from 7 to 49 years. A total of 225 reconstructions have been performed in two surgical stages basing of Firmin's technique with some modifications and refinements. The first stage consists in fabrication and grafting of a three-dimensional costal cartilage framework. The second stage is performed 5-6 months later: the reconstructed ear is raised up and an additional cartilaginous graft is used to increase its projection. A mastoid fascial flap together with a skin graft are then used to protect the cartilage graft. All reconstructions were performed without any major complication. The results have been considered satisfactory by all patients starting from the first surgical step. Low morbidity, the good results obtained and a high rate of patient satisfaction make our protocol an optimal choice for treatment of microtia. The surgeon's experience and postoperative patient care must be considered as essential aspects of treatment. PMID:26246664

  15. An Art Inquiry into the Experiences of a Family of a Child Living with a Chronic Pain Condition: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Kathryn; Shepard, Blythe

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pain among children is poorly understood, and few studies portray the experiences of sufferers and their families. This qualitative case study aimed at gaining a rich description and a contextual understanding of the experiences of a young chronic pain sufferer, aged 6, and her family members through an art-making process. Several examples…

  16. Age Variation in the Prevalence of "DSM-IV" Disorders in Cases of Suicide of Middle-Aged and Older Persons in Sydney

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowdon, John; Draper, Brian; Wyder, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Data concerning 127 persons aged 35 years or above who died by suicide (as determined in consecutive cases by a Sydney coroner) were analyzed. Psychological autopsy (PA) interviews were conducted in 52 cases, and details were compared with the 75 cases where data were available only from coroner's files (CF). Most characteristics of the two groups…

  17. Relationship between home and school adjustment: children's experiences at ages 10 and 14.

    PubMed

    Aman-Back, Susanna; Björkqvist, Kaj

    2007-06-01

    773 children (359 girls, 414 boys) of two age groups, 10 years and 14 years, completed a questionnaire about subjective experiences of home and school. Children who reported getting along well with their parents and finding it easy to communicate with them also reported being more satisfied with themselves, enjoying school more, feeling less lonely, being less bullied by others, and also bullying others less. Boys reported bullying more than girls and more satisfaction with themselves than girls. Girls reported enjoying school more, feeling lonelier, sometimes having trouble falling asleep, and having headaches more often than boys. Girls at age 14 reported experiencing a prominent increase in headaches and parental complaints about their eating habits.

  18. Biosphere reserves in action: Case studies of the American experience

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-26

    For nearly 20 years, biosphere reserves have offered a unique framework for building the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for conservation and sustainable use of ecosystems. The 12 case studies in this volume chronicle many of the cooperative efforts to implement the biosphere reserve concept in the United States. Considered together, these efforts involve more than 20 types of protected areas, and the participation of all levels of government, and many private organizations, academic institutions, citizens groups, and individuals. Biosphere reserves are multi-purpose areas that are nominated by the national committee of the Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) and designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to serve as demonstration areas for cooperation in building harmonious relationships between human activities and the conservation of ecosystems and biological diversity. Each biosphere reserve exemplifies the characteristic ecosystems of one of the worlds biogeographical regions. It is a land or coas%arine area involving human communities as integral components and including resources managed for objectives ranging from complete protection to intensive, yet sustainable development. A biosphere reserve is envisioned as a regional ''landscape for learning'' in which monitoring, research, education, and training are encouraged to support sustainable conservation of natural and managed ecosystems. It is a framework for regional cooperation involving government decisionmakers, scientists, resource managers, private organizations and local people (i.e., the biosphere reserve ''stakeholders''). Finally, each biosphere reserve is part of a global network for sharing information and experience to help address complex problems of conservation and development. The 12 case studies presented in this report represent only a few of the possible evolutions of a biosphere reserve in its efforts to reach out to the local

  19. Middle-Aged Independent-Living African Americans' Selections for Advance Directives: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Brenda J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this collective embedded qualitative case study was to examine the perspectives of three middle-aged independent-living African Americans who had participated in the process of advance care planning (ACP) and completed at least two advance directives (ADs), a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care (DPAHC) and a Living Will (LW).…

  20. A Case Series of Marijuana Exposures in Pediatric Patients Less than 5 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, George Sam; Narang, Sandeep K.; Wells, Kathryn; Chuang, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In Colorado, there has been a large increase in medical marijuana dispensaries and licenses for the use of medical marijuana over the past year. This is a retrospective case series of marijuana exposures that have presented to the emergency department (ED) in children less than 5 years of age. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart…

  1. A Precarious Passage: Aging out of the Child-Only Case Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Mary Agnes; Hamilton, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Child-only cases, minors who receive welfare benefits as individuals, lose their eligibility at age 18 but face the same challenges to self-sufficiency as other "emerging adults." This study examines how 59 youth in 4 New York State communities thought about and prepared for the termination of their benefits. In 8 focus groups and 12 follow-up…

  2. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private…

  3. Successful Aging in a 70-Year-Old Man with Down Syndrome: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Devenny, Darlynne A.; Gu, Hong; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Kittler, Phyllis; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Schupf, Nicole; Scotto, Luigi; Tycko, Benjamin; Urv, Tiina K.; Ye, Lingling; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The authors present a case study of a 70-year-old man with Down syndrome ("Mr. C.") who they followed for 16 years and who does not exhibit declines in cognitive or functional capacities indicative of dementia, despite having well-documented, complete trisomy 21. The authors describe the age-associated changes that occurred over 16 years as well…

  4. Language, Literacy and Numeracy in National Training Packages: Case Studies in Aged Care and Hospitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Christine; Brand, Jennie Bickmore

    The implementation and effectiveness of the inclusion of literacy and numeracy in industry training packages was examined in case studies of three programs in Western Australia. Two were certificate programs in cooking and food and beverage as specified in the hospitality training package, and the third was an aged care program based on the…

  5. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer.

  6. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer. PMID:25581402

  7. Understanding the Experience of Age-Related Vestibular Loss in Older Individuals: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Carol; Bridges, John F. P.; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Background Inner ear balance (or vestibular) function declines with age and is associated with decreased mobility and an increased risk of falls in older individuals. We sought to understand the lived experience of older adults with vestibular loss in order to improve care in this population. Methods Qualitative data were derived from semi-structured interviews of individuals aged 65 years or older presenting to the Balance and Falls Prevention Clinic from February 1, 2014 to March 30, 2015 for evaluation of age-related vestibular loss. Transcripts were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. We created a taxonomy of overarching superordinate themes based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Framework, and classified key dimensions within each of these themes. Results Sixteen interviews were conducted with individuals (mean age 76.0 years, 75 % female) with age-related vestibular loss. The three superordinate themes and associated key dimensions were (1) body impairment (including depression, fatigue, fear/anxiety, and problems with concentrating and memory); (2) activity limitation and participation restriction (isolation, needing to stop in the middle of activities, reduced participation relative to expectations, reduced ability to drive or travel, and problems with bending/looking up, standing, and walking); and (3) environmental influences (needing help with daily activities). All participants reported difficulty walking. Conclusions Older adults report that vestibular loss impacts their body functioning and restricts their participation in activities. The specific key dimensions uncovered by this qualitative study can be used to evaluate care from the patient's perspective. PMID:26739817

  8. Laparoscopic splenectomy: a single center experience. Unusual cases and expanded inclusion criteria for laparoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Marte, Gianpaolo; Scuderi, Vincenzo; Rocca, Aldo; Surfaro, Giuseppe; Migliaccio, Carla; Ceriello, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) is nowadays considered as the gold standard for most hematological diseases where splenectomy is necessary, but many questions still remain. The aim of this study was to analyze our 5-years experiences consisting of 48 consecutive LS cases in order to assess the optimal approach and the feasibility of the procedure also in malignant diseases and unusual cases such as a primary spleen lymphoma, a big splenic artery aneurism, or a spleen infarct due to a huge pancreatic pseudo-cyst. Forty-eight consecutive patients underwent LS from January 2006 to January 2011 with at least 1-year follow-up. Clinical data and immediate outcome were retrospectively recorded; age, diagnosis, operation time, perioperative transfusion requirement, conversion rate, accessory incision, hospital stay, and complications were analyzed. We had 14 cases of malignant splenic disease, the most frequent malignant diagnosis was non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (12/14, 85.7 %). Splenomegaly (interpole diameter (ID) >20 cm) was observed in 12 cases (25 %) and massive splenomegaly (ID >25 cm) in 3 cases (6.25 %). Conversion to laparotomy occurred in two patients (4.16 %), both associated to uncontrollable bleeding in patients with splenomegaly. Mean operative time was 138 ± 22 min. Mean hospital stay was 4.5 days. Postoperative morbidity rate was 8.8 % for the benign group and 35.7 % in the malignant group. Mortality occurred in 1/48 patients (2.08 %), as a result of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). LS can be performed safely for malignant splenic disease and splenomegaly without any statistically significant increase of morbidity and mortality rate. Conversion rate is increased for massive splenomegaly. LS should be considered as the preferential approach even in patients with malignant disease, splenomegaly, or unusual cases. Massive splenomegaly should be considered as relative contraindication to LS even at experienced centers. PMID:23355349

  9. The Mortality Penalty of Incarceration: Evidence from a Population-based Case-control Study of Working-age Males.

    PubMed

    Pridemore, William Alex

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing body of research on the effects of incarceration on health, though there are few studies in the sociological literature of the association between incarceration and premature mortality. This study examined the risk of male premature mortality associated with incarceration. Data came from the Izhevsk (Russia) Family Study, a large-scale population-based case-control design. Cases (n = 1,750) were male deaths aged 25 to 54 in Izhevsk between October 2003 and October 2005. Controls (n = 1,750) were selected at random from a city population register. The key independent variable was lifetime prevalence of incarceration. I used logistic regression to estimate mortality odds ratios, controlling for age, hazardous drinking, smoking status, marital status, and education. Seventeen percent of cases and 5 percent of controls had been incarcerated. Men who had been incarcerated were more than twice as likely as those who had not to experience premature mortality (odds ratio = 2.2, 95 percent confidence interval: 1.6-3.0). Relative to cases with no prior incarceration, cases who had been incarcerated were more likely to die from infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, non-alcohol-related accidental poisonings, and homicide. Taken together with other recent research, these results from a rigorous case-control design reveal not only that incarceration has durable effects on illness, but that its consequences extend to a greater risk of early death. I draw on the sociology of health literature on exposure, stress, and social integration to speculate about the reasons for this mortality penalty of incarceration.

  10. The Mortality Penalty of Incarceration: Evidence from a Population-based Case-control Study of Working-age Males.

    PubMed

    Pridemore, William Alex

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing body of research on the effects of incarceration on health, though there are few studies in the sociological literature of the association between incarceration and premature mortality. This study examined the risk of male premature mortality associated with incarceration. Data came from the Izhevsk (Russia) Family Study, a large-scale population-based case-control design. Cases (n = 1,750) were male deaths aged 25 to 54 in Izhevsk between October 2003 and October 2005. Controls (n = 1,750) were selected at random from a city population register. The key independent variable was lifetime prevalence of incarceration. I used logistic regression to estimate mortality odds ratios, controlling for age, hazardous drinking, smoking status, marital status, and education. Seventeen percent of cases and 5 percent of controls had been incarcerated. Men who had been incarcerated were more than twice as likely as those who had not to experience premature mortality (odds ratio = 2.2, 95 percent confidence interval: 1.6-3.0). Relative to cases with no prior incarceration, cases who had been incarcerated were more likely to die from infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, non-alcohol-related accidental poisonings, and homicide. Taken together with other recent research, these results from a rigorous case-control design reveal not only that incarceration has durable effects on illness, but that its consequences extend to a greater risk of early death. I draw on the sociology of health literature on exposure, stress, and social integration to speculate about the reasons for this mortality penalty of incarceration. PMID:24793163

  11. Experimenting from a distance in the case of Rutherford scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröber, S.; Vetter, M.; Eckert, B.; Jodl, H.-J.

    2010-07-01

    The Rutherford scattering experiment plays a central role in working out atomic models in physics and chemistry. Nevertheless, the experiment is rarely performed at school or in introductory physics courses at university. Therefore, we realized this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL), i.e. the experiment is set up in reality and can be operated by a computer via the Internet. We present results of measurements and supplementary didactical material. In addition, we make suggestions on how to use the RCL in class and we describe the added value of performing this experiment as an RCL.

  12. Modeling old-age wealth with endogenous early-life outcomes: The case of Mexico.

    PubMed

    DeGraff, Deborah S; Wong, Rebeca

    2014-04-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on the life course and aging by examining the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being, using data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Empirical research in this area has been challenged by the potential endogeneity of the early-life outcomes of interest, an issue which most studies ignore or downplay. Our contribution takes two forms: (1) we examine in detail the potential importance of two key life-cycle outcomes, age at marriage (a measure of family formation) and years of educational attainment (a measure of human capital investment) for old-age wealth, and (2) we illustrate the empirical value of past context variables that could help model the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being. Our illustrative approach, matching macro-level historical policy and census variables to individual records to use as instruments in modeling the endogeneity of early-life behaviors, yields a statistically identified two-stage model of old-age wealth with minimum bias. We use simulations to show that the results for the model of wealth in old age are meaningfully different when comparing the approach that accounts for endogeneity with an approach that assumes exogeneity of early-life outcomes. Furthermore, our results suggest that in the Mexican case, models which ignore the potential endogeneity of early-life outcomes are likely to under-estimate the effects of such variables on old-age wealth.

  13. Modeling old-age wealth with endogenous early-life outcomes: The case of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    DeGraff, Deborah S.; Wong, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on the life course and aging by examining the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being, using data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Empirical research in this area has been challenged by the potential endogeneity of the early-life outcomes of interest, an issue which most studies ignore or downplay. Our contribution takes two forms: (1) we examine in detail the potential importance of two key life-cycle outcomes, age at marriage (a measure of family formation) and years of educational attainment (a measure of human capital investment) for old-age wealth, and (2) we illustrate the empirical value of past context variables that could help model the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being. Our illustrative approach, matching macro-level historical policy and census variables to individual records to use as instruments in modeling the endogeneity of early-life behaviors, yields a statistically identified two-stage model of old-age wealth with minimum bias. We use simulations to show that the results for the model of wealth in old age are meaningfully different when comparing the approach that accounts for endogeneity with an approach that assumes exogeneity of early-life outcomes. Furthermore, our results suggest that in the Mexican case, models which ignore the potential endogeneity of early-life outcomes are likely to under-estimate the effects of such variables on old-age wealth. PMID:25170434

  14. Lithium and age of pre-main sequence stars: the case of Parenago 1802

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarrusso, M.; Tognelli, E.; Catanzaro, G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Lamia, L.; Leone, F.; Pizzone, R. G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.

    2016-04-01

    With the aim to test the present capability of the stellar surface lithium abundance in providing an estimation for the age of PMS stars, we analyze the case of the detached, double-lined, eclipsing binary system PAR 1802. For this system, the lithium age has been compared with the theoretical one, as estimated by applying a Bayesian analysis method on a large grid of stellar evolutionary models. The models have been computed for several values of chemical composition and mixing length, by means of the code FRANEC updated with the Trojan Horse reaction rates involving lithium burning.

  15. Maternal death after oocyte donation at high maternal age: case report

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Joke M; Schuitemaker, Nico WE; Steegers, Eric AP; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2008-01-01

    Background The percentage of women giving birth after the age of 35 increased in many western countries. The number of women remaining childless also increased, mostly due to aging oocytes. The method of oocyte donation offers the possibility for infertile older women to become pregnant. Gestation after oocyte-donation-IVF, however, is not without risks for the mother, especially at advanced age. Case presentation An infertile woman went abroad for oocyte-donation-IVF, since this treatment is not offered in The Netherlands after the age of 45. The first oocyte donation treatment resulted in multiple gestation, but was ended by induced abortion: the woman could not cope with the idea of being pregnant with twins. During the second pregnancy after oocyte donation, at the age of 50, she was mentally more stable. The pregnancy, again a multiple gestation, was uneventful until delivery. Immediately after delivery the woman had hypertension with nausea and vomiting. A few hours later she had an eclamptic fit. HELLP-syndrome was diagnosed. She died due to cerebral haemorrhage. Conclusion In The Netherlands, the age limit for women receiving donor oocytes is 45 years and commercial oocyte donation is forbidden by law. In other countries there is no age limit, the reason why some women are going abroad to receive the treatment of their choice. Advanced age, IVF and twin pregnancy are all risk factors for pre-eclampsia, the leading cause of maternal death in The Netherlands. Patient autonomy is an important ethical principle, but doctors are also bound to the principle of 'not doing harm', and do have the right to refuse medical treatment such as IVF-treatment. The discussion whether women above 50 should have children is still not closed. If the decision is made to offer this treatment to a woman at advanced age, the doctor should counsel her intensively about the risks before treatment is started. PMID:19116003

  16. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  17. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  18. Tinea barbae (tinea sycosis): experience with nine cases.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Ramírez-Tamayo, Teresa; Saúl, Amado

    2003-12-01

    Tinea barbae is a rare dermatophytosis that affects the hair and hair follicles of the beard and mustache. This paper presents 9 cases of tinea barbae observed over an 18-year period of time and classified as follows: 1 was superficial and 8 were deep (6 folliculitis-like and 2 kerion-like). Most of the cases (4) were associated with topical steroid therapy, others with pet contact (3 cases) and one with diabetes. The causal agents isolated were: Trichophyton rubrum in 3; Microsporum canis in 3; Trichophyton mentagrophytes in 2; and Trichophyton tonsurans in one. The involvement of the hair was observed and classified in all cases. The trichophytin skin reaction was positive in all 9 patients. All the patients were treated with systemic antimycotics, 3 cases with griseofulvin, 1 with ketoconazole, 3 with itraconazole, and 2 with terbinafine. Clinical and mycologic cures were achieved at 6 to 8 weeks of treatment at the usual doses.

  19. Getting to Know Me: Social Role Experiences and Age Differences in Self-Concept Clarity During Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Lodi-Smith, Jennifer; Roberts, Brent W.

    2011-01-01

    The current research had 2 aims: (1) to determine the cross-sectional age differences in self-concept clarity during adulthood and (2) to examine the importance of social role experiences for age differences in self-concept clarity. These aims were addressed in 2 large samples of adults ranging in age from 18 to 94 years. In both studies, self-concept clarity had a curvilinear relation to age such that self-concept clarity was positively related to age from young adulthood through middle age and negatively related to age in older adulthood. This relationship was moderated by annual income and community investment. In addition, annual income and health-related social role limitations mediated age differences in self-concept clarity. Findings are discussed in terms of modern theories of identity development. PMID:20663028

  20. Getting to know me: social role experiences and age differences in self-concept clarity during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lodi-Smith, Jennifer; Roberts, Brent W

    2010-10-01

    The current research had 2 aims: (1) to determine the cross-sectional age differences in self-concept clarity during adulthood and (2) to examine the importance of social role experiences for age differences in self-concept clarity. These aims were addressed in 2 large samples of adults ranging in age from 18 to 94 years. In both studies, self-concept clarity had a curvilinear relation to age such that self-concept clarity was positively related to age from young adulthood through middle age and negatively related to age in older adulthood. This relationship was moderated by annual income and community investment. In addition, annual income and health-related social role limitations mediated age differences in self-concept clarity. Findings are discussed in terms of modern theories of identity development.

  1. A case of an adoptive girl with precocious puberty: the problem of age estimation.

    PubMed

    De Donno, Antonio; Roca, Roberta; Introna, Francesco; Santoro, Valeria

    2013-09-10

    Age estimation is one of the main tasks of forensic anthropology and odontology, both on the dead and the living. In living subjects, age estimation may be used to establish an individual's status as a minor in cases involving adoption, criminal responsibility, child pornography, and those seeking asylum, especially where adequate identification documents are lacking. The authors report a case about age assessment of a girl born in Mbujimayi (Democratic Republic of Congo) and later adopted in Italy. The birth certificate issued after finding the child in a state of abandonment (in December 2007), bore date of 12.12.2004, but this was in contrast with the year of birth - 2003 - stated on the certification available to the center that had provided accommodation to the girl in Africa. Her adoptive parents reported that the child had been diagnosed with precocious puberty and was thus under treatment. She weighed 32.5 kg and was 132.5 cm tall. Body mass index (BMI) corresponded to the range between 9.5 and 14 years of age. The assessment of maturity indicators (sexual characteristics) placed the child at the lower limits of Stage II of Tanner's classification (sparse growth of long, slightly darkened, downy straight pubic hair; elevation of the breast and nipple as a small mound with increased diameter of the areolae). The skeletal age was determined by taking X-rays of the hand and wrist using Fels, TW2 and Greulich and Pyle methods. Dental growth was assessed through orthopantomogram using Demirjian's technique. The methods applied were adjusted considering the studies on African population found in the literature, and a skeletal and dental age of 10 years was established. Afterwards, the wrist X-rays performed at the Children's Hospital of Bari, 7 months before our investigation, revealed a skeletal age of 7 years. This evidence showed that, despite the treatment the child had promptly initiated, early puberty had influenced the skeletal growth with an acceleration

  2. Age, training, and previous experience predict race performance in long-distance inline skaters, not anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-02-01

    The association of characteristics of anthropometry, training, and previous experience with race time in 84 recreational, long-distance, inline skaters at the longest inline marathon in Europe (111 km), the Inline One-eleven in Switzerland, was investigated to identify predictor variables for performance. Age, duration per training unit, and personal best time were the only three variables related to race time in a multiple regression, while none of the 16 anthropometric variables were related. Anthropometric characteristics seem to be of no importance for a fast race time in a long-distance inline skating race in contrast to training volume and previous experience, when controlled with covariates. Improving performance in a long-distance inline skating race might be related to a high training volume and previous race experience. Also, doing such a race requires a parallel psychological effort, mental stamina, focus, and persistence. This may be reflected in the preparation and training for the event. Future studies should investigate what motivates these athletes to train and compete.

  3. Statistic analyses of the color experience according to the age of the observer.

    PubMed

    Hunjet, Anica; Parac-Osterman, Durdica; Vucaj, Edita

    2013-04-01

    Psychological experience of color is a real state of the communication between the environment and color, and it will depend on the source of the light, angle of the view, and particular on the observer and his health condition. Hering's theory or a theory of the opponent processes supposes that cones, which are situated in the retina of the eye, are not sensible on the three chromatic domains (areas, fields, zones) (red, green and purple-blue), but they produce a signal based on the principle of the opposed pairs of colors. A reason of this theory depends on the fact that certain disorders of the color eyesight, which include blindness to certain colors, cause blindness to pairs of opponent colors. This paper presents a demonstration of the experience of blue and yellow tone according to the age of the observer. For the testing of the statistically significant differences in the omission in the color experience according to the color of the background we use following statistical tests: Mann-Whitnney U Test, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Median test. It was proven that the differences are statistically significant in the elderly persons (older than 35 years).

  4. Challenging cisgenderism in the ageing and aged care sector: Meeting the needs of older people of trans and/or non-binary experience.

    PubMed

    Ansara, Y Gavriel

    2015-10-01

    Recent Australian legislative and policy changes can benefit people of trans and/or non-binary experience (e.g. men assigned female with stereotypically 'female' bodies, women assigned male with stereotypically 'male' bodies, and people who identify as genderqueer, agender [having no gender], bi-gender [having two genders] or another gender option). These populations often experience cisgenderism, which previous research defined as 'the ideology that invalidates people's own understanding of their genders and bodies'. Some documented forms of cisgenderism include pathologising (treating people's genders and bodies as disordered) and misgendering (disregarding people's own understanding and classifications of their genders and bodies). This system of classifying people's lived experiences of gender and body invalidation is called the cisgenderism framework. Applying the cisgenderism framework in the ageing and aged care sector can enhance service providers' ability to meet the needs of older people of trans and/or non-binary experience. PMID:26525440

  5. Challenging cisgenderism in the ageing and aged care sector: Meeting the needs of older people of trans and/or non-binary experience.

    PubMed

    Ansara, Y Gavriel

    2015-10-01

    Recent Australian legislative and policy changes can benefit people of trans and/or non-binary experience (e.g. men assigned female with stereotypically 'female' bodies, women assigned male with stereotypically 'male' bodies, and people who identify as genderqueer, agender [having no gender], bi-gender [having two genders] or another gender option). These populations often experience cisgenderism, which previous research defined as 'the ideology that invalidates people's own understanding of their genders and bodies'. Some documented forms of cisgenderism include pathologising (treating people's genders and bodies as disordered) and misgendering (disregarding people's own understanding and classifications of their genders and bodies). This system of classifying people's lived experiences of gender and body invalidation is called the cisgenderism framework. Applying the cisgenderism framework in the ageing and aged care sector can enhance service providers' ability to meet the needs of older people of trans and/or non-binary experience.

  6. A Multicenter Retrospective Case Study of Anaphylaxis Triggers by Age in Korean Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Yeon; Ahn, Kangmo; Kim, Jihyun; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Min, Taek Ki; Yang, Hyeon-Jong; Pyun, Bok Yang; Kwon, Ji-Won; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu-Earn; Yu, Jinho; Hong, Soo-Jong; Kwon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sung-Won; Song, Tae Won; Kim, Woo Kyung; Kim, Hyung Young; Jeon, You Hoon; Lee, Yong Ju; Lee, Hae Ran; Kim, Hye-Young; Ahn, Youngmin; Yum, Hye Yung; Suh, Dong In; Kim, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jin-Tack; Kim, Jeong Hee; Park, Yong Mean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although anaphylaxis is recognized as an important, life-threatening condition, data are limited regarding its triggers in different age groups. We aimed to identify anaphylaxis triggers by age in Korean children. Methods We performed a retrospective review of medical records for children diagnosed with anaphylaxis between 2009 and 2013 in 23 secondary or tertiary hospitals in South Korea. Results A total of 991 cases (mean age=5.89±5.24) were reported, with 63.9% involving patients younger than 6 years of age and 66% involving male children. Food was the most common anaphylaxis trigger (74.7%), followed by drugs and radiocontrast media (10.7%), idiopathic factors (9.2%), and exercise (3.6%). The most common food allergen was milk (28.4%), followed by egg white (13.6%), walnut (8.0%), wheat (7.2%), buckwheat (6.5%), and peanut (6.2%). Milk and seafood were the most common anaphylaxis triggers in young and older children, respectively. Drug-triggered anaphylaxis was observed more frequently with increasing age, with antibiotics (34.9%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (17.9%) being the most common causes. Conclusions The most common anaphylaxis trigger in Korean children was food. Data on these triggers show that their relative frequency may vary by age. PMID:27582405

  7. Science experiences of six elementary student teachers: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcox, Jacqueline Kay

    This qualitative study focused on the science experiences of six elementary student teachers. The purpose of the study was to learn how preservice teachers make meaning of science teaching during their student teaching experience. The sources of data were interviews with participants, descriptive field notes from observations of their science teaching, and artifacts collected from the site. The themes that emerged from data analysis were personal and professional career influences and constant adjustments of teaching strategies. The participants experienced these themes in varying intensities. Learning to teach science to elementary children for the first time is complicated by the context of student teaching. The science teaching experiences of student teachers varied with the cooperating teachers' approaches to science teaching, the lengths of time they were assigned to teach science, and the science schedules of the classroom. The role played by mentors interested in science can be important in a student teacher's science experience. Images of science teaching held by student teachers were also found to influence the science teaching experience. The science curriculum, group management skills, and student responses affected the science teaching experience, as did personal knowledge of a science topic being taught. Those student teachers who had limited knowledge of a science topic became factually oriented in their teaching and tried fewer teaching approaches. Lack of experience and management skills with cooperative groups hindered student teachers' use of hands on activities. Affective student responses to their science lessons were important to some of the student teachers, while others were concerned about student questions and cognitive learning. Upon completion of the student teaching experience, four of the participants ranked science third or lower in a rank order of subjects they enjoyed teaching during student teaching. At the end of their student

  8. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: initial experience with first 112 cases.

    PubMed

    Tasci, Ali Ihsan; Bitkin, Alper; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem; Tugcu, Volkan; Sonmezay, Erkan

    2012-12-01

    In this study we report our initial robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) experience for organ-confined prostate cancer with the first 112 cases between August 2009 and January 2011. The mean age was 61 (46-76) years. Gleason scores ranged between 4 and 9, and the mean prostate volume was 38.7 (15-115) ml. The mean follow-up time was 8.1 (1-18) months. The mean operative time was 174.7 (75-360) min, and the mean estimated blood loss was 141 (60-800) ml. A nerve-sparing procedure was performed bilaterally in 79 cases and unilaterally in 15 cases. All the complications seen (8 out of 112 patients, 7.1%) were grade 1 and 2 according to the Clavien classsification system. Postoperatively, five (4.4%) patients needed transfusion. Mean drain extraction time was 3.2 (2-15) days and mean hospital stay was 4 (2-18) days. The catheter was removed on postoperative day 8.5 (6-20). Surgical margin was positive in 13 (11.6%) patients. Forty-nine patients have 6 months and 30 patients have 12 months follow-up. The continence rate were 29.4, 64.2, 84.2, 91.1 and 96.6% immediately after catheter removal and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. No anastomotic stricture or urinary retention was seen in the follow-up period. RALRP is a safe and feasible technique in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Our initial experience with this procedure shows promising short-term outcomes. PMID:27628466

  9. Experience- and age-mediated oviposition behaviour in the yellow fever mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Ruktanonchai, N W; Lounibos, L P; Smith, D L; Allan, S A

    2015-09-01

    In repeated behaviours such as those of feeding and reproduction, past experiences can inform future behaviour. By altering their behaviour in response to environmental stimuli, insects in highly variable landscapes can tailor their behaviour to their particular environment. In particular, female mosquitoes may benefit from plasticity in their choice of egg-laying site as these sites are often temporally variable and clustered. The opportunity to adapt egg-laying behaviour to past experience also exists for mosquito populations as females typically lay eggs multiple times throughout their lives. Whether experience and age affect egg-laying (or oviposition) behaviour in the mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) was assessed using a wind tunnel. Initially, gravid mosquitoes were provided with a cup containing either repellent or well water. After ovipositing in these cups, the mosquitoes were blood-fed and introduced into a wind tunnel. In this wind tunnel, an oviposition cup containing repellent was placed in the immediate vicinity of the gravid mosquitoes. A cup containing well water was placed at the opposite end of the tunnel so that if the females flew across the chamber, they encountered the well water cup, in which they readily laid eggs. Mosquitoes previously exposed to repellent cups became significantly more likely to later lay eggs in repellent cups, suggesting that previous experience with suboptimal oviposition sites informs mosquitoes of the characteristics of nearby oviposition sites. These results provide further evidence that mosquitoes modify behaviour in response to environmental information and are demonstrated in a vector species in which behavioural plasticity may be ecologically and epidemiologically meaningful.

  10. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities. PMID:24299253

  11. Ageing under mechanical stress: first experiments for a silver based multilayer mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalo, Arnaud; Ravel, Guillaume; Ignat, Michel; Cousin, Bernard; Swain, Michael V.

    2004-06-01

    Improving materials and devices reliability is a major concern to the spatial industry. Results are reported for satellite mirrors-like specimens consisting in oxide-protected metal systems. Optical coatings were deposited by electron beam evaporation. Mechanical stress fields in multi-layered materials play an important role. The stress state can have far-reaching implications both in kinetics and thermodynamics. Therefore an integrated apparatus with four-point bending equipment was designed. The technique allowed us to exert stress into a film or a system of films on a substrate concurrently with thermal treatment. In order to achieve the first tests performed with the help of the apparatus, various preliminary characterizations were required. The article reports the preliminary micro-mechanical testing of the materials (ultra micro-indentation to evaluate the elastic modulus of the samples materials and wafer curvature technique to determine the specimen residual stress) and the first ageing experiment. Experimental evidence of accelerated ageing under stress is successfully reported.

  12. Case definitions for paediatric AIDS: the Zambian experience.

    PubMed

    Chintu, C; Malek, A; Nyumbu, M; Luo, C; Masona, J; DuPont, H L; Zumla, A

    1993-01-01

    For the purpose of surveillance of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in developing countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended criteria for the clinical case definition of AIDS in adults and children. In a preliminary examination of children in Zambia a number of patients with obvious AIDS did not fit the published WHO case definition for paediatric AIDS. Based on this the Zambia National AIDS Surveillance Committee designed local criteria for the clinical case definition of paediatric AIDS. We compared the Zambian criteria with the WHO criteria for the diagnosis of paediatric AIDS by studying 134 consecutively admitted children to one of the paediatric wards at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka. Twenty-nine of the patients were HIV-1 seropositive and 105 were HIV-1 seronegative. Among the 29 HIV-seropositive patients, the Zambian criteria identified 23, and the WHO criteria identified 20 children as having AIDS. The 105 HIV-seronegative children were classified as having AIDS in 9 cases by the Zambian criteria and in 38 cases by the WHO criteria. These results give the Zambian criteria for the diagnosis of AIDS a sensitivity of 79.3%, a specificity of 91.4% and a positive predictive value of 86.8% compared to a sensitivity of 69%, specificity of 64% and a positive predictive value of 38% for the WHO criteria. The current WHO criteria are inadequate for the diagnosis of paediatric AIDS. The need to refine the WHO criteria for the diagnosis of paediatric AIDS is discussed.

  13. Clinical Needs Finding: Developing the Virtual Experience, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vaishali; Thompson, Megan; Altman, Stuart M; Taylor, Peter; Summers, Alexander; Goodwin, Kelsey; Louie, Angelique Y

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative program at the University of California, Davis for students to engage in clinical needs finding. Using a team-based approach, students participated in clinical rotations to observe firsthand the needs of clinicians at the university affiliated medical center. The teams were asked to develop documentary-style videos to capture key experiences that would allow future viewers to use the videos as “virtual” clinical rotations. This was conceived as a strategy to allow students in prohibitively large classes, or students in programs at institutions without associated medical or veterinary school programs, to experience clinical rotations and perform needs assessments. The students' perspectives on the experience as well as instructor analysis of best practices for this type of activity are presented and discussed. We found that the internship experience was valuable to the students participating, by not only introducing the practice of needs finding but for increasing the students' confidence in the practice of engineering design and their ability to work independently. The videos produced were of such high quality that instructors from other institutions have requested copies for instructional use. Virtual clinical rotations through video experiences may provide a reasonable substitute for students who do not have the ability to participate in rotations in person. PMID:23483373

  14. [OCT angiography for exudative age-related macular degeneration : Initial experiences].

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, A; Farecki, M-L; Book, B; Heimes, B; Pauleikhoff, D

    2016-01-01

    The new technique of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography allows a non-invasive reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure of the total retinal and choroidal vascularization within seconds. There are still limitations caused by movement artefacts, superimposition of superficial retinal vessels at the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) level and insufficient three-dimensional imaging modalities. Initial experiences with this new method and especially the correlation with the current standard diagnostic procedure of fluorescein angiography show that new information can be obtained regarding specific vascular and neovascular changes. For three-dimensional neovascular changes, such as those found in exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD,) a more sophisticated diagnostic analysis strategy must be specifically developed. Initial experiences demonstrate that the differentiation into the various types of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) by fluorescein angiography, specifically for type 1 (occult) and type 2 (classical) can also be visualized by OCT angiography. Furthermore, the new technology provides additional information on the choroidal and outer retinal changes associated with this disease, which may result in a better understanding of the underlying pathology. PMID:26743785

  15. Observable Indicators of Flow Experience: A Developmental Perspective on Musical Engagement in Young Children from Infancy to School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custodero, Lori A.

    2005-01-01

    Flow experience is an optimal state determined by an individual's perception of high skill and high challenge for a given task. In this study, young children's flow experience is examined in four naturally occurring music learning environments: infants and two-year-olds in childcare settings, and school-age children in Suzuki violin and Dalcroze…

  16. Renewal and Risk: The Dual Experience of Young Motherhood and Aging out of the Child Welfare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryce, Julia M.; Samuels, Gina Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This interpretive study examines how childhood history and the personal experience of being mothered impact the meaning attributed to motherhood among young mothers aging out of the child welfare system. Through the use of an interpretive approach, findings are derived from interviews with 15 females who reported an experience of pregnancy or…

  17. Integrating Web-Based Applications into Aged Care: Two Case Studies and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Imogen C; Musić, Selma; Carlsson, Anthony; Scanlan, Faye; Silver, Mark; Bhar, Sunil S

    2016-09-01

    In anticipation of the growing need for adequate mental health care for older adults in residential aged care facilities, psychologists are challenged to overcome several barriers that impede the uptake and delivery of their services in such settings. Information and communication technologies (ICT) have strong potential to overcome some of these barriers by supporting the delivery of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for common psychogeriatric issues. This paper presents two case studies that illustrate when and how psychologists can use various ICT applications (e.g., tablet devices, web-based applications) integrated with cognitive behavioural and reminiscence-based therapies. Both case studies demonstrate that ICT can effectively support the therapeutic alliance, enhance therapeutic engagement, and individualize treatment delivery to accommodate the needs of elderly patients. It is hoped that these case studies will encourage clinicians to consider using ICT to augment therapy with their elderly patients. PMID:27073103

  18. [Measles outbreak in the adult age group: evaluation of 28 cases].

    PubMed

    Karakeçili, Faruk; Akın, Hicran; Çıkman, Aytekin; Özçiçek, Fatih; Kalkan, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the age group affected from measles has widened and the disease has become more common among adolescents and young adults. The number of measles case reports have increased in our country, particularly from 2010-2011, and measles outbreaks occurred in various regions in 2012 and 2013. The aim of this study was to analyze the demographical and epidemiological characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings, and complications of adult patients with measles who were affected during the outbreak. A total of 28 patients (25 male, 3 female; age range: 19-39 years, median age: 24) who were hospitalized and followed-up in our clinic between January 2013 and June 2013, were evaluated. In the serum sample of the index case, measles-specific IgM antibodies were detected by ELISA, and measles virus RNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), then genotyping was performed to detect the epidemiological relationship. In all of the other cases, measles IgM and IgG antibodies were screened by ELISA. The most common symptoms on admission included high fever (n= 28, 100%), malaise (n= 25, 89%), sore throat (n= 25, 89%), headache (n= 20, 71%) and cough (n= 18, 64%). At physical examination, rash (n= 28, 100%), lymphadenopathy (n= 11, 39%) and conjunctivitis (n= 10, 36%) were in the foreground, and Koplik spots were detected in five (18%) cases. The most common laboratory findings were; increased level of C-reactive protein (n= 15, 54%), leukopenia (n= 12, 43%) and increased serum levels of aminotransferases (n= 12, 43%), and thrombocytopenia was detected in five (18%) patients. One or more complications (secondary bacterial pneumonia in 5, diarrhea in 4, hepatitis in 3 and otitis in 2 cases) developed in the eight (29%) patients. Measles RT-PCR and IgM tests yielded positive results for the index case, and the isolate was identified as D8 strain by genotyping. Measles lgM antibodies were also positive in all of the other cases. The hospitalization period was

  19. [Measles outbreak in the adult age group: evaluation of 28 cases].

