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Sample records for agglomerans pv gypsophilae

  1. Polar auxin transport is essential for gall formation by Pantoea agglomerans on Gypsophila.

    PubMed

    Chalupowicz, Laura; Weinthal, Dan; Gaba, Victor; Sessa, Guido; Barash, Isaac; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit

    2013-02-01

    The virulence of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae (Pag) on Gypsophila paniculata depends on a type III secretion system (T3SS) and its effectors. The hypothesis that plant-derived indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) plays a major role in gall formation was examined by disrupting basipetal polar auxin transport with the specific inhibitors 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). On inoculation with Pag, galls developed in gypsophila stems above but not below lanolin rings containing TIBA or NPA, whereas, in controls, galls developed above and below the rings. In contrast, TIBA and NPA could not inhibit tumour formation in tomato caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The colonization of gypsophila stems by Pag was reduced below, but not above, the lanolin-TIBA ring. Following Pag inoculation and TIBA treatment, the expression of hrpL (a T3SS regulator) and pagR (a quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator) decreased four-fold and that of pthG (a T3SS effector) two-fold after 24 h. Expression of PIN2 (a putative auxin efflux carrier) increased 35-fold, 24 h after Pag inoculation. However, inoculation with a mutant in the T3SS effector pthG reduced the expression of PIN2 by two-fold compared with wild-type infection. The results suggest that pthG might govern the elevation of PIN2 expression during infection, and that polar auxin transport-derived IAA is essential for gall initiation. PMID:23083316

  2. Genetic organization of the hrp gene cluster and dspAE/BF operon in Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Mor, H; Manulis, S; Zuck, M; Nizan, R; Coplin, D L; Barash, I

    2001-03-01

    Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae induces gall formation in gypsophila that is dependent on the existence of a pathogenicity plasmid (pPATHEhg). We previously demonstrated the presence of several hrp genes on this plasmid. By employing transposon mutagenesis and sequencing, a functional hrp gene cluster on the pPATHEhg has now been characterized completely. The hrp genes of E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae are remarkably similar to and colinear with those of Erwinia amylovora and Pantoea stewartii and generally showed 60 to 90% nucleotide or deduced amino acid identity. E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae, however, lacks hrpW, which is present in E. amylovora. Additionally, E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae mutants deficient in harpin production retained pathogenicity and were slightly reduced in their ability to elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. The "disease specific" region, dspA/EB/F, exhibited 60 to 74% identity with the dspA/EB/F loci of E. amylovora and P. stewartii, respectively. Mutations in dspA/E abolished pathogenicity of E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae but not HR elicitation on tobacco. Inactivation of HrpL reduced plant-induced transcription of dspA/E by three orders, indicating Hrp-dependent regulation. PMID:11277443

  3. Differential involvement of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathways in pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Manulis, S; Haviv-Chesner, A; Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E; Barash, I

    1998-07-01

    Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg), which induces galls on Gypsophila paniculata, harbors two major pathways for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) synthesis, the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) routes, as well as cytokinin biosynthetic genes. Mutants were generated in which the various biosynthetic routes were disrupted separately or jointly in order to assess the contribution of IAA of various origins and cytokinins to pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin biosynthesis caused the largest reduction in gall size. Inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a minor, nonsignificant decrease in pathogenicity. No further reduction in gall size was observed by the simultaneous inactivation of both IAA pathways only or in combination with that of cytokinin production. However, inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a 14-fold reduction in the population of Ehg on bean plants. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin production did not affect epiphytic fitness. While the apparent transcriptional activity of iaaM-inaZ fusion increased slightly in cells of Ehg on bean and gypsophila leaves, compared with that in culture, very high levels of induction were observed in cells injected into gypsophila stems. In contrast, moderate levels of induction of ipdC-inaZ in Ehg were observed on leaves of these plants and in gypsophila stems, when compared with that in culture. These results suggest that the IAM pathway is involved primarily in gall formation and support the main contribution of the IpyA pathway to the epiphytic fitness of this bacterial species. PMID:9650296

  4. The operon for cytokinin biosynthesis of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae contains two promoters and is plant induced.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Manulis, S; Barash, I; Lichter, A

    2001-12-01

    The operon for cytokinin biosynthesis in the gall-forming bacterium Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg) has been previously shown to reside on an indigenous plasmid (pPATH(Ehg)) that is mandatory for pathogenicity. This operon consists of two genes: the first open reading frame (pre-etz) is of unknown function, whereas the second one (etz) encodes for isopentenyl transferase. Northern hybridization performed with the wild-type strain Ehg824-1 grown in Luria-Bertani broth demonstrated two transcripts of which an etz-specific transcript (1.0 kb) was predominant. Fusion of upstream DNA fragments of both pre-etz and etz to the ice nucleation reporter gene inaZ in pVSP61 showed high ice nucleation activity in both cultures, confirming the presence of two independent promoters. An increase of 1-1.5 orders in transcriptional activity of these promoters was observed following inoculation of gypsophila cuttings. Mutants of Ehg824-1 were generated by insertion of inaZ into pre-etz and etz using the transposon reporter Tn3-Spice. An increase of about two orders in transcriptional activity was recorded with both mutants following inoculation of gypsophila or bean cuttings. A similar induction was also observed when the bacteria were applied to the leaf surface of these plants. Unlike other virulence genes present on the pPATH(Ehg), neither pre-etz nor etz was regulated by the adjacent hrp gene cluster. PMID:11822839

  5. The regulatory cascade that activates the Hrp regulon in Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Nizan-Koren, R; Manulis, S; Mor, H; Iraki, N M; Barash, I

    2003-03-01

    The pathogenicity of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg) is dependent on a plasmid (pPATH(Ehg)) that harbors the hrp gene cluster and additional virulence genes. The hrp regulatory cascade of Ehg comprises an hrpXY operon encoding a two-component system; hrpS encoding a transcriptional factor of the NtrC family and hrpL encoding an alternative sigma factor. Results obtained suggest the following signal transduction model for activating the Hrp regulon: phosphorylated HrpY activates hrpS, HrpS activates hrpL, and HrpL activates genes containing "hrp box" promoter. This model was supported by studies on the effects of mutations in the regulatory genes on pathogenicity and complementation analysis. Nonpolar mutations in hrpX did not affect virulence or transcription of downstream genes. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved aspartate 57 in HrpY suggested that its phosphorylation is crucial for activating the hrp regulatory cascade. Studies on the effects of mutations in the hrp regulatory genes on transcriptional activity of downstream genes or of their isolated promoters in planta showed dependency of hrpS expression on active HrpY, of hrpL expression on active HrpS, and of hrpN or hrpJ expression on active HrpL. These results were also partially supported by overexpression of regulatory genes under in vitro conditions. The hrpXY is constitutively expressed with high basal levels under repressive conditions, in contrast to hrpS and hrpL, which exhibit low basal expression levels and are environmentally regulated. PMID:12650456

  6. The dual function in virulence and host range restriction of a gene isolated from the pPATH (Ehg) plasmid of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Ezra, D; Barash, I; Valinsky, L; Manulis, S

    2000-06-01

    The host range of the gall-forming bacterium Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg) is restricted to gypsophila whereas Erwinia herbicola pv. betae (Ehb) attacks beet as well as gypsophila. Both pathovars contain an indigenous plasmid (pPATH(Ehg or pPATH(Ehb)) that harbors pathogenicity genes, including the hrp gene cluster. A cosmid library of Ehg824-1 plasmid DNA was mobilized into Ehb4188 and the transconjugants were screened for pathogenicity on beet. One Ehb transconjugant harboring the cosmid pLA173 of pPATHEb induced a hypersensitive-like response and abolished pathogenicity on beet. Transposon mutagenesis of an open reading frame (ORF) located on this cosmid eliminated its affect on pathogenicity. Marker exchange of this mutation into Ehg824-1 caused a substantial reduction in gall size on gypsophila and caused Ehg824-1 to extend its host range and incite galls on beet. The ORF (1.5 kb) was designated as pthG (pathogenicity gene on gypsophila). DNA sequence analysis of pthG revealed no significant homology to known genes in the data bank. Only remnants of the pthG sequences were identified on the pPATH of Ehb4188. The deduced protein lacked an N-terminal signal peptide but contained a short trans-membrane helix in its C terminus. The gene product, as determined by expression in Escherichia coli and Western blots (immunoblots), was a 56-kDa protein. PMID:10830268

  7. Molecular characterization of global regulatory RNA species that control pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Ma, W; Cui, Y; Liu, Y; Dumenyo, C K; Mukherjee, A; Chatterjee, A K

    2001-03-01

    rsmB(Ecc) specifies a nontranslatable RNA regulator that controls exoprotein production and pathogenicity in soft rot-causing Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. This effect of rsmB(Ecc) RNA is mediated mostly by neutralizing the function of RsmA(Ecc), an RNA-binding protein of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, which acts as a global negative regulator. To determine the occurrence of functional homologs of rsmB(Ecc) in non-soft-rot-causing Erwinia species, we cloned the rsmB genes of E. amylovora (rsmB(Ea)) and E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae (rsmB(Ehg)). We show that rsmB(Ea) in E. amylovora positively regulates extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production, motility, and pathogenicity. In E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae, rsmB(Ehg) elevates the levels of transcripts of a cytokinin (etz) gene and stimulates the production of EPS and yellow pigment as well as motility. RsmA(Ea) and RsmA(Ehg) have more than 93% identity to RsmA(Ecc) and, like the latter, function as negative regulators by affecting the transcript stability of the target gene. The rsmB genes reverse the negative effects of RsmA(Ea), RsmA(Ehg), and RsmA(Ecc), but the extent of reversal is highest with homologous combinations of rsm genes. These observations and findings that rsmB(Ea) and rsmB(Ehg) RNA bind RsmA(Ecc) indicate that the rsmB effect is channeled via RsmA. Additional support for this conclusion comes from the observation that the rsmB genes are much more effective as positive regulators in a RsmA(+) strain of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora than in its RsmA(-) derivative. E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae produces a 290-base rsmB transcript that is not subject to processing. By contrast, E. amylovora produces 430- and 300-base rsmB transcripts, the latter presumably derived by processing of the primary transcript as previously noted with the transcripts of rsmB(Ecc). Southern blot hybridizations revealed the presence of rsmB homologs in E. carotovora, E. chrysanthemi, E. amylovora, E. herbicola, E

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of a Hypersensitive Reaction-Inducing Pantoea agglomerans Strain Isolated from Olive Knots Caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Chiaraluce; Cortese, Chiara; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio; Torelli, Emanuela; Firrao, Giuseppe; Buonaurio, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans strains inducing a hypersensitive reaction in tobacco leaves are frequently isolated inside olive knots caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Italian P. agglomerans strain, which is able to increase olive knot disease severity when coinoculated with P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi. PMID:25103763

  9. The presence of diverse IS elements and an avrPphD homologue that acts as a virulence factor on the pathogenicity plasmid of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Manulis, Shulamit; Mor, Henia; Barash, Isaac

    2002-07-01

    The pathogenicity of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg) and Erwinia herbicola pv. betae (Ehb) is dependent on a native plasmid (pPATH(Ehg) or pPATH(Ehb)) that harbors the hrp gene cluster, genes encoding type III effectors, phytohormones, biosynthetic genes, and several copies of IS1327. Sequence analysis of the hrp-flanking region in pPATH(Ehg) (cosmid pLA150) revealed a cluster of four additional IS elements designated as ISEhel, ISEhe2, ISEhe3, and ISEhe4. Two copies of another IS element (ISEhe5) were identified on the upstream region of the indole-3-acetic acid operon located on the same cosmid. Based on homology of amino acids and genetic organization, ISEhe1 belongs to the IS630 family, ISEhe2 to the IS5 family, ISEhe3 and ISEhe4 to different groups of the IS3 family, and ISEhe5 to the IS1 family. With the exception of ISEhe4, one to three copies of all the other IS elements were identified only in pathogenic strains of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae and Erwinia herbicola pv. betae whereas ISEhe4 was present in both pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. An open reading frame that exhibited high identity (89% in amino acids) to AvrPphD of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola was present within the cluster of IS elements. An insertional mutation in the AvrPphDEh, reduced gall size in gypsophila by approximately 85%. In addition, remnants of known genes from four different bacteria were detected on the same cosmid. PMID:12118887

  10. The genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis in Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae: characterization and role in gall formation.

    PubMed Central

    Lichter, A; Barash, I; Valinsky, L; Manulis, S

    1995-01-01

    A locus conferring cytokinin production was previously isolated from the gall-forming bacterium Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae. This locus resided in a cluster with the genes specifying indole-3-acetic acid production on the pathogenicity-associated plasmid pPATH (A. Lichter, S. Manulis, O. Sagee, Y. Gafni, J. Gray, R. Meilen, R. O. Morris, and I. Barash, Mol. Plant Microbe Interact., 8:114-121, 1995). Sequence analysis of this locus indicated the presence of a cytokinin biosynthesis gene (etz) homologous to other described cytokinin biosynthesis genes. A unique open reading frame (pre-etz) encoding 169 amino acids preceded etz and together with etz formed a region with a distinctive low G+C content. Northern (RNA) analysis indicated the presence of an etz-specific transcript of 1 kb and a common transcript for pre-etz and etz of 1.4 kb. The level of the 1-kb transcript was high in the late logarithmic phase and very low in the stationary phase. In contrast, the level of the 1.4-kb transcript was lower than that of the 1-kb transcript in the late logarithmic phase and predominant in the stationary phase. A marker exchange mutant of etz which did not produce cytokinins exhibited a reduction in gall size on Gypsophila cuttings and almost abolished disease symptoms in a whole-plant assay. Complementation of this marker exchange mutant with the intact etz gene on a multicopy plasmid resulted in overproduction of cytokinins and larger plant galls from which small shoots emerged. Insertional mutation in pre-etz resulted in a sharp decrease in both the level of the etz-specific transcript and cytokinin production. A frameshift mutation in pre-etz caused a similar reduction in the cytokinin level. A marker exchange mutation in pre-etz caused a reduction of symptoms but to lower degree than the etz mutation. In the former mutant, cytokinin production and pathogenicity could not be restored by complementation. Furthermore, attempts to complement the etz marker exchange

  11. [Absence of mutagenic effect of Pseudomonas syringae pv. atrofaciens 9400 and Pantoea agglomerans P324 culture liquids].

    PubMed

    Bohdan, Iu M; Butsenko, L M; Pasichnyk, L A; Hvozdiak, R I

    2010-01-01

    The mutagenic activity of the culture liquids of phytopathogenic strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. atrofaciens 9400 and epiphytic strain Pantoea agglomerans P324 was studied in the Ames test and Allium cepa-test. In pro- and eucariotic test-systems no effect of the culture liquids of these bacteria on spontaneous mutations of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 or chromosome aberrations in the cells of Allium cepa root apical meristem was found. PMID:20812509

  12. Biological Control of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, the Causal Agent of Basal Kernel Blight of Barley, by Antagonistic Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Braun-Kiewnick, A; Jacobsen, B J; Sands, D C

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of Pantoea agglomerans (synanamorph Erwinia herbicola) suppressed the development of basal kernel blight of barley, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, when applied to heads prior to the Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae infection window at the soft dough stage of kernel development. Field experiments in 1994 and 1995 revealed 45 to 74% kernel blight disease reduction, whereas glasshouse studies resulted in 50 to 100% disease control depending on the isolate used and barley cultivar screened. The efficacy of biocontrol strains was affected by time and rate of application. Percentage of kernels infected decreased significantly when P. agglomerans was applied before pathogen inoculation, but not when coinoculated. A single P. agglomerans application 3 days prior to the pathogen inoculation was sufficient to provide control since populations of about 10(7) CFU per kernel were established consistently, while Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae populations dropped 100-fold to 2.0 x 10(4) CFU per kernel. An application to the flag leaf at EC 49 (before heading) also reduced kernel infection percentages significantly. Basal blight decreased with increasing concentrations (10(3) to 10(7) CFU/ml) of P. agglomerans, with 10(7) CFU/ml providing the best control. For long-term preservation and marketability, the survival of bacterial antagonists in several wettable powder formulations was tested. Over all formulations tested, the survival declined between 10- to >100-fold over a period of 1.5 years (r = -0.7; P = 0.000). Although not significant, storage of most formulations at 4 degrees C was better for viability (90 to 93% survival) than was storage at 22 degrees C (73 to 79%). However, long-term preservation had no adverse effect on biocontrol efficacy. PMID:18944586

  13. The type III effector HsvG of the gall-forming Pantoea agglomerans mediates expression of the host gene HSVGT.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Gal; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Chalupowicz, Laura; Teper, Doron; Yeheskel, Adva; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Sessa, Guido; Barash, Isaac

    2012-02-01

    The type III effector HsvG of the gall-forming Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae is a DNA-binding protein that is imported to the host nucleus and involved in host specificity. The DNA-binding region of HsvG was delineated to 266 amino acids located within a secondary structure region near the N-terminus of the protein but did not display any homology to canonical DNA-binding motifs. A binding site selection procedure was used to isolate a target gene of HsvG, named HSVGT, in Gypsophila paniculata. HSVGT is a predicted acidic protein of the DnaJ family with 244 amino acids. It harbors characteristic conserved motifs of a eukaryotic transcription factor, including a bipartite nuclear localization signal, zinc finger, and leucine zipper DNA-binding motifs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that HSVGT transcription is specifically induced in planta within 2 h after inoculation with the wild-type P. agglomerans pv. gypsophilae compared with the hsvG mutant. Induction of HSVGT reached a peak of sixfold at 4 h after inoculation and progressively declined thereafter. Gel-shift assay demonstrated that HsvG binds to the HSVGT promoter, indicating that HSVGT is a direct target of HsvG. Our results support the hypothesis that HsvG functions as a transcription factor in gypsophila. PMID:21995766

  14. Comparative anatomy of gall development on Gypsophila paniculata induced by bacteria with different mechanisms of pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Chalupowicz, L; Barash, I; Schwartz, M; Aloni, R; Manulis, S

    2006-07-01

    Galls induced on Gypsophila paniculata by Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae (Pag) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At), bacteria with different mechanisms of pathogenicity, were compared morphologically and anatomically. The pathogenicity of Pag is dependent on the presence of an indigenous plasmid that harbors hrp gene cluster, genes encoding Hop virulence proteins and biosynthetic genes for auxin (IAA) and cytokinins (CKs), whereas that of At involves host transformation. The Pag-induced gall was rough, brittle and exhibited limited growth, in contrast to the smooth, firm appearance and continuous growth of the At-induced gall. Anatomical analysis revealed the presence of cells with enlarged nuclei and multiple nucleoli, giant cells and suberin deposition in Pag that were absent from At-induced galls. Although circular vessels were observed in both gall types, they were more numerous and the vascular system was more organized in At. An aerenchymal tissue was observed in the upper part of the galls. Ethylene emission from Pag galls, recorded 6 days after inoculation, was eight times as great as that from non-infected controls. In contrast, a significant decrease in ethylene production was observed in Gypsophila cuttings infected with Pag mutants deficient in IAA and CK production. The results presented are best accounted for by the two pathogens having distinct pathogenicity mechanisms that lead to their differential recognition by the host as non-self (Pag) and self (At). PMID:16477460

  15. A host-specific virulence protein of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae is translocated into human epithelial cells by the Type III secretion system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Valinsky, Lea; Nisan, Israel; Tu, Xuanlin; Nisan, Gal; Rosenshine, Ilan; Hanski, Emanuel; Barash, Isaