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Sample records for ages radio explorer

  1. Trajectory Design from GTO to Near-Equatorial Lunar Orbit for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Yang Yang, Fan; Perez, Andres Dono; Galal, Ken F.; Faber, Nicolas T.; Mitchell, Scott; Landin, Brett; Burns, Jack O.

    2015-01-01

    The trajectory design for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) mission concept involves launching the DARE spacecraft into a geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) as a secondary payload. From GTO, the spacecraft then transfers to a lunar orbit that is stable (i.e., no station-keeping maneuvers are required with minimum perilune altitude always above 40 km) and allows for more than 1,000 cumulative hours for science measurements in the radio-quiet region located on the lunar farside.

  2. JPL Technology Development for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) Proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Lazio, J.; Sanchez Barbetty, M.; Sigel, D.; O'Dwyer, I.

    2014-01-01

    In support of the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) proposal team, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been investigating several technologies for this mission. The goal of DARE is to measure the sky-integrated spectrum of highly redshifted Hydrogen from the radio-quiet region above the far side of the Moon. The detailed shape of the spectrum in the 40-120 MHz region contains information on the epoch compact object formation and subsequent re-heating of the intergalactic medium. However, the expected Hydrogen signal strength is orders of magnitude weaker than the galactic foreground, and extreme instrumental stability and calibration accuracy will be needed to extract the signal of interest from the stronger foreground signal. JPL has developed a deployable bi-conical dipole antenna and measured its RF performance against a full-size, solid dipole to verify that the deployable concept will not compromise the spectral bandpass of the instrument. In addition, variations in bandpass response as a function of physical temperature of the front-end electronics (active balun and receiver) have been made over a wide temperature range. These data can be used to determine the required level of thermal control on the DARE spacecraft. This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. We also acknowledge support from the Lunar University Network for Astrophysical Research (LUNAR). The LUNAR consortium has been funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute to investigate concepts for astrophysical observatories on the Moon via cooperative agreement NNA09DB30A.

  3. Instrumental and Calibration Advancements for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Raul A.; Burns, Jack O.; Bradley, Richard F.; Tauscher, Keith; Nhan, Bang; Bowman, Judd D.; Purcell, William R.; Newell, David; Draper, David

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a space mission concept proposed to NASA to measure with high precision the monopole component of the redshifted 21-cm signal from neutral hydrogen originated during cosmic dawn at redshifts 35 > z > 11. For the 21-cm line, these high redshifts correspond to the frequency range 40-120 MHz. Through its spectral features, this signal will provide a wealth of information about the large-scale physics of the first stars, galaxies and black holes. The signal is expected to have an absolute amplitude below 200 mK, which is five orders of magnitude smaller than the diffuse foregrounds dominated by Galactic synchrotron radiation. In order to avoid the impact of the Earth’s ionosphere, which corrupts low-frequency radio waves through refraction, absorption, and emission, this measurement is conducted from orbit above the far side of the Moon. This location is ideal because it enables the Moon to shield the spacecraft from Solar radiation and terrestrial radio-frequency interference. The DARE instrument is designed around a dual-polarization, widefield, wideband, biconical antenna, which provides full-Stokes capabilities in order to measure and remove the low-level polarized component of the foregrounds. The spacecraft is rotated about its boresight axis at 1 RPM to modulate the foregrounds and separate them from the spatially uniform cosmological signal. The instrument requires exquisite calibration to reach a sensitivity of a few mK in the presence of strong foregrounds. For this purpose, the frequency-dependent antenna beam is characterized to 20 ppm. This is accomplished through a combination of electromagnetic simulations, anechoic chamber measurements, and on-orbit mapping using a calibrated high-power ground-based source. The DARE front-end receiver is characterized on the ground in terms of its input impedance, gain, noise properties, and stability. Its performance is verified when operating on-orbit at a fixed temperature

  4. Extraction of global 21-cm signal from simulated data for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) using an MCMC pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauscher, Keith A.; Burns, Jack O.; Rapetti, David; Mirocha, Jordan; Monsalve, Raul A.

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a mission concept proposed to NASA in which a crossed dipole antenna collects low frequency (40-120 MHz) radio measurements above the farside of the Moon to detect and characterize the global 21-cm signal from the early (z~35-11) Universe's neutral hydrogen. Simulated data for DARE includes: 1) the global signal modeled using the ares code, 2) spectrally smooth Galactic foregrounds with spatial structure taken from multiple radio foreground maps averaged over a large, well characterized beam, 3) systematics introduced in the data by antenna/receiver reflections, and 4) the Moon. This simulated data is fed into a signal extraction pipeline. As the signal is 4-5 orders of magnitude below the Galactic synchrotron contribution, it is best extracted from the data using Bayesian techniques which take full advantage of prior knowledge of the instrument and foregrounds. For the DARE pipeline, we use the affine-invariant MCMC algorithm implemented in the Python package, emcee. The pipeline also employs singular value decomposition to use known spectral features of the antenna and receiver to form a natural basis with which to fit instrumental systematics. Taking advantage of high-fidelity measurements of the antenna beam (to ~20 ppm) and precise calibration of the instrument, the pipeline extracts the global 21-cm signal with an average RMS error of 10-15 mK for multiple signal models.

  5. Investigations of the First Objects to Light Up the Universe: The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack; Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd; Bradley, Richard; Datta, Abhirup; Furlanetto, Steven; Jones, Dayton; Kasper, Justin; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-08-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is designed to probe the epoch of formation of the first stars, black holes, and galaxies, never before observed, using the redshifted hyperfine 21-cm transition from neutral hydrogen. These first objects to illuminate the Universe (redshifts 35 to 11) will be studied via their heating and ionization of the intergalactic medium. Over its lifetime of 2 years, DARE observes at low radio astronomy frequencies (VHF), 40 - 120 MHz, in a 125 km altitude lunar orbit. The Moon occults both Earth and the Sun as DARE makes observations on the lunar farside, shielding it from the corrupting effects of radio interference, Earth’s ionosphere, and solar emissions. Bi-conical dipole antennas, pseudo-correlation receivers used in differential mode to stabilize the radiometer, and a digital spectrometer achieve the sensitivity required to observe the cosmic signal. The unique frequency structure of the 21-cm signal and its uniformity over large angular scales are unlike the spectrally featureless, spatially varying characteristics of the Galactic foreground, allowing the signal to be cleanly separated from the foreground. In the talk, the DARE science objectives, the science instrument, foreground removal strategy, and design of an engineering prototype will be described.

  6. Exploring the Dynamic Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, Kunal P.; Hallinan, Gregg; Frail, Dale A.; Myers, Steven T.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Bourke, Stephen; Horesh, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Most of what is currently known about slow radio transients (supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events, stellar flares, etc.) has come via radio follow-up of objects identified by synoptic telescopes at optical, X-ray or gamma-ray wavelengths. However, with the ability to capture obscured, unbeamed and magnetically-driven phenomena, radio surveys offer unique discovery strong diagnostic for cosmic transients. For the first time, we are systematically exploring the dynamic radio sky on timescales between one day to several years using multi-epoch large surveys with the Karl G. Jansky Array (VLA). We have carried out surveys in the COSMOS deep field as well as wide fields like Stripe 82. I have developed a unique infrastructure for near-real-time calibration, imaging, transient search, transient vetting, rapid multiwavelength follow-up, and contemporaneous optical surveys to better characterize radio transient phenomena. A large part of my thesis includes the commissioning of a new observing mode at the VLA: On-The-Fly Mosaicking. This mode has significantly improved the survey efficiency of the VLA, and it is a driver for VLASS, the future all-sky survey planned with this telescope. Through our radio surveys we have discovered several fascinating transients that are unique to the radio. These surveys have established the VLA as an efficient transient discovery machine. My thesis has enormous implications for how to design efficient transient surveys for the next generation of radio interferometer facilities like ASKAP, MeerKAT, WSRT/Apertif and LOFAR. My work has also provided answers to key problems such as the rates of transients, demographics of variability of radio sources including AGN, and false-positive foreground for future searches for the radio counterparts of gravitational-wave (GW) sources.

  7. From Darkness to Light: Observing the First Stars and Galaxies with the Redshifted 21-cm Line using the Dark Ages Radio Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Datta, Abhirup; Furlanetto, Steven; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin; Loeb, Abraham; Harker, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) will reveal when the first stars, black holes, and galaxies formed in the early Universe and will define their characteristics, from the Dark Ages (z=35) to the Cosmic Dawn (z=11). This epoch of the Universe has never been directly observed. The DARE science instrument is composed of electrically-short bi-conical dipole antennas, a correlation receiver, and a digital spectrometer that measures the sky-averaged, low frequency (40-120 MHz) spectral features from the highly redshifted 21-cm HI line that surrounds the first objects. These observations are possible because DARE will orbit the Moon at an altitude of 125 km and takes data when it is above the radio-quiet, ionosphere-free, solar-shielded lunar farside. DARE executes the small-scale mission described in the NASA Astrophysics Roadmap (p. 83): 'mapping the Universe's hydrogen clouds using 21-cm radio wavelengths via lunar orbiter from the farside of the Moon'. This mission will address four key science questions: (1) When did the first stars form and what were their characteristics? (2) When did the first accreting black holes form and what was their characteristic mass? (3) When did reionization begin? (4) What surprises emerged from the Dark Ages (e.g., Dark Matter decay). DARE uniquely complements other major telescopes including Planck, JWST, and ALMA by bridging the gap between the smooth Universe seen via the CMB and rich web of galaxy structures seen with optical/IR/mm telescopes. Support for the development of this mission concept was provided by the Office of the Director, NASA Ames Research Center and by JPL/Caltech.

  8. Radio Astronomy Explorer /RAE/. I - Observations of terrestrial radio noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.; Stone, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) I data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial radio noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 dB and more above cosmic noise background, on frequencies above the F-layer critical frequency.

  9. Explore the World with a Radio!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninno, Anton

    1998-01-01

    Describes using AM-FM, shortwave, and scanner radios in the classroom; suggests class activities integrating the curriculum, including radio logs, geography, social studies, letter writing, and career exploration; and lists related Internet resources and ERIC articles. A sidebar highlights the "Shortwave Classroom" newsletter. (PEN)

  10. Exploring the Dynamic Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Horesh, A.; Hallinan, G.; Bourke, S.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Frail, D. A.; Ofek, E.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic radio sky remains a rich area for discovery. Taking advantage of the new capabilities of the Jansky-VLA, we have carried out a near-real-time survey for radio transients in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. We observed 50 sq. deg. at 3 GHz at 3 epochs separated by 1 week and 1 month with 75uJy rms. In contrast to previous surveys, our survey is coupled with contemporaneous optical monitoring (with the Palomar Transient Factory) and rapid follow-up (at X-ray through radio frequencies), enabling physical interpretation of the detected transients. Supernovae, non-thermal tidal disruption events (TDEs), stellar flares, orphan long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and NS-NS coalescence events are among those which we expect to see. Such detections will have large impact on several key questions such as the rate of TDEs, obscured supernovae, the beaming factor of GRBs and the rate of NS-NS mergers. This systematic search for transient and variable radio sources is meant to be a fore-runner of next-generation surveys planned for WSRT/Apertif, ASKAP, LOFAR and MeerKAT.

  11. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  12. The Properties of Primordial Stars and Galaxies measured from the 21-cm Global Spectrum using the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Fialkov, Anastasia; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin; Loeb, Abraham; Mirocha, Jordan; Monsalve, Raul A.; Rapetti, David; Tauscher, Keith; Wollack, Edward

    2017-01-01

    DARE is a mission concept designed to observe the formation of primordial stars, black holes, and galaxies (z=11-35) by measuring their spectral effects on the redshifted 21-cm hydrogen line. The UV and X-ray radiation emitted by these first objects ionized and heated the intergalactic medium and imprinted characteristic features in the 21-cm spectrum. The 1.4 GHz signal is redshifted into the radio band 40-120 MHz. DARE will take advantage of the quietest RF environment in the inner solar system by using the Moon as a shield from human radio frequency interference and solar emissions via observations on the lunar farside. DARE’s science objectives are to determine: when the first stars turned on and their properties, when the first black holes began accreting and their masses, the reionization history of the early Universe, and if evidence exists for exotic physics in the Dark Ages such as Dark Matter decay. Wideband crossed-dipole antennas, pilot tone stablized radiometric receivers, a polarimeter, and a digital spectrometer constitute the science instrument. DARE’s radiometer is precisely calibrated with a featureless spectral response, controlled systematics, and heritage from CMB missions. Models for the instrument main beam and sidelobes, antenna reflection coefficient, gain variations, and calibrations will be validated with electromagnetic simulations, laboratory and anechoic chamber measurements, and verified on-orbit. The unique frequency structure of the 21-cm spectrum, its uniformity over large angular scales, and its unpolarized state are unlike the spectrally featureless, spatially-varying, polarized emission of the bright Galactic foreground, allowing the signal to be cleanly separated from the foreground. The 21-cm signal will be extracted in the presence of foregrounds using a Bayesian framework with a Markov Chain Monto Carlo (MCMC) numerical inference technique. The DARE data analysis pipeline enables efficient, simultaneous, and self

  13. Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) 1 observations of terrestrial radio noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Radio Astonomy Explorer (RAE) 1 data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 or more db higher than cosmic noise background. Maximum terrestrial noise is observed when RAE is over the dark side of the Earth in the neighborhood of equatorial continental land masses where thunderstorms occur most frequently. The observed noise level is 30-40 db lower with RAE over oceans.

  14. Project Explorer GAS #007: Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment (MARCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stluka, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Polls were taken at the Project Explorer meetings regarding flying without the radio experiment transmitting. The radio downlinks require extra coordination and are sensitive to certain payloads. The poll results were unanimous. The radio downlinks are vital in providing data on the health and status of the total experiments package, in real time, during the flight. The amateur radio operators, prepared to receive the downlinks and OSCAR-10 relays, revealed that there was enormous interest throughout the world, to participate. This sets the stage for the reflight opportunities which the GAS program has provided. Major activities, pertinent to the STS-41G flight preparations by the GAS #007 team and support group, are listed.

  15. Spectral age modelling of the `Sausage' cluster radio relic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Harwood, Jeremy J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.

    2014-12-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a post-core passage, binary merging cluster that hosts a large, thin, arc-like radio relic, nicknamed the `Sausage', tracing a relatively strong shock front. We perform spatially resolved spectral fitting to the available radio data for this radio relic, using a variety of spectral ageing models, with the aim of finding a consistent set of parameters for the shock and radio plasma. We determine an injection index of 0.77^{+0.03}_{-0.02} for the relic plasma, significantly steeper than was found before. Standard particle acceleration at the shock front implies a Mach number M=2.90^{+0.10}_{-0.13}, which now matches X-ray measurements. The shock advance speed is vshock ≈ 2500 km s-1, which places the core passage of the two subclusters 0.6-0.8 Gyr ago. We find a systematic spectral age increase from 0 at the northern side of the relic up to ˜60 Myr at ˜145 kpc into the downstream area, assuming a 0.6 nT magnetic field. Under the assumption of freely ageing electrons after acceleration by the `Sausage' shock, the spectral ages are hard to reconcile with the shock speed derived from X-ray and radio observations. Re-acceleration or unusually efficient transport of particle in the downstream area and line-of-sight mixing could help explain the systematically low spectral ages.

  16. Thunderstorms and ground-based radio noise as observed by radio astronomy Explorer 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) data were analyzed to determine the frequency dependence of HF terrestrial radio noise power. RAE observations of individual thunderstorms, mid-ocean areas, and specific geographic regions for which concommitant ground based measurements are available indicate that noise power is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency which conforms to expectations over the geographic locations and time periods investigated. In all cases investigated, active thunderstorm regions emit slightly higher power as contrasted to RAE observations of the region during meteorologically quiet periods. Noise levels are some 15 db higher than predicted values over mid-ocean, while in locations where ground based measurements are available a maximum deviation of 5 db occurs. Worldwide contour mapping of the noise power at 6000 km for five individual months and four observing frequencies, examples of which are given, indicate high noise levels over continental land masses with corresponding lower levels over ocean regions.

  17. Multifrequency radio observations of Cygnus A - Spectral aging in powerful radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Perley, R. A.; Dreher, J. W.; Leahy, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the radio spectrum across the lobes of Cygnus A is presented in order to critically test the synchroton spectral aging theory. The results are in good agreement with the jet model for powerful radio galaxies, involving particle acceleration at the hot spots and outflow into the radio lobes, with subsequent energy loss due to synchrotron radiation. The hot spot spectra are well represented by a spectral aging model involving continuous injection of relativistic particles. Both hot spots have spectral break frequencies around 10 GHz. An injection index of 0.5 is found for both hot spots, consistent with diffusive shock acceleration at a strong nonrelativistic shock in a Newtonian fluid. The LF hot spot emission spectrum falls below the injected power law. This effect is isolated to the hot spots, and is best explained by a low-energy cutoff in the particle distribution.

  18. Exploring Cognition Using Software Defined Radios for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Reinhart, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    NASA missions typically operate using a communication infrastructure that requires significant schedule planning with limited flexibility when the needs of the mission change. Parameters such as modulation, coding scheme, frequency, and data rate are fixed for the life of the mission. This is due to antiquated hardware and software for both the space and ground assets and a very complex set of mission profiles. Automated techniques in place by commercial telecommunication companies are being explored by NASA to determine their usability by NASA to reduce cost and increase science return. Adding cognition the ability to learn from past decisions and adjust behavior is also being investigated. Software Defined Radios are an ideal way to implement cognitive concepts. Cognition can be considered in many different aspects of the communication system. Radio functions, such as frequency, modulation, data rate, coding and filters can be adjusted based on measurements of signal degradation. Data delivery mechanisms and route changes based on past successes and failures can be made to more efficiently deliver the data to the end user. Automated antenna pointing can be added to improve gain, coverage, or adjust the target. Scheduling improvements and automation to reduce the dependence on humans provide more flexible capabilities. The Cognitive Communications project, funded by the Space Communication and Navigation Program, is exploring these concepts and using the SCaN Testbed on board the International Space Station to implement them as they evolve. The SCaN Testbed contains three Software Defined Radios and a flight computer. These four computing platforms, along with a tracking antenna system and the supporting ground infrastructure, will be used to implement various concepts in a system similar to those used by missions. Multiple universities and SBIR companies are supporting this investigation. This paper will describe the cognitive system ideas under consideration and

  19. Wuhan Atmospheric Radio Exploration (WARE) radar: implementation and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Qing, H.; Chen, G.; Gu, X.; Ni, B.; Yang, G.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2014-11-01

    The recently constructed Wuhan Atmospheric Radio Exploration (WARE) radar is the first mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar in the mainland of China, located at Chongyang, Hubei Province (114°8'8'' E, 29°31'58'' N, ∼ 23° geomagnetic latitude). WARE radar has a capability of probing the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere at the altitudes from 3 to 100 km (excluding 25-60 km). With fine temporal and spatial resolution, WARE radar provides an outstanding opportunity for the first time to extensively and intensively investigate various atmospheric phenomena at the regions of mid-latitude China. In this paper, we present the main configuration and technical specifications of WARE radar system. For the first time, we also report some initial results obtained by the WARE radar: (1) wind field observations from 69 to 85 km and from 3.2 to 16.9 km together with their comparisons with the rawinsonde results, (2) tropopause heights determined by radar echo power and comparisons between radar tropopause and rawinsonde tropopause, (3) atmospheric gravity waves in the troposphere with the wave length and propagation direction analyzed using the hodograph method, (4) aspect sensitivity of echo power at six specified heights in the troposphere and stratosphere, and (5) diurnal and semi-diurnal tides at the tropospheric and low stratospheric heights analyzed by the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method.

  20. Automated exploration of the radio plasma imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Ivan; Reinisch, Bodo; Grinstein, Georges; Khmyrov, Grigori; Kozlov, Alexander; Huang, Xueqin; Fung, Shing

    2004-12-01

    As research instruments with large information capacities become a reality, automated systems for intelligent data analysis become a necessity. Scientific archives containing huge volumes of data preclude manual manipulation or intervention and require automated exploration and mining that can at least preclassify information in categories. The large data set from the radio plasma imager (RPI) instrument on board the IMAGE satellite shows a critical need for such exploration in order to identify and archive features of interest in the volumes of visual information. In this research we have developed such a preclassifier through a model of preattentive vision capable of detecting and extracting traces of echoes from the RPI plasmagrams. The overall design of our model complies with Marr's paradigm of vision, where elements of increasing perceptual strength are built bottom up under the Gestalt constraints of good continuation and smoothness. The specifics of the RPI data, however, demanded extension of this paradigm to achieve greater robustness for signature analysis. Our preattentive model now employs a feedback neural network that refines alignment of the oriented edge elements (edgels) detected in the plasmagram image by subjecting them to collective global-scale optimization. The level of interaction between the oriented edgels is determined by their distance and mutual orientation in accordance with the Yen and Finkel model of the striate cortex that encompasses findings in psychophysical studies of human vision. The developed models have been implemented in an operational system "CORPRAL" (Cognitive Online RPI Plasmagram Ranking Algorithm) that currently scans daily submissions of the RPI plasmagrams for the presence of echo traces. Qualifying plasmagrams are tagged in the mission database, making them available for a variety of queries. We discuss CORPRAL performance and its impact on scientific analysis of RPI data.

  1. Lunar Radio Telescopes: A Staged Approach for Lunar Science, Heliophysics, Astrobiology, Cosmology, and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, W. M.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K.

    2012-01-01

    Observations with radio telescopes address key problems in cosmology, astrobiology, heliophysics, and planetary science including the first light in the Universe (Cosmic Dawn), magnetic fields of extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the lunar ionosphere. The Moon is a unique science platform because it allows access to radio frequencies that do not penetrate the Earth's ionosphere and because its far side is shielded from intense terrestrial emissions. The instrument packages and infrastructure needed for radio telescopes can be transported and deployed as part of Exploration activities, and the resulting science measurements may inform Exploration (e.g., measurements of lunar surface charging). An illustrative roadmap for the staged deployment of lunar radio telescopes

  2. Reflections on the Radio Astronomy Explorer program of the 1960s and 70s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) program of the late 1960s and early 1970s is, to date, the only totally dedicated radio astronomy mission to have flown. However, only some of the prelaunch goals were achieved due to the unexpectedly high levels of interference from the earth in the form of both naturally occurring and man-made noise. Some important lessons in receiver design were learned which could and should be applied to any future radio astronomy missions.

  3. Exploration of the Saturnian System with Cassini Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliore, Arvydas J.

    1999-01-01

    The ongoing Galileo mission has provided many new insights into the Jovian system. Among them are new discoveries from the Radio Science investigations , including multiple measurements of the Jovian ionosphere, the ionospheres and plasma environments of Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, and the internal structure of the Galilean satellites. The Cassini spacecraft, which will be placed in orbit about Saturn in 2004, will conduct Radio Science investigations of many aspects of the Saturnian system with a radio instrument of unprecedented stability and versatility. It will use radio links at three wavelengths : S-band(13 cm), X-band (3.5 cm), and Ka-band (1 cm) to probe the atmospheres and ionospheres of Saturn and Titan and Saturn's rings by means of radio occultations, and to measure the masses and gravity fields of Saturn, Titan, and selected icy satellites by precision tracking. In addition, the stability of the radio instrument will be utilized to conduct a search for gravitational waves during solar oppositions, and to precisely measure general relativistic effects during solar conjunctions during the interplanetary cruise prior to arrival at Saturn.

  4. The radio astronomy explorer satellite, a low-frequency observatory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Alexander, J. K.; Stone, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    The RAE-1 is the first spacecraft designed exclusively for radio astronomical studies. It is a small, but relatively complex, observatory including two 229-meter antennas, several radiometer systems covering a frequency range of 0.2 to 9.2 MHz, and a variety of supporting experiments such as antenna impedance probes and TV cameras to monitor antenna shape. Since its launch in July, 1968, RAE-1 has sent back some 10 billion data bits per year on measurements of long-wavelength radio phenomena in the magnetosphere, the solar corona, and the Galaxy. In this paper we describe the design, calibration, and performance of the RAE-1 experiments in detail.

  5. Exploring bird aerodynamics using radio-controlled models.

    PubMed

    Hoey, Robert G

    2010-12-01

    A series of radio-controlled glider models was constructed by duplicating the aerodynamic shape of soaring birds (raven, turkey vulture, seagull and pelican). Controlled tests were conducted to determine the level of longitudinal and lateral-directional static stability, and to identify the characteristics that allowed flight without a vertical tail. The use of tail-tilt for controlling small bank-angle changes, as observed in soaring birds, was verified. Subsequent tests, using wing-tip ailerons, inferred that birds use a three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing tip (wing tip vortices) to control adverse yaw and to create a small amount of forward thrust in gliding flight.

  6. Exploring the Dynamic Radio Sky: The Search for Slow Transients with the VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, Kunal P.

    2015-10-01

    While synoptic surveys in the optical and at high energies have revealed a rich discovery phase space of slow transients, a similar yield is still awaited in the radio. Majority of the past blind surveys, carried out with radio interferometers, have suffered from a low yield of slow transients, ambiguous transient classifications, and contamination by false positives. The newly-refurbished Karl G. Jansky Array (Jansky VLA) offers wider bandwidths for accurate RFI excision as well as substantially-improved sensitivity and survey speed compared with the old VLA. The Jansky VLA thus eliminates the pitfalls of interferometric transient search by facilitating sensitive, wide-field, and near-real-time radio surveys and enabling a systematic exploration of the dynamic radio sky. This thesis aims at carrying out blind Jansky VLA surveys for characterizing the radio variable and transient sources at frequencies of a few GHz and on timescales between days and years. Through joint radio and optical surveys, the thesis addresses outstanding questions pertaining to the rates of slow radio transients (e.g. radio supernovae, tidal disruption events, binary neutron star mergers, stellar flares, etc.), the false-positive foreground relevant for the radio and optical counterpart searches of gravitational wave sources, and the beaming factor of gamma-ray bursts. The need for rapid processing of the Jansky VLA data and near-real-time radio transient search has enabled the development of state-of-the-art software infrastructure. This thesis has successfully demonstrated the Jansky VLA as a powerful transient search instrument, and it serves as a pathfinder for the transient surveys planned for the SKA-mid pathfinder facilities, viz. ASKAP, MeerKAT, and WSRT/Apertif.

  7. Radio science receiver support of the Mars Exploration Rover Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Douglas; Asmar, Sami; Chang, Christine; Estabrook, Polly; Finely, Sue; Pham, Timothy; Satorius, Edgar

    2004-01-01

    The low power levels of the communication signals during the Entry Descent and Landing (EDL) sequences of the Mars rovers prevented the transmission of telemetry at X-band signal to inform the mission operations center of the health and progress of the spacecraft. As an altemative, a series of tones were sent to indicate basic spacecraft conditions and execution of critical events. An open-loop receiver designed for Radio Science experiments was used to acquire the signal during this time. The receiver recorded over a 100 Khz bandwidth to identify the presence of the carrier and tones. The data were fed in real-time to a processing unit which detected the carrier and the frequency separation of the tones from the carrier, in order to determine which event has occurred. Up to 256 different tones were possible. During the actual events, all tones were identified, and the carrier was tracked down to the surface, and for the second rover, through the bouncing which followed, and finally, while stopped on the surface, found the carrier and tones which indicated the spacecraft was alive. In order to identify the tones, the ground receivers had to be able to respond to the bevy of events occurring in the relatively short timespan of EDL.

  8. Precision of radio science instrumentation for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is the largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications facility Primary function: providing two-way communication between the Earth and spacecraft exploring the solar system Instrumented with large parabolic reflectors, high-power transmitters, low-noise amplifiers & receivers.

  9. Radio astronomy Explorer-1 observations of the Gum nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    Complicating factors in the spectrum analysis of the Gum nebula are discussed. These include accounting for the spectrum of supernova remnants in the direction of the nebula, the different absorption laws for radiation from beyond and within the nebula, and the Razin effect. This last results in a low frequency cutoff to the spectrum of synchrotron radiation by particles in a thermal plasma. These factors cause the observer to overestimate the amount of absorption occurring in the nebula. Data from the Explorer 38 satellite are presented for 3.93 and 6.55 MHz. Average optical depth for the nebula at 4 MHz was calculated.

  10. Underwater Multi-Node Radio Communication Solutions for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawar, Zaid Fares Yousef; Haddad, Sanad Atef Sari; Mestariheh, Feras R. M.; Jonsson, Lars Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of the presumably life harboring subsurface ocean of Europa will provide scientists with extensive new knowledge in the search for extraterrestrial life. A highly miniaturized payload is required to penetrate a narrow passage through the thick ice crust covering Europa's surface. Underwater wireless communications may be the most viable means of communication for such exploratory missions, accounting for size and weight restrictions. This presents a challenge to achieve satisfactory data rates and a range that permits autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to communicate within their region of operation, as well as with a surface lander or orbiter. This work presents thorough prototype experimentation on an underwater communication system established between several nodes using RF signals. During an eight-week internship experience at NASA's Ames Research Center in September-October 2014, our team developed a Europa exploration mission concept, built representative hardware, and carried out tests to assess the feasibility of key aspects of the concept. Experiments demonstrating the viability of RF communication underwater comprised inspecting the effect of depth and horizontal distance on signal strength as well as the optimum positioning of antennas. To test the system's performance, two submersibles were designed and built. A commercially available remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was also modified and used as a main communication node. The two submersibles were wirelessly connected and accommodated sensors capable of characterizing water properties and equipped with 2.4 GHz, 1 mW transceivers to communicate the measured data. The communication procedure is that the main communication node requests the collected data from the two submersibles when in range and receives it instantly through RF. This work models what may take place during an actual mission to Europa. The developed mission concept involved a hybrid communication system consisting of

  11. The Explored Asteroids: Science and Exploration in the Space Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, D. W. G.

    2015-11-01

    Interest in asteroids is currently high in view of their scientific importance, the impact hazard, and the in situ resource opportunities they offer. They are also a case study of the intimate relationship between science and exploration. A detailed review of the twelve asteroids that have been visited by eight robotic spacecraft is presented here. While the twelve explored asteroids have many features in common, like their heavily cratered and regolith covered surfaces, they are a remarkably diverse group. Some have low-eccentricity orbits in the main belt, while some are potentially hazardous objects. They range from dwarf planets to primary planetesimals to fragments of larger precursor objects to tiny shards. One has a moon. Their surface compositions range from basaltic to various chondrite-like compositions. Here their properties are reviewed and what was confirmed and what was newly learned is discussed, and additionally the explored asteroids are compared with comets and meteorites. Several topics are developed. These topics are the internal structure of asteroids, water distribution in the inner solar system and its role in shaping surfaces, and the meteoritic links.

  12. Chills and thrills: does radio harm our children? The controversy over program violence during the age of radio.

    PubMed

    Dennis, P M

    1998-01-01

    A review of the popular and scientific periodical for the 1930s and 1940s revealed that the controversy surrounding the radio "thriller" and its possible harmful effects on young listeners was one of radio's most highly publicized issues during its golden years of broadcasting. Many of the questions raised concerning this issue were similar to those asked later during the age of television. Relying heavily upon the psychoanalytic emphasis on emotion, catharsis, and intrapsychic dynamics, expert opinion voiced in various popular periodicals and newspapers of the day suggested that the violence and excitement portrayed in many of the crime and adventure programs was harmless, and perhaps beneficial, for most listeners. However, research in support of this conclusion was sparse, and psychologists evidenced little interest in the issue. Not until the advent of television, and the emergence of social learning theory in the early 1960s, did psychologists direct significant research effort towards evaluating the effects of media violence.

  13. Ageing analysis of the giant radio galaxy J1343+3758

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Mack, K.-H.; Klein, U.

    2005-04-01

    Deep 4860 and 8350 MHz observations with the VLA and 100-m Effelsberg telescopes, supplementing available radio survey maps at the frequencies of 327 MHz (WENSS survey) and 1400 MHz (NVSS survey), are used to study the synchrotron spectra and radiative ages of relativistic particles in opposite lobes of the giant radio galaxy J1343+3758 (Machalski & Jamrozy [CITE]). The classical spectral ageing analysis (e.g. Myers & Spangler [CITE]) with assumption of equipartition magnetic fields gives a mean separation velocity (< v_sep>) of about 0.16 c and 0.12 c measured with respect to the emitting plasma, and suggests a maximum particle age of about 48 and 50 Myr in the NE and SW lobes, respectively. On the contrary, a mean jet-head advance speed (< v_adv>) in the above lobes, derived from ram-pressure arguments, is about 0.016 c and 0.017 c, respectively. This would imply a substantial backflow of the lobe material from the hotspot regions towards the radio core, v_bf, which is not supported by the available radio maps. A compromise is achieved by assuming an enhancement of 3 to 5 times the equipartition magnetic field strengths in the lobes which gives < v_sep>≈ 0.06 c and < v_adv>≈< v_bf>≈ 0.03 c, hence a dynamical age of the source of 204 ± 40 Myr. A comparison of the radiative and dynamical ages of the investigated giant radio galaxy implies that the dynamical age is about 4 times the maximum synchrotron age of the emitting particles, which supports the conclusion of Blundell & Rawlings ([CITE]) that the spectral and dynamical ages are comparable only when they are ll10 Myr, and suggests that for FRII-type sources the discrepancy between these ages increases with age.

  14. The Solar System Radio Explorer Kiosk - Leveraging Other E/PO Programs for Greater Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L. N.; Reinisch, B. W.; Taylor, W. W.; Thieman, J. R.; Mendez, F.; Riccobono, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Solar System Radio Explorer Kiosk (SSREK) - a newly won small E/PO follow-on to a NASA/OSS research grant - is designed to leverage existing NASA E/PO projects and other education programs to enable a large return from a small investment. The SSREK project will create an interactive museum kiosk to engage and teach visitors about Jupiter and the Sun by learning what their low frequency radio bursts may be telling us about these worlds. This project will work with the network of radio observers and the archive of data obtained through the NASA-sponsored Radio Jove project. The SSREK project is partnering with the Maryland Science Center (MSC) as a test site for the SSREK. The MSC will enable us to ensure that this project meets the requirements of their museum environment. We are also partnering with the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) to help us enable museum visitors with visual impairments to share in the excitement of science and help these visitors recognize how other senses besides sight can be used to do science. Both the MSC and NFB will assist us in formative and summative evaluation of the project. All of the software and designs for the wheelchair-accessible arcade-style cabinet will be made available on the associated web site hosted at NASA/GSFC - further extending the reach of the project.

  15. Exploring Hydrofluorocarbons as Groundwater Age Tracers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. B.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L. N.; Casile, G.; Sanford, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater dating tracers are an essential tool for analyzing hydrologic conditions in groundwater systems. Commonly used tracers for dating post-1940's groundwater include sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 3H-3He, and other isotopic tracers (85Kr, δ2H and δ18O isotopes, etc.). Each tracer carries a corresponding set of advantages and limitations imposed by field, analytical, and interpretive methods. Increasing the number available tracers is appealing, particularly if they possess inert chemical properties and unique temporal emission histories from other tracers. Atmospherically derived halogenated trace gases continue to hold untapped potential for new tracers, as they are generally inert and their emission histories are well documented. SF5CF3, and CFC-13 were previously shown to have application as dating tracers, though their low mixing ratios and low solubility require large amounts of water to be degassed for their quantification. Two related groups of compounds, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are hypothesized to be potential age tracers, having similar mixing ratios to the CFCs and relatively high solubility. However, these compounds yield gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) responses that are 10-2 -10-5 less than CFC-12, making purge and trap or field stripping GC-ECD approaches impractical. Therefore, in order to use dissolved HCFCs and HFCs as age tracers, different approaches are needed. To solve this problem, we developed an analytical method that uses an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) in place of an ECD to detect fluorinated compounds. In contrast to the ECD, the AED is a universally sensitive, highly linear, elementally specific detector. The new GC-AED system is being used to measure chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and other fluorinated compounds in one liter water samples to study their potential as age dating tracers. HCFC-22 is a

  16. Using Internet, Television and Radio to Promote Public Participation in Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clipper, Milton C., Jr.; MacLeish, Marlene Y.

    2008-06-01

    The theme of the 59th International Astronautical Congress, From Imagination to Reality, reflects a global sentiment that future space exploration will require a scientifically literate public that is informed about the benefits of space exploration for life on Earth and is motivated to influence decision makers who provide resources to support space exploration. This paper reports on a successful twelve-year private-public partnership among Public Broadcasting Atlanta, (PBA) Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM), the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The partnership has produced television-radio documentaries, transmitted space science knowledge to classrooms, designed electronic citizen participation platforms, spun off new programs and maintained a space film archive. This model provides a framework for analyzing determinants of innovative public-private partnerships, mobilization of scarce resources, and space exploration knowledge management.

  17. Radio astronomy Explorer-B in-flight mission control system development effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutsky, D. A.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Uphoff, C.

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of the development for the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations (MAESTRO) program to be used for the in-flight decision making process during the translunar and lunar orbit adjustment phases of the flight of the Radio Astronomy Explorer-B. THe program serves two functions: performance and evaluation of preflight mission analysis, and in-flight support for the midcourse and lunar insertion command decisions that must be made by the flight director. The topics discussed include: analysis of program and midcourse guidance capabilities; methods for on-line control; printed displays of the MAESTRO program; and in-flight operational logistics and testing.

  18. An Exploration of Distributed Leaf Wetness and Dew Detection Using Inexpensive Radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeier, J. J.; Rowlandson, T. L.; Kruger, A.; Hornbuckle, B. K.

    2009-12-01

    Our understanding of latent heat transfer between the soil surface and canopy is not complete. A major contributing factor to the uncertainty is the presence and amount of dew on the plant canopy. Improved measurements of dew duration, and possibly amount would help refine land surface process models. There are automated leaf wetness sensors available that consist of a simple sensor that attempts to simulate a single leaf. The electrical resistivity of the sensor is a function of the amount of liquid water that has condensed on its surface. These sensors generally provide reliable dew/no dew indication, but do not provide good information on dew amount. It may be possible to obtain dew amount from such sensors, but that would require careful calibration, because of the nonlinear relationship between dew amount and resistivity. The alternative is traditional measurements that require manually sampling and measuring dew amount. This latter is time-consuming and labor-intensive. Further, all these methods are point measurements that suffer from sampling errors. We are exploring the use of very inexpensive radios that operate in the unlicensed industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band as leaf wetness sensors. Our hypothesis is that dew on plant leafs attenuates the radio signals, and by recording the received signal strength, one can detect changes in leaf wetness. Further, such measurements are distributed/volume measurements that counter sampling errors inherent in point measurements. By using directional antennas, there is the exciting possibility to perform tomographic dew measurements. To test our hypothesis, we have deployed a number of radios operating at 2.4 GHz and 900 MHz, collocated with traditional leaf-wetness sensors in a corn field near Ames, Iowa. We have also made a large number of traditional leaf wetness/dew amount measurements at this location. Preliminary data analysis for the radio-based technique is promising. In this work, we present and

  19. The under-explored radio-loudness of quasars and the possibility of radio-source-environment interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Katherine M.

    2003-10-01

    I demonstrate that radio observations in the literature to date of optically-selected quasars are largely inadequate to reveal the full extent of their jet-activity. I discuss a recent example of an optically-powerful quasar, which is radio-quiet according to all the standard classifications, which Blundell and Rawlings discovered to have a >100 kpc jet, and show that other than being the first FR I quasar to be identified, there is no reason to presume it is exceptional. I also discuss a possible new probe of accounting for the interactions of radio sources with their environments. This tool could help to avoid over-estimating magnetic fields strengths within cluster gas. I briefly describe recent analyses by Rudnick and Blundell which confront claims in the literature of cluster gas B-fields >10 μG.

  20. The Solar System in the Age of Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2011-06-01

    We are celebrating the 50th anniversary of the launch of Sputnik, which began the space age. Though the manned exploration of the solar system has been limited to the Moon, in NASA's Apollo Program that ended over 35 years ago, robotic exploration of the solar system continues to be very successful. This paper explores the latest space mission and other observations of each planet and of each type of solar-system object, including dwarf planets, asteroids, and comets, as well as the sun.

  1. Thunderstorms observed by radio astronomy Explorer 1 over regions of low man made noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) I observations of thunderstorms over regions of low man-made noise levels are analyzed to assess the satellite's capability for noise source differentiation. The investigation of storms over Australia indicates that RAE can resolve noise generation due to thunderstorms from the general noise background over areas of low man-made noise activity. Noise temperatures observed by RAE over stormy regions are on the average 10DB higher than noise temperatures over the same regions in the absence of thunderstorms. In order to determine the extent of noise contamination due to distant transmitters comprehensive three dimensional computer ray tracings were generated. The results indicate that generally, distant transmitters contribute negligibly to the total noise power, being 30DB or more below contributions arriving from an area immediately below the satellite.

  2. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in red giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth distribution over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  3. Exploring Systems Engineering (and the Universe) Through the RadioJOVE telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditi Raj, Anya

    2017-01-01

    Amateur projects in radio astronomy are popular methods to engage in what often seems to be an inaccessible field, and pre-made kits are becoming increasingly available to hobbyists and educators. One such kit is the RadioJOVE, which is attractive due to its simplicity, accessibility and its extensive support network and community of users. When coupled with an education in project management, building the RadioJOVE provides a perfect framework to learn about best practices in completing a project. We will primarily discuss the use of the RadioJOVE project to enhance study in project management and systems engineering. We also intend to discuss the importance of amateur projects such as the RadioJOVE in gaining a holistic understanding of radio astronomy and the project’s potential to spark interest in radio astronomy in students of various disciplines.

  4. Moon Age and Regolith Explorer (MARE) Mission Design and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.; Lee, David E.; Carson, John M., III

    2017-01-01

    On December 11, 1972, Apollo 17 marked the last controlled U.S. lunar landing and was followed by an absence of methodical in-situ investigation of the lunar surface. The Moon Age and Regolith Explorer (MARE) proposal provides scientific measurement of the age and composition of a relatively young portion of the lunar surface near Aristarchus Plateau and the first post-Apollo U.S. soft lunar landing. It includes the first demonstration of a crew survivability-enhancing autonomous hazard detection and avoidance system. This report focuses on the mission design and performance associated with the MARE robotic lunar landing subject to mission and trajectory constraints.

  5. Calibration of a cylindrical RF capacitance probe. [for ionospheric plasma effects on Radio Astronomy Explorer 1 antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, S. R.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    Ambient electron concentrations derived from observations with the Radio Astronomy Explorer 1 antenna capacitance probe have been compared with upper hybrid resonance measurements from the same spacecraft. From this comparison an empirical correction factor for the capacitance probe measurements has been derived. The differences between the two types of measurements is attributed to sheath effects.

  6. After Machines: An Ecological Age of Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R.

    This paper addresses the transition from an industrial to ecological age of space exploration through a novel technological platform characterised through the concept of `assemblage' [1]. While machines have transported us beyond Earth's atmosphere and have protected us from the vacuum of space, they do not directly sustain us. This paper takes an ecological, rather than an industrial approach, to space exploration and explores an alternative technological platform, referred to as an `assemblage', which may directly support living systems beyond Earth's specific chemistry and physics. The unique operating system of assemblage technology is discussed as a counterpoint to machines ­ being composed of `agentised' matter, or actants [2] that are spontaneously assembled as a whole, form loose, reversible connections between each other, and confer the platform with environmental sensitivity, robustness and creativity. Applications of assemblage technologies are discussed in the context of space exploration with respect to ecopoiesis and their potential to construct `synthetic ecologies' in lifeless environments. It is proposed that assemblages therefore may provide a way to think about a technical system that transgresses modern distinctions between life and non-life. Since the design of space habitats has historically been linked with the ecological design of landscapes and buildings on earth [3], a new technological platform that facilitates the construction of material relationships between bodies, could also conceivably underpin a transition from the industrial exploration of space, to an ecological engagement with living beyond Earth's surface.

  7. The Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI) and the Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Burns, J.; Jones, D.; Kasper, J.; Neff, S.; MacDowall, R.; Weiler, K.; DALI/ROLSS Team

    2009-01-01

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe, the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Achieving the required performance demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet” locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. The Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI) is a Moon-based telescope concept, funded under the Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study program, intended to observe the highly-redshifted hyperfine (21-cm) transition from neutral hydrogen (H I) in the intergalactic medium at z 30. This H I signal is potentially rich for both cosmology and astrophysics_for a portion of the Dark Ages, the physics is sufficiently simple that the H I signal can be used to constrain fundamental cosmological parameters in a manner similar to that of CMB observations, but the spectral nature of the signal allows the evolution of the Universe as a function of z to be followed. Observing at wavelengths around 5 m ( 60 MHz), DALI would be located on the Moon's far side, where it would be shielded from terrestrial emissions. We illustrate the notional DALI concept and identify required areas of technology development. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS), funded under the Lunar Sortie Science Opportunity program, is intended to probe particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and the lunar ionosphere. ROLSS is designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers), and would also serve as a pathfinder for a future larger telescope, such as DALI. We describe the science antenna design work, antenna materials testing, and a system-level analysis.

  8. Protection of passive radio frequencies used for earth exploration by satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochard, Guy

    2004-10-01

    Space-borne passive sensing of the Earth"s surface and atmosphere has an essential and increasing importance in Earth Observation. The impressive progress recently made or shortly expected in weather analysis, warning and forecasts (in particular for dangerous weather phenomena as rain and floods, storms, cyclones, droughts) as well as in the study and prediction of climate change, is mainly attributable to the spaceborne observations. On this basis, economic studies show that meteorological services have a high positive impact on a wide range of economic activities, notwithstanding safety of life and property aspects. Space-borne passive sensing feeds crucial observational data to numerical weather predction models run on the most advanced super-computers that are operated by a few global forecasting centers. All meteorological and environmental satellite organizations operate these crucial remote-sensing missions as part of the GOS of the World Weather Watch and others... Spaceborne passive sensing for meterological applications is performed in frequency bands allocated to the Earth Exploration-Satellite Service. This is named "EESS passive" in the ITU-R Radio Regulations. The appropriate bands are uniquely determined by the physical properties (e.g. molecular resonance) of constituents of the atmosphere, and are therefore one of the unique natural resources (similarly to Radio Astronomy bands). Passive measurements at several frequencies in the microwave spectrum must be made simultaneously in order to extract the individual contribution of the geophysical parameter of interest. Bands below 100 GHz are of particular importance to provide an "all-weather" capability since many clouds are almost transparent at these frequencies. Along this line, the two first figures below about zenithal opacity describes respectively the atmosphere optical thickness due to water vapor and dry components in the frequency range 1 to 275 GHz and 275 GHz to 1000 GHz on which have

  9. Moon Age and Regolith Explorer (MARE) Mission Design and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.; Lee, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The moon’s surface last saw a controlled landing from a U.S. spacecraft on December 11, 1972 with Apollo 17. Since that time, there has been an absence of methodical in-situ investigation of the lunar surface. In addition to the scientific value of measuring the age and composition of a relatively young portion of the lunar surface near Aristarchus Plateau, the Moon Age and Regolith Explorer (MARE) proposal provides the first U.S. soft lunar landing since the Apollo Program and the first ever robotic soft lunar landing employing an autonomous hazard detection and avoidance system, a system that promises to enhance crew safety and survivability during a manned lunar (or other) landing. This report focuses on the mission design and performance associated with the MARE robotic lunar landing subject to mission and trajectory constraints.

  10. Aging in precarious times: Exploring the role of gender in shaping views on aging.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Catrinel; Flick, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores views on aging and how these differ according to gender and precariousness status. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 men and 10 women with secure and insecure pensions. Themes like fear of illness and health decline were more present in men, while fear of losing their attractiveness in old age more present among women. For all participants, loss of autonomy and social roles represented a negative view of old age, while activity in the form of work, volunteering, or leisure represented positive views. Differences in views on aging were related to pension security and less to gender. Women with insecure pension plans displayed the most negative views of aging. Implications for practice and policy to prevent health and gender inequalities are discussed.

  11. New Age of Exploration: A View from a Science Writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Z.

    2012-09-01

    We present an auxiliary frame for planetary science outreach, based especially on historical parallels and analogues. The general aim is to create and further cultivate a broader public support for integrated planetary exploration (i.e., one which uses both interplanetary probes/orbital observatories and ground instruments). The main approach consist of a series of a quite limited units of information, consisting of a unifying background narration and short stories illustrating specific points. These units could come in two versions, one emphasizing the visual side (static photos, static drawings, animations, videos), something as movie-like trailers for a wide use, including their upload to YouTube, the other emphasizing the narration itself in voice or textual form. These presentations should be scientifically rigorous, both factually and contextually, but will make use of "showbusiness" and "marketing" features, in a better sense of these terms. Both versions will support interactiveness. The main point stressed is an extensive set of similarities between The Age of Exploration here on Earth (15th-19th century) on the one side and the present era of direct and indirect solar system exploration and a new dimension introduced by exoplanet discoveries on the other. The parallel/analogue approach is developed step by step, from early Portuguese explorers of the coast of West Africa (with mentions of ancient cases, represented, for example, by Phoenician and Greek colonisations of the Mediterranean. The consequences of the Age of Exploration benefited Europe enormously. The same could be expected form its modern space counterpart, as it has been demonstrated by a number of industrial outcomes from the Apollo Project. The relevant storytelling will highlight also mysteries and riddles (preserving sciece approach), like martian methane and probable ocean on Europa. The information units will be oriented towards the members of public, but keeping in mind psychology and

  12. The Astronomical Low Frequency Array: A Proposed Explorer Mission for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.; Allen, R.; Basart, J.; Bastian, T.; Bougeret, J. L.; Dennison, B.; Desch, M.; Dwarakanath, K.; Erickson, W.; Finley, D.; Kaiser, M.; Kassim, N.; Kuiper, T.; MacDowall, R.; Mahoney, M.; Perley, R.; Preston, R.; Reiner, M.; Rodriguez, P.; Stone, R.; Unwin, S.; Weiler, K.; Woan, G.; Woo, R.

    1999-01-01

    A radio interferometer array in space providing high dynamic range images with unprecedented angular resolution over the broad frequency range from 0.030 - 30 MHz will open new vistas in solar, terrestial, galactic, and extragalactic astrophysics.

  13. Medical comforts during the heroic age of Antarctic exploration.

    PubMed

    Guly, H R

    2013-04-01

    In the literature of the exploration of the Antarctic in the early 20th century, there are many references to 'medical comforts'. While 'medical comforts' was sometimes used as a euphemism for alcoholic beverages, the term, which originated in the army, covered all foods and drinks used for the treatment and prevention of illness and during convalescence. This article describes the use of medical comforts during the Antarctic expeditions of the so called 'heroic age'. Apart from alcohol, medical comforts included beef extracts, milk extracts and arrowroot. These products were extensively advertised to the medical and nursing professions and to the general public and the Antarctic connection was sometimes used in the advertising. The products were largely devoid of vitamins and their use may have contributed to some of the disease that occurred on these expeditions.

  14. The New World and the New Frontier: Studying the Age of Exploration and the Space Age with Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritzer, Penelope; Ploger, Don

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a social studies classroom unit for use with elementary students. Focuses on comparing the age of exploration and space age exploration. Provides background information on both explorations and compares the similarities and differences between the two. Includes suggestions and questions for using this interdisciplinary approach. (CMK)

  15. Women in Radio Soap Operas: A Historical Perspective of the Image of Women's "Sphere" in the "Golden Age."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St John, Jacqueline

    Radio's "Golden Age," the 1930s and 1940s produced numerous successful and profitable daytime serials, called "soap operas" because they were most often sponsored by firms selling laundry products. Among the most popular of these series were those produced by the team of Anne and Frank Hummert. Working through the…

  16. A simple demonstration for exploring the radio waves generated by a mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-09-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones.

  17. A Simple Demonstration for Exploring the Radio Waves Generated by a Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones. (Contains 5 figures.)

  18. Exploring the nature of the broadband variability in the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidiac, C.; Rani, B.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Nestoras, I.; Zensus, J. A.; Sievers, A.; Ungerechts, H.; Itoh, R.; Fukazawa, Y.; Uemura, M.; Sasada, M.; Gurwell, M.; Fedorova, E.

    2016-05-01

    The detailed investigation of the broadband flux variability in the blazar 3C 273 allowed us to probe the location and size of emission regions and their physical conditions. We conducted correlation studies of the flaring activity in 3C 273, which was observed for the period between 2008 and 2012. The observed broadband variations were investigated using the structure function and the discrete correlation function methods. Starting from the commonly used power spectral density (PSD) analysis at X-ray frequencies, we extended our investigation to characterise the nature of variability at radio, optical, and γ-ray frequencies. The PSD analysis showed that the optical and infrared light-curve slopes are consistent with the slope of white-noise processes, while the PSD slopes at radio, X-ray, and γ-ray energies are consistent with red-noise processes. We found that the estimated fractional variability amplitudes strongly depend on the observed frequency. The flux variations at γ-ray and mm-radio bands are found to be significantly correlated. Using the estimated time lag of (110 ± 27) days between γ-ray and radio light-curves, where γ-ray variations lead the radio bands, we constrained the location of the γ-ray emission region at a de-projected distance of 1.2 ± 0.9 pc from the jet apex. Flux variations at X-ray bands were found to have a significant correlation with variations at both radio and γ-ray energies. The correlation between X-ray and γ-ray light curves indicates two possible time lags, which suggests that two components are responsible for the X-ray emission. A negative time lag of -(50 ± 20) days, where the X-rays are leading the emission, suggests that X-rays are emitted closer to the jet apex from a compact region (0.02-0.05 pc in size), most likely from the corona at a distance of (0.5 ± 0.4) pc from the jet apex. A positive time lag of (110 ± 20) days (γ-rays are leading the emission) suggests a jet-base origin of the other X

  19. Continued development of the radio science technique as a tool for planetary and solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A possible alternative to a spacecraft monostatic radar system for surface studies of Titan is introduced. The results of a short study of the characteristics of a bistatic radar investigation of Titan's surface, presented in terms of the Voyager 1 flyby and a proposed Galileo orbiter of Saturn are outlined. The critical factors which need to be addressed in order to optimize the radio occultation technique for the study of clouds and cloud regions in planetary atmospheres are outlined. Potential improvements in the techniques for measuring small-scale structures in planetary atmospheres and ionospheres are addressed. The development of a technique for vastly improving the radial resolution from the radio occultation measurements of the rings of Saturn is discussed.

  20. Gravity-gradient dynamics experiments performed in orbit utilizing the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE-1) spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, H.

    1973-01-01

    Six dynamic experiments were performed in earth orbit utilizing the RAE spacecraft in order to test the accuracy of the mathematical model of RAE dynamics. The spacecraft consisted of four flexible antenna booms, mounted on a rigid cylindrical spacecraft hub at center, for measuring radio emissions from extraterrestrial sources. Attitude control of the gravity stabilized spacecraft was tested by using damper clamping, single lower leading boom operations, and double lower boom operations. Results and conclusions of the in-orbit dynamic experiments proved the accuracy of the analytic techniques used to model RAE dynamical behavior.

  1. Radio Science Concepts for Exploring the Interior Structures of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Anderson, J. D.; Castillo, J. C.; Folkner, W. M.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schubert, G.; Spilker, T. R.; Tyler, G. L.; Watkins, M. M.; Yoder, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    A set of concepts are proposed for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) to apply Radio Science tools to investigate the interior structures of the Galilean Satellites and address key questions on their thermal and dynamical evolution. Multi-frequency Doppler tracking and ranging of the orbiter can be used to measure the gravity harmonic coefficients of the satellites as well as their secular and dynamic potential Love numbers. These measurements will confirm the presence of a subsurface ocean and constrain the oceanic density. Under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, the core's size and density will be determined. The potential tidal phase lag, a function of the viscosity profile, will be determined or limited for each body. Altimetry data produce local topography and topographic harmonic coefficients as well as the topographic Love number. Combining the gravity and topography data will determine the mean as well as the spatial variations of the crustal thickness and produce a model of the cryospheric structure. This knowledge leads to understanding the mechanisms of topographic support or compensation and any large-scale geomorphological features related to the interior. Accelerometers measure the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft, a typical systematic noise type in the gravity data and, thus, improve the accuracy of the measurement. Gradiometers improve the resolution of the data by providing higher spatial resolution in the gravity field and its correlation with the topography. The resulting information will be crucial to establishing the link between surface and internal dynamics leading to identifying the terrain with easiest ocean access and to understanding the origin of the chaotic terrains and ridges. Time observations of surface features enable an examination of the difference between the obliquity and inclination which, when combined with the gravity data, provide a measurement of the moments of inertia. High stability coherent

  2. Antenna Technology and other Radio Frequency (RF) Communications Activities at the Glenn Research Center in Support of NASA's Exploration Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Vision for Space Exploration outlines a very ambitious program for the next several decades of the Space Agency endeavors. Ahead is the completion of the International Space Station (ISS); safely flight the shuttle (STS) until 2010; develop and fly the Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion) by no later than 2014; return to the moon by no later than 2020; extend human presence across the solar system and beyond; implement a sustainable and affordable human and robotic program; develop supporting innovative technologies, knowledge and infrastructure; and promote international and commercial participation in exploration. To achieve these goals, a series of enabling technologies must be developed or matured in a timely manner. Some of these technologies are: spacecraft RF technology (e.g., high power sources and large antennas which using surface receive arrays can get up to 1 Gbps from Mars), uplink arraying (reduce reliance on large ground-based antennas and high operation costs; single point of failure; enable greater data-rates or greater effective distance; scalable, evolvable, flexible scheduling), software define radio (i.e., reconfigurable, flexible interoperability allows for in flight updates open architecture; reduces mass, power, volume), and optical communications (high capacity communications with low mass/power required; significantly increases data rates for deep space). This presentation will discuss some of the work being performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in antenna technology as well as other on-going RF communications efforts.

  3. The Deep Space Network: A Radio Communications Instrument for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Stelzried, C. T.; Noreen, G. K.; Slobin, S. D.; Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.; Donnelly, H.; Kinman, P. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Burow, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Deep Space Network (DSN) is to serve as a communications instrument for deep space exploration, providing communications between the spacecraft and the ground facilities. The uplink communications channel provides instructions or commands to the spacecraft. The downlink communications channel provides command verification and spacecraft engineering and science instrument payload data.

  4. The Intersection of Gender and Age: An Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of gender inequality for women entering work has not been subject to significant research or theorizing. This small study indicated that young women entering the workplace are subject to direct discrimination and by using an intersectionality approach this paper proposes that the intersection of gender and young age results in…

  5. Exploring age-related brain degeneration in meditation practitioners.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that meditation practices are associated with substantial psychological as well as physiological benefits. In searching for the biological mechanisms underlying the beneficial impact of meditation, studies have revealed practice-induced alterations of neurotransmitters, brain activity, and cognitive abilities, just to name a few. These findings not only imply a close link between meditation and brain structure, but also suggest possible modulating effects of meditation on age-related brain atrophy. Given that normal aging is associated with significant loss of brain tissue, meditation-induced growth and/or preservation might manifest as a seemingly reduced brain age in meditators (i.e., cerebral measures characteristic of younger brains). Surprisingly, there are only three published studies that have addressed the question of whether meditation diminishes age-related brain degeneration. This paper reviews these three studies with respect to the brain attributes studied, the analytical strategies applied, and the findings revealed. The review concludes with an elaborate discussion on the significance of existing studies, implications and directions for future studies, as well as the overall relevance of this field of research.

  6. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  7. Evaluation of a radio based ADL interaction recognition system in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands.

    PubMed

    Neuhaeuser, J; Diehl-Schmid, J; Lueth, T C

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution the evaluation of a system called "Eventlogger" is presented, which is installed in a day hospital for old age psychiatry. The Eventlogger is a radio based module with an adjustable communication range, able to recognize interaction of the user with objects or with other people. It is intended to function as a monitoring tool for the users' activities. Due to the demographic change monitoring systems for elderly people become more important. In this paper the "simple activities of daily living" (sADL) is introduced as well as the evaluation for the recognition of sADL in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands is presented. Together with the first approaches of post processing for better results it is shown that the system is now ready to be used with patients of the day hospital for old age psychiatry.

  8. Psychology during the expeditions of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration.

    PubMed

    Guly, H R

    2012-06-01

    The psychology of Antarctic explorers and groups in Antarctic bases has been much studied in recent years, and current knowledge has been summarized in a review by Palinkas and Suedenfeld (2008). There was no formal psychological research during the heroic age of Antarctic exploration, but a number of the doctors and non-medical personnel on the expeditions were keen observers of the psychological aspects of the expeditions and wrote about them. In this paper, I describe their understanding of the psychology of Antarctic exploration. By comparing this with current knowledge, it is clear that most of what has been found by formal study was known to the explorers of the heroic age.

  9. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  10. Exploring the power of yeast to model aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana V; Vilaça, Rita; Santos, Cláudia N; Costa, Vítor; Menezes, Regina

    2017-02-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process determined by molecular, cellular and systemic factors and it is well established that advancing age is a leading risk factor for several neurodegenerative diseases. In fact, the close association of aging and neurodegenerative disorders has placed aging as the greatest social and economic challenge of the 21st century, and age-related diseases have also become a key priority for countries worldwide. The growing need to better understand both aging and neurodegenerative processes has led to the development of simple eukaryotic models amenable for mechanistic studies. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an unprecedented experimental model to study the fundamental aspects of aging and to decipher the intricacies of neurodegenerative disorders greatly because the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Moreover, yeast offers several methodological advantages allowing a rapid and relatively easy way of establishing gene-protein-function associations. Here we review different aging theories, common cellular pathways driving aging and neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the major contributions of yeast to the state-of-art knowledge in both research fields.

  11. A Theoretical Development of a Multicarrier Wireless Relay System and a Practical Exploration of Full-Duplex Radio Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    all-analog adaptive radio interference cancellation. Critical hardware issues such as phase noise, IQ imbalance and nonlinearity are handled in our...analog adaptive radio interference cancellation. Critical hardware issues such as phase noise, IQ imbalance and nonlinearity are handled in our...93 12.3.2 Complex System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 12.4 IQ Imbalance

  12. Exploring the Influence of Ethnicity, Age, and Trauma on Prisoners' World Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the author explores world assumptions of prisoners, how these assumptions vary by ethnicity and age, and whether trauma history affects world assumptions. A random sample of young and old prisoners, matched for prison location, was drawn from the New Jersey Department of Corrections prison population. Age and ethnicity had…

  13. The African Turquoise Killifish: A Model for Exploring Vertebrate Aging and Diseases in the Fast Lane.

    PubMed

    Harel, Itamar; Brunet, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Why and how organisms age remains a mystery, and it defines one of the biggest challenges in biology. Aging is also the primary risk factor for many human pathologies, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, manipulating the aging rate and potentially postponing the onset of these devastating diseases could have a tremendous impact on human health. Recent studies, relying primarily on nonvertebrate short-lived model systems, have shown the importance of both genetic and environmental factors in modulating the aging rate. However, relatively little is known about aging in vertebrates or what processes may be unique and specific to these complex organisms. Here we discuss how advances in genomics and genome editing have significantly expanded our ability to probe the aging process in a vertebrate system. We highlight recent findings from a naturally short-lived vertebrate, the African turquoise killifish, which provides an attractive platform for exploring mechanisms underlying vertebrate aging and age-related diseases.

  14. Foraging across the life span: is there a reduction in exploration with aging?

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Rui; Wilke, Andreas; Czienskowski, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Does foraging change across the life span, and in particular, with aging? We report data from two foraging tasks used to investigate age differences in search in external environments as well as internal search in memory. Overall, the evidence suggests that foraging behavior may undergo significant changes across the life span across internal and external search. In particular, we find evidence of a trend toward reduced exploration with increased age. We discuss these findings in light of theories that postulate a link between aging and reductions in novelty seeking and exploratory behavior. PMID:23616741

  15. Investigating effects of aging on radio-frequency dielectric properties of chicken meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of aging on dielectric properties of chicken meat were tracked through measurement of the dielectric properties with an open-ended coaxial probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at 23 oC. The chicken meat was stored in a refrigerator for 13 days at 4 oC. The changes in dielectric constant and loss...

  16. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  17. Layer V perirhinal cortical ensemble activity during object exploration: a comparison between young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, S N; Hartzell, A L; Lister, J P; Hoang, L T; Barnes, C A

    2012-10-01

    Object recognition memory requires the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and this cognitive function declines during normal aging. Recent electrophysiological recordings from young rats have shown that neurons in Layer V of the PRC are activated by three-dimensional objects. Thus, it is possible that age-related object recognition deficits result from alterations in PRC neuron activity in older animals. To examine this, the present study used cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) with confocal microscopy to monitor cellular distributions of activity-induced Arc RNA in layer V of the PRC. Activity was monitored during two distinct epochs of object exploration. In one group of rats (6 young/6 aged) animals were placed in a familiar testing arena and allowed to explore five different three-dimensional objects for two 5-min sessions separated by a 20-min rest (AA). The second group of animals (6 young/6 aged) also explored the same objects for two 5-min sessions, but the environment was changed between the first and the second epoch (AB). Behavioral data showed that both age groups spent less time exploring objects during the second epoch, even when the environment changed, indicating successful recognition. Although the proportion of active neurons between epochs did not change in the AA group, in the AB group more neurons were active during epoch 2 of object exploration. This recruitment of neurons into the active neural ensemble could serve to signal that familiar stimuli are being encountered in a new context. When numbers of Arc positive neurons were compared between age groups, the old rats had significantly lower proportions of Arc-positive PRC neurons in both the AA and AB behavioral conditions. These data support the hypothesis that age-associated functional alterations in the PRC contribute to declines in stimulus recognition over the lifespan.

  18. Effect of chronic piracetam on age-related changes of cross-maze exploration in mice.

    PubMed

    Salimov, R; Salimova, N; Shvets, L; Shvets, N

    1995-11-01

    Normal aging is known to deteriorate memory, spatial orientation, and perceptual recognition. Experiment 1 examined behavioral manifestations of aging by using a cross-maze exploration test in 2-, 6-, and 10-month-old hybrid mice (CBA x C57BL). A decrease in explorative patrolling and an increase in arm reentries, a latency to start and a total time of exploration were found in 10-month-old mice. In Experiment 2, administration of the cognition enhancer piracetam (2-oxo-1-pirrolidone acetamide) (400 mg/kg, IP, once a day for 10 days) enhanced arm patrolling and decreased reentries in 10-month-old mice to the level displayed by the 2-month-old animals. The results suggest that the cross-maze test may be useful for a preliminary screening of antisenescent drugs.

  19. Project Explorer: Get Away Special #007. [alloy solidification, seed germination, crystal growth, and radio transmission of payload data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, A. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Tentatively scheduled to fly on STS-17 (41G), this get away special aims to demonstrate amateur radio transmissions to global ground stations in the English language. Experiments No. 1, 2, and 3 use the micro-gravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the germination of radish seeds, and the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution. Flight results are to be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 (the Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment - MARCE) features radio transmissions and also provides timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor obtains real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements within the GAS canister. These data are to be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they are converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception. The support structure for the G #007 experiments consists of two primary plates and four bumper assemblies.

  20. NOvelty-related motivation of anticipation and exploration by dopamine (NOMAD): implications for healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Düzel, Emrah; Bunzeck, Nico; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Düzel, Sandra

    2010-04-01

    Studies in humans and animals show that dopaminergic neuromodulation originating from the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) of the midbrain enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity for novel events and has a motivationally energizing effect on actions through striatal mechanisms. In this review, we discuss how these mechanisms of dopaminergic neuromodulation connect to the behavioural and functional consequences that age-related structural degeneration of the SN/VTA exerts on declarative memory. We propose a framework called 'NOvelty-related Motivation of Anticipation and exploration by Dopamine' (NOMAD) which captures existing links between novelty, dopamine, long-term memory, plasticity, energization and their relation to aging. We propose that maximizing the use of this mechanism by maintaining mobility and exploration of novel environments could be a potential mechanism to slow age-related decline of memory.

  1. Effects of intrinsic aging and photodamage on skin dyspigmentation: an explorative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Gabor; Trojahn, Carina; D'Alessandro, Brian; Patwardhan, Sachin; Canfield, Douglas; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Photoaging is associated with increasing pigmentary heterogeneity and darkening of skin color. However, little is known about age-related changes in skin pigmentation on sun-protected areas. The aim of this explorative study was to measure skin color and dyspigmentation using image processing and to evaluate the reliability of these parameters. Twenty-four volunteers of three age-groups were included in this explorative study. Measurements were conducted at sun-exposed and sun-protected areas. Overall skin-color estimates were similar among age groups. The hyper- and hypopigmentation indices differed significantly by age groups and their correlations with age ranged between 0.61 and 0.74. Dorsal forearm skin differed from the other investigational areas (p<0.001). We observed an increase in dyspigmentation at all skin areas, including sun-protected skin areas, already in young adulthood. Associations between age and dyspigmentation estimates were higher compared to color parameters. All color and dyspigmentation estimates showed high reliability. Dyspigmentation parameters seem to be better biomarkers for UV damage than the overall color measurements.

  2. Exploring Experiences and Perceptions of Aging and Cognitive Decline Across Diverse Racial and Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Holly; Sherzai, Dean; Belliard, Juan Carlos; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore how older adults from three prominent ethnoracial groups experience cognitive decline and aging. Method: Semistructured key informant interviews (KIIs) and focus groups (FGs) were conducted with caregivers, experts, and older adults. Results: (N = 75). Fifteen KIIs regarding cognitive aging issues were conducted among health care professionals and community-based agencies serving older adults. Eight FGs included family caregivers and physicians, and six FGs with Latino, African American, and White older adult community members. Major themes included (a) personal expectations about aging, (b) societal value of older adults, (c) model of care preferred, and (d) community concerns. An overarching theme was a sense of loss associated with aging; however, how this loss was experienced and dealt with varied. Discussion: Distinct patterns of concerns and views are important to understand for the development of programs aimed at meeting the needs of diverse older adult community members to improve health outcomes. PMID:26925436

  3. Mars Exploration Rovers 2004-2013: Evolving Operational Tactics Driven by Aging Robotic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Julie; Seibert, Michael; Bellutta, Paolo; Ferguson, Eric; Forgette, Daniel; Herman, Jennifer; Justice, Heather; Keuneke, Matthew; Sosland, Rebekah; Stroupe, Ashley; Wright, John

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of more than 10 years of continuous operations on the Martian surface, the operations team for the Mars Exploration Rovers has encountered and overcome many challenges. The twin rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, designed for a Martian surface mission of three months in duration, far outlived their life expectancy. Spirit explored for six years and Opportunity still operates and, in January 2014, celebrated the 10th anniversary of her landing. As with any machine that far outlives its design life, each rover has experienced a series of failures and degradations attributable to age, use, and environmental exposure. This paper reviews the failures and degradations experienced by the two rovers and the measures taken by the operations team to correct, mitigate, or surmount them to enable continued exploration and discovery.

  4. Language and ageing - exploring propositional density in written language - stability over time.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Elizabeth; Craig, Hugh; Ferguson, Alison; Colyvas, Kim

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the stability of propositional density (PD) in written texts, as this aspect of language shows promise as an indicator and as a predictor of language decline with ageing. This descriptive longitudinal study analysed written texts obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health in which participants were invited to respond to an open-ended question about their health. The 635 texts used for this study were taken from 127 middle-aged women who responded to this question on each of the five surveys conducted at 3-year intervals over a 16-year period. The study made use of an automated PD rater (CPIDR-3) for the analysis. PD was found to be a stable measure over time when comparing the grouped data, but there was between- and within-subject variation over time. Further research is needed to explore the valid use of this measure in research into language and ageing.

  5. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1996 uses available data from literature, industry, and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on minerals industry direction are drawn from these data.

  6. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  7. Aging out: a qualitative exploration of ageism and heterosexism among aging African American lesbians and gay men.

    PubMed

    Woody, Imani

    2014-01-01

    African Americans elders, like their non-African American counterparts, are not a homogeneous group; however an early characteristic placed on all African Americans is in their shared history in the United States. As members of multiple minority groups, older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people of African descent have survived racism, heterosexism, homophobia, and now ageism. This article describes a qualitative study grounded in Black feminist and minority stress theories that explored the issues of perceived social discrimination and alienation of 15 older African American lesbians and gay males whose lived experiences were captured using in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Several themes were identified in the study, including (a) Sense of Alienation in the African American Community, (b) Deliberate Concealment of Sexual Identity and Orientation, (c) Aversion to LGBT Labels, (d) Perceived Discrimination and Alienation From Organized Religion, (e) Feelings of Grief and Loss Related to Aging, (f) Isolation, and (g) Fear of Financial and Physical Dependence. The implication of the findings suggests that the ethos and needs of older African American lesbian women and gay men need to be addressed to eliminate potential barriers to successful aging for this cohort.

  8. Age of Exploration. Grade 5 Model Lesson for Standard 5.2. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    California State Standard 5.2 is delineated as: Students trace the routes of early explorers and describe the early explorations of the Americas. The Age of Exploration, which began in the late 1400s, was an important era in the discovery and development of land yet unknown to Europeans. During this period, Europeans sought new sea routes to Asia…

  9. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1997 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Sulvey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  10. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1999 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The report documents data on exploration budgets by region and commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry. And it presents inferences and observations on mineral industry direction based on these data and discussions.

  11. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Porter, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1998 draws on available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  12. Estimating the extent of Antarctic summer sea ice during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinburgh, Tom; Day, Jonathan J.

    2016-11-01

    In stark contrast to the sharp decline in Arctic sea ice, there has been a steady increase in ice extent around Antarctica during the last three decades, especially in the Weddell and Ross seas. In general, climate models do not to capture this trend and a lack of information about sea ice coverage in the pre-satellite period limits our ability to quantify the sensitivity of sea ice to climate change and robustly validate climate models. However, evidence of the presence and nature of sea ice was often recorded during early Antarctic exploration, though these sources have not previously been explored or exploited until now. We have analysed observations of the summer sea ice edge from the ship logbooks of explorers such as Robert Falcon Scott, Ernest Shackleton and their contemporaries during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration (1897-1917), and in this study we compare these to satellite observations from the period 1989-2014, offering insight into the ice conditions of this period, from direct observations, for the first time. This comparison shows that the summer sea ice edge was between 1.0 and 1.7° further north in the Weddell Sea during this period but that ice conditions were surprisingly comparable to the present day in other sectors.

  13. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonferrous, nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 58 percent in 2004 from the 2003 budget, according to Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes two years after a five-year period of declining spending for mineral exploration (1998 to 2002). Figures suggest a subsequent 27 percent increase in budgeted expenditures from 2002 to 2003. For the second consecutive year, all regional exploration budget estimates were anticipated to increase.

  14. Application of High- and Low-Orbiting Radio Tomography for Exploring the Ionospheric Structures on Different Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Padokhin, Artem; Nazarenko, Marina; Nesterov, Ivan; Tumanova, Yulia; Tereshchenko, Evgeniy; Kozharin, Maksim

    2016-07-01

    The methods of ionospheric radio tomography (RT) are actively developing at present. These methods are suitable for reconstructing the spatial distributions of electron density from radio signals transmitted from the navigational satellite systems and recorded by the networks of ground-based receivers. The RT systems based on the low-orbiting (LO) (Parus/Transit) navigational systems have been in operation since the early 1990s. Recently, the RT methods employing the signals from high-orbiting (HO) satellite navigational systems such as GPS/GLONASS have come into play. In our presentation, we discuss the accuracies, advantages, and limitations of LORT and HORT as well as the possibilities of their combined application fro reconstructing the structure of the ionosphere in the same region during the same time interval on the different spatiotemporal scales. The LORT reconstructions provide practically instantaneous (spanning 5-10 min) 2D snapshots of the ionosphere within a spatial interval with a length of up to a few thousand km. The vertical resolution of LORT is 25-30 km and the horizontal resolution, 15-25 km. The HORT methods are capable of reconstructing the 4D structure of the ionosphere (three spatial coordinates and time). The spatial resolution of HORT is generally not better than 100 km with a 60-20 min interval between the successive reconstructions. In the regions of dense receiving networks, the resolution can be improved to 30-50 km and the time step can be reduced to 30-10 min. In California and Japan which are covered by extremely dense receiving networks the resolution can be even higher (10-30 km) and the time interval between the reconstruction even shorter (up to 2 min). In the presentation, we discuss the LORT and HORT reconstructions of the ionosphere during different time periods of the 23rd and 24th solar cycles in the different regions of the world. We analyze the spatiotemporal features and dynamics of the ionosphere depending on the solar

  15. Qualitative Study Exploring the Meaning of Knee Symptoms to Adults Ages 35–65 Years

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Joanna; Badley, Elizabeth M.; Jaglal, Susan B.; Davis, Aileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective While osteoarthritis (OA) has mainly been viewed as a disease affecting older people, its prevalence in younger adults is substantial. However, there is limited research on how younger adults understand knee symptoms. This article explores the meaning of knee symptoms to adults ages 35–65 years. Methods This qualitative study comprised 6 focus groups and 10 one‐on‐one interviews with 51 participants (median age 49, 61% female), who self‐reported knee OA or reported knee symptoms (i.e., pain, aching, or stiffness) on most days of the past month. Constructivist grounded theory guided the sampling, data collection, and analysis. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Results Central to participants’ understanding of knee symptoms was the perception that symptoms were preventable, meaning that there was the potential to prevent the onset of symptoms and to alter the course of symptoms. This understanding was demonstrated in participants’ explanation of symptoms. Participants commented on the cause, prevention, and course of symptoms. Moreover, participants reflected on their experience with symptoms, indicating that symptoms made them feel older than their current age. However, they did not perceive their symptoms as normal or acceptable. Conclusion Participants interpreted knee symptoms as potentially preventable, suggesting that they may be open to primary and secondary prevention strategies. PMID:26238409

  16. Exploring the physiology and pathology of aging in the intestine of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-30

    The gastrointestinal tract, due to its role as a digestive organ and as a barrier between the exterior and interior milieus, is critically impacted by dietary, environmental, and inflammatory conditions that influence health and lifespan. Work in flies is now uncovering the multifaceted molecular mechanisms that control homeostasis in this tissue, and establishing its central role in health and lifespan of metazoans. The Drosophila intestine has thus emerged as a productive, genetically accessible model to study various aspects of the pathophysiology of aging. Studies in flies have characterized the maintenance of regenerative homeostasis, the development of immune senescence, the loss of epithelial barrier function, the decline in metabolic homeostasis, as well as the maintenance of epithelial diversity in this tissue. Due to its fundamental similarity to vertebrate intestines, it can be anticipated that findings obtained in this system will have important implications for our understanding of age-related changes in the human intestine. Here, I review recent studies exploring age-related changes in the fly intestine, and their insight into the regulation of health and lifespan of the animal.

  17. Model based systems engineering (MBSE) applied to Radio Aurora Explorer (RAX) CubeSat mission operational scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangelo, S. C.; Cutler, J.; Anderson, L.; Fosse, E.; Cheng, L.; Yntema, R.; Bajaj, M.; Delp, C.; Cole, B.; Soremekum, G.; Kaslow, D.

    Small satellites are more highly resource-constrained by mass, power, volume, delivery timelines, and financial cost relative to their larger counterparts. Small satellites are operationally challenging because subsystem functions are coupled and constrained by the limited available commodities (e.g. data, energy, and access times to ground resources). Furthermore, additional operational complexities arise because small satellite components are physically integrated, which may yield thermal or radio frequency interference. In this paper, we extend our initial Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) framework developed for a small satellite mission by demonstrating the ability to model different behaviors and scenarios. We integrate several simulation tools to execute SysML-based behavior models, including subsystem functions and internal states of the spacecraft. We demonstrate utility of this approach to drive the system analysis and design process. We demonstrate applicability of the simulation environment to capture realistic satellite operational scenarios, which include energy collection, the data acquisition, and downloading to ground stations. The integrated modeling environment enables users to extract feasibility, performance, and robustness metrics. This enables visualization of both the physical states (e.g. position, attitude) and functional states (e.g. operating points of various subsystems) of the satellite for representative mission scenarios. The modeling approach presented in this paper offers satellite designers and operators the opportunity to assess the feasibility of vehicle and network parameters, as well as the feasibility of operational schedules. This will enable future missions to benefit from using these models throughout the full design, test, and fly cycle. In particular, vehicle and network parameters and schedules can be verified prior to being implemented, during mission operations, and can also be updated in near real-time with oper

  18. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Exploration budgets fell for a fourth successive year in 2001. These decreases reflected low mineral commodity prices, mineral-market investment reluctance, company failures and a continued trend of company mergers and takeovers.

  19. 'Polar anaemia': cardiac failure during the heroic age of Antarctic exploration.

    PubMed

    Guly, H R

    2012-04-01

    On the Belgica expedition (1897-1899), Dr F.A. Cook described a disease that he called 'polar anaemia' and on this expedition it affected most of the expedition members and caused one death. The symptoms were shortness of breath, abnormalities of the pulse and oedema (swelling of the legs) and the disease was clearly cardiac failure. During the heroic age of Antarctic exploration a similar disease affected at least eight other expeditions causing five other deaths. This disease was very similar (and probably identical) to a disease affecting (mostly) Scandinavian seamen and called 'ship beri-beri'. Both diseases were almost certainly what is now called wet beri-beri due to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency though most sufferers were probably also vitamin C deficient and some may have had both beri-beri and scurvy. It may have been exacerbated by invalid diets. This paper describes the disease and how it was considered and treated at the time.

  20. A new formula for assessing skeletal age in growing infants and children by measuring carpals and epiphyses of radio and ulna.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Stefano; Mangiulli, Tatiana; Merelli, Vera; Conforti, Federica; Velandia Palacio, Luz Andrea; Agostini, Susanna; Spinas, Enrico; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a specific formula for the purpose of assessing skeletal age in a sample of Italian growing infants and children by measuring carpals and epiphyses of radio and ulna. A sample of 332 X-rays of left hand-wrist bones (130 boys and 202 girls), aged between 1 and 16 years, was analyzed retrospectively. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was applied to study how sex affects the growth of the ratio Bo/Ca in the boys and girls groups. The regression model, describing age as a linear function of sex and the Bo/Ca ratio for the new Italian sample, yielded the following formula: Age = -1.7702 + 1.0088 g + 14.8166 (Bo/Ca). This model explained 83.5% of total variance (R(2) = 0.835). The median of the absolute values of residuals (observed age minus predicted age) was -0.38, with a quartile deviation of 2.01 and a standard error of estimate of 1.54. A second sample test of 204 Italian children (108 girls and 96 boys), aged between 1 and 16 years, was used to evaluate the accuracy of the specific regression model. A sample paired t-test was used to analyze the mean differences between the skeletal and chronological age. The mean error for girls is 0.00 and the estimated age is slightly underestimated in boys with a mean error of -0.30 years. The standard deviations are 0.70 years for girls and 0.78 years for boys. The obtained results indicate that there is a high relationship between estimated and chronological ages.

  1. Exploring stress-induced cognitive impairment in middle aged, centrally obese adults.

    PubMed

    Lasikiewicz, N; Hendrickx, H; Talbot, D; Dye, L

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that psychosocial stress can induce cognitive impairment. However, few studies have explored impairment following acute stress exposure in individuals with central obesity. Central obesity co-occurs with glucocorticoid excess and can lead to elevated cortisol responses to stress. It is not clear whether centrally obese individuals exhibit greater cognitive impairment following acute stress. Cortisol responses to stress versus no-stress control were compared in 66 high- and low waist to hip ratio (WHR) middle-aged adults (mean age of 46 ± 7.17 years). Cognitive performance post exposure was assessed using Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery. It was hypothesised that high WHR would exhibit greater cortisol in response to stress exposure and would show poorer cognitive performance. Males, particularly of high WHR, tended to secrete greater cortisol during stress exposure. Exposure to stress and increasing WHR were specifically associated with poorer performance on declarative memory tasks (spatial recognition memory and paired associates learning). These data tentatively suggest a reduction in cognitive performance in those with central obesity following exposure to acute stress. Further research is needed to elucidate the effects of stress on cognition in this population.

  2. Exploration of multi-fold symmetry element-loaded superconducting radio frequency structure for reliable acceleration of low- & medium-beta ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shichun; Geng, Rongli

    2015-09-01

    Reliable acceleration of low- to medium-beta proton or heavy ion species is needed for future high-current superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerators. Due to the high-Q nature of an SRF resonator, it is sensitive to many factors such as electron loading (from either the accelerated beam or from parasitic field emitted electrons), mechanical vibration, and liquid helium bath pressure fluctuation etc. To increase the stability against those factors, a mechanically strong and stable RF structure is desirable. Guided by this consideration, multi-fold symmetry element-loaded SRF structures (MFSEL), cylindrical tanks with multiple (n>=3) rod-shaped radial elements, are being explored. The top goal of its optimization is to improve mechanical stability. A natural consequence of this structure is a lowered ratio of the peak surface electromagnetic field to the acceleration gradient as compared to the traditional spoke cavity. A disadvantage of this new structure is an increased size for a fixed resonant frequency and optimal beta. This paper describes the optimization of the electro-magnetic (EM) design and preliminary mechanical analysis for such structures.

  3. A statistical study of inertia gravity waves in the troposphere based on the measurements of Wuhan Atmosphere Radio Exploration (WARE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Haiyin; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Chen, Gang; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Yang, Guobin; Zhang, Yuannong

    2014-04-01

    Wuhan atmosphere radio exploration (WARE) radar is the first mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar to have become operative in the mainland of China and is dedicated to real-time atmospheric observations. Based on the WARE radar data collected for the period from September 2011 to February 2013, 2666 downward and 1735 upward inertia gravity waves (IGWs) are identified from three-dimensional (3-D) wind fields observed in the troposphere and subsequently analyzed in a statistical manner. Wave characteristics including intrinsic frequencies, vertical wavelengths, horizontal wavelengths, vertical wave number spectra, energy density spectra, and wave sources are investigated using a combination of the Lomb-Scargle spectral analysis, the quasi-monochromatic gravity waves model, and the hodograph method. Our results demonstrate that the characteristic parameters of upward and downward tropospheric IGWs are not significantly different. These results indicate that the tropospheric IGWs parameters are not directly correlated with propagation directions. Combining with the information of statistical 3-D wind field and some climatic characteristics of Hubei Province, atmospheric moist convection will contribute most in summer, whereas jet/front systems will contribute most in winter. One may expect seasonal variations to be tied to the varying importance of these sources.

  4. Partner or perish? Exploring inter-organisational partnerships in the multicultural community aged care sector.

    PubMed

    Radermacher, Harriet; Karunarathna, Yoshitha; Grace, Nicci; Feldman, Susan

    2011-09-01

    Given an Australian national and state policy agenda that continues to promote collaborative work, many community organisations are attempting to engage in partnerships with mixed results. This paper reports on a qualitative study conducted to explore the experiences of existing partnerships between organisations and small community groups who deliver community based support services to older people from culturally diverse backgrounds. In particular, this study sought to identify the key factors that facilitate and hinder the formation, maintenance and effectiveness of partnerships within the ethnic and multicultural community aged care (EMCAC) sector. Fourteen participants representing nine community and health service organisations located in the Melbourne metropolitan area took part in semi-structured interviews. Participants reported that partnerships between organisations are necessary and beneficial within the EMCAC sector. Organisational capacity, access to information and guidelines, and the inequality experienced by smaller organisations were key issues identified by participants. Increasing organisational capacity and reducing the inequalities experienced in partnerships may be addressed via training and education about the nature of partnerships, as well as by advocating for increased resources to smaller ethno-specific organisations. Further investigation is required to examine whether not engaging in partnerships will deem an organisation unsustainable in the longer term.

  5. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  6. Radio Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Neil

    1998-01-01

    Thousands of today's high school students run FM radio stations at school, carrying on a tradition that began 50 years ago. Radio helps students learn to work with others and develop a strong sense of responsibility. A sidebar gives advice on starting a high school radio station. (MLF)

  7. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  8. Architecture for the silver generation: exploring the meaning of appropriate space for ageing in a Swedish municipality.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas E

    2011-03-01

    This paper focuses on an architecture competition for the silver generation, namely those aged 65 years and older. Twenty-seven Swedish informants were interviewed using an interviewing guide that included a photographic survey. The informants emphasised aesthetic dimensions in architecture for the prolongation of ageing in place and independent living in a residential home. This study highlights the individual adjustment of space, and the integrated location in existing urban settings near nature. Based on the findings, a habitational model for exploring the appropriate space for ageing is formulated. It suggests that architecture through location and spatial features needs to generate positive associations with the users.

  9. What's in a Topic? Exploring the Interaction between Test-Taker Age and Item Content in High-Stakes Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Jayanti; Papageorgiou, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    The research reported in this article investigates differential item functioning (DIF) in a listening comprehension test. The study explores the relationship between test-taker age and the items' language domains across multiple test forms. The data comprise test-taker responses (N = 2,861) to a total of 133 unique items, 46 items of which were…

  10. Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

  11. Dawn of a New Space Age: Developing a Global Exploration Strategy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volosin, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Jeff Volosin is an aerospace engineer with over 20 years of experience in the design, development, and operations of both robotic and crewed spacecraft. Mr. Volosin is currently leading the NASA effort to develop and integrate a global exploration strategy which reflects the lunar exploration interests of international space agencies, academia and commercial stakeholders. Prior to joining NASA as a member of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate in 2004, Jeff was an aerospace contractor, serving in a number of leadership positions including: Operations Manager for the NASA Communications Network and Flight Operations Manager for the Advanced Composition Explorer, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, and the NOAA Polar and Geostationary satellite constellations. Earlier in his career, Jeff spent 4 years as a system engineer supporting the Space Exploration Initiative studies on human voyages to the Moon and Mars and also supported the Space Station program as an advanced life support engineer.

  12. A creep apparatus to explore the quenching and ageing phenomena of PVC films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. H. D.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    A creep apparatus has been constructed for an in situ determination of length and length change. Using this apparatus, the creep behavior of PVC thin films associated with quenching and aging was studied. The more severe the quench through the glass transition temperature, the greater is the instantaneous elastic deformation and the subsequent creep behavior. As aging proceeds, the quenched films gradually lose the ductility incurred by quenching. These results agree well with the well-known phenomena of physical aging. Thus, the changes reflecting molecular mobilities due to quenching and aging can be properly monitored by such a creep apparatus.

  13. To Explore or to Research: Trends in modern age ocean studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. A.; Valette-Silver, N. J.; Lobecker, E.; Skarke, A. D.; Elliott, K.; McDonough, J.

    2013-12-01

    The recommendations of President's Panel Report on Ocean Exploration gave rise to NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration in 2001, and helped establish NOAA as the lead agency for a federal ocean exploration program. The panel defined exploration as discovery through disciplined, diverse observations and recordings of findings including rigorous, systematic observations and documentation of biological, chemical, physical, geological, and archaeological aspects of the ocean in the three dimensions of space and in time. Here we ask the question about the fine line that separates ';Exploration' and ';Research'. We contend that successful exploration aims to establish new lines of knowledge or give rise to new hypothesis as compared to research where primary goal is to prove or disprove an existing hypothesis. However, there can be considerable time lag before a hypothesis can be established after an initial observation. This creates interesting challenges for ocean exploration because instant ';return on investment' can not be readily shown. Strong media and public interest is garnered by far and apart exciting discoveries about new biological species or processes. However, most of the ocean exploration work goes to systematically extract basic information about a previously unknown area. We refer to this activity as baseline characterization in providing information about an area which can support hypothesis generation and further research to prove or disprove this hypothesis. Examples of such successful characterization include OER endeavors in the Gulf of Mexico that spanned over 10 years and it provided baseline characterization in terms of biological diversity and distribution on basin-wide scale. This baseline characterization was also conveniently used by scientists to conduct research on benthic communities to study effects of deep water horizon incident. More recently similar characterization has been attempted by NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer from 2011 - 2013 field

  14. EXPLORING THE CENTRAL SUB-PARSEC REGION OF THE {gamma}-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXY 3C 84 WITH VLBA AT 43 GHz IN THE PERIOD OF 2002-2008

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kenta; Nagai, Hiroshi; Kino, Motoki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kataoka, Jun; Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Doi, Akihiro; Orienti, Monica; Giovannini, Gabriele; Giroletti, Marcello; Laehteenmaeki, Anne; Tornikoski, Merja; Leon-Tavares, Jonathan; Bach, Uwe; Kameno, Seiji

    2012-02-20

    Following the discovery of a new radio component right before the GeV {gamma}-ray detection since 2008 August by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, we present a detailed study of the kinematics and light curve on the central sub-parsec scale of 3C 84 using the archival Very Long Baseline Array 43 GHz data covering the period between 2002 January and 2008 November. We find that the new component 'C3', previously reported by the observations with the Very Long Baseline Interferometer Exploration of Radio Astrometry, was already formed in 2003. The flux density of C3 increases moderately until 2008, and then it becomes brighter rapidly after 2008. The radio core, C1, also shows a similar trend. The apparent speed of C3 with reference to the core C1 shows moderate acceleration from 0.10c to 0.47c between 2003 November and 2008 November, but is still sub-relativistic. We further try to fit the observed broadband spectrum by the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model using the measured apparent speed of C3. The fit can reproduce the observed {gamma}-ray emission, but does not agree with the observed radio spectral index between 22 and 43 GHz.

  15. Nanotube Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Weldon, Jeff; Garcia, Henry; Zettl, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  16. The future for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

    2013-12-01

    THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

  17. Explorations in Multi-Age Teaming (MAT): Evaluations of Three Projects in Fulton County, Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Randy; Hopping, Linda; Jenkins-Miller, Minnie; McElroy, Camille; Minafee, Margaret; Wisenbaker, Joseph

    Multi-Age Teaming (MAT) programs were implemented at Crabapple and McNair Middle Schools in Fulton County, Georgia, in the fall of 1993, and at Camp Creek Middle School in the fall of 1994. An important goal of these programs was the creation of school families within schools with multi-age teams of sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students. At…

  18. Exploring the Use of Motivational Interviewing with a Disengaged Primary-Aged Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cryer, Sarah; Atkinson, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests motivational interviewing (MI) techniques are both widely-used by educational psychologists (EPs) and effective in supporting young people of secondary age. To date, there has been no published research investigating the use of MI with primary-aged children. This study details the use of a short MI-based intervention with a…

  19. Exploring Career Options and Possibilities Later in Life: Adult (Age 50-75) Career Development Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Angela Carmella

    2009-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed entitled the "Adult (age 50-75) Career Development Survey" (ACDS) to provide an empirical foundation for understanding the current needs of individuals age 50-75 and learning about their attitudes toward, willingness to, and experience in using career counseling and technology in making decisions on…

  20. Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Radio science experiments use electromagnetic waves to probe or study the solar system. Three major research areas were identified within this discipline: radio astronomy, radar astronomy, and celestial mechanics. Radio astronomy (or radiometry) is the detection and measurement of naturally produced radio frequency emissions. Sources include surfaces, atmospheres, rings, and plasmas. Radar astronomy is the observation of man-made signals after their interaction with a target. Both imaging and non-imaging results. Celestial mechanics includes all studies related to the motions of (and gravity fields of) bodies within the solar system. These should not be considered rigid separations, but aid in the discussion of the data sets.

  1. PSR J2030+364I: Radio Discovery and Gamma-ray Study of a Middle-aged Pulsar in the Now Identified Fermi-LAT Source 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Romani, R. W.; Parent, D.; Decesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Donato, D.; SazParkinson, P. M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi-LAT sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641, associated with IFGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times that spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.28, spin-down luminosity of 3 x 10(exp 34) erg/s, and characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1 % that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc/cu cm. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive - PSR J2030+364 I would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only > or approx. 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  2. PSR J2030+3641: RADIO DISCOVERY AND GAMMA-RAY STUDY OF A MIDDLE-AGED PULSAR IN THE NOW IDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT SOURCE 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    SciTech Connect

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Romani, R. W.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Parent, D.; DeCesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Ferrara, E. C.; Donato, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu

    2012-02-10

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641 associated with 1FGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times which spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.2 s, a spin-down luminosity of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1}, and a characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1% that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc cm{sup -3}. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive-PSR J2030+3641 would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only {approx}> 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  3. Age-Based Methods to Explore Time-Related Variables in Occupational Epidemiology Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Janice P. Watkins, Edward L. Frome, Donna L. Cragle

    2005-08-31

    Although age is recognized as the strongest predictor of mortality in chronic disease epidemiology, a calendar-based approach is often employed when evaluating time-related variables. An age-based analysis file, created by determining the value of each time-dependent variable for each age that a cohort member is followed, provides a clear definition of age at exposure and allows development of diverse analytic models. To demonstrate methods, the relationship between cancer mortality and external radiation was analyzed with Poisson regression for 14,095 Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. Based on previous analysis of this cohort, a model with ten-year lagged cumulative radiation doses partitioned by receipt before (dose-young) or after (dose-old) age 45 was examined. Dose-response estimates were similar to calendar-year-based results with elevated risk for dose-old, but not when film badge readings were weekly before 1957. Complementary results showed increasing risk with older hire ages and earlier birth cohorts, since workers hired after age 45 were born before 1915, and dose-young and dose-old were distributed differently by birth cohorts. Risks were generally higher for smokingrelated than non-smoking-related cancers. It was difficult to single out specific variables associated with elevated cancer mortality because of: (1) birth cohort differences in hire age and mortality experience completeness, and (2) time-period differences in working conditions, dose potential, and exposure assessment. This research demonstrated the utility and versatility of the age-based approach.

  4. Exploring opportunities for healthy aging among older persons with a history of homelessness in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Waldbrook, Natalie

    2015-03-01

    Within the areas of literature on both population aging and health and homelessness, little attention has been given to the opportunities and barriers to healthy aging among older persons with a history of homelessness. Set in the context of inner-city Toronto, Canada, this article reports on the findings from qualitative interviews with 29 formerly homeless older persons. The findings illustrate participants' experiences of positive health change since moving into a stable housing environment and the aspects of housing they perceive to have improved their health and wellbeing. The qualitative findings also draw attention to the ongoing barriers to healthy aging that can be experienced among older persons with a history of homelessness. Overall, this study draws on the lived experiences of formerly homeless older persons to offer a better understanding of the long-term effects of homelessness on health, wellbeing, and aging.

  5. Search for Differences between Radio-loud and Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar Populations with Fermi-LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, E. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) have enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with a set of 112 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in the properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, the average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than the average radio-quiet one and is located at lower Galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi-LAT data alone, using all point sources from the 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike our previous work, the present catalog is constructed with a semi-coherent method based on the time-differencing technique and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in a catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 25 of which are radio-quiet. All pulsars found in the search were previously known gamma-ray pulsars. We find no statistically significant differences in age or in distributions in Galactic latitude for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the distributions in rotation period are marginally different with a statistical probability of 4× {10}-3. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as {ε }{RQ}=(63+/- 8) % . The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnetosphere models, while the polar cap models are disfavored.

  6. Atypical object exploration at 12 months of age is associated with autism in a prospective sample.

    PubMed

    Ozonoff, Sally; Macari, Suzanne; Young, Gregory S; Goldring, Stacy; Thompson, Meagan; Rogers, Sally J

    2008-09-01

    This prospective study examined object exploration behavior in 66 12-month-old infants, of whom nine were subsequently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Previous investigations differ on when the repetitive behaviors characteristic of autism are first present in early development. A task was developed that afforded specific opportunities for a range of repetitive uses of objects and was coded blind to outcome status. The autism/ASD outcome group displayed significantly more spinning, rotating, and unusual visual exploration of objects than two comparison groups. The average unusual visual exploration score of the autism/ASD group was over four standard deviations above the mean of the group with no concerns at outcome. Repetitive behaviors at 12 months were significantly related to cognitive and symptomatic status at 36 month outcome. These results suggest that repetitive or stereotyped behaviors may be present earlier than initially thought in very young children developing the autism phenotype.

  7. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  8. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  9. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  10. Instructional Radio: So Good but So Neglected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Richard O.

    1979-01-01

    Issues related to the use of radio broadcasting for instructional purposes (such as two-way radio network conferences among doctors) and effectiveness, cost factors, and policy decisions within broadcasting are explored. Suggestions for implementing an instructional program on a school radio station are presented. (PHR)

  11. Exploring the role of the mental health nurse in community mental health care for the aged.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Rob; Garlick, Robyn; Happell, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    There is currently considerable discussion about the impact of the aging population on the demand for health care services, however there is considerably less attention paid to the impact of mental health issues on the needs of the aged population. Nurses comprise the largest professional group within the mental health workforce in Australia. The availability of a high quality mental health nursing workforce will therefore be crucial to meeting the health needs of aging clients in the future, accompanied by an increased pressure to increase the proportion of care delivered in the community. There is however, a paucity of literature on the role and contribution of community mental health nurses specialising in the aged care field. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of a project designed to examine the role of mental health nursing within aged persons' community mental health teams in Victoria, Australia, with particular emphasis on the biopsychosocial interventions used. Fifteen participants from three community mental health services in Victoria participated in a focus group interview to share their insights and experiences. Data analysis revealed two main themes, the role of the nurse, and the specific functions of the nurse. This data is presented as a beginning contribution to the paucity of literature currently available in this important area.

  12. Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachaluba, Sarah Buck; Brady, Jessica Evans; Critten, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on quantitative and qualitative research examining humanities scholars' understandings of the advantages and disadvantages of print versus electronic information resources. It explores how humanities' faculty members at Florida State University (FSU) use print and electronic resources, as well as how they perceive these…

  13. Exploring Tree Age & Diameter to Illustrate Sample Design & Inference in Observational Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casady, Grant M.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biology labs often explore the techniques of data collection but neglect the statistical framework necessary to express findings. Students can be confused about how to use their statistical knowledge to address specific biological questions. Growth in the area of observational ecology requires that students gain experience in…

  14. Atypical Object Exploration at 12 Months of Age Is Associated with Autism in a Prospective Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Macari, Suzanne; Young, Gregory S.; Goldring, Stacy; Thompson, Meagan; Rogers, Sally J.

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study examined object exploration behavior in 66 12-month-old infants, of whom nine were subsequently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Previous investigations differ on when the repetitive behaviors characteristic of autism are first present in early development. A task was developed that afforded specific opportunities…

  15. Sound Explorations from the Ages of 10 to 37 Months: The Ontogenesis of Musical Conducts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delalande, Francois; Cornara, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    One of the forms of first musical conduct is the exploration of sound sources. When young children produce sounds with any object, these sounds may surprise them and so they make the sounds again--not exactly the same, but introducing some variation. A process of repetition with slight changes is set in motion which can be analysed, as did Piaget,…

  16. Adaptation in very old age: exploring the role of resources, beliefs, and attitudes for centenarians' happiness.

    PubMed

    Jopp, Daniela; Rott, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    When individuals reach very old age, accumulating negative conditions represent a serious challenge to their capacity to adapt and are likely to reduce the quality of life. By examining happiness and its determinants in centenarians, this study investigated the proposal that psychological resilience may come to an end in extremely old age. Data from the population-based Heidelberg Centenarian Study indicated high levels of happiness. Basic resources (i.e., job training, cognition, health, social network, extraversion) explained a substantial proportion of variance in happiness, but some resource effects were mediated through self-referent beliefs (e.g., self-efficacy) and attitudes toward life (e.g., optimistic outlook). Results challenge the view that psychological resilience reaches a critical limit or that the self-regulatory adaptation system loses its efficiency in very advanced age.

  17. ECONOMIC STRESSORS AND ALCOHOL-RELATED OUTCOMES: EXPLORING AGE COHORT DIFFERENCES

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robyn Lewis; Richman, Judith A.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined processes linking age cohort, economic stressors, coping strategies and two drinking-related outcomes (i.e., past-month drinking and problematic drinking). Methods Structural equation models were conducted utilizing data from a national survey. Results Findings revealed the associations between economic stressors and both past-month drinking and problematic drinking were significantly greater for members of the millennial cohort compared to baby boomers. These effects are partly explained by the lesser tendency of members of the millennial cohort to use collective, politically-focused coping strategies. Discussion These findings clarify the circumstances in which age matters most for the associations among economy-related stressors, coping strategies and drinking-related outcomes. They highlight how difficult economic circumstances influence the availability of coping strategies and, in turn, alcohol consumption – and differently for younger and older age cohorts. PMID:26291290

  18. Exploring the specificity of age-related differences in theory of mind tasks.

    PubMed

    Slessor, Gillian; Phillips, Louise H; Bull, Rebecca

    2007-09-01

    Tasks assessing theory of mind (ToM) and non-mental state control tasks were administered to young and older adults to examine previous contradictory findings about age differences in mental state decoding. Age differences were found on a verbal ToM task after controlling for vocabulary levels. Older adults achieved significantly lower scores than did younger adults on static and dynamic visual ToM tasks, and a similar pattern was found on non-ToM control tasks. Rather than a specific ToM deficit, older adults exhibited a more general impairment in the ability to decode cues from verbal and visual information about people.

  19. Frostbite and other cold injuries in the heroic age of Antarctic exploration.

    PubMed

    Guly, Henry R

    2012-12-01

    Frostbite and other cold injuries on the early polar expeditions were common. This paper explains how frostbite was described, prevented, and treated on the Antarctic expeditions of the heroic age, comparing them with modern recommendations. Nonfreezing cold injury probably also occurred but was not differentiated from frostbite, and chilblains were also described.

  20. Exploring the Relationship between Teaching Staff Age and Their Attitude towards Information and Communications Technologies (ICT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsaadani, Mohamed Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Current research seeks to understand the relationship between teaching staff' age and their attitude toward ICT. Survey methodology is facilitated through the use of the questionnaires. The survey domain is a random sampling of teaching staff in Egyptian HEI. The population for this study was 500 full-time Faculty staff, and only 412 returned and…

  1. Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes toward Aging among Nursing and Non-Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Meredith Troutman; Clark, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing life expectancies and more years spent living with chronic illnesses mean that increasing numbers of older adults will require nursing care. However, most nurses prefer not to work with older adults, and many nursing students have limited knowledge and negative attitudes towards aging and older adults. This study examined the knowledge…

  2. Flood Tides and Aging Swimmers: An Exploration into the Supply and Demand for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerchner, Charles T.

    The teacher supply and demand problem is considered along three dimensions: (1) the aggregate balance between supply and demand, and the balance in different education specialties and different areas of the country; (2) the composition of the teacher work force, its age, and level of training; and (3) the apparent quality of the work force and the…

  3. Exploring the Utility of a School-Age Narrative Microstructure Index: Proportion of Restricted Utterances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerger, Sara; Thorne, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This research attempted to replicate Hoffman's 2009 finding that the proportion of narrative utterances with semantic or syntactic errors (i.e., = 14% "restricted utterances") can differentiate school-age children with typical development from those with language impairment with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 88%.…

  4. The Career Transition Process: A Qualitative Exploration of Korean Middle-Aged Workers in Postretirement Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seon-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Today's society, shaped by demographic changes and a global economy, has created different employment trends and work lives that result in adults' engaging in postretirement second careers. This phenomenon is a common occurrence in rapidly aging societies like Korea. This qualitative study examined the postretirement career transition process of…

  5. An Exploration of the Participation of Kindergarten-Aged Hong Kong Children in Extra Curricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Eva Yi Hung; Cheng, Doris Pui Wah

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a mixed-methods research design to investigate the extra curricular participation of kindergarten-aged Hong Kong children, based on reports provided by 1260 parents, and parents' perceptions of their children's extra curricular participation, through nine individual interviews. The results of the survey indicated that…

  6. Radio astronomy with microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic constellation of microspacecraft in lunar orbit can carry out valuable radio astronomy investigations in the frequency range of 30kHz--30MHz, a range that is difficult to explore from Earth. In contrast to the radio astronomy ivestigations that have flown on individual spacecraft, the four microspacecraft together with a carrier spacecraft, which transported them to lunar orbit, form an interferometer with far superior angular resolution. Use of microspacecraft allows the entire constellation to be launched with a Taurus-class vehicle. Also distinguishing this approach is that the Moon is used as needed to shield the constellation from RF interference from the Earth and Sun.

  7. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  8. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  9. Exploring the dynamics of middle-aged and older adult residents' perceptions of neighborhood safety.

    PubMed

    Pitner, Ronald O; Yu, Mansoo; Brown, Edna

    2011-07-01

    This study examined what variables best predict concerns about neighborhood safety among middle-aged and older adults. Eighty-five participants were selected from a Midwestern urban area. Participants completed a 22-item questionnaire that assessed their perceptions of neighborhood safety and vigilance. These items were clustered as: (a) community care and vigilance, (b) safety concerns, (c) physical incivilities, and (d) social incivilities. Police crime data were also used in the analyses. Our findings suggest that aspects of the broken window theory, collective efficacy, and place attachments play a role in affecting residents' perceptions of neighborhood safety.

  10. Exploring User Acceptance of FOSS: The Role of the Age of the Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, M. Dolores; Bueno, Salvador

    Free and open source software (FOSS) movement essentially arises like answer to the evolution occurred in the market from the software, characterized by the closing of the source code. Furthermore, some FOSS characteristics, such as (1) the advance of this movement and (2) the attractiveness that contributes the voluntary and cooperative work, have increased the interest of the users towards free software. Traditionally, research in FOSS has focused on identifying individual personal motives for participating in the development of a FOSS project, analyzing specific FOSS solutions, or the FOSS movement itself. Nevertheless, the advantages of the FOSS for users and the effect of the demographic dimensions on user acceptance for FOSS have been two research topics with little attention. Specifically, this paper's aim is to focus on the influence of the userś age with FOSS the FOSS acceptance. Based on the literature, userś age is an essential demographic dimension for explaining the Information Systems acceptance. With this purpose, the authors have developed a research model based on the Technological Acceptance Model (TAM).

  11. Elder transgender lesbians: exploring the intersection of age, lesbian sexual identity, and transgender identity.

    PubMed

    Witten, Tarynn M

    2015-01-01

    This study is the first to examine the experiences and needs of an international sample of current, English-speaking, lesbian, transgender-identified (trans-lesbian) adults around a number of later life and end-of-life perceptions, preparations, and concerns. I analyzed a subset (n = 276) of the cross-sectional data collected from the online Trans MetLife Survey on Later-Life Preparedness and Perceptions in Transgender-Identified Individuals (N = 1,963). I assessed perceptions and fears around aging, preparation for later life, and end-of-life as well as numerous demographic and psycho-social variables. Despite the overall feeling that they have aged successfully, the respondent trans-lesbian population harbors significant fears about later life. I found that this population, while better-prepared than the overall respondent trans-identified population, is still ill-prepared for the major legalities and events that occur in the later to end-of-life time periods.

  12. Low Radio Frequency Picosatellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2014-06-01

    The dramatic advances in cubesat and other picosatellite capabilities are opening the door for scientifically important observations at low radio frequencies. Because simple antennas are effective at low frequencies, and receiver technology allows low mass and low power instruments, these observations are an ideal match for very small spacecraft. A workshop on cubesat missions for low frequency radio astronomy was held at the Kiss Institute for Space Sciences, Caltech, to explore mission concepts involving one up to hundreds of picosatellites. One result from this workshop was that there are opportunities for viable missions throughout this large range. For example, the sky-integrated spectral signature of highly redshifted neutral hydrogen from the dark ages and cosmic dawn epochs can be measured by a single antenna on a single spacecraft. There are challenging issues of calibration, foreground removal, and RF interference that need to be solved, but the basic concept is appealingly simple. At the other extreme, imaging of angular structure in the high-redshift hydrogen signal will require an interferometer array with a very large number of antennas. In this case the primary requirement is a sufficiently low individual spacecraft mass that hundreds can be launched affordably. The technical challenges for large arrays are long-term relative station keeping and high downlink data rates. Missions using several to a few tens of picosatellites can image and track bright sources such as solar and planetary radio bursts, and will provide essential validation of technologies needed for much larger arrays.This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  13. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  14. Environmental Restrictors to Occupational Participation in Old Age: Exploring Differences across Gender in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Orellano-Colón, Elsa M.; Mountain, Gail A.; Rosario, Marlene; Colón, Zahira M.; Acevedo, Sujeil; Tirado, Janiliz

    2015-01-01

    Many older adults face challenges that prevent them from accomplishing common daily activities such as moving around, home maintenance, and leisure activities. There is still a need to examine and understand how environmental factors impact daily participation across gender. This study sought to make a qualitative comparison of gender differences regarding environmental barriers to participation in daily occupations from the perspectives of older adults who live alone in Puerto Rico. Twenty-six Hispanic older adults, 70 years or older participated in this study. We used a descriptive qualitative research design in which researchers administered an in-depth interview to each participant. The results elucidated that women were more likely than men to experience restricted participation due to lack of accessibility of the built environment and transportation systems. The findings could help with the development of tailored, occupation-based, preventive interventions that address gender specific environmental barriers and promote greater participation among both women and men. Further research is required to explore whether these environmental barriers to occupational participation remain consistent across living situations, socioeconomic status and ethnicity. PMID:26378554

  15. Paclitaxel Through the Ages of Anticancer Therapy: Exploring Its Role in Chemoresistance and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barbuti, Anna Maria; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is a member of the taxane class of anticancer drugs and one of the most common chemotherapeutic agents used against many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel is a microtubule-stabilizer that selectively arrests cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and found to induce cytotoxicity in a time and concentration-dependent manner. Paclitaxel has been embedded in novel drug formulations, including albumin and polymeric micelle nanoparticles, and applied to many anticancer treatment regimens due to its mechanism of action and radiation sensitizing effects. Though paclitaxel is a major anticancer drug which has been used for many years in clinical treatments, its therapeutic efficacy can be limited by common encumbrances faced by anticancer drugs. These encumbrances include toxicities, de novo refraction, and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR). This article will give a current and comprehensive review of paclitaxel, beginning with its unique history and pharmacology, explore its mechanisms of drug resistance and influence in combination with radiation therapy, while highlighting current treatment regimens, formulations, and new discoveries. PMID:26633515

  16. Exploring the relationship between depression and erectile dysfunction in aging men.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Stuart N

    2002-01-01

    Normal sexual function is a biopsychosocial process; sexual dysfunction almost always has organic and psychological components and requires multidisciplinary, goal-directed evaluation and treatment. Factors such as aging, declining testosterone levels, medical illness, certain medications. and comorbid depressive illness can contribute to sexual dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is one of the more common male sexual dysfunctions encountered in the clinical setting. Comorbidity between erectile dysfunction and depressive illness is high, but the causal relationship is unclear. The psychosocial distress that often accompanies erectile dysfunction might stimulate the development of depressive illness, or, as some data suggest, depression might cause erectile dysfunction. This article reviews the literature on the relationship between depression and erectile dysfunction, as well as the design of a new study that may provide some answers, and concludes that erectile dysfunction is a common, treatable condition that may cause or be the result of depression. Recent data suggest that sildenafil is an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction in men with comorbid depression. Erectile dysfunction should be considered a multifactorial condition that may require a multidisciplinary approach to treatment, especially when depression is present.

  17. Searching for Love in all the “Write” Places: Exploring Internet Personals Use by Sexual Orientation, Gender, and Age

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Janet; Grov, Christian; Royce, Tracy; Gillespie, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Few researchers of Internet sexual exploration have systematically compared variance of use across sexual orientations, with even fewer surveying bisexual respondents. In 2004, 15,246 individuals responded to an online survey of their use of Internet personals and adult websites. Gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals (GLBs) were more likely than heterosexuals to have exchanged correspondence, met others offline, and had sex with someone they met through personal ads. Whereas gay men and lesbians of all ages were most likely to have established a long-term relationship as a result of personals, heterosexuals over age 40 were more likely to have established a long-term relationship than younger heterosexuals. Further, compared to men, women were approximately two times as likely to have established a serious relationship as a result of personals. Qualitative findings suggest that the Internet functions not only as a means of screening for desired characteristics, but also as a shield against prejudice in real life encounters. GLBs and heterosexuals alike used online venues as a means of sexual identity development, sexual exploration, and community building. PMID:20502618

  18. Epic Moon: a history of lunar exploration in the age of the telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William P.; Dobbins, Thomas A.

    timeless. The story of mankind's endless fascination with the world of the Moon and the gallery of interesting characters who pursued the details of the lunar surface with often strange intensity is a modern-day epic. Many of the stories recounted for the first time here will still be recounted generations hence, when the Apollo explorations may seem a mere interlude in what has actually been a more sustained and more significant era of endeavour. It is possible that the names of Schroeter, Beer and Mädler, Webb and Schmidt may prove to be as memorable as those of Armstrong, Aldrin, Cernan and Schmitt.

  19. EVA Radio DRATS 2011 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.; Bakula, Casey J.

    2012-01-01

    In the Fall of 2011, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) participated in the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field experiments held near Flagstaff, Arizona. The objective of the DRATS outing is to provide analog mission testing of candidate technologies for space exploration, especially those technologies applicable to human exploration of extra- terrestrial rocky bodies. These activities are performed at locations with similarities to extra-terrestrial conditions. This report describes the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Dual-Band Radio Communication System which was demonstrated during the 2011 outing. The EVA radio system is designed to transport both voice and telemetry data through a mobile ad hoc wireless network and employs a dual-band radio configuration. Some key characteristics of this system include: 1. Dual-band radio configuration. 2. Intelligent switching between two different capability wireless networks. 3. Self-healing network. 4. Simultaneous data and voice communication.

  20. [Exploration of life experiences of an aged woman in a military housing community through reminiscing on photos].

    PubMed

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Ku, Chao-Kuang; Ku, Ju-Li

    2009-02-01

    Reminiscence therapy helps elders recall memories of old times through activities designed to achieve self-healing. The qualitative case in this research was a 70 year-old woman who had lived in a military village for 40 years. Semi-structured questionnaires were used for the interview and data was recorded and transcribed word for word. Analytical methods used the three major patterns of reminiscing over objects, vertical and horizontal life. In reminiscing over objects, the author performed interconnected analysis using selected objects that were beloved and/or had special meaning to the subject. In the perspective of vertical life, the author explored the subject's life experiences through each life stage (childhood, adolescence, middle age, and aged). Themes examined included the Confucian ethical code and patriarch, marriage, economic life, and living alone with loneliness. In the perspective of horizontal life, the author described and analyzed special events in the subject's life, including themes of illness and death, serving in the KMT (Kuomintang) political party and women's organizations, and the contribution of medical treatment. Life experience stories from the subject's four decades living in a military housing community was shared through personal photos. Such a process was targeted to help integrate the life experience of an aged woman in a military housing community and confirm the meaning, value, and contribution of her own life.

  1. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  2. Exploring Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, William

    "Exploring Television" is an inquiry/discovery textbook designed to help students to understand, analyze, criticize, evaluate, and judge the experiences they have had in front of the television set. The text consists of three main parts. "The Medium" inquires into the radio-movie origins of television and prompts research into the networks and…

  3. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  4. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset: E2F2 as a New Potential Modifier Gene

    PubMed Central

    Valcárcel-Ocete, Leire; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Iriondo, Mikel; Fullaondo, Asier; García-Barcina, María; Fernández-García, José Manuel; Lezcano-García, Elena; Losada-Domingo, José María; Ruiz-Ojeda, Javier; Álvarez de Arcaya, Amaia; Pérez-Ramos, José María; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Saft, Carsten; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Aguirre, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Age of onset (AO) of Huntington disease (HD) is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp) in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO), and the first motor symptoms age (motor AO or mAO). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample of 35 HD patients from Basque Country Hospitals. We found suggestive association signals between HD eAO and/or mAO and genetic variation within the E2F2, ATF7IP, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, LINC01559, HIP1 and GRIK2 genes. Among them, the most significant was the association between eAO and rs2742976, mapping to the promoter region of E2F2 transcription factor. Furthermore, rs2742976 T allele patient carriers exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte E2F2 gene expression, suggesting a possible implication of E2F2-dependent transcriptional activity in HD pathogenesis. Thus, E2F2 emerges as a new potential HD AO modifier factor. PMID:26148071

  5. Older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and palate: a qualitative study exploring aging and appearance.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Claire; Harcourt, Diana

    2015-03-01

    Objective : To explore older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P), focusing on aging and appearance. Design : An exploratory-descriptive qualitative study. Participants : Individual semi-structured interviews (five via telephone, one face-to-face) conducted with six adults between the ages of 57 and 82 years. Results : Interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which resulted in five themes: cleft across the life span, keeping up appearances, being one of a kind, resilience and protection, and cleft in an ever-changing society. A CL/P had an ongoing impact on participants' lives, although its relevance shifted over time and some aspects of life (e.g., romantic relationships, decisions about having children of their own) were particularly affected. Participants seemed at ease living with CL/P as an older adult and considered it an important aspect of their identity, yet they still described feeling isolated at times and had little contact with other people with a cleft. They felt that health care could be more considerate to the needs of older people with a cleft, particularly around dentistry and information provision. Participants thought societal attitudes toward visible differences had changed over the years, but not necessarily for the better. A paradox was evident between reports of being noticed by others because of their cleft and simultaneously feeling invisible or ignored because of their age. Conclusions : These findings have implications for provision of care for older adults with a CL/P and for younger people with a CL/P who will be the older generation of the future.

  6. Radios in the Classroom: Curriculum Integration and Communication Skills. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninno, Anton

    Teachers have explored the use of radio in the classroom almost since radio technology entered into the mainstream of society, yet radio remains a relatively unused mode of instruction. This Digest describes several radio applications and summarizes various radio activities to assist teachers in integrating technology into the curriculum.…

  7. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  8. Delayed triggering of radio active galactic nuclei in gas-rich minor mergers in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabala, S. S.; Deller, A.; Kaviraj, S.; Middelberg, E.; Turner, R. J.; Ting, Y. S.; Allison, J. R.; Davis, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    We examine the processes triggering star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 25 low-redshift (z < 0.13) gas-rich galaxy mergers observed at milliarcsecond resolution with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) as part of the mJy Imaging VLBA Exploration at 20 cm (mJIVE-20) survey. The high (>107 K) brightness temperature required for an mJIVE-20 detection allows us to unambiguously identify the radio AGN in our sample. We find three such objects. Our VLBI AGN identifications are classified as Seyferts or low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) in narrow line optical diagnostic plots; mid-infrared colours of our targets and the comparison of Hα star formation rates with integrated radio luminosity are also consistent with the VLBI identifications. We reconstruct star formation histories in our galaxies using optical and UV photometry, and find that these radio AGN are not triggered promptly in the merger process, consistent with previous findings for non-VLBI samples of radio AGN. This delay can significantly limit the efficiency of feedback by radio AGN triggered in galaxy mergers. We find that radio AGN hosts have lower star formation rates than non-AGN radio-selected galaxies at the same starburst age. Conventional and VLBI radio imaging shows these AGN to be compact on arcsecond scales. Our modelling suggests that the actual sizes of AGN-inflated radio lobes may be much larger than this, but these are too faint to be detected in existing observations. Deep radio imaging is required to map out the true extent of the AGN, and to determine whether the low star formation rates in radio AGN hosts are a result of the special conditions required for radio jet triggering, or the effect of AGN feedback.

  9. Powerful Activity in the Bright Ages. I. A Visible/IR Survey of High Redshift 3C Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Kotyla, J. P.; Tremblay, G. R.; Stanghellini, C.; Sparks, W. B.; Baum, S.; Capetti, A.; Macchetto, F. D.; Miley, G. K.; O'Dea, C. P.; Perlman, E. S.; Quillen, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present new rest-frame UV and visible observations of 22 high-z (1 < z < 2.5) 3C radio galaxies and QSOs obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 instrument. Using a custom data reduction strategy in order to assure the removal of cosmic rays, persistence signal, and other data artifacts, we have produced high-quality science-ready images of the targets and their local environments. We observe targets with regions of UV emission suggestive of active star formation. In addition, several targets exhibit highly distorted host galaxy morphologies in the rest frame visible images. Photometric analyses reveal that brighter QSOs generally tend to be redder than their dimmer counterparts. Using emission line fluxes from the literature, we estimate that emission line contamination is relatively small in the rest frame UV images for the QSOs. Using archival VLA data, we have also created radio map overlays for each of our targets, allowing for analysis of the optical and radio axes alignment.

  10. Low Frequency Radio Astronomical Antennas for the Lunar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Lazio, J.; ROLSS DALI Teams

    2009-01-01

    Low radio frequencies ( MHz) represent the last of the relatively unexplored wavebands in the electromagnetic spectrum for astrophysics. Such observations are very challenging from the surface of the Earth because of an abundance of human-made radio interference (e.g., FM bands, TV channels) and because of ionospheric refraction. The lunar farside presents a unique opportunity to fully open this cosmic window because of the demonstrated radio-quiet environment. The ultimate science goal of a lunar farside low frequency telescope is to explore a new frontier in cosmology, the so-called Dark Ages. This era occurs between Recombination (at z 1100) when the universe first becomes transparent (producing what we observe today as the CMB) and Reionization when the first stars and galaxies form (at z 10-20). During the Dark Ages, the universe was unlit by any star and the only detectable signal is likely to arise from neutral hydrogen absorption against the CMB (from the collapse of the first structures). Observing this absorption signal would be a powerful probe of fundamental cosmology. During the Dark Ages (z 20 - 150), when the 21-cm (1.4 GHz) neutral hydrogen line is redshifted into the low frequency radio band (10-30 MHz, 10-30 m), the absorption signal has the potential to be the richest of all cosmological data sets. In this poster, we will discuss the opportunities and options for low frequency radio antennas in both lunar orbit and on the lunar surface. We are investigating a novel concept to deploy a large number of low-mass antennas deposited on sheets of polyimide film. We will also describe results of laboratory vacuum testing at U. Colorado on polyimide film cycled between -150 C and 100 C, and exposed to far-ultraviolet light, with conditions like those on the lunar surface.

  11. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  12. RADIO ALTIMETERS

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A radio ranging device is described which utilizes a superregenerative oscillator having alternate sending and receiving phases with an intervening ranging interval between said phases, means for varying said ranging interval, means responsive to an on-range noise reduction condition for stopping said means for varying the ranging interval and indicating means coupled to the ranging interval varying means and calibrated in accordance with one-half the product of the ranging interval times the velocity of light whereby the range is indicated.

  13. IA-Regional-Radio - Social Network for Radio Recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziczkowski, Grzegorz; Bougueroua, Lamine; Wegrzyn-Wolska, Katarzyna

    This chapter describes the functions of a system proposed for the music hit recommendation from social network data base. This system carries out the automatic collection, evaluation and rating of music reviewers and the possibility for listeners to rate musical hits and recommendations deduced from auditor's profiles in the form of regional Internet radio. First, the system searches and retrieves probable music reviews from the Internet. Subsequently, the system carries out an evaluation and rating of those reviews. From this list of music hits, the system directly allows notation from our application. Finally, the system automatically creates the record list diffused each day depending on the region, the year season, the day hours and the age of listeners. Our system uses linguistics and statistic methods for classifying music opinions and data mining techniques for recommendation part needed for recorded list creation. The principal task is the creation of popular intelligent radio adaptive on auditor's age and region - IA-Regional-Radio.

  14. A Medley of Radio Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raley, Nancy

    1984-01-01

    The potential for college use and development of radio stations is explored, and innovative and effective ideas from colleges' current efforts are presented. Topics covered include news services, phone-in features, student staff, college program highlights, foreign language programs, paid advertising, and public service announcements. (MSE)

  15. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  16. National College Radio Study: Audience Research and National Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    A study profiled college radio stations and explored the feasibility of a college radio network. A mail survey was sent in April 1995 to 1,469 college radio stations (including broadcast stations, carrier current stations, closed-circuit campus stations, radiating cable FM, and cable television access stations). A total of 228 surveys were…

  17. Learning radio astronomy by doing radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo Gallego, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is an educational program that allows high school and undergraduate students to control a 34 meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the internet. High-school teachers who join the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna as an educational resource. Also, teachers are provided with learning activities they can do with their students and focused on the classroom implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. PARTNeR provides students with firsthand experience in radio astronomy science. Thus, remote radio astronomical observations allow students to learn with a first rate scientific equipment the basics of radio astronomy research, aiming to arouse scientific careers and positive attitudes toward science. In this contribution we show the current observational programs and some recent results.

  18. International Radio Broadcasting: Who Listens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Donald R.

    It is difficult to obtain reliable data on the nature of the audience for international broadcast programs in Asia (e.g., those beamed by the Voice of America or Radio Japan). However, analysis of listener mail and some survey research have provided a fairly clear profile of the audience: young (ages 15-34), well educated, urban, male (but with a…

  19. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis in a Mixed Methods Research Design to Explore Music in the Lives of Mature Age Amateur Keyboard Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) in a mixed methods research design with reference to five recent publications about music in the lives of mature age amateur keyboard players. It explores the links between IPA and the data-gathering methods of "Rivers of Musical Experience",…

  20. We Have the Spaceship; But Where's the Start Button: Human Engineering Issues in the Age of Long Duration Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, George S.; Adams, Christopher W.

    2005-01-01

    As long duration space exploration and habitation becomes more commonplace, a number of Human Engineering factors (Gravitational Adaptation, 2-D to 3-D Movement Adaptation, Design Form/Function, and Space Ergonomics to name a few) will become more pronounced. More research and development is needed in these areas or the explorers may find themselves in painful or dangerous situations.

  1. Measuring the Symmetry of Supernova Remnants in the Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Jennifer; Lopez, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 300 supernova remnants (SNRs) are known in the MIlky Way galaxy, and they offer an important means to study the explosions and interactions of supernovae at sub-pc scales. In this poster, we present analysis of the morphology of Galactic SNRs at radio wavelengths. Specifically, we measure the symmetry of several tens of SNRs in 6- and 20-cm Very Large Array images using a multipole expansion technique, the power-ratio method. We explore how the SNRs' morphology changes as a function of their size and estimated dynamical ages, with the aim of probing how SNR shapes evolve with time.

  2. The Radio Amateur's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Douglas, Ed.

    The objectives of this basic reference work for the radio amateur are to present radio theory and practice in terms of application and to reflect both the fundamentals and the rapidly-advancing technology of radio communications so that the radio amateur will have a guide to what is practical, meaningful, proven, and useful. Twenty-three chapters…

  3. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  4. Benefits and Dynamics of Learning Gained through Volunteering: A Qualitative Exploration Guided by Seniors' Self-Defined Successful Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Social participation is an important strategy in promoting successful aging. Although participating in volunteering has been proven to benefit older adults' health and well-being, we often ignore its role as a process of learning while helping others. The purpose of this study was to use the self-defined successful aging concept of seniors to…

  5. Exploring the molecular basis of age-related disease comorbidities using a multi-omics graphical model

    PubMed Central

    Zierer, Jonas; Pallister, Tess; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Krumsiek, Jan; Bell, Jordana T.; Lauc, Gordan; Spector, Tim D; Menni, Cristina; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Although association studies have unveiled numerous correlations of biochemical markers with age and age-related diseases, we still lack an understanding of their mutual dependencies. To find molecular pathways that underlie age-related diseases as well as their comorbidities, we integrated aging markers from four different high-throughput omics datasets, namely epigenomics, transcriptomics, glycomics and metabolomics, with a comprehensive set of disease phenotypes from 510 participants of the TwinsUK cohort. We used graphical random forests to assess conditional dependencies between omics markers and phenotypes while eliminating mediated associations. Applying this novel approach for multi-omics data integration yields a model consisting of seven modules that represent distinct aspects of aging. These modules are connected by hubs that potentially trigger comorbidities of age-related diseases. As an example, we identified urate as one of these key players mediating the comorbidity of renal disease with body composition and obesity. Body composition variables are in turn associated with inflammatory IgG markers, mediated by the expression of the hormone oxytocin. Thus, oxytocin potentially contributes to the development of chronic low-grade inflammation, which often accompanies obesity. Our multi-omics graphical model demonstrates the interconnectivity of age-related diseases and highlights molecular markers of the aging process that might drive disease comorbidities. PMID:27886242

  6. Exploring the complexities of body image experiences in middle age and older adult women within an exercise context: The simultaneous existence of negative and positive body images.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K Alysse; Cline, Lindsay E; Gammage, Kimberley L

    2016-06-01

    Despite many body changes that accompany the aging process, the extant research is limited on middle age and older adults' body image experiences. The purpose of the present study was to explore how body image is represented for middle age and older adult women. Using thematic analysis, 10 women over the age of 55 were interviewed within an exercise context. The following themes were found: body dissatisfaction, body satisfaction despite ageist stereotypes, neutral body image within cohort, and positive body image characteristics. Negative and positive body images were experienced simultaneously, with neutral experiences expressed as low levels of dissatisfaction. This supports the contention that negative and positive body images exist on separate continuums and neutral body image is likely on the same continuum as negative body image. Programs that foster a social support network to reduce negative body image and improve positive body image in older female populations are needed.

  7. Using a generalized linear mixed model approach to explore the role of age, motor proficiency, and cognitive styles in children's reach estimation accuracy.

    PubMed

    Caçola, Priscila M; Pant, Mohan D

    2014-10-01

    The purpose was to use a multi-level statistical technique to analyze how children's age, motor proficiency, and cognitive styles interact to affect accuracy on reach estimation tasks via Motor Imagery and Visual Imagery. Results from the Generalized Linear Mixed Model analysis (GLMM) indicated that only the 7-year-old age group had significant random intercepts for both tasks. Motor proficiency predicted accuracy in reach tasks, and cognitive styles (object scale) predicted accuracy in the motor imagery task. GLMM analysis is suitable to explore age and other parameters of development. In this case, it allowed an assessment of motor proficiency interacting with age to shape how children represent, plan, and act on the environment.

  8. Self-objectification, habitual body monitoring, and body dissatisfaction in older European American women: exploring age and feminism as moderators.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Karen P; Hill, Melanie S

    2008-06-01

    This study examined the influence of feminist attitudes on self-objectification, habitual body monitoring, and body dissatisfaction in middle age and older women. The participants were 138 European American heterosexual women ranging in age from 40 to 87 years old. Consistent with previous research, self-objectification and habitual body monitoring were positively correlated with body dissatisfaction and, self-objectification and habitual body monitoring remained stable across the lifespan. While age did not moderate the relationship between self-objectification and body dissatisfaction, age was found to moderate the relationship between habitual body monitoring and body dissatisfaction such that the relationship was smaller for older women than for middle-aged women. Interestingly, feminist attitudes were not significantly correlated with body dissatisfaction, self-objectification, or habitual body monitoring, and endorsement of feminist attitudes was not found to moderate the relationship between self-objectification or habitual body monitoring and body dissatisfaction. Potential implications for older women are discussed.

  9. A Question of Interference: FM Radio's Early Struggle for Survival 1934-1945.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenaty, Jayne W.

    This paper explores FM radio's struggle for survival in the 1940s, focusing primarily on the impact of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) decision making and on the influence and activities of the well-established radio corporations, primarily the Radio Corporation of America (RCA). It describes the invention of FM radio by Edwin H. Armstrong…

  10. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  11. An Exploration of the Effect of Hemodynamic Changes Due to Normal Aging on the fNIRS Response to Semantic Processing of Words

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mahnoush; Pouliot, Philippe; Bonnéry, Clément; Leclerc, Paul-Olivier; Desjardins, Michèle; Lesage, Frédéric; Joanette, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Like other neuroimaging techniques assessing cerebral blood oxygenation, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been applied in many neurocognitive studies. With NIRS, neural activation can be explored indirectly via hemodynamic changes in the imaged region. In studies of aging, changes in baseline physiology and brain anatomy confound NIRS measures seeking to investigate age-related changes in neuronal activity. The field is thus hampered by the complexity of the aging process itself, and statistical inferences from functional data acquired by optical imaging techniques must be interpreted with care. Multimodal integration of NIRS with both structural and baseline physiological assessments is crucial to avoid misinterpreting neuroimaging signals. In this study, a combination of two different optical techniques, anatomical MRI and Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), was used to investigate age-related changes in activation during a lexical-semantic processing task. Quantitative analysis revealed decreased baseline oxyhemoglobin and cerebral blood flow in the older adults. Using baseline physiology measures as regressors in the investigation of functional concentration changes when doing analyses of variance, we found significant changes in task-induced areas of activity. In the right hemisphere, more significant age-related activity was observed around the junction of the inferior frontal gyrus and inferior precentral sulcus, along with engagement of Wernicke’s area. In the left hemisphere, the degree and extent of frontal activation, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, differed between age groups. Measuring background physiological differences and using their values as regressors in statistical analyses allowed a more appropriate, age-corrected understanding of the functional differentiations between age groups. Age-corrected baselines are thus essential to investigate which components of the NIRS signal are altered by aging. PMID

  12. Lunar Farside Radio Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2005-03-01

    low frequencies. In other words, exploring the radio spectrum below 15 MHz (impossible from Earth) might open up a new era in Cosmology and Astrophysics in general;last, but not the least, the political problems involved with the future international exploitation of the Moon Farside. The IISL supported this author in this regard, but much more serious action should be undertaken, especially in conjunction with the United Nations. The protection of at least part of the Farside against wild commercial and military exploitation is regarded as the #1 priority of this study.

  13. Motivational Factors Underlying Problem Solving: Comparing Wolf and Dog Puppies' Explorative and Neophobic Behaviors at 5, 6, and 8 Weeks of Age.

    PubMed

    Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Virányi, Zsófia; Kubinyi, Enikő; Range, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wolves have been shown to be better in independent problem-solving tasks than dogs, however it is unclear whether cognitive or motivational factors underlie such differences. In a number of species problem solving has been linked to both persistence in exploration and neophobia, suggesting both these aspects may underlie dog-wolf differences in problem solving. Indeed adult wolves have been shown to be more likely to approach a novel object and more persistent in their investigation of it, but also slower in making contact with it and more fearful of it than dogs. Methods: In the current study we investigated potential differences in equally-raised dogs' and wolves' explorative and neophobic behaviors in a novel environment and with novel objects at 5, 6, and 8 weeks of age. Results: Results showed that wolves were more persistent in exploring both the environment and the objects than dogs, and this was the case at all ages. There were no differences in the frequency of fear-related behaviors and time spent in proximity to humans. Stress-related behaviors were similarly expressed at 5 and 6 weeks, although wolves showed a higher frequency of such behaviors at 8 weeks. Discussion: Overall, results with puppies confirm those with adult animals: wolves appear to be more explorative than dogs. Such motivational differences need to be taken into account when comparing dogs and wolves in cognitive tasks.

  14. Motivational Factors Underlying Problem Solving: Comparing Wolf and Dog Puppies' Explorative and Neophobic Behaviors at 5, 6, and 8 Weeks of Age

    PubMed Central

    Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Virányi, Zsófia; Kubinyi, Enikő; Range, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wolves have been shown to be better in independent problem-solving tasks than dogs, however it is unclear whether cognitive or motivational factors underlie such differences. In a number of species problem solving has been linked to both persistence in exploration and neophobia, suggesting both these aspects may underlie dog-wolf differences in problem solving. Indeed adult wolves have been shown to be more likely to approach a novel object and more persistent in their investigation of it, but also slower in making contact with it and more fearful of it than dogs. Methods: In the current study we investigated potential differences in equally-raised dogs' and wolves' explorative and neophobic behaviors in a novel environment and with novel objects at 5, 6, and 8 weeks of age. Results: Results showed that wolves were more persistent in exploring both the environment and the objects than dogs, and this was the case at all ages. There were no differences in the frequency of fear-related behaviors and time spent in proximity to humans. Stress-related behaviors were similarly expressed at 5 and 6 weeks, although wolves showed a higher frequency of such behaviors at 8 weeks. Discussion: Overall, results with puppies confirm those with adult animals: wolves appear to be more explorative than dogs. Such motivational differences need to be taken into account when comparing dogs and wolves in cognitive tasks. PMID:28232814

  15. Exploring the Role of Genetic Variability and Lifestyle in Oxidative Stress Response for Healthy Aging and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; D’Aquila, Patrizia; de Rango, Francesco; Bellizzi, Dina; Rose, Giuseppina; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is both the cause and consequence of impaired functional homeostasis characterizing human aging. The worsening efficiency of stress response with age represents a health risk and leads to the onset and accrual of major age-related diseases. In contrast, centenarians seem to have evolved conservative stress response mechanisms, probably derived from a combination of a diet rich in natural antioxidants, an active lifestyle and a favorable genetic background, particularly rich in genetic variants able to counteract the stress overload at the level of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. The integration of these factors could allow centenarians to maintain moderate levels of free radicals that exert beneficial signaling and modulator effects on cellular metabolism. Considering the hot debate on the efficacy of antioxidant supplementation in promoting healthy aging, in this review we gathered the existing information regarding genetic variability and lifestyle factors which potentially modulate the stress response at old age. Evidence reported here suggests that the integration of lifestyle factors (moderate physical activity and healthy nutrition) and genetic background could shift the balance in favor of the antioxidant cellular machinery by activating appropriate defense mechanisms in response to exceeding external and internal stress levels, and thus possibly achieving the prospect of living a longer life. PMID:23965963

  16. Exploring the role of genetic variability and lifestyle in oxidative stress response for healthy aging and longevity.

    PubMed

    Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; D'Aquila, Patrizia; de Rango, Francesco; Bellizzi, Dina; Rose, Giuseppina; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2013-08-08

    Oxidative stress is both the cause and consequence of impaired functional homeostasis characterizing human aging. The worsening efficiency of stress response with age represents a health risk and leads to the onset and accrual of major age-related diseases. In contrast, centenarians seem to have evolved conservative stress response mechanisms, probably derived from a combination of a diet rich in natural antioxidants, an active lifestyle and a favorable genetic background, particularly rich in genetic variants able to counteract the stress overload at the level of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. The integration of these factors could allow centenarians to maintain moderate levels of free radicals that exert beneficial signaling and modulator effects on cellular metabolism. Considering the hot debate on the efficacy of antioxidant supplementation in promoting healthy aging, in this review we gathered the existing information regarding genetic variability and lifestyle factors which potentially modulate the stress response at old age. Evidence reported here suggests that the integration of lifestyle factors (moderate physical activity and healthy nutrition) and genetic background could shift the balance in favor of the antioxidant cellular machinery by activating appropriate defense mechanisms in response to exceeding external and internal stress levels, and thus possibly achieving the prospect of living a longer life.

  17. Work-Family Conflict: An Exploration of the Differential Effects of a Dependent Childs Age on Working Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darcy, Colette; McCarthy, Alma

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children.…

  18. Project Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, K. K.; Henderson, A.; Lee, J.; Smith, G.; Stluka, E.

    1984-01-01

    PROJECT EXPLORER is a program that will fly student-developed experiments onboard the Space Shuttle in NASA's Get-Away Special (GAS) containers. The program is co-sponsored by the Alabama Space and Rocket Center, the Alabama-Mississippi Section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Alabama A&M University and requires extensive support by the University of Alabama in Huntsville. A unique feature of this project will demonstrate transmissions to ground stations on amateur radio frequencies in English language. Experiments Nos. 1, 2, and 3 use the microgravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution, and the germination of radish seeds. Flight results will be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 features radio transmission and will also provide timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor will obtain real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements taken inside the canister. These data will be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they have been converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception.

  19. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  20. Age Band 1 of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition: Exploring Its Usefulness in Mainland China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Jing; Gu, Guixiong; Meng, Wei; Wu, Zhuochun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the validity and reliability of age band 1 of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (MABC-2) in preparation for its standardization in mainland China. Interrater and test-retest reliability of the MABC-2 was estimated using Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). Cronbach's alpha for…

  1. The CITRA Research-Practice Consensus-Workshop Model: Exploring a New Method of Research Translation in Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabir, Myra; Breckman, Risa; Meador, Rhoda; Wethington, Elaine; Reid, M. Carrington; Pillemer, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: On the basis of the experience of an extensive community-based research partnership in New York City, we developed an innovative process for bridging the gap between aging-related research and practice, using a consensus-workshop model. Design and Methods: We adapted the traditional scientific consensus-workshop model to include…

  2. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  3. The Social Studies Education Discourse Community on Globalization: Exploring the Agenda of Preparing Citizens for the Global Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbaria, Ayman K.

    2011-01-01

    The scholarship nexus between education and globalization provides limited insights into how global education has been framed and rendered. The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it seeks a better understanding of the nature of the mission of preparing citizens for the global age and what it entails in the context of learning and teaching…

  4. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  5. Astronomers Win Protection for Key Part of Radio Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    Astronomers using the millimeter-wave region of the radio spectrum have won crucial protection for their science. Dedicated allocations for radio astronomy have been given final approval by the 2,500 delegates to the World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-00), which recently concluded a month of deliberations in Istanbul, Turkey. Radio services can transmit in these parts of the spectrum as long as they don't hinder astronomers' attempts to catch faint signals from the cosmos. The new allocations represent the culmination of more than three years of cooperative planning by radio astronomers in many countries. Millimeter waves -- high-frequency radio waves -- have come of age as an astronomical tool in the last ten years. They are one of the last technological frontiers for astronomers. WRC-00 has protected for science all the frequencies between 71 and 275 Gigahertz (GHz) that radio astronomers currently use, adding more than 90 GHz of spectrum to the 44 GHz already set aside in this frequency range. As a result, radio astronomy is now allocated most of the frequencies between 71 and 275 GHz that can get through the Earth's atmosphere. "We have formal access to all three atmospheric 'windows', apart from their very edges," said Dr. Tom Gergely of the National Science Foundation, one of the U.S. delegates to WRC-00. The WRC also changed most of the frequencies allocated to satellite downlinks within the 71-275 GHz range to frequencies not used for science. Since no satellites yet operate at these high frequencies, no equipment needs to be altered. "Commercial technologies are just starting to develop above 50 GHz," said Dr. Klaus Ruf, Chairman of the Inter-Union Commission for the Allocation of Frequencies. "The WRC's actions mean that, when they are, radio astronomers should be able to share this part of the spectrum with most terrestrial services." The World Radiocommunication Conference is held every two or three years. Here member countries of the

  6. Radiocarbon and cation-radio ages for rock varnish on Tioga and Tahoe marainal boulders of Pine Creek, eastern Sierra Nevada, California, and their paleoclimatic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorn, R.I.; Turrin, B.D.; Jull, A.J.T.; Linick, T.W.; Donahue, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C analyses of organic matter extracted from rock varnishes on morainal boulders yield limiting minimum ages for three crests of the Tioga glaciation. At Pine Creek in the eastern Sierra Nevada, varnish started to form on boulders of the outermost Tioga moraine before 19,000 yr B.P., and varnish originated on the innermost Tioga moraine before 13,200 yr B.P. Comparisons with lake-level, paleohydrological, paleoecological, colluvial, and rock varnish micromorphological data indicate that central-eastern California and western Nevada experienced a moisture-effective period during the late Pleistocene but after the Tioga maximum, and perhaps as Tioga glaciers receded from the mouth of Pine Creek canyon. Varnishes on Tahoeage morainal boulders at Pine Creek have cation-ratio ages of about 143,000-156,000 yr B.P., suggesting that the Tahoe glaciation should not be correlated with oxygen-isotope stage 4 in the early Wisconsin, but rather with stage 6. Varnishes on morainal boulders of an older glaciation at Pine Creek are dated by cation ratio at about 182,000-187,000 yr B.P. ?? 1987.

  7. Commercial Radio as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenbuhler, Eric W.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the day-to-day work routines of commercial radio with the principles of a theoretical communication model. Illuminates peculiarities of the conduct of communication by commercial radio. Discusses the application of theoretical models to the evaluation of practicing institutions. Offers assessments of commercial radio deriving from…

  8. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  9. Exploring the Potential of High Resolution Remote Sensing Data for Mapping Vegetation and the Age Groups of Oil Palm Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiran, N.; Sarker, M. L. R.

    2014-02-01

    The land use/land cover transformation in Malaysia is enormous due to palm oil plantation which has provided huge economical benefits but also created a huge concern for carbon emission and biodiversity. Accurate information about oil palm plantation and the age of plantation is important for a sustainable production, estimation of carbon storage capacity, biodiversity and the climate model. However, the problem is that this information cannot be extracted easily due to the spectral signature for forest and age group of palm oil plantations is similar. Therefore, a noble approach "multi-scale and multi-texture algorithms" was used for mapping vegetation and different age groups of palm oil plantation using a high resolution panchromatic image (WorldView-1) considering the fact that pan imagery has a potential for more detailed and accurate mapping with an effective image processing technique. Seven texture algorithms of second-order Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) with different scales (from 3×3 to 39×39) were used for texture generation. All texture parameters were classified step by step using a robust classifier "Artificial Neural Network (ANN)". Results indicate that single spectral band was unable to provide good result (overall accuracy = 34.92%), while higher overall classification accuracies (73.48%, 84.76% and 93.18%) were obtained when textural information from multi-scale and multi-texture approach were used in the classification algorithm.

  10. Are We There Yet? Exploring the Impact of Translating Cognitive Tests for Dementia Using Mobile Technology in an Aging Population

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Kai; Maguire, Áine; Andrews, Jack L.; Martin, Eric; Menon, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    This study examines implications of the expanded use of mobile platforms in testing cognitive function, and generates evidence on the impact utilizing mobile platforms for dementia screen. The Saint Louis University Mental State examination (SLUMS) was ported onto a computerized mobile application named the Cambridge University Pen to Digital Equivalence assessment (CUPDE). CUPDE was piloted and compared to the traditional pen and paper version, with a common comparator test for both groups. Sixty healthy participants (aged 50–79) completed both measurements. Differences were tested between overall outcomes, individual items, and relationship with the comparator. Significant differences in the overall scores between the two testing versions as well as within individual items were observed. Even when groups were matched by cognitive function and age, scores on SLUMS original version (M = 19.75, SD = 3) were significantly higher than those on CUPDE (M = 15.88, SD = 3.5), t(15) = 3.02, p < 0.01. Mobile platforms require the development of new normative standards, even when items can be directly translated. Furthermore, these must fit aging populations with significant variance in familiarity with mobile technology. Greater understanding of the interplay and related mechanisms between auditory and visual systems, which are not well understood yet in the context of mobile technologies, is mandatory. PMID:27014053

  11. Exploring the Self-Disclosure Process in Peer Mentoring Relationships for Transition-Age Youth With Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Cathryn T; Kramer, Jessica M; Cohn, Ellen S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the self-disclosure process in regard to connection development and relationship quality in peer mentoring relationships between transition-age youth (ages 15-20) and young adults (ages 18-36) with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. Self-disclosure is defined as "the disclosure of inner feelings and experiences to another person" that "fosters liking, caring, and trust, thereby facilitating the deepening of close relationships" ( Reis & Shaver, 1988 , p. 372). Nine peer mentoring dyads with varied interpersonal connections were purposefully selected from a larger intervention study. Recorded mentoring conversations were analyzed for self-disclosure content and peer mentor response. The findings demonstrated trends related to connection development and differences across degree of connection. In relationships with stronger connections, there was a higher quantity of self-disclosure and more frequent disclosure of emotions, and peer mentors responded more frequently with advice and reciprocated self-disclosure. Implications of findings for promoting higher-quality peer mentoring relationships are discussed.

  12. Are We There Yet? Exploring the Impact of Translating Cognitive Tests for Dementia Using Mobile Technology in an Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Kai; Maguire, Áine; Andrews, Jack L; Martin, Eric; Menon, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    This study examines implications of the expanded use of mobile platforms in testing cognitive function, and generates evidence on the impact utilizing mobile platforms for dementia screen. The Saint Louis University Mental State examination (SLUMS) was ported onto a computerized mobile application named the Cambridge University Pen to Digital Equivalence assessment (CUPDE). CUPDE was piloted and compared to the traditional pen and paper version, with a common comparator test for both groups. Sixty healthy participants (aged 50-79) completed both measurements. Differences were tested between overall outcomes, individual items, and relationship with the comparator. Significant differences in the overall scores between the two testing versions as well as within individual items were observed. Even when groups were matched by cognitive function and age, scores on SLUMS original version (M = 19.75, SD = 3) were significantly higher than those on CUPDE (M = 15.88, SD = 3.5), t (15) = 3.02, p < 0.01. Mobile platforms require the development of new normative standards, even when items can be directly translated. Furthermore, these must fit aging populations with significant variance in familiarity with mobile technology. Greater understanding of the interplay and related mechanisms between auditory and visual systems, which are not well understood yet in the context of mobile technologies, is mandatory.

  13. [Saving motives in young, middle-aged, and older adults. Preliminary results of a new inventory for exploring lifespan saving motives].

    PubMed

    Rager, B; Lang, F R; Wagner, G G

    2012-12-01

    There is some research on personal reasons for saving money in the economic sciences. However, not much is known about the age differences of saving motives. In this vein, the future time perspective (FTP) is known to play a critical role for motivation across the life span. In this study, we introduce a new Saving Motive Inventory (SMI), which also covers saving goals after retirement. Furthermore, it is argued that additional saving motives that are not based on economic models of life-cycle saving also exist. In accordance with the socio-emotional selectivity theory, we explored age differences in an online survey with 496 participants from young (19-44 years), middle-aged (45-64 years), and older (65-86 years) adulthood, who completed a questionnaire on saving motives, personality, and future-related thinking (e.g., Future Time Perspective Scale, Life Orientation Test). Results of the explorative Factor Analysis (EFA) are consistent with the theoretical expectations. The factors are generativity, educational investment, consumption, indifference, and provision for death and dying. Together these five factors account for 67% of the variance. In general, the inventory is reliable and valid with respect to the expected internal and external criteria. It contributes to better understanding of saving motives over the lifespan, especially with respect to effects of the future time perspective.

  14. 3C 236: Radio Source, Interrupted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Baum, Stefi A.; Sparks, William B.; Martel, André R.; Allen, Mark G.; Macchetto, Ferdinando D.; Miley, George K.

    2001-04-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph MAMA near-UV images and archival Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) V- and R-band images that reveal the presence of four star-forming regions in an arc along the edge of the dust lane in the giant (4 Mpc) radio galaxy 3C 236. Two of the star-forming regions are relatively young, with ages of order ~107 yr, while the other two are older, with ages of order ~108-109 yr, which is comparable to the estimated age of the giant radio source. Based on dynamical and spectral aging arguments, we suggest that the fuel supply to the active galactic nucleus (AGN) was interrupted for ~107 yr and has now been restored, resulting in the formation of the inner 2 kpc-scale radio source. This timescale is similar to that of the age of the youngest of the star-forming regions. We suggest that the transport of gas in the disk is nonsteady and that this produces the multiple episodes of star formation in the disk, as well as the multiple epochs of radio source activity. If the inner radio source and the youngest star-forming region are related by the same event of gas transport, the gas must be transported from the hundreds of parsec scale to the subparsec scale on a timescale of ~107 yr, which is similar to the dynamical timescale of the gas on the hundreds of parsec scale.

  15. 3C236: Radio Source, Interrupted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, C. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Baum, S. A.; Sparks, W. B.

    We present highlights of the results of new HST STIS/MAMA near-UV images and archival WFPC2 V- and R-band images which reveal the presence of four apparently star forming regions in an arc along the edge of the dust lane in the giant (4 Mpc) radio galaxy 3C236. Two of the star forming regions are relatively young with ages of order ~107 yr, while the other two are older with ages of order ~108 -- 109 yr, which is comparable to the estimated age of the giant radio source. Based on dynamical and spectral aging arguments, we suggest that the fuel supply to the AGN was interrupted for ~107 yr and has now been restored, resulting in the formation of the inner 2 kpc scale radio source. This time scale is similar to that of the age of the youngest of the star forming regions. We suggest that the transport of gas in the disk is non-steady and that this produces both the multiple episodes of star formation in the disk as well as the multiple epochs of radio source activity. If the inner radio source and the youngest star forming region are related by the same event of gas transport, the gas must be transported from the hundreds of pc scale to the sub-parsec scale on a time scale of ~107 yr, which is similar to the dynamical timescale of the gas on the hundreds of pc scales.

  16. Self-other agreement of personality judgments in job interviews: exploring the effects of trait, gender, age and social desirability.

    PubMed

    Nederström, Mikael; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2014-10-01

    The article investigated agreement between self-reports and stranger ratings of personality. A sample of 139 real-life job applicants was interviewed by expert psychologists upon entrance to the assessment center. The applicants provided self-descriptions on 15 personality factors, and the psychologists rated the same traits of each target based on their impressions in the interview. The results demonstrated that professional judges can reach a substantial self-other agreement (SOA) on several traits even when the targets are strangers, and that the trait being judged, the target's gender, age and social desirability have an effect on the level of agreement.

  17. Cycling provision separated from motor traffic: a systematic review exploring whether stated preferences vary by gender and age

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Rachel; Elliott, Bridget; Woodcock, James; Goodman, Anna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this paper, we represent a systematic review of stated preference studies examining the extent to which cycle infrastructure preferences vary by gender and by age. A search of online, English-language academic and policy literature was followed by a three-stage screening process to identify relevant studies. We found 54 studies that investigated whether preferences for cycle infrastructure varied by gender and/or by age. Forty-four of these studies considered the extent of separation from motor traffic. The remainder of the studies covered diverse topics, including preferred winter maintenance methods and attitudes to cycle track lighting. We found that women reported stronger preferences than men for greater separation from motor traffic. There was weaker evidence of stronger preferences among older people. Differences in preferences were quantitative rather than qualitative; that is, preferences for separated infrastructure were stronger in some groups than in others, but no group preferred integration with motor traffic. Thus, in low-cycling countries seeking to increase cycling, this evidence suggests focusing on the stronger preferences of under-represented groups as a necessary element of universal design for cycling. PMID:28190905

  18. "I want to be 100 years old, but I smoke too much": Exploring the gap between positive aging goals and reported preparatory actions in different social circumstances.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Catrinel; Flick, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Preparing for positive aging is shaped by the social context a person lives in. The present qualitative study explores and compares representations about preparatory actions in precarious workers (i.e., with temporary job contracts and insecure pension plans) and individuals with secure pension plans living in Germany. It also examines, the discrepancy between what middle-aged persons think they should be doing in preparation and what they report doing for aging well. Findings from the analysis of the semi-structured interviews conducted here show that people who have insecure pension plans tend to see themselves as social networkers and optimists, while those with secure pension plans see themselves as social activists and careful planners of old age. All participants value an active, healthy body but manage to do little in order to attain it due to lacking time and discipline. In accordance with the socioemotional selectivity theory, perceiving a short-time perspective makes precarious individuals focus on emotional goals, while financially secure individuals value social goals. Implications for practice and policy change are discussed.

  19. Age band 1 of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition: exploring its usefulness in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Gu, Guixiong; Meng, Wei; Wu, Zhuochun

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the validity and reliability of age band 1 of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (MABC-2) in preparation for its standardization in mainland China. Interrater and test-retest reliability of the MABC-2 was estimated using Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). Cronbach's alpha for each item and Item-total correlation were used to determine internal consistency. The content validity was determined by the Item-level content validity index (I-CVI). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the factorial validity of the MABC-2 test. The correlation coefficients between the MABC-2 and the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2 (PDMS-2) were used to assess the criteria-related validity. The Cronbach's alpha values of all eight items together were moderate but acceptable. The correlation coefficients between each test item and the total score were moderate except for two items. The ICC of interrater and test-retest reliability for each test items was good. The I-CVI of each item was excellent (each above 0.78). The result of confirmatory factor analysis showed that the goodness-of-fit indices of the adjusted model were good (each above 0.9), indicating a satisfactory fit of the data to the model. The total score on MABC-2 and PDMS-2 was correlated well (r=0.631). It is concluded that the reliability and validity of age band 1 of MABC-2 were fair in this study based on a large sample. However, there was a need to adjust part of items to improve the test's psychometric properties when it is used in Chinese children.

  20. Exploration concepts for syntectonic sediments of Triassic and Jurassic Age along northern and eastern rim of Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.A.; Wilkerson, R.P.; Putnam, M.W.

    1985-02-01

    Current tectonic models for the formation of the Gulf of Mexico generally include continental rifting starting in the Triassic and continuing through the Jurassic. A comparison between the sedimentology and structural geology of known continental rifts (such as the Gulf of Suez, Egypt) and the Triassic and Jurassic of the Gulf of Mexico suggests the following. (1) The interior salt basins of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama probably were deposited within a failed continental rift. (2) Positive features such as the Angelina-Caldwell flexure, Wiggins arch, and Middle ground arch probably represent the southern edge of the failed rift. (3) Positive features such as the Sabine uplift and Monroe arch are probably isolated horst blocks within the failed rift. Pre-evaporite sediments account for much of the production in the Gulf of Suez, and these rock sequences are well exposed there on shore. Depositional and structural histories for these rocks are similar in both the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of Suez, and a careful comparison suggests new play concepts for the Gulf of Mexico. The post-evaporite sequences of the Gulf of Suez are also similar to the Norphlet and Smackover Formations of the Gulf of Mexico, although Smackover equivalents are currently being deposited in the Gulf of Suez. Comparisons between the two rift systems indicate that a clearer understanding of the structural setting of the Gulf of Mexico at the time of deposition of the Norphlet and Smackover should lead to better exploration plays for these syntectonic formations.

  1. Exploration of surface hydrophilic properties on AISI 304 stainless steel and silicon wafer against aging after atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Shang-I.; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work is to seek the enhanced surface hydrophilic properties on AISI 304 stainless steel and silicon wafer after atmospheric pressure plasma treatment using a specifically designed atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The aging tendency of surface hydrophilic property under air is highlighted. It is concluded that both of the silicon wafer and stainless steel treated with plasma generated from supply gas of argon 15 slm mixed with oxygen 40 sccm shows a better tendency on remaining high water contact angle as compared to that with pure argon and nitrogen addition. Additional peaks of O I (777, 844 nm), O II (408 nm) are detected by optical emission spectroscope indicating the presence of the oxygen radicals and ionic species, which interact with surfaces and thus contribute to low water contact angle (WCA) surfaces. Moreover, the result acquired from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that the increase in the oxygen-related bonding exhibits a better contribution on remaining high surface energy over a period of time.

  2. Exploring Self-regulation of More or Less Expert College-Age Video Game Players: A Sequential Explanatory Design.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz Soylu, Meryem; Bruning, Roger H

    2016-01-01

    This study examined differences in self-regulation among college-age expert, moderately expert, and non-expert video game players in playing video games for fun. Winne's model of self-regulation (Winne, 2001) guided the study. The main assumption of this study was that expert video game players used more processes of self-regulation than the less-expert players. We surveyed 143 college students about their game playing frequency, habits, and use of self-regulation. Data analysis indicated that while playing recreational video games, expert gamers self-regulated more than moderately expert and non-expert players and moderately expert players used more processes of self-regulation than non-experts. Semi-structured interviews also were conducted with selected participants at each of the expertise levels. Qualitative follow-up analyses revealed five themes: (1) characteristics of expert video gamers, (2) conditions for playing a video game, (3) figuring out a game, (4) how gamers act and, (5) game context. Overall, findings indicated that playing a video game is a highly self-regulated activity and that becoming an expert video game player mobilizes multiple sets of self-regulation related skills and processes. These findings are seen as promising for educators desiring to encourage student self-regulation, because they indicate the possibility of supporting students via recreational video games by recognizing that their play includes processes of self-regulation.

  3. Exploring Self-regulation of More or Less Expert College-Age Video Game Players: A Sequential Explanatory Design

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz Soylu, Meryem; Bruning, Roger H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined differences in self-regulation among college-age expert, moderately expert, and non-expert video game players in playing video games for fun. Winne's model of self-regulation (Winne, 2001) guided the study. The main assumption of this study was that expert video game players used more processes of self-regulation than the less-expert players. We surveyed 143 college students about their game playing frequency, habits, and use of self-regulation. Data analysis indicated that while playing recreational video games, expert gamers self-regulated more than moderately expert and non-expert players and moderately expert players used more processes of self-regulation than non-experts. Semi-structured interviews also were conducted with selected participants at each of the expertise levels. Qualitative follow-up analyses revealed five themes: (1) characteristics of expert video gamers, (2) conditions for playing a video game, (3) figuring out a game, (4) how gamers act and, (5) game context. Overall, findings indicated that playing a video game is a highly self-regulated activity and that becoming an expert video game player mobilizes multiple sets of self-regulation related skills and processes. These findings are seen as promising for educators desiring to encourage student self-regulation, because they indicate the possibility of supporting students via recreational video games by recognizing that their play includes processes of self-regulation. PMID:27729881

  4. Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory began operating in 1959, and joined the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL in 1970. It became part of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics in 1975. The site near Penticton, BC has a 26 m radio telescope, a seven-antenna synthesis telescope on a 600 m baseline and two telescopes dedicated to monitoring the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm. This part of the Institu...

  5. Radio determination satellite service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1990-07-01

    The capabilities and measured performance of a geosynchronous satellite-based service called the radio determination satellite service (RDSS), which operates at radio frequencies allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and is licensed in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), are discussed. Plans for both improvement in capability and expansion to nearly global coverage are described. Since RDSS can also provide radio navigation, some comparisons of this service with the Global Positioning System (GPS) are made.

  6. Learning English Language by Radio in Primary Schools in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odera, Florence Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radio is one of the most affordable educational technologies available for the use in education and development in developing countries. This article explores the use of school radio broadcast to assist teachers and pupils to learn and improve English language both written and spoken in Kenyan primary schools. English language occupies a central…

  7. Size dependence of the radio-luminosity-mechanical-power correlation in radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2013-06-01

    We examine the relationship between source radio luminosity and kinetic power in active galactic nucleus jets. We show that neglecting various loss processes can introduce a systematic bias in the jet powers inferred from radio luminosities for a sample of radio galaxies. This bias can be corrected for by considering source size as well as radio luminosity; effectively the source size acts as a proxy for source age. Based on a sample of Fanaroff-Riley Type II radio sources with jet powers derived from the measured hotspot parameters, we empirically determine a new expression for jet power that accounts for the source size, (Q{sub jet}/10{sup 36} W)=1.5{sub −0.8}{sup +1.8}(L{sub 151}/10{sup 27} W Hz{sup −1}){sup 0.8}(1+z){sup 1.0}(D/kpc){sup 0.58±0.17}, where D is source size and L {sub 151} the 151 MHz radio luminosity. By comparing a flux-limited and volume-limited sample, we show that any derived radio-luminosity-jet-power relation depends sensitively on sample properties, in particular the source size distribution and the size-luminosity correlation inherent in the sample. Such bias will affect the accuracy of the kinetic luminosity function derived from lobe radio luminosities and should be treated with caution.

  8. Radio data transmission for SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Enron has used such wireless systems as meteor burst radio, 952 MHz multiple address radio, VSAT and L-band satellite, cellular radio and ACSB radio. The company's experience with meteor burst radio communications is discussed in this paper. It indicates good system reliability and consequently all back-up telephone lines have been removed from sites using this system.

  9. Meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of inhibition and attention in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: exploring task-specific, stimulant medication, and age effects.

    PubMed

    Hart, Heledd; Radua, Joaquim; Nakao, Tomohiro; Mataix-Cols, David; Rubia, Katya

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) revealed fronto-striato-parietal dysfunctions during tasks of inhibition and attention. However, it is unclear whether task-dissociated dysfunctions exist and to what extent they may be influenced by age and by long-term stimulant medication use. OBJECTIVE To conduct a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in ADHD during inhibition and attention tasks, exploring age and long-term stimulant medication use effects. DATA SOURCES PubMed, ScienceDirect, Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases were searched up to May 2012 for meta-analyses. Meta-regression methods explored age and long-term stimulant medication use effects. STUDY SELECTION Twenty-one data sets were included for inhibition (287 patients with ADHD and 320 control subjects), and 13 data sets were included for attention (171 patients with ADHD and 178 control subjects). DATA EXTRACTION Peak coordinates of clusters of significant group differences, as well as demographic, clinical, and methodological variables, were extracted for each study or were obtained from the authors. DATA SYNTHESIS Patients with ADHD relative to controls showed reduced activation for inhibition in the right inferior frontal cortex, supplementary motor area, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as striato-thalamic areas, and showed reduced activation for attention in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, posterior basal ganglia, and thalamic and parietal regions. Furthermore, the meta-regression analysis for the attention domain showed that long-term stimulant medication use was associated with more similar right caudate activation relative to controls. Age effects could be analyzed only for the inhibition meta-analysis, showing that the supplementary motor area and basal ganglia were underactivated solely in children with ADHD relative to controls, while the inferior frontal cortex and

  10. A Radio Tag for Big Whales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Radio tags to track wildlife have been used for years. However, such tagging of whales has been more complicated and less successful. This article explores the latest technology that is designed to give information over a long period of time. (MA)

  11. HI absorption in nearby compact radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, M.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Curran, S. J.; Musaeva, A.; Deng, C.; Parry, R.; Sligo, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    HI absorption studies yield information on both AGN feeding and feedback processes. This AGN activity interacts with the neutral gas in compact radio sources, which are believed to represent the young or recently re-triggered AGN population. We present the results of a survey for HI absorption in a sample of 66 compact radio sources at 0.040 < z < 0.096 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. In total, we obtained seven detections, five of which are new, with a large range of peak optical depths (3% to 87%). Of the detections, 71% exhibit asymmetric, broad (ΔvFWHM > 100 km s-1) features, indicative of disturbed gas kinematics. Such broad, shallow and offset features are also found within low-excitation radio galaxies which is attributed to disturbed circumnuclear gas, consistent with early-type galaxies typically devoid of a gas-rich disk. Comparing mid-infrared colours of our galaxies with HI detections indicates that narrow and deep absorption features are preferentially found in late-type and high-excitation radio galaxies in our sample. These features are attributed to gas in galactic disks. By combining XMM-Newton archival data with 21-cm data, we find support that absorbed X-ray sources may be good tracers of HI content within the host galaxy. This sample extends previous HI surveys in compact radio galaxies to lower radio luminosities and provides a basis for future work exploring the higher redshift universe.

  12. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  13. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  14. Amateur Radio Satellite Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, David P.

    The Amateur Radio Satellite Communications project had, as its goal, the assembly of an amateur radio satellite station in a high school physics classroom. Specific objectives were to provide: (1) a special source of interest as a motivator for attracting students and building public relations; (2) a center of interest as a motivator for the study…

  15. Planetary foreshock radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncic, Zdenka; Cairns, Iver H.

    2005-07-01

    The electron foreshock regions upstream of Earth's bow shock and upstream of traveling interplanetary shocks are known to be propitious sites for a variety of energetic particle and plasma wave phenomena, including radio emissions. A quantitative theoretical model has been developed for radio emissions associated with the terrestrial foreshock and for type II radio bursts associated with interplanetary shocks. Here, we generalize this model and apply it to other planetary foreshocks. We present predictions for the levels of planetary foreshock radio emissions and compare these with observations by past and present space missions. One key result is that Mercury can be a strong source of foreshock radio emissions, and this prediction may be testable with the anticipated BepiColombo space mission. Although the terrestrial foreshock radio emissions are the most detectable with existing instruments, our results predict that they are the second strongest in absolute terms, following the Jovian foreshock emissions. Indeed, we predict that the radio instrument on board Ulysses should have detected Jovian foreshock radio emissions, and we suggest that there is some evidence in the data to support this. We also suggest that Cassini was potentially capable of detecting foreshock emissions from Venus during its gravity-assist flybys and may possibly be capable of detecting foreshock emissions from Saturn under favorable solar wind conditions.

  16. Radio Astronomy for Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, N.; Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    Karl Jansky is considered the father of RADIOASTRONOMY. During the 1930s, Jansky worked for the Bell Telephone Laboratories studying the origin of static noise from thunderstorms. During the course of this work he discovered that some signals had an extraterrestrial origin. However, it was Grote Reber, a professional radio engineer and radio amateur, who carried out further investigations. In 1937...

  17. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  18. Writing for Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupper, Marianna S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a 24-hour commercial radio station simulation class project for eighth-grade language arts. Students wrote their own scripts, chose music and were disc jockeys on their own music and talk shows, and prepared news and traffic reports. Guest speakers from actual commercial radio came in to discuss issues such as advertising, censorship,…

  19. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958…

  20. Broadcasting Astronomy: The Stars Meet on the Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, L.; Masiero, S.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we describe our project Tutti Dentro — Le Stelle si incontrano in Radio (Come in everybody! — The Stars meet on the Radio), an Italian radio show about astronomy and space. The format involved celebrities, young astronomers and a network of 95 FM and web radio stations during the period July 2007 - January 2009. We will explore its structure, the language and the strategies adopted, along with the technical equipment and the software for recording sessions and editing. Finally we will describe the response from celebrities, radio stations and listeners. Our results could be a useful reference for those wishing to create similar radio programmes to deliver astronomy to a wider audience.

  1. Silent and suffering: a pilot study exploring gaps between theory and practice in pain management for people with severe dementia in residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Peisah, Carmelle; Weaver, Judith; Wong, Lisa; Strukovski, Julie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is common in older people, particularly those in residential aged care facilities (RACF) and those with dementia. However, despite 20 years of discourse on pain and dementia, pain is still undetected or misinterpreted in people with dementia in residential aged care facilities, particularly those with communication difficulties. Methods A topical survey typology with semistructured interviews was used to gather attitudes and experiences of staff from 15 RACF across Northern Sydney Local Health District. Results While pain is proactively assessed and pain charts are used in RACF, this is more often regulatory-driven than patient-driven (eg, prior to accreditation). Identification of pain and need for pain relief was ill defined and poorly understood. Both pharmacological and non-pharmacological regimes were used, but in an ad hoc, variable and unsystematic manner, with patient, staff, and attitudinal obstacles between the experience of pain and its relief. Conclusion A laborious “pain communication chain” exists between the experience of pain and its relief for people with severe dementia within RACF. Given the salience of pain for older people with dementia, we recommend early, proactive consideration and management of pain in the approach to behaviors of concern. Individualized pain measures for such residents; empowerment of nursing staff as “needs interpreters”; collaborative partnerships with common care goals between patients where possible; RACF staff, doctors, and family carers; and more meaningful use of pain charts to map response to stepped pain protocols may be useful strategies to explore in clinical settings. PMID:25342895

  2. Health belief model perceptions, knowledge of heart disease, and its risk factors in educated African-American women: an exploration of the relationships of socioeconomic status and age.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah E; Weaver, Michael T; Grimley, Diane; Appel, Susan J; Ard, Jamy

    2006-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death for African-American women in the United States. Although African-American women experience higher rates of heart disease with earlier onset and more severe consequences than White women do, they are not aware of their risk for the disease. The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been commonly used to guide preventive interventions in cardiovascular health. However, the HBM has not been evaluated for African-American women regarding its effectiveness. This study explored the perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness of heart disease, and the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), age, and knowledge of heart disease and its risk factors among 194 educated African-American women from the southern United States. Participants did not perceive themselves to be at high risk for developing heart disease while perceiving heart disease as serious. African-American women who were older perceived heart disease to be more serious than their younger counterparts did. Older women and those with higher SES knew more about heart disease and risk factors. Neither SES nor age moderated the relationship between knowledge and perceived susceptibility or seriousness.

  3. Solar emission levels at low radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solar radio emission could seriously interfere with observations made by a low frequency (1 to 10 MHz) array in space. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) radio data were used to determine solar emission level. The results indicate that solar emission should seriously disturb less than ten percent of the data, even during the years of solar maximum. Thus it appears that solar emission should not cause a disastrous loss of data. The information needed to design procedures to excise solar interference from the data produced by any low-frequency array is provided.

  4. The Influence of New Media and Family Structure on Young Adolescents' Television and Radio Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jane Delano; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines adolescents' television and radio use. Finds that (1) Blacks and girls use television and radio more than Whites and boys; (2) television use declines with age while radio use increases; (3) access to cable television and VCRs is not related to frequency of use; and (4) lack of access to parents increases use. (KEH)

  5. Facets of radio-loud AGN evolution : a LOFAR surveys perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radio observations provide a unique view of black holes in the Universe. This thesis presents low frequency radio images and uses the radio sources in those images to study the evolution of black holes and galaxies through the age of the Universe.

  6. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios AGENCY: Federal... implement security features in software defined radios (SDRs). While, the Commission dismisses this petition... Order 1. On March 17, 2005, the Commission adopted the Cognitive Radio Report and Order, 70 FR...

  7. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  8. The Portable Radio Science Receiver (RSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogstad, S.; Navarro, R.; Finley, S.; Goodhart, C.; Proctor, R.; Asmar, S.

    2009-08-01

    The radio science receiver (RSR) is an open-loop receiver that has been used in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) facilities for almost a decade and is a valuable resource used to record data for radio science experiments, radio astronomy observations, and very long baseline interferometry. In the last few years, NASA has needed to send RSRs to non-DSN facilities such as the Greenbank Telescope and Australia's Parkes and Narrabri antenna array for special events such as the Mars Exploration Rover entry, descent, and landing maneuver and the Huygens probe landing on Titan. The need to quickly and cost effectively ship and set up an RSR without taking away valuable existing DSN resources has led to the development of a prototype portable RSR (PRSR). The PRSR maintains most of the capabilities of a full RSR and greatly exceeds it in many ways while only a fraction of the cost and weight.

  9. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  10. Unveiling the radio cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinde, Keith

    2017-02-01

    Using a radio telescope with no moving parts, the dark energy speeding up the expansion of the Universe can be probed in unprecedented detail, says Keith Vanderlinde, on behalf of the CHIME collaboration.

  11. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a recently discovered phenomenon consisting of short (few ms) bursts of radio waves that have dispersion measures that strongly suggest an extragalactic and possibly cosmological origin. Current best estimates for the rate of FRBs is several thousand per sky per day at radio frequencies near 1.4 GHz. Even with so high a rate, to date, fewer than 20 FRBs have been reported, with one source showing repeated bursts. In this talk I will describe known FRB properties including what is known about the lone repeating source, as well as models for the origin of these mysterious events. I will also describe the CHIME radio telescope, currently under construction in Canada. Thanks to its great sensitivity and unprecedented field-of-view, CHIME promises major progress on FRBs.

  12. Packet Radio for Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This tutorial on packet radio (communication system using radio and digital packet-switching technology) highlights radio transmission of data, brief history, special considerations in applying packet radio to library online catalogs, technology, defining protocol at physical and network levels, security, geographic coverage, and components. (A…

  13. Soldier’s Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-14

    individual soldier. "t’s primary use is by individuals in squads or small units, but may also be used to interconnect into local and wide area...Velopilnq the concept for the Soldier’s Radio. The operation of the SR can be partitioned into two areas. The architecture required to provide intra- squad ... SQUAD CONMECTrVITY The basic radio ccmmunications architectures suitable for :cnsideration for the SR intra- squad operations include the Net, .tar

  14. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  15. Radio spectrum surveillance station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a general and functional description of a low-cost surveillance station designed as the first phase of NASA's program to develop a radio spectrum surveillance capability for deep space stations for identifying radio frequency interference sources. The station described has identified several particular interferences and is yielding spectral signature data which, after cataloging, will serve as a library for rapid identification of frequently observed interference. Findings from the use of the station are discussed.

  16. Radio observations of solar eclipse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuying; Fu, Qijun

    1998-09-01

    For radio astronomy, a solar eclipse provides an opportunity for making solar radio observations with high one-dimension spatial resolution. The radio observation of a solar eclipse has played an important role in solar radio physics. Some important factors for radio observation of a solar eclipse are introduced and analysed. Solar eclipse radio observation has also played an important role in the progress of solar radio atronomy in China. The solar eclipses of 1958, 1968, 1980 and 1987, which were observed in China, are introduced, and the main results of these observations are briefly shown.

  17. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  18. Sensitive radio survey of obscured quasar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars in samples at both low (z ˜ 0.5) and high (z ˜ 2.5) redshift to understand the role of radio activity in accretion, using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 6.0 GHz and 1.4 GHz. Our z ˜ 2.5 sample consists of optically selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of νLν[1.4 GHz] ≲ 1040 erg s-1. Only a single source is individually detected in our deep (rms˜10 μJy) exposures. This population would not be identified by radio-based selection methods used for distinguishing dusty star-forming galaxies and obscured active nuclei. In our pilot A-array study of z ˜ 0.5 radio-quiet quasars, we spatially resolve four of five objects on scales ˜5 kpc and find they have steep spectral indices with an average value of α = -0.75. Therefore, radio emission in these sources could be due to jet-driven or radiatively driven bubbles interacting with interstellar material on the scale of the host galaxy. Finally, we also study the additional population of ˜200 faint ( ˜ 40 μJy-40 mJy) field radio sources observed over ˜120 arcmin2 of our data. 60 per cent of these detections (excluding our original targets) are matched in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and are, in roughly equal shares, active galactic nuclei (AGN) at a broad range of redshifts, passive galaxies with no other signs of nuclear activity and infrared-bright but optically faint sources. Spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed star-forming galaxies constitute only a small minority of the matches. Such sensitive radio surveys allow us to address important questions of AGN evolution and evaluate the AGN contribution to the radio-quiet sky.

  19. Astrometry of southern radio sources.

    PubMed

    White, G L; Jauncey, D L; Harvey, B R; Savage, A; Gulkis, S; Preston, R A; Peterson, B A; Reynolds, J E; Nicolson, G D; Malin, D F

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogues. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarc-second radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way.

  20. Saints, sinners and non-believers: the moral space of food. A qualitative exploration of beliefs and perspectives on healthy eating of Irish adults aged 50-70.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Mary; McCarthy, Mary B

    2014-02-01

    Food choices can involve a moral element of which healthy eating has come to play a major part in recent years. This research aimed to explore the moral space of food for older adults in order to understand how they conceptualise and negotiate various moral demands in the context of their general food lives. In-depth interviews on the lived experience of food and eating were conducted with a purposive sample of 50 adults aged 50-70, who varied by dietary quality and health status. An inductive thematic analysis was carried out. Three major themes representing aspects of the "moral space of food" were identified. This moral space was influenced by old religious and secular moralities which have become intertwined with new moralities of "healthism", a trend towards encouraging personal responsibility for health. Participants sought to maintain moral congruence by keeping their behaviour within moral boundaries through balance and moderation. Some resisted immoral positioning by highlighting their own autonomy or by challenging healthist ideology. A fundamental tension exists between the concept of healthy eating as desirable to remain a moral person while simultaneously being equated with sacrifice of pleasure and enjoyment. Healthist ideology perpetuates this tension, problematising enjoyment of food and bodies of those outside of the "norm". Attempting to address negative moralistic undertones of healthy eating messages may help to engage public interest in nutrition.

  1. [Hypersensitivity reaction to radio contrast media: diagnosis, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Mahlab-Guri, Keren; Herskovitz, Pearl; Sthoeger, Zev

    2012-07-01

    More than 70 million radiographic examinations with radio contrast media are performed worldwide each year. The incidence of adverse reactions to radio contrast media is 5-13%. Adverse reactions include hypersensitivity reactions, chemotoxic reactions and renal toxicity. Hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media range from mild pruritus to life-threatening emergency. The differential diagnosis between hypersensitivity reaction to radio contrast media and chemotoxic reaction is challenging. The incidence of chemotoxic reactions is mainly affected by the chemical structure of the radio contrast media and the rate of infusion. The incidence of hypersensitivity radio contrast media reaction is affected by age and by the presence of asthma and other atopic diseases. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity reaction to radio contrast media is based on clinical manifestations. The additional value of laboratory tests is limited and questionable. In case of hypersensitivity radio contrast reaction, the infusion should be stopped immediately, airways should be protected and fluids, oxygen and drugs should be given. Prophylactic treatment before its administration may prevent hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.

  2. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  3. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-22

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  4. Radio data archiving system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; Zanichelli, A.; Dovgan, E.; Nanni, M.; Stagni, M.; Righini, S.; Sponza, M.; Bedosti, F.; Orlati, A.; Smareglia, R.

    2016-07-01

    Radio Astronomical Data models are becoming very complex since the huge possible range of instrumental configurations available with the modern Radio Telescopes. What in the past was the last frontiers of data formats in terms of efficiency and flexibility is now evolving with new strategies and methodologies enabling the persistence of a very complex, hierarchical and multi-purpose information. Such an evolution of data models and data formats require new data archiving techniques in order to guarantee data preservation following the directives of Open Archival Information System and the International Virtual Observatory Alliance for data sharing and publication. Currently, various formats (FITS, MBFITS, VLBI's XML description files and ancillary files) of data acquired with the Medicina and Noto Radio Telescopes can be stored and handled by a common Radio Archive, that is planned to be released to the (inter)national community by the end of 2016. This state-of-the-art archiving system for radio astronomical data aims at delegating as much as possible to the software setting how and where the descriptors (metadata) are saved, while the users perform user-friendly queries translated by the web interface into complex interrogations on the database to retrieve data. In such a way, the Archive is ready to be Virtual Observatory compliant and as much as possible user-friendly.

  5. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - I. Morphology, magnetic field strength and energetics.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Jeremy J; Croston, Judith H; Intema, Huib T; Stewart, Adam J; Ineson, Judith; Hardcastle, Martin J; Godfrey, Leith; Best, Philip; Brienza, Marisa; Heesen, Volker; Mahony, Elizabeth K; Morganti, Raffaella; Murgia, Matteo; Orrú, Emanuela; Röttgering, Huub; Shulevski, Aleksandar; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Due to their steep spectra, low-frequency observations of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies potentially provide key insights in to the morphology, energetics and spectrum of these powerful radio sources. However, limitations imposed by the previous generation of radio interferometers at metre wavelengths have meant that this region of parameter space remains largely unexplored. In this paper, the first in a series examining FR IIs at low frequencies, we use LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) observations between 50 and 160 MHz, along with complementary archival radio and X-ray data, to explore the properties of two FR II sources, 3C 452 and 3C 223. We find that the morphology of 3C 452 is that of a standard FR II rather than of a double-double radio galaxy as had previously been suggested, with no remnant emission being observed beyond the active lobes. We find that the low-frequency integrated spectra of both sources are much steeper than expected based on traditional assumptions and, using synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting, show that the total energy content of the lobes is greater than previous estimates by a factor of around 5 for 3C 452 and 2 for 3C 223. We go on to discuss possible causes of these steeper-than-expected spectra and provide revised estimates of the internal pressures and magnetic field strengths for the intrinsically steep case. We find that the ratio between the equipartition magnetic field strengths and those derived through synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting remains consistent with previous findings and show that the observed departure from equipartition may in some cases provide a solution to the spectral versus dynamical age disparity.

  6. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - I. Morphology, magnetic field strength and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Jeremy J.; Croston, Judith H.; Intema, Huib T.; Stewart, Adam J.; Ineson, Judith; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Godfrey, Leith; Best, Philip; Brienza, Marisa; Heesen, Volker; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Morganti, Raffaella; Murgia, Matteo; Orrú, Emanuela; Röttgering, Huub; Shulevski, Aleksandar; Wise, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Due to their steep spectra, low-frequency observations of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies potentially provide key insights in to the morphology, energetics and spectrum of these powerful radio sources. However, limitations imposed by the previous generation of radio interferometers at metre wavelengths have meant that this region of parameter space remains largely unexplored. In this paper, the first in a series examining FR IIs at low frequencies, we use LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) observations between 50 and 160 MHz, along with complementary archival radio and X-ray data, to explore the properties of two FR II sources, 3C 452 and 3C 223. We find that the morphology of 3C 452 is that of a standard FR II rather than of a double-double radio galaxy as had previously been suggested, with no remnant emission being observed beyond the active lobes. We find that the low-frequency integrated spectra of both sources are much steeper than expected based on traditional assumptions and, using synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting, show that the total energy content of the lobes is greater than previous estimates by a factor of around 5 for 3C 452 and 2 for 3C 223. We go on to discuss possible causes of these steeper-than-expected spectra and provide revised estimates of the internal pressures and magnetic field strengths for the intrinsically steep case. We find that the ratio between the equipartition magnetic field strengths and those derived through synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting remains consistent with previous findings and show that the observed departure from equipartition may in some cases provide a solution to the spectral versus dynamical age disparity.

  7. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe.

  8. Radio coverage statistics.

    PubMed

    Lynn, W

    1984-01-01

    The Clearinghouse on Development Communication surveyed 135 countries in Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America, for U.S.A.I.D., to determine the number of radio and television broadcast stations and receivers. Some of the data were obtained from the World Factbook, the World Radio and TV Handbook, and the World Radio and T.V. Facts and Figures, from 1979 to 1981. In those countries where stations are privately owned, audience surveys are often available. In 2 out of 3 developing countries, however, stations are government owned, and no such information is available. Numbers of receivers can sometimes be ascertained from receiver license applications. There is a need for more complete information on broadcast demographics, listening and viewing patterns by the community of world development program personnel.

  9. Radio frequency spectrum management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujdak, E. J., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This thesis is a study of radio frequency spectrum management as practiced by agencies and departments of the Federal Government. After a brief introduction to the international agency involved in radio frequency spectrum management, the author concentrates on Federal agencies engaged in frequency management. These agencies include the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee (IRAC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). Based on an analysis of Department of Defense frequency assignment procedures, recommendations are given concerning decentralizing military frequency assignment by delegating broader authority to unified commanders. This proposal includes a recommendation to colocate the individual Service frequency management offices at the Washington level. This would result in reduced travel costs, lower manpower requirements, and a common tri-Service frequency management data base.

  10. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  11. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  12. Radio Observations of Meteors.

    PubMed

    Millman, P M

    1954-08-27

    To summarize, we find that the radio technique of meteor observation enables us to extend the systematic recording of meteor rates down to the 9th or 10th magnitude; to determine satisfactory heights and velocities on a scale previously impossible; to calculate the orbits of meteor showers and individual meteors, in particular those that appear only in the daytime; and to study wind drift and fine structure in the ionosphere. The radio observations have quite definitely indicated that down to the 9th magnitude, corresponding to particles approximately 1 mm in diameter, meteors are members of the solar system and do not come from interstellar space.

  13. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  14. The Deep Space Network: An instrument for radio astronomy research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Levy, G. S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Walken, P. R.; Chandlee, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network operates and maintains the Earth-based two-way communications link for unmanned spacecraft exploring the solar system. It is NASA's policy to also make the Network's facilities available for radio astronomy observations. The Network's microwave communication systems and facilities are being continually upgraded. This revised document, first published in 1982, describes the Network's current radio astronomy capabilities and future capabilities that will be made available by the ongoing Network upgrade. The Bibliography, which includes published papers and articles resulting from radio astronomy observations conducted with Network facilities, has been updated to include papers to May 1987.

  15. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  16. Prism beamswitch for radio telescopes.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Ulich, B L

    1978-12-01

    A dielectric prism and switching mechanism have been constructed for beamswitching a Cassegrain radio telescope. Spatially extended radio sources may be mapped without significant confusion utilizing the sensitivity and stability inherent in the conventional Dicke radiometer.

  17. The software system ``Evolution of radio galaxies''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Kopylov, A. I.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Verkhodanova, N. V.; Chernenkov, V. N.; Parijskij, Yu. N.; Soboleva, N. S.; Temirova, A. V.

    The project of the informational system creation on the problem of evolution of radio galaxies is described. This system, being developed at present at the server http://sed.sao.ru, allows a user to operate with simulated curves of spectral energy distributions (SED) and to estimate ages and redshifts by photometric data using χ2-method. Authors use SEDs of several models (GISSEL'98 (Bruzual, Charlot, 1996), PEGASE (Fioc, Rocca-Volmerange, 1996, 1998)) for different types of galaxies. Synthetic spectra are smoothed by the filter sensetivity curves before the procedure of age estimation. There is a possibility to calculate extictions in different filters using infrared maps. The server containes full archive of RC-catalog radio galaxy images obtained with 6 m telescope of SAO and VLA data. Modes of HTTP, FTP and FTP access, formats of output result (TABLE and GNUPLOT graphic) and additional functions are described.

  18. System to Study Evolution of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanova, N. V.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Kopylov, A. I.; Zhelenkova, O. P.; Chernenkov, V. N.; Parijskij, Yu. N.; Soboleva, N. S.; Temirova, A. V.

    The project of the informational system creation on the problem of evolution of radio galaxies is described. This system, being developed at present at the server http:// sed.sao.ru, allows a user to operate with simulated curves of spectral energy distributions (SED) and to estimate ages and redshifts by photometric data using χ2-method. Authors use SEDs of several models (GISSEL'98 (Bruzual, Charlot, 1996), PEGASE (Fioc, Rocca-Volmerange, 1996, 1998)) for different types of galaxies. Synthetic spectra are smoothed by the filter sensetivity curves before the procedure of age estimation. There is a possibility to calculate extictions in different filters using infrared maps. The server containes full archive of RC-catalog radio galaxy images obtained with 6 m telescope of SAO and VLA data. Modes of HTTP, FTP and FTP access, formats of output result (TABLE and GNUPLOT graphic) and additional functions are described.

  19. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  20. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  1. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  2. Community Radio in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Broadcasting Corp., Ottawa (Ontario).

    Results are presented of a survey of 20 community radio organizations operating in Canada. For each of the 20 agencies, information is provided relating to: (1) the name and address of the organization; (2) the name and population of the community served; (3) the station's call letters, frequency, and power; (4) the date of the station's license;…

  3. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    SciTech Connect

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  4. Albanian: Basic Radio Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This volume has been designed as a supplement to a course in Albanian developed by the Defense Language Institute. The emphasis in this text is placed on radio communications instruction. The volume is divided into five exercises, each of which contains a vocabulary, dictation, and an air-to-ground communications procedure conducted in Albanian…

  5. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  6. Educational Broadcasting--Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahamed, Uvais; Grimmett, George

    This manual is intended for those who must conduct educational radio broadcasting training courses in Asia-Pacific countries without the resources of experienced personnel, as well as for individuals to use in self-learning situations. The selection of material has been influenced by the need to use broadcasting resources effectively in programs…

  7. Community Control of Local Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Peter M.

    This study was designed to determine to what extent local communities control the local radio which serves them, by what formal mechanisms their control is secured, and the underlying assumptions and goals which govern the practice of the professionals who have charge of the facilities. Two British radio stations, BBC Radio Bristol and the…

  8. Ham Radio is Mir Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students communicated with U.S. and Russian astronauts via ham radio while they were in orbit on the space station Mir. Gives suggestions for other ham radio classroom activities as well as names of organizations, publications, and grant programs that teachers can access to help in bring ham radio into their…

  9. Radio: Your Publics Are Listening!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Gary

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide school board members, administrators, teachers, and others interested in education with an understanding of radio, how it works, and how school systems can take advantage of the communications possibilities offered by radio. After providing background information on radio as a mass communications medium…

  10. Collaborative Beamfocusing Radio (COBRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Jeremy P.; Hsu, Mark J.; Smith, David; Husain, Anis

    2013-05-01

    A Ziva team has recently demonstrated a novel technique called Collaborative Beamfocusing Radios (COBRA) which enables an ad-hoc collection of distributed commercial off-the-shelf software defined radios to coherently align and beamform to a remote radio. COBRA promises to operate even in high multipath and non-line-of-sight environments as well as mobile applications without resorting to computationally expensive closed loop techniques that are currently unable to operate with significant movement. COBRA exploits two key technologies to achieve coherent beamforming. The first is Time Reversal (TR) which compensates for multipath and automatically discovers the optimal spatio-temporal matched filter to enable peak signal gains (up to 20 dB) and diffraction-limited focusing at the intended receiver in NLOS and severe multipath environments. The second is time-aligned buffering which enables TR to synchronize distributed transmitters into a collaborative array. This time alignment algorithm avoids causality violations through the use of reciprocal buffering. Preserving spatio-temporal reciprocity through the TR capture and retransmission process achieves coherent alignment across multiple radios at ~GHz carriers using only standard quartz-oscillators. COBRA has been demonstrated in the lab, aligning two off-the-shelf software defined radios over-the-air to an accuracy of better than 2 degrees of carrier alignment at 450 MHz. The COBRA algorithms are lightweight, with computation in 5 ms on a smartphone class microprocessor. COBRA also has low start-up latency, achieving high accuracy from a cold-start in 30 ms. The COBRA technique opens up a large number of new capabilities in communications, and electronic warfare including selective spatial jamming, geolocation and anti-geolocation.

  11. Rings in Radio Galaxies: a Multiwavelength Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizani, Nectaria A.; Garrett, M. A.; Morganti, R.; Cohen, A.; Kassim, N.; Gonzales-Serrano, I.; Leahy, J. P.

    We are studying the two powerful radio galaxies Hercules A and 3C310 and their clusters. They present many essential and atypical similarities with the striking one being the presence of large-scale rings instead of hotspots. Employing a multiwavelength observational campaign from radio to Gamma-ray wavelengths we are trying to determine the origin of their unusual structure and tenue (compared with the common AGN) and to disentagle the physical mechanisms taking place interior to them and in their clusters. For example: -In the RADIO we probe the pc- and kpc-scale environment. -In the (Near-)INFRARED we try to constrain the nature of the acceleration mechanism in the rings with the corresponding in the usual hotspots investigate the ISM shed light in their evolution. -In the OPTICAL we study of the ionized gas in the accretion disk fuelling the massive black hole. -In the ULTRAVIOLET we explore the nuclear region the ISM and its interaction with the jets. -In the X-RAYS we probe the intracluster medium identify possible interactions between the X-ray and radio emission measure cluster magnetic fields. -In the GAMMA-RAYS we study the intergalactic medium.

  12. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  13. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  14. Virtual observatory tools and amateur radio observations supporting scientific analysis of Jupiter radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Hess, Sebastien; Le Sidaner, Pierre; Savalle, Renaud; Stéphane, Erard; Coffre, Andrée; Thétas, Emmanuel; André, Nicolas; Génot, Vincent; Thieman, Jim; Typinski, Dave; Sky, Jim; Higgins, Chuck; Imai, Masafumi

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol, as well as data from the Iitate Low Frquency Radio Antenna, in Japan. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. The attached figure shows data from those three providers. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  15. MODELING BRIGHT γ-RAY AND RADIO EMISSION AT FAST CLOUD SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Raymond, John C.; Slane, Patrick O.; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ellison, Donald C. E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp

    2015-06-10

    Recent observations by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite have revealed bright γ-ray emission from middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) inside our Galaxy. These remnants, which also possess bright non-thermal radio shells, are often found to be interacting directly with surrounding gas clouds. We explore the non-thermal emission mechanism at these dynamically evolved SNRs by constructing a hydrodynamical model. Two scenarios of particle acceleration, either a re-acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays or an efficient nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) of particles injected from downstream, are considered. Using parameters inferred from observations, our models are contrasted with the observed spectra of SNR W44. For the re-acceleration case, we predict a significant enhancement of radio and GeV emission as the SNR undergoes a transition into the radiative phase. If sufficiently strong magnetic turbulence is present in the molecular cloud, the re-acceleration scenario can explain the observed broadband spectral properties. The NLDSA scenario also succeeds in explaining the γ-ray spectrum but fails to reproduce the radio spectral index. Efficient NLDSA also results in a significant post-shock non-thermal pressure that limits the compression during cooling and prevents the formation of a prominent dense shell. Some other interesting differences between the two models in hydrodynamical behavior and resulting spectral features are illustrated.

  16. “My body’s a 50 year-old but my brain is definitely an 85 year-old”: exploring the experiences of men ageing with HIV-associated neurocognitive challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hopcroft, Lisa; Bester, Laura; Clement, Daniel; Quigley, Adria; Sachdeva, Manisha; Rourke, Sean B; Nixon, Stephanie A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Research investigating HIV, neurocognition and ageing is well developed using neuropsychometric or other quantitative approaches; however, little is known about individuals’ subjective experiences. The purpose of this article is to explore the experiences of men aged 50 and older who self-identify as having HIV-associated neurocognitive challenges. In particular, this study uses the Episodic Disability Framework (EDF) to explore participants’ perceptions regarding: 1) symptoms/impairments, difficulties with day-to-day activities, challenges with social inclusion and uncertainty; 2) ageing as related to their HIV-associated neurocognitive challenges, and 3) the episodic nature of their HIV-associated neurocognitive challenges. Methods This qualitative, interpretive study involved in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 12 men aged 50 years and older who self-identified as having HIV-associated neurocognitive challenges. Participants were recruited from a neurobehavioural research unit (NBRU) at a large hospital in Toronto, Canada. Data were analyzed thematically and with reference to the EDF. Results Participants’ experiences reflected all concepts within the EDF to some extent. Difficulties with daily activities were diverse but were addressed using similar living strategies. Participants described challenges with work and social relationships resulting from neurocognitive challenges. Participants downplayed the significance of uncertainty in their lives, which they attributed to effective living strategies. Most men reported confusion regarding the link between their neurocognitive challenges and ageing. Others discussed ageing as an asset that helped with coping. Conclusions This is the first study to use a disability framework to examine the subjective experiences of men ageing with HIV-associated neurocognitive challenges. Findings reframe the episodic disability experienced by these individuals as being predictably linked to certain

  17. AIDS radio triggers.

    PubMed

    Elias, A M

    1991-07-01

    In April 1991, the Ethnic Communities' Council of NSW was granted funding under the Community AIDS Prevention and Education Program through the Department of Community Services and Health, to produce a series of 6x50 second AIDS radio triggers with a 10-second tag line for further information. The triggers are designed to disseminate culturally-sensitive information about HIV/AIDS in English, Italian, Greek, Spanish, Khmer, Turkish, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Arabic, Cantonese, and Vietnamese, with the goal of increasing awareness and decreasing the degree of misinformation about HIV/AIDS among people of non-English-speaking backgrounds through radio and sound. The 6 triggers cover the denial that AIDS exists in the community, beliefs that words and feelings do not protect one from catching HIV, encouraging friends to be compassionate, compassion within the family, AIDS information for a young audience, and the provision of accurate and honest information on HIV/AIDS. The triggers are slated to be completed by the end of July 1991 and will be broadcast on all possible community, ethnic, and commercial radio networks across Australia. They will be available upon request in composite form with an information kit for use by health care professionals and community workers.

  18. MULTIMOMENT RADIO TRANSIENT DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Stone, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present a multimoment technique for signal classification and apply it to the detection of fast radio transients in incoherently dedispersed data. Specifically, we define a spectral modulation index in terms of the fractional variation in intensity across a spectrum. A signal whose intensity is distributed evenly across the entire band has a lower modulation index than a spectrum whose intensity is localized in a single channel. We are interested in broadband pulses and use the modulation index to excise narrowband radio frequency interference by applying a modulation index threshold above which candidate events are removed. The technique is tested both with simulations and using data from known sources of radio pulses (RRAT J1928+15 and giant pulses from the Crab pulsar). The method is generalized to coherent dedispersion, image cubes, and astrophysical narrowband signals that are steady in time. We suggest that the modulation index, along with other statistics using higher order moments, should be incorporated into signal detection pipelines to characterize and classify signals.

  19. The Askaryan Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kara D.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high energy cosmogenic neutrinos could be most efficiently detected in dense, radio frequency (RF) transparent media via the Askaryan effect. Building on the expertise gained by RICE, ANITA and IceCube's radio extension in the use of the Askaryan effect in cold Antarctic ice, we are currently developing an antenna array known as ARA (The Askaryan Radio Array) to be installed in boreholes extending 200 m below the surface of the ice near the geographic South Pole. The unprecedented scale of ARA, which will cover a fiducial area of ~ 100 square kilometers, was chosen to ensure the detection of the flux of neutrinos suggested by the observation of a drop in high energy cosmic ray flux consistent with the GZK cutoff by HiRes and the Pierre Auger Observatory. Funding to develop the instrumentation and install the first prototypes has been granted, and the first components of ARA were installed during the austral summer of 2010-2011. Within 3 years of commencing operation, the full ARA will exceed the sensitivity of any other instrument in the 0.1-10 EeV energy range by an order of magnitude. The primary goal of the ARA array is to establish the absolute cosmogenic neutrino flux through a modest number of events. This information would frame the performance requirements needed to expand the array in the future to measure a larger number of neutrinos with greater angular precision in order to study their spectrum and origins.

  20. The VVDS-VLA deep field. IV. Radio-optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardelli, S.; Zucca, E.; Bolzonella, M.; Ciliegi, P.; Gregorini, L.; Zamorani, G.; Bondi, M.; Zanichelli, A.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Gavignaud, I.; Bongiorno, A.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Abbas, U.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de La Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Memeo, P.; Perez-Montero, E.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Temporin, S.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.

    2009-02-01

    Aims: The availability of wide angle and deep surveys, both in the optical and the radio band, allows us to explore the evolution of radio sources with optical counterparts up to redshift z˜ 1.1 in an unbiased way using large numbers of radio sources and well defined control samples of radio-quiet objects. Methods: We use the 1.4 GHz VIMOS-VLA Deep Survey, the optical VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey and the CFHT Legacy Survey to compare the properties of radio-loud galaxies with respect to the whole population of optical galaxies. The availability of multiband photometry and high quality photometric redshifts allows us to derive rest-frame colors and radio luminosity functions to a limit of a B rest-frame magnitude of M_B=-20. We derive spectrophotometric types, following the classification of Zucca et al. (2006, A&A, 455, 879), in order to have a priori knowledge of the optical evolution of different galaxy classes. Results: Galaxy properties and luminosity functions are estimated up to z˜ 1 for radio-loud and radio-quiet early and late type galaxies. Radio-loud late type galaxies show significantly redder colors than radio-quiet objects of the same class and this is related to the presence of more dust in stronger star forming galaxies. We estimate the optical luminosity functions, stellar masses and star formation rate distributions for radio sources and compare them with those derived for a well defined control sample, finding that the probability of a galaxy to be a radio emitter significantly increases at high values of these parameters. Radio-loud early type galaxies exhibit luminosity evolution in their bivariate radio-optical luminosity function, due to evolution in the radio-optical ratio. The lack of evolution of the mass function of radio-loud early type galaxies means that no new AGN are formed at redshift z<1. In contrast, radio-loud late type objects exhibit a strong evolution, both in luminosity and density, of the radio luminosity function for z>0.7. This

  1. Simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the radio-mode-switching pulsar PSR B1822-09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Mitra, D.; Rankin, J. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Wright, G. A. E.; Basu, R.; Szary, A.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2017-04-01

    We report on simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the radio-mode-switching pulsar PSR B1822-09 with ESA's XMM-Newton and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Lovell radio telescopes. PSR B1822-09 switches between a radio-bright and radio-quiet mode, and we discovered a relationship between the durations of its modes and a known underlying radio-modulation time-scale within the modes. We discovered X-ray (energies 0.2-1.4 keV) pulsations with a broad sinusoidal pulse, slightly lagging the radio main pulse in phase by 0.094 ± 0.017, with an energy-dependent pulsed fraction varying from ∼0.15 at 0.3 keV to ∼0.6 at 1 keV. No evidence is found for simultaneous X-ray and radio mode switching. The total X-ray spectrum consists of a cool component (T ∼0.96 × 106 K, hotspot radius R ∼2.0 km) and a hot component (T ∼2.2 × 106 K, R ∼100 m). The hot component can be ascribed to the pulsed emission and the cool component to the unpulsed emission. The high-energy characteristics of PSR B1822-09 resemble those of middle-aged pulsars such as PSR B0656+14, PSR B1055-52 and Geminga, including an indication for pulsed high-energy gamma-ray emission in Fermi Large Area Telescope data. Explanations for the high pulsed fraction seem to require different temperatures at the two poles of this orthogonal rotator, or magnetic anisotropic beaming effects in its strong magnetic field. In our X-ray skymap, we found a harder source at only 5.1 ± 0.5 arcsec from PSR B1822-09, which might be a pulsar wind nebula.

  2. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  3. Radio Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Robert J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; /NRAO, Socorro /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We extend our earlier work on cluster cores with distinct radio bubbles, adding more active bubbles, i.e. those with GHz radio emission, to our sample, and also investigating ''ghost bubbles'', i.e. those without GHz radio emission. We have determined k, which is the ratio of the total particle energy to that of the electrons radiating between 10MHz and 10GHz. Constraints on the ages of the active bubbles confirm that the ratio of the energy factor, k, to the volume filling factor, f lies within the range 1 {approx}< k/f {approx}< 1000. In the assumption that there is pressure equilibrium between the radio-emitting plasma and the surrounding thermal X-ray gas, none of the radio lobes has equipartition between the relativistic particles and the magnetic field. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the data led to the conclusion that there are not enough bubbles present in the current sample to be able to determine the shape of the population. An analysis of the ghost bubbles in our sample showed that on the whole they have higher upper limits on k/f than the active bubbles, especially when compared to those in the same cluster. A study of the Brightest 55 cluster sample shows that 17, possibly 20, clusters required some form of heating as they have a short central cooling time, t{sub cool} {approx}< 3 Gyr, and a large central temperature drop, T{sub centre}/T{sub outer} < 1/2. Of these between 12 (70 per cent) and 15 (75 per cent), contain bubbles. This indicates that the duty cycle of bubbles is large in such clusters and that they can play a major role in the heating process.

  4. Radio quiet, please! - protecting radio astronomy from interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, W.

    2011-06-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite and increasingly precious resource for astronomical research, as well as for other spectrum users. Keeping the frequency bands used for radio astronomy as free as possible of unwanted Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is crucial. The aim of spectrum management, one of the tools used towards achieving this goal, includes setting regulatory limits on RFI levels emitted by other spectrum users into the radio astronomy frequency bands. This involves discussions with regulatory bodies and other spectrum users at several levels - national, regional and worldwide. The global framework for spectrum management is set by the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union, which has defined that interference is detrimental to radio astronomy if it increases the uncertainty of a measurement by 10%. The Radio Regulations are revised every three to four years, a process in which four organisations representing the interests of the radio astronomical community in matters of spectrum management (IUCAF, CORF, CRAF and RAFCAP) participate actively. The current interests and activities of these four organisations range from preserving what has been achieved through regulatory measures, to looking far into the future of high frequency use and giant radio telescope use.

  5. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  6. Longitudinal Assessment of Cognitive and Psychosocial Functioning After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Exploring Disaster Impact on Middle-Aged, Older, and Oldest-Old Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Katie E.; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Marks, Loren D.; Galea, Sandro; Volaufova, Julia; Lefante, Christina; Su, L. Joseph; Welsh, David A.; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (HKR) on cognitive and psychosocial functioning in a lifespan sample of adults 6 to 14 months after the storms. Participants were recruited from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). Most were assessed during the immediate impact period and retested for this study. Analyses of pre-and post-disaster cognitive data confirmed that storm-related decrements in working memory for middle-aged and older adults observed in the immediate impact period had returned to pre-hurricane levels in the post-disaster recovery period. Middle-aged adults reported more storm-related stressors and greater levels of stress than the two older groups at both waves of testing. These results are consistent with a burden perspective on post-disaster psychological reactions. PMID:23526570

  7. Uzaybimer Radio Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbay, R.; Öz, G. K.; Arslan, Ö.; Özeren, F. F.; Küçük, İ.

    2016-12-01

    A 13 meters former NATO radar is being converted into a radio telescope. The radio telescope is controlled by a system which has been developed at UZAYBİMER. The Telescope Control System(TCS) has been designed using modern industrial systems. TCS has been developed in LabView platform in which works Windows embedded OS. The position feedback used on radio telescopes is an industrial EtherCAT standard. ASCOM library is used for astronomical calculations.

  8. Radio Emission from Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjellming, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Stellar radio emission is most common in double star systems where each star provides something essential in producing the large amounts of radio radiation needed for it to be detectable by RADIO TELESCOPES. They transfer mass, supply energy or, when one of the stars is a NEUTRON STAR or BLACK HOLE, have the strong gravitational fields needed for the energetic particles and magnetic fields needed...

  9. The properties of radio ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, W. B.; Disney, M. J.; Wall, J. V.; Rodgers, A. W.

    1984-03-01

    The authors present optical and additional radio data for the bright galaxies of the Disney & Wall survey. These data form the basis of a statistical comparison of the properties of radio elliptical galaxies to radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations may be explained by the depth of the gravitational potential well in which the galaxy resides governing the circumstances under which an elliptical galaxy rids itself of internally produced gas.

  10. Native Radio Broadcasting in North America: An Overview of Systems in the United States and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bruce L.; Brigham, Jerry C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that examined the development of Native American (i.e., Indian, Inuit or Eskimo, and Aleut) radio broadcasting in Canada and the United States. Underlying cultural concerns are discussed, funding sources are explored, and further research is suggested. A directory of Native American radio stations in the United States is…

  11. Radio-loud and Radio-quiet QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, K. I.; Condon, J. J.; Kimball, A. E.; Perley, R. A.; Ivezić, Željko

    2016-11-01

    We discuss 6 GHz JVLA observations covering a volume-limited sample of 178 low-redshift (0.2< z< 0.3) optically selected quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). Our 176 radio detections fall into two clear categories: (1) about 20% are radio-loud QSOs (RLQs) with spectral luminosities of {L}6≳ {10}23.2 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1 that are primarily generated in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) responsible for the excess optical luminosity that defines a bona fide QSO; and (2) the remaining 80% that are radio-quiet QSOs (RQQs) that have {10}21≲ {L}6≲ {10}23.2 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1 and radio sizes ≲ 10 {kpc}, and we suggest that the bulk of their radio emission is powered by star formation in their host galaxies. “Radio-silent” QSOs ({L}6≲ {10}21 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1) are rare, so most RQQ host galaxies form stars faster than the Milky Way; they are not “red and dead” ellipticals. Earlier radio observations did not have the luminosity sensitivity of {L}6≲ {10}21 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1 that is needed to distinguish between such RLQs and RQQs. Strong, generally double-sided radio emission spanning \\gg 10 {kpc} was found to be associated with 13 of the 18 RLQ cores with peak flux densities of {S}{{p}}> 5 {mJy} {{beam}}-1 ({log}(L)≳ 24). The radio luminosity function of optically selected QSOs and the extended radio emission associated with RLQs are both inconsistent with simple “unified” models that invoke relativistic beaming from randomly oriented QSOs to explain the difference between RLQs and RQQs. Some intrinsic property of the AGNs or their host galaxies must also determine whether or not a QSO appears radio-loud.

  12. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  13. Packet Radio Communications Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    init.ate any pending DMA channel I/O now possible as a result of the completed DMA I/O operation. For example, if the packet transmision has been...keyboard and printer b. Binary data record I/O fo/from the tape media c. Scan for unsolicited keyboard input 2-12 Software description of experimental...the station and transmit to the station packets input on the radio receivers. The goal is to provide a transparent packet transfer media to

  14. Radio frequency strain monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor); Holben, Jr., Milford S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A radio frequency strain monitor includes a voltage controlled oscillator for generating an oscillating signal that is input into a propagation path. The propagation path is preferably bonded to the surface of a structure to be monitored and produces a propagated signal. A phase difference between the oscillating and propagated signals is detected and maintained at a substantially constant value which is preferably a multiple of 90.degree. by changing the frequency of the oscillating signal. Any change in frequency of the oscillating signal provides an indication of strain in the structure to which the propagation path is bonded.

  15. Solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Smith, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Active areas of both observational and theoretical research in which rapid progress is being made are discussed. These include: (1) the dynamic spectrum or frequency versus time plot; (2) physical mechanisms in the development of various types of bursts; (3) microwave type 1, 2, 3, and moving type 4 bursts; (4) bursts caused by trapped electrons; (5) physics of type 3bursts; (6) the physics of type 2 bursts and their related shocks; (7) the physics of both stationary and moving traps and associated type 1 and moving type 4 bursts; and (8) the status of the field of solar radio emission.

  16. Observations of Solar Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Giorla

    2011-05-01

    A low frequency radio telescope has been recently been constructed on the campus of the The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) and has begun conducting observations at 20MHz as part of NASA'a Radio Jove program. This instrument is capable of observations of solar radio emission including strong prompt radio emission associated with solar burst events. We will discuss solar observations conducted with this instrument as well as an effort to conduct coincident observations with the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  17. Internet Resources for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    A subjective overview of Internet resources for radio-astronomical information is presented. Basic observing techniques and their implications for the interpretation of publicly available radio data are described, followed by a discussion of existing radio surveys, their level of optical identification, and nomenclature of radio sources. Various collections of source catalogues and databases for integrated radio source parameters are reviewed and compared, as well as the web interfaces to interrogate the current and ongoing large-area surveys. Links to radio observatories with archives of raw (uv-) data are presented, as well as services providing images, both of individual objects or extracts (``cutouts'') from large-scale surveys. While the emphasis is on radio continuum data, a brief list of sites providing spectral line data, and atomic or molecular information is included. The major radio telescopes and surveys under construction or planning are outlined. A summary is given of a search for previously unknown optically bright radio sources, as performed by the students as an exercise, using Internet resources only. Over 200 different links are mentioned and were verified, but despite the attempt to make this report up-to-date, it can only provide a snapshot of the situation as of mid-1998.

  18. What's Happening in "Their Space"? Exploring the Borders of Formal and Informal Learning with Undergraduate Students of Education in the Age of Mobile Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Jane; Jones, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The changing nature of teaching and learning in an age of accessible technologies provides challenges and opportunities for the design of learning events. Working with a sample of undergraduate students of education in one UK higher education institution we use an exploratory, qualitative approach to investigate students' spontaneous uses of their…

  19. Serving the Student-Survivor: Exploring the Transitional and Psychosocial Needs of School-Aged Children with Cancer and Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanin, Devon Malia

    2014-01-01

    The advances in medicine today have created an emerging population of student-survivors, school-aged children living with and/or recovering from serious health conditions (Bauman, 2010). Each school day in the United States, 46 young people, or the equivalent of two classrooms of students, learn they have cancer (Cure Search National Childhood…

  20. Exploring Pre-K Age 4 Learning Standards and Their Role in Early Childhood Education: Research and Policy Implications. Research Report. ETS RR-16-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bruin-Parecki, Andrea; Slutzky, Carly

    2016-01-01

    Currently in the United States, 50 states, 5 territories, and the District of Columbia have established prekindergarten (pre-K) age 4 learning standards that are intended to outline skills and knowledge that set children on a path to success in kindergarten and upcoming grades. These standards are emphasized as a centralizing force in early…

  1. Optical emission in the radio lobes of radio galaxies. II - New observations of 21 radio lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, P.; Tyson, J. A.; Saslaw, W. C.

    1983-02-01

    The authors report new identifications of optical emission associated with the radio lobes of double radio galaxies. Optical emission is present in the outer radio structure of the sources 3C 219, 3C 244.1, 3C 247, 3C 252, 3C 268.2, 3C 321, 3C 319, 3C 337, and possibly in 3C 330. The authors have not found emission to the detection limit of V ≡ 24 in the sources 3C 79, 3C 173.1, 3C 223, 3C 325, and 3C 381. Of the 21 separate sources in optical studies of extended lobes of radio galaxies reported to date, 16 radio sources observed so far show significant optical emission within one or both lobes, while in 11 of these the optical object is within 2arcsec of the radio peak.

  2. The Extragalactic Radio Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of an isotropic component of the high-latitude radio sky has been recognized for nearly fifty years, but has typically been assumed to be Galactic in origin. We use recent radio observations to test whether the observed high-latitude component could originate within either an extended Galactic halo or a more local "bubble" structure. The lack of significant polarization from the isotropic component, combined with the lack of significant correlation with the Galactic far-infrared emission, rule out an origin within the Galaxy. We conclude that an extragalactic origin is the only viable alternative for the bulk of the isotropic high-latitude emission. The extragalactic component is 2-3 times brighter than local (Galactic) emission towards the Galactic poles and is consistent with a power law in frequency with amplitude T(sub r) = 24.1 plus or minus 2.1 K and spectral index beta = -2.599 plus or minus 0.036 evaluated at reference frequency 310 MHz.

  3. PKS 0347+05: a radio-loud/radio-quiet double active galactic nucleus system triggered in a major galaxy merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C. N.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Morganti, R.; Holt, J.; Rose, M.; Dicken, D.; Inskip, K.

    2012-12-01

    We present optical, infrared (IR) and radio observations of the powerful Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio source PKS 0347+05 (z = 0.3390), and demonstrate that it is a rare example of a radio-loud/radio-quiet double active galactic nucleus (AGN) system, comprising a weak-line radio galaxy (WLRG) separated by 25 kpc (in projection) from a Seyfert 1 nucleus at the same redshift. Our deep Gemini optical images show a highly disturbed morphology, with a warped dust lane crossing through the halo and nuclear regions of the radio galaxy host, tidal tails and a bridge connecting the radio galaxy to the Seyfert 1 nucleus. Spectral synthesis modelling of our Gemini optical spectrum of the radio galaxy shows evidence for a reddened young stellar population of age ≤100 Myr. Further evidence for recent star formation activity in this source is provided by the detection of strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in mid-IR Spitzer/IRS spectra. Together, these observations support a model in which both AGN have been triggered simultaneously in a major galaxy merger. However, despite the presence of a powerful FR II radio source, and the apparently plentiful supply of fuel provided by the merger, the nucleus of the radio galaxy shows only weak, low-ionization emission-line activity. We speculate that the fuel supply to nuclear regions of the radio galaxy has recently switched off (within the last ˜106 yr), but the information about the resulting decrease in nuclear AGN activity has yet to reach the extended lobes and hotspots of the FR II radio source. Based on this scenario, we derive a lower limit on the typical lifetimes of powerful, intermediate-redshift FR II radio sources of τ FR II ≳5×106 yr. Overall, our observations emphasize that the fuelling of AGN activity in major galaxy mergers is likely to be highly intermittent.

  4. The first radio astronomy from space - RAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    The spacecraft design, instrumentation, and performance of the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) satellites (RAE-1 launched to earth orbit in 1968 and RAE-2 launched to lunar orbit in 1972) are reviewed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs of typical data. Consideration is given to the three pairs of antennas, the Ryle-Vonberg and burst radiometers, and problems encountered with antenna deployment and observing patterns. Results summarized include observations of type III solar bursts, the spectral distribution of cosmic noise in broad sky regions, Jupiter at low frequencies, and auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) from the earth. The importance of avoiding the AKR bands in designing future space observatories is stressed.

  5. The first radio astronomy from space - RAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    The spacecraft design, instrumentation, and performance of the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) satellites (RAE-1 launched to earth orbit in 1968 and RAE-2 launched to lunar orbit in 1972) are reviewed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs of typical data. Consideration is given to the three pairs of antennas, the Ryle-Vonberg and burst radiometers, and problems encountered with antenna deployment and observing patterns. Results summarized include observations of type III solar bursts, the spectral distribution of cosmic noise in broad sky regions, Jupiter at low frequencies, and auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) from the earth. The importance of avoiding the AKR bands in designing future space observatories is stressed.

  6. Radio evidence for interplanetary streamers in the range 10-170 solar radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Bougeret, J. L.; Stone, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Type III radio storms are observed by the radio experiment on board the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 out to 0.5-0.8 AU from the Sun, at a rate of 2 to 3 storms per solar rotation near solar maximum. They correlate with the type I and type III radio storms observed at higher frequencies, originating closer to the Sun. They are associated with an almost continuous injection of suprathermal electrons into the interplanetary medium. Some of the properties of the regions where the particles propagate are discussed, using the radio emission as a tracer.

  7. Remote Radio Sounding Science for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L.; Gallagher, D.

    2003-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's top side ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments, and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the moon surfaces vary in response to magnetic field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans. Radio sounding at 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide globally-determined electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. Subsurface variations in conductivity, can be investigated by radio sounding from 10 MHz to 40 MHz allowing the determination of the presence of dense and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts.

  8. Radio Plasma Imager Simulations and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Benson, R. F.; Fung, S. F.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Boardsen, S. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Haines, D. M.; Bibl, K.; Cheney, G.; Galkin, I. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) will be the first-of-its kind instrument designed to use radio wave sounding techniques to perform repetitive remote sensing measurements of electron number density (N(sub e)) structures and the dynamics of the magnetosphere and plasmasphere. RPI will fly on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission to be launched early in the year 2000. The design of the RPI is based on recent advances in radio transmitter and receiver design and modern digital processing techniques perfected for ground-based ionospheric sounding over the last two decades. Free-space electromagnetic waves transmitted by the RPI located in the low density magnetospheric cavity will be reflected at distant plasma cutoffs. The location and characteristics of the plasma at those remote reflection points can then be derived from measurements of the echo amplitude, phase, delay time, frequency, polarization, Doppler shift, and echo direction. The 500 m tip-to-tip X and Y (spin plane) antennas and 20 m boom Z axis antenna on RPI will be used to measures echoes coming from distances of several R(sub E).

  9. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  10. Sampling Studies Of Quasars, Radio-loud Galaxies, & Radio-quiet Galaxies -- Searching For The Cause Of Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldwell, G.; Salois, Amee; Soechting, I.; Smith, M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparing the environments of Radio-Loud Galaxies, Radio-Quiet Galaxies, and Quasars offers an opportunity to study the evolution of these objects. Our samples have been carefully chosen from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which also includes samples studied in the FIRST survey, and have been cut to determine the best possible results. Our study includes three samples. The Quasar sample currently contains 69 objects, the Radio-Loud Galaxy (RLG) sample has 1,335 objects, and the Radio-Quiet Galaxy (RQG) sample contains 2,436 objects (any updates will be given at the meeting). A number of trims were made to produce (smaller) samples with characteristics suited for precise results. By comparing the environments of these three samples we will be able to see any similarities or differences between them. If similarities are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to 'nature' - in an isolated manner with little environmental feedback, which may or may not have an effect on its evolution, as supposed by Coldwell et al. (2009). If differences are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to `nurture’ and that the environment may have played an important role in the development of their properties. We employ similar procedures used by Coldwell et al. (2009) in their study of blue and red AGNs. Upon the completion of an accurate sample, future work will be pursued studying a number of properties of the environments including studies of: the stellar masses, star formation rates, sersic morphologies, as well as densities and ages of the environments.

  11. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  12. Safety and Special Radio Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    Numerous radio stations across the nation perform nonbroadcast services in areas ranging from aviation, forestry protection, and telephone maintenance to amateur and citizen radio. These services can be grouped in four general categories: (1) safety, (2) industry, (3) land transportation, and (4) miscellaneous purposes. This bulletin briefly…

  13. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  14. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  15. Audiences for Contemporary Radio Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James T.; And Others

    A radio audience survey of 110 sample geographic clusters in the Santa Barbara, California, area served a twofold purpose: the construction of a demographic profile of audience types according to radio format choices, and the identification and analysis of various audience subgroups. A skip interval technique of these geographic clusters resulted…

  16. The Radio Phenomenon in Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faenza, Roberto

    One in a series of studies of experiments in new audiovisual techniques in Europe and the situations in some member countries, this paper traces the development of radio in Italy. Opposing views about radio broadcasting (public monopoly vs. freedom of broadcasting) are examined, and the various political and legal aspects of communications in…

  17. 78 FR 32165 - Commercial Radio Operators; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 0 Commercial Radio Operators; Correction AGENCY: Federal Communication Commission... rules concerning radio operator licenses for maritime and aviation in order to reduce administrative...) Administers the Commission's commercial radio operator program (part 13 of this chapter); the...

  18. Galaxy clusters: Radio relics from fossil electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    The detection of a tailed radio galaxy in a galaxy cluster conjoined to a region of diffuse radio emission confirms that radio galaxies provide the energetic electrons needed to explain the origin of this enigmatic emission.

  19. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch

  20. Radio Properties of NGC2363

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Skillman, Evan

    1994-05-01

    We have obtained the high resolution VLA radio images of the giant HII region NGC2363 in 3.6 cm, 21 cm and 92 cm. The spectral index (resolution = 1('') ) from the low noise 3.6 cm (rms = 0.02 mJy) and 21 cm (rms = 0.028 mJy) data suggests that this source including the large bubble inside of it discovered by Roy et al.(1991) is dominated by the thermal emission. The 92 cm result (resolution = 5.8('') , rms = 2.2 mJy) more strongly constrains the source to be thermal. The bubble found in the [OIII] emission line shows 45 km s(-1) expanding velocity and has the size about 200 pc. The existence of SNRs in a giant HII region is an eventual certainty and McCray & Kafatos (1987) have demonstrated the natural evolution of an OB cluster into a superbubble with a size of ~ 100pc and an age of 10(7) years. Roy et al.(1991) estimate a kinematic age for the N2363 bubble of 2 times 10(6) years and conclude that stellar winds are responsible since this is too young for supernovae to have played an important role. Detection of nonthermal emission coincident with the bubble would imply otherwise. Although no evidence of nonthermal emission was found (unlike in NGC5471; Skillman 1985), the presence of SNRs is not ruled out. The shell sizes are similar to those found in the giant HII regions 30 Dor and NGC604. They are also dominated by thermal emission, yet new X-ray observations suggest there are SNRs inside these shells. The bubble associated with NGC2363 may be just like one of the big shells found inside of 30 Dor or NGC604.

  1. Radio characteristics of galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, J. J.

    1986-02-01

    Radio characteristics of galactic nuclei, providing such unique information as spectral data on source variability, and the long-term history of the central engine and its duration of activity and total energy, are reviewed. The compact radio source characteristics are complicated by orientation-dependent relativistic beaming and by refractive focusing in the interstellar medium. Incoherent synchrotron radiation is thought to be the emission mechanism, with the result that synchrotron self-absorption in compact sources hides the central engine from direct radio observation. However, the history revealed by the extended jets and lobes of radio galaxies and quasars favors a single massive object not supported by radiation pressure, either a spinar or a black hole, as the energy source in radio-galaxy nuclei.

  2. Radio outburst of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bach, U.

    2013-04-01

    We report on extremely high radio flux of BL Lacertae at 43 and 8 GHz. Observations at 43 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Noto (Italy) revealed a flux density of 10.5 +/- 0.2 Jy on 2013 April 10.65, while observations at 8 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Medicina (Italy) detected a flux density of 8.2 +/- 0.7 Jy on April 12.22. These extremely high radio fluxes show that the radio activity likely correlated to the strong optical, near-infrared, and gamma-ray activity of 2011-2012 (see ATels #4028, #4031, #4155, #4271, #4277, #4349, #4565, #4600), and X-ray activity of late 2012 (ATels #4557, #4627), is far to be exhausted.

  3. THE ARECIBO DETECTION OF THE COOLEST RADIO-FLARING BROWN DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Route, M.; Wolszczan, A. E-mail: alex@astro.psu.edu

    2012-03-10

    Radio detection provides unique means to measure and study magnetic fields of the coolest brown dwarfs. Previous radio surveys have observed quiescent and flaring emission from brown dwarfs down to spectral type L3.5, but only upper limits have been established for even cooler objects. We report the detection of sporadic, circularly polarized flares from the T6.5 dwarf, 2MASS J1047+21, with the Arecibo radio telescope at 4.75 GHz. This is by far the coolest brown dwarf yet detected at radio frequencies. The fact that such an object is capable of generating observable, coherent radio emission, despite its very low, {approx}900 K temperature, demonstrates the feasibility of studies of brown dwarfs of the meagerly explored L, T, and Y spectral types, using radio detection as a tool.

  4. On post-SKA radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yuri; Chernenkov, Vladimir

    It is suggested that the development of the SKA will drastically change the face of radio astronomy in the 21st Century. A FAST-style SKA would admit observations of low contrast features, and would be the best design for studying the `dark ages' of the Universe (x>> 1) where sub-arcmin total power instruments can usefully be employed. To date there have been no proposals for post-SKA, billion square-metra instruments; we speculate that mobile communication systems can be used. In the very distant future, SKA multi-beam systems could be used to collect signals reflected by Solar system bodies such as the asteroid belt.

  5. The Radio Language Arts Project: adapting the radio mathematics model.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P R

    1985-01-01

    Kenya's Radio Language Arts Project, directed by the Academy for Educational Development in cooperation with the Kenya Institute of Education in 1980-85, sought to teach English to rural school children in grades 1-3 through use of an intensive, radio-based instructional system. Daily 1/2 hour lessons are broadcast throughout the school year and supported by teachers and print materials. The project further was aimed at testing the feasibility of adaptation of the successful Nicaraguan Radio Math Project to a new subject area. Difficulties were encountered in articulating a language curriculum with the precision required for a media-based instructional system. Also a challenge was defining the acceptable regional standard for pronunciation and grammar; British English was finally selected. An important modification of the Radio Math model concerned the role of the teacher. While Radio Math sought to reduce the teacher's responsibilities during the broadcast, Radio Language Arts teachers played an important instructional role during the English lesson broadcasts by providing translation and checks on work. Evaluations of the Radio language Arts Project suggest significant gains in speaking, listening, and reading skills as well as high levels of satisfaction on the part of parents and teachers.

  6. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  7. Radio Seeing Monitor Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiriart, David; Valdez, Jorge; Zaca, Placido; Medina, José L.

    2002-10-01

    A two-element interferometer for monitoring atmospheric phase fluctuations (radio seeing) is presented; this uses the unmodulated beacon signal at 11.715 GHz from a geostationary satellite. The system measures phase differences on the signal received by two small antennas separated by 50 m. The system incorporates the best features from previous designs: a heterodyne phase-lock receiver and an IQ demodulator system. Phase fluctuations measured at this frequency may be extrapolated to millimetric and submillimetric wavelengths since the atmosphere is not dispersive at these frequencies. The instrument has been tested at the Observatory San Pedro Martir (Mexico) at 2800 m above sea level. The final destination of the instrument is Cerro la Negra (Mexico), where the Large Millimeter Telescope is under construction, at an altitude of 4600 m.

  8. In the mood for love or vice versa? Exploring the relations among sexual activity, physical affection, affect, and stress in the daily lives of mid-aged women.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Mary H; Trevathan, Wenda R; Todd, Michael

    2007-06-01

    How do physical affection, sexual activity, mood, and stress influence one another in the daily lives of mid-aged women? Fifty-eight women (M age, 47.6 yrs) recorded physical affection, several different sexual behaviors, stressful events, and mood ratings every morning for 36 weeks. Using multilevel modeling, we determined that physical affection or sexual behavior with a partner on one day significantly predicted lower negative mood and stress and higher positive mood on the following day. The relation did not hold for orgasm without a partner. Additionally, positive mood on one day predicted more physical affection and sexual activity with a partner, but fewer solo orgasms the following day. Negative mood was mostly unrelated to next-day sexual activity or physical affection. Sexual orientation, living with a partner, and duration of relationship moderated some of these effects. Results support a bidirectional causal model in which dyadic sexual interaction and physical affection improve mood and reduce stress, with improved mood and reduced stress in turn increasing the likelihood of future sex and physical affection.

  9. Aging According to Biography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiland, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Uses Erik Erikson's work to discuss how biographies treat aging. Explores how developmental theorists observe biographical representations of the life cycle and its applicability to aging. (Author/BHK)

  10. Radio's Black Heritage: "Destination Freedom," 1948-1950

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, J. Fred

    1978-01-01

    Throughout the so-called Golden Age of radio broadcasting, 1920-1950, Afro-Americans were prevented from developing normally within the medium. The appearance of Richard Durham's "Destination Freedom" in 1948 represents a striking incongruity, the social message of the program being essentially the struggle for civil rights. (Author/GC)

  11. DISCOVERY OF ULTRA-STEEP SPECTRUM GIANT RADIO GALAXY WITH RECURRENT RADIO JET ACTIVITY IN ABELL 449

    SciTech Connect

    Hunik, Dominika; Jamrozy, Marek

    2016-01-20

    We report a discovery of a 1.3 Mpc diffuse radio source with extremely steep spectrum fading radio structures in the vicinity of the Abell 449 cluster of galaxies. Its extended diffuse lobes are bright only at low radio frequencies and their synchrotron age is about 160 Myr. The parent galaxy of the extended relic structure, which is the dominant galaxy within the cluster, is starting a new jet activity. There are three weak X-rays sources in the vicinity of the cluster as found in the ROSAT survey, however it is not known if they are connected with this cluster of galaxies. Just a few radio galaxy relics are currently known in the literature, as finding them requires sensitive and high angular resolution low-frequency radio observations. Objects of this kind, which also are starting a new jet activity, are important for understanding the life cycle and evolution of active galactic nuclei. A new 613 MHz map as well as the archival radio data pertaining to this object are presented and analyzed.

  12. Exploring the age of onset and recurrence of childhood animal cruelty: can animal cruelty be learned from witnessing others commit it?

    PubMed

    Hensley, Christopher; Tallichet, Suzanne E; Dutkiewicz, Erik L

    2012-06-01

    Despite recent research, few studies have examined the specific social contexts in which animal cruelty may be learned. Using data collected from 180 inmates at a medium- and maximum-security prison in a southern state, the authors seek to replicate findings from the Hensley and Tallichet study that examined the potential for the onset and recurrence of childhood animal cruelty to become a learned behavior, specifically in terms of demographic characteristics and childhood experiences with witnessing animal abuse. In the current study, those who were younger when they first witnessed animal cruelty initially hurt or killed animals themselves at a younger age. Respondents who had witnessed a family member hurt or kill animals reported engaging in recurrent animal cruelty and were older when they committed their first act of animal cruelty.

  13. Radio studies of extragalactic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Weiler, K W; Sramek, R A; Panagia, N

    1986-03-14

    Some exploding stars (supernovae) are powerful emitters of centimeter radio radiation. Detailed observations have shown that these supernovae quickly become detectable in the radio range, first at shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) and later at progressively longer and longer wavelengths (lower frequencies). This part of the phenomenon appears to be well explained by a monotonic decrease in the amount of ionized material surrounding the radio-emitting regions as the shock from the explosion travels outward. The radio emission itself is of a nonthermal, synchrotron origin, as is the case in most bright cosmic radio sources. Once the absorption effects become negligible, the radio intensity declines with time until reaching the detection limit of the telescope. Models suggest that the absorbing material originates in a dense wind of matter lost by the supernova progenitor star, or by its companion if it is in a binary system, in the last stages of evolution before the explosion. The synchrotron radio emission can be generated either externally by the shock wave from the explosion propagating through this same high density stellar wind or internally by a rapidly rotating neutron star, which is the collapsed core of the exploded star. Present results appear to favor the former model for at least the first several years after the supernova explosion, although the latter model remains viable.

  14. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers Detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Nissanke, S.; Hallinan, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nakar, E.; Piran, T.

    2016-11-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron-generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produce radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produce γ-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan-radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of weeks. Based on the derived light curves, we suggest an optimized survey at 1.4 GHz with five epochs separated by a logarithmic time interval. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts of simulated GW-merger events to be detected by advanced LIGO and Virgo by current and future radio facilities. The detectable distances for these GW merger events could be as high as 1 Gpc. Around 20%-60% of the long-lasting radio remnants will be detectable in the case of the moderate kinetic energy of 3\\cdot {10}50 erg and a circum-merger density of 0.1 {{cm}}-3 or larger, while 5%-20% of the orphan-radio afterglows with kinetic energy of 1048 erg will be detectable. The detection likelihood increases if one focuses on the well-localizable GW events. We discuss the background noise due to radio fluxes of host galaxies and false positives arising from extragalactic radio transients and variable active galactic nuclei, and we show that the quiet radio transient sky is of great advantage when searching for the radio counterparts.

  15. Radio emission in Mercury magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Reville, V.; Brun, A. S.; Pantellini, F.; Zarka, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Active stars possess magnetized wind that has a direct impact on planets that can lead to radio emission. Mercury is a good test case to study the effect of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on radio emission driven in the planet magnetosphere. Such studies could be used as proxies to characterize the magnetic field topology and intensity of exoplanets. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify the radio emission in the Hermean magnetosphere. Methods: We use the magnetohydrodynamic code PLUTO in spherical coordinates with an axisymmetric multipolar expansion for the Hermean magnetic field, to analyze the effect of the IMF orientation and intensity, as well as the hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density and temperature), on the net power dissipated on the Hermean day and night side. We apply the formalism derived by Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293), Zarka (2007, Planet. Space Sci., 55, 598) to infer the radio emission level from the net dissipated power. We perform a set of simulations with different hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind, IMF orientations and intensities, that allow us to calculate the dissipated power distribution and infer the existence of radio emission hot spots on the planet day side, and to calculate the integrated radio emission of the Hermean magnetosphere. Results: The obtained radio emission distribution of dissipated power is determined by the IMF orientation (associated with the reconnection regions in the magnetosphere), although the radio emission strength is dependent on the IMF intensity and solar wind hydro parameters. The calculated total radio emission level is in agreement with the one estimated in Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293) , between 5 × 105 and 2 × 106 W.

  16. Exploring TeleRobotics: A Radio-Controlled Robot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III; Hsiung, Steve C.

    2007-01-01

    Robotics is a rich and exciting multidisciplinary area to study and learn about electronics and control technology. The interest in robotic devices and systems provides the technology teacher with an excellent opportunity to make many concrete connections between electronics, control technology, and computers and science, engineering, and…

  17. Radio protection zone evaluation at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapping, Ken

    Increasing use of the radio spectrum by licensed and unlicensed devices, together with the encroachment of housing developments are an issue facing many radio observatories, including the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO), located near Penticton in Southern British Columbia. A joint study by Industry Canada (Canada's national spectrum manager), and the National Research Council (Operator of DRAO) is currently in progress to examine protection zone needs and the reliability of the definitions of the zone, and the general level of background noise from growing local communities. The objectives are to produce a definition of a protection zone that is useful in spectrum management to protect the observatory, and to establish how much local community development is acceptable if the observatory is to remain a viable location for radio astronomical observations. This presentation will summarize the results so far in this ongoing study.

  18. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2006 draws upon available information from literature, industry and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based upon these data.

  19. Radio Search For Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.

    Theoretical justification and ongoing observational efforts in view of detecting radio emissions from extrasolar planets will be presented. On the "prediction" side, a heuris- tic scaling law has been established relating the radio output of any magnetized flow- obstacle system to the incident magnetic energy flux on the obstacle. Its confirmation by the observation of radio emission from extrasolar planets would help to understand the energy budget of such a system. On the "detection" side, specific procedures have been developed for interference mitigation and weak burst detection.

  20. Recurrent Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jamrozy, Marek; Konar, Chiranjib; Machalski, Jerzy; Mack, Karl-Heinz; Saikia, Dhruba; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U.

    2007-10-15

    One of the outstanding issues concerning extragalactic radio sources is the total duration of their active phase and the possible existence of duty cycles of their nuclear activity. A duty cycle can be recognized if there is a mechanism which preserves the information of past activity for a sufficiently long time after a new activity has started up. If a new cycle starts before the radio lobes created during a former activity period have faded, we can recognize this by the observations of a young radio source embedded in an old relic structure.

  1. Searches for Fast Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; McLaughlin, M. A.

    2003-10-01

    We discuss optimal detection of fast radio transients from astrophysical objects while taking into account the effects of propagation through intervening ionized media, including dispersion, scattering, and scintillation. Our analysis applies to the giant-pulse phenomenon exhibited by some pulsars, for which we show examples, and to radio pulses from other astrophysical sources, such as prompt radio emission from gamma-ray burst sources and modulated signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. We estimate scintillation parameters for extragalactic sources that take into account scattering both in the host galaxy and in foreground Galactic plasma.

  2. The Helios radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S.; Stone, R.

    1984-01-01

    Radio bursts traveling between the Sun and the Earth were tracked by radio astronomy experiments on Helios 1 and 2. A relatively short dipole antenna with a well-defined toroidal reception pattern was flown. The antenna spins in the ecliptic at 60.3 rpm and 2 frequencies are measured in each revolution. The signal analysis determines the strength of the signal, the direction of the source in the ecliptic, and the degree of modulation, and estimates source size. The experiments provide three-dimensional direction finding in space. They extend the radio frequency window beyond what is observable on Earth, and offer a long triangulation baseline.

  3. The High Time Resolution Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, D.

    2013-11-01

    each orbit, PSR J1729-2117 which is an unusual isolated recycled pulsar, and PSR J2322-2650 which has a companion of very low mass - just 7 × 10^{-4} {M}_{⊙}, amongst others. I begin this thesis with the study of these pulsars and discuss their histories. In addition, I demonstrate that optical observations of the companions to some of the newly discovered pulsars in the High Time Resolution Universe survey may result in a measurement of their age and that of the pulsar. I have discovered five new extragalactic single radio bursts, confirming them as an astronomical population. These appear to occur frequently, with a rate of 1.0^{+0.6}_{-0.5} × 10^4 sky^{-1} day^{-1}. The sources are likely at cosmological distances - with redshifts between 0.45 and 1.45, making them more than half way to the Big Bang in the most distant case. This implies their luminosities must be enormous, 10^{31} to 10^{33} J emitted in just a few milliseconds. Their source is unknown but I present an analysis of the options. I also perform a population simulation of the bursts which demonstrates how their intrinsic spectrum could be measured, even for unlocalised FRBs: early indications are that the spectral index of FRBs < 0.

  4. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2008 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry, and presents analyses of exploration activities by the mineral industry based upon these data.

  5. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Vasil, R.L.; Nolting, A.

    2011-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2010 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry.

  6. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Bourget, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2009 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on industry exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities by the mineral industry based upon these data.

  7. Biomorphic Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, the first NASA/JPL workshop on Biomorphic Explorers for future missions. The topics include: 1) Biomorphic Explorers: Classification (Based on Mobility and Ambient Environment); 2) Biomorphic Flight Systems: Vision; 3) Biomorphic Explorer: Conceptual Design; 4) Biomorphic Gliders; 5) Summary and Roadmap; 6) Coordinated/Cooperative Exploration Scenario; and 7) Applications. This paper also presents illustrations of the various biomorphic explorers.

  8. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  9. The excess radio background and fast radio transients

    SciTech Connect

    Kehayias, John; Kephart, Thomas W.; Weiler, Thomas J. E-mail: thomas.w.kephart@vanderbilt.edu

    2015-10-01

    In the last few years ARCADE 2, combined with older experiments, has detected an additional radio background, measured as a temperature and ranging in frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz, not accounted for by known radio sources and the cosmic microwave background. One type of source which has not been considered in the radio background is that of fast transients (those with event times much less than the observing time). We present a simple estimate, and a more detailed calculation, for the contribution of radio transients to the diffuse background. As a timely example, we estimate the contribution from the recently-discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Although their contribution is likely 6 or 7 orders of magnitude too small (though there are large uncertainties in FRB parameters) to account for the ARCADE 2 excess, our development is general and so can be applied to any fast transient sources, discovered or yet to be discovered. We estimate parameter values necessary for transient sources to noticeably contribute to the radio background.

  10. Exploring gender-specific trends in underage drinking across adolescent age groups and measures of drinking: is girls' drinking catching up with boys'?

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Schwartz, Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    Underage drinking is among the most serious of public health problems facing adolescents in the United States. Recent concerns have centered on young women, reflected in media reports and arrest statistics on their increasing problematic alcohol use. This study rigorously examined whether girls' alcohol use rose by applying time series methods to both arrest data, Uniform Crime Reports, and self-report data from Monitoring the Future, a nationally representative long-term survey gathered independently of crime control agents. All self-reported drinking behaviors across all age groups show declining or unchanged female rates and no significant change in the gender gap, while the official source displays a steady narrowing gender gap and some increase of female arrest rates for liquor law violations. Results indicate that social control measures applied to underage drinking have shifted to target young women's drinking patterns, but their drinking has not become more widespread/problematic. Girls' increased alcohol use and abuse is a socially constructed problem, rather than the result of normalization of drinking or more strain in girls' lives. Future underage drinking policies and practices that apply legal intervention strategies to less chronic adolescent drinking behaviors will increase the visibility of girls' drinking.

  11. DISCOVERY OF A WANDERING RADIO JET BASE AFTER A LARGE X-RAY FLARE IN THE BLAZAR MARKARIAN 421

    SciTech Connect

    Niinuma, K.; Kino, M.; Doi, A.; Hada, K.; Nagai, H.; Koyama, S.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the location of the radio jet bases (“radio cores”) of blazars in radio images and their stationarity by means of dense very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In order to measure the position of a radio core, we conducted a 12 epoch astrometric observation of the blazar Markarian 421 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry at 22 GHz immediately after a large X-ray flare, which occurred in the middle of 2011 September. For the first time,we find that the radio core is not stationary but rather changes its location toward 0.5 mas downstream. This angular scale corresponds to the de-projected length of a scale of 10{sup 5} Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) at the distance of Markarian 421. This radio-core wandering may be a new type of manifestation associated with the phenomena of large X-ray flares.

  12. Exploring Globorotalia truncatulinoides coiling ratios as a proxy for subtropical gyre dynamics in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean during late Pleistocene Ice Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billups, K.; Hudson, C.; Kunz, H.; Rew, I.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the use of the coiling direction of planktic foraminifer Globorotalia truncatulinoides in sediment cores from the northwestern subtropical Atlantic Ocean as a proxy for variations in the intensity of the western boundary of the subtropical gyre over the past 280 kyr. Core-top sediments from the study region are dominated by the left coiling variety consistent with the deep permanent thermocline at the study sites (KNR140-37PC and Ocean Drilling Program Site 1059). Downcore G. truncatulinoides (sinistral) maxima occur in conjunction with 14 out of the 25 (Northern and Southern Hemisphere) precession maxima contained in the study interval. The agreement between the dominance of left coiling tests and the precession index of the Southern Hemisphere, in particular, supports a link between a deep thermocline in the northwestern subtropical Atlantic and northward flow of equatorially sourced warm surface currents, a situation analogous to the Late Holocene. Interglacial marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 5 lacks G. truncatulinoides (s) minima attesting to the relative stability of the western boundary during an interval of prolonged global warmth. G. truncatulinoides (s) disappear during the glacial extremes of MIS 2, 6, and 8 implying a weaker western boundary current at these times. Our results support that the coiling direction of this species is sensitive to variations in hydrography of the western boundary of the subtropical gyre. Because of the association between G. truncatulinoides (s) and precession maxima in both hemispheres, results support the importance of oceanic heat transport in half-precession climate variability in the North Atlantic.

  13. Radio observations of the brown dwarf- exoplanet boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Route, Matthew Philip

    Although exoplanets and brown dwarfs have been hypothesized to exist for many years, it was only in the last two decades that their existence has been directly verified. Since then, a large number of both types of substellar objects have been discovered; they have been studied, characterized, and classified. Yet knowledge of their magnetic properties remains difficult to obtain. Only radio emission provides a plausible means to study the magnetism of these cool objects. At the initiation of this research project, not a single exoplanet had been detected in the radio, and only a handful of radio emitting brown dwarfs were known. This project was launched to attempt to detect emission from brown dwarfs cooler than spectral type L3.5, the coolest brown dwarf detected prior to this project, and also to attempt to discover radio emission from nearby exoplanets. These objects are known to emit radio waves via the gyrosynchrotron and electron cyclotron maser instability mechanisms. By analyzing flaring radio emission from these objects, we would therefore gain insight into their magnetic field properties and the characteristics of the surrounding plasma environment. This dissertation presents the results from surveys of 33 brown dwarfs, 18 exoplanetary systems, and one additional M dwarf for flaring radio emission, conducted with the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope at a center frequency of 4.75 GHz using the broadband, fast-sampled Mock spectrometer. During the course of these surveys, we failed to detect flaring radio emission from any exoplanets, including the young exoplanetary system HR 8799, which theoretical work indicated may have strong magnetic fields capable of generating radio emission at gigahertz frequencies due to their relatively hot temperatures and high masses. Such a detection would provide an exciting alternative to the previous unsuccessful low radio frequency searches for the emission from exoplanets orbiting middle-aged, solar type stars. Among the

  14. Analysis of satellite measurements of terrestrial radio noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, G.; Caruso, J. A.; Vargas-Vila, R.; Ziemba, E.

    1974-01-01

    Worldwide distributions of terrestrial radio noise as monitored by Radio Astronomy Explorer 1 (RAE 1) generated and compared with CCIR predictions. These contour maps show the global morphology of radio noise at 6.55 and 9.18 MHz for fall, winter, spring and summer during the local time blocks of 00-08 LT and 16-24 LT. These computer produced maps show general agreement with CCIR predictions over large land masses. The RAE and CCIR maps diverge at high latitudes over Asia and frequently over ocean regions. Higher noise levels observed by RAE at high latitudes are attributed to magnetospheric emission while higher noise levels observed by RAE over Asia are attributable to high power transmitters. Analysis of RAE noise observations in conjunction with various geophysical phenomena showed no obvious correlation.

  15. The Business of Radio Promotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jonathan

    This speech suggests that public radio stations should examine and use the techniques employed by commercial stations to increase their listening audience--creative promotion based on community involvement and participation. Some examples are included. (SC)

  16. Radio astronomy - The next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.

    1991-09-01

    Discoveries made over the past several decades by radio astronomers include radio galaxies, quasars, pulsars, gravitational lenses, energetic bursts from the sun and Jupiter, the greenhouse effect on Venus, the rotation of Mercury, giant molecular clouds, violent activity in galactic nuclei, and cosmic background radiation. This paper discusses the development of ever more powerful radio telescopes, which include the VLA operated by NRAO near Socorro (New Mexico); the new NRAO's 100-m Green Bank Telescope being constructed in Green Bank (West Virginia); and the proposed Millimeter Array, which will consist of 40 antennas, each 8-m across, arranged in any of four different ways depending on the size of the region under study. Consideration is also given to methods for increasing the resolving power and image quality of radio telescopes, with special attention given to very-long-baseline interferometry.

  17. Facilities for radio-iodination.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, N W; Bhattacharyya, A K; Dunn, M J

    1980-02-01

    A fume cabinet with a sloping front, fitted with a chemical absorbing filter and extractor fan, but without exhaust ducting, appears to possess considerable advantages for radio-iodination work compared with standard fume cupboards.

  18. Large kinetic power in FRII radio jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Kino, Motoki; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Isobe, Naoki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the total kinetic powers ( L j) and ages ( t age) of powerful jets of four FR II radio sources (Cygnus A, 3C 223, 3C 284, and 3C 219) by the detail comparison of the dynamical model of expanding cocoons with observed ones. It is found that these sources have quite large kinetic powers with the ratio of L j to the Eddington luminosity ( L Edd) resides in 0.02< L j/ L Edd<10. Reflecting the large kinetic powers, we also find that the total energy stored in the cocoon ( E c) exceed the energy derived from the minimum energy condition ( E min ): 2< E c/ E min <160. This implies that a large amount of kinetic power is carried by invisible components such as thermal leptons (electron and positron) and/or protons.

  19. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  20. 75 FR 66709 - Commercial Radio Operators Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 0, 1, 13, 80, and 87 Commercial Radio Operators Rules AGENCY: Federal Communications... radio operator licenses for maritime and aviation radio stations who perform certain functions performed within the commercial radio operators service, to determine which rules can be clarified, streamlined,...

  1. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  2. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  3. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  4. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  5. PARTNeR: Radio astromony for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, C.; Vaquerizo, J. A.

    2008-06-01

    PARTNeR stands for Proyecto Academico con el Radiotelescopio de NASA en Robledo (the Academic Project with NASA's radio telescope at Robledo), and allows students to perform radio astronomy observations. High school and university students can access the PARTNeR radio telescope via the internet. The students can operate the antenna from their own school or university and perform radio astronomy observations.

  6. Innovativeness and the Public Radio Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Wenmouth, Jr.; Krugman, Dean M.

    1981-01-01

    A public radio audience was surveyed to test the hypothesis that a relationship exists between innovativeness and public radio listening. Rather than supporting the hypothesis, findings indicate that the entertainment and information elements of public radio are the primary attractions for the public radio audience. (MER)

  7. Radio Implementation of a Testbed For Cognitive Radio Source Localization Using USRPS and GNU Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    pp. 116–130, 2009. [4] R.A. Rashid , M.A. Sarijari, N. Fisal, S.K.S. Yusof and N.H. Mahalin, “Spectrum sensing measurement using GNU Radio and...USRP software radio platform,” in Proc. 7th Int. Conf. Wireless and Mobile Commun., Luxembourg, 2011. [5] R.A. Rashid , M.A. Sarijari, N. Fisal...Sarijari, A. Marwanto, N. Fisal, S.K.S. Yusof and R.A Rashid , “Energy detection sensing based on GNU Radio and USRP: An analysis study,” in Proc

  8. Ondvrejov solar radio WWW page

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivrivcka, Karel; Meszarosova, Hana

    Since mid 1997 the Solar Radio Astronomy Group of the Astronomical Institute in Ondvrejov has been running a new WWW page. You can find us at the address --- http://sunkl.asu.cas.cz/radio/ --- where information about our instruments, observed frequencies, as well as about our data archive is available. The home page includes four main topics: 1. Observation & Instrumentation --- here you can find information about which instruments are currently in use, observed frequencies, time resolutions etc. Presently we use for solar radio observations three dedicated instruments: RT3 -- single frequency 3 GHz receiver with 10 ms time resolution RT4 -- radio spectrograph 2.0--4.5 GHz with 100 ms time resolution RT5 -- radio spectrograph 0.8--2.0 GHz with 100 ms time resolution The observations are run daily, while the Sun is higher then 5 degrees above the horizon. Because of the tremendous amount of data, only chosen time intervals with radio events are archived. Event Archive Info: --- here you can find information about archived data (date, time interval) as well as overall images of individual events in GIF format (the image names are at the same time hyperlinks for direct loading) sorted by date and time of observation. Gallery: --- here you can find some representative examples of spectra of solar radio events, recorded by our instruments. Anonymous FTP Server: --- enables direct FTP access to our image archive. This WWW page should give you an insight, what data are available and what the events look roughly like. The uncalibrated rough data from our archive can be processed only by special programs and are not generally free. But if you are interested in a particular event from our archive, you can contact us via e-mail address: radio@asu.cas.cz This work has been supported by the Czech Academy of Sciences through grant no.A3003707.

  9. Populations of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, J. V.

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, radio sky surveys were the center of an intense and public debate -- Big-Bang versus Steady-State cosmology -- the arguments revolving about source counts and statistical interpretations in the face of instrumental complications. The 1965 discovery of the microwave background took the fire from the debate, but left the momentum in place for large-area radio surveys at different frequencies, and for extensive identification/redshift-measurement programs. By the 1970s the data enabled us to start disentangling the different populations of extragalactic radio sources. We could refine our taxonomy, and we could view the possibility of delineating individual cosmic histories and evolutions. We could at least describe a goal to elucidate the birth-life-death cycles of the objects involved 1quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) and radio galaxies: together the 'active galactic nuclei' (AGNs)1 whose unaccountably prodigious energies somehow produce the beautifully aligned radio structures with which we are now familiar. One part of John Bolton's vision was to see how distorted a view of the AGN universe the original long-wavelength surveys provided. One legacy is thus the 'short-wavelength survey' for extragalactic radio sources, which has done so much to balance our picture of the radio sky. And indeed the legacy continues in the form of the immense sky surveys at present under way, complete with their sub-industries of radio-positioning and identification. From these, yet further results are emerging on spatial distribution and the skeleton structure of the universe. It is the purpose of this paper to outline something of this current view of the populations, their differences, similarities and unifying concepts.

  10. National Centre for Radio Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    India's National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), located on the Pune University Campus, is part of the TATA INSTITUTE OF FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH. At Khodad, 80 km from Pune, NCRA has set up the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), the world's largest telescope operating at meter wavelengths. GMRT consists of 30 fully steerable dishes of 45 m diameter, spread over a 25 km area. Another meter...

  11. Historic Radio Astronomy Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    This special issue of Astronomische Nachrichten contains the proceedings of a session of the Historic Radio Astronomy Working Group of the International Astronomical Union that took place during the 26th General Assembly of the IAU in Prague on 17th August 2006. In addition to the talks presented in Prague some contributions were solicited to give a more complete overview of `The Early History of European Radio Astronomy'.

  12. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  13. A zero-power radio receiver.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-09-01

    This report describes both a general methodology and some specific examples of passive radio receivers. A passive radio receiver uses no direct electrical power but makes sole use of the power available in the radio spectrum. These radio receivers are suitable as low data-rate receivers or passive alerting devices for standard, high power radio receivers. Some zero-power radio architectures exhibit significant improvements in range with the addition of very low power amplifiers or signal processing electronics. These ultra-low power radios are also discussed and compared to the purely zero-power approaches.

  14. JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE: a low frequency radio imager at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Kasaba, Y.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Zarka, P.; Lamy, L.; Hess, S. L. G.; Rothkaehl, H.

    2015-10-01

    The JENRAGE (Jovian Environment Radio Astronomy and Ganymede Exploration) experiment of the Radio and Plasma Waves Instrument (RPWI) on-board JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) is a sensitive, and versatile radio instrument. It will observe radio waves ranging from 80 kHz to 45 MHz at a 100 Msample per second aquisition rate. The instrument is composed of set of 3 electrical dipoles (developed by the Polish team), connected to low noise preamplifiers and conditioning analog filters (built by the Japanese team), then sampled and digitally filtererd into ~300 kHz bands (digital part developed by the Swedish team). This international project is coordinated by B. Cecconi and Y. Kasaba, both co-PI of JUICE/RPWI. Although the radio antenna connected to this instrument have no intrinsic directivity, the JENRAGE measurements can provide instantaneous direction of arrival, flux density and polarization degree of the observed radio waves. Hence, the JENRAGE can be described as an full-sky radio imager. As the instrument provides direction of arrival, radio sources can be located with some assumption on the propagation between the source and the observer. Hence, it is possible to produce radio source maps and correlate them with observations at other wavelengths, such as UV or IR observations of the auroral regions of Jupiter. The flux and polarization measurements together with the time- frequency shape of the radio emissions can also be used to identify the radio emission processes. These features have shown their capabilities on Cassini, with the RPWS/HFR instrument. We will present the JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE design and the science objectives. Additional science topics linked to the icy satellites, which are currently being assessed, will also be presented.

  15. Microwave and theoretical studies for Cosmic Background Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, its instruments, and its scientific mission are discussed. The COBE radiometer is considered, and measurement of galactic radio emission with masers is reviewed. Extragalactic radiation and zodiacal dust are mentioned briefly.

  16. Natural radio lasing at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.; Leblanc, Y.; Ellis, G. R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Like the comparable AKR radio emissions from earth's magnetosphere, the well-known decametric radio S-bursts from Jupiter, observed in France and Australia at frequencies from 10 to 26 MHz, have been found to exhibit equally spaced discrete spectral components which can be attributed to the adjacent longitudinal oscillation modes of natural radio lasers. Implying sizes of only a few kilometers for the individual radio lasers producing the S-bursts, the frequency spacing of these modes was roughly constant with frequency and about 30 to 50 kHz. Their corresponding temporal spacings, however, varied inversely proportional to the observing frequency, suggesting that the radio lasers producing the S-bursts were expanding uniformly at a rate of about 4 km/s. Presumably caused by the projected motion of Io with respect to the planet, this expansion of the S-burst radio lasers would account for the downward frequency drifts of the S-bursts without the energetic electron bunches which have heretofore always been assumed necessary to account for such behavior.

  17. Radio galaxies and their environment

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.

    1993-02-24

    The relationships between radio galaxies and their environment are varied, complex, and evolve with cosmic epoch. Basic questions are what role the environment plays in triggering and fuelling (radio) galaxy activity what the effects of this activity are on its environment, and how radio galaxies and environment evolve. Clearly, this could be the topic of a workshop all in itself and the scope of this review will necessarily be limited. A review of the connections between environment and galaxy activity in general has been given by Heckman. First, I will briefly summarize the relationships between parent galaxy and cluster environments, and radio galaxies. A more detailed discussion of various aspects of this will be given elsewhere by F. Owen, J.0. Burns and R. Perley. I will then discuss the current status of investigations of extended emission-line regions in radio galaxies, again referring elsewhere in this volume for more detailed discussions of some particular aspects (kinematics and ionization mechanisms by K. Meisenheimer; polarization and spectral index lobe asymmetries by G. Pooley). I will conclude with a brief discussion of the current status of observations of high redshift radio galaxies.

  18. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  19. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  20. Integration of offshore seismic data, exploration wells, and onland outcrops as constraints on the tectonics and uplift age of metamorphic core complexes, eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz, G. G.; Mann, P.; Campos Aguiniga, H.

    2009-12-01

    High-grade metamorphic domes of the D’Entrecasteaux Islands (DEI) of eastern Papua New Guinea are located within continental crust at the tip of the westward propagating Woodlark spreading ridge. Multi-channel seismic data collected by the RV Maurice Ewing in 1992 was integrated with seismic data from 1974 and two wells drilled by the oil industry in 1973 to understand pattern and age of faults and clastic wedges in offshore basins surrounding the 2-2.5-km high DEI. The WNW-trending line of the DEI demarcates two areas of contrasting deformational and depositional histories. In the area of the Kiribisi and Trobriand basins north of the DEI, normal faults occupy a WNW-striking basin that began to rift in the early Miocene and continued to rift sporadically until the early Pliocene when all normal faults were buried by ~650 m of undeformed Plio-Pleistocene sediments. We infer that these basins formed as sub-basins within a larger forearc basin bounded to the north by the forearc high of the Trobriand Islands and to the south by the DEI. Uplift of the forearc high and inversion of normal faults near the high during the Pleistocene and suggests the possibility of present-day, southward subduction along the Trobriand trench. To the south of the DEI in the Goodenough basin, the Pleistocene section is thicker and deformed by active, WNW-striking normal faults with seafloor scarps and high-angle dips. Wedging of the Pleistocene clastic fill in a half-graben geometry along the Owen-Stanley fault in the Southern part of the Goodenough basin along the southern coastline of the bay indicates that most normal motion has now shifted to this fault system. The shift in extension from north of the DEI to the Owen-Stanley fault zone in post-Pliocene time likely signals the arrival of the propagating rift tip of the Woodlark basin. The presence of conglomerate with high-grade metamorphic clasts in the Pliocene section north of the DEI supports the idea that the uplift and erosion

  1. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  2. Brown University Radio Student Telescope (BURST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The Brown University Radio Student Telescope (BURST) is a rooftop low frequency radio interferometer that we hope to potentially use to observe radio transients, non-thermal radio emission from Galactic synchrotron and supernova remnants, and extragalactic radio sources. It was built by a group of Brown undergraduates this past summer. An overview of the design, ultimate installation, challenges in implementation and data acquisition will be covered in the poster.

  3. Results and Perspectives of the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an extension of the Pierre Auger Cosmic-Ray Observatory. It is used to detect radio emission from extensive air showers with energies beyond 1017 eV in the 30 - 80 MHz frequency band. After three phases of deployment, AERA now consists of more than 150 autonomous radio stations with different spacings, covering an area of about 17km2. It is located at the same site as other Auger low-energy detector extensions enabling combinations with various other measurement techniques. The radio array allows different technical schemes to be explored as well as cross-calibration of our measurements with the established baseline detectors of the Auger Observatory. We report on the most recent technological developments and give an overview of the experimental results obtained with AERA. In particular, we will present the measurement of the radiation energy, i.e., the amount of energy that is emitted by the air shower in the form of radio emission, and its dependence on the cosmic-ray energy by comparing with the measurement of the the well-calibrated Auger surface detector. Furthermore, we outline the relevance of this result for the absolute calibration of the energy scale of cosmic-ray observatories.

  4. The faint radio AGN population in the spotlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Ruiz, Noelia; Middelberg, Enno

    2016-08-01

    To determine the AGN component in the faint radio population is fundamental in galaxy evolution studies. A relatively easy and direct way to determine which galaxies do have a radio-active AGN is a detection using the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. The goal of this project is to study with statistically relevant numbers the faint radio source population using VLBI observations. To achieve this goal, the project is divided into two parts. In the first part, we have observed ~3000 radio sources in the COSMOS extragalactic field with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.4GHz. We have detected 468 sources. In the second part, we have observed ~200 radio sources in the COSMOS field with extremely high sensitivity using the VLBA together with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4GHz, to explore an even fainter population in the flux density regime of tens of uJy. We are currently calibrating this data. In this overview I will present the survey design, observations, and calibration, along with some first results.

  5. V-FASTR: THE VLBA FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wayth, Randall B.; Tingay, Steven J.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Majid, Walid A.; Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2011-07-10

    Recent discoveries of dispersed, non-periodic impulsive radio signals with single-dish radio telescopes have sparked significant interest in exploring the relatively uncharted space of fast transient radio signals. Here we describe V-FASTR, an experiment to perform a blind search for fast transient radio signals using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The experiment runs entirely in a commensal mode, alongside normal VLBA observations and operations. It is made possible by the features and flexibility of the DiFX software correlator that is used to process VLBA data. Using the VLBA for this type of experiment offers significant advantages over single-dish experiments, including a larger field of view, the ability to easily distinguish local radio-frequency interference from real signals, and the possibility to localize detected events on the sky to milliarcsecond accuracy. We describe our software pipeline, which accepts short integration ({approx} ms) spectrometer data from each antenna in real time during correlation and performs an incoherent dedispersion separately for each antenna, over a range of trial dispersion measures. The dedispersed data are processed by a sophisticated detector and candidate events are recorded. At the end of the correlation, small snippets of the raw data at the time of the events are stored for further analysis. We present the results of our event detection pipeline from some test observations of the pulsars B0329+54 and B0531+21 (the Crab pulsar).

  6. The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and the light-dark exploration test are age dependent, sexually dimorphic, and task dependent.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Sarah M; Kim, Daniel; Pritchard, Melissa; Salgado, Sanjay; Thaler, Alison

    2011-11-01

    Previous research in our laboratory revealed sexually dimorphic effects of prior exposure to phencyclidine (PCP) on elevated plus maze behavior. In an attempt to examine the developmental time course of this effect and determine the extent to which it generalizes to other anxiety paradigms, young adult (61-64 days old) and adult (96-107 days old) male and female rats were treated with PCP (15 mg/kg) or saline. Following a two week withdrawal period, animals were tested in either the elevated plus maze (EPM) or a light-dark exploration (LD) test. In adults, both tests revealed a sexually dimorphic effect driven by PCP-induced decreases in anxiety in females as indicated by increased time spent in the open arms of the EPM and in the lit compartment of the LD test and increased anxiety in males as indicated by decreased time spent in the lit compartment of the LD. In young animals, PCP pretreatment decreased open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze, indicating increased anxiety. However, PCP increased time spent in the light compartment in the light-dark exploration test, indicating decreased anxiety. Corticosterone levels measured 15 min after the onset of the EPM failed to reveal an association between the behavioral effects of PCP and corticosterone levels. The results in adults substantiate the previously observed sexually dimorphic effect of PCP on elevated plus maze behavior in adults and indicate that the effect generalizes to another anxiety paradigm. The results in the younger animals suggest an age dependent effect of PCP on anxiety in general and indicate that behaviors in the elevated plus maze and the light-dark exploration test reflect dissociable psychobiological states.

  7. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  8. Exploration Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Stanley, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2012 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry. Three sources of information are reported and analyzed in this annual review of international exploration for 2012: 1) budgetary statistics expressed in U.S. nominal dollars provided by SNL Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia; 2) regional and site-specific exploration activities that took place in 2012 as compiled by the USGS and 3) regional events including economic, social and political conditions that affected exploration activities, which were derived from published sources and unpublished discussions with USGS and industry specialists.

  9. Participatory Exploration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kathy Nado delivers a presentation on Participatory Exploration on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to present NASA'...

  10. Infrared-faint radio sources in the SERVS deep fields. Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Mignano, A.; Lacy, M.; Morganti, R.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≳ 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an active galactic nuclei (AGN). Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≲ 1 mJy). Aims: The scope of this paper is to assess the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs, testing their classification and improving the knowledge of their IR properties by making use of the most sensitive IR survey available so far: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We also explore how the criteria of IFRSs can be fine-tuned to pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at very high redshift (z > 4). Methods: We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 μm IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. Results: We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that IR-detected IFRSs are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z ≳ 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S1.4 GHz 100 μJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z 2) dust-enshrouded star-burst galaxies. We also argue that, while IFRSs with radio-to-IR ratios >500 can very efficiently pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at redshift 2 < z < 4, lower radio-to-IR ratios ( 100-200) are expected for higher redshift radio-loud AGNs.

  11. Comparative responses to radio and television anti-smoking advertisements to encourage smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Sarah; Wakefield, Melanie

    2010-03-01

    While mass media campaigns have been shown to contribute to reductions in smoking prevalence, little research has been undertaken on the effectiveness of radio advertising as a communication medium. This is despite radio being less expensive and having greater reach than television in some low and middle income countries. We aimed to explore the potential of radio as an adjunct or alternative to televised campaigns by comparing reactions to a radio anti-smoking ad with three televised anti-smoking ads, all of which communicated the serious health consequences of smoking in an emotionally evocative way. In pre-exposure interviews, 18-59-year-old daily smokers (n = 306) were asked to listen to a particular radio time slot/watch a particular television program that they usually listened to/watched, in which the ad was broadcast. Post-exposure interviews were conducted within 3 days of exposure and measured recall, recognition, emotional and cognitive responses, and intentions to quit smoking. Findings indicate that the radio ad showed similar or slightly higher levels than a concurrently aired television ad on understanding (radio: 96%; television: 95%), believability (radio: 89%; television: 90%), concern about smoking (both 77%) and motivation to quit (radio: 51%; television: 45%), and significantly higher levels of unprompted recall (radio: 20%; television: 6%). It also compared well against two subsequent anti-smoking television ads. Emotionally evocative radio advertising may be an effective adjunct or alternative to television advertising in jurisdictions where there are substantial limits on funds available for airing these campaigns, or where the reach of radio outstrips television.

  12. First `Winged' and `X'-shaped Radio Source Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.

    2007-01-22

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies (17 from our own census of the literature) show an additional pair of low surface brightness ''wings'', thus forming an overall ''X''-shaped appearance. The origin of the wings in these radio sources is unclear. They may be the result of back-flowing plasma from the currently active radio lobes into an asymmetric medium surrounding the active nucleus, which would make these ideal systems in which to study thermal/non-thermal plasma interactions in extragalactic radio sources. Another possibility is that the wings are the aging radio lobes left over after a (rapid) realignment of the central supermassive black-hole/accretion disk system due perhaps to a merger. Generally, these models are not well tested; with the small number of known examples, previous works focused on detailed case studies of selected sources with little attempt at a systematic study of a large sample. Using the VLA-FIRST survey database, we are compiling a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources for such studies. As a first step toward this goal, an initial sample of 100 new candidate objects of this type are presented in this paper. The search process is described, optical identifications from available literature data, and basic radio data are presented. From the limited resolution FIRST images ({approx} 5''), we can already confidently classify a sufficient number of these objects as having the characteristic wing lengths >80% of the active lobes to more than double the number of known X-shaped radio sources. We have also included as candidates, radio sources with shorter wings (<80% wing to lobe length ratios), or simply ''winged'' sources, as it is probable that projection effects are important. Finally, among the candidates are four quasars (z=0.37 to 0.84), and several have morphologies suggestive of Fanaroff-Riley type-I (low-power) radio galaxies. While followup observations are necessary to confirm these identifications, this

  13. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2007 draws upon available information from industry, literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based upon these data.

  14. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2005 draws upon available information from literature, industry and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. It provides data on exploration budgets by global region and mineral commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based on these data.

  15. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Rapstine, T.D.; Lee, E.C.

    2012-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2011 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. This summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents surveys returned by companies primarily focused on precious (gold, platinum-group metals and silver) and base (copper, lead, nickel and zinc) metals.

  16. Sharing Low Frequency Radio Emissions in the Virtual Observatory: Application for JUNO-Ground-Radio Observations Support.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Savalle, R.; Zarka, P. M.; Anderson, M.; Andre, N.; Coffre, A.; Clarke, T.; Denis, L.; Ebert, R. W.; Erard, S.; Genot, V. N.; Girard, J. N.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Hess, S. L.; Higgins, C. A.; Hobara, Y.; Imai, K.; Imai, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Kumamoto, A.; Kurth, W. S.; Lamy, L.; Le Sidaner, P.; Misawa, H.; Nakajo, T.; Orton, G. S.; Ryabov, V. B.; Sky, J.; Thieman, J.; Tsuchiya, F.; Typinski, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol, as well as data from the Iitate Low Frquency Radio Antenna, in Japan. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. The attached figure shows data from those three providers. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  17. The history of radio telescopes, 1945-1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T.

    2009-08-01

    Forged by the development of radar during World War II, radio astronomy revolutionized astronomy during the decade after the war. A new universe was revealed, centered not on stars and planets, but on the gas between the stars, on explosive sources of unprecedented luminosity, and on hundreds of mysterious discrete sources with no optical identifications. Using “radio telescopes” that looked nothing like traditional (optical) telescopes, radio astronomers were a very different breed from traditional (optical) astronomers. This pathbreaking of radio astronomy also made it much easier for later “astronomies” and their “telescopes” (X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, gamma-ray) to become integrated into astronomy after the launch of the space age in the 1960s. This paper traces the history of radio telescopes from 1945 through about 1990, from the era of converted small-sized, military radar antennas to that of large interferometric arrays connected by complex electronics and computers; from the era of strip-chart recordings measured by rulers to powerful computers and display graphics; from the era of individuals and small groups building their own equipment to that of Big Science, large collaborations and national observatories.

  18. The idea of space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazlish, B.

    1985-01-01

    Public reactions to the space program, especially to the 1969 Moon landing are discussed. Space exploration is compared to explorations during the Age of Discovery. It is argued that space exploration has failed to capture the public's imagination, that it has had few economic or social consequences of any importance, and that it has had a minimum impact on national prestige.

  19. AGN JET KINETIC POWER AND THE ENERGY BUDGET OF RADIO GALAXY LOBES

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Shabala, S. S.

    2013-04-10

    Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FR I radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FR II radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FR II radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation to that obtained for FR I radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relations determined separately for FR I and FR II radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FR I and FR II radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral aging and strong shocks driven by powerful FR II radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FR Is and counteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation determined for low power FR I radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.

  20. International exploration by independent

    SciTech Connect

    Bertragne, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    Recent industry trends indicate that the smaller U.S. independents are looking at foreign exploration opportunities as one of the alternatives for growth in the new age of exploration. Foreign finding costs per barrel usually are accepted to be substantially lower than domestic costs because of the large reserve potential of international plays. To get involved in overseas exploration, however, requires the explorationist to adapt to different cultural, financial, legal, operational, and political conditions. Generally, foreign exploration proceeds at a slower pace than domestic exploration because concessions are granted by a country's government, or are explored in partnership with a national oil company. First, the explorationist must prepare a mid- to long-term strategy, tailored to the goals and the financial capabilities of the company; next, is an ongoing evaluation of quality prospects in various sedimentary basins, and careful planning and conduct of the operations. To successfully explore overseas also requires the presence of a minimum number of explorationists and engineers thoroughly familiar with the various exploratory and operational aspects of foreign work. Ideally, these team members will have had a considerable amount of on-site experience in various countries and climates. Independents best suited for foreign expansion are those who have been financially successful in domestic exploration. When properly approached, foreign exploration is well within the reach of smaller U.S. independents, and presents essentially no greater risk than domestic exploration; however, the reward can be much larger and can catapult the company into the 'big leagues.'

  1. Multifunction multiband airborne radio architecture study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. N.; Ogi, S. K.; Huang, M. Y.; Bodnar, L. L.; Martin, P.

    1982-01-01

    The demands of modern military avionic communication, radio navigation, and cooperative identification (CNI) equipment has been greatly expanded as the result of the need for antijam (AJ), low probability of intercept (LPI), higher navigation accuracy, and increased volume of information transfer. These demands are verified in programs such as GPS, JTIDS, SEEK TALK, SINCGARS and AFSAT I and II. The cost of this additional capability has severely hampered the ability of the Government to procure new CNI systems and equipment with desired performance capabilities. The problem is further compounded by the lack of available space in the tactical aircraft, the transition of new equipment into the inventory, and the retention of many current systems. The multifunction multiband airborne radio system (MFBARS) program is formulated to explore the feasibility of producing a modern CNI system at an affordable life cycle cost (LCC) and within real estate requirements. A cost effective system approach was developed that revolved around high technology RF-LSI analog components that are in the development stage, high speed digital pre-processor elements and a programmable signal processor all under control of a host processor configuration. This design trades the ultimate gain in volume, weight and life cycle cost against a reasonable risk for the mid 1980's development.

  2. a Radio-Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Thomas Kwok-Fah

    Radio-frequency (RF) inhomogeneity encountered in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging poses a significant impediment to obtaining images of the highest diagnostic quality. This inhomogeneity arises from the conductivity effect, which attenuates the RF field with increasing depth, and the permittivity effect. The latter is the dominant effect at 1.5 Tesla (64 MHz), and contributes to standing waves within the body. A theoretical model has been developed which describes these effects for an infinitely long right circularly cylindrical object inside a concentric RF coil and RF shield. This model assumes that the RF field propagates as a travelling wave in the z direction, along the long axis of the cylinder. The resulting solutions adequately predict the field distribution for RF coils which have both a finite wavelength and an infinite wavelength in z. This corresponds to high-pass and low-pass birdcage resonators, respectively, that are in general used in MR imaging. Standing wave models are easily obtained from the superposition of solutions of two travelling waves in opposite directions. The results of this model indicate that the axial propagation constant k_{z} is a strong function of the dielectric present in the coil -to-shield space. The field distribution in the axial plane can be represented by the Bessel function J_1(k _{rho}r), where k _sp{rho}{2} = k^2-k_sp{z}{2} . By varying the dielectric material occupying the coil-to-shield space, an optimum value of k _{z} can be obtained for a particular coil and shield configuration which minimizes the amplitude variations in the axial plane. Experimental verification of the theoretical model has been obtained. These measurements were performed on a non-resonant, travelling wave test coil with a saline phantom as a load simulating the body. The measured field profiles in the axial plane agree with the predicted values, establishing the validity of the theoretical model. As expected, optimal RF homogeneity was obtained

  3. Video via radio testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.

    2002-03-01

    to enable us to transmit live video via the SINGARS radio at a narrow bandwidth of 16 K bps.

  4. Jovian type III radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    Radio bursts have been observed in the Voyager plasma wave data from Jupiter that bear a striking resemblance to solar type III radio bursts. The emissions lie in the frequency range near 10 kHz, have durations of a minute or so, and occur in a set of periodically spaced bursts. The spacing between primary bursts is typically 15 min, but the bursts may have additional components which recur on time scales of about 3 min. The similarity with solar type III radio bursts suggests a source mechanism involving the movement of energetic electrons through a density gradient in the plasma surrounding Jupiter. The periodicity of bursts suggests Io may be involved in the generation of waves, since the timing is similar to the Alfven wave travel time from one hemisphere to the other through the Io torus.

  5. The development of radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, W.; Wielebinski, R.

    2002-07-01

    Following the detection of extraterrestrial radio waves in 1932 by Karl Jansky, radio astronomy developed quickly after World War II. It established itself soon as a new branch of astronomy with today's outstanding record in the detection of new phenomena in space. These have been honoured by a number of Nobel prizes. Radio astronomy largely depends on technical developments in receiver technology, antenna systems, electronics and computing power. Ever shorter wavelengths down to the submm-wavelength range became accessible, resulting in new exciting discoveries. However, now and in future care must be taken, in particular for the lower frequency range, of harmful man-made interferences, which might mask the weak signals from space. New international facilities with orders-of-magnitude higher sensitivity like ALMA and SKA are planned or under construction. Space-borne observatories like PLANCK will detect weak fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background, which will constrain cosmological models with an unprecedented accuracy.

  6. Age and Terrorist Victimization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trela, James; Hewitt, Christopher

    While research has examined how age-related factors structure the probability of experiencing a particular event or suffering a particular kind of injury, one issue which has not been empirically addressed is the age structure of victimization from terrorist activity and civil strife. To explore the relationship between age and terrorist…

  7. Language and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; Anagnopoulos, Cheryl

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the effects of aging on language usage focusing on three areas of exploration: (1) changes in language in relation to changes in other cognitive abilities, (2) the linguistic consequences of normal aging versus those of dementia and aphasia, and (3) age-group differences in patterns of conversational interaction. (67 references) (GLR)

  8. Nanosats for a Radio Interferometer Observatory in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Katsanevras, S.; Puy, D.; Bentum, M.

    2015-10-01

    During the last decades, astronomy and space physics changed dramatically our knowledge of the evolution of the Universe. However, our view is still incomplete in the very low frequency range (1- 30 MHz), which is thus one of the last unexplored astrophysical spectral band. Below 30 MHz, ionospheric fluctuations severely perturb groundbased observations. They are impossible below 10 MHz due to the ionospheric cutoff. In addition, man made radio interferences makes it even more difficult to observe from ground at low frequencies. Deploying a radio instrument in space is the only way to open this new window on the Universe. Among the many science objectives for such type of instrumentations, we can find cosmological studies such as the Dark Ages of the Universe, the remote astrophysical objects, pulsars and fast transients, the interstellar medium. The following Solar system and Planetary objectives are also very important: - Sun-Earth Interactions: The Sun is strongly influencing the interplanetary medium (IPM) and the terrestrial geospatial environment. The evolution mechanisms of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their impact on solar system bodies are still not fully understood. This results in large inaccuracies on the eruption models and prediction tools, and their consequences on the Earth environment. Very low frequency radio imaging capabilities (especially for the Type II solar radio bursts, which are linked with interplanetary shocks) should allow the scientific community to make a big step forward in understanding of the physics and the dynamics of these phenomena, by observing the location of the radio source, how they correlate with their associated shocks and how they propagate within the IPM. - Planets and Exoplanets: The Earth and the fourgiant planets are hosting strong magnetic fields producing large magnetospheres. Particle acceleration are very efficient therein and lead to emitting intense low frequency radio waves in their auroral regions. These

  9. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample: A Correlation Study of Blazars and Radio Galaxies in X-ray and Radio Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Brandon Scott

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory has increased the quality and number of detections the X-ray regime since its launch in 1999. It is an important tool for studying the jets which are associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and their possible emission mechanisms. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample (MCS) is a sample of 27 AGN which have been selected from the radio flux-limited MOJAVE (Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) sample. The objects contained in the MOJAVE sample are traditionally associated with relativistically beamed jets that have small viewing angles. The MCS was created to study the correlation of X-ray and radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The complete sample is made up of all MOJAVE Fanaroff & Riley type II objects which have over 100 mJy of extended radio emission at 1.4 GHz and a radio structure of at least 3" in extent. Chandra observations have revealed X-ray and radio correlation in 21 of the 27 jets, bringing the detection rate to ˜78%. The selection criteria provides a quantitative method of discovering new X-ray jets associated with AGN from radio observations. The X-ray morphologies are usually well correlated with the radio emission, except for the sources which show extreme bending on the kiloparsec scale. The emission mechanism for these relativistically beamed quasars and radio galaxies can be interpreted as inverse Compton scattering off of the cosmic microwave background by the electrons in the jets (IC/CMB). The emission mechanism is reinforced by spectral energy distributions (SED) which model the emission mechanisms for sources with sufficient X-ray, optical, and radio data available. I have explored the effects of jet bending and jet deceleration in conjunction with the inverse Compton emission model and used different scenarios to derive best fit viewing angles and bulk Lorentz factors, which were calculated by using the superluminal speeds along with parameters that were derived from the IC/CMB model. The range of

  10. Mobile radio interferometric geodetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Niell, A. E.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.; Morabito, D. D.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (ARIES) in a proof of concept mode is discussed. Accuracy demonstrations over a short baseline, a 180 km baseline, and a 380 km baseline are documented. Use of ARIES in the Sea Slope Experiment of the National Geodetic Survey to study the apparent differences between oceanographic and geodetic leveling determinations of the sea surface along the Pacific Coast is described. Intergration of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System and a concept called SERIES (Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) is briefly reviewed.

  11. Radio Relays Improve Wireless Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Signal Hill, California-based XCOM Wireless Inc. developed radio frequency micromachine (RF MEMS) relays with a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract through NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In order to improve satellite communication systems, XCOM produced wireless RF MEMS relays and tunable capacitors that use metal-to-metal contact and have the potential to outperform most semiconductor technologies while using less power. These relays are used in high-frequency test equipment and instrumentation, where increased speed can mean significant cost savings. Applications now also include mainstream wireless applications and greatly improved tactical radios.

  12. A low-frequency radio survey of the planets with RAE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    Over one thousand occultations of each planet in the solar system have occurred during the period from mid-1973 through mid-1976 as seen from the lunar orbiting Radio Astronomy Explorer-2 (RAE-2) spacecraft. These occultations have been examined for evidence of planetary radio emissions in the 0.025 to 13.1 MHz band. Only Jupiter and the earth have given positive results. Lack of detection of emission from the other planets can mean that either they do not emit radio noise in this band or the flux level of their emissions and/or its occurrence rate are too low to be detected by RAE-2.

  13. A low-frequency radio survey of the planets with RAE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    Over one thousand occultations of each planet in the solar system have occurred during the period from mid-1973 through mid-1976 as seen from the lunar orbiting Radio Astronomy Explorer 2 (RAE 2) spacecraft. These occultations have been examined for evidence of planetary radio emissions in the 0.025-13.1 MHz band. Only Jupiter and the earth have given positive results. Lack of detection of emission from the other planets can mean that either they do not emit radio noise in this band or the flux level of their emissions and/or its occurrence rate are too low to be detected by RAE 2.

  14. The VLBI structure of radio-loud Broad Absorption Line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Gu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The nature and origin of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars and their relationship to non-BAL quasars are an open question. The BAL quasars are probably normal quasars seen along a particular line of sight. Alternatively, they are young or recently refueled. The high resolution radio morphology of BAL quasars is very important to understand the radio properties of BAL quasars. We present VLBA observations at L and C bands for a sample of BAL quasars. The observations will help us to explore the VLBI radio properties, and distinguish the present models of explaining BAL phenomena.

  15. Phonetic bilingual dictionary for radio engineering and telecommunication terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aibatov, Lev R.

    2005-06-01

    Efficiency of concept category application in research methodology of radio-electronic and telecommunication systems was experimentally explored. it was experimentally proved that procedure of concept category determination by the algorithm for revealing of the general attributes of objects examined can ensure the high efficiency of explorations both in science disciplines corresponding to professional sphere of investigator and disciplines which are considerably distant from this sphere. Considered methodology contribution into the final results of researches can reach the value up to 100%. Concept category application makes it possible to transfer the results evaluation from the sphere of new disciplines into the sphere of initial science discipline, in the congruent axiology system. Concept category application facilitates both development of various disciplines and changes their boundaries resulting in mutual penetration of these disciplines, too. Based on fulfilled explorations the dictionaries of fundamentally new type, more specifically, phonetic bilingual dictionaries for radio engineering and telecommunication terms were developed. The area of current patent laws was corrected. As a result a new class of industrial property objects (dictionaries) was revealed and minor patents on the dictionary of foreign language were first received. Representation of the radio and telecommunication signals as industrial property objects was founded.

  16. Exploring Careers. Sales Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    "Exploring Careers" is a career education resource program, published in fifteen separate booklets, for junior high school-age students. It provides information about the world of work and offers its readers a way of learning about themselves and relating that information to career choices. The publications aim to build career awareness…

  17. Exploring Careers. Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    "Exploring Careers" is a career education resource program, published in fifteen separate booklets, for junior high school-age students. It provides information about the world of work and offers its readers a way of learning about themselves and relating that information to career choices. The publications aim to build career awareness by means…

  18. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 27 percent in 2003 from the 2002 budget, according to the Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes after five years of declining spending for mineral exploration.

  19. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  20. Educational Radio: Directions in the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Sachida

    1986-01-01

    This personal perspective on developments in educational radio broadcasting in some small island nations of the South Pacific discusses radio as a powerful teaching aid, curriculum development, educational communicators, printed support materials, costs, facilities duplication, and future trends. (MBR)

  1. Radio frequency power load and associated method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus includes a container and a fluid having an ion source therein, the fluid being contained in the container. Two conductors are immersed in the fluid. A radio frequency transmission system includes a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus includes a fluid having an ion source therein, and two conductors immersed in the fluid. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system includes the steps of: immersing two conductors of a radio frequency power load apparatus in a fluid having an ion source therein; and connecting the apparatus to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  2. Re-acceleration Model for Radio Relics with Spectral Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2016-05-01

    Most of the observed features of radio gischt relics, such as spectral steepening across the relic width and a power-law-like integrated spectrum, can be adequately explained by a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model in which relativistic electrons are (re-)accelerated at shock waves induced in the intracluster medium. However, the steep spectral curvature in the integrated spectrum above ˜2 GHz detected in some radio relics, such as the Sausage relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, may not be interpreted by the simple radiative cooling of postshock electrons. In order to understand such steepening, we consider here a model in which a spherical shock sweeps through and then exits out of a finite-size cloud with fossil relativistic electrons. The ensuing integrated radio spectrum is expected to steepen much more than predicted for aging postshock electrons, since the re-acceleration stops after the cloud-crossing time. Using DSA simulations that are intended to reproduce radio observations of the Sausage relic, we show that both the integrated radio spectrum and the surface brightness profile can be fitted reasonably well, if a shock of speed {u}s ˜ 2.5-2.8 × {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a sonic Mach number {M}s ˜ 2.7-3.0 traverses a fossil cloud for ˜45 Myr, and the postshock electrons cool further for another ˜10 Myr. This attempt illustrates that steep curved spectra of some radio gischt relics could be modeled by adjusting the shape of the fossil electron spectrum and adopting the specific configuration of the fossil cloud.

  3. Kashima 34-m Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Kawai, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The Kashima 34-m radio telescope has been continuously operated and maintained by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) as a facility of the Kashima Space Technology Center (KSTC) in Japan. This brief report summarizes the status of this telescope, the staff, and activities during 2012.

  4. RadioActive101 Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brites, Maria José; Ravenscroft, Andrew; Dellow, James; Rainey, Colin; Jorge, Ana; Santos, Sílvio Correia; Rees, Angela; Auwärter, Andreas; Catalão, Daniel; Balica, Magda; Camilleri, Anthony F.

    2014-01-01

    In keeping with the overarching RadioActive101 (RA101) spirit and ethos, this report is the product of collaborative and joined-up thinking from within the European consortium spread across five countries. As such, it is not simply a single voice reporting on the experiences and knowledge gained during the project. Rather it is a range of…

  5. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F [London, TN; Dress, William B [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  6. Radio Days in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuchat, Dan

    2005-01-01

    What social studies project challenges students with interdisciplinary learning, engages their various abilities and learning styles, offers them the opportunity for collaborative work-and encourages them to speak in strange voices? The answer is an eighth grade radio drama project. For most of the month of March 2004, the entire eighth grade at…

  7. Radio Monitoring of Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubach, C.; Maddison, S. T.; Wright, C. M.; Wilner, D. J.; Lommen, D. J. P.; Koribalski, B.

    2017-01-01

    Protoplanetary disc systems observed at radio wavelengths often show excess emission above that expected from a simple extrapolation of thermal dust emission observed at short millimetre wavelengths. Monitoring the emission at radio wavelengths can be used to help disentangle the physical mechanisms responsible for this excess, including free-free emission from a wind or jet, and chromospheric emission associated with stellar activity. We present new results from a radio monitoring survey conducted with Australia Telescope Compact Array over the course of several years with observation intervals spanning days, months and years, where the flux variability of 11 T Tauri stars in the Chamaeleon and Lupus star forming regions was measured at 7 and 15 mm and 3 and 6 cm. Results show that for most sources are variable to some degree at 7 mm, indicating the presence of emission mechanisms other than thermal dust in some sources. Additionally, evidence of grain growth to cm-sized pebbles was found for some sources that also have signs of variable flux at 7 mm. We conclude that multiple processes contributing to the emission are common in T Tauri stars at 7 mm and beyond, and that a detection at a single epoch at radio wavelengths should not be used to determine all processes contributing to the emission.

  8. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  9. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  10. Workplace Training at SBS Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Lynette

    2001-01-01

    Notes that at Australia's Special Broadcasting Services Radio, workplace training is an essential requirement for on-air staff but a degree in journalism or communications is an enormous advantage. Describes several in-house accredited competency-based modules in journalism and broadcasting. (RS)

  11. Counselor Effectiveness Through Radio Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This study determined the effectiveness of the use of radio as a means of providing immediate feedback on student counselors in a practicum setting. Using a non-equivalent group experimental design, 10 experimental subjects were compared to 10 control subjects with respect to counselor effectiveness. The experimental subjects were given immediate…

  12. Digital Audio Radio Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

  13. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  14. Dictionary of Radio and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannett, W. E.

    This dictionary presents definitions of both the well-established terms and many new ones that have come into use with the advances that have taken place in the fields of radio and television. In many cases extended definitions are given in order to describe briefly elementary principles and circuits, while newer and more complex devices and…

  15. Antarctic radio Askaryan neutrino telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Amy

    2012-03-01

    There are strong motivations for a detectable flux of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic neutrinos above 10^17-18 eV. Neutrinos in this regime are expected from interactions between the highest energy cosmic rays and cosmic microwave background photons, and can also originate from the UHE sources themselves. Radio Cerenkov technique is the most promising technique for instrumenting a detection volume large enough to detect the low expected fluxes. The RICE experiment pioneered the radio Cerenkov technique with antennas deployed along strings of the AMANDA experiment deep in the South Pole ice. New radio arrays being deployed in the Antarctic ice are designed to measure dozens of these unique cosmic messengers to exploit the rich particle physics and astrophysical information that they carry. I will discuss the status and results from initial deployments of the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) near the South Pole, and the ARIANNA array on the Ross Ice Shelf. I will also describe how these experiments could measure neutrino-nucleon cross sections at energies that exceed those probed by the LHC.

  16. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  17. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  18. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  19. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  20. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  1. 47 CFR 90.185 - Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multiple licensing of radio transmitting equipment in the mobile radio service. 90.185 Section 90.185 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES...

  2. Radio emission evolution of nonstationary sources in the Hedgehog model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.; Mikhaylutsa, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Correlations are obtained for numerical calculation of flux F sub v and polarized radiation intensity of a cloud of arbitrary geometry, consisting of ultrarelativistic electrons that dissipate in a radial magnetic field of the nucleus at a random angle to the observer. It is possible that some of the variable extragalactic objects that were previously described by the Shklovskiy model are young formations in the examined model. Radio astronomical observations would permit a determination of their distance, age, and lifetime.

  3. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  4. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  5. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  6. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  7. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  8. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  9. 46 CFR 169.715 - Radio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio. 169.715 Section 169.715 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.715 Radio. (a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are... Regulations, part 83. (b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is...

  10. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  11. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  12. 46 CFR 169.715 - Radio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio. 169.715 Section 169.715 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.715 Radio. (a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are... Regulations, part 83. (b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is...

  13. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  14. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  15. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  16. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  17. 46 CFR 169.715 - Radio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio. 169.715 Section 169.715 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.715 Radio. (a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are... Regulations, part 83. (b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is...

  18. 78 FR 37474 - Commercial Radio Operators

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 13 Commercial Radio Operators AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final... years, the information collection associated with commercial radio licenses, as well as for Commercial Operator License Examination Managers (COLEM(s)) that administer commercial radio operator licenses...

  19. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  20. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  1. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  2. 46 CFR 169.715 - Radio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio. 169.715 Section 169.715 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.715 Radio. (a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are... Regulations, part 83. (b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is...

  3. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  4. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  5. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  6. 46 CFR 169.715 - Radio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio. 169.715 Section 169.715 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.715 Radio. (a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are... Regulations, part 83. (b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is...

  7. 62. The Return of Educational Radio?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Sally D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines one of the traditional technologies of distance education, radio, and presents examples of educational and community radio usage in Asia and Africa. Instead of merely transposing western approaches to distance education in developing countries, it is suggested that the developed world can learn from uses of radio in developing…

  8. 46 CFR 129.395 - Radio installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio installations. 129.395 Section 129.395 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.395 Radio installations. A separate circuit, with overcurrent protection at the switchboard, must be provided for at least one radio installation....

  9. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  10. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  11. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  12. 78 FR 23150 - Commercial Radio Operators

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 0, 1, 13, 80 and 87 Commercial Radio Operators AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This document amends our rules concerning commercial radio operator licenses for maritime and aviation radio stations in order to reduce administrative burdens in the...

  13. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  14. 14 CFR 99.9 - Radio requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radio requirements. 99.9 Section 99.9... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.9 Radio requirements. (a) A person who operates a civil aircraft into an ADIZ must have a functioning two-way radio, and the...

  15. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio systems. 32.2231 Section 32.2231... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2231 Radio systems. (a) This account shall include the original cost of ownership of radio transmitters and receivers....

  16. A Select Survey of Campus Radio Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, H.

    To ascertain the continued need for a campus radio station at 10 watts and to justify a subsequent increase in power, the student radio station at Auburn University (Alabama) conducted surveys of college radio stations, emphasizing facilities in the southeast United States. Some of the findings of the surveys indicated that in the southeast and…

  17. New trends in meteor radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses in low cost—but performing—SDR (software defined radio) technology presents a major breakthrough in the domain of meteor radio observations. Their performances are now good enough for meteor work and should therefore encourage newcomers to join the meteor radio community.

  18. Making Waves: Pirate Radio and Popular Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steve

    The history of pirate radio--radio broadcasts offered by unlicensed broadcasters as alternatives to licensed, commercial radio programming--is difficult to trace, both in America and the United Kingdom (UK) since mention of pirate broadcasts of a less-then-thrilling nature are rarely found. Also, until 1927, the U.S. government did not formally…

  19. International Radio Regulations Resulting from WARC 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrada, Abderrazak

    The main features of international regulations on radio communications of the International Telecommunication Union are summarized and the possible effects on these regulations of the World Administrative Radio Conference of 1979 (WARC-79) are discussed in this paper. It is noted that while the international radio regulations are regarded as…

  20. Packet Radio: An Alternative Way to Connect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Larry W.

    1995-01-01

    Explains packet radio as a form of telecomputing in which digital data is transported via radio waves instead of telephone lines or other cabling, and describes how it can be used by students to access the Internet. Highlights include packet bulletin board systems and equipment needed for a packet radio station. (LRW)