    PubMed

    Karakeçili, Faruk; Akın, Hicran; Çıkman, Aytekin; Özçiçek, Fatih; Kalkan, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the age group affected from measles has widened and the disease has become more common among adolescents and young adults. The number of measles case reports have increased in our country, particularly from 2010-2011, and measles outbreaks occurred in various regions in 2012 and 2013. The aim of this study was to analyze the demographical and epidemiological characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings, and complications of adult patients with measles who were affected during the outbreak. A total of 28 patients (25 male, 3 female; age range: 19-39 years, median age: 24) who were hospitalized and followed-up in our clinic between January 2013 and June 2013, were evaluated. In the serum sample of the index case, measles-specific IgM antibodies were detected by ELISA, and measles virus RNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), then genotyping was performed to detect the epidemiological relationship. In all of the other cases, measles IgM and IgG antibodies were screened by ELISA. The most common symptoms on admission included high fever (n= 28, 100%), malaise (n= 25, 89%), sore throat (n= 25, 89%), headache (n= 20, 71%) and cough (n= 18, 64%). At physical examination, rash (n= 28, 100%), lymphadenopathy (n= 11, 39%) and conjunctivitis (n= 10, 36%) were in the foreground, and Koplik spots were detected in five (18%) cases. The most common laboratory findings were; increased level of C-reactive protein (n= 15, 54%), leukopenia (n= 12, 43%) and increased serum levels of aminotransferases (n= 12, 43%), and thrombocytopenia was detected in five (18%) patients. One or more complications (secondary bacterial pneumonia in 5, diarrhea in 4, hepatitis in 3 and otitis in 2 cases) developed in the eight (29%) patients. Measles RT-PCR and IgM tests yielded positive results for the index case, and the isolate was identified as D8 strain by genotyping. Measles lgM antibodies were also positive in all of the other cases. The hospitalization period was

  20. How experience shapes memory for faces: an event-related potential study on the own-age bias.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Holger; Wolff, Nicole; Steffens, Melanie C; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2013-10-01

    Young adults more accurately remember own-age than older faces. We tested whether this own-age bias (OAB) is reduced by increased experience. Young experts (geriatric nurses) and controls performed a recognition experiment with young and old faces. Critically, while control participants demonstrated better memory for young faces, no OAB was observed in the experts. Event-related potentials revealed larger N170 and P2 amplitudes for young than old faces in both groups, suggesting no group differences during early perceptual processing. At test, N250 repetition effects were more anteriorily distributed for own- than other-age faces in control participants, whereas experts showed no corresponding effects. A larger late positive component (LPC) for old than young faces was observed in controls, but not in experts. Larger LPCs may reflect prolonged stimulus processing compromising memory retrieval. In sum, experience with other-age faces does not affect early perceptual processing, but modulates later stages related to memory retrieval.

  1. An employer's experience with infertility coverage: a case study.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Kaylen; Meletiche, Dennis; Del Rosario, Gina

    2009-12-01

    A case study of Southwest Airlines, a Fortune 500 company, demonstrates that a well-designed infertility coverage plan can control resource use. This successful model could be used by employers who wish to ensure that their employees have access to high-quality, cost-effective infertility services in a managed-care environment. PMID:19631318

  2. Improving Learning Experiences through Gamification: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geelan, Benjamin; de Salas, Kristy; Lewis, Ian; King, Carolyn; Edwards, Dale; O'Mara, Aidan

    2015-01-01

    Gamified learning systems are becoming increasingly common within educational institutions, however there is a lack of understanding on the elements of gamification that influence, either positively or negatively, the learning experiences of students using these systems. This study examines an existing gamified learning tool implemented within an…

  3. A Case for an Art Education of Everyday Aesthetic Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncum, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Argues for incorporating everyday sites, such as shopping malls, amusement parks, advertising, the Internet, and television, into art education. Also argues that everyday aesthetic experiences significantly impact the formation of individual identities and world views and that the dynamics behind the influence of everyday aesthetics will only…

  4. Exploring the Experiences of Former Alternative Education Participants: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington-Cobb, Shirley L.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative education has become an integral program, in one form or another throughout most school districts in the United States. Alternative education is a very complex and controversial issue that is best understood through the stories of former alternative education students looking back on their lived experiences. Children in the alternative…

  5. The Graduate Experience in English: Ten Personal Case-Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macrorie, Ken, Ed.

    1964-01-01

    Ten graduate students in English attack their graduate (M.A. and Ph.D.) experiences which they consider to be narrow and demeaning. They point to intellectual, financial, and personal difficulties which beset them, as well as petty, unnecessary rigors and delays to which they are subjected and which often prolonged graduation. They speak of…

  6. Differential Susceptibility to Rearing Experience: The Case of Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluess, Michael; Belsky, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Background: Inconsistencies regarding developmental effects of non-maternal childcare may be caused by neglecting the possibility that children are differentially susceptible towards such experiences. Method: Interactions between difficult/negative child temperament and childcare type, quantity, and quality on teacher-rated behavior problems and…

  7. How Experience Shapes Health Beliefs: The Case of Influenza Vaccination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of past experience with influenza and the influenza vaccine on four categories of the Health Belief Model: beliefs about susceptibility to contracting influenza, severity of illness, perceived benefits of the vaccine in preventing influenza, and perceived barriers to getting vaccinated. The study population comprised…

  8. The prevalence of lacunar infarct decreases with aging in the elderly: a case-controlled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiyou; He, Wenbo; Peng, Chuan-yong; Zhou, Jin; Xu, Qi-lan; Wu, Zong-shan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Lacunar infarct (LI) is well known as a heterogeneous primary disorder of cerebral small vessel. Compelling results have demonstrated that age is a risk factor to the prevalence of LI. However, the relationship between age and the prevalence of LI remains obscure. It is essential to note the relationship between age and the prevalence of LI through more clinical data. Methods A total of 3,500 patients were included in the case-controlled study. All data were collected from the Examination Center of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Lu’an People’s Hospital from January 2014 to December 2015. A primary discharge diagnosis of LI was done, and all subjects were evaluated as retrospective data. The relationship between the risk factors and the prevalence of diabetes and the relationship between age and the prevalence of diabetes was analyzed. A chi-square test was used to analyze the associations between different variables. A one-way analysis of variance was used to test the equality of three or more means at one time by using variances. Statistical significance was defined as a P-value of <0.05. Results The one-way analysis of variance demonstrated that the prevalence of LI increased with age before 60 years and decreased with age after 69 years. The same results were found in both the male and the female subjects. These results showed that the age-related risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, cerebral infarct, cardiovascular diseases, smoking, and drinking) have no relationship with the prevalence of LI on the basis of age. There is a significant difference among the different age ranges (P=0.0006). Two-tailed P-value (unpaired t-test) showed the mean significant difference between 30–39 years and 40–49 years (P=0.009) and between 70–79 years and 80–100 years (P=0.0196). F-test (to compare variances) demonstrated that the variances of the different age ranges are significantly different between 30–39 years and 40–49 years (P=0

  9. Social Networking Sites' Influence on Travelers' Authentic Experience a Case Study of Couch Surfing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    This study explored travelers' experiences in the era of network hospitality 2.0 using CouchSurfing.org as a case study. The following research questions guided this study: 1) what experience does CouchSurfing create for travelers before, during and after their travel? 2) how does couch surfers' experience relate to authenticity in context of…

  10. A Case Study of Professors' and Instructional Designers' Experiences in the Development of Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Karl B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the experiences of instructional designers and professors during the online course development process and to determine if their experiences had an effect on the process itself. To gain an understanding of their experiences, open-ended interviews were conducted, seeking descriptions of…

  11. [Extracorporeal piezogenerated shockwave lithotripsy. Our experience in 500 cases].

    PubMed

    Vargas Blasco, C; Alcover García, J; Gil-Vernet Sedo, J M; Bianchi Cardona, L

    1990-01-01

    Between April 1987 and August 1988, 498 patients suffering renal or ureteral lithiasis, all of them with a 6 months or more follow-up period, have been treated in our Unit. Patients were treated in an ambulatory regime without need for anesthesia or analgesia. Up to 27% of the cases has surgical background for lithiasis. One hundred and twenty-six patients had a double J ureteral catheter placed prior to lithotripsy treatment. Fourty-four percent cases needed only one session, 25% two, 12% three and 18% more than three sessions. At the time of discharge 86% patients had no lithiasis or fragments less than 3 mm. Only 9% had fragments larger that 3 mm. It is our opinion than piezoelectric extracorporeal lithotripsy has been proven as a safe, effective and painless procedure in most renal lithiasis.

  12. Handling Europe's first Ebola case: internal hospital communication experience.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Margarita; Melendez, Victoria; Latasa, Pello

    2015-04-01

    Europe's first Ebola virus disease (EVD) case was diagnosed in our hospital. There was an unjustified panic in the population because of an imbalance of credibility assigned to the media as opposed to scientific information. A reinforcement of hospital internal communication was needed to keep health care workers informed with up-to-date scientific EVD information. The proactive management of information flow to both internal and external actors is required to reduce unjustified fear within the public. PMID:25721062

  13. European Geothermal Drilling Experience-Problem Areas and Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, G.; Ungemach, P.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal drilling has long been restricted in Western Europe to the sole dry steam field of Larderello in Italy. In the last few years, a wider experience is building up as a consequence of intensified exploration and development programs carried out for evaluation and production of both low- and high-enthalpy geothermal resources. A sample of some 40 boreholes indicates the problem areas which are given.

  14. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia aerosol measurement experiment-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with time of day, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  15. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-05-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with source region, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  16. Brain training for silver gamers: effects of age and game form on effectiveness, efficiency, self-assessment, and gameplay experience.

    PubMed

    Nacke, Lennart E; Nacke, Anne; Lindley, Craig A

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, an aging demographic majority in the Western world has come to the attention of the game industry. The recently released "brain-training" games target this population, and research investigating gameplay experience of the elderly using this game form is lacking. This study employs a 2 x 2 mixed factorial design (age group: young and old x game form: paper and Nintendo DS) to investigate effects of age and game form on usability, self-assessment, and gameplay experience in a supervised field study. Effectiveness was evaluated in task completion time, efficiency as error rate, together with self-assessment measures (arousal, pleasure, dominance) and game experience (challenge, flow, competence, tension, positive and negative affect). Results indicate players, regardless of age, are more effective and efficient using pen-and-paper than using a Nintendo DS console. However, the game is more arousing and induces a heightened sense of flow in digital form for gamers of all ages. Logic problem-solving challenges within digital games may be associated with positive feelings for the elderly but with negative feelings for the young. Thus, digital logic-training games may provide positive gameplay experience for an aging Western civilization.

  17. A multi-case report of the pathways to and through genetic testing and cancer risk management for BRCA mutation-positive women aged 18–25

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Lin, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Much of the extant literature addressing the psychosocial aspects of BRCA1/2 mutation testing and risk management aggregates mutation carriers of all ages in study recruitment, data analysis, and interpretation. This analytic strategy does not adequately address the needs of the youngest genetic testing consumers, i.e., women aged 18–25. Despite low absolute cancer risk estimates before age 30, BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women aged 18–25 feel vulnerable to a cancer diagnosis but find themselves in a management quandary because the clinical utility of screening and prevention options are not yet well defined for such young carriers. We present three cases, selected from a larger study of 32 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women who completed or considered genetic testing before age 25, to demonstrate the unique developmental, relational and temporal influences, as well as the challenges, experienced by very young BRCA mutation-positive women as they complete genetic testing and initiate cancer risk management. The first case describes the maturation of a young woman whose family participated in a national cancer registry. The second addresses the experiences and expectations of a young woman who completed genetic testing after learning that her unaffected father was a mutation carrier. The third case highlights the experiences of a young woman parentally bereaved in childhood, who presented for genetic counseling and testing due to intense family pressure. Together, these cases suggest that BRCA1/2-positive women aged 18–25 are challenged to reconcile their burgeoning independence from their families with risk-related support needs. Loved ones acting in ways meant to care for these young women may inadvertently apply pressure, convoluting family support dynamics and autonomous decision-making. Ongoing support from competent healthcare professionals will enable these young women to remain informed and receive objective counsel about their risk-management decisions

  18. Pediatric retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy: An initial experience of 15 cases

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Souvik; Khanna, Puneet; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Baipai, Minu; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneoscopic approach of nephrectomy in pediatric patients is a debatable issue from surgical point of view. Experience of anesthetic management of 15 such patients from a tertiary care teaching hospital has been described here. We found that capno-retroperitoneum increases end-tidal carbon-di-oxide, but normocapnea was achieved in the most of the patients. No significant hemodynamic changes were noted in any patients. However, subcutaneous emphysema was common, but self-limiting without any serious consequence. Postoperative pain after this procedure is usually manageable by nonopioid analgesics. PMID:25788784

  19. Special cases in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: The Spanish experience.

    PubMed

    Pié, Juan; Puisac, Beatriz; Hernández-Marcos, Maria; Teresa-Rodrigo, Maria Esperanza; Gil-Rodríguez, Maria; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Ramos-Cáceres, Maria; Bernal, Maria; Ayerza-Casas, Ariadna; Bueno, Inés; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ramos, Feliciano J

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is an autosomal dominant (NIPBL, SMC3, and RAD21) or X-linked (SMC1A and HDAC8) disorder, characterized by distinctive craniofacial appearance, growth retardation, intellectual disability, and limb anomalies. In 2005, the Spanish CdLS Reference Center was started and now we have more than 270 cases in our database. In this special issue, we describe some of the unique or atypical patients studied by our group, whose clinical features have contributed to the expansion of the CdLS classical phenotype, helping clinicians to diagnose it. We include the case of a male with unilateral tibial hypoplasia and peroneal agenesis who had a mutation in NIPBL; we also describe one patient with a mutation in NIPBL and somatic mosaicism identified by new generation sequencing techniques; we also include one patient with CdLS and Turner syndrome; and last, an interesting patient with a duplication of the SMC1A gene. Finally, we make a short review of the splicing mutations we have found in NIPBL regarding the new knowledge on the physiological variants of the gene. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27164022

  20. Clinical experience with wound biofilm and management: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hurlow, Jennifer; Bowler, Philip G

    2009-04-01

    Biofilm is a relatively new concept in the fields of infectious disease, wound infection, and healing. Although scientific research and "noise" regarding wound biofilm is increasing, little is known about the presentation, diagnosis, potential implications, and management strategies regarding wound biofilms. A series of four clinical cases is utilized to demonstrate the existence of wound biofilm. All patients presented with or developed a film on the wound bed that appeared to be distinct from slough; wounds also were failing to progress. Although the slough in some of the wounds was easily removed with traditional debridement methods, removal of the film required physical disruption with a curette or dry gauze. All wounds eventually progressed to healing. Considering the biofilm concept and available preclinical research, it is evident from this small case series that the appearance of biofilm in wounds is quite different from slough and requires different management strategies for its control. The evolving biofilm paradigm could profoundly change approaches to wound management. Additional research is needed in this evolving aspect of wound management.

  1. Vestibular schwannoma: 825 cases from a 25-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Mariana Hausen; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Neto, Rubens Vuono de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Acoustic nerve tumors have been recognized as a clinico-pathologic entity for at least 200 years, and they represent 90% of cerebellopontine angle diseases. Histologically, the tumors are derived from Schwann cells of the myelin sheath, with smaller tumors consisting of elongated palisade cells, while in large tumors, cystic degeneration can be found in the central areas, possibly due to deficient vascularization. We retrospectively reviewed 825 cases of vestibular schwannomas, reported between January 1984 and August 2006, in which the patients underwent surgery to remove the tumor. Objective: To evaluate signs, symptoms, aspects of clinical diagnosis, including the results of audiological and imaging studies, and surgical techniques and complications. Methods: A retrospective chart review. The medical records of all patients undergoing surgical treatment for schwannoma during the period indicated were reviewed. Results and Conclusion: Hearing loss was the first symptom reported in almost all cases, and tumor size was not proportional to the impairment of the auditory threshold. The surgical techniques allowed safe preservation of facial function. In particular, the retrolabyrinthine route proved useful in small tumors, with 50% preservation of hearing. PMID:25991975

  2. Geographic Region, Weather, Pilot Age and Air Carrier Crashes: a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohua; Pressley, Joyce C.; Qiang, Yandong; Grabowski, Jurek G.; Baker, Susan P.; Rebok, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Information about risk factors of aviation crashes is crucial for developing effective intervention programs. Previous studies assessing factors associated with crash risk were conducted primarily in general aviation, air taxis and commuter air carriers. Methods A matched case-control design was used to examine the associations of geographic region, basic weather condition, and pilot age with the risk of air carrier (14 CFR Part 121) crash involvement. Cases (n=373) were air carrier crashes involving aircraft made by Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, and Airbus, recorded in the National Transportation Safety Board’s aviation crash database during 1983 through 2002, and controls (n=746) were air carrier incidents involving aircraft of the same three makes selected at random from the Federal Aviation Administration’s aviation incident database. Each case was matched with two controls on the calendar year when the index crash occurred. Conditional logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results With adjustment for basic weather condition, pilot age, and total flight time, the risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska was more than three times the risk for other regions [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35 – 7.49]. Instrument meteorological conditions were associated with an increased risk for air carrier crashes involving pilot error (adjusted OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.15 – 4.44) and a decreased risk for air carrier crashes without pilot error (adjusted OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.40 – 0.87). Neither pilot age nor total flight time was significantly associated with the risk of air carrier crashes. Conclusions The excess risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska and the effect of adverse weather on pilot-error crashes underscore the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety. PMID:19378910

  3. Healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture--A phenomenographic study based on older persons' lived experiences.

    PubMed

    Manasatchakun, Pornpun; Chotiga, Pleumjit; Roxberg, Åsa; Asp, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Healthy ageing is a concept that concerns older persons' quality of life and is a key factor in promoting well-being. The older population in Thailand is growing. Isan (a region of north-eastern Thailand) has been reported as having one of the most rapidly increasing older populations in the country. In order to care for and promote the health of older people, healthcare providers should understand how healthy ageing is perceived by this target group. Although healthy ageing has been studied in different contexts as well as perspectives, no studies have previously focused on older persons' experiences of healthy ageing from a lifeworld perspective in Isan-Thai. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe older persons' qualitatively different conceptions of healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture. A phenomenographic approach with an epistemological base in lifeworld theory was used to disclose the various ways to conceptualize healthy ageing. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 people aged 60 and above who live in Isan-Thai. The findings of this study revealed three categories of descriptions: "being independent in dependence," "being at peace," and "being a valuable person." This study also found family members, friends, healthcare providers, and religion important to healthy ageing in the Isan-Thai culture. Understanding how older people conceptualize healthy ageing is valuable for healthcare providers. They can apply these findings regarding healthy ageing in their fieldwork when caring for older people. PMID:26960686

  4. Healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture--A phenomenographic study based on older persons' lived experiences.

    PubMed

    Manasatchakun, Pornpun; Chotiga, Pleumjit; Roxberg, Åsa; Asp, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Healthy ageing is a concept that concerns older persons' quality of life and is a key factor in promoting well-being. The older population in Thailand is growing. Isan (a region of north-eastern Thailand) has been reported as having one of the most rapidly increasing older populations in the country. In order to care for and promote the health of older people, healthcare providers should understand how healthy ageing is perceived by this target group. Although healthy ageing has been studied in different contexts as well as perspectives, no studies have previously focused on older persons' experiences of healthy ageing from a lifeworld perspective in Isan-Thai. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe older persons' qualitatively different conceptions of healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture. A phenomenographic approach with an epistemological base in lifeworld theory was used to disclose the various ways to conceptualize healthy ageing. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 people aged 60 and above who live in Isan-Thai. The findings of this study revealed three categories of descriptions: "being independent in dependence," "being at peace," and "being a valuable person." This study also found family members, friends, healthcare providers, and religion important to healthy ageing in the Isan-Thai culture. Understanding how older people conceptualize healthy ageing is valuable for healthcare providers. They can apply these findings regarding healthy ageing in their fieldwork when caring for older people.

  5. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Horton, L. D.; Challis, C. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Batistoni, P. [EURATOM Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-21

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ∼40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  6. Bone changes of mucolipidosis II at different ages. Postmortem study of three cases.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, U E; Beluffi, G; Castello, A; Coci, A; Zatti, G

    1992-03-01

    Bone changes are a constant feature of mucolipidosis II, with striking differences between newborns and older children. Intracellular, membrane-bound vacuoles were found in the chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and stromal fibroblasts of three affected children. Osteoclasts and marrow cells were unaffected. Ricketslike lesions were present at birth in the two younger cases, whereas signs of high bone turnover and defective calcification were no longer present in the older child. Severe abnormalities of the metaphyseal plate with the loss of normal cartilage architecture and the absence of endochondral ossification were the major changes in this age group.

  7. Hypnobehavioral approaches for school-age children with dysphagia and food aversion: a case series.

    PubMed

    Culbert, T P; Kajander, R L; Kohen, D P; Reaney, J B

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe hypnobehavioral treatment of five school-age children with maladaptive eating behaviors, including functional dysphagia, food aversion, globus hystericus, and conditioned fear of eating (phagophobia). The unique treatment approach described emphasizes the successful use of self-management techniques, particularly hypnosis, by all five children. Common etiological factors, treatment strategies, and proposed mechanisms of change are discussed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case series in the mainstream pediatric literature describing the use of a hypnobehavioral approach for children with these maladaptive eating problems.

  8. The role of age-specific learning and experience for turtles navigating a changing landscape.

    PubMed

    Roth, Timothy C; Krochmal, Aaron R

    2015-02-01

    The severity of the environment often influences animal cognition [1-6], as does the rate of change within that environment [7-10]. Rapid alteration of habitat places limitations on basic resources such as energy, water, nesting sites, and refugia [8, 10]. How animals respond to these situations provides insight into the mechanisms of cognition and the role of behavior in adaptation [11-13]. We tested the hypothesis that learning plays a role in the navigation of the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) within a model of environmental change. We radiotracked experienced and naive turtles at different developmental stages from two different populations as they sought out new habitats when their pond was destroyed. Our data suggest that the ability of turtles to navigate is facilitated in part by experience during a critical period. Resident adults repeatedly used specific routes with exceptional precision, while translocated adults failed to find water. Naive juveniles (1-3 years old) from both populations used the same paths taken by resident adults; the ability to follow paths was lost by age 4. We also used laboratory behavioral assays to examine the possible cues facilitating this precise navigation. Turtles responded to manipulation of the local ultraviolet environment, but not the olfactory environment. This is the first evidence to suggest that learning during a critical period may be important for how animals respond to changing environments. Our work emphasizes the need for the examination of learning in navigation and the breadth of critical learning periods across vertebrates. PMID:25578905

  9. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  10. Case notes, case histories, and the patient's experience of insanity at Gartnavel Royal Asylum, Glasgow, in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J

    1998-08-01

    This article is concerned primarily with questions as to how and why case notes were produced and utilized, and how they may (or may not) be used by historians. More specifically, it discusses how the Glasgow Royal Asylum's case notes may be deployed to access patients' experiences of madness and confinement. The deficiencies and biases of the case record are also explored. So too is the relationship of case notes with other asylum based records, including reception order questionnaires, with a separate section on patient writings as part of the case history corpus. This leads into an analysis of how the Asylum's case notes became case histories and for what purposes. These subjects are related to changes and continuities in medical ideologies about insanity, social attitudes to the insane and the nature of medical practice in asylums. Some fundamental shifts in emphasis in the use of the case note and case history occurred in this period. These shifts were associated with an increased emphasis on organic interpretations of mental disease and on clinical approaches to insanity; with the medicalization of asylum records and the wider discourse on insanity, and with declining deference to the public at large in the presentation of cases. The survey concludes by analysing the changing place of patient testimony within the case record.

  11. Case notes, case histories, and the patient's experience of insanity at Gartnavel Royal Asylum, Glasgow, in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J

    1998-08-01

    This article is concerned primarily with questions as to how and why case notes were produced and utilized, and how they may (or may not) be used by historians. More specifically, it discusses how the Glasgow Royal Asylum's case notes may be deployed to access patients' experiences of madness and confinement. The deficiencies and biases of the case record are also explored. So too is the relationship of case notes with other asylum based records, including reception order questionnaires, with a separate section on patient writings as part of the case history corpus. This leads into an analysis of how the Asylum's case notes became case histories and for what purposes. These subjects are related to changes and continuities in medical ideologies about insanity, social attitudes to the insane and the nature of medical practice in asylums. Some fundamental shifts in emphasis in the use of the case note and case history occurred in this period. These shifts were associated with an increased emphasis on organic interpretations of mental disease and on clinical approaches to insanity; with the medicalization of asylum records and the wider discourse on insanity, and with declining deference to the public at large in the presentation of cases. The survey concludes by analysing the changing place of patient testimony within the case record. PMID:11620430

  12. Pancreatoblastoma an Unusual Occurrence of a Tumour in Paediatric Age Group: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Halder, Pankaj; Mukhopadhyay, Bedabrata; Das, Chhanda; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatoblastoma, is rare exocrine malignant tumour of childhood. We are reporting a case of three-year-old child presented to our hospital suffering from vague abdominal pain for further examination and treatment. Clinical examination revealed only a palpable abdominal mass. CT Scan revealed a huge complex space occupying lesion 9.1x8.8x9.2cm with large central cystic degeneration and lobulated enhancing peripheral solid components with foci of calcification, seem to arise from body and tail regions of pancreas. Surgery was done and mass was removed. By histopathology and immunohistochemistry it was diagnosed as pancreatoblastoma. The prognosis is very good in paediatric age, lacking evidence of metastatic disease at first presentation. Therefore early diagnosis is needed for specific treatment. The case is being reported because of its rarity. PMID:27134883

  13. Knowledge and experience required for experts in atkins cases.

    PubMed

    Olley, J Gregory

    2009-01-01

    The United States Supreme Court's Atkins v. Virginia (2002) decision has created a need for experts who are knowledgeable and experienced in both mental retardation and forensic psychology. This article summarizes the issues that are critical to the diagnosis in the "close calls" that typify Atkins cases. A resolution of such close calls hinges upon the expert's ability to testify with regard to the characteristics of mild mental retardation and the way that diagnostic standards may be applied differently in clinical versus forensic settings. The critical impairments are not in the form of physical stigmata. They are characterized by difficulties in judgment when engaged in typical community functioning. The keys to these close calls are the individual's problems in functioning in the community with the degree of independence required for adults.

  14. Adolescent cancer patients' perspectives on their educational experiences: Ten case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Nancy Smith

    The goal of this study was to explore the educational experiences of adolescent cancer patients in treatment for cancer and enrolled in hospital, homebound, or community schools. The incidence of students who have or had cancer is becoming more prevalent in schools today because of increases in the population, the incidence rate of cancer, and the survival rate of cancer. The number of students surviving cancer has increased over 41% in the past ten years and underscores the importance of assuring an excellent education to children and adolescents with cancer so that they may enjoy a good quality of life as long-term survivors. This study explored the educational experiences of students who were adolescent cancer patients and identified educational and psychosocial issues important to their success. The goal of this research effort was to provide educators and medical staff with a deeper understanding of the unique psychoeducational needs of this population and to provide a foundation for developing ideas for improving the educational programs and support available to students who continue their middle and high school education while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants included ten cancer patient whose mean age at onset of disease was 13.8 +/- 1.7 years, and mean age at interview was 15.2 +/- 1.8 years. The researcher conducted individual, in-depth, ethnographic interviews of students, and one parent and one teacher of each student. Case studies of the students included extensive dialogue of each of the contributing participants. An analysis of the case studies was conducted by coding emerging themes so that topics could be fully explored and compared between individuals, groups of individuals, and educational settings to identify the meaning that these students placed on the educational and psychosocial issues that they voiced as important. Advantages and disadvantages of each educational situation, homebound, hospital school, and community school, were

  15. Emphysematous pyelonephritis: A 10-year experience with 26 cases

    PubMed Central

    Misgar, Raiz Ahmad; Mubarik, Idrees; Wani, Arshad Iqbal; Bashir, Mir Iftikhar; Ramzan, Mahroosa; Laway, Bashir Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a necrotizing infection which results in gas within the renal parenchyma, collecting system, or perinephric tissue. A majority of cases occur in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). In EPN, early aggressive medical treatment may avoid nephrectomy. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of patients with EPN with respect to patient demographics, clinical presentation, diagnostic investigations, microbiological findings, treatment modality and outcome, and the influence of prognostic factors on the outcome. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of 26 patients with EPN for clinical, laboratory, radiological, and microbiological findings, treatments given, and outcome. The severity of EPN was graded as per the Huang classification. We applied the reported prognostic factors to our patients to find out whether these factors correlated with failure of conservative treatment. Results: All the study subjects had DM and all but two of them were females. The majority of our patients (61.5%) had extensive EPN (class 3 or 4) and majority (76.9%) had two or more bad prognostic factors. Escherichia coli was the most common causative organism involved in 50% of our cases. Twenty-three (88.5%) of our patients responded to conservative treatment, two required nephrectomy, and one expired on conservative treatment. Conclusions: In this series of patients with EPN, all had DM, nearly all were women, and E. coli was the most frequently isolated pathogen. Nearly a third of our patients had bilateral disease. Despite the presence of two or more bad prognostic factors and extensive EPN (class 3 or 4) in a majority of our patients, conservative treatment afforded a striking success rate of 88.5%. We recommend early aggressive medical treatment and suggest that nephrectomy should be considered only if patients deteriorate or do not improve on conservative treatment. PMID:27366713

  16. The dual mobility socket concept: experience with 668 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Benoit; Ardouin, Ludovic; Burdin, Gilles; Lautridou, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Long-term results of a retrospective series of primary arthroplasty with the original cementless dual mobility socket (A) and the midterm results with the second generation (B) are reported. In series A (follow-up 16.5 years) 437 total hip arthroplasties (THA) were included and in series B (follow-up five years) 231 hips. The 15-year survival rate was 84.4 ± 4.5% (revision for any reason as endpoint); 30 hips (6.8%) were revised for aseptic loosening. Five THA were revised for dislocation: two early and three after ten years or more. With the second generation socket neither dislocation nor revision for mechanical reasons were observed. The survival rate was 99.6 ± 0.4% (revision for any reason). The prevalence of revision for dislocation was very low in our series. This concept does not avoid wear and aseptic loosening, especially in young active patients, but the long-term stability has been confirmed. Dual mobility can be recommended for patients over 70 years of age and for younger patients with high risk of dislocation. PMID:21184223

  17. FONO - A difficult case for theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    High levels of ab initio theory are used to investigate the equilibrium structures, vibrational spectra, and relative energetics of FNO2, cis-FONO, and trans-FONO isomers. FNO2 is determined to be 36.9 +/- 2.5 kcal/mol (0 K) more stable than cis-FONO, which is more stable than trans-FONO by 2.5 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol (0 K). The molecular structure of cis-FONO is shown to have typical F-O and central O-N single bond distances, indicating that cis-FONO has a structure analogous to HONO. The computed vibrational spectrum of cis-FONO is shown to be consistent with IR matrix isolation experiments, including isotopic shifts. The experimentally deduced structure of FONO is shown to be incorrect because one of the vibrational bands included in the normal coordinate analysis is either a combination band or an overtone.

  18. Metformin use and young age lung cancer: A case series report

    PubMed Central

    DENG, BO; WANG, YI; XIE, DONG; STODDARD, SHAWN M.; YANG, PING

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, a widely-prescribed antihyperglycemic drug for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-II), has been demonstrated to be antineoplastic in vivo and in vitro. However, various preclinical and epidemiological studies investigating the effects of metformin on lung cancer have obtained inconclusive results. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of metformin, for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-II), on the onset of lung cancer. In the present study, the pathological features of ten consecutive young age lung cancer cases, aged between 15 and 45 years old at the time of diagnosis and exhibiting existing primary DM, were investigated using the Mayo Clinic Lung Cancer Cohort database. Amongst this cohort, there were 2 cases of DM type 1 (DM-I) and 8 cases of DM-II. Of these patients, two exhibiting adenocarcinoma and DM-II had not been administered metformin; however, 1 patient exhibiting lymphoma and 4 patients with pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) had been administered metformin at least 12 months prior to lung cancer diagnosis. The remaining 3 patients exhibiting NETs and DM-II had been treated with insulin therapy. The present study hypothesized that the high proportion of NETs observed in the cases of metformin-treated DM-II was unlikely to be a random event. It was suggested that metformin treatment was not effective in the prevention of pulmonary NETs, and that metformin may instead induce the occurrence of NETs via as yet unknown signaling pathways. The present hypothesis may potentially serve as a novel indicator for the requirement to monitor young patients with diabetes, who are being treated with metformin, for the occurrence of pulmonary NETs. PMID:27073573

  19. Age-Sensitive Effect of Adolescent Dating Experience on Delinquency and Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ryang Hui

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a developmental perspective and focuses on examining whether the impact of adolescent dating is age-sensitive. Dating at earlier ages is hypothesized to have a stronger effect on adolescent criminal behavior or substance use, but the effect would be weaker as one ages. The data obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of…

  20. Lost in the city: revisiting Milgram's experiment in the age of social networks.

    PubMed

    Szüle, János; Kondor, Dániel; Dobos, László; Csabai, István; Vattay, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    As more and more users access social network services from smart devices with GPS receivers, the available amount of geo-tagged information makes repeating classical experiments possible on global scales and with unprecedented precision. Inspired by the original experiments of Milgram, we simulated message routing within a representative sub-graph of the network of Twitter users with about 6 million geo-located nodes and 122 million edges. We picked pairs of users from two distant metropolitan areas and tried to find a route between them using local geographic information only; our method was to forward messages to a friend living closest to the target. We found that the examined network is navigable on large scales, but navigability breaks down at the city scale and the network becomes unnavigable on intra-city distances. This means that messages usually arrived to the close proximity of the target in only 3-6 steps, but only in about 20% of the cases was it possible to find a route all the way to the recipient, in spite of the network being connected. This phenomenon is supported by the distribution of link lengths; on larger scales the distribution behaves approximately as P(d) ≈ 1/d, which was found earlier by Kleinberg to allow efficient navigation, while on smaller scales, a fractal structure becomes apparent. The intra-city correlation dimension of the network was found to be D2 = 1.25, less than the dimension D2 = 1.78 of the distribution of the population. PMID:25383796

  1. Lost in the city: revisiting Milgram's experiment in the age of social networks.

    PubMed

    Szüle, János; Kondor, Dániel; Dobos, László; Csabai, István; Vattay, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    As more and more users access social network services from smart devices with GPS receivers, the available amount of geo-tagged information makes repeating classical experiments possible on global scales and with unprecedented precision. Inspired by the original experiments of Milgram, we simulated message routing within a representative sub-graph of the network of Twitter users with about 6 million geo-located nodes and 122 million edges. We picked pairs of users from two distant metropolitan areas and tried to find a route between them using local geographic information only; our method was to forward messages to a friend living closest to the target. We found that the examined network is navigable on large scales, but navigability breaks down at the city scale and the network becomes unnavigable on intra-city distances. This means that messages usually arrived to the close proximity of the target in only 3-6 steps, but only in about 20% of the cases was it possible to find a route all the way to the recipient, in spite of the network being connected. This phenomenon is supported by the distribution of link lengths; on larger scales the distribution behaves approximately as P(d) ≈ 1/d, which was found earlier by Kleinberg to allow efficient navigation, while on smaller scales, a fractal structure becomes apparent. The intra-city correlation dimension of the network was found to be D2 = 1.25, less than the dimension D2 = 1.78 of the distribution of the population.

  2. [Two cases of schizophrenia presenting with 'solar experience': the 'polysolar experience' and its progression].

    PubMed

    Harashima, Kanoko; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Senichiro; Okajima, Yoshiro; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    The 'solar experience' as an abnormal experience of schizophrenia in which patients directly experience the sun itself was first described by Miyamoto in 1974. Patients have delusions of the sun dying, hallucinations of the sun, and even believe that they become the sun. The patient may draw pictures of the sun similar to Edvard Munch's famous painting "The Sun". Miyamoto explained the progression of the solar experience as follows: (1) in the early stage of schizophrenia, patients believe that the sun falls or dies; (2) in the midst of the illness, they occupy the position of the sun in their delusions; and (3) in the recovery stage, they see or draw the sun against a scenic background, indicating that they no longer perceive themselves to be at the center of the world. Because of the absolute centrality of the sun, Miyamoto noted that the patient never experiences multiple suns (a 'polysolar experience'). However, in his book Memoirs of My Nervous Illness (original German title: Denkwürdigkeiten eines Nervenkranken), Daniel Paul Schreber described that he saw two suns. In this paper, the authors report two patients with schizophrenia who presented with a solar experience. Patient 1 was a man in his early forties. Fourteen years before his 'polysolar experience', he had attempted suicide, developed stupor, and was diagnosed with depression. However, he sometimes exhibited cenestopathy. Three years before the experience, he developed catatonic stupor and auditory hallucinations, and his diagnosis was changed to schizophrenia. After two months of hospitalization, the patient, in partial remission, was discharged. Ten months later, he saw two fragments tumble down from the sun, which he described as sons of the sun. Thereafter, his behavior became erratic, which led to a third hospitalization. In the recovery phase, the patient drew a picture of a large sun covering the entire piece of drawing paper and another of the sun set in scenery. Patient 2 was a married

  3. Effect of age on the outcome of renal transplantation: A single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Ozkul, Faruk; Erbis, Halil; Yilmaz, Vural Taner; Kocak, Huseyin; Osmanoglu, Ibrahim Ali; Dinckan, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the effects of old age on renal transplantation (Tx) results and graft survival, and compared elderly patient population with the young patients. Methods: A total of 1946 renal transplant were performed from 1537 living and 409 cadaveric donors between 2003 and 2014. The recipients were divided into two groups according to their age at the time of transplantation. The young age group consisted of 18-59-year-old, and the elderly group consisted of the ones ≥ 60 years. Results: Acute rejection was seen in 19.5% of the young age group while this rate was 16.7% in the old age group (p=0.535). DGF was seen in 6.3% of the young age group, and in 13.5% of the old age group (p<0.001). Analysis of the overall survival rates demonstrated that 1.6% of the patients in the young age group and 6.8% of the patients in the old age groups died (p=0.003). Conclusions: Renal transplant had high graft survival rates in the elderly as in the young patients. However, the risks for complications were higher in the older age group compared to the younger age group. Thus, it is important to make a careful selection among elderly candidates for renal transplantation. PMID:27648022

  4. JSC Case Study: Fleet Experience with E-85 Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, Kirck

    2009-01-01

    JSC has used E-85 as part of an overall strategy to comply with Presidential Executive Order 13423 and the Energy Policy Act. As a Federal fleet, we are required to reduce our petroleum consumption by 2 percent per year, and increase the use of alternative fuels in our vehicles. With the opening of our onsite dispenser in October 2004, JSC became the second federal fleet in Texas and the fifth NASA center to add E-85 fueling capability. JSC has a relatively small number of GSA Flex Fuel fleet vehicles at the present time (we don't include personal vehicles, or other contractor's non-GSA fleet), and there were no reasonably available retail E-85 fuel stations within a 15-minute drive or within five miles (one way). So we decided to install a small 1000 gallon onsite tank and dispenser. It was difficult to obtain a supplier due to our low monthly fuel consumption, and our fuel supplier contract has changed three times in less than five years. We experiences a couple of fuel contamination and quality control issues. JSC obtained good information on E-85 from the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC). We also spoke with Defense Energy Support Center, (DESC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and US Army Fort Leonard Wood. E-85 is a liquid fuel that is dispensed into our Flexible Fuel Vehicles identically to regular gasoline, so it was easy for our vehicle drivers to make the transition.

  5. Four foot septifoil cooling experiment unrestricted inlet/outlet case

    SciTech Connect

    Foti, D.J.; Randolph, H.W.; Geiger, G.T.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The ability to predict the behavior of reactor components to varying coolant flow scenarios constitutes a necessary skill for assessing reactor safety. One tool for performing these calculations is the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested the Equipment Engineering Section (EES) of SRL to conduct a series of experiments to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor components. The configuration selected consisted of a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an {open_quotes}unseated{close_quotes} configuration. Varying power levels were to be supplied to the rods with 3.5 kilowatts per foot the value targeted for modelling during the computer runs. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, water flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs. heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. This report documents testing done with unimpeded flow into and out of the septifoil in order to assess basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling and pressure rise. Previous tests have evaluated water flow rate and the ratio of axial to azimuthal heat transfer.

  6. Severe Anemia and Helicobacter Pylori Infection in school age Children; A case reports

    PubMed Central

    Gheibi, Sh; Noroozi, M; Hejazi, S; Karamyyar, M; Farrokh-Eslamlou, H

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency anemia is a widespread public health problem with major consequences for human health especially, children. However, in a fraction of patients an underlying cause is never found during routine investigation. Recent studies have suggested an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection and iron-deficiency anemia. Case presentation Here is reported four school aged children (two male, two female) with refractory severe iron-deficiency anemia associated H. Pylori gastritis. Mean age of the patients was 13.62 years old and they were admitted with chief complaints of abdominal, chest pain weakness, headache and respiratory distress. Mean hemoglobin level in patients was 6.2 g/dl with persistence to iron therapy. After the diagnosis and therapy of H. pylori infection, clinical complaints, hemoglobin level and iron profiles were being normal and they gained weight. Conclusion This study suggests screening of H. pylori infection and appropriate treatment in any case of refractory moderate to severe iron-deficiency anemia, especially with clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27222704

  7. Brain regions essential for improved lexical access in an aged aphasic patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Meinzer, Marcus; Flaisch, Tobias; Obleser, Jonas; Assadollahi, Ramin; Djundja, Daniela; Barthel, Gabriela; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    Background The relationship between functional recovery after brain injury and concomitant neuroplastic changes is emphasized in recent research. In the present study we aimed to delineate brain regions essential for language performance in aphasia using functional magnetic resonance imaging and acquisition in a temporal sparse sampling procedure, which allows monitoring of overt verbal responses during scanning. Case presentation An 80-year old patient with chronic aphasia (2 years post-onset) was investigated before and after intensive language training using an overt picture naming task. Differential brain activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus for correct word retrieval and errors was found. Improved language performance following therapy was mirrored by increased fronto-thalamic activation while stability in more general measures of attention/concentration and working memory was assured. Three healthy age-matched control subjects did not show behavioral changes or increased activation when tested repeatedly within the same 2-week time interval. Conclusion The results bear significance in that the changes in brain activation reported can unequivocally be attributed to the short-term training program and a language domain-specific plasticity process. Moreover, it further challenges the claim of a limited recovery potential in chronic aphasia, even at very old age. Delineation of brain regions essential for performance on a single case basis might have major implications for treatment using transcranial magnetic stimulation. PMID:16916464

  8. Schwannoma of Upper Lip: Report of a Rare Case in a Rare Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Hajong, Debobratta; Naku, Narang; Sharma, Girish; Boruah, Manash

    2016-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign, encapsulated perineural tumour originating from the schwann cells of the neural sheath of peripheral motor and sensory nerves. It may develop at any age but is extremely rare in paediatric age group. The tumour is frequently located on the head and neck region, the tongue being the most common site followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, lips and jaws. Schwannomas rarely occur in the lip area and it is exceedingly rare in the upper lip. The lesion is usually solitary but can be multiple when associated with neurofibromatosis. The diagnosis is usually confirmed after biopsy and anti-S100 protein immuno-histochemical staining is usually used to identify the tumour. In the present study the patient was a 14-year-old young girl with the schwannoma on the upper lip which is probably the third such case in a paediatric age group being reported and was excised without any recurrence at 2 year after excision. PMID:27656503

  9. Schwannoma of Upper Lip: Report of a Rare Case in a Rare Age Group.

    PubMed

    Hajong, Ranendra; Hajong, Debobratta; Naku, Narang; Sharma, Girish; Boruah, Manash

    2016-08-01

    Schwannoma is a benign, encapsulated perineural tumour originating from the schwann cells of the neural sheath of peripheral motor and sensory nerves. It may develop at any age but is extremely rare in paediatric age group. The tumour is frequently located on the head and neck region, the tongue being the most common site followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, lips and jaws. Schwannomas rarely occur in the lip area and it is exceedingly rare in the upper lip. The lesion is usually solitary but can be multiple when associated with neurofibromatosis. The diagnosis is usually confirmed after biopsy and anti-S100 protein immuno-histochemical staining is usually used to identify the tumour. In the present study the patient was a 14-year-old young girl with the schwannoma on the upper lip which is probably the third such case in a paediatric age group being reported and was excised without any recurrence at 2 year after excision. PMID:27656503

  10. Refeeding syndrome in Southeastern Taiwan: Our experience with 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Ju; Chen, Huan-Lin; Bair, Ming-Jong; Wu, Chia-Hsien; Lin, I-Tsung; Lee, Yuan-Kai; Chu, Cheng-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To present our experience with refeeding syndrome in southeastern Taiwan. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study during a 2-year period at the Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taitung Branch. We enrolled patients with very little or no nutrition intake for more than 10 d, a high risk group of refeeding syndrome, including those suffering from alcohol abuse, cancerous cachexia, chronic malnutrition, and prolonged starvation. RESULTS: A total of 11 patients (7 males, 4 females) with nasogastric feeding were included as having refeeding syndrome. Most of them had the symptoms of diarrhea, lethargy, and leg edema. The initial nutritional supplement was found to be relatively high in calories (1355.1 ± 296.2 kcal/d), high in protein (47.3 ± 10.4 gm/d), low in vitamin B1 (2.0 ± 0.5 mg/d), low in potassium (1260.4 ± 297.7 mg/d), and low in phosphorus (660.1 ± 151.8 mg/d). Furthermore, hypophosphatemia (2.4 ± 0.9 mg/dL) was noted during follow-up. Based on the suggestions of a dietician and a gastroenterologist, the clinical disorders of diarrhea, malaise and leg edema were significantly improved. The level of phosphate was also increased (3.3 ± 0.6 mg/dL). CONCLUSION: Refeeding syndrome is an overlooked and risky disorder that has some potentially fatal complications. Nasogastric feeding in nursing homes is an important risk factor for patients and deserves greater attention based on the initial results of this study. PMID:25132771

  11. Standardized medical age assessment of refugees with questionable minority claim-a summary of 591 case studies.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Ernst; Kramer, Josef; Gebauer, Axel; Bednar, Alexander; Recsey, Zoltan; Zehetmayr, Jürgen; Bukal, Josef; Winkler, Ingomar

    2015-05-01

    In order to establish identity of asylum seekers, part of which is age clarification, administrative authorities are obliged to investigate the credibility of allegations based on the usual means of evidence to determine the applicable legal background. In case of serious doubts concerning age minority declaration, medical expert opinion builds the key proof bound by a complex framework consisting of EU regulations, domestic legal backgrounds and the scientific 'state of the art,' the latter being largely influenced by the pursuit of the German 'Study Group on Forensic Age Diagnostics.' Our application example demonstrates the exceptional value of its guidelines serving evidence-based understanding of the age issue in borderline adults within the asylum context. The results deriving from a substantial number of cases disclose an unequivocal inclination of age-disputed male refugees towards concluding somatic development despite a tendency of low lying age reports.

  12. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Fokke J; Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Graf, Helmut; Lewis, Michael; Moehner, Sabine; Assmann, Anita; Kühl-Habich, Doerthe

    2007-01-01

    Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria) from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile) of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0) and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3) for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD). While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and 1365 controls) showed a

  13. Evaluation of cases with Fasciola hepatica infection: experience in 6 children

    PubMed Central

    Tezer, Hasan; Yuksek, Saliha Kanik; Parlakay, Aslinur Özkaya; Gülhan, Belgin; Tavil, Betül; Tunç, Bahattin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate 6 pediatric cases diagnosed as fascioliasis. Methods Patients diagnosed as fascioliasis are retrospectively interpreted. Results Herein 6 pediatric cases having a mean age of (12.7±3.1) years with different complaints including fever, weakness, paleness, sweating, cough, headache, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, and abdominal distension admitting to our hospital are evaluated. Conclusions Diagnosis of fascioliasis needs a high index of suspicion supported by stool microscopy, serology, imaging procedures, and in difficult cases even liver biopsy. Triclabendazole resistance should be kept in mind in unresponsive cases.

  14. HI at z 20: The Large Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Werthimer, D.; Taylor, G.; Ellingson, S.; LEDA Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    When did the first stars form? Did supermassive black holes form at the same time, earlier, or later? One of the great challenges of cosmology today is the study of these first generation objects. The Large Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Ages (LEDA) project seeks to detect, in total-power, emission from neutral Hydrogen (21 cm rest wavelength) in the intergalactic medium about 100 million years after the Big Bang (redshifts 20). Detection would deliver the first observational constraints on models of structure formation and the first pockets of star and black holes formation in the Universe. LEDA will develop and integrate by 2013 signal processing instrumentation into the new first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA). This comprises a large-N correlator serving all 512 dipole antennas of the LWA1, leveraging a packetized CASPER architecture and combining FPGAs and GPUs for the F and X stages. Iterative calibration and imaging will rely on warped snapshot imaging and be drawn from a GPU-enabled library (cuWARP) that is designed specifically to support wide-field full polarization imaging with fixed dipole arrays. Calibration techniques will include peeling, correction for ionospheric refraction, direction dependent dipole gains, deconvolution via forward modeling, and exploration of pulsar data analysis to improve performance. Accurate calibration and imaging will be crucial requirements for LEDA, necessary to subtract the bright foreground sky and detect the faint neutral Hydrogen signal. From the computational standpoint, LEDA is a O(100) TeraFlop per second challenge that enables a scalable architecture looking toward development of radio arrays requiring power efficient 10 PetaFlop per second performance. Stage two of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA2) is one example.

  15. Correlation between donor age and organs transplanted per donor: our experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ashikari, J; Omiya, K; Konaka, S; Nomoto, K

    2014-05-01

    The shortage of available organs for transplantation is a worldwide issue. To maximize the number of transplantations, increasing the number of organs transplanted per donor (OTPD) is widely recognized as an important factor for improving the shortage. In Japan, we have had 211 donors, 1112 organs transplanted, and 924 recipients receiving the transplants, resulting in 4.4 ± 1.4 recipients receiving transplants per donor and 5.3 ± 1.6 OTPD as of February 2013. Because donor age is a well-recognized factor of donor suitability, we analyzed the correlation between donor age group and OTPD. Only the age group 60 to 69 years and the age group 70 to 79 years were significantly different (P < .05) from adjacent age groups. We estimate that a donor under age 70 years has the potential to donate 4.6 to 6.7 organs.

  16. Initiating Transdisciplinarity in Academic Case Study Teaching: Experiences from a Regional Development Project in Salzburg, Austria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhar, Andreas; Vilsmaier, Ulli; Glanzer, Michaela; Freyer, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe experiences with the initiation of transdisciplinarity in academic case study teaching with special reference to regional planning, based on the case study "Leben 2014 (Life 2014)--perspectives for regional development in the national park region Ober-pinz-gau, Salzburg".…

  17. Maternal Reports of Home Literacy Experiences in Multilingual Mauritius: A Case Study of Pre-Schoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auleear Owodally, Ambarin Mooznah

    2014-01-01

    While the extant literature has highlighted the important contribution of home literacy experiences to early literacy development, limited research has been carried out among children living in postcolonial contexts, where there is a mismatch between the home and school language. Such is the case of Mauritius. The present exploratory case study…

  18. Scleroderma of geriatric age and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome – description of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Rudny, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (Ssc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease of unknown origin, characterized by progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Immune reactions taking part in Ssc pathogenesis may contribute to cancer development; therefore patients with risk factors for this disease require observation for a neoplastic process. On the other hand, symptoms of Ssc may be a mask of various cancers. Differentiating between the idiopathic form of Ssc and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome often causes a lot of difficulties. The article presents two cases of Ssc at the beginning of the disease after 60 years of age. The first case was diagnosed as Ssc, whereas in the second case the defined diagnosis was scleroderma-like syndrome in the course of colorectal cancer. This paper presents an analysis of differential diagnostic procedures which were performed and led to the final diagnosis, mentions types of cancers co-occurring with Ssc and suggests a screening scheme for cancer development in patients with a diagnosis of Ssc. PMID:27407287

  19. Case Study of K-12 Public School Superintendents Having Business Background and No Teaching Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, James

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of superintendents with business backgrounds and who lack teaching experience. There is a shortage of qualified superintendent candidates in K-12 school districts. As a result, some school boards are hiring nontraditional superintendents. This qualitative case study is important because it…

  20. The Experience of Creating Community: An Intrinsic Case Study of Four Midwestern Public School Choral Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this intrinsic case study was to explore four midwestern choral teachers' experiences of creating and sustaining community within their public school choirs. Research questions included (1) how choral teachers describe their experiences of creating choral communities, (2) how the teacher-student relationship is experienced, and (3)…

  1. Early Career Teachers' Emotional Experiences and Development--A Norwegian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakhelln, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Emotional experiences that are an integral part of the process of becoming teachers have been insufficiently explored in the research literature. The early experiences of three new teachers in a Norwegian upper secondary school are analysed using a collective case-study design and a socio-cultural theoretical framework. Emotions arising in the…

  2. How and What Can We Learn from Replicating Historical Experiments? A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hottecke, Dietmar

    2000-01-01

    Argues that historical experiments replicated as closely as possible to the original enable experiences that are intellectual as well as sensual in kind. Demonstrates that learning by replicating makes it possible to learn on different levels of human activity related to mind and body. Introduces a case study of the replication of the kind of…

  3. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  4. Organizational Change in Academic Programs: A Case Study of Doctoral Students' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Christina Coffee

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the experiences of doctoral students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as they transitioned from a fairly stable academic department experiencing significant changes. To achieve the purpose of the study, I investigated the experiences of doctoral students through an organizational development…

  5. Experience in Egypt with 25 cases of craniosynostosis and forehead advancement.

    PubMed

    Assaad, A; Gheita, A A

    1987-01-01

    The authors' experience in 25 cases of craniosynostosis treated within a period of 2 years is described. The morphology of the skull has varied from one case to the other, so that modification of the technique was needed in each case. There was no mortality, but two complications were encountered: CSF subcutaneous collection that resolved spontaneously and an almost complete absorption of the neoforehead and part of the frontal bar due to infection.

  6. Caregivers' Experience during Their Children's Transition Process from Early Childhood Special Education Services to School-Aged Special Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Linda Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates caregivers' perceptions of the transition process for children transitioning from Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) to School Age Special Education services (SA). Interest in this topic developed during the researcher's 18 years of experience as an Itinerant Early Childhood Special Education Teacher during which she…

  7. Do the Instructors Differ in Their Behavioral Intention to Adopt E-Learning Based on Age, Gender, and Internet Experience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altawallbeh, Manal; Thiam, Wun; Alshourah, Sultan; Fong, Soon Fook

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine if there are differences of the age, gender, and internet experience on behavioural intention to adopt e-learning of the instructors in Jordanian universities. The paper takes a social, and technical approach in its investigation by using a research model based on the ANOVA and t-test Analysis to identify if…

  8. The Impact of Teachers' Age, Gender and Experience on the Use of Information and Communication Technology in EFL Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahdi, Hassan Saleh; Al-Dera, Abdullah Sa'ad

    2013-01-01

    The integration of information and communication technology (ICT) into language teaching and learning depends on many factors. Some of these factors are associated with teachers. Teachers play a crucial role in the integration of ICT. This study investigates the impact of teacher's age, experience, and gender on the integration of ICT into…

  9. Technology Implementation: Teacher Age, Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Professional Development as Related to Classroom Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweed, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify the combination of factors that pertain to the implementation of new technologies in the classroom. Specifically, the study was an analysis of the age of the teacher, years of teaching experience, quality of professional development, and teacher self-efficacy as defined by Bandura (1997) to…

  10. Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media: Commentary on Bull et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhow, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The recent editorial in this journal by Bull et al. ("Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media" Vol 8, Iss 2) discussed the challenges of bridging formal learning practices and informal learning opportunities within the context of today's Web-enhanced world. In this commentary, Christine…

  11. Instrumental and Terminal Life Values of Faculty by Community College Location, Age, Experience, Highest Degree and Other Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, John F.; Hales, Loyde W.

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the life values of community college faculty and selected demographic variables (i.e., college location, age, teaching experience, highest degree held, and other employment). A stratified random sample of 984 Oregon community college instructors was asked to identify "guiding…

  12. Predicting relatedness and self-definition depressive experiences in aging women based on personality traits: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Henriques-Calado, Joana; Duarte-Silva, Maria Eugénia; Campos, Rui C; Sacoto, Carlota; Keong, Ana Marta; Junqueira, Diana

    2013-01-01

    As part of the research relating personality and depression, this study seeks to predict depressive experiences in aging women according to Sidney Blatt's perspective based on the Five-Factor Model of Personality. The NEO-Five Factor Inventory and the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire were administered. The domains Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness predicted self-criticism, explaining 68% of the variance; the domains Neuroticism and Extraversion predicted dependency, explaining 62% of the variance. The subfactors Neediness and Connectedness were differently related to personality traits. These findings are relevant to the research relating personality and anaclitic / introjective depressive experiences in late adulthood.

  13. To Cut or Not to Cut: Cosmetic Surgery Usage and Women's Age-Related Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Shelley J.

    2012-01-01

    Part of the developmental trajectory of middle and late life presumes the adjustment to physical aging, an adjustment that is complicated for women for whom the prioritization of beauty is central to their social value in Western societies. A 60-item written questionnaire was distributed to a volunteer community sample of 202 women ages 19-86.…

  14. The Health Experiences and Development of Teen-Age Mothered Babies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Jeannette Doris

    Conducted from an educational sociologist's point of view, this study explores the relationship of mother's age to the development of her child. A documentary frequency technique was used to investigate four general questions: (1) Do children of younger mothers, ages 16 years and under, have health problems different from the health problems of…

  15. Experiences in the Bilingual Education of a Child of Pre-School Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zierer, Ernesto

    1978-01-01

    This article describes a plan to develop bilingualism carried out by the parents of a child of pre-school age who died of brain cancer at the age of five. The child learned German, the language of his father, and Spanish, the language of his mother, consecutively. (CFM)

  16. What is the role of a case manager in community aged care? A qualitative study in Australia.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to explore the perceptions of case managers about their roles in providing community aged care in Australia. Purposeful sampling was used and 33 qualitative semi-structured interviews with 47 participants were conducted. Participants were drawn from a list of all case managers working in aged care organisations that provided publicly funded case-managed community aged care programmes in the State of Victoria, Australia. Participant selection criteria included age, gender, job titles, professional backgrounds, practice locations, organisational attributes and organisational size. Data collection was implemented between September 2012 and March 2013. Thematic analysis was performed. Participants believed that case managers performed diverse roles based on clients' needs. They also articulated 16 important roles of case managers, including advisors, advocates, carers, communicators, co-ordinators, educators, empowering clients, engaging clients and families, liaising with people, managing budgets, navigators, negotiators, networking with people, facilitators, problem solvers and supporters. However, they were concerned about brokers, mediators and counsellors in terms of the terminology or case managers' willingness to perform these roles. Moreover, they perceived that neither gatekeepers nor direct service provision was case managers' role. The findings of this study suggest that case managers working in community aged care sectors may be more effective if they practised the 16 roles aforementioned. With the value of helping rather than obstructing clients to access services, they may not act as gatekeepers. In addition, they may not provide services directly as opposed to their peers working in medical care settings. The findings will also assist organisations to design job descriptions specifying case managers' roles and associated job responsibilities. Clear job descriptions will further benefit the organisations in staff recruitment, orientation

  17. Age-Related Incidence Curve of Hospitalized Shaken Baby Syndrome Cases: Convergent Evidence for Crying as a Trigger to Shaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Ronald G.; Trent, Roger B.; Cross, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an age-specific incidence of hospitalized cases of Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) that has similar properties to the previously reported ''normal crying curve,'' as a form of indirect evidence that crying is an important stimulus for SBS. Design and setting: The study analyzed cases of Shaken Baby Syndrome by…

  18. Accounting for age uncertainty in growth modeling, the case study of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) of the Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dortel, Emmanuelle; Massiot-Granier, Félix; Rivot, Etienne; Million, Julien; Hallier, Jean-Pierre; Morize, Eric; Munaron, Jean-Marie; Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Age estimates, typically determined by counting periodic growth increments in calcified structures of vertebrates, are the basis of population dynamics models used for managing exploited or threatened species. In fisheries research, the use of otolith growth rings as an indicator of fish age has increased considerably in recent decades. However, otolith readings include various sources of uncertainty. Current ageing methods, which converts an average count of rings into age, only provide periodic age estimates in which the range of uncertainty is fully ignored. In this study, we describe a hierarchical model for estimating individual ages from repeated otolith readings. The model was developed within a Bayesian framework to explicitly represent the sources of uncertainty associated with age estimation, to allow for individual variations and to include knowledge on parameters from expertise. The performance of the proposed model was examined through simulations, and then it was coupled to a two-stanza somatic growth model to evaluate the impact of the age estimation method on the age composition of commercial fisheries catches. We illustrate our approach using the sagittal otoliths of yellowfin tuna of the Indian Ocean collected through large-scale mark-recapture experiments. The simulation performance suggested that the ageing error model was able to estimate the ageing biases and provide accurate age estimates, regardless of the age of the fish. Coupled with the growth model, this approach appeared suitable for modeling the growth of Indian Ocean yellowfin and is consistent with findings of previous studies. The simulations showed that the choice of the ageing method can strongly affect growth estimates with subsequent implications for age-structured data used as inputs for population models. Finally, our modeling approach revealed particularly useful to reflect uncertainty around age estimates into the process of growth estimation and it can be applied to any

  19. Accounting for age uncertainty in growth modeling, the case study of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) of the Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dortel, Emmanuelle; Massiot-Granier, Félix; Rivot, Etienne; Million, Julien; Hallier, Jean-Pierre; Morize, Eric; Munaron, Jean-Marie; Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Age estimates, typically determined by counting periodic growth increments in calcified structures of vertebrates, are the basis of population dynamics models used for managing exploited or threatened species. In fisheries research, the use of otolith growth rings as an indicator of fish age has increased considerably in recent decades. However, otolith readings include various sources of uncertainty. Current ageing methods, which converts an average count of rings into age, only provide periodic age estimates in which the range of uncertainty is fully ignored. In this study, we describe a hierarchical model for estimating individual ages from repeated otolith readings. The model was developed within a Bayesian framework to explicitly represent the sources of uncertainty associated with age estimation, to allow for individual variations and to include knowledge on parameters from expertise. The performance of the proposed model was examined through simulations, and then it was coupled to a two-stanza somatic growth model to evaluate the impact of the age estimation method on the age composition of commercial fisheries catches. We illustrate our approach using the sagittal otoliths of yellowfin tuna of the Indian Ocean collected through large-scale mark-recapture experiments. The simulation performance suggested that the ageing error model was able to estimate the ageing biases and provide accurate age estimates, regardless of the age of the fish. Coupled with the growth model, this approach appeared suitable for modeling the growth of Indian Ocean yellowfin and is consistent with findings of previous studies. The simulations showed that the choice of the ageing method can strongly affect growth estimates with subsequent implications for age-structured data used as inputs for population models. Finally, our modeling approach revealed particularly useful to reflect uncertainty around age estimates into the process of growth estimation and it can be applied to any

  20. [Therapeutic strategies of atrial fibrillation in patients aged 65 and over. Report of 86 cases].

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Aïcha; Zakhama, Lilia; Boussabah, Ehlem; Thameur, Moez; Boukhriss, Bessma; Amara, Yosser; Masmoudi, Mourad; Bencheikh, Mamoun; Benyoussef, Soraya

    2004-01-01

    Auricular fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, yet the optimal strategy for its management remains unclear. Since the study AFFIRM from which resulted them final were deferred in December 2002, the assumption of responsibility of the fibrillation of the old subject tends to become clarified. 86 patients at least 65 years or more were enrolled in our retrospective study from January 1997 to June 2003. The mean age is 70 years (65 to 82 years) and sex ratio to 0.79. 34% had a history of hypertension and 12% had a coronary artery disease. 2 groups were individualized, according to the year of admission before or after 2002. It comes out from these work 2 points: the restoration of the sinusal rhythm was the first choice. In the event of failure, the option was to maintain fibrillation and this, in the 2 groups. The AVK were founded in the large majority of the cases only after year 2002.

  1. Healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture—A phenomenographic study based on older persons’ lived experiences

    PubMed Central

    Manasatchakun, Pornpun; Chotiga, Pleumjit; Roxberg, Åsa; Asp, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Healthy ageing is a concept that concerns older persons’ quality of life and is a key factor in promoting well-being. The older population in Thailand is growing. Isan (a region of north-eastern Thailand) has been reported as having one of the most rapidly increasing older populations in the country. In order to care for and promote the health of older people, healthcare providers should understand how healthy ageing is perceived by this target group. Although healthy ageing has been studied in different contexts as well as perspectives, no studies have previously focused on older persons’ experiences of healthy ageing from a lifeworld perspective in Isan-Thai. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe older persons’ qualitatively different conceptions of healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture. A phenomenographic approach with an epistemological base in lifeworld theory was used to disclose the various ways to conceptualize healthy ageing. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 people aged 60 and above who live in Isan-Thai. The findings of this study revealed three categories of descriptions: “being independent in dependence,” “being at peace,” and “being a valuable person.” This study also found family members, friends, healthcare providers, and religion important to healthy ageing in the Isan-Thai culture. Understanding how older people conceptualize healthy ageing is valuable for healthcare providers. They can apply these findings regarding healthy ageing in their fieldwork when caring for older people. PMID:26960686

  2. Caries Experience Differs between Females and Males across Age Groups in Northern Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Feingold, Eleanor; Govil, Manika; McNeil, Daniel W; Crout, Richard J; Weyant, Robert J; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Sex disparities in dental caries have been observed across many populations, with females typically exhibiting higher prevalence and more affected teeth. In this study we assessed the sex disparities in two Northern Appalachian populations from West Virginia (WV, N = 1997) and Pennsylvania (PA, N = 1080) by comparing caries indices between males and females across four phases of dental development: primary dentition in children aged 1-5 years, mixed dentition in children aged 6-11 years, permanent dentition in adolescents aged 12-17 years, and permanent dentition in adults aged 18-59 years. No significant sex differences were observed for children aged 1-5 years. Contrary to national and international trends, WV girls aged 6-11 years had 1.5 fewer affected teeth than boys (p < 0.001). However, by ages 12-17, caries indices in the WV girls matched those in boys. In both WV and PA adults, women and men had similar total counts of affected teeth (i.e., DMFT), although women had more dental restorations (p < 0.001) and men had more current decay (p < 0.001). These results suggest that in some Appalachian populations, young girls benefit from protection against caries that is lost during adolescence and that adult women utilize dental health care to a greater degree than men. PMID:26106416

  3. Caries Experience Differs between Females and Males across Age Groups in Northern Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, John R.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Feingold, Eleanor; Govil, Manika; McNeil, Daniel W.; Crout, Richard J.; Weyant, Robert J.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    Sex disparities in dental caries have been observed across many populations, with females typically exhibiting higher prevalence and more affected teeth. In this study we assessed the sex disparities in two Northern Appalachian populations from West Virginia (WV, N = 1997) and Pennsylvania (PA, N = 1080) by comparing caries indices between males and females across four phases of dental development: primary dentition in children aged 1–5 years, mixed dentition in children aged 6–11 years, permanent dentition in adolescents aged 12–17 years, and permanent dentition in adults aged 18–59 years. No significant sex differences were observed for children aged 1–5 years. Contrary to national and international trends, WV girls aged 6–11 years had 1.5 fewer affected teeth than boys (p < 0.001). However, by ages 12–17, caries indices in the WV girls matched those in boys. In both WV and PA adults, women and men had similar total counts of affected teeth (i.e., DMFT), although women had more dental restorations (p < 0.001) and men had more current decay (p < 0.001). These results suggest that in some Appalachian populations, young girls benefit from protection against caries that is lost during adolescence and that adult women utilize dental health care to a greater degree than men. PMID:26106416

  4. Collaborative partnership in age-friendly cities: two case studies from Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Garon, Suzanne; Paris, Mario; Beaulieu, Marie; Veil, Anne; Laliberté, Andréanne

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to explain the collaborative partnership conditions and factors that foster implementation effectiveness within the age-friendly cities (AFC) in Quebec (AFC-QC), Canada. Based on a community-building approach that emphasizes collaborative partnership, the AFC-QC implementation process is divided into three steps: (1) social diagnostic of older adults' needs; (2) an action plan based on a logic model; and (3) implementation through collaborations. AFC-QC promotes direct involvement of older adults and seniors' associations at each of the three steps of the implementation process, as well as other stakeholders in the community. Based on two contrasting case studies, this article illustrates the importance of collaborative partnership for the success of AFC implementation. Results show that stakeholders, agencies, and organizations are exposed to a new form of governance where coordination and collaborative partnership among members of the steering committee are essential. Furthermore, despite the importance of the senior associations' participation in the process, they encountered significant limits in the capacity of implementing age-friendly environments solely by themselves. In conclusion, we identify the main collaborative partnership conditions and factors in AFC-QC.

  5. [Psychiatric mobile teams for the three ages of live: the Lausanne experience].

    PubMed

    Bonsack, C; Holzer, L; Stancu, I; Baier, V; Samitca, M; Charbon, Y; Koch, N

    2008-09-17

    Mobile teams have been developed for the three ages to meet the needs of people who should receive--but do not access to--a psychiatric assessment or to specialized care. To achieve this goal, the teams built a strong partnership within the social network, both with relatives and professionals involved. The general principles of intervention are similar between the ages: a focused target population, assertive outreach which benefits also relatives and carers, multidisciplinary teams with a limited caseload to ensure availability. The specificities of each age will be analyzed.

  6. Problem-Based Learning: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Peter, Ed.; Mennin, Stewart, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    The case studies in this book consider many of the most important issues perceived and experienced by people who are using or developing problem-based learning (PBL). The book focuses on politics, administration, resources, the roles of teachers, and the effects of PBL on students. The chapters are: (1) "Come and See the Real Thing" (David…

  7. Behavioral and neural plasticity caused by early social experiences: the case of the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Andrés; Ramírez, Gabriela P.; Balbuena, María Sol; Farina, Walter M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive experiences during the early stages of life play an important role in shaping future behavior. Behavioral and neural long-term changes after early sensory and associative experiences have been recently reported in the honeybee. This invertebrate is an excellent model for assessing the role of precocious experiences on later behavior due to its extraordinarily tuned division of labor based on age polyethism. These studies are mainly focused on the role and importance of experiences occurred during the first days of the adult lifespan, their impact on foraging decisions, and their contribution to coordinate food gathering. Odor-rewarded experiences during the first days of honeybee adulthood alter the responsiveness to sucrose, making young hive bees more sensitive to assess gustatory features about the nectar brought back to the hive and affecting the dynamic of the food transfers and the propagation of food-related information within the colony. Early olfactory experiences lead to stable and long-term associative memories that can be successfully recalled after many days, even at foraging ages. Also they improve memorizing of new associative learning events later in life. The establishment of early memories promotes stable reorganization of the olfactory circuits inducing structural and functional changes in the antennal lobe (AL). Early rewarded experiences have relevant consequences at the social level too, biasing dance and trophallaxis partner choice and affecting recruitment. Here, we revised recent results in bees' physiology, behavior, and sociobiology to depict how the early experiences affect their cognition abilities and neural-related circuits. PMID:23986708

  8. 20 CFR 410.426 - Determining total disability: Age, education, and work experience criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.426 Determining total disability: Age, education, and...

  9. 20 CFR 410.426 - Determining total disability: Age, education, and work experience criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.426 Determining total disability: Age, education, and...

  10. Large spatial variations in coastal 14C reservoir age - a case study from the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, B. C.; Filipsson, H. L.; Snowball, I.

    2013-05-01

    Coastal locations are highly influenced by input from freshwater river runoff, including sources of terrestrial carbon, which can be expected to modify the 14C reservoir age, or R (t), associated with marine water. In this Baltic Sea case study, pre-bomb museum collection mollusc shells of known calendar age, from 30 locations across a strategic salinity transect of the Baltic Sea, were analysed for 14C, δ13C and δ18O. R (t) was calculated for all 30 locations. Seven locations, of which six are within close proximity of the coast, were found to have relatively higher R (t) values, indicative of hard-water effects. Whenever possible, the Macoma genus of mollusc was selected from the museum collections, in order to exclude species specific reservoir age effects as much as possible. When the Macoma samples are exclusively considered, and samples from hard-water locations excluded, a statistically significant correlation between Macoma R (t) and average salinity is found, indicating a two end-member linear mixing model between 14Cmarine and 14Crunoff. A map of Baltic Sea Macoma aragonite R (t) for the late 19th and early 20th centuries is produced. Such a map can provide an estimate for contemporary Baltic Sea Macoma R (t), although one must exercise caution when applying such estimates back in time or to 14C dates obtained from different sample material. A statistically significant correlation is found between δ18Oaragonite and Macoma R (t), suggesting that δ18Oaragonite can be used to estimate Macoma palaeo-R (t), due to the δ18Oaragonite signal being dominated by the salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea. A slightly increased correlation can be expected when δ18Oaragonite is corrected for temperature fractionation effects. The results of this Baltic Sea case study, which show that R (t) is affected by hydrographic conditions and local carbon inputs, have important consequences for other coastal and estuarine locations, where R (t) is also likely to significantly

  11. Large spatial variations in coastal 14C reservoir age - a case study from the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, B. C.; Filipsson, H. L.; Snowball, I.

    2013-02-01

    Coastal locations are highly influenced by input from freshwater river runoff, including sources of terrestrial carbon, which can be expected to modify the 14C reservoir age, or R(t), associated with marine water. In this Baltic Sea case study, pre-bomb museum collection mollusc shells of known calendar age, from 30 locations across a strategic salinity transect of the Baltic Sea, were analysed for 14C, δ13C and δ18O. R(t) was calculated for all 30 locations. Seven locations, of which six are within close proximity of the coast, were found to have relatively higher R(t) values, indicative of hard-water effects. δ13Caragonite values were found to be indicative of hard-water influence only for certain locations, suggesting the possibility of different sources of old carbon in different locations. Whenever possible, the Macoma genus of mollusc was selected from the museum collections, in order to exclude species specific reservoir age effects as much as possible. When the Macoma samples are exclusively considered, and samples from hard-water locations excluded, a statistically significant correlation between Macoma R(t) and average salinity is found, indicating a two end-member linear mixing model between 14Cmarine and 14Crunoff. A map of Baltic Sea Macoma aragonite R(t) for the late 19th and early 20th centuries is produced. Such a map can provide an estimate for contemporary Baltic Sea Macoma R(t), although one must exercise caution when applying such estimates back in time or to 14C dates obtained from different sample material. A statistically significant correlation is also found between δ18Oaragonite and Macoma R(t), suggesting that δ18Oaragonite can be used to estimate Macoma palaeo-R(t). The results of this Baltic Sea case study, which show that R(t) is affected by hydrographic conditions and local carbon inputs, have important consequences for other coastal and estuarine locations, where R(t) is also likely to significantly vary on spatial and temporal

  12. A Narrative Study of the Experiences that Impact Educational Choices of Middle-Aged Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Shireese Redmond

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to answer the research questions of how middle-aged women perceive higher education and why they do or do not pursue a higher level of education. According to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2009 American Community Survey microdata, more than half of the women between the ages of 30-50 years in one Midwestern US…

  13. Chinese Eye Exercises and Myopia Development in School Age Children: A Nested Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Meng-Tian; Li, Shi-Ming; Peng, Xiaoxia; Li, Lei; Ran, Anran; Meng, Bo; Sun, Yunyun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Chinese eye exercises have been implemented in China as an intervention for controlling children’s myopia for over 50 years. This nested case-control study investigated Chinese eye exercises and their association with myopia development in junior middle school children. Outcome measures were the onset and progression of myopia over a two-year period. Cases were defined as 1. Myopia onset (cycloplegic spherical equivalent ≤ −0.5 diopter in non-myopic children). 2. Myopia progression (myopia shift of ≥1.0 diopter in those who were myopic at baseline). Two independent investigators assessed the quality of Chinese eye exercises performance at the end of the follow-up period. Of 260 children at baseline (mean age was 12.7 ± 0.5 years), 201 were eligible for this study. There was no association between eye exercises and the risk of myopia-onset (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.24–2.21), nor myopia progression (OR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.41–1.53). The group who performed high quality exercises had a slightly lower myopia progression of 0.15 D than the children who did not perform the exercise over a period of 2 years. However, the limited sample size, low dosage and performance quality of Chinese eye exercises in children did not result in statistical significance and require further studies. PMID:27329615

  14. School Experiences Influence Personal Health and Interpersonal Relationships of Adolescents: The Canadian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin

    2007-01-01

    Canadian data from the 1998 Cross-National Survey on Health Behaviors in School-Aged Children were analyzed to examine the effects of school experiences on personal health (physical health, mental health, self-esteem, helplessness, and body image) and interpersonal relationships (number of close friends and making friends) among adolescents.…

  15. Nurses' experiences of restraint and seclusion use in short-stay acute old age psychiatry inpatient units: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, E C; Baird, J; McCann, T V

    2015-03-01

    Restraint and seclusion are often ineffective and can affect patients adversely. In this study, we explored nurses' experiences of restraint and seclusion in short-stay acute old age psychiatry inpatient units and how these experiences underpin resistance to eliminating these practices. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurses in three old age psychiatry units in Melbourne, Australia. The results provide one overarching theme, lack of accessible alternatives to restraint and seclusion, indicating that nurses believe there are no effective, accessible alternatives to these practices. Three related themes contribute to this perception. First, an adverse interpersonal environment contributes to restraint and seclusion, which relates to undesirable consequences of poor staff-to-patient relationships. Second, an unfavourable physical environment contributes to aggression and restraint and seclusion use. Third, the practice environment influences the adoption of restraint and seclusion. The findings contribute to the limited evidence about nurses' experiences of these practices in short-stay old age psychiatry, and how account needs to be taken of these experiences and contextual influences when introducing measures to address these practices. Policies addressing these measures need to be accompanied by wide-ranging initiatives to deal with aggression, including providing appropriate education and support and addressing ethical and workplace cultural issues surrounding these practices.

  16. Experience Modulates the Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on Gene and Protein Expression in the Hippocampus: Impaired Plasticity in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sewal, Angila S.; Patzke, Holger; Perez, Evelyn J.; Park, Pul; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Fletcher, Bonnie R.; Long, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) treatment has attracted considerable attention in the emerging area of cognitive neuroepigenetics. The possibility that ongoing cognitive experience importantly regulates the cell biological effects of HDACi administration, however, has not been systematically examined. In an initial experiment addressing this issue, we tested whether water maze training influences the gene expression response to acute systemic HDACi administration in the young adult rat hippocampus. Training powerfully modulated the response to HDACi treatment, increasing the total number of genes regulated to nearly 3000, including many not typically linked to neural plasticity, compared with <300 following HDACi administration alone. Although water maze training itself also regulated nearly 1800 genes, the specific mRNAs, gene networks, and biological pathways involved were largely distinct when the same experience was provided together with HDACi administration. Next, we tested whether the synaptic protein response to HDACi treatment is similarly dependent on recent cognitive experience, and whether this plasticity is altered in aged rats with memory impairment. Whereas synaptic protein labeling in the young hippocampus was selectively increased when HDACi administration was provided in conjunction with water maze training, combined treatment had no effect on synaptic proteins in the aged hippocampus. Our findings indicate that ongoing experience potently regulates the molecular consequences of HDACi treatment and that the interaction of recent cognitive experience with histone acetylation dynamics is disrupted in the aged hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The possibility that interventions targeting epigenetic regulation could be effective in treating a range of neurodegenerative disorders has attracted considerable interest. Here we demonstrate in the rat hippocampus that ongoing experience powerfully modifies the molecular

  17. The Clusters AgeS Experiment (CASE). Variable Stars in the Field of the Globular Cluster NGC 3201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J.; Rozyczka, M.; Thompson, I. B.; Narloch, W.; Mazur, B.; Pych, W.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    2016-01-01

    The field of the globular cluster NGC 3201 was monitored between 1998 and 2009 in a search for variable stars. BV light curves were obtained for 152 periodic or likely periodic variables, fifty-seven of which are new detections. Thirty-seven newly detected variables are proper motion members of the cluster. Among them we found seven detached or semi-detached eclipsing binaries, four contact binaries, and eight SX Phe pulsators. Four of the eclipsing binaries are located in the turnoff region, one on the lower main sequence and the remaining two slightly above the subgiant branch. Two contact systems are blue stragglers, and another two reside in the turnoff region. In the blue straggler region a total of 266 objects were found, of which 140 are proper motion (PM) members of NGC 3201, and another nineteen are field stars. Seventy-eight of the remaining objects for which we do not have PM data are located within the half-light radius from the center of the cluster, and most of them are likely genuine blue stragglers. Four variable objects in our field of view were found to coincide with X-ray sources: three chromospherically active stars and a quasar at a redshift z≍0.5.

  18. The Clusters AgeS Experiment (CASE). Variable stars in the field of the globular cluster NGC 362

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozyczka, M.; Thompson, I. B.; Narloch, W.; Pych, W.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    2016-09-01

    The field of the globular cluster NGC 362 was monitored between 1997 and 2015 in a search for variable stars. BV light curves were obtained for 151 periodic or likely periodic variable stars, over a hundred of which are new detections. Twelve newly detected variable stars are proper-motion members of the cluster: two SX Phe and two RR Lyr pulsators, one contact binary, three detached or semi-detached eclipsing binaries, and four spotted variable stars. The most interesting objects among these are the binary blue straggler V20 with an asymmetric light curve, and the 8.1 d semidetached binary V24 located on the red giant branch of NGC 362, which is a Chandra X-ray source. We also provide substantial new data for 24 previously known variable stars.

  19. Enriched childhood experiences moderate age-related motor and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Megan J; Saucier, Deborah M; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2013-01-01

    Aging is associated with deterioration of skilled manual movement. Specifically, aging corresponds with increased reaction time, greater movement duration, segmentation of movement, increased movement variability, and reduced ability to adapt to external forces and inhibit previously learned sequences. Moreover, it is thought that decreased lateralization of neural function in older adults may point to increased neural recruitment as a compensatory response to deterioration of key frontal and intra-hemispheric networks, particularly of callosal structures. However, factors that mediate age-related motor decline are not well understood. Here we show that music training in childhood is associated with reduced age-related decline of bimanual and unimanual motor skills in a MIDI keyboard motor learning task. Compared to older adults without music training, older adults with more than a year of music training demonstrated proficient bimanual and unimanual movement, evidenced by enhanced speed and decreased movement errors. Further, this group demonstrated significantly better implicit learning in the weather prediction task, a non-motor task. The performance of older adults with music training in those tasks was comparable to young adults. Older adults, however, displayed greater verbal ability compared to young adults irrespective of a past history of music training. Our results indicate that music training early in life may reduce age-associated decline of neural motor and cognitive networks.

  20. Enriched childhood experiences moderate age-related motor and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Megan J.; Saucier, Deborah M.; Metz, Gerlinde A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with deterioration of skilled manual movement. Specifically, aging corresponds with increased reaction time, greater movement duration, segmentation of movement, increased movement variability, and reduced ability to adapt to external forces and inhibit previously learned sequences. Moreover, it is thought that decreased lateralization of neural function in older adults may point to increased neural recruitment as a compensatory response to deterioration of key frontal and intra-hemispheric networks, particularly of callosal structures. However, factors that mediate age-related motor decline are not well understood. Here we show that music training in childhood is associated with reduced age-related decline of bimanual and unimanual motor skills in a MIDI keyboard motor learning task. Compared to older adults without music training, older adults with more than a year of music training demonstrated proficient bimanual and unimanual movement, evidenced by enhanced speed and decreased movement errors. Further, this group demonstrated significantly better implicit learning in the weather prediction task, a non-motor task. The performance of older adults with music training in those tasks was comparable to young adults. Older adults, however, displayed greater verbal ability compared to young adults irrespective of a past history of music training. Our results indicate that music training early in life may reduce age-associated decline of neural motor and cognitive networks. PMID:23423702

  1. Summer Employment and Community Experiences of Transition-Age Youth with Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Ditchman, Nicole; Sun, Ye; Trainor, Audrey A.; Swedeen, Beth; Owens, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Although early work experiences during high school represent one of the most consistent predictors of postschool employment for young adults with disabilities, little is known about how these adolescents might access these valuable transition experiences. This study examined the summer employment and community activities of 136 high school…

  2. Experiences of Supporting People with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease in Aged Care and Family Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carling-Jenkins, Rachel; Torr, Jennifer; Iacono, Teresa; Bigby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Research addressing the experiences of families of adults with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease in seeking diagnosis and gaining support is limited. The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of these processes by exploring the experiences of families and carers in supporting people with Down syndrome and…

  3. Age at Adoption from Institutional Care as a Window into the Lasting Effects of Early Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Megan M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major questions of human development is how early experience impacts the course of development years later. Children adopted from institutional care experience varying levels of deprivation in their early life followed by qualitatively better care in an adoptive home, providing a unique opportunity to study the lasting effects of early…

  4. Meeting the educational needs of an aging population: The Australian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minichiello, Victor

    1992-07-01

    The number of older people in Australia is growing fast, and gerontology has recently become a recognised area of study in tertiary institutions. However, negative attitudes persist among health and welfare professionals, and ways in which gerontology courses can combat the myths associated with aging and the aged are discussed. It is pointed out that people do not grow old in isolation, but in a social context. Education for older people should be seen as a part of social policy, recognising the lifelong right to education. The University of the Third Age (U3A) is a response to the demand for education from older people. The origins of this movement in Europe, and its spread to North America and Australia, are outlined. To meet the needs of older people, courses offered by U3A's have to be multidisciplinary.

  5. Collaborating, teaching and learning in a cyberspace community: a virtual AGE experience.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Catherine J; Weinreich, Donna M

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes one outcome of a collaborative teaching and learning partnership between two Universities via a Web-based environment. A description and evaluation of a semester-long project combining students from two different universities is examined. A total of 22 students participated as members of six different virtual health-care teams. Each team was charged with (1) creating a team contract; (2) completing an electronic patient medical record; and (3) a patient care plan. Students posted to discussion threads regularly using learning objects developed by faculty for Virtual AGE (vAGE-Active Gerontology Education). The successes and lessons learned for both students and faculty are discussed. PMID:18032303

  6. A study on the relationships between age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jaeyeop; Park, Juhyung; Cho, Milim; Park, Yunhee; Kim, DeokJu; Yang, Dongju; Yang, Yeongae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation of age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry. [Subjects and Methods] The study was conducted using 100 subjects who were over 55 years old and worked in heavy industry. To obtain data, we first had the subjects complete the MoCA-K test and Work Ability Index (WAI). The data were then analyzed by frequency and correlation using statistical software (SPSS 21.0). [Results] Through this study, we discovered a significant positive correlation between WAI and MoCA-K, age, and work experience. [Conclusion] This study revealed that work ability in older employees increases not with the number of years worked but with the enhancement of cognitive ability. Special management that focuses on cognition is therefore required for senior employees working in the field of heavy industry.

  7. The Orthopaedic Trauma Patient Experience: A Qualitative Case Study of Orthopaedic Trauma Patients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Nathan N.; Mugarura, Rodney; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Bouchard, Maryse

    2014-01-01

    The disability adjusted life years (DALYs) associated with injuries have increased by 34% from 1990 to 2010, making it the 10th leading cause of disability worldwide, with most of the burden affecting low-income countries. Although disability from injuries is often preventable, limited access to essential surgical services contributes to these increasing DALY rates. Similar to many other low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), Uganda is plagued by a growing volume of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to explore the orthopaedic trauma patient's experience in accessing medical care in Uganda and what affects the injury might have on the socioeconomic status for the patient and their dependents. We also evaluate the factors that impact an individual's ability to access an appropriate treatment facility for their traumatic injury. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients 18 year of age or older admitted with a fractured tibia or femur at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. As limited literature exists on the socioeconomic impacts of disability from trauma, we designed a descriptive qualitative case study, using thematic analysis, to extract unique information for which little has been previously been documented. This methodology is subject to less bias than other qualitative methods as it imposes fewer preconceptions. Data analysis of the patient interviews (n = 35) produced over one hundred codes, nine sub-themes and three overarching themes. The three overarching categories revealed by the data were: 1) the importance of social supports; 2) the impact of and on economic resources; and 3) navigating the healthcare system. Limited resources to fund the treatment of orthopaedic trauma patients in Uganda leads to reliance of patients on their friends, family, and hospital connections, and a tremendous economic burden that falls on the patient and their dependents. PMID:25360815

  8. Valproic acid-induced acute pancreatitis in pediatric age: case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    COFINI, M.; QUADROZZI, F.; FAVORITI, P.; FAVORITI, M.; COFINI, G.

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is commonly prescribed medication for epilepsy, migraine and bipolar disorder. Although the common adverse effect associated with VPA are typically benign, less common adverse effect can occur; these include hepatotixicity, teratogenicity and acute pancreatitis (AP). VPA-induced pancreatitis does not depend on valproic acid serum level and may occur anytime after onset of therapy. Re-challenge with VPA is dangerous and should be avoided. The diagnosis of VPA-induced pancreatitis seems to be underestimated because of difficulties in determining the causative agent and the need for a retrospective re-evaluation of the causative factor. More of idiopathic pancreatitis should be a drug-induced pancreatitis. We report four cases of VPA-induced AP found in a group of 52 cases of AP in children come to our attention from January 2008 to December 2012. The aim of these reports is to point out our experience about clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, outcome in children with VPA-induced AP and review of literature. PMID:26712070

  9. Age and experience shape developmental changes in the neural basis of language-related learning

    PubMed Central

    McNealy, Kristin; Mazziotta, John C.; Dapretto, Mirella

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the neural underpinnings of language learning across the lifespan and how these might be modified by maturational and experiential factors. Building on behavioral research highlighting the importance of early word segmentation (i.e. the detection of word boundaries in continuous speech) for subsequent language learning, here we characterize developmental changes in brain activity as this process occurs online, using data collected in a mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal design. One hundred and fifty-six participants, ranging from age 5 to adulthood, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to three novel streams of continuous speech, which contained either strong statistical regularities, strong statistical regularities and speech cues, or weak statistical regularities providing minimal cues to word boundaries. All age groups displayed significant signal increases over time in temporal cortices for the streams with high statistical regularities; however, we observed a significant right-to-left shift in the laterality of these learning-related increases with age. Interestingly, only the 5- to 10-year-old children displayed significant signal increases for the stream with low statistical regularities, suggesting an age-related decrease in sensitivity to more subtle statistical cues. Further, in a sample of 78 10-year-olds, we examined the impact of proficiency in a second language and level of pubertal development on learning-related signal increases, showing that the brain regions involved in language learning are influenced by both experiential and maturational factors. PMID:22010887

  10. Age and experience shape developmental changes in the neural basis of language-related learning.

    PubMed

    McNealy, Kristin; Mazziotta, John C; Dapretto, Mirella

    2011-11-01

    Very little is known about the neural underpinnings of language learning across the lifespan and how these might be modified by maturational and experiential factors. Building on behavioral research highlighting the importance of early word segmentation (i.e. the detection of word boundaries in continuous speech) for subsequent language learning, here we characterize developmental changes in brain activity as this process occurs online, using data collected in a mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal design. One hundred and fifty-six participants, ranging from age 5 to adulthood, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to three novel streams of continuous speech, which contained either strong statistical regularities, strong statistical regularities and speech cues, or weak statistical regularities providing minimal cues to word boundaries. All age groups displayed significant signal increases over time in temporal cortices for the streams with high statistical regularities; however, we observed a significant right-to-left shift in the laterality of these learning-related increases with age. Interestingly, only the 5- to 10-year-old children displayed significant signal increases for the stream with low statistical regularities, suggesting an age-related decrease in sensitivity to more subtle statistical cues. Further, in a sample of 78 10-year-olds, we examined the impact of proficiency in a second language and level of pubertal development on learning-related signal increases, showing that the brain regions involved in language learning are influenced by both experiential and maturational factors.

  11. Differential Expression of Social Dominance as a Function of Age and Maltreatment Experience

    PubMed Central

    Teisl, Michael; Rogosch, Fred A.; Oshri, Assaf; Cicchetti, Dante

    2013-01-01

    Recent perspectives on social dominance in normative populations suggest a developmental progression from using primarily coercive strategies to incorporation of more socially competent strategies to attain material and social resources. Parental influences on the resource control strategies children use have been proposed, but not investigated empirically. The present study examined age- and gender-related differences in dominance strategies in 470 children from high-risk neighborhoods who were between 6 and 13 years of age, and approximately half of whom had experienced maltreatment. A Q-sort measure of social dominance was developed and received preliminary support. Consistent with predictions from resource control theory, age-related differences in dominance-related behavior were demonstrated in both non-maltreated and maltreated children. Maltreated children were more likely than non-maltreated children to be identified as dominant bullies at any age. Dominance and bullying were not more likely to be associated for children who had experienced physical and sexual abuse relative to those who were neglected or emotionally maltreated. Results are discussed in terms of the influence of maltreatment on the social development of children and intervention approaches for limiting these deleterious effects are recommended. PMID:21823792

  12. Age and experience shape developmental changes in the neural basis of language-related learning.

    PubMed

    McNealy, Kristin; Mazziotta, John C; Dapretto, Mirella

    2011-11-01

    Very little is known about the neural underpinnings of language learning across the lifespan and how these might be modified by maturational and experiential factors. Building on behavioral research highlighting the importance of early word segmentation (i.e. the detection of word boundaries in continuous speech) for subsequent language learning, here we characterize developmental changes in brain activity as this process occurs online, using data collected in a mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal design. One hundred and fifty-six participants, ranging from age 5 to adulthood, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to three novel streams of continuous speech, which contained either strong statistical regularities, strong statistical regularities and speech cues, or weak statistical regularities providing minimal cues to word boundaries. All age groups displayed significant signal increases over time in temporal cortices for the streams with high statistical regularities; however, we observed a significant right-to-left shift in the laterality of these learning-related increases with age. Interestingly, only the 5- to 10-year-old children displayed significant signal increases for the stream with low statistical regularities, suggesting an age-related decrease in sensitivity to more subtle statistical cues. Further, in a sample of 78 10-year-olds, we examined the impact of proficiency in a second language and level of pubertal development on learning-related signal increases, showing that the brain regions involved in language learning are influenced by both experiential and maturational factors. PMID:22010887

  13. The Experience of Anger and Sadness in Everyday Problems Impacts Age Differences in Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard-Fields, Fredda; Coats, Abby Heckman

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined regulation of the discrete emotions anger and sadness in adolescents through older adults in the context of describing everyday problem situations. The results support previous work; in comparison to younger age groups, older adults reported that they experienced less anger and reported that they used more passive and fewer…

  14. Using fluidized bed and flume experiments to quantify cohesion development from aging and drainage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal variations in soil erosion resistance are often the result of a decrease in soil cohesion due to physical disruption followed by a regain of soil cohesion through a process analogous to a thixotropic sol-gel reaction also called aging, stabilization or consolidation. The goal of this study ...

  15. Listening to Individual Voices and Stories--The Mature-Age Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a qualitative research project, part of a doctoral thesis, which examines the impact of university study on a group of 20 female and male mature-age students at the University of Newcastle, Australia, who have entered university via a non-traditional pathway. These students are in the second to final years of…

  16. The effect of age and time to death on primary care costs: the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Atella, Vincenzo; Conti, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    A large body of literature shows that time to death (TTD) is by far a better predictor of health spending than age. In this paper, we investigate if this finding holds true also in presence of primary care costs (pharmaceuticals, diagnostic tests and specialist visits) in Italy, where they represent an important share (about 30%) of the total health care expenditure (HCE). Our analysis is based on a large sample of the Italian population (about 750,000 individuals), obtained from the Health Search-SiSSI database, which contains patient-level data collected routinely by General Practitioners in Italy since 2002. We study individuals aged 19 and older, over the period 2006-2009. By means of a two-part model which accounts for the presence of zero expenditure, our findings show that age represents the most important driver of primary care costs in Italy, although TTD remains a good predictor. These results suggest that age and TTD can have a different role in shaping health care costs according to the component of health expenditure examined. Therefore, our advice to policy makers is to use disaggregated models to better disentangle these contributions and to produce more reliable health spending forecasts.

  17. Bilateral deep neck space infection in the paediatric age group: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Songu, M; Demiray, U; Adibelli, Z H; Adibelli, H

    2011-06-01

    Deep neck space infections can occur at any age but require more intimate management in the paediatric age group because of their rapidly progressive nature. Concurrent abscess in distinct neck spaces has rarely been reported in healthy children. Herewith, a rare case of bilateral neck abscess is reported in a 16-month-old female and the clinical presentation and management are discussed with a review of the literature.

  18. Effects of age, sex, prior experience, and intraspecific food variation on diet composition of a tropical folivore (Phasmetodea: Phasmatidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Sandlin, E.A.; Willig, M.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Recent attention in ecology has focused on factors that influence the foraging behavior of herbivores. We evaluated responses to different arrays of food plants exhibited by an abundant folivore within the tabonuco forest of Puerto Rico. Previous work indicates that the walkingstick Lamponius portoricensis Rehn forages on a limited array of plant species and selects habitats that contain high densities of Piper treleaseanum Britton Wilson. We designed three separate experiments to evaluate (1) if walkingsticks of different ages or of different sex have different food preferences, (2) if previous exposure to only one food type affects subsequent diet composition, and (3) if walkingsticks distinguish among leaves of different quality from the same plant. Four plants [Dendropanax arboreus (L.) Decne Planch, Piper hispidum Sw., P. treleaseanum, and Urera baccifera (L.) Gaud.] known to be forage for this insect were used in food choice experiments. Multi- variate analyses revealed that, at different ages, males and females exhibit different patterns of consumption. Likewise, preexposure to only one food influences subsequent diet differently depending upon preexposure regime and sex. In addition, preferences are shown for different qualities of leaves within single forage species. In particular, lower (older) leaves of P. treleaseanum are preferred, whereas leaves of D. arboreus and U. baccifera are eaten indiscriminately. These results are consistent with the contention that herbivores forage within nutritional constraints. In addition, walkingsticks distinguish between plant species, recognize differences in leaf quality associated with age or position, and modify their diet to reflect past experience.

  19. Does age matter in song bird vocal interactions? Results from interactive playback experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The song of oscines provides an extensively studied model of age-dependent behaviour changes. Male and female receivers might use song characteristics to obtain information about the age of a signaller, which is often related to its quality. Whereas most of the age-dependent song changes have been studied in solo singing, the role of age in vocal interactions is less well understood. We addressed this issue in a playback study with common nightingales (Luscinia megarhynchos). Previous studies showed that male nightingales had smaller repertoires in their first year than older males and males adjusted their repertoire towards the most common songs in the breeding population. We now compared vocal interaction patterns in a playback study in 12 one year old and 12 older nightingales (cross-sectional approach). Five of these males were tested both in their first and second breeding season (longitudinal approach). Song duration and latency to respond did not differ between males of different ages in either approach. In the cross-sectional approach, one year old nightingales matched song types twice as often as did older birds. Similarly, in the longitudinal approach all except one bird reduced the number of song type matches in their second season. Individuals tended to overlap songs at higher rates in their second breeding season than in their first. The higher levels of song type matches in the first year and song overlapping by birds in their second year suggest that these are communicative strategies to establish relationships with competing males and/or choosy females. PMID:22071317

  20. How and What Can We Learn From Replicating Historical Experiments? A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho-Ttecke, Dietmar

    This article focusses on the topic of replicating historical experiments as learning and teaching devices. It will be argued that historical experiments replicated as close as possible to the original enable experiences that are intellectual as well as sensual in kind. It will be demonstrated that learning by replicating makes it possible to learn on different levels of human activity related to the mind and the body. It will be discussed what the notion of replication means and what one can learn by replicating. Furthermore, a case study will be introduced, the replication of a rotation apparatus (a kind of electric motor) which was developed by Michael Faraday in 1821. The case study reveals that reconstructing and redoing historical experimental situations disclose laboratory dimensions of natural sciences. I will give an account of the process of replicating this experiment and its relation to the historical background. At the end, the experiment will be placed in a broad historical context of electricity and motion in order to demonstrate that the case study is related to a history of experiments by which mechanical motion is produced through electrical means.

  1. [Mining analysis and experience summary for chronic atrophic gastritis cases treated by Professor LIU Feng-bin].

    PubMed

    Hou, Zheng-kun; Liu, Feng-bin; Li, Pei-wu; Zhuang, Kun-hai

    2015-06-01

    To summarize Professor LIU Feng-bin's clinical experience and theoretical thoughts on chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), the study group designed a retrospective study on his case series and expert interview. First of all, the data of CAG patients treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine between 2009 and 2013, e. g. herbs, diseases, syndrome type, prescription amount and number of herbs, was collected and processed. The statistical description and binary logistic regression were used to determined the syndrome type, initial basic remedy and modification. During the statistics, a complete and sub-group analysis was performed simultaneously. After the expert interview, the syndrome type and medication were finalized. As a result, a total of 228 CAG patients aged at (50.30 ± 10.18) were collected, including 151 males (66.23%). Of them, the TCM diagnosis and syndrome type were extracted from the information of 157 patients, including 115 cases with gastric stuffiness, 23 cases with gastric pain, 19 missing cases, 2 cases with spleen-stomach weakness syndrome, 57 cases with spleen deficiency and dampness-heat syndrome, 18 cases with spleen-stomach disharmony syndrome, 23 cases with syndrome of liver depression syndrome, 21 cases with liver qi invading stomach syndrome and 26 qi and yin deficiency syndrome, respectively. All of the 228 patients used totally 104 herbs, while the subgroups with 157 patients used 94 herbs. The most frequently used 15 herbs used in each groups were analyzed to determine the initial basic remedy and modification. Subsequently, based on the information of the sub-groups with 157 patients, with the syndrome type as the dependent variable, the logistic regression analysis was made on the most frequently used 32 herbs, in order to determined the modification in herbs for different syndrome types. After experts reviewed and modified, they believed the main causes of CAG were dietary irregularities

  2. Genetic analysis of age-at-onset traits based on case-control family data.

    PubMed

    Yip, Benjamin H; Moger, Tron Anders; Pawitan, Yudi

    2010-12-30

    Family studies are a useful alternative to twin studies for disentangling genetic and environmental effects on human diseases. However, although age-at-onset traits are often of interest, family-based quantitative genetic analysis of such data is still not commonly used. One reason is that we need multiple random components to capture the genetic and environmental contributions, so it becomes hard to use the existing frailty models for correlated survival data. In this paper we consider the alternative accelerated failure-time models with random effects. The method allows both left truncation and right censoring, and it can deal with an arbitrary family structure and multiple random components. For estimation we use the h-likelihood procedure, which avoids the integration of the random effects in the marginal likelihood approach. To deal with large cohort data, we propose a case-control scheme, where we ascertain all families with at least two events and a subsample of control families. A pseudo-h-likelihood approach is used to analyse the ascertained data. We study the performance of the method using simulated data, and provide an illustration with analysis of melanoma in the Swedish population.

  3. An unusual case of spontaneous Mycobacterium chelonae corneal ulcer in a healthy middle-aged adult

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Vipul; Sriganesh, R; Relekar, Kirti

    2016-01-01

    Background To report a rare presentation of culture-positive Mycobacterium chelonae corneal ulcer and its management. Findings We report a rare case of a patient with a history of chronic pain and blurriness of vision. Examination revealed a chronic nonhealing paracentral corneal ulcer inferiorly at the 5–7 o’clock meridian with anterior chamber reaction unresponsive to routine antibiotic and antifungal medications with Mantoux test positivity in a middle-aged nondiabetic patient with no prior history of trauma, ocular surgery, and contact lens usage. Ziehl–Neelsen staining of the nonhealing ulcer revealed acid-fast bacilli typical of M. chelonae, with subsequent culture positivity in Löwenstein–Jensen medium. Subsequent treatment with topical fortified amikacin and tobramycin resulted in rapid healing of the corneal ulcer. Conclusion M. chelonae presenting as a chronic nonhealing corneal ulcer spontaneously occurring in a healthy adult with no predisposing factor draws attention towards the need to have a good index of suspicion by performing a Ziehl–Neelsen stain and culture, and subsequent successful management with topical fortified amikacin and tobramycin. PMID:27274315

  4. Students' Perceptions of Meaningfulness in First Year Experience Courses: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study, framed by a constructivist perspective, addresses a deficit in the literature and the knowledge base of a first year experience (FYE) academic program at a large, urban university regarding freshmen perceptions of meaningfulness in their courses. Existing studies identify concepts related to meaningfulness, but do not…

  5. A Survey of Pediatricians' Attitudes and Experiences with Court in Cases of Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodore, Adrea D.; Runyan, Desmond K.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To explore pediatricians' attitudes and experiences with the court system in child maltreatment cases. Design: An anonymous, cross-sectional survey of a random sample of pediatricians registered with the North Carolina Medical Board. Results: The response rate of the study was 60% (N=270). Few pediatricians (10%) reported that they had…

  6. Ear Playing and Aural Development in the Instrumental Lesson: Results from a "Case-Control" Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, David; Green, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a case-control experiment that was conducted in 2012 as part of the Ear Playing Project (EPP) at the Institute of Education, University of London. The EPP developed from the "informal learning" strand of Musical Futures and engaged instrumental students in the UK in learning from specially-created audio recordings…

  7. Community College Students' Experiences with Financial Aid Policies and Practices: A Critical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes community college students' experiences with governmental financial aid policies and institutional financial aid processes at an urban community college campus in the Northeastern United States. Drawing from theories of social justice, conceptions of social capital, and institutionalist analyses of the community…

  8. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  9. Life Experience of African Graduate Students in a Multi-Cultural Setting: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antwi, Ransford; Ziyati, Abdelali

    A study examined how international students from North and West Africa fit in, cope, manage, and respond to their experiences in American Universities that are in many cases set up in the context of Americans who constitute the majority. Assuming that the lives of international students outside their home countries and cultures are…

  10. The Gift of Time: Today's Academic Acceleration Case Study Voices of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheibel, Susan Riley

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine today's academic acceleration from the lived experience and perspectives of two young adults whose education was shortened, thereby allowing them the gift of time. Through personal interviews, parent interviews, and physical artifacts, the researcher gained a complex, holistic understanding…

  11. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  12. Behavioral Experiments in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia: A Single Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Roger; Nordahl, Hans M.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of cognitive therapy of paranoid delusions appeared in the literature, the empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy in treating psychotic symptoms has been widely established. The aim of the present case study is to show how the behavioral experiment can be used as a powerful tool to change delusional thinking…

  13. Microteaching Experience in Distance English Language Teacher Training: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merc, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this single-subject case study was to document the experiences of a teacher trainee during a 12-week microteaching process in the Distance English Language Teacher Training program (DELT). The student teacher subject responded to questionnaires, submitted online dialogue journals, and answered open-ended questions before and after…

  14. Teacher, Text, and Experience: A Case of Young Children's Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapgood, Susanna; Magnusson, Shirley J.; Sullivan Palincsar, Annemarie

    2004-01-01

    In this descriptive case study, we describe a 10-day program of study of motion down inclined planes during which a class of 21 second graders investigated scientific relations such as mass and speed, speed and momentum, and mass and momentum via both text-based experiences ("second-hand investigations") and hands-on, materials-based experiments…

  15. Understanding Student Experiences: A Case Study in Scientific Visualization and Civics and Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessee, Emily George

    2012-01-01

    This research study provides the finding of a qualitative case study in Technology, Engineering, and Design Education as well as Social Studies Education. The purpose of this study was to describe the role of graphics within a social studies lesson by examining a student's experience when a new lesson is implemented in class. The participants…

  16. Elementary Teachers' Experiences and Perceptions of Departmentalized Instruction: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohl, Alecia; Schmertzing, Lorraine; Schmertzing, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This case study investigated elementary teachers' experiences and perceptions during a trial year of departmentalized instruction in a rural south Georgia elementary school. To inform their decision about whole-school departmentalization for the future, school administrators appointed twelve first through third grade teachers to pilot the…

  17. Using Infant Massage Following a Mother's Unfavorable Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Experiences: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappin, Grace

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the synchronous behaviors enacted by mother and infant with blindness. In the study, a mother's less than optimal experience with the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) had a profound effect not only on her and her infant son, who was born 3 months prematurely and was visually impaired, but also on…

  18. [Benign tumors of epithelial origin of the salivary glands. The authors' own experience and cases].

    PubMed

    Pomatto, E; Corradi, L; Carbone, V; Fornaseri, C

    1993-04-30

    Following a review of the most recent literature on benign tumours of the salivary glands of epithelial origin, the paper illustrates an up-to-date classification of these tumours in anatomical and pathological terms. The author's personal clinical experience in 50 cases of major and minor salivary glands operated during the period between 1985 and 1991.

  19. Assessment of liver hydatid cyst cases--10 years experience in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mergen, Haluk; Genç, Hüdai; Tavusbay, Cengiz

    2007-01-01

    We analysed 73 hydatid cyst patients according to their age, gender, localization, number of cysts, infectivity, symptoms, physical examination findings, presence of accompanying diseases, and diagnostic methods. Female/male ratio was 1.6/1. In total, 69% of cases had a single cyst and 31% multiple cysts. Of the cysts, 61% were in form of "eau de roche" and the rest infective. The mean age was 42.3 years, ranging from 18 to 85 years. The most common symptom was abdominal pain in 74% of patients. Right lobe involvement was encountered in 65% of cases, left lobe in 13%, and left and right in 8%. In 27% of patients, cholelithiasis was the most common accompanying disease. As an imaging technique ultrasound was the most commonly used diagnostic technique. PMID:17326896

  20. Influence of physical fitness, age, experience, and weekly training load on match performance in elite Australian football.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; Fahrner, Brendan; Meyer, Denny; Robinson, Dean; Cook, Jill L

    2013-05-01

    Season long competition schedules in football create unique challenges for coaches in balancing the requirements of recovery, developing and maintaining physical fitness, and adjusting the training load before each match. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of player characteristics (physical fitness, age, and playing experience) and weekly in-season training load on elite match performance across an Australian football season. Twenty-five players (age: 24.1 ± 3.0 years; height: 188.3 ± 7.3 cm; weight: 90.4 ± 8.3 kg) from one elite team participated in this study. Before the season, player's age, experience, height, and weight along with measures of aerobic (6-minute run) and anaerobic (6 × 40 m repeated sprints) physical fitness were recorded. Individual player training load during the season was measured using global positioning system technology for the main training session of the week. Player match performance was calculated weekly from 33 individual playing statistics. Multilevel modeling was used to investigate the relationship between weekly training load and match performance and to explore the influence of player characteristics on this relationship. Playing experience (p < 0.01) and aerobic fitness (p < 0.05) displayed positive relationships with performance, whereas player age (p < 0.01) showed a negative relationship. Most players coped well with weekly variations in training load; however, the relationship was moderated by the results of the preseason repeated sprint test (p < 0.05). The adverse effect on playing performance in selected players after a more intense training session suggests that recovery from the session may be delayed in players who exhibit a better anaerobic fitness profile.

  1. Interrelationships among Age, Sex, and Depth of Sport Experience on a Complex Motor Task by 4- to 9-Year Old Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlman, Jolynn S.; Beitel, Patricia A.

    Age, gender, and/or previous experience seem to be related to the performance/learning of new perceptual motor tasks. This study sought to determine the relative interrelationships of age, gender, and the depth of sport experience on initial practice of a complex perceptual motor soccer task for 46 children 4- to 9-years-old who were enrolled in a…

  2. Inequality of Experience of Dental Caries between Different Ethnic Groups of Brazilians Aged 15 to 19 Years

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess inequality of experience of dental caries, based on race/ethnicity, among Brazilian adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in 2010 and test whether socioeconomic indicators fully explain ethnic differences in dental caries. Methods Data from a National Oral Health Survey conducted in Brazil in 2010 was analysed. Race/ethnicity was self-assigned and modified to White, African descents, East Asian descents, Mixed Race and Indigenous descents. The prevalence of caries experience by race/ethnic group in 2010(n = 5,367) was calculated. Further analysis included conceptual hierarchical modelling and mediation analysis. Results Caries experience was 76.9% in 15 to 19 year old Brazilians in 2010. While African descents were 32% more likely to have caries experience than Whites, Mixed Race were 69% more likely to have caries experience than Whites. Hierarchical conceptual modelling analysis confirmed the highly significant association between caries and race/ethnicity. Mixed Race and East Asian descents were 1.44 (95% CI 1.24–1.67) and 1.81 (95% CI 1.02–3.20) times more likely to experience caries than Whites after adjusting for age, sex, education and income. The difference in the likelihood of experiencing caries between Whites and African descents was not statistically significant after adjusting for years of education and family income. The results of mediation analysis confirmed that inequality of caries experience between Whites and Mixed Race and East Asian descents was mediated through education and income. The likelihood that Mixed Race and East Asian descents would experience caries compared to Whites was attenuated, by 14.8% and by 9.5% respectively, after adjusting for years of education and income. Conclusions Data analysis demonstrated that Whites have benefited more from the significant reduction in dental caries experience in 15 to 19 year old Brazilians, as compared to African descents and Mixed Race. Education

  3. Tor: Case Study of a Boy with Autism between the Age of Three and Eight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, C Reuterskiold; Nettelbladt, U.

    2005-01-01

    Longitudinal data are presented on a boy between the ages of three and eight. At age three he received a diagnosis of language impairment and at age six a diagnosis of high-functioning autism. Results are presented from extensive assessments at four points in time, including interviews with his mother and teachers. The results indicate that the…

  4. [Fragility and experiencing limits as a chance for development in old age--the meaning of the particular experiences of the aging body for identification and development as focused on the very old].

    PubMed

    Blum-Lehmann, Susanne

    2008-06-01

    The main focus of this article is the meaning of particular experiences of the aging body for identity and development with respect to very old age. This experience of embodiment results from a dynamic development between unpleasant experiences of physical aging, positive bodily experiences of the pleasure of living, and reflections on this direct engagement with the aging body. The interaction of those three dimensions requires a constant rebalancing, which, in view of the frail body, becomes increasingly demanding. Beyond one's own experiences with aging through direct engagement with the body, established social relationships give room for an individual's physical nature and support the maintenance of identity and development. People who look after and care for old aged people have to recognize their own embodiment and have to acknowledge their aging body. This applies not only to contact with old aged people, but also requests that the potential for developing one's own identity be recognised. The inclusion of the body in the discourse on the aging process demands a mindset change in social gerontology and for the individual it means to submit oneself to the ethics of embodied existence.

  5. The commodification of patient opinion: the digital patient experience economy in the age of big data.

    PubMed

    Lupton, Deborah

    2014-07-01

    As part of the digital health phenomenon, a plethora of interactive digital media platforms have been established in recent years to elicit lay people's experiences of illness and health care. The overt function of these platforms is to provide forums where patients and caregivers can share their experiences with others, benefit from the support and knowledge of other users and contribute to large aggregated data archives as part of developing better medical treatments and services and conducting medical research. However, what may not always be readily apparent to the users of these platforms are the growing commercial uses by many of the platforms' owners of the data they contribute. This article examines this phenomenon of what I term 'the digital patient experience economy'. Such aspects of this economy as prosumption (the combination of content consumption and production that is characteristic of the use of Web 2.0 technologies), the valorising of big data, the discourse and ethic of sharing and the commercialisation of affective labour are discussed. It is argued that via these online platforms patients' opinions and experiences may be expressed in more diverse and accessible forums than ever before, but simultaneously they have become exploited in novel ways.

  6. The Autobiographical Group: A Tool for the Reconstruction of Past Life Experience with the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, Luis; Feixas, Guillem

    1993-01-01

    Used guided autobiography to foster reconstruction of past life experiences among 12 older adults in Barcelona, Spain. Found a significant and gradual change in the construing system of those participants in autobiographical group as compared to control group of 10 older adults. Distance of elements self-ideal/self and self-ideal/others…

  7. Story of a School: A Headmaster's Experiences with Children Aged Seven to Eleven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, London (England).

    The experiences of a headmaster of a primary junior school situated in the older part of a large city are described. The point is made that the children in this school, with but little conscious awareness of what was beautiful, had within them an ability to create true beauty within all the media of the arts. This booklet is divided into eight…

  8. Adult-Age Inflammatory Pain Experience Enhances Long-Term Pain Vigilance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng-Guang; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous animal studies have illustrated a modulatory effect of neonatal pain experience on subsequent pain-related behaviors. However, the relationship between chronic pain status in adulthood and future pain perception remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study, we investigated the effects of inflammatory pain experience on subsequent formalin-evoked pain behaviors and fear conditioning induced by noxious stimulation in adult rats. Our results demonstrated an increase of the second but not the first phase of formalin-induced pain behaviors in animals with a history of inflammatory pain that have recovered. Similarly, rats with persistent pain experience displayed facilitated acquisition and prolonged retention of pain-related conditioning. These effects of prior pain experience on subsequent behavior were prevented by repeated morphine administration at an early stage of inflammatory pain. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that chronic pain diseases, if not properly and promptly treated, may have a long-lasting impact on processing and perception of environmental threats. This may increase the susceptibility of patients to subsequent pain-related disorders, even when chronic pain develops in adulthood. These data highlight the importance of treatment of chronic pain at an early stage. PMID:22574223

  9. Commentary: Explicit Attention to Age and Gender Disparities is Key to Understanding Adolescent Experiences and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanc, Ann K.; Bruce, Judith

    2013-01-01

    This special issue addresses an ambitious set of concerns around the experience of adolescents in the majority world: expanded models of development, successful models of intervention, and the impact of globalization. The papers, which vary widely in both substance and methodology, make a substantial contribution to pushing forward the boundaries…

  10. "I Grew Up Too Fast for My Age:" Postdischarge Issues and Experiences of Male Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwell, Stephanie; McMackin, Robert; Tansi, Robert; Bartlett, Nozomi

    2010-01-01

    This study adopts a contextual approach to examine factors related to the community reentry experiences and post discharge recidivism among youth who have been placed in residential juvenile justice treatment programs for a minimum of 6 months. A total of 35 youth were interviewed: 18 youth who remained arrest free in the community after discharge…

  11. Can facial proportions taken from images be of use for ageing in cases of suspected child pornography? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Cristina; Obertová, Zuzana; Ratnayake, Melanie; Marasciuolo, Laura; Tutkuviene, J; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Gabriel, Peter; Ritz-Timme, S

    2012-01-01

    The age of the victim plays a crucial role for the legal implications concerning pornography. Judges therefore often call on forensic experts to verify the age of individuals depicted on photographs or videos. However, there is no scientifically established protocol available for forensic practice in such cases. The conventional methods such as the evaluation of secondary sexual characteristics provide unsatisfactory results particularly when the legally relevant ages for child pornography (i.e. 14 and 18 years) are concerned. To overcome these limits, a European research group has explored the applicability of facial proportions as an age indicator on images. In this pilot study, standardized facial images of 353 females and 20 males from four age groups (6, 10, 14 and 18 years) were randomly selected for the metric analysis from a large data set including German, Italian and Lithuanian subjects. In this sample, several indices extracted from the frontal and lateral photographs were closely correlated to their respective indices taken from the living individuals. Furthermore, age-related changes were identified for indices taken from the photographs. The discriminant analysis showed that for the pooled sample, 60.3% of the cases were correctly classified into the respective age group. The percentage of correctly classified cases increased in the respective country samples as follows: 69.9% for Germany, 69.4% for Lithuania and 80.5% for Italy. The present study suggests that the metric assessment of the face may be used for age estimation on images. Nonetheless, more work needs to be done in order to verify the reliability of these findings on a large sample.

  12. Vitamin D deficiency in children aged 6 to 12 years: single center's experience in Busan

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Young Eun; Kim, Bo Ryung; Choi, Won Bok; Kim, Young Mi; Cho, Min-Jung; Kim, Hye-Young; Park, Kyung Hee; Kim, Kwang Hoon; Chun, Peter; Kim, Su Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the prevalence and risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in children. Methods We analyzed the medical records of 330 patients from the age of 6 to 12, who visited the endocrinology clinic of the Department of Pediatrics at Pusan National University Hospital, from September, 2013 to May, 2014. According to their serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, the patients were grouped into either the deficiency group (25(OH)D<20 ng/mL), or the sufficiency group (25(OH)D≥20 ng/mL). The differences between the 2 groups were compared. Results There were 195 patients (59.1%) who had vitamin D deficiency. Their mean serum 25(OH)D level was 14.86±3.20 ng/mL. The differences in sex, age, and pubertal status between the 2 groups were not statistically significant. Weight standard deviation score (SDS), and body mass index SDS, were significantly higher in the vitamin D deficiency group (P=0.002 for each), compared to the sufficiency group. Compared with Autumn, both Spring (odds ratio [OR], 9.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3–22.0), and Winter (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 3.5–10.0), were risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. In multiple logistic regression analysis, only seasonal differences have been confirmed to have an effect on vitamin D deficiency. Conclusion Vitamin D deficiency in children aged 6 to 12 years is very common. Spring and Winter are the most important risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. We suggest that it is necessary to supplement the guideline for the vitamin D intake according to our situation. PMID:27777907

  13. Munich Oktoberfest experience: remarkable impact of sex and age in ethanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Binner, C; Selinski, S; Barysch, M J; Pölcher, C; Schormann, Wiebke; Hermes, Matthias; Brulport, Marc; Bauer, Alexander; Rudolph, Claudia; Bedawy, Essam; Schug, Markus; Golka, Klaus; Hasenclever, D; Trauer, H; Lessig, R; Bolt, H M; Ickstadt, K; Hengstler, Jan Georg

    2008-12-01

    Approximately 5,000 of 6 million annual visitors of the Oktoberfest in Munich have to undergo medical treatment. Patients with alcohol intoxication without trauma or further complications are all treated in a specialized medical camp. We studied these patients in order to identify risk factors and to assess the relevance of the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) and of ethanol blood concentrations for patient management. In 2004 totally 405 patients suffering from ethanol intoxication without trauma were treated in the medical camp. A complete set of the following data was obtained from all 405 patients: GCS, ethanol blood concentration, age, sex, blood pressure (mean, systolic and diastolic), body temperature, heart rate, blood sugar, GOT, gamma-GT, and CK. A multivariate logistic regression model was applied to identify risk factors predicting patients at increased risk of hospitalization. Low GCS (< or =8 vs. >8, OR: 4.18, CI: 1.96-8.65) low age (20-29 vs. > or =30 years, OR: 2.35, CI: 1.05-5.65) and male gender (male vs. female, OR: 3.58, CI: 1.36-9.34) independently predicted patients that had to be hospitalized. All other parameters including ethanol blood concentrations were not explanatory. Patients with GCS < or = 8 (n = 66) had a lower median blood pressure (P = 0.0312) and showed a smaller increase in blood pressure during the observation period compared to patients with GCS > 8 (P < 0.001), suggesting that this subgroup may require longer recovery periods. Men aged 20-29 years were at highest risk for hospital admission. Increased risk could not be explained by higher ethanol blood concentrations in this subgroup. Importantly, GCS < 6 does not justify endotracheal intubation in ethanol intoxicated patients, when further complications, such as trauma, can be excluded.

  14. Toward a typology of technology users: how older people experience technology's potential for active aging.

    PubMed

    Gjevjon, Edith Roth; Oderud, Tone; Wensaas, Gro H; Moen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines an emerging typology of older users of information and communication technology (ICT) to facilitate active aging. Through inductive data analysis from focus groups, iterative workshops, and personal interviews, we suggest three types of technology users. These types are "the Excluded," "the Entertained," and "the Networker." Clearly, ICT offers several benefits to those who are enthusiastic and frequent users, exemplified as the Entertained and the Networker. Hence, our findings support the notion of technology as a tool to maintain or increase an older person's engagement and activity level. Conversely, for those reluctant, uninterested, or incapable of using ICT, such potentials are limited and imply fewer opportunities for participation in activities.

  15. Parents׳ experiences of raising pre-school aged children in an outer-Melbourne growth corridor.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Fiona Jane; Rich, Stephanie; Stockdale, Rebecca; Shelley, Julia

    2014-05-01

    There is growing concern about the outer-suburbs in Australia as healthy places to raise children. This paper aimed to explore this from the perspectives of parents raising preschool-age children in an outer-Melbourne municipality. Findings showed that parents were positive about the natural environment as well as the provision of recreation areas and generally felt their neighbourhoods were a safe place for raising children. However, car-dependency, housing estate design and limited local job opportunities all appeared to contribute to social isolation amongst families. Using the Environments for Health Framework, this paper makes suggestions to improve liveability for families in this municipality.

  16. [Treatment of distal ureteral calculi with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: experiences with 310 cases].

    PubMed

    Zehntner, C; Lux, O; Casanova, G A; Marth, D; Zingg, E J

    1989-07-01

    Distal ureteral calculi are approached by ureterorenoscopy by most authors. With increasing experience ESWL of distal ureteral calculi gained in importance. The success rate of 96.2% in a large series of 310 consecutive patients treated in this manner, confirmed the results of other authors. Excluding women of child-bearing age and very large calculi (greater than 2 cm) the ESWL is a suitable treatment modality of distal ureteral calculi.

  17. Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy by a single surgeon in Taiwan: experience with the initial 30 cases.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yen-Chuan; Yang, Chi-Rei; Wang, John; Cheng, Chen-Li; Patel, Vipul R

    2008-09-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) is an established trend in surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer in the USA; however, RALP is still in its infancy in Taiwan. We have tracked various indicators of proficiency as a single Taiwanese surgeon became familiar with the procedure through experience with 30 initial RALP surgeries using the da Vinci system between December 2005 and April 2007. Here, we report the changes in these proficiency indicators, and the short-term outcomes for the patients. Thirty consecutive patients were classified into group 1 (cases 1-15) and group 2 (cases 16-30). Preoperative clinical characteristics, including age, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists anesthetic surgical risks class (ASA), prostate-specific antigen levels (PSA), and Gleason scores were similar between the groups. The clinical stage (T1/T2) was significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (p = 0.028). Group 1 needed more frequent insertion of a double-J stent (60% versus 0%) before surgery and evaluation by cystogram before removal of urethral catheter (80% versus 6.7%) than group 2; these differences were statistically significant. Blood loss and transfusion rates were lower in group 2, but complication and conversion rates were higher in group 1. These differences were not statistically significant. Positive surgical margins, continence rates, potency, and intercourse rates at 12 months were similar between the groups. Console time was 262 min in group 1 and 190 min in group 2 (p = 0.033); this appeared to be the best indicator of proficiency. Establishing proficiency as determined by functional outcomes required about 30 cases, but the positive surgical margin rates indicate that experience with more than 30 cases was needed to ascend the learning curve with respect to oncological outcomes. PMID:27628256

  18. Assessing the cognitive impact of Alzheimer disease pathology and vascular burden in the aging brain: the Geneva experience.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Gold, Gabriel; Kövari, Enikö; von Gunten, Armin; Imhof, Anouk; Bouras, Constantin; Hof, Patrick R

    2007-01-01

    The progressive development of Alzheimer disease (AD)-related lesions, such as neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), amyloid deposits and synaptic loss, and the occurrence of microvascular and small macrovascular pathology within the cerebral cortex are conspicuous neuropathologic features of brain aging. Recent neuropathologic studies strongly suggested that the clinical diagnosis of dementia depends more on the severity and topography of pathological changes than on the presence of a qualitative marker. However, several methodological problems, such as selection biases, case-control design, density-based measures and masking effects, of concomitant pathologies persisted. In recent years, we performed several clinicopathologic studies using stereological counting of AD lesions. In order to define the cognitive impact of lacunes and microvascular lesions, we also analyzed pure vascular cases without substantial AD pathology. Our data revealed that total NFT numbers in the CA1 field, cortical microinfarcts and subcortical gray matter lacunes were the stronger determinants of dementia. In contrast, the contribution of periventricular and subcortical white matter demyelinations had a modest cognitive effect even in rare cases with isolated microvascular pathology. Importantly, in cases with pure AD pathology, more than 50% of Clinical Dementia Rating scale variability was not explained by NFT, amyloid deposits and neuronal loss in the hippocampal formation. In cases with microvascular pathology or lacunes, this percentage was even lower. The present review summarizes our data in this field and discusses their relevance within the theoretical framework of the functional neuropathology of brain aging and with particular reference to the current efforts to develop standardized neuropathological criteria for mixed dementia. PMID:17036244

  19. Comparing Record Dynamics Predictions with Simulations and Experiments of Aging Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    We describe the spontaneous off-equilibrium relaxation process known as aging in a simple, real-space model: Kinetic constraints bind on-lattice particles together in ``clusters,'' where a phenomenological function of size controls their lifetime. But once a cluster breaks down, its particles can move independently in space, a process akin to ``cage breaking,'' to join other clusters.Known properties of glassy systems emerge, such as spatial heterogeneity and record dynamics. Here we compare our simple model with recent molecular dynamics studies of hard-sphere colloids.We find agreement with the scaling properties of the particles mean square displacement, and the aging properties of the interface energy, of the intermediate scattering function, and of the probability density function of the particle displacements occurring within different time windows. These properties are related to an underlying Poisson process which describes the salient events or quakes which correspond to the break up of clusters and give a coarse-grained description of the model dynamics, confirmed by re-analysis of experimental data. SB acknowledges support from NSF with DMR-grant #1207431, and thanks SDU for its hospitality and the Villum Foundation for support.

  20. A dedicated clinic for HIV-positive individuals over 50 years of age: a multidisciplinary experience.

    PubMed

    Waters, L; Patterson, B; Scourfield, A; Hughes, A; de Silva, S; Gazzard, B; Barton, S; Asboe, D; Pozniak, A; Boffito, M

    2012-08-01

    The HIV-infected population is ageing. Issues including polypharmacy and co-morbidities led us to develop a dedicated clinic for HIV-infected individuals over 50. We describe our service evaluation after two years. The over 50 clinic commenced in January 2009. The team comprises a registrar, consultant, nurse practitioner and is supported by a pharmacist and mental health services. Patients undergo a full medication and drug interactions review, neurocognitive assessment, adherence self-assessment and investigations including therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) and bone mineral density. Over two years of activity, 150 patients attended the service. Median (range) age was 58 (50-88), all were on combined antiretroviral therapy and 38% (57/150) were on ≥3 non-HIV drugs. CACS was high (>90th centile) in 14%. Thirty-eight percent had osteopaenia and 18% had osteoporosis requiring treatment. Thirteen out of 125 men had an increased prostate specific antigen, four were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Drug interaction, TDM and neurocognitive assessments were useful for several patients. Asymptomatic patients over 50 in long-term follow-up had new pathologies detected through targeted screening. The clinic has improved general practitioner (GP) liaison and facilitated closer working relationships with other specialties. Patients have reacted positively to the clinic, particularly as many do not routinely access their GP. PMID:22930290

  1. The life experience and status of Chinese rural women from observation of three age groups.

    PubMed

    Dai, K

    1991-03-01

    Interview data gathered during 2 surveys in Anhui and Shejiang Provinces in 1986 and 1987 are used to depict changes in the social status and life situation of rural women in China in 3 age groups, 18-36, 37-55, and 56 and over. For the younger women, marriage increasingly is a result of discussion with parents, not arrangement, but 3rd-party introductions are increasing. They are active in household and township enterprises and aspire to more education and economic independence. The middle-aged group experienced war and revolution and now work nonstop under the responsibility system of household production, aspiring to university education for sons and enterprise work for daughters. The older women, while supported by their sons, live a frugal existence. In general, preference for sons is still prevalent and deep-seated. At the same time, the bride price and costs of marriage are increasing and of widespread concern. Rural socioeconomic growth is required before Confucian traditions are overcome. PMID:12179888

  2. Health, disability, and life insurance experiences of working-age persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iezzoni, L I; Ngo, L

    2007-05-01

    Working-age Americans with multiple sclerosis (MS) may face considerable financial insecurities when they become unable to work and lack the health, disability, and life insurance typically offered through employers. In order to estimate the rates of having these insurance policies, as well as how insurance status affects reports of financial stress, we conducted half-hour telephone interviews with 983 working-age persons across the US, who reported being diagnosed with MS. The interviews occurred from May through November 2005, and among the sampled individuals contacted and confirmed eligible, 93.2% completed the interview. The study population was largely female (78.9%), Caucasian (86.4%), married (68.6%), with at least some college education (71.5%), and unemployed (60.2%). Overall, 96.3% had some health insurance (40.3% with public health insurance, primarily Medicare), 56.7% had long-term disability insurance (36.4% with public programs), and 68.3% had life insurance. Notably, 27.4% indicated that, since being diagnosed with MS, health insurance concerns had significantly affected employment decisions. In addition, 16.4% reported considerable difficulty paying for health care, 27.4% put off or postponed seeking needed health care because of costs, and 22.3% delayed filling prescriptions, skipped medication doses, or split pills because of costs. Overall, 26.6% reported considerable worries about affording even basic necessities, such as food, utilities, and housing.

  3. The leisure time and the third age: the experience of a geriatric day hospital.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, S; Scalia, G; Di Mauro, A; Di Fazio, I; Giuffrida, F; Leotta, C; Grasso, M G; Distefano, A

    2001-01-01

    Leisure time represents an important part of the so-called 'successful aging' and contributes to overcome the problems related to the reduction of the social roles, favoring a better subjective adaptation to old age. In this work we observed the elderly population frequenting our Day Hospital, by estimating the affective sphere (geriatric depression scale, GDS), the autosufficiency (activity of daily living, ADL; and instrumental activity of daily living, IADL) and the schooling years in correlation with the type and length of leisure time activities during the day. These data have been compared with those of the national statistics (ISTAT). The analyses revealed a very wide diffusion of the utilization of mass media and a large interindividual differentiation of the modes of using leisure time. The correlations between the indices of affectivity and autosufficiency show an effect on the types of leisure time activities, while the scholarity of the subjects has no influence on it. These results suggest considering leisure time as an indispensable part of the relational life of elderly subjects, having an important 'valency' for the affective sphere and the individual expectations and needs. PMID:15374030

  4. Children's environmental knowing: A case study of children's experiences during an environmental education programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sandra Anne

    This study explores children's experiences during WaterWorlds (pseudonym) a field-based environmental education programme at a marine science centre. The study objectives were to investigate how children understand and interpret their experiences, and how these experiences foster their environmental knowing. To address these objectives, I carried out a case study at a marine science centre in British Columbia. I examined children's WaterWorlds experiences and explored their environmental understandings and commitment to environmental action. I analysed the experiences of children in four separate classes and carried out an in-depth examination of four individual children. Data were collected using informal semi-structured interviews, observations, conversations, researcher journal logs, and student documents including their writing and illustrations. My findings indicate that the WaterWorlds programme experience fosters children's environmental knowing. Participation in WaterWorlds activities led to connection, caring, and concern for other species and in some cases, for the marine environment as a whole. During the programme, children chose the ways they interpreted and expressed their environmental knowledge, ethic of care, advocacy, and commitment to action. This development of each child's self-expression resulted in motivational and powerful learning experiences that inspired and nurtured their connections to the earth. This research provides evidence and examples of how educators can foster children's environmental knowing through multi-disciplinary environmental education experiences. It illustrates that activities such as observing and documenting the lives of other animal species, collecting data and conducting research on those species, and working and learning alongside experts in the field of environmental education are powerful experiences that motivate concern and care for the earth among children.

  5. General paediatric surgery for patients aged under 5 years: a 5-year experience at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Kwok, C-S; Gordon, A C

    2016-09-01

    Introduction The gradual shift of general paediatric surgery (GPS) provision from district general hospitals (DGH) to specialised units is well recognised in the UK. The consequences of centralisation include a reduction in exposure to GPS for current surgical trainees. The GPS practice of a DGH is examined here. Methods All operations performed on children aged under 5 years over a 5-year period were identified using the local electronic operation database. Electronic hospital records and clinic letters were accessed to collect data on demographics, operations performed and outcome measures. Results 472 GPS operations were performed on children between the age of 22 days and 5 years between 2009 and 2014, of which 43 were on an emergency basis and 105 were performed on patients aged less than 1 year. Three patients were admitted following day case surgery. Six patients were readmitted within 30 days. Complication rates for all procedures and the four most common procedures were similar to those found in published literature. Conclusions GPS for patients aged less than 5 years is comparatively safe in the DGH setting. The training opportunities available at DGHs are invaluable to surgical trainees and vital for sustaining the future provision of GPS by such hospitals. PMID:27269243

  6. Foreign Bodies Ingestion in Children: Experience of 61 Cases in a Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit from Romania

    PubMed Central

    Diaconescu, Smaranda; Gimiga, Nicoleta; Sarbu, Ioan; Stefanescu, Gabriela; Olaru, Claudia; Ioniuc, Ileana; Ciongradi, Iulia; Burlea, Marin

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of foreign bodies is a worldwide pediatric pathology. We assessed the clinical, endoscopic, and therapeutic aspects of this condition in a pediatric gastroenterology unit. We reviewed 61 patients (median age of 3.25 ± 4.7 years). The most frequently ingested objects were coins (26.23%), unidentified metal objects (13.11%), bones (8.19%), batteries, and buttons (6.55%). The clinical features we encountered included abdominal pain (55.73%), vomiting (34.42%), and asymptomatic children (29.5%). Routine X-ray examination enabled finding the foreign body in 42 of the cases. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed within 24–72 hours. 25 cases resulted in a negative endoscopy (40.98%), 19 objects (31.14%) were removed using a polypectomy snare, and extraction failure occurred in 17 patients (27.86%). 28 foreign bodies were passed without incidents; in 14 cases, the swallowed objects were never found. In one case, a battery was stuck in the esophageal folds and led to tracheal-esophageal fistula and bronchopneumonia and later to esophageal stenosis. We report a large proportion of foreign bodies that could not be identified or removed due to lack of early endoscopy and poor technical settings. Batteries and sharp objects lead to severe complications and preschool-age children are at high risk for such events. PMID:26949384

  7. Foreign Bodies Ingestion in Children: Experience of 61 Cases in a Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit from Romania.

    PubMed

    Diaconescu, Smaranda; Gimiga, Nicoleta; Sarbu, Ioan; Stefanescu, Gabriela; Olaru, Claudia; Ioniuc, Ileana; Ciongradi, Iulia; Burlea, Marin

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of foreign bodies is a worldwide pediatric pathology. We assessed the clinical, endoscopic, and therapeutic aspects of this condition in a pediatric gastroenterology unit. We reviewed 61 patients (median age of 3.25 ± 4.7 years). The most frequently ingested objects were coins (26.23%), unidentified metal objects (13.11%), bones (8.19%), batteries, and buttons (6.55%). The clinical features we encountered included abdominal pain (55.73%), vomiting (34.42%), and asymptomatic children (29.5%). Routine X-ray examination enabled finding the foreign body in 42 of the cases. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed within 24-72 hours. 25 cases resulted in a negative endoscopy (40.98%), 19 objects (31.14%) were removed using a polypectomy snare, and extraction failure occurred in 17 patients (27.86%). 28 foreign bodies were passed without incidents; in 14 cases, the swallowed objects were never found. In one case, a battery was stuck in the esophageal folds and led to tracheal-esophageal fistula and bronchopneumonia and later to esophageal stenosis. We report a large proportion of foreign bodies that could not be identified or removed due to lack of early endoscopy and poor technical settings. Batteries and sharp objects lead to severe complications and preschool-age children are at high risk for such events. PMID:26949384

  8. User Experiences of the McMaster Optimal Aging Portal’s Evidence Summaries and Blog Posts: Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    M Barbara, Angela; Dobbins, Maureen; Haynes, R Brian; Iorio, Alfonso; Lavis, John N

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence summaries and blogs can support evidence-informed healthy aging, by presenting high-quality health research evidence in plain language for a nonprofessional (citizen) audience. Objective Our objective was to explore citizens’ perceptions about the usability of evidence summaries and blog posts on the Web-based McMaster Optimal Aging Portal. Methods Twenty-two citizens (aged 50 years and older) and informal caregivers participated in a qualitative study using a think-aloud method and semistructured interviews. Eleven interviews were conducted in person, 7 over the telephone, and 4 by Skype. Results We identified themes that fell under 4 user-experience categories: (1) desirability: personal relevance, (2) understandability: language comprehension, grasping the message, dealing with uncertainty, (3) usability: volume of information, use of numbers, and (4) usefulness: intention to use, facility for sharing. Conclusions Participants recognized that high-quality evidence on aging was valuable. Their intended use of the information was influenced by how much it applied to their own health circumstances or those of a loved one. Some specific formatting features that were preferred included consistent layout, content organized by subheadings, catchy titles, numerical information summarized in a table, and inclusion of a glossary. PMID:27542995

  9. Adjusting to personal and organisational change: views and experiences of female nurses aged 40-60 years.

    PubMed

    Gabrielle, Sarah; Jackson, Debra; Mannix, Judy

    2008-01-01

    The Australian nursing workforce is ageing and there is a well-documented shortage of nurses. This global phenomenon means that retaining nurses in the workforce is gaining in importance as older nurses retire and leave nursing. The existing literature reveals deficiencies in knowledge about older nurses as they adapt to ageing often within stressful work environments. The aim of this narrative-based study, informed by feminist principles, was to explore the views and experiences of female registered nurses aged 40-60 years, in acute hospital and community health care settings. In-depth semi-structured interviews of approximately 1 h duration were gathered during late 2004. The transcribed narratives were subjected to thematic analysis. Two major themes were identified. The first theme: "Feeling uncared for" contained three sub-themes--Unsupportive work relationships: "We should be helping each other"; Workplace bullying: "It hurts me and I feel really bad"; and, Stress and burnout: "It's just like being in a pressure cooker all the time". The second major theme identified was "Adapting to ageing: my nursing career". Findings of this research suggest some unmet support needs for older nurses in the workforce which could discourage them from remaining in nursing. The findings highlight a need for further research into the support needs of older nurses. PMID:18780674

  10. Chikungunya fever: Atypical and lethal cases in the Western hemisphere: A Venezuelan experience.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaime R; Leopoldo Códova G; Castro, Julio S; Rodríguez, Libsen; Saravia, Víctor; Arvelaez, Joanne; Ríos-Fabra, Antonio; Longhi, María A; Marcano, Melania

    2015-01-01

    A large epidemic of Chikungunya fever currently affects the Caribbean, Central and South America. Despite a high number of reported cases, little is known on the occurrence of severe clinical complications. We describe four Venezuelan patients with a severe and/or lethal course who exhibit unusual manifestations of the disease. Case 1 describes a 75 year-old man with rapid onset of septic shock and multi-organ failure. Cases 2 and 3 describe two patients with rapid aggressive clinical course who developed shock, severe purpuric lesions and a distinct area large of necrosis in the nasal region. Case 4 depicts a splenectomized woman with shock, generalized purpuric lesions, bullous dermatosis and acronecrosis of an upper limb. Chikungunya fever in the Western hemisphere may also associate with atypical and severe manifestations. Some patients experience a life-threatening, aggressive clinical course, with rapid deterioration and death due to multisystem failure.

  11. Chikungunya fever: Atypical and lethal cases in the Western hemisphere: A Venezuelan experience.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaime R; Leopoldo Códova G; Castro, Julio S; Rodríguez, Libsen; Saravia, Víctor; Arvelaez, Joanne; Ríos-Fabra, Antonio; Longhi, María A; Marcano, Melania

    2015-01-01

    A large epidemic of Chikungunya fever currently affects the Caribbean, Central and South America. Despite a high number of reported cases, little is known on the occurrence of severe clinical complications. We describe four Venezuelan patients with a severe and/or lethal course who exhibit unusual manifestations of the disease. Case 1 describes a 75 year-old man with rapid onset of septic shock and multi-organ failure. Cases 2 and 3 describe two patients with rapid aggressive clinical course who developed shock, severe purpuric lesions and a distinct area large of necrosis in the nasal region. Case 4 depicts a splenectomized woman with shock, generalized purpuric lesions, bullous dermatosis and acronecrosis of an upper limb. Chikungunya fever in the Western hemisphere may also associate with atypical and severe manifestations. Some patients experience a life-threatening, aggressive clinical course, with rapid deterioration and death due to multisystem failure. PMID:26793440

  12. Sudden unexpected death in infants under 3 months of age and vaccination status – a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Jonville-Béra, Annie-Pierre; Autret-Leca, Elisabeth; Barbeillon, Florence; Paris-Llado, Josepha

    2001-01-01

    Aims To determine whether DTPP+Hib vaccination (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis +/− haemophilus) increased the risk of sudden unexpected death (SUD) in children under 3 months of age. Methods We conducted a multicentre case-control study in the 28 French ‘SIDS Centers’. Case selection was based on death labelled sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) of an infant aged between 30 and 90 days. Three living controls were selected, matched for sex, gestational age and born immediately after the victim in the same maternity unit. Results We identified 114 cases of SUD aged between 30 and 90 days and 341 live controls matched for age and sex and born in the same maternity unit as the case. DTPP±Hib immunization did not increase the risk of SUD (OR 1.08) (95% CI 0.49, 2.36) in children under 3 months of age when adjusted for sleeping position, illness in the week before death, maternal tobacco consumption, birth weight, type of mattress, breastfeeding and sex. However, low birth-weight (6.53 [2.29, 18.9]), multiple birth (5.1 [1.76, 15.13]), no breastfeeding (1.77 [1.1, 2.85]), prone sleeping position (9.8 [5, 8, 18, 9]), soft mattress (3.26 [1.69, 6.29]), recent illness (3.44 [1.84, 6.41]) and parental smoking (1.74 [1.2, 2.96]) were confirmed as risk factors in early SIDS. Conclusions DTPP±Hib immunization is not a risk factor for early SUD. In this population, we found the same risk factors as described for SIDS. PMID:11298074

  13. Do fertility control policies affect health in old age? Evidence from China's one-child experiment.

    PubMed

    Islam, Asadul; Smyth, Russell

    2015-05-01

    How do fertility control policies contribute to the welfare of women, and their husbands, particularly as they get older? We consider whether the reduction in fertility resulting from population control policies has had any effect on the health of elderly parents in China. In particular, we examine the influence of this fertility decline, experienced due to China's one-child policy, on several measures of the health of parents in middle and old age. Overall, our results suggest that having fewer children has a positive effect on self-reported parental health but generally no effect on other measures of health. The results also suggest that upstream financial transfers have a positive effect on several measures of parental health. PMID:24692342

  14. The influence of sex, age, and race experience on pacing profiles during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Magnus; Assarsson, Hannes; Carlsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pacing-profile differences during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race related to the categories of sex, age, and race experience. Skiing times from eight sections (S1 to S8) were analyzed. For each of the three categories, 400 pairs of skiers were matched to have a finish time within 60 seconds, the same start group, and an assignment to the same group for the other two categories. Paired-samples Student's t-tests were used to investigate sectional pacing-profile differences between the subgroups. Results showed that males skied faster in S2 (P=0.0042), S3 (P=0.0049), S4 (P=0.010), and S1-S4 (P<0.001), whereas females skied faster in S6 (P<0.001), S7 (P<0.001), S8 (P=0.0088), and S5-S8 (P<0.001). For the age category, old subjects (40 to 59 years) skied faster than young subjects (19 to 39 years) in S3 (P=0.0029), and for the other sections, there were no differences. Experienced subjects (≥4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) skied faster in S1 (P<0.001) and S1-S4 (P=0.0054); inexperienced skiers (<4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) had a shorter mean skiing time in S5-S8 (P=0.0063). In conclusion, females had a more even pacing profile than that of males with the same finish time, start group, age, and race experience. No clear age-related pacing-profile difference was identified for the matched subgroups. Moreover, experienced skiers skied faster in the first half whereas inexperienced skiers had higher skiing speeds during the second half of the race.

  15. The influence of sex, age, and race experience on pacing profiles during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Magnus; Assarsson, Hannes; Carlsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pacing-profile differences during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race related to the categories of sex, age, and race experience. Skiing times from eight sections (S1 to S8) were analyzed. For each of the three categories, 400 pairs of skiers were matched to have a finish time within 60 seconds, the same start group, and an assignment to the same group for the other two categories. Paired-samples Student’s t-tests were used to investigate sectional pacing-profile differences between the subgroups. Results showed that males skied faster in S2 (P=0.0042), S3 (P=0.0049), S4 (P=0.010), and S1–S4 (P<0.001), whereas females skied faster in S6 (P<0.001), S7 (P<0.001), S8 (P=0.0088), and S5–S8 (P<0.001). For the age category, old subjects (40 to 59 years) skied faster than young subjects (19 to 39 years) in S3 (P=0.0029), and for the other sections, there were no differences. Experienced subjects (≥4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) skied faster in S1 (P<0.001) and S1–S4 (P=0.0054); inexperienced skiers (<4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) had a shorter mean skiing time in S5–S8 (P=0.0063). In conclusion, females had a more even pacing profile than that of males with the same finish time, start group, age, and race experience. No clear age-related pacing-profile difference was identified for the matched subgroups. Moreover, experienced skiers skied faster in the first half whereas inexperienced skiers had higher skiing speeds during the second half of the race. PMID:26937207

  16. Learning from experience in case conference: a Bionian approach to teaching and consulting.

    PubMed

    Burka, Jane B; Sarnat, Joan E; St John, Cornelia

    2007-08-01

    In case conferences as well as didactic seminars, the power of the group can bring psychoanalytic education to life. However, primitive anxieties activated by group dynamics may also interfere with teaching and learning. The authors offer the example of a stalemated private practice case conference that had unconsciously organized against learning as the members began to read Bion's work. The case conference leader, an analyst, presented her case conference, which was mired in basic assumption dependency dynamics, to our peer consultation group. Drawing upon Bion's early contributions on groups, as well as his later ideas about thinking and mental growth, the peer group facilitated the case conference's return to work-group functioning and learning from experience. Activated in the peer group, commensal container<--> contained processes gradually spread throughout the entire relational system of peer group, case-conference leader, case-conference members, and patients. This example underscores the importance of promoting within our institutes a culture in which faculty view themselves as part of an evolving intersubjective matrix that works to foster the containing capacities of candidates, patients, and faculty alike.

  17. Prioritising sewerage maintenance using inferred sewer age: a case study for Edinburgh.

    PubMed

    Arthur, S; Burkhard, R

    2010-01-01

    The reported research project focuses on using a database which contains details of customer contacts and CCTV data for a key Scottish catchment to construct a GIS based sewer condition model. Given the nature of the asset registry, a key research challenge was estimating the age of individual lengths of pipe. Within this context, asset age was inferred using the estimated age of surface developments-this involved overlaying the network in a GIS with historical digital maps. The paper illustrates that inferred asset age can reliably be used to highlight assets which are more likely to fail.

  18. Going around in a Circle: A Norwegian Study of Suicidal Experiences in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Anne Lise; Lyberg, Anne; Berggren, Ingela; Åström, Sture; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Depression has repeatedly been found to be a risk factor for completed suicide, particularly when coupled with a pervasive sense of hopelessness. The aim of this study was to evaluate depressed older persons' suicidal experiences. Data were collected by means of individual in-depth interviews with nine informants living in two districts of Norway. A hermeneutic analysis was performed. One main theme: Going around in a circle and two themes: being alone without meaning in life and struggling to achieve reconciliation emerged from the analysis. An important implication for mental healthcare practice is the need to develop a person's ability to shape and take control of her/his life. The healthcare organisation must be committed to a plan that sets out strategies enabling suicidal individuals to avoid the negative experience of meaninglessness. It was concluded that suicidal depressed elderly persons need help to escape from their desperate situation. More research is urgently required in order to prevent suicide in depressed elderly persons whose emotional pain is unbearable. PMID:25574387

  19. Factors That May Influence the Experience of Hot Flushes by Healthy Middle-Aged Women

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Interest in menopausal symptoms in general and hot flushes (HFs) in particular has grown in recent years. This is mostly due to increased awareness and the vast impact these symptoms have on women's lives. Despite the high prevalence of women who experience HFs, a definitive etiology for HFs is yet to be found. Our objective was to review the current literature dealing with associated factors for experiencing HFs and to provide a synthesized overview on this common and often debilitating condition. Methods We systematically searched the English-language literature in the PubMed database using relevant key words and included only those articles that contained information on associated factors for HFs in generally healthy midlife women. Results Both conflicting scientific results between studies documenting factors that influence HFs and the lack of validated measuring tools make it difficult to truly pinpoint associated factors for HFs. Nonetheless, we identified the following clusters of associated factors: the menopausal stages, sex steroid hormones, other endocrine agents, genetic polymorphisms, race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI) and obesity, mood disorders, smoking, soy isoflavones and phytoestrogens, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Conclusions No single associated factor was consistently identified as having a major role in experiencing HFs. More resources should be directed to develop a unified study system along with multivariable analyses to get a better understanding of this condition, which often imposes a tremendous social and personal toll on the women who experience it. PMID:20831431

  20. Experience of an incontinence clinic for older women: no apparent age limit for potential physical and psychological benefits.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, C; Bachand, G; Dubeau, C E; Kuchel, G A

    2001-10-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common but undertreated condition in older women. Although a variety of noninvasive interventions is available, older women may be hesitant to seek care for UI because of misconceptions about normal aging and treatment futility. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of a UI clinic specifically tailored to the needs of older women to promote a sense of empowerment and to enhance satisfaction with treatment and outcome. We describe a case series of 52 women between the ages of 65 and 98 who were evaluated at the Geriatric Incontinence Clinic at the McGill University Health Centre over a 1-year period. A standardized telephone questionnaire was administered by a nurse consultant 6 months after each subject's final visit to assess patient satisfaction and current incontinence status. Forty-five women (86%) were available for telephone follow-up and completed the questionnaire. Mean age was 80 years, with urge incontinence in 45%, mixed incontinence (stress and urge) in 33%, impaired bladder emptying with urge symptoms in 10%, and other diagnoses in 12%. Overall, a mean reduction of 1.4 incontinent episodes per day was reported. At follow-up, 30% of the subjects reported being cured of their incontinence, 30% had improved, 20% were the same, and 20% were worse. Over 85% of all women reported satisfaction with their new incontinence status. Women of all ages, independent of the type of UI, type of treatment, and cognitive status, were able to achieve reductions in incontinence symptoms. All patients who had worsened were noncompliant with treatment recommendations at follow-up. Older women can derive significant benefit from a UI assessment. Neither advanced age nor category of incontinence precludes improvements or enhanced satisfaction with treatment. Efforts to improve targeting and compliance may improve outcomes. PMID:11703887

  1. Robotic-assisted gynecologic/oncologic surgery: experience of early cases in a Saudi Arabian tertiary care facility.

    PubMed

    Al-Badawi, Ismail A; Al-Aker, Murad; Al-Subhi, Jamal; Bukhari, Ibtihal; Al-Omar, Osama; Ahmad, Sarfraz

    2012-06-01

    We report early experience of a case-mix series of robotic-assisted (RA) gynecologic/oncologic surgery in an Arabian population from a tertiary care facility, and discuss the emergence/growth of robotic surgery in the Arab world (Middle East). From December 2005 to December 2010, 60 consecutive patients [benign with complex pathology (BN, n = 34) and 26 cases with various malignancies; i.e., endometrial cancer (EC, n = 13), ovarian cancer (OC, n = 4), cervical cancer (CC, n = 1), and other cancers (OTH, n = 8), underwent RA procedures for the diagnosis/treatment/management of gynecologic/oncologic diseases at a single institution using the da Vinci(®) Surgical System. Data were analyzed for demographics, clinico-pathologic and peri/post-operative factors using intent-to-treat analysis. Despite continuous growth in the number of cases performed each year, the establishment of the robotic surgery program at our institution has been rather challenging due to patient acceptance, public awareness, and administrative resistance. The mean age of the case-mix was 43 ± 15 years (distribution: BN 39 ± 14, EC 61 ± 6, OC 36 ± 15, CC 50, OTH 41 ± 12 years). The body mass index for the case-mix was 30.3 ± 6.9 kg/m(2) (distribution: BN 29.7 ± 6.2, EC 34.0 ± 3.6, OC 20.0 ± 1.7, CC 48, OTH 30.2 ± 6.2 kg/m(2)). The histology of most EC cases was endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The mean operative time was case-mix 95 ± 43, BN 77 ± 26, EC 156 ± 30, OC 80 ± 35, CC 150, OTH 79 ± 23 min. Mean blood loss was case-mix 126, BN 129, EC 177, OC 67, CC 50, OTH 71 min. Two cases (3.3%) were converted to laparotomy (one each in EC and BN groups). Mean hospital length of stay was 2 days. Four cases (6.7%) experienced complications. Only 4/26 (15.4%) of cancer cases required adjuvant therapy. The data suggest that RA gynecologic/oncologic procedures are feasible and satisfactory to our Arabian patient population and comparable to the

  2. The effects of age and previous experience on social rank in female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus spadiceus.

    PubMed

    Kim; Zuk

    2000-08-01

    Social rank can influence lifetime reproductive success and therefore fitness. We examined the effects of morphology, age, previous social experience and aggressiveness on social rank in all-female flocks of red junglefowl. None of the morphological characters measured (mass, tarsus length, comb height or comb length) appeared to play a role in determining rank. Older females were not more likely to be dominant, while previous social experience and aggression levels were both important in dominance determination. Flock-experienced hens were more likely to be dominant as were more aggressive individuals. Red junglefowl females most likely use a combination of characters to establish social order in a newly formed flock. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10973726

  3. Surgery for spinal tuberculosis: a multi-center experience of 582 cases

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Karim, Rezaul; Jonayed, Sharif Ahmed; Munir, Hasan Khalid Md.; Chakraborty, Shubhendu; Alam, Tashfique

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) of the spine is a common site of osseous TB, accounting for 50%-60% of cases. Spinal TB still occurs in both developed and developing countries. The diagnosis of spinal TB is difficult and it commonly presents at an advanced stage. Delays in establishing diagnosis and management result in complications such as spinal cord compression and spinal deformity. Methods A total of 582 patients with TB of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine with moderate to severe cord compression were studied. Variable degrees of neurological deficit with deformity were treated from January, 2003 to July, 2014. Thoracotomy along with anterolateral decompression and autogenous strut bone grafting with simultaneous fixation by screws and rods were performed in 113 cases. Posterior decompression, posterior interbody and posterolateral fusion by bone graft with stabilization by transpedicular screws and rods were done in the remaining 469 cases. Appropriate anti-TB drugs were given to all patients for 18-24 months. The follow-up period was 3 months to 10 years. Results The average age was 32.5 years. All patients survived surgery. There were 7 cases of superficial infections (1.2%) whilst there were 4 cases (0.7%) of deep infections. Revision surgery was performed in 6 patients (1.0%). Implant failure occurred in 4 cases (0.7%) whilst malposition of screws occurred in 12 cases (2.1%). Perioperative bleeding complications were reported for 4 patients (0.7%). Neurological improvement occurred in all patients except for 2 cases (0.3%). Preoperatively, the majority of patients (n=221, 38%) were classified with Class A on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIS) neurological impairment scale. This was significantly reduced postoperatively to 0.4%. Conclusions For patients with spinal TB anterior debridement, auto graft bone fusion, anterior or posterior fixation appears to be effective in arresting disease, correcting kyphotic deformity and maintaining

  4. Understanding reliance on automation: effects of error type, error distribution, age and experience

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Julian; Rogers, Wendy A.; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rovira, Ericka

    2015-01-01

    An obstacle detection task supported by “imperfect” automation was used with the goal of understanding the effects of automation error types and age on automation reliance. Sixty younger and sixty older adults interacted with a multi-task simulation of an agricultural vehicle (i.e. a virtual harvesting combine). The simulator included an obstacle detection task and a fully manual tracking task. A micro-level analysis provided insight into the way reliance patterns change over time. The results indicated that there are distinct patterns of reliance that develop as a function of error type. A prevalence of automation false alarms led participants to under-rely on the automation during alarm states while over relying on it during non-alarms states. Conversely, a prevalence of automation misses led participants to over-rely on automated alarms and under-rely on the automation during non-alarm states. Older adults adjusted their behavior according to the characteristics of the automation similarly to younger adults, although it took them longer to do so. The results of this study suggest the relationship between automation reliability and reliance depends on the prevalence of specific errors and on the state of the system. Understanding the effects of automation detection criterion settings on human-automation interaction can help designers of automated systems make predictions about human behavior and system performance as a function of the characteristics of the automation. PMID:25642142

  5. Adaptation to Low Vision Caused by Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Theresa Marie

    2008-01-01

    One in eight Americans aged 65 and older has an eye disease resulting in low vision, and more women than men are visually impaired, mainly because women live longer. Age-related visual impairments are an indicator of a decline in activities of daily living and self-help skills. The top eye conditions that affect older adults are macular…

  6. Determinants of Institutional Delivery among Childbearing Age Women in Western Ethiopia, 2013: Unmatched Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Feyissa, Tesfaye Regassa; Genemo, Gebi Agero

    2014-01-01

    Background Place of delivery is a crucial factor which affects the health and wellbeing of the mother and newborn. Institutional delivery helps the women to access skilled assistance, drugs, equipment, and referral transport. Even though 34% of pregnant women received at least one antenatal care from a skilled provider in Ethiopia by 2013, institutional delivery was 10%. The main objective of the study was to assess determinants of institutional delivery in Western Ethiopia. Methods Retrospective unmatched case control study design was used to assess determinants of institutional delivery in Western Ethiopia from September to October 2013. A total of 320 respondents from six districts of East Wollega zone, West Ethiopia were included. Data were collected using pretested and structured questionnaires. Data were entered and cleaned by Epi-info then exported and analyzed using SPSS software. Statistical significance was determined through a 95% confidence level. Results Education [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) = 2.754(1.510–8.911)], family size [AOR (95% CI) = .454(.209–.984)], residence [AOR (95% CI) = 3.822 (1.766–8.272)] were important predictors of place of delivery. Four or more antenatal care [(ANC) (AOR (95% CI) = 2.914(1.105–7.682)], birth order [(AOR (95% CI) = .136(.054–.344), age at last delivery [(AOR (95% CI) = 9.995(2.101–47.556)], birth preparedness [AOR (95% CI) = 6.957(2.422–19.987)], duration of labour [AOR (95% CI) = 3.541(1.732–7.239)] were significantly associated with institutional delivery. Moreover service related factors such as distance from health institutions [AOR (95% CI) = .665(.173–.954)], respondents’ awareness of skill of health care professionals [AOR (95% CI) = 2.454 (1.663–6.255)], mode of transportations [AOR (95% CI) = .258(.122–.549)] were significantly associated with institutional delivery. Conclusions and Recommendations Policy

  7. Age-related differences in post-yield damage in human cortical bone. Experiment and model.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A C; Hayes, W C; Gibson, L J

    1996-11-01

    Very few quantitative comparisons between mechanical test behavior of cortical bone and microscopic evidence of damage have been reported. In this study, the hypothesis that age-related degradation of mechanical properties in human cortical bone is associated with increases in damage in the form of microcracks was investigated. The initial modulus and yield stress were 6% (not significant) and 10% (p = 0.05) lower, respectively, in specimens from elderly femora than in specimens from young adult femora. However, both groups showed a 34% decrease in modulus after being loaded to 1% strain. Microcracks were observed in cement lines and between lamellae and were parallel to the loading direction. There were 50% more cracks in longitudinal sections of tested specimens than in controls from elderly femora; however, there were no more cracks in tested specimens than in controls from young adult femora. In addition, there were twice as many cracks in controls and three times as many cracks in tested specimens from elderly femora than in those from young adult femora (p < 0.01). A microstructurally based model was developed which supported the mechanical test results and indicated that damage began to develop at about 1500 mu epsilon. The results suggest that older bone may have reduced mechanical properties due to the presence of more microcracks, and that older bone is more susceptible to developing microcracks at a given strain level. However, the mechanical test data indicate that specimens from young adult femora also sustained some king of damage as a result of mechanical loading, which requires further investigation.

  8. Ten-year experience in management of diabetic ketoacidosis and ketosis: 140 episodes at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Yordam, Nuren; Gönç, E Nazli; Kandemir, Nurgün; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Ozön, Alev

    2005-01-01

    One hundred and forty episodes in 112 patients (58 boys) with diabetic ketoacidosis (96 episodes) and diabetic ketosis (44 episodes) were studied to elucidate the clinical and laboratory risk factors for altered level of consciousness at presentation and to analyze the outcome of a distinct protocol in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The patients were analyzed according to demographic data and clinical and laboratory findings at admission. The treatment protocol involved use of 0.45% sodium chloride (NaCl) in 2.5% dextrose as the initial fluid therapy following volume expansion. Dextrose content of the fluid was doubled once the serum glucose level fell below 250 mg/dl. The mean ages at presentation with diabetic ketoacidosis and ketosis were 10.3 +/- 4.4 and 10.2 +/- 4.0 years, respectively. Thirty-one percent of patients had altered consciousness at presentation. The level of consciousness correlated negatively with serum bicarbonate level (r=-0.485; p<0.001). A serum bicarbonate level below 15 mmol/L was a risk factor for altered consciousness. There was no correlation between effective osmolality and the level of consciousness. Serum effective osmolality above 320 mOsm/kg H2O did not appear to be a risk factor for altered consciousness. No mortality or any signs of clinical brain edema were observed in patients treated with the distinct treatment protocol. In conclusion, acidosis appears to be the major factor in the pathogenesis of altered consciousness at presentation. Serum effective osmolality does not seem to be a risk factor as suggested previously. Dextrose added to the infusion fluid early in treatment seems to prevent the development of brain edema, and this may be due to a protective effect of higher osmolality in the resultant solution.

  9. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana: Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports.

  10. Observation of Dust Aging Processes During Transport from Africa into the Caribbean - A Lagrangian Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D. N.; Walser, A.; Dollner, M.; Reitebuch, O.; Gross, S.; Chouza, F.; Ansmann, A.; Toledano, C.; Freudenthaler, V.; Kandler, K.; Schäfler, A.; Baumann, R.; Tegen, I.; Heinold, B.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles are regularly transported over long distances impacting air quality, health, weather and climate thousands of kilometers downwind of the source. During transport, particle properties are modified thereby changing the associated impact on the radiation budget. Although mineral dust is of key importance for the climate system many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during long-range transport, the role of wet and dry removal mechanisms, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. In June/July 2013, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted to study the transport and transformation of Saharan mineral dust. Besides ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments deployed on Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico, the DLR research aircraft Falcon was equipped with an extended aerosol in-situ instrumentation, a nadir-looking 2-μm wind lidar and instruments for standard meteorological parameters. During SALTRACE, five large dust outbreaks were studied by ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements between Senegal, Cape Verde, the Caribbean, and Florida. Highlights included the Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados. Between Cape Verde and Barbados, the aerosol optical thickness (500 nm) decreased from 0.54 to 0.26 and the stratification of the dust layers changed significantly from a rather homogenous structure near Africa to a 3-layer structure with embedded cumulus clouds in the Caribbean. In the upper part of the dust layers in the Caribbean, the aerosol properties were similar to the observations near Africa. In contrast, much more variability in the dust properties was observed between 0.7 and 2.5 km altitude probably due to interaction of the mineral dust with clouds. In our

  11. Epidemiology of Neisseria meningitidis infections: case distribution by age and relevance of carriage.

    PubMed

    Gabutti, G; Stefanati, A; Kuhdari, P

    2015-01-01

    Notwithstanding different meningococcal serogroups have changed their distribution and their impact in different age classes over time, N. meningitidis' invasive diseases are a major public health issue worldwide, due to the related complications and severe sequelae. Nowadays, the highest rates of invasive disease are registered in children younger than 1 year of age, with a second lesser peak in adolescents and young adults (15-25 years of age). On the contrary, the prevalence of carriage is low in newborns and in school-age children, and increases during adolescence and young-adult age; then it decreases again in older age. N. meningitidis' infection prevalence has greatly decreased in Europe and North America thanks to the use of conjugate vaccines (MenC and MenACWY) as well as the incidence of invasive disease due to serogroup A in sub-saharian Africa after the introduction of MenAfriVac conjugate vaccine. The great success of conjugate vaccines is related not only to the direct protection from disease but also to the impact on carriage; this latter allows an indirect protection of unimmunized subjects. For these reasons, the implementation of immunization with the new generation vaccines in the age classes most impacted by disease and carriage (first year of life, adolescence and young adulthood) could permit to achieve an extraordinary decrease of the incidence of meningococcal disease. PMID:26788731

  12. MARS (Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System): experience in 34 cases of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Gilnardo; Rossi, Massimo; Pretagostini, Renzo; Poli, Luca; Novelli, Luigi; Berloco, Pasquale; Ferretti, Giancarlo; Iappelli, Massimo; Cortesini, Raffaello

    2002-01-01

    As reported in the literature, the mortality rates for patients with Acute Hepatic Failure (AHF) approaches 80% in cases in which liver transplantation is not possible. Post-transplant mortality mostly depends on the severity of the neurological condition at the time of the operation (20% in I-II degree coma patients and 44% in III degree coma patients). The primary indications for liver transplantation in AHF are Fulminant Hepatitis (FH)(93%), Subfulminant Hepatitis (5%) and other indications (2%). Other causes of AHF are Primary Non-Function (PNF) and Delayed Function (DF), which occur in 7-10%. Therefore it becomes necessary to monitor the patients with a Liver Support Device to be able to improve the clinical condition of the patients before liver transplantation (LT). In our experience we used the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) (MARS Monitor; Teraklin AG, Rostock Germany), which enables the selective removal of albumin-bound substances accumulating in liver failure by the use of albumin-enriched dialysate. The system is used as a bridging device to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) of patients with FHF. We studied 34 patients, including 16 males and 18 females: 9 were affected by Primary-Non-Function (PNF), nine by Fulminant Hepatitis (FH), six by Delayed-Non-Function (DNF), and ten by Acute on Chronic Hepatic Failure (AOCHF). The average age of the patients was 41.8 years and the average number of applications was 6.4; the median length of application was about eight hours. The parameters that we monitored, before and after each treatment, were neurological status (EEG, cerebral CT, Glasgow Coma Score), haemodynamic parameters, acid base equilibrium, and blood gas analysis. We also monitored hepatic and renal function. In addition, the clinical conditions of the patients were monitored using kidney and liver ultrasound/ultrasonography (US). Inclusion criteria were bilirubin > 15 mg/dL, ammonia > 160 micro g/dL and a Glasgow Coma Score

  13. Near-death experience and out of body phenomenon during torture--a case report.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Maxwell J F

    2011-01-01

    A case of a near death experience (NDE) associated with an "Out of body" phenomenon in an African man as a result of torture is presented. Although NDEs occur in approximately ten per cent of survivors of cardiac arrest, case reports emerging from the medical examination of torture victims are lacking. This may be due to cultural/linguistic barriers and fear of disbelief. Low NDE incidence during torture would suggest that torture techniques rarely induce the critical brain ischaemia considered necessary to provoke an NDE. Alternatively psychological or physical characteristics of torture may render NDE harder to recall. Proof of low incidence during torture would counter the theory that NDEs are a psychological response to perceived threat of death. NDEs often induce transformational benefits in patients' lives and for this reason the author urges physicians to consider the possibility of NDE amongst torture victims under their care. A request for information about similar cases is made.

  14. Supratentorial extradural hematoma in children: An institutional clinical experience of 65 cases

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Pratap Chandra; Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Das, Srikant; Deo, Rama Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objective: To survey the epidemiology, management, and severity of extradural hematoma (EDH) in children. Materials and Methods: All patients of EDH (n = 65) in the age group of 0–16 years admitted to our department during the period of August 13 and July 14 were analyzed retrospectively from the hospital records. In all patients, age, sex, mode of injury, clinical presentation, site of EDH, management, duration of hospitalization, and outcome were evaluated. Observation and Results: Of 65 patients, males were 70.76% with a male to female ratio of 2.4:1, most of the victims (47.69%) were in the age group of 11–16 years. Mean duration of hospitalization was 4.32 days. The most common mode of injury was fall from height in 29 cases (44.61%) followed by road traffic accident (RTA) in 23 cases (35.35%). Temporoparietal EDH was the most common computed tomography finding present in 22 (33.84%) patients. 67.69% patients presented to casualty with minor head injury having Glasgow coma scale (GCS) between 14 and 15. Most common presenting feature was vomiting in 52 cases (80%) and next to it was altered sensorium. The mortality rate was 7.69% (n = 5). Conclusion: Extradural hematoma is a life-threatening entity encountered in pediatric head injury. Timely intervention and diagnosis decrease mortality to a great degree. Most of the mortality is encountered in patients who presented late at the neurosurgical unit with low GCS. PMID:26167211

  15. Psychogenic voice disorders and traumatic stress experience: a discussion paper with two case reports.

    PubMed

    Baker, Janet

    2003-09-01

    Psychogenic dysphonia refers to loss of voice where there is insufficient structural or neurological pathology to account for the nature and severity of the dysphonia, and where loss of volitional control over phonation seems to be related to psychological processes such as anxiety, depression, conversion reaction, or personality disorder. Such dysphonias may often develop post-viral infection with laryngitis, and generally in close proximity to emotionally or psychologically taxing experiences, where "conflict over speaking out" is an issue. In more rare instances, severe and persistent psychogenic dysphonia may develop under innocuous or unrelated circumstances, but over time, it may be traced back to traumatic stress experiences that occurred many months or years prior to the onset of the voice disorder. In such cases, the qualitative nature of the traumatic experience may be reflected in the way the psychogenic voice disorder presents. The possible relationship between psychogenic dysphonia and earlier traumatic stress experience is discussed, and the reportedly low prevalence of conversion reaction (4% to 5%) as the basis for psychogenic dysphonia is challenged. Two cases are presented to illustrate the issues raised: the first, a young woman who was sexually assaulted and chose to "keep her secret," and the second, a 52-year-old woman who developed a psychogenic dysphonia following a second, modified thyroplasty for a unilateral vocal fold paresis.

  16. Age or Experience? The Influence of Age at Implantation and Social and Linguistic Environment on Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szagun, Gisela; Stumper, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the influence of social environmental variables and age at implantation on language development in children with cochlear implants. Method: Participants were 25 children with cochlear implants and their parents. Age at implantation ranged from 6 months to 42 months (M[subscript age] = 20.4 months, SD = 22.0…

  17. Prospects for cosmic neutrino detection in tritium experiments in the case of hierarchical neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the effects of neutrino mixing and the neutrino mass hierarchy when considering the capture of the cosmic neutrino background (CNB) on radioactive nuclei. The implications of mixing and hierarchy at future generations of tritium decay experiments are considered. We find that the CNB should be detectable at these experiments provided that the resolution for the kinetic energy of the outgoing electron can be pushed to a few 0.01 eV for the scenario with inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, about an order of magnitude better than that of the upcoming KATRIN experiment. Another order of magnitude improvement is needed in the case of normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also note that mixing effects generally make the prospects for CNB detection worse due to an increased maximum energy of the normal beta decay background.

  18. Living with semantic dementia: a case study of one family's experience.

    PubMed

    Kindell, Jacqueline; Sage, Karen; Wilkinson, Ray; Keady, John

    2014-03-01

    Semantic dementia is a variant of frontotemporal dementia and is a recently recognized diagnostic condition. There has been some research quantitatively examining care partner stress and burden in frontotemporal dementia. There are, however, few studies exploring the subjective experiences of family members caring for those with frontotemporal dementia. Increased knowledge of such experiences would allow service providers to tailor intervention, support, and information better. We used a case study design, with thematic narrative analysis applied to interview data, to describe the experiences of a wife and son caring for a husband/father with semantic dementia. Using this approach, we identified four themes: (a) living with routines, (b) policing and protecting, (c) making connections, and (d) being adaptive and flexible. Each of these themes were shared and extended, with the importance of routines in everyday life highlighted. The implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed. PMID:24532121

  19. Intraoral minor salivary gland neoplasm: a single institution experience of 80 cases.

    PubMed

    Jansisyanont, P; Blanchaert, R H; Ord, Robert A

    2002-06-01

    From March 1991 to February 2001, 80 cases of minor salivary gland tumours were diagnosed in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Maryland at Baltimore (Baltimore, MD, USA). Data extracted from a retrospective chart review included age, sex, symptoms, site, histological diagnosis. treatment and outcome. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumour and makes up 89.5% of all benign tumours. The percentage of malignancy (76.3%) was much higher than that found in other studies. Of the malignant tumours, 54.1% were mucoepidermoid carcinomas. This study differs from many previous reviews that were published by pathologists rather than a surgical unit.

  20. Sorption and distribution of aged atrazine residues in the drainage system of an outdoor lysimeter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, N. D.; Schäffer, A.; Burauel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Even though the environmental impact of the herbicide atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine] is a matter of controversy, it is still extensively applied for agricultural purposes. Particularly in the US, atrazine has been applied to approximately 70% of all corn acreages in the last 18 years. Atrazine is banned in the EU but its use is increasing in countries like China, Brazil and India. Therefore, the worldwide soil burden of this compound must be enormous. Atrazine has been found to be highly persistent in the environment and it has been suggested that it is moderately mobile in the soil profile. As a result, it is found in most groundwater aquifers and surface waters in agricultural areas in the US. Even in Germany, where it was prohibited in 1991, it is still found in groundwater wells below agriculturally used land where it was formerly applied. For a long-term outdoor lysimeter experiment with a disturbed soil column, a drainage system of fine gravel was originally embedded at the bottom of the lysimeter. In this drainage system, atrazine and its metabolite 2-hydroxy-atrazine were extracted as long as 22 years after the last atrazine application. Due to the radiolabelling, the spatial distribution of the atrazine residues can be evaluated in fractions like fine clay particles attached to the gravel or in the gravel itself. Approximately 2% of the total gravel consisted of carbonaceous, slag-like particles which might retain most of the atrazine and its residues. The latest data will be presented at the session.

  1. The Spatio-temporal Distribution of Japanese Encephalitis Cases in Different Age Groups in Mainland China, 2004 – 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Song, Miao; Li, Minghua; Fu, Shihong; Lv, Zhi; He, Ying; Lei, Wenwen; Wang, Bin; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) is very prevalent in China, but the incidence of JE among children has been greatly reduced by extensive promotion of vaccinations. The incidence of JE among adults, however, has increased in some parts of China. Methods/Principal Findings Data on JE in mainland China, in terms of incidence, gender, and age, were collected between 2004 and 2014. We conducted spatial and temporal analyses on data from different age groups. Generally, children aged 0–15 years still represent the major population of JE cases in China, despite the gradual decrease in incidence over years. However, the incidence of JE among adults in several provinces is notably higher than the national average, especially during the epidemic waves in 2006, 2009, and 2013. The JE cases in the 0–15-year-old group are distributed mainly in the area south of the Yangtze River, with peak incidence occurring from July to September. In the adult group, especially for those over 40 years old, the JE cases are concentrated mainly in the area north of the Yangtze River. JE incidence in the adult group in September and October is significantly greater compared to the other groups. Further analysis using Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) reveals that the distribution of adult JE cases in the six provinces north of the Yangtze River, between north 30–35° latitude and east 110–130° longitude, is a hotspot for adult JE cases. Conclusions/Significance The rate of JE case increase for adults is much greater than for children and has become a public health issue. Therefore, studies on the necessity and feasibility of vaccinating adults who live in JE-endemic areas, but have never been vaccinated for JE, should become a new focus of JE prevention in the future. PMID:27050414

  2. The concept of compensation in cognitive aging: the case of prose processing in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R A; Bäckman, L

    Although the rule of cognitive aging appears to be one of generalized decline with advancing age, much recent theoretical and empirical work has addressed a variety of potential exceptions to this rule. One mechanism through which decline might not be experienced is known as compensation. We describe a conceptualization of compensation that applies to lifespan cognitive development, in general, and the aging of prose processing skills, in particular. Our model of the forms and processes of compensation directs attention to the developing dynamics of cognitive skills and compensatory mechanisms. We outline three main approaches to research on compensation in cognitive aging: a) the logical experimental, b) on-line observation and manipulation, and c) several verbal report procedures. In summarizing our own research program, we emphasize that a) each of these approaches can render valuable information, b) each have some limitations, and c) there are potential theoretical benefits from employing more than one of them in a given study.

  3. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Victoria E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Christensen, John N.

    2010-04-30

    Obtaining quantitative information about the timescales associated with sediment transport, storage, and deposition in continental settings is important but challenging. The uranium-series comminution age method potentially provides a universal approach for direct dating of Quaternary detrital sediments, and can also provide estimates of the sediment transport and storage timescales. (The word"comminution" means"to reduce to powder," reflecting the start of the comminution age clock as reduction of lithic parent material below a critical grain size threshold of ~;;50 mu m.) To test the comminution age method as a means to date continental sediments, we applied the method to drill-core samples of the glacially-derived Kings River Fan alluvial deposits in central California. Sediments from the 45 m core have independently-estimated depositional ages of up to ~;;800 ka, based on paleomagnetism and correlations to nearby dated sediments. We characterized sequentially-leached core samples (both bulk sediment and grain size separates) for U, Nd, and Sr isotopes, grain size, surface texture, and mineralogy. In accordance with the comminution age model, where 234U is partially lost from small sediment grains due to alpha recoil, we found that (234U/238U) activity ratios generally decrease with age, depth, and specific surface area, with depletions of up to 9percent relative to radioactive equilibrium. The resulting calculated comminution ages are reasonable, although they do not exactly match age estimates from previous studies and also depend on assumptions about 234U loss rates. The results indicate that the method may be a significant addition to the sparse set of available tools for dating detrital continental sediments, following further refinement. Improving the accuracy of the method requires more advanced models or measurements for both the recoil loss factor fa and weathering effects. We discuss several independent methods for obtaining fa on individual samples

  4. Experience of Southern Chinese: new challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age--a call for multi-disciplinary collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava; Chu, Annie Tsz-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Compared with western populations, Southern Chinese, especially those residing in Hong Kong, are experiencing increasing breast cancer incidence and also a younger onset of breast cancer. Combating this problem and treating young women with breast cancer poses specific challenges and complicated considerations. With reference to the postponement in the age of marriage and reproduction in modern societies, the issue of fertility after breast cancer, especially for high-risk young patients, is one significant quality of life concern that cannot be underestimated as a secondary medical topic. While the issue has its significance and is confronting front-line breast cancer care teams of different disciplines, related research is mostly on Caucasians. In cultures where the traditional expectation on women for child-bearing is still prominent, young breast cancer patients may endure significant distress over fertility options after breast cancer. There is a lack of related data on Asian breast cancer survivors at child-bearing age, which calls for a pressing need to encourage qualitative groundwork, case reports, and cohort experiences in hope for providing insight and arouse research interest. In order to provide a long-term comprehensive multidisciplinary management service with encouragement to encompass prospects for a positive future among young breast cancer survivors, relevant disciplines need to collaborate and work efficaciously together both on clinical and research aspects of cancer-related fertility issues. PMID:22994790

  5. Successful Advanced Maternal Age Pregnancy with Mosaic Turner Syndrome Conceived after Ovulation Induction with Clomiphene Citrate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masahiro; Hinokio, Kenji; Kiyokawa, Machiko; Morine, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Turner women typically experience gonadal dysfunction that results in amenorrhea and sterility. We encountered a case of mosaic Turner syndrome where conception was possible after ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate (CC). The patient's ovaries were overresponsive to induction with CC. The challenges and successful outcome are reported. PMID:25018883

  6. The use of Zostavax in Spain: the economic case for vaccination of individuals aged 50 years and older.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Belmonte, Juan Luis; Cisterna, Ramón; Gil de Miguel, Angel; Guilmet, Caroline; Bianic, Florence; Uhart, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Background Population aging brings up a number of health issues, one of which is an increased incidence of herpes zoster (HZ) and its complication, post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). Zostavax vaccine has recently become available to prevent HZ and PHN. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of vaccination against HZ in Spain considering a vaccination of the population aged 50 years and older and comparing this to the current situation where no vaccination is being administered. Methods An existing, validated, and published economic model was adapted to Spain using relevant local input parameters and costs from 2013. Results Vaccinating 30% of the Spanish population aged 50 years and older resulted in €16,577/QALY gained, €2025/HZ case avoided, and €5594/PHN case avoided under the third-party payer perspective. From a societal perspective, the ICERs increased by 6%, due to the higher price of the vaccine. The number needed to vaccinate to prevent one case was 20 for HZ, and 63 for PHN3. Sensitivity analyses showed that the model was most sensitive to the HZ and PHN epidemiological data, the health state utilities values, and vaccine price used. Conclusion Considering an acceptable range of cost-effectiveness of €30,000-€50,000 per QALY gained, vaccination of the 50+ population in Spain against HZ with a new vaccine, Zostavax, is cost-effective and makes good use of the valuable healthcare budget. PMID:26808422

  7. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico's cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico.

  8. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico's cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico. PMID:26015805

  9. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico’s cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico. PMID:26015805

  10. When ageing and disasters collide: lessons from 16 international case studies.

    PubMed

    Powell, Simone; Plouffe, Louise; Gorr, Patti

    2009-06-01

    Sixteen case studies examined the impact of various natural disasters and conflict-related emergencies on older people, the strengths and gaps in emergency planning, response and recovery, and the contributions older people made to their families and communities. Case examples were chosen from both developed and developing countries. Older persons suffered disproportionate impacts in several cases. Regardless of the country's level of prosperity, those most affected tended to be economically disadvantaged, disabled or frail, women, socially isolated, or caregivers of family members. Emergency responders were often not aware of distinct needs or abilities of older persons and not equipped to respond appropriately. The best emergency practices recognised and included specific needs within mainstream efforts and integrated older persons in community planning, response and recovery activities. This paper presents the 'lessons learned' from these case studies and makes the case for greater attention to this segment of the population in emergency management. PMID:19435731

  11. In the vanguard of biomedicine? The curious and contradictory case of anti-ageing medicine.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jennifer R; Settersten, Richard A; Flatt, Michael A

    2010-02-01

    The rise of anti-ageing medicine is emblematic of the current conditions of American biomedicine. Through in-depth interviews with 31 anti-ageing practitioners, we examine how practitioners strive for-and justify-a model of care that runs counter to what they see as the 'assembly line' insurance-managed industry of healthcare. Their motivation, however, is not merely a reaction to conventional medicine. It is derived from what they see as a set of core beliefs about the role of the physician, the nature of the physician-patient relationship, and the function of biomedicine. We analyse this ideology to underscore how anti-ageing medicine is built on a 'technology of the self', a self in need of constant surveillance, intervention, and maintenance. The ultimate goal is to create an optimal self, not just a self free of illness. A fundamental irony is that, despite their self-presentation and the perception of the public, anti-ageing providers do not use practices that are especially 'high-tech' or unconventional. Instead, the management of ageing bodies rests on providers' perceived knowledge of their patients, tailored treatments, and a collaborative pact between the provider and patient. PMID:20003037

  12. Ages of Exoplanet Host-stars from Asteroseismology: HD 17156, a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Y.

    2012-09-01

    The characterization of the growing number of newly discovered exoplanets —nature, internal structure, formation and evolution— strongly relies on the properties of their host-star, i.e., its mass, radius and age. These can be inferred from stellar evolution models constrained by the observed global parameters of the host-star — effective temperature, photospheric chemical composition, surface gravity and/or luminosity— and by its mean density inferred from a transit analysis. Additional constraints for the models can be provided by asteroseismic observations of the host-star. The precision and accuracy of the age, mass and radius not only depend on the quality and number of available observations of the host-star but also on our ability to model it properly. Stellar models are still based on a number of approximations, they rely on physical inputs and data that can be uncertain and do not correctly treat all the physical processes that can be at work inside a star. We focus here on the determination of the age of HD 17156, an oscillating star hosting an exoplanet. We examine the dispersion of the age values obtained by different methods —empirical or model-dependent— and the different sources of error —observational or theoretical— that intervene in the age determination based on stellar models.

  13. Inaccuracy of age assessment from images of postpubescent subjects in cases of alleged child pornography.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L

    2013-03-01

    Despite frequent medical expert testimony authoritatively stating that images of individuals who are postpubescent indicate age less than 18 and therefore, child pornography, developmental experts have noted that a scientific basis for such estimation is lacking. In fact, recent studies have demonstrated a high degree of inaccuracy in such estimates, and that the stage of breast development often used as indicative of age under 18 years is present in a substantial percentage of adult women. Ten images of adult women from legitimate pornographic sites promoting youthful images were shown to 16 pediatric endocrinologists expert in evaluating maturation, who determined whether or not the individuals represented were under 18 years of age. They also provided information about what features were most important in their evaluations. Sixty-nine percent of the 160 estimates were that the images represented females under 18 years of age. There was wide variability in the designation of importance of the various features of maturation in reaching conclusions, with breast development and facial appearance considered most important. This study confirms that medical testimony, even by experts in adolescent development, can deem images of adult women selected for their youthful appearance to be under age 18 two thirds of the time. Thus, important as prosecuting users of child pornographic material may be, justice requires the avoidance of testimony that is not scientifically based. PMID:22960879

  14. Inaccuracy of age assessment from images of postpubescent subjects in cases of alleged child pornography.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L

    2013-03-01

    Despite frequent medical expert testimony authoritatively stating that images of individuals who are postpubescent indicate age less than 18 and therefore, child pornography, developmental experts have noted that a scientific basis for such estimation is lacking. In fact, recent studies have demonstrated a high degree of inaccuracy in such estimates, and that the stage of breast development often used as indicative of age under 18 years is present in a substantial percentage of adult women. Ten images of adult women from legitimate pornographic sites promoting youthful images were shown to 16 pediatric endocrinologists expert in evaluating maturation, who determined whether or not the individuals represented were under 18 years of age. They also provided information about what features were most important in their evaluations. Sixty-nine percent of the 160 estimates were that the images represented females under 18 years of age. There was wide variability in the designation of importance of the various features of maturation in reaching conclusions, with breast development and facial appearance considered most important. This study confirms that medical testimony, even by experts in adolescent development, can deem images of adult women selected for their youthful appearance to be under age 18 two thirds of the time. Thus, important as prosecuting users of child pornographic material may be, justice requires the avoidance of testimony that is not scientifically based.

  15. One teacher's experience interpreting and enacting a new science curriculum framework: An ethnographic case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Betsy Denton

    What experiences does a teacher have when interpreting and enacting curriculum frameworks and national and state standards? What does a teacher think about as she moves between the text of the written curriculum framework, her own particular experiences, and the context of a classroom? What are the negotiations that a teacher makes as she adopts and adapts curriculum policy for her own classroom? The purpose of this ethnographic case study was to explore these questions in the context of an eighth-grade science class as the teacher interpreted and enacted a new inquiry-based, constructivist curriculum framework. This yearlong study employed qualitative methods of data collection including open-ended interviews, classroom observations, guiding conversations (Cole & Knowles, 2001) and cogenerative dialogues and reflections (Roth & Tobin, 2005) with the teacher, and analysis of classroom artifacts. Constant comparative analysis and narrative analysis were used to analyze data and produce a narrative truth that emphasized verisimilitude or truthlike observations in order to capture one teacher's classroom experiences and advance an empathic form of understanding so the reader could experience the teacher's world. Reflections upon the teacher's story at the conclusion of this study suggest the following educational policy changes and areas of further study: (1) the need for more professional learning experiences for both preservice and practicing teachers that help them construct an understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underlie the curriculum they are enacting, (2) the need for more research, particularly qualitative case studies, describing learning communities in schools and constructivist leaders who have successfully facilitated authentic professional development, (3) the need for curriculum developers to address the pressing issue of depth vs. breadth in curriculum reform, and (4) the need for more studies that show how teachers adapt and improvise

  16. Children and the Arts: A Source Book of Arts Experiences for School Age Child Care Programs Developed for Florida's At-Risk Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Central Florida, Orlando. Coll. of Education.

    Designed to assist administrators and teachers conducting child care programs for school-age at-risk children, this curriculum guide outlines age-appropriate, process-oriented arts experiences. Content focuses on learning activities in the visual arts, dance/creative movement, drama, and music. Each section includes all or several of the following…

  17. We Still Have a Lot to Learn: Learning Experiences of Individuals Age 80 and Older in Care Facilities in a Midwestern State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebert, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the learning experiences of individuals, age 80 and older, in care facilities in a Midwestern state. Even with the well documented growth of the over age 85 demographic, there are few studies about learning that included this demographic or considered the wants and needs of this group. Using a phenomenological…

  18. Gender Issues in Older Adults' Participation in Learning: Viewpoints and Experiences of Learners in the University of the Third Age (U3A).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of 41 female and 15 male older adults participating in Universities of the Third Age found the genders approach retirement differently. Women want to experience freedom and make up for lost opportunities; men prefer to "sit." However, men with active interests before retirement continued activity in the Third Age. (SK)

  19. Age-related bone resorption in the normal incus: a case of maladaptive remodelling?

    PubMed Central

    Lannigan, F J; O'Higgins, P; Oxnard, C E; McPhie, P

    1995-01-01

    The changes that occur in the normal human incus with age have been investigated. Evidence for age-related changes in this ossicle, especially in the region of the long process, has been accumulating over the last 30-40 years and yet they have neither been confirmed quantitatively nor explained satisfactorily. In this study the results of a morphometric study of the long processes of a series of normal incudes are presented. These demonstrate that the lenticular and long processes undergo progressive symmetric resorption with advancing age. We consider these findings in the light of previous considerations of incudal remodelling and propose that these remodelling changes may reflect a normal adaptive response to the biomechanical milieu of the human middle ear. PMID:7559138

  20. Analysis, prediction, and case studies of early-age cracking in bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElSafty, Adel; Graeff, Matthew K.; El-Gharib, Georges; Abdel-Mohti, Ahmed; Mike Jackson, N.

    2016-06-01

    Early-age cracking can adversely affect strength, serviceability, and durability of concrete bridge decks. Early age is defined as the period after final setting, during which concrete properties change rapidly. Many factors can cause early-age bridge deck cracking including temperature change, hydration, plastic shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, and drying shrinkage. The cracking may also increase the effect of freeze and thaw cycles and may lead to corrosion of reinforcement. This research paper presents an analysis of causes and factors affecting early-age cracking. It also provides a tool developed to predict the likelihood and initiation of early-age cracking of concrete bridge decks. Understanding the concrete properties is essential so that the developed tool can accurately model the mechanisms contributing to the cracking of concrete bridge decks. The user interface of the implemented computer Excel program enables the user to input the properties of the concrete being monitored. The research study and the developed spreadsheet were used to comprehensively investigate the issue of concrete deck cracking. The spreadsheet is designed to be a user-friendly calculation tool for concrete mixture proportioning, temperature prediction, thermal analysis, and tensile cracking prediction. The study also provides review and makes recommendations on the deck cracking based mainly on the Florida Department of Transportation specifications and Structures Design Guidelines, and Bridge Design Manuals of other states. The results were also compared with that of other commercially available software programs that predict early-age cracking in concrete slabs, concrete pavement, and reinforced concrete bridge decks. The outcome of this study can identify a set of recommendations to limit the deck cracking problem and maintain a longer service life of bridges.

  1. Definitions of fitness in age-structured populations: Comparison in the haploid case.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Soares, Cintia

    2016-02-21

    Fisher's (1930) Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection (FTNS), and in particular the development of an explicit age-structured version of the theorem, is of everlasting interest. In a recent paper, Grafen (2015a) argues that Fisher regarded his theorem as justifying individual rather than population fitness maximization. The argument relies on a new definition of fitness in age-structured populations in terms of individual birth and death rates and age-specific reproductive values in agreement with a principle of neutrality. The latter are frequency-dependent and defined without reference to genetic variation. In the same paper, it is shown that the rate of increase in the mean of the breeding values of fitness weighted by the reproductive values, but keeping the breeding values constant as in Price (1972) is equal to the additive genetic variance in fitness. Therefore, this partial change is obtained by keeping constant not only the genotypic birth and death rates but also the mean age-specific birth and death rates from which the age-specific reproductive values are defined. In this paper we reaffirm that the Malthusian parameter which measures the relative rate of increase or decrease in reproductive value of each genotype in a continuous-time age-structured population is the definition of fitness used in Fisher's (1930) FTNS. This is shown by considering an age-structured asexual haploid population with constant age-specific birth and death (or survival) parameters for each type. Although the original statement of the FTNS is for a diploid population, this simplified haploid model allows us to address the definition of fitness meant in this theorem without the complexities and effects of a changing genic environment. In this simplified framework, the rate of change in mean fitness in continuous time is expected to be exactly equal to the genetic variance in fitness (or to the genetic variance in fitness divided by the mean fitness in discrete time), which can

  2. [Morphofunctional state of reproductive system of ageing male rats in case of using nanocerium].

    PubMed

    Nosenko, N D; Zholobak, N M; Poliakova, L I; Sinitsyn, P V; Lymarieva, A A; Shcherbakov, O V; Spivak, M Ia; Reznikov, O H

    2014-01-01

    The influence of nanocrystalline cerium dioxide (NCD, 1 and 100 mg/kg per os daily for 10 days) on morphofuctional state of reproductive system was investigated in ageing male rats. It has been established that activation of hormone-producing testicular Leydig's cells, as well as of secretory and proliferative processes in prostate, underlies the stimulating effect of NCD at a dose 1 mg/kg on hormonal function of testis and spermatogenesis of ageing male rats. NCD used at a dose 100 mg/kg had no significant effect on the assessed indices of morphofuctional state of reproductive system.

  3. The whole world had a case of the ice age shivers

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1993-12-24

    There is now worldwide evidence of short-term increases in the earth's temperature during the last ice ages. This evidence comes from South American glaciers, Antarctic ice cores, and sediment cores from the tropical oceans, as well as Greenland ice cores. Researcher are unsure of the causes of these fluctuations. Some speculate a means for transmitting a climate signal from the North Atlantic to the rest of the world, while others look to some shorter-term version of the orbital variations that pace the cycle of the ice ages.

  4. Age at first marriage, education and divorce: the case of the U.S.A..

    PubMed

    Perreira, P T

    1991-01-01

    "This paper presents an analysis of the determinants of the age of marriage and the probability of divorce among women in the United States." The author hypothesizes that the possibility of divorce enters into women's decision to marry. "As expected, empirical results indicate that in the United States, where it is easier to obtain divorce, women tend to marry earlier. Furthermore, Catholic women tend to marry later....Results seem to indicate the age at marriage and education should not be considered to be exogenous in the study of the probability of divorce. Another important result is that women who marry earlier...show a lower probability of divorce...."

  5. New observations by visualizing age stratification and internal dynamics of freshwater lenses in heterogeneous media - laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, L.; Dose, E.; Houben, G.; Himmelsbach, T.

    2012-12-01

    We performed a series of multi-tracer laboratory scale experiments in a transparent sand-box model to visualize (a) processes during the genesis of freshwater lenses and (b) their internal dynamics. For physical modeling an acrylic glass box was used to simulate a cross section of an island, similar to Stoeckl & Houben (2012). Degassed salt water with a density of 1023 kg/m3 was injected from the bottom, saturating the sand inside the model. Fluorescent tracer dyes uranine, eosine and indigotine were used to mark the infiltrating fresh water from the top. All experiments were filmed and analyzed using fast motion mode. We performed two different types of experimental set-up according to Vacher (1988): (1) Layers of different hydraulic conductivity: By filling the sand-box model with sand of different grain sizes, layers of different hydraulic conductivity could be simulated. (2) Recharge distribution: By recharging the island heterogeneously we could observe shifts in the geometry of the freshwater lens. A novel approach of using different tracer colors and varying them spatially and over time within the recharge waters allowed us to visualize and measure internal flow processes. Age stratification and flow paths could therefore be investigated. Moreover, a combination of temporal and spatial tracer color variation in one single experiment enabled us to measure flow velocities of freshwater movement. Additionally, by injecting small amounts of tracer in the salt water environment, movements near the interface between fresh- and saltwater could be observed. Using the finite element model FEFLOW we could model the density driven dynamics of our small scale freshwater lens, including its formation and the degradation after turning off the recharge water. This is important to fill the gap between our physical sand-box model and ongoing field investigations. The main focus of this work is the effects of climate change as well as geological and morphological

  6. The effect of non-family experiences on age of marriage in a setting of rapid social change.

    PubMed

    Yabiku, Scott T

    2005-11-01

    This study examines the changing effects of non-family activities on the age of transition to first marriage in four cohorts of individuals across 45 years in the Chitwan Valley, Nepal. The results indicate that school enrolment had a negative effect on both men's and women's marriage rates, while total years of schooling had a positive effect on men's marriage rates. Non-family employment experiences increased marriage rates for men only. Analysing the effects of schooling and employment over time suggests that school enrolment became a growing deterrent to marriage for both sexes, and that non-family employment became an increasingly desirable attribute in men. The results are consistent with changing views about sex roles and schooling over time in the region, as the roles of student and spouse became more distinct. The results also suggest an increasing integration of husbands in the non-family labour market.

  7. Tumours and tumour-like lesions of the hip in the paediatric age: a review of the Rizzoli experience.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, P; Angelini, A; Montalti, M; Pala, E; Calabrò, T; Ussia, G; Abati, C N; Mercuri, M

    2009-01-01

    Bone tumours and tumour-like lesions of the hip in children are rare. Signs and symptoms of these tumours are generally nonspecific. Delay of diagnosis is not uncommon. A high index of suspicion in young patients presenting with persistent pain and without history of trauma, that is unresolved with conservative therapy should prompt further investigation, including radiographs or computed tomography scan of the pelvis. In the experience of the Istituto Rizzoli, in patients less than 14 years (mean 9 years, ranged from 6 months to 14 years), 752 tumours and tumours-like lesions occurred in the pelvis or proximal femur, involving the hip. Tumour-like lesions accounted for 322 cases (simple bone cyst in 255, eosinophilic granuloma in 43, aneurismal bone cyst in 34), benign tumours for 340 cases (osteoid osteoma in 229, fibrous dysplasia in 63, exostosis in 48) and malignant tumours for 80 cases (Ewing's sarcoma in 53 and osteosarcoma in 27). The epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, and radiograph findings are discussed for each of these tumours.Treatment of these tumours differs from observation or minimally invasive treatment for most pseudotumoural lesions, intralesional excision or termoablation for benign bone tumours and wide resection for malignant bone tumours. In this latter group, chemotherapy is required and often administered pre- and postoperatively.

  8. Older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and palate: a qualitative study exploring aging and appearance.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Claire; Harcourt, Diana

    2015-03-01

    Objective : To explore older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P), focusing on aging and appearance. Design : An exploratory-descriptive qualitative study. Participants : Individual semi-structured interviews (five via telephone, one face-to-face) conducted with six adults between the ages of 57 and 82 years. Results : Interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which resulted in five themes: cleft across the life span, keeping up appearances, being one of a kind, resilience and protection, and cleft in an ever-changing society. A CL/P had an ongoing impact on participants' lives, although its relevance shifted over time and some aspects of life (e.g., romantic relationships, decisions about having children of their own) were particularly affected. Participants seemed at ease living with CL/P as an older adult and considered it an important aspect of their identity, yet they still described feeling isolated at times and had little contact with other people with a cleft. They felt that health care could be more considerate to the needs of older people with a cleft, particularly around dentistry and information provision. Participants thought societal attitudes toward visible differences had changed over the years, but not necessarily for the better. A paradox was evident between reports of being noticed by others because of their cleft and simultaneously feeling invisible or ignored because of their age. Conclusions : These findings have implications for provision of care for older adults with a CL/P and for younger people with a CL/P who will be the older generation of the future.

  9. A Case for Early Learning: An Invitational Environment for Children, Ages 3 - 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randazzo, Joseph D.

    The challenges facing education today, in particular the educational programs for children aged 3 to 6, are found to be many and varied, with the failures in urban settings pointing up the need for different and responsive learning environments. In the development of alternatives to current conditions in the schools today, the following are…

  10. Exploring One Student's Explanations at Different Ages: The Case of Sharon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Esther

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the types of explanations one student, Sharon, gives and prefers at different ages. Sharon is interviewed in the second grade regarding multiplication of one-digit numbers, in the fifth grade regarding even and odd numbers, and in the sixth grade regarding equivalent fractions. In the tenth grade, she revisits each of these…

  11. Nature, Nurture, and Age in Language Acquisition: The Case of Speech Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wode, Henning

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the research on speech perception and reassesses the contribution of innate capacities versus external stimulation in conjunction with age in first- and second-language acquisition. A developmental model of speech perception is then discussed in relation to neonatal auditory perception. (Contains 86 references.) (MDM)

  12. Celestial Symbolism in Central European Later Prehistory - Case Studies from the Bronze Age Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásztor, Emília

    It is commonly held that the sun played a particularly important cultural role in later prehistoric Europe. The rise of a general European sun cult has even been suggested for the Bronze Age. During this period, the increasing use of special symbols assumed to represent the sun is easily discernible on different types of archaeological finds.

  13. Preschool Age Children, Divorce and Adjustment: A Case Study in Greek Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babalis, Thomas; Xanthakou, Yiota; Papa, Christina; Tsolou, Olympia

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this research, which was carried out in 2010, is the comparative study of the psychosocial adjustment of preschool children from divorced and nuclear families in the nursery school. Method: The sample of the study consisted of 60 students (mean age = 5.21), 30 preschool children of divorced parents and 30 preschool…

  14. The Knowledge Institutions in the Information Age. The Special Case of the Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molz, R. Kathleen

    This essay explores the somewhat uneven course of the public library as a knowledge institution in America and its relevance during the current information age, particularly in the United States, where there is a basic connection between access to knowledge and the political system. The public library situation is considered in terms of the…

  15. Age-Matched, Case-Controlled Comparison of Clinical Indicators for Development of Entropion and Ectropion

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Kevin S.; Czyz, Craig N.; Cahill, Kenneth V.; Foster, Jill A.; Burns, John A.; Everman, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the clinical findings associated with involutional entropion and ectropion and compare them to each other and to age-matched controls. Methods. Prospective, age-matched cohort study involving 30 lids with involutional entropion, 30 lids with involutional ectropion, and 52 age-matched control lids. Results. The statistically significant differences associated with both the entropion and ectropion groups compared to the control group were presence of a retractor dehiscence, presence of a “white line,” occurrence of orbital fat prolapse in the cul-de-sac, decreased lower lid excursion, increased lid laxity by the snapback test, and an increased lower lid distraction. Entropion also differed from the control group with an increased lid crease height and decreased lateral canthal excursion. Statistically significant differences associated with entropion compared to ectropion were presence of a retractor dehiscence, decreased lateral canthal excursion, and less laxity in the snapback test. Conclusion. Entropic and ectropic lids demonstrate clinically and statistically significant anatomical and functional differences from normal, age-matched lids. Many clinical findings associated with entropion are also present in ectropion. Entropion is more likely to develop with a pronounced retractor deficiency. Ectropion is more likely to develop with diminished elasticity as measured by the snapback test. PMID:24734167

  16. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  17. Ensemble streamflow forecasting experiments in a tropical basin: The São Francisco river case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fernando Mainardi; Collischonn, Walter; Meller, Adalberto; Botelho, Luiz César Mendes

    2014-11-01

    The present study shows experiments of ensemble forecasting applied to a large tropical river basin, where such forecasting methodologies have many potential applications. The case study is the Três Marias hydroelectric power plant basin (Brazil), on the São Francisco river, where forecast results are particularly important for reservoir operation and downstream flood control. Results showed some benefits in the use of ensembles, particularly for the reservoir inflow on flooding events, and in comparison to the deterministic values given by the control member of the ensemble and by the ensemble mean. The study also discusses the improvements that must be tested and implemented in order to achieve better results, what is particularly important for the smaller basins within the study case. Despite the necessary improvements mentioned, the results suggest that benefits can result from the application of ensemble forecasts for hydropower plants with large basins within the Brazilian energy system.

  18. Stent-assisted Coiling for Ruptured Basilar Artery Dissecting Aneurysms: An Initial Experience of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    KOIZUMI, Satoshi; SHOJIMA, Masaaki; IIJIMA, Akira; OYA, Soichi; MATSUI, Toru; YOSHIKAWA, Gakushi; TSUTSUMI, Kazuo; NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    No treatment strategy has been established for subarachnoid hemorrhages due to basilar artery (BA) trunk dissecting aneurysms. Our aim was to report our initial experience performing stent-assisted coiling (SAC) for ruptured BA dissecting aneurysms to validate the effectiveness of this treatment. We experienced four consecutive cases of ruptured dissecting BA trunk aneurysm treated with SAC between 2008 and 2014 at three institutions. Aneurysm rebleeding was prevented without causing severe brainstem ischemia in all cases. In our opinion, both the blockage of the inflow to aneurysms and the preservation of the antegrade flow of the BA can be achieved by SAC, although controversies regarding long-term stability and appropriate antiplatelet therapy remain. PMID:26667082

  19. Reconstructing merger timelines using star cluster age distributions: the case of MCG+08-11-002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Medling, Anne M.; U, Vivian; Max, Claire E.; Sanders, David; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2016-05-01

    We present near-infrared imaging and integral field spectroscopy of the centre of the dusty luminous infrared galaxy merger MCG+08-11-002, taken using the Near InfraRed Camera 2 (NIRC2) and the OH-Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck II. We achieve a spatial resolution of ˜25 pc in the K band, allowing us to resolve 41 star clusters in the NIRC2 images. We calculate the ages of 22/25 star clusters within the OSIRIS field using the equivalent widths of the CO 2.3 μm absorption feature and the Br γ nebular emission line. The star cluster age distribution has a clear peak at ages ≲ 20 Myr, indicative of current starburst activity associated with the final coalescence of the progenitor galaxies. There is a possible second peak at ˜65 Myr which may be a product of the previous close passage of the galaxy nuclei. We fit single and double starburst models to the star cluster age distribution and use Monte Carlo sampling combined with two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to calculate the probability that the observed data are drawn from each of the best-fitting distributions. There is a >90 per cent chance that the data are drawn from either a single or double starburst star formation history, but stochastic sampling prevents us from distinguishing between the two scenarios. Our analysis of MCG+08-11-002 indicates that star cluster age distributions provide valuable insights into the timelines of galaxy interactions and may therefore play an important role in the future development of precise merger stage classification systems.

  20. The Stateville penitentiary malaria experiments: a case study in retrospective ethical assessment.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G

    2013-01-01

    During World War II, malaria research was conducted in prisons. A notable example was the experiments at Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois, in which prisoner-subjects were infected with malaria for the purpose of testing the safety and efficacy of novel anti-malaria drugs. Over time, commentators have shifted from viewing the malaria research at Stateville as a model of ethical clinical research to seeing the experiments as paradigmatic of abusive human experimentation. This essay undertakes a retrospective ethical assessment of the Stateville malaria research during the 1940s in light of basic ethical principles and the Nuremberg Code, as well as contemporary malaria research. In addition to its historical interest, this case study provides a rich context for addressing basic issues of research ethics, including the voluntariness of consent, the justification of risks, and the exploitation of vulnerable subjects. PMID:24769747

  1. Experiment.com's first $1M - case studies and trends in online scientific crowdfunding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, D.

    2014-12-01

    Experiment is an online platform for connecting scientists and communities of online donors. After funding nearly 200 projects in topic areas ranging from life science to social science, we've amassed some knowledge about how science is kickstarted. As online crowdfunding and science communication on the internet continues to grow, we'd like to share some historical data as well as forecast the future of science funding. We'd like to present several successful case studies of scientists conducting their research online and in the open. Successful projects include spin-off startups, undergraduate and graduate student projects, and some of AGU's own scientists and faculty. If this absract is accepted, interested parties can submit questions or requests for figures in advance to denny@experiment.com. Also, we hope this talk will be entertaining.

  2. The emotional experience of patient care: a case for innovation in health care design.

    PubMed

    Altringer, Beth

    2010-07-01

    This paper considers recent developments in health care facility design and in the psychology literature that support a case for increased design sensitivity to the emotional experience of patient care. The author discusses several examples of innovative patient-centred health care design interventions. These generally resulted in improvements in the patient and staff experience of care, at less cost than major infrastructural interventions. The paper relates these developments in practice with recent neuroscience research, illustrating that the design of the built environment influences patient emotional stress. In turn, patient emotional stress appears to influence patient satisfaction, and in some instances, patient outcomes. This paper highlights the need for further research in this area.

  3. Clinical case reviews in multiple sclerosis spasticity: experiences from around Europe.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jürgen; Amato, Maria P; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Lycke, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Spasticity is one of the main symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Epidemiological studies indicate that approximately two-thirds of MS patients experience spasticity and, in a relevant proportion of this group, spasticity is moderate to severe. Yet, spasticity remains largely undertreated. The most commonly used oral antispasticity agents (e.g., baclofen, tizanidine, gabapentin) generally do not reduce spasticity adequately at dosages that are well tolerated by patients. This review of MS spasticity cases from around Europe presents current knowledge of considerations for administration of a new agent (tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol-based nabiximols [Sativex®] oromucosal spray) for management of MS spasticity, with the aim of ensuring appropriate and optimal use for best outcomes. Assessment of the European clinical experience is intended to provide a better understanding of the prescribing regulations for MS spasticity treatments, facilitate identification of suitable candidate patients for Sativex and increase awareness of alternative management approaches for MS-related spasticity. PMID:24289846

  4. De Garengeot's hernia: our experience of three cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Khalid; Wood, Claire; Hammad, Ahmed; Middleton, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Groin hernia is a common surgical presentation and nearly half of the femoral hernias present acutely with strangulation. The hernia sac usually contains omentum or small bowel. Rarely, the appendix can herniate into the femoral canal. De Garengeot's hernia is the term used to describe the presence of appendicitis in the femoral hernia. Hernia explorations are performed by surgical trainees and encountering a De Garengeot's hernia can be challenging to manage. We report our experience of three cases of this rare entity and a literature review to improve our understanding for optimum management. PMID:25080546

  5. Foot and ankle reconstruction: an experience on the use of 14 different flaps in 226 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Liang; Wang, Yi; He, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Min; Li, Fu-Bin; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this report was to present our experience on the use of different flaps for soft tissue reconstruction of the foot and ankle. From 2007 to 2012, the soft tissue defects of traumatic injuries of the foot and ankle were reconstructed using 14 different flaps in 226 cases (162 male and 64 female). There were 62 pedicled flaps and 164 free flaps used in reconstruction. The pedicled flaps included sural flap, saphenous flap, dorsal pedal neurocutaneous flap, pedicled peroneal artery perforator flap, pedicled tibial artery perforator flap, and medial plantar flap. The free flaps were latissimus musculocutaneous flap, anterolateral thigh musculocutaneous flap, groin flap, lateral arm flap, anterolateral thigh perforator flap, peroneal artery perforator flap, thoracdorsal artery perforator flap, medial arm perforator flap. The sensory nerve coaptation was not performed for all of flaps. One hundred and ninety-four cases were combined with open fractures. One hundred and sixty-two cases had tendon. Among 164 free flaps, 8 flaps were completely lost, in which the defects were managed by the secondary procedures. Among the 57 flaps for plantar foot coverage (25 pedicled flaps and 32 free flaps), ulcers were developed in 5 pedicled flaps and 6 free flaps after weight bearing, and infection was found in 14 flaps. The donor site complications were seen in 3 cases with the free anterolateral thigh perforator flap transfer. All of limbs were preserved and the patients regained walking and daily activities. All of patients except for one regained protective sensation from 3 to 12 months postoperatively. Our experience showed that the sural flap and saphenous flap could be good options for the coverage of the defects at malleolus, dorsal hindfoot and midfoot. Plantar foot, forefoot and large size defects could be reconstructed with free anterolateral thigh perforator flap. For the infected wounds with dead spce, the free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap remained to

  6. Modeling dengue fever risk based on socioeconomic parameters, nationality and age groups: GIS and remote sensing based case study.

    PubMed

    Khormi, Hassan M; Kumar, Lalit

    2011-10-15

    Dengue fever (DF) and its impacts are growing environmental, economic, and health concerns in Saudi Arabia. In this study, we have attempted to model areas with humans at risk of dengue fever prevalence, depending on the spatial relationship between dengue fever cases and different socioeconomic parameters. We have developed new methods to verify the quality of neighborhoods from high resolution satellite images based on several factors such as density of houses in each neighborhood in each district, width of streets, and roof area of houses. In the absence of detailed neighborhood quality information being available for each district, we felt this factor would best approximate the reality on the ground at local scales. Socioeconomic parameters, such as population numbers, population density, and neighborhood quality were analyzed using Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) to create a prediction model identifying levels of risk of dengue and to describe the association between DF cases and the related socio-economic factors. Descriptive analysis was used to characterize dengue fever victims among Saudis and non-Saudis in various age groups. The results show that there was a strong positive association between dengue fever cases and socioeconomic factors (R²=0.80). The prevalence among Saudis was higher compared to non-Saudis in 2006 and 2007, while the prevalence among non-Saudis was higher in 2008, 2009 and 2010. For age groups, DF was more prevalent in adults between the ages of 16 and 60, accounting for approximately 74% of all reported cases in 2006, 67% in 2007, 81% in 2008, 87% in 2009, and 81% in 2010.

  7. Age and seasonal effects on predator-sensitive foraging in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus): a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Stone, Anita I

    2007-02-01

    A field experiment was conducted to examine the effect of perceived predation risk on the use of foraging areas by juvenile and adult primates under different conditions of local food abundance. Wild squirrel monkeys, Saimiri sciureus, were observed in an experiment conducted during the dry and the wet seasons at a site in Eastern Amazonia, Brazil. Animals were presented with feeding platforms that differed in food quantity and exposure to aerial predators through varying vegetative cover. In the dry season, juveniles and adults chose platforms based solely on food quantity. However, in the wet season, juveniles foraged preferentially on high-reward platforms only if cover level also was high (i.e., potentially offered greater concealment from predators). In contrast, adults showed the same pattern of platform use regardless of season. These results indicate that age and local resource availability based on seasonality affect whether primates forage in a predator-sensitive manner. Juveniles may be more sensitive to predation risk when foraging, and individuals may take fewer risks when resource abundance is high in their environment. PMID:17154385

  8. The role of stimulus complexity, age and experience in the expression of exploratory behaviour in the Chimango Caracara, Milvago chimango.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Laura Marina; Guido, Jorgelina María; Bó, María Susana; Muzio, Rubén N; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

    2015-01-01

    Exploration represents an important way by which organisms evaluate environment information. The decision of whether or not an animal should investigate environmental changes may influence the extent to which animals learn about their surroundings and cope with habitat modifications. We analysed exploration behaviour in a suburban population of a raptor species, the Chimango Caracara, Milvago chimango, by examining how age, previous experience and object complexity influence novel object exploration. Our findings showed that object complexity did not influence caracaras initial approach and contact with objects, but did influence the degree of engagement during exploratory activities, as measured by total exploration time and number of exploration events. These variables were higher for complex objects than for simple objects. Experience resulted in less exploration of simple objects. It is likely that, for caracaras, simple objects are easier to encode and recall than complex objects, so additional exploration of such objects would not provide further information. Results suggest that exploratory behaviour in this raptor was guided more by the benefits of a greater quantity of information obtained by exploring complex objects, than by the risks associated to this activity. We can conclude that caracaras cope with novel features in their surroundings with a novelty-seeking strategy, characteristic for generalist species in discovering early new resources opportunities, and which might be a determining factor for adaptive responses to environment modification.

  9. Continuity, Change and Mature Musical Identity Construction: Using "Rivers of Musical Experience" to Trace the Musical Lives of Six Mature-Age Keyboard Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Angela

    2011-01-01

    "Rivers of Musical Experience" were used as a research tool to explore the wide range of musical experiences and concomitant identity construction that six amateur keyboard players over the age of 55 brought to their learning as mature adults. It appears that significant changes in their lives acted as triggers for them to engage in musical…

  10. The Effect of a Human Potential Lab Experience on Perceived Importance of Goals and Awareness of Strengths in Non-Traditional Aged Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Bryon C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a positively oriented group experience (human potential lab) on the awareness of personal strengths and perceived importance of goal setting in non-traditional aged undergraduates. The research questions that were posed were: 1) Does participation in the human potential lab experience increase…

  11. Multiple case study analysis of young women's experiences in high school engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Meagan C.

    richly describe the diversity of experiences. A multiple case study analysis, this study answers the question: How do gender, class, race, and other components of intersectionality, influence high school females' experiences in engineering? Nine young women taking a high school engineering course in a suburban high school in Central Texas during the school year 2011-2012 volunteered to participate. The students were observed in their engineering classes for half of the spring 2012 semester, with bi-weekly interviews with the students, monthly interviews with the teacher, and a single interview with a parent of each volunteer. The nine rich case studies provide us with new stories that help prevent us from narrowing the experiences of women to a single incomplete stereotype, because these young women vary across race, socioeconomic backgrounds, and sexual orientation. Although each story is unique, there are commonalities among their experiences, including family, influence, classroom environment, biases, and beliefs. By drawing from their collective experiences in high school engineering, the findings direct us toward recommendations for educators, parents, engineering curriculum developers, designers of teacher professional development, and future research to improve equity and access for every student in engineering.

  12. Early life loss and trauma: eating disorder onset in a middle-aged male--a case study.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Lynne; Lewis, Vivienne; Wells, Jonathan R

    2014-03-01

    The onset of an eating disorder in middle-age men is poorly researched as are eating disorders in men generally. Therefore, life events that influence eating disorders in men, including delayed onset of an eating disorder remains unknown. Given the limited understanding of males with eating disorders and limited access to large samples of men with eating disorders, an in-depth analysis of a single case of a male in middle age with an eating disorder was chosen to gain insight and understanding into this phenomenon. A Life History approach explored the case of Joseph (pseudonym), who was diagnosed at age 44 years with an Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. Data were collected through (a) life course open-ended questioning through interviews, (b) written statements, and (c) comments on transcripts. Three themes emerged, loss and unworthiness, becoming bigger, and wanting to change reflecting eating behaviors associated with attachment disruption, loss and trauma, body dissatisfaction, and negative affect. Later in life, an emotional "tipping point" precipitated an eating disorder. Results indicate traumatic loss leading to early attachment disruption as influential in Joseph's delayed onset of an eating disorder. The value of thorough narrative life histories during therapy when eating disorders occur late in life is discussed as well as the significance for men.

  13. Age, transvestism, bondage, and concurrent paraphilic activities in 117 fatal cases of autoerotic asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R; Hucker, S J

    1991-09-01

    Autoerotic asphyxia is the practice of self-inducing cerebral anoxia, usually by hanging, strangulation, or suffocation, during masturbation. This study investigated the relationships between: asphyxiators' ages; two paraphilias commonly accompanying autoerotic asphyxia, bondage and transvestism; and various other types of simultaneous sexual behaviour. Subjects were two concurrent series totalling 117 males aged 10-56 who died accidentally during autoerotic asphyxial activities. Data concerning sexual paraphernalia at the scene of death or among the deceased's effects were extracted from coronors' files using standardised protocols. Anal self-stimulation with dildos, etc., and self-observation with mirrors or cameras were correlated with transvestism. Older asphyxiators were more likely to have been simultaneously engaged in bondage or transvestism, suggesting elaboration of the masturbatory ritual over time. The greatest degree of transvestism was associated with intermediate rather than high levels of bondage, suggesting that response competition from bondage may limit asphyxiators' involvement in a third paraphilia like transvestism. PMID:1958948

  14. A case at last for age-phased reduction in equity.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, P A

    1989-11-01

    Maximizing expected utility over a lifetime leads one who has constant relative risk aversion and faces random-walk securities returns to be "myopic" and hold the same fraction of portfolio in equities early and late in life--a defiance of folk wisdom and casual introspection. By assuming one needs to assure at retirement a minimum ("subsistence") level of wealth, the present analysis deduces a pattern of greater risk-taking when young than when old. When a subsistence minimum is needed at every period of life, the rentier paradoxically is least risk tolerant in youth--the Robert C. Merton paradox that traces to the decline with age of the present discounted value of the subsistence-consumption requirements. Conversely, the decline with age of capitalized human capital reverses the Merton effect.

  15. Molecular ageing: Free radical initiated epimerization of thymopentin - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhkarimli, Dayag; Choo, Ken-Loon; Owen, Michael; Fiser, Béla; Jójárt, Balázs; Csizmadia, Imre G.; Viskolcz, Béla

    2014-05-01

    The epimerization of amino acid residues increases with age in living organisms. In the present study, the structural consequences and thermodynamic functions of the epimerization of thymopentin (TP-5), the active site of the thymic hormone thymopoietin, were studied using molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods. The results show that free radical-initiated D-amino acid formation is energetically favoured (-130 kJmol-1) for each residue and induces significant changes to the peptide structure. In comparison to the wild-type (each residue in the L-configuration), the radius of gyration of the D-Asp3 epimer of the peptide decreased by 0.5 Å, and disrupted the intramolecular hydrogen bonding of the native peptide. Beyond establishing important structural, energetic and thermodynamic benchmarks and reference data for the structure of TP-5, these results disseminate the understanding of molecular ageing, the epimerization of amino acid residues.

  16. Measuring the performance of electronic health records: a case study in residential aged care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Qian, Siyu; Yu, Hui; Lei, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the performance of electronic health records (EHR) is an important, yet un-resolved challenge. Various measurements have addressed different aspects of EHR success, yet a holistic, comprehensive measurement tool needs to be developed to capture the potential EHR success variables completely. A self-administered questionnaire survey instrument was developed based on the theoretical framework of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model. It measures nigh variables of EHR success: system quality, information quality, service quality, training, self efficacy, intention to use, use, user satisfaction and net benefits. The instrument was used to measure the performance of aged care EHR systems in three aged care organizations. The results suggest that the instrument was reliable. PMID:23920809

  17. Molecular ageing: Free radical initiated epimerization of thymopentin – A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Sheykhkarimli, Dayag; Choo, Ken-Loon; Owen, Michael; Csizmadia, Imre G.; Fiser, Béla; Jójárt, Balázs; Viskolcz, Béla

    2014-05-28

    The epimerization of amino acid residues increases with age in living organisms. In the present study, the structural consequences and thermodynamic functions of the epimerization of thymopentin (TP-5), the active site of the thymic hormone thymopoietin, were studied using molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods. The results show that free radical-initiated D-amino acid formation is energetically favoured (−130 kJmol{sup −1}) for each residue and induces significant changes to the peptide structure. In comparison to the wild-type (each residue in the L-configuration), the radius of gyration of the D-Asp{sup 3} epimer of the peptide decreased by 0.5 Å, and disrupted the intramolecular hydrogen bonding of the native peptide. Beyond establishing important structural, energetic and thermodynamic benchmarks and reference data for the structure of TP-5, these results disseminate the understanding of molecular ageing, the epimerization of amino acid residues.

  18. Mycetoma: Experience of 482 Cases in a Single Center in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Calderón, Luz; Saúl, Amado; Araiza, Javier; Hernández, Marco; González, Gloria M.; Ponce, Rosa María

    2014-01-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous disease. It is classified into eumycetoma caused by fungi and actinomycetoma due to filamentous actinomycetes. Mycetoma can be found in geographic areas in close proximity to the Tropic of Cancer. Mexico is one of the countries in which this disease is highly endemic. In this retrospective study we report epidemiologic, clinical and microbiologic data of mycetoma observed in the General Hospital of Mexico in a 33 year-period (1980 to 2013). A total of 482 cases were included which were clinical and microbiology confirmed. Four hundred and forty four cases (92.11%) were actinomycetomas and 38 cases (7.88%) were eumycetomas. Most patients were agricultural workers; there was a male predominance with a sex ratio of 3∶1. The mean age was 34.5 years old (most ranged from 21 to 40 years). The main affected localization was lower and upper limbs (70.74% and 14.52% respectively). Most of the patients came from humid tropical areas (Morelos, Guerrero and Hidalgo were the regions commonly reported). The main clinical presentation was as tumor-like soft tissue swelling with draining sinuses (97.1%). Grains were observed in all the cases. The principal causative agents for actinomycetoma were: Nocardia brasiliensis (78.21%) and Actinomadura madurae (8.7%); meanwhile, for eumycetomas: Madurella mycetomatis and Scedosporium boydii (synonym: Pseudallescheria boydii) were identified. This is a single-center, with long-follow up, cross-sectional study that allows determining the prevalence and characteristics of mycetoma in different regions of Mexico. PMID:25144462

  19. Mycetoma: experience of 482 cases in a single center in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Calderón, Luz; Saúl, Amado; Araiza, Javier; Hernández, Marco; González, Gloria M; Ponce, Rosa María

    2014-08-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous disease. It is classified into eumycetoma caused by fungi and actinomycetoma due to filamentous actinomycetes. Mycetoma can be found in geographic areas in close proximity to the Tropic of Cancer. Mexico is one of the countries in which this disease is highly endemic. In this retrospective study we report epidemiologic, clinical and microbiologic data of mycetoma observed in the General Hospital of Mexico in a 33 year-period (1980 to 2013). A total of 482 cases were included which were clinical and microbiology confirmed. Four hundred and forty four cases (92.11%) were actinomycetomas and 38 cases (7.88%) were eumycetomas. Most patients were agricultural workers; there was a male predominance with a sex ratio of 3:1. The mean age was 34.5 years old (most ranged from 21 to 40 years). The main affected localization was lower and upper limbs (70.74% and 14.52% respectively). Most of the patients came from humid tropical areas (Morelos, Guerrero and Hidalgo were the regions commonly reported). The main clinical presentation was as tumor-like soft tissue swelling with draining sinuses (97.1%). Grains were observed in all the cases. The principal causative agents for actinomycetoma were: Nocardia brasiliensis (78.21%) and Actinomadura madurae (8.7%); meanwhile, for eumycetomas: Madurella mycetomatis and Scedosporium boydii (synonym: Pseudallescheria boydii) were identified. This is a single-center, with long-follow up, cross-sectional study that allows determining the prevalence and characteristics of mycetoma in different regions of Mexico.

  20. Hormesis-based anti-aging products: a case study of a novel cosmetic.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S; Kryzch, Valérie; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Perrier, Eric; Nizard, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Application of hormesis in aging research and interventions is becoming increasingly attractive and successful. The reason for this is the realization that mild stress-induced activation of one or more stress response (SR) pathways, and its consequent stimulation of repair mechanisms, is effective in reducing the age-related accumulation of molecular damage. For example, repeated heat stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins has been shown to have a variety of anti-aging effects on growth and other cellular and biochemical characteristics of normal human skin fibroblasts, keratinocytes and endothelial cells undergoing aging in vitro. Therefore, searching for potential hormetins - conditions and compounds eliciting SR-mediated hormesis - is drawing attention of not only the researchers but also the industry involved in developing healthcare products, including nutriceuticals, functional foods and cosmeceuticals. Here we present the example of a skin care cosmetic as one of the first successful product developments incorporating the ideas of hormesis. This was based on the studies to analyse the molecular effects of active ingredients extracted from the roots of the Chinese herb Sanchi (Panax notoginseng) on gene expression at the level of mRNAs and proteins in human skin cells. The results showed that the ginsenosides extracted from Sanchi induced the transcription of stress genes and increased the synthesis of stress proteins, especially the heat shock protein HSP1A1 or Hsp70, in normal human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, this extract also has significant positive effects against facial wrinkles and other symptoms of facial skin aging as tested clinically, which may be due to its hormetic mode of action by stress-induced synthesis of chaperones involved in protein repair and removal of abnormal proteins. Acceptance of such a hormesis-based product by the wider public could be instrumental in the social recognition of the concept of

  1. Personalizing the Information Search Process: A Case Study of Journal Writing with Elementary-Age Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harada, Violet H.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a case study that focused on journal writing as a means of deepening elementary school students' cognitive and affective awareness of the information search process. Describes the research team that conducted the research and the impact of journal writing on the school library media specialist's reflective practices. (Author/LRW)

  2. Final Part-Word Repetitions in School-Age Children: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Jan; Kingston, Mary

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to the many published accounts of the disfluent repetition of sounds at the beginnings of words, cases where it is predominantly the final parts of words that are repeated have been reported relatively rarely. With few exceptions, those studies that have been published have described either pre-school children or neurologically…

  3. Enhanced ergonomics approaches for product design: a user experience ecosystem perspective and case studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper first discusses the major inefficiencies faced in current human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches: (1) delivering an optimal end-to-end user experience (UX) to users of a solution across its solution lifecycle stages; (2) strategically influencing the product business and technology capability roadmaps from a UX perspective and (3) proactively identifying new market opportunities and influencing the platform architecture capabilities on which the UX of end products relies. In response to these challenges, three case studies are presented to demonstrate how enhanced ergonomics design approaches have effectively addressed the challenges faced in current HFE approaches. Then, the enhanced ergonomics design approaches are conceptualised by a user-experience ecosystem (UXE) framework, from a UX ecosystem perspective. Finally, evidence supporting the UXE, the advantage and the formalised process for executing UXE and methodological considerations are discussed. Practitioner Summary: This paper presents enhanced ergonomics approaches to product design via three case studies to effectively address current HFE challenges by leveraging a systematic end-to-end UX approach, UX roadmaps and emerging UX associated with prioritised user needs and usages. Thus, HFE professionals can be more strategic, creative and influential.

  4. Studying abroad: a multiple case study of nursing students' international experiences.

    PubMed

    Green, Barbara F; Johansson, Inez; Rosser, Megan; Tengnah, Cassam; Segrott, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    This paper examines the experiences of nursing students undertaking an international placement during their pre-registration education. The study took place in two schools--one in the United Kingdom, and one in Sweden. The move of nursing education into higher education enabled students to participate in international exchange programmes. Previous research demonstrates that students participating in such programmes may gain enhanced cultural awareness and experience personal and professional growth. The study comprised a multiple case study, utilising semi-structured individual and group interviews and documentary analysis. Eighteen students from the UK and 14 from Sweden participated. Participants described an increase in confidence, self-reliance and professional knowledge and skills resulting from their international placement. There was an awareness of how healthcare roles differ between countries and a change in attitudes to others from different backgrounds and cultures. The differences between the two cases were marginal. Whilst there was support from both home and host universities this varied between the international placement providers. The international placements were beneficial; however, there is a need for change in the preparation, support and monitoring of students, greater engagement with the partner institutions, and more effective mentoring of staff. PMID:18692278

  5. Enhanced ergonomics approaches for product design: a user experience ecosystem perspective and case studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper first discusses the major inefficiencies faced in current human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches: (1) delivering an optimal end-to-end user experience (UX) to users of a solution across its solution lifecycle stages; (2) strategically influencing the product business and technology capability roadmaps from a UX perspective and (3) proactively identifying new market opportunities and influencing the platform architecture capabilities on which the UX of end products relies. In response to these challenges, three case studies are presented to demonstrate how enhanced ergonomics design approaches have effectively addressed the challenges faced in current HFE approaches. Then, the enhanced ergonomics design approaches are conceptualised by a user-experience ecosystem (UXE) framework, from a UX ecosystem perspective. Finally, evidence supporting the UXE, the advantage and the formalised process for executing UXE and methodological considerations are discussed. Practitioner Summary: This paper presents enhanced ergonomics approaches to product design via three case studies to effectively address current HFE challenges by leveraging a systematic end-to-end UX approach, UX roadmaps and emerging UX associated with prioritised user needs and usages. Thus, HFE professionals can be more strategic, creative and influential. PMID:24405167

  6. Development of a Rubber-Based Product Using a Mixture Experiment: A Challenging Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Yahya; Piepel, Gregory F.; Caniyilmaz, Erdal

    2013-07-01

    Many products used in daily life are made by blending two or more components. The properties of such products typically depend on the relative proportions of the components. Experimental design, modeling, and data analysis methods for mixture experiments provide for efficiently determining the component proportions that will yield a product with desired properties. This article presents a case study of the work performed to develop a new rubber formulation for an o-ring (a circular gasket) with requirements specified on 10 product properties. Each step of the study is discussed, including: 1) identifying the objective of the study and requirements for properties of the o-ring, 2) selecting the components to vary and specifying the component constraints, 3) constructing a mixture experiment design, 4) measuring the responses and assessing the data, 5) developing property-composition models, 6) selecting the new product formulation, and 7) confirming the selected formulation in manufacturing. The case study includes some challenging and new aspects, which are discussed in the article.

  7. Studying abroad: a multiple case study of nursing students' international experiences.

    PubMed

    Green, Barbara F; Johansson, Inez; Rosser, Megan; Tengnah, Cassam; Segrott, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    This paper examines the experiences of nursing students undertaking an international placement during their pre-registration education. The study took place in two schools--one in the United Kingdom, and one in Sweden. The move of nursing education into higher education enabled students to participate in international exchange programmes. Previous research demonstrates that students participating in such programmes may gain enhanced cultural awareness and experience personal and professional growth. The study comprised a multiple case study, utilising semi-structured individual and group interviews and documentary analysis. Eighteen students from the UK and 14 from Sweden participated. Participants described an increase in confidence, self-reliance and professional knowledge and skills resulting from their international placement. There was an awareness of how healthcare roles differ between countries and a change in attitudes to others from different backgrounds and cultures. The differences between the two cases were marginal. Whilst there was support from both home and host universities this varied between the international placement providers. The international placements were beneficial; however, there is a need for change in the preparation, support and monitoring of students, greater engagement with the partner institutions, and more effective mentoring of staff.

  8. Bridging the gap between batch and column experiments: A case study of Cs adsorption on granite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2009-01-15

    Both batch and column methods are conventionally utilized to determine some critical parameters for assessing the transport of contaminants of concern. The validity of using these parameters is somewhat confusing, however, since outputs such as distribution coefficient (Kd) from these two approaches are often discrepant. To bridge this gap, all possible factors that might contribute to this discrepancy were thoroughly investigated in this report by a case study of Cs sorption to crushed granite under various conditions. Our results confirm an important finding that solid/liquid (S/L) ratio is the dominant factor responsible for this discrepancy. As long as the S/L ratio exceeds 0.25, a consistent Kd value can be reached by the two methods. Under these conditions (S/L ratios>0.25), the sorption capacity of the solid is about an order of magnitude less than that in low S/L ratios (<0.25). Although low sorption capacity is observed in the cases of high S/L ratios, the sorption usually takes place preferentially on the most favorable (thermodynamically stable) sorption sites to form a stronger binding. This is verified by our desorption experiments in which a linear isotherm feature is shown either in deionized water or in 1M of ammonium acetate solutions. It may be concluded that batch experiment with an S/L ratio exceeding 0.25 is crucial to obtain convincing Kd values for safety assessment of radioactive waste repository.

  9. Assessment of marine ecosystem services indicators: Experiences and lessons learned from 14 European case studies.

    PubMed

    Lillebø, Ana I; Somma, Francesca; Norén, Katja; Gonçalves, Jorge; Alves, M Fátima; Ballarini, Elisabetta; Bentes, Luis; Bielecka, Malgorzata; Chubarenko, Boris V; Heise, Susanne; Khokhlov, Valeriy; Klaoudatos, Dimitris; Lloret, Javier; Margonski, Piotr; Marín, Atucha; Matczak, Magdalena; Oen, Amy Mp; Palmieri, Maria G; Przedrzymirska, Joanna; Różyński, Grzegorz; Sousa, Ana I; Sousa, Lisa P; Tuchkovenko, Yurii; Zaucha, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    This article shares the experiences, observations, and discussions that occurred during the completing of an ecosystem services (ES) indicator framework to be used at European Union (EU) and Member States' level. The experience base was drawn from 3 European research projects and 14 associated case study sites that include 13 transitional-water bodies (specifically 8 coastal lagoons, 4 riverine estuaries, and 1 fjord) and 1 coastal-water ecosystem. The ES pertinent to each case study site were identified along with indicators of these ES and data sources that could be used for mapping. During the process, several questions and uncertainties arose, followed by discussion, leading to these main lessons learned: 1) ES identification: Some ES that do not seem important at the European scale emerge as relevant at regional or local scales; 2) ES indicators: When direct indicators are not available, proxies for indicators (indirect indicators) might be used, including combined data on monitoring requirements imposed by EU legislation and international agreements; 3) ES mapping: Boundaries and appropriate data spatial resolution must be established because ES can be mapped at different temporal and spatial scales. We also acknowledge that mapping and assessment of ES supports the dialogue between human well-being and ecological status. From an evidence-based marine planning-process point of view, mapping and assessment of marine ES are of paramount importance to sustainable use of marine natural capital and to halt the loss of marine biodiversity. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:726-734. © 2016 SETAC.

  10. The Role of Patients’ Age on Their Preferences for Choosing Additional Blood Pressure-Lowering Drugs: A Discrete Choice Experiment in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sieta T.; de Vries, Folgerdiena M.; Dekker, Thijs; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Denig, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether patients’ willingness to add a blood pressure-lowering drug and the importance they attach to specific treatment characteristics differ among age groups in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods Patients being prescribed at least an oral glucose-lowering and a blood pressure-lowering drug completed a questionnaire including a discrete choice experiment. This experiment contained choice sets with hypothetical blood pressure-lowering drugs and a no additional drug alternative, which differed in their characteristics (i.e. effects and intake moments). Differences in willingness to add a drug were compared between patients <75 years (non-aged) and ≥75 years (aged) using Pearson χ2-tests. Multinomial logit models were used to assess and compare the importance attached to the characteristics. Results Of the 161 patients who completed the questionnaire, 151 (72%) could be included in the analyses (mean age 68 years; 42% female). Aged patients were less willing to add a drug than non-aged patients (67% versus 84% respectively; P = 0.017). In both age groups, the effect on blood pressure was most important for choosing a drug, followed by the risk of adverse drug events and the risk of death. The effect on limitations due to stroke was only significant in the non-aged group. The effect on blood pressure was slightly more important in the non-aged than the aged group (P = 0.043). Conclusions Aged patients appear less willing to add a preventive drug than non-aged patients. The importance attached to various treatment characteristics does not seem to differ much among age groups. PMID:26445349

  11. A case study of a mother's intertwining experiences with incest and postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Røseth, Idun; Bongaardt, Rob; Binder, Per-Einar

    2011-01-01

    The association between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and major depression disorder (MDD) gives reason to suspect that many mothers with postpartum depression (PPD) have a history of CSA. However, few studies have investigated how CSA and PPD are related. In this case study we explore how the experience of incest intertwines with the experience of postpartum depression. We focus on participant subject "Nina," who has experienced both. We interviewed her three times and we analysed the interviews with Giorgi's phenomenological descriptive method to arrive at a contextualised meaning structure. Nina's intruding fantasies of men who abuse her children merge with her recollections of her own incest experiences. She may succeed in forcing these fantasies out of her consciousness, but they still alter her perceptions, thoughts, and emotions. She feels overwhelmed and succumbs to sadness, while she also is drawn towards information about CSA, which in turn feeds her fantasies. The psychodynamic concepts of repetition compulsion, transference, and projection may provide some explanation of Nina's actions, thoughts, and emotions through her past experiences. With our phenomenological stance, we aim to acknowledge Nina's descriptions of her everyday life here and now. With reference to Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Minkowski, we show that Nina's past is not a dated memory; rather it determines the structure of her consciousness that constitutes her past as her true present and future. Incest dominates Nina's world, and her possibilities for action are restricted by this perceived world. Any suspension of action implies anguish, and she resolves this by incest-structured action that in turn feeds and colours her expectations. Thus anxiety and depression are intertwined in the structure of this experience.

  12. “Open” repair of ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (experience of 51 cases)

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Piero Paolo; Walas, Ryszard; Cebotaru, Theodor; Popa, Calin; Vintila, Bogdan; Steiu, Flaviu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of toracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) represents a difficult problem for the vascular surgeon and may become a formidable challenge in an emergency procedure. In patient with hemodynamic instability, protective measures as cerebral spinal fluid drainage and bio-pump against spinal cord, visceral and renal ischemia, may be ineffective or impracticable. Material and methods We report our experience of 51 emergency-operated patients with TAAA out of 660 treated between 1994 and 2014; 48 patients (94%) were hemodynamically unstable, 3 (6%) were hemodynamically stable. The TAAA patients were evaluated, according to Crawford classification, as: 18 type I, 13 type II, 15 type III, 5 type IV. Results Overall mortality was 23 cases out of 51 (43.1%); 8 deaths occurred during the surgical procedure and 14 in the postoperative period. Early deaths, subdivided by Crawford TAAA classification, were: type I 9/18 (50%), type II 9/13 (69.2%), type III 7/15 (46.6%), type IV 3/5 (60%). Paraplegia-paraparesis developed in 6 cases out of 43 (16.2%), excluding 8 deaths during the operative procedure. Acute renal failure was observed in 8 out of 43 patients (18.6%). Dialysis was found to be a risk factor for hospital mortality (p = 0.03). Pulmonary insufficiency was diagnosed in 15 patients out of 43 (34.8%), and 5 patients (15.5%) needed tracheostomy, out of whom 3 died (p = 0.04%). Postoperative bleeding was present in 8 cases out of 43 (18.6%). Inferior laryngeal nerve palsy was present in 6 cases out of 43 (13.5%). The follow-up period comprised 1-3-5-10 years postoperative follow-up. The actuarial survival rate of patients discharged from hospital was respectively 75%, 63%, 48%, 35%. Conclusions In the literature there are very few studies published on emergency treatment for TAAA. Having usually low numbers of patients in the groups wider experiences are still needed to give more light on the pathophysiology and surgical treatment of this type

  13. Who Should Report Abnormal Behavior at Preschool Age? The Case of Behavioral Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballespi, Sergi; Jane, Ma Claustre; Riba, Ma Dolors

    2012-01-01

    Children who are behaviorally "inhibited"--a condition at the extreme of the behavioral inhibition dimension--experience distress in uncertain social situations. Although parents and teachers are in the best position to detect this condition, they rarely agree. This study aims to analyze the agreement between parents and teachers and to examine…

  14. The use of computed tomography (CT) to estimate age in the 2009 Victorian Bushfire Victims: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bassed, Richard B; Hill, Anthony J

    2011-02-25

    The development of new imaging technologies is beginning to have an impact upon medico-legal death investigation in an increasing number of jurisdictions. Computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality which is able to provide information to investigators without the need for a physically invasive autopsy in certain circumstances. The use of post-mortem CT as an aid to the identification of the victims of the Black Saturday bushfires is discussed with particular reference to dental age estimation. A case report is presented which demonstrates the ability of this imaging modality to separate individuals based upon dental development. Whilst CT is not yet able to adequately discriminate between differing restoration types and shapes, and therefore cannot be used for dental identification in the classic sense, the ability of this imaging modality to assess dental and skeletal development for the purpose of age estimation is valid.

  15. [Critical review of 222 cases of neoplastic pathology of the colon. Our experience using a computer].

    PubMed

    Parrella, R E; Astore, S; Brizi, M G; Natale, L; Pagano, A; Posi, G

    1987-11-01

    From August 1983 to December 1985, 2352 radiological examinations of the colon were performed in the Radiology Department of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore of Rome. From this group a sample of 222 patients was analyzed. They included 111 patients with colonic polyps and 111 with cancer. These cases were carefully examined, in terms of age, frequency of this pathology according to sex, symptom-illness rate, and the radiological data were compared with the endoscopic and histological findings. The data were processed using a computerized program. A critical correlation of the data obtained revealed that: 1) The surest symptom of colon carcinoma is blood in faeces with or without changes in defaecation frequency. Nor should isolated bowel disorders be ignored ("irritated" colon due to organic injuries). 2) The diagnostic accuracy of double contrast enema is very close to that of endoscopy, provided that intestinal cleaning is adequate (this in fact is an important aspect of the examination). 3) The mean age of patients in this group is high and cancer is more common than polyps. This seems to be due to the back of a complete diagnostic sequence, in which radiology has a specific and important role.

  16. The lived experience of low back pain among Irish farmers: case studies.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Aoife; Blake, Catherine; Meredith, David; McNamara, John; Phelan, Jim; Cunningham, Caitriona

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is the most commonly reported musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) among farmers. There is limited researching regarding the lived experience of LBP among farmers. Video interviews were conducted with three dairy farmers who reported having a significant episode of LBP. The interview data were transcribed and analyzed, and results were presented in relation to the constructs explored. The farmers experienced their first significant episode of LBP in their late 20s or early 30s and all attributed their LBP to farm work or a farm-related incident. Hours worked per day ranged from 9 to 13 hours. Tasks identified by farmers that they were unable to do due to LBP included physical work, working with sheep, building work, and "certain jobs." Work changes made due to LBP included getting help, slowing down, avoiding strenuous work, carrying smaller loads, mechanizing the farm, using the tractor more, and wearing a back belt for certain jobs. Each farmer had his own way of preventing or managing his LBP, including a mix of active self-management and passive coping strategies such as swimming, using ice, spinal manipulation, and taking medication. The farmers were unable to quantify how much their LBP had cost them directly or indirectly. The case studies illustrate farmers engaging in ongoing work despite significant pain. All of the farmers have adapted at work and engaged in self-management strategies to reduce the occurrence of LBP. Given the rich data produced by these case studies, future case studies are recommended to gain greater insights into farmers' experiences concerning LBP. PMID:24911693

  17. Experience and Opinions of Forensic Psychiatrists Regarding PTSD in Criminal Cases.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ziv E; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    By the end of 2014, 1.5 million veterans of the Second Iraq and Afghan wars were to have returned home, up to 35 percent with PTSD. The potential use of PTSD as the basis for legal claims in criminal defense is therefore a pressing problem. Using a Web-based survey, we examined the experiences and attitudes of members of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) regarding PTSD in the criminal forensic setting. Of 238 respondents, 50 percent had been involved in a criminal case involving PTSD, 41 percent in the previous year. Eighty-six percent of cases involved violent crime and 40 percent homicides. Forty-two percent of defendants were soldiers in active service or veterans, of whom 89 percent had had combat exposure, mostly in the Second Iraq and Afghan wars. Outcomes reported were not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) (7%), guilty on the original charge (40%), and pleading guilty to a lesser charge (23%). The findings suggest that many forensic psychiatrists will be asked to evaluate PTSD in the criminal setting, with a growing number of cases related to combat exposure in recent veterans. The implications of these findings for the practice of forensic psychiatry are discussed.

  18. Controls Astrophysics and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES) advanced studies and planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The CASES (Controls, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space) program consists of a flight demonstration of CSI (Controls-Structures Interactions) technology on the Space Shuttle. The basis structure consists of a 32 m deployable boom with actuators and sensors distributed along its length. Upon deployment from the Orbiter bay, the CASES structure will be characterized dynamically and its deformations controlled by a series of experimental control laws; and cold gas thrusters at its tip will be used to orient the Orbiter to a fixed celestial reference. The scientific observations will consist of hard x-ray imaging, at high resolution, of the Sun and the Galactic center. The hard x-ray observations require stable (few arc min) pointing at these targets for one or more position-sensitive proportional counters in the Orbiter bay, which view the object to be imaged through an aperture-encoding mask at the boom tip. This report gives the concensus developed at the second CASES Science Working Group meeting, which took place at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center May 16-17, 1990. An earlier paper and scientific summaries are available and form the basis for the present discussion.

  19. Experience and Opinions of Forensic Psychiatrists Regarding PTSD in Criminal Cases.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ziv E; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    By the end of 2014, 1.5 million veterans of the Second Iraq and Afghan wars were to have returned home, up to 35 percent with PTSD. The potential use of PTSD as the basis for legal claims in criminal defense is therefore a pressing problem. Using a Web-based survey, we examined the experiences and attitudes of members of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) regarding PTSD in the criminal forensic setting. Of 238 respondents, 50 percent had been involved in a criminal case involving PTSD, 41 percent in the previous year. Eighty-six percent of cases involved violent crime and 40 percent homicides. Forty-two percent of defendants were soldiers in active service or veterans, of whom 89 percent had had combat exposure, mostly in the Second Iraq and Afghan wars. Outcomes reported were not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) (7%), guilty on the original charge (40%), and pleading guilty to a lesser charge (23%). The findings suggest that many forensic psychiatrists will be asked to evaluate PTSD in the criminal setting, with a growing number of cases related to combat exposure in recent veterans. The implications of these findings for the practice of forensic psychiatry are discussed. PMID:26944743

  20. Estimating the value of volunteer-assisted community-based aging services: a case example.

    PubMed

    Scharlach, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of a social return on investment (SROI) approach in estimating the financial and social value created by volunteer-assisted community-based aging services. An expanded value added statement (EVAS) analysis found that the total value of outputs produced by the Concierge Club of San Diego substantially exceeded the cost of the program, after considering likely secondary and tertiary benefits for a range of affected stakeholders-including elderly service recipients, family members, volunteers, and societal institutions. Additional research is needed regarding the direct and indirect costs and benefits of volunteer support services for vulnerable older adults and their families.

  1. Toward Mass Customization in the Age of Information: The Case for Open Engineering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.; Lautenschlager, Uwe; Mistree, Farrokh

    1997-01-01

    In the Industrial Era, manufacturers used "dedicated" engineering systems to mass produce their products. In today's increasingly competitive markets, the trend is toward mass customization, something that becomes increasingly feasible when modern information technologies are used to create open engineering systems. Our focus is on how designers can provide enhanced product flexibility and variety (if not fully customized products) through the development of open engineering systems. After presenting several industrial examples, we anchor our new systems philosophy with two real engineering applications. We believe that manufacturers who adopt open systems will achieve competitive advantage in the Information Age.

  2. Estimating the value of volunteer-assisted community-based aging services: a case example.

    PubMed

    Scharlach, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of a social return on investment (SROI) approach in estimating the financial and social value created by volunteer-assisted community-based aging services. An expanded value added statement (EVAS) analysis found that the total value of outputs produced by the Concierge Club of San Diego substantially exceeded the cost of the program, after considering likely secondary and tertiary benefits for a range of affected stakeholders-including elderly service recipients, family members, volunteers, and societal institutions. Additional research is needed regarding the direct and indirect costs and benefits of volunteer support services for vulnerable older adults and their families. PMID:25551169

  3. Spondylolisthesis in an Etruscan woman from Spina (Ferrara, Italy): an iron age case report.

    PubMed

    Manzon, Vanessa Samantha; Onisto, Nicoletta; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2014-06-01

    Spondylolisthesis consists of the slippage of a vertebra in relation to the one beneath. It is caused by separation of the neural arch from the vertebral body (spondylolysis), and predominantly occurs at the isthmus (pars interarticularis). Originally thought to be a congenital anomaly, its strict correlation with certain activities that seem to exert stress on lower spine was later demonstrated. This paper describes a case of progression of spondylolysis to spondylolisthesis found on an adult female skeleton from the Etruscan necropolis of Spina (Ferrara, Italy). The case in question was identified among 209 skeletons exhumed at Spina. As spondylolisthesis is strictly connected with activities that exert stress on lower spine, the evidence suggests that this woman was engaged in stressful physical activity, perhaps related to the specific trade function of the site. PMID:25145016

  4. Florid osseous dysplasia in a middle-aged Turkish woman: A case report.

    PubMed

    Onder, Buket; Kurşun, Sebnem; Oztaş, Bengi; Barış, Emre; Erdem, Erdal

    2013-09-01

    Florid osseous dysplasia (FOD) is an uncommon, benign, cemento-osseous lesion of the jaws. The etiology of FOD is still unknown. It is often asymptomatic and may be identified on routine dental radiographs. The classic radiographic appearance of FOD is amorphous, lobulated, mixed radiolucent/radiopaque masses of cotton-wool appearance with a sclerotic border in the jaws. In our case the lesion was found incidentally on routine periapical radiographs taken for restored teeth and edentulous areas. For further and detailed examination, a panoramic radiograph and cone-beam computed tomograph (CBCT) were taken. The panoramic radiograph and CBCT revealed maxillary bilateral and symmetrical, non-expansile, well-defined, round, radiopaque masses in contact with the root of the maxillary right second molar and left first molar teeth. Our aim in presenting this case report was to highlight the importance of imaging in diagnosis of FOD. PMID:24083214

  5. Single vs dual (en bloc) kidney transplants from donors ≤ 5 years of age: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shraideh, Yousef; Farooq, Umar; El-Hennawy, Hany; Farney, Alan C; Palanisamy, Amudha; Rogers, Jeffrey; Orlando, Giuseppe; Khan, Muhammad; Reeves-Daniel, Amber; Doares, William; Kaczmorski, Scott; Gautreaux, Michael D; Iskandar, Samy S; Hairston, Gloria; Brim, Elizabeth; Mangus, Margaret; Stratta, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes between single and dual en bloc (EB) kidney transplants (KT) from small pediatric donors. METHODS: Monocentric nonprospective review of KTs from pediatric donors ≤ 5 years of age. Dual EB KT was defined as keeping both donor kidneys attached to the inferior vena cava and aorta, which were then used as venous and arterial conduits for the subsequent transplant into a single recipient. Donor age was less useful than either donor weight or kidney size in decision-making for kidney utilization as kidneys from donors < 8 kg or kidneys < 6 cm in length were not transplanted. Post-transplant management strategies were standardized in all patients. RESULTS: From 2002-2015, 59 KTs were performed including 34 dual EB and 25 single KTs. Mean age of donors (17 mo vs 38 mo, P < 0.001), mean weight (11.0 kg vs 17.4 kg, P = 0.046) and male donors (50% vs 84%, P = 0.01) were lower in the dual EB compared to the single KT group, respectively. Mean cold ischemia time (21 h), kidney donor profile index (KDPI; 73% vs 62%) and levels of serum creatinine (SCr, 0.37 mg/dL vs 0.49 mg/dL, all P = NS) were comparable in the dual EB and single KT groups, respectively. Actuarial graft and patient survival rates at 5-years follow-up were comparable. There was one case of thrombosis resulting in graft loss in each group. Delayed graft function incidence (12% dual EB vs 20% single KT, P = NS) was slightly lower in dual EB KT recipients. Initial duration of hospital stay (mean 5.4 d vs 5.6 d) and the one-year incidences of acute rejection (6% vs 16%), operative complications (3% vs 4%), and major infection were comparable in the dual EB and single KT groups, respectively (all P = NS). Mean 12 mo SCr and abbreviated MDRD levels were 1.17 mg/dL vs 1.35 mg/dL and 72.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 vs 60.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (both P = NS) in the dual EB and single KT groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: By transplanting kidneys from young pediatric donors into adult recipients, one can

  6. Melatonin in Retinal Physiology and Pathology: The Case of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Russel J.; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, an indoleamine, is synthesized mainly in the pineal gland in a circadian fashion, but it is produced in many other organs, including the retina, which seems to be especially important as the eye is a primary recipient of circadian signals. Melatonin displays strong antioxidative properties, which predispose it to play a protective role in many human pathologies associated with oxidative stress, including premature aging and degenerative disease. Therefore, melatonin may play a role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease affecting photoreceptors, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with an established role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Several studies have shown that melatonin could exert the protective effect against damage to RPE cells evoked by reactive oxygen species (ROS), but it has also been reported to increase ROS-induced damage to photoreceptors and RPE. Melatonin behaves like synthetic mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, which concentrate in mitochondria at relatively high levels; thus, melatonin may prevent mitochondrial damage in AMD. The retina contains telomerase, an enzyme implicated in maintaining the length of telomeres, and oxidative stress inhibits telomere synthesis, while melatonin overcomes this effect. These features support considering melatonin as a preventive and therapeutic agent in the treatment of AMD.

  7. Melatonin in Retinal Physiology and Pathology: The Case of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Russel J.; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, an indoleamine, is synthesized mainly in the pineal gland in a circadian fashion, but it is produced in many other organs, including the retina, which seems to be especially important as the eye is a primary recipient of circadian signals. Melatonin displays strong antioxidative properties, which predispose it to play a protective role in many human pathologies associated with oxidative stress, including premature aging and degenerative disease. Therefore, melatonin may play a role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease affecting photoreceptors, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with an established role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Several studies have shown that melatonin could exert the protective effect against damage to RPE cells evoked by reactive oxygen species (ROS), but it has also been reported to increase ROS-induced damage to photoreceptors and RPE. Melatonin behaves like synthetic mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, which concentrate in mitochondria at relatively high levels; thus, melatonin may prevent mitochondrial damage in AMD. The retina contains telomerase, an enzyme implicated in maintaining the length of telomeres, and oxidative stress inhibits telomere synthesis, while melatonin overcomes this effect. These features support considering melatonin as a preventive and therapeutic agent in the treatment of AMD. PMID:27688828

  8. Testing the Feasibility of a Passive and Active Case Ascertainment System for Multiple Rare Conditions Simultaneously: The Experience in Three US States

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Suzanne; Ruttenber, Margaret; Mann, Joshua; Smith, Michael G; Royer, Julie; Valdez, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Background Owing to their low prevalence, single rare conditions are difficult to monitor through current state passive and active case ascertainment systems. However, such monitoring is important because, as a group, rare conditions have great impact on the health of affected individuals and the well-being of their caregivers. A viable approach could be to conduct passive and active case ascertainment of several rare conditions simultaneously. This is a report about the feasibility of such an approach. Objective To test the feasibility of a case ascertainment system with passive and active components aimed at monitoring 3 rare conditions simultaneously in 3 states of the United States (Colorado, Kansas, and South Carolina). The 3 conditions are spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and fragile X syndrome. Methods Teams from each state evaluated the possibility of using current or modified versions of their local passive and active case ascertainment systems and datasets to monitor the 3 conditions. Together, these teams established the case definitions and selected the variables and the abstraction tools for the active case ascertainment approach. After testing the ability of their local passive and active case ascertainment system to capture all 3 conditions, the next steps were to report the number of cases detected actively and passively for each condition, to list the local barriers against the combined passive and active case ascertainment system, and to describe the experiences in trying to overcome these barriers. Results During the test period, the team from South Carolina was able to collect data on all 3 conditions simultaneously for all ages. The Colorado team was also able to collect data on all 3 conditions but, because of age restrictions in its passive and active case ascertainment system, it was able to report few cases of fragile X syndrome. The team from Kansas was able to collect data only on spina bifida. For all states, the implementation of an

  9. Outcome of canal wall down mastoidectomy: experience in sixty three cases.

    PubMed

    Asma, A; Shaharudin, M H; Muhd Almyzan, A; Lokman, S

    2013-06-01

    A canal wall down mastoidectomy (CWDM) is an effective technique for eradication of advanced chronic otitis media or cholesteatomas. A retrospective study was conducted at a Malaysian Tertiary Medical Center between June 1996 to December 2003 to evaluate the outcome of Modified Radical Mastoidectomy(MRM), a form of CWDM for patients with chronic active otitis media (OM) with cholesteatoma, chronic mastoiditis or chronic active OM with cholesteatoma and mastoiditis. All new cases of MRM which fulfilled the selection criteria were reviewed. The main outcome measures were the hearing outcome and status of dry ear postoperatively. A total of 84 patients had undergone CWDM. However only 63 patients (26 male, 37 female) were included for analysis. The age of the patients ranged between 5 months to 72 years (mean, 31years). The majority of the patients (86%) were adults and 9 (14%) were children. The ossicular chain was eroded in 91% (57 cases). There were 33 patients (53%) who showed no improvement of Air Bone Gap (ABG) closure while 16 patients (25%) had a post-operative improvement. The presence or absence of stapes suprastructure was found to be the major factor in determining the amount of ABG (Chi squared test, P = 0.025 preoperatively and P = 0.031 postoperatively). A dry ear was achieved in 78% of patients with 3% recurrence rate. In conclusion, the study showed that a proper MRM gave high percentage of dry ear and this procedure did not worsen the hearing.

  10. [Our experience with surgery of esophageal stenosis caused by caustic soda. Apropos of 128 cases].

    PubMed

    Pavlicic, Z; Cissoko, I S

    1988-11-01

    The authors report a series of 128 cases of esophageal burns due to caustic soda, treated between 1974 and 1987 in the Dept. of Surgery of the Friguia Kimbo Alumina Factory Hospital. 95% of patients were children aged less than 15. Ingestion was generally accidental. In view of the delay before patients were seen, in addition to parenteral alimentation, nutrition was covered by an alimentation gastrostomy performed in 96% of patients immediately following admission. Dilator treatment was used in 37 patients with 29 good result, 6 failures, and 2 perforations with 1 death. Retrosternal esophagoplasty using the transverse colon was performed in 95 cases with a 96.8% cure rate over a total follow-up period of 1 to 10 years, and 3 deaths. Overall mortality taking all categories together was 5.4%. The authors used these results as a basis for reviewing this condition, attempting to define as a basis for reviewing this condition, attempting to define the therapeutic methods successively used in the Guinea medico-social context.

  11. Estimated cases of blindness and visual impairment from neovascular age-related macular degeneration avoided in Australia by ranibizumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Paul; Bressler, Neil; Doan, Quan V; Dolan, Chantal; Ferreira, Alberto; Osborne, Aaron; Rochtchina, Elena; Danese, Mark; Colman, Shoshana; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, such as ranibizumab, have significantly improved the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. This study used patient-level simulation modelling to estimate the number of individuals in Australia who would have been likely to avoid legal blindness or visual impairment due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration over a 2-year period as a result of intravitreal ranibizumab injections. The modelling approach used existing data for the incidence of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Australia and outcomes from ranibizumab trials. Blindness and visual impairment were defined as visual acuity in the better-seeing eye of worse than 6/60 or 6/12, respectively. In 2010, 14,634 individuals in Australia were estimated to develop neovascular age-related macular degeneration who would be eligible for ranibizumab therapy. Without treatment, 2246 individuals would become legally blind over 2 years. Monthly 0.5 mg intravitreal ranibizumab would reduce incident blindness by 72% (95% simulation interval, 70-74%). Ranibizumab given as needed would reduce incident blindness by 68% (64-71%). Without treatment, 4846 individuals would become visually impaired over 2 years; this proportion would be reduced by 37% (34-39%) with monthly intravitreal ranibizumab, and by 28% (23-33%) with ranibizumab given as needed. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, given either monthly or as needed, can substantially lower the number of cases of blindness and visual impairment over 2 years after the diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  12. [Uncommon abdominal sites of hydatid disease. Our experience with the surgical treatment of 15 cases].

    PubMed

    Mosca, Francesco; Portale, Teresa Rosanna; Persi, Achille; Stracqualursi, Antonio; Puleo, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to report on a series of 15 patients with abdominal hydatid disease in uncommon sites submitted to surgery in our unit over the period 1974-2003. Eight women and 7 men (mean age: 48.4 years) were included in the study. The hydatid cysts were located in the peritoneum in 8 patients, in the spleen in 5, in the kidney in 1 and in the retroperitoneum in 1. In 4 cases the peritoneal cysts were solitary, while 4 patients in this subgroup presented multiple cysts and 2 had concomitant liver hydatidosis. The splenic cysts were solitary in 2 cases, associated with a hepatic cyst in 2 and with a lung cyst in 1. The renal and retroperitoneal cysts were both solitary. The diagnosis was made at operation in 3 cases, while in 12 patients it was made by serological tests, ultrasonography and/or CT. All patients were operated on: we performed a total cystectomy in 7 patients with peritoneal cysts and in the patient with a retroperitoneal location, splenectomy in the 5 splenic cysts and a partial cystectomy with external drainage of the residual cavity in 1 peritoneal cyst and in the renal location. The postoperative course was regular with no mortality and no major morbidity in 14 patients, while 1 patient submitted to splenectomy developed a subphrenic abscess that required surgical drainage. Two recurrences occurred in patients with peritoneal cysts 71 and 20 months, respectively, after the first operation and these were managed by total cystectomy. The diagnosis of uncommon abdominal sites of hydatid disease is more accurate today because of the new imaging techniques, which are often able to show specific radiological signs of hydatid disease. The treatment of choice is surgical and complete removal of the cyst is the gold standard, but its feasibility is related to the location of the cyst.

  13. Nonkeratinised Squamous Metaplasia of the Urinary Bladder in Children: A Report of Case Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Jurkiewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Background. Squamous metaplasia refers to the pathological transformation of the urothelium leading to nonkeratinised stratified squamous metaplasia (N-KSM). Objective. To present our experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of N-KSM of the urinary bladder in children. Materials and Methods. In this study, we present our experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of N-KSM of the urinary bladder in children aged from 5 to 17 years. From 2005 to 2013, metaplasia was diagnosed in 119 patients. The reasons behind visiting the hospital were nonspecific intense pain in the abdomen, recurrent urinary tract infections, and urination disorders. The most common symptoms of urinary bladder dysfunction were pollakiuria and difficulties in initiating micturition and retention of urine (reduced detrusor muscle activity). Results. In 20/119 patients (16.8%), metaplasia was incidentally diagnosed during cystoscopy performed for other causes. The changes characteristic for squamous metaplasia were diagnosed—in all these patients, a biopsy was performed. In all 119 patients, a squamous metaplasia was histopathologically diagnosed. Conclusions. Squamous metaplasia of the urinary bladder mucosa occurs in children and adolescents. Symptomatic treatment is administered mainly to improve the patients' quality of life and disease prognosis. PMID:24822222

  14. Mothers’ experiences in the Nurse-Family Partnership program: a qualitative case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few studies have explored the experiences of low income mothers participating in nurse home visiting programs. Our study explores and describes mothers' experiences participating in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) Program, an intensive home visiting program with demonstrated effectiveness, from the time of program entry before 29 weeks gestation until their infant's first birthday. Methods A qualitative case study approach was implemented. A purposeful sample of 18 low income, young first time mothers participating in a pilot study of the NFP program in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada partook in one to two face to face in-depth interviews exploring their experiences in the program. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis procedures were used to analyze all interviews. Data collection and initial analysis were implemented concurrently. Results The mothers participating in the NFP program were very positive about their experiences in the program. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: 1. Getting into the NFP program; 2. The NFP nurse is an expert, but also like a friend providing support; and 3. Participating in the NFP program is making me a better parent. Conclusions Our findings provide vital information to home visiting nurses and to planners of home visiting programs about mothers' perspectives on what is important to them in their relationships with their nurses, how nurses and women are able to develop positive therapeutic relationships, and how nurses respond to mothers' unique life situations while home visiting within the NFP Program. In addition our findings offer insights into why and under what circumstances low income mothers will engage in nurse home visiting and how they expect to benefit from their participation. PMID:22953748

  15. Oral submucous fibrosis at pediatric age, now time to think: Series of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinay K.; Malhotra, Seema; Patil, Ranjit; Tripathi, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    The younger generation is consuming areca nut and areca nut products, which is coming in the market with different multicolored attractive pouches and easily available in each and every corner of the road. For the children from the lower socioeconomic strata, areca nut use is rampant. Alarmingly, it has been seen that the highest period of risk for engaging in areca nut alone is between the ages of 5 and 12. Oral submucous fibrosis associated with areca nut in children is a great concern for the Society and the Government. Factors associated with this report for consuming areca nut are levels of awareness, household environment, peer pressure, low cost, easy availability etc. PMID:24049299

  16. Calculating excess risk with age-dependent adjustment factors and cumulative doses: ethylene oxide case study.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Flores, Ciriaco Valdez

    2009-10-01

    U.S. EPA's Supplemental Guidance in 2005 documented their procedure for incorporating age-dependent adjustment factors (ADAFs) into lifetime excess risk calculations. EPA's first attempt to implement an ADAF when the dose-response model had a cumulative dose metric was for ethylene oxide and that attempt (US EPA, 2006) failed to successfully follow EPA's own guidelines. The failure suggested that the incorporation of ADAFs would increase the lifetime excess risk for ethylene oxide by approximately 66%. However, if the procedure in the guidelines were followed correctly, then the increase would have only been 0.008% or approximately 8,000 fold less. Because cumulative exposure is a common dose metric in dose-response models of epidemiological data, a correct implementation of the guidelines is of widespread importance.

  17. Well Wishes: A Case on Septic Systems and Well Water Requiring In-Depth Analysis and Including Optional Laboratory Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczak, Mary M.; Lantz, Juliette M.

    2004-01-01

    The case of Well Wishes involves students in a thorough examination of the interaction among nitrogen-composed species in the septic systems and well water, which helps to clean household water. The case supports the attainment of five goals for students, and can be analyzed through classroom discussions or laboratory experiments.

  18. Understanding Students' Experience of Transition from Lecture Mode to Case-Based Teaching in a Management School in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Subhadip; Banerjee, Pratyush

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to understand experience of students about transition from lecture mode to case study pedagogy in business management courses. Indian education system is predominantly a follower of the lecture mode of teaching from the grass-root level till graduation. Hence Indian students are relatively less familiar with the case based…

  19. "It's All Connected!" Nursing Students' Experiences of a New Form of Case Seminar Integrating Medical and Nursing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turunen Olsson, Pernilla; Weurlander, Maria; Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine; Wärn Hede, Gunnel; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Broberger, Eva; Hult, Håkan; Wernerson, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nursing students learn medical subjects and nursing separately, which makes it difficult to develop an integrated understanding. This study aimed to explore nursing students' experiences of participating in a case seminar integrating medical and nursing sciences and if, and how, it contributed to their learning. A case seminar…

  20. Online Learning and Teaching with Technology: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David, Ed.; Walker, Rob, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    This book contains case studies that look at using technology in a wide range of situations, from fully online courses to more traditional face-to-face settings. The case studies deal with issues related to student interaction, teaching and assessment, planning and development, and policy. The following case studies are included: (1) "Flame War"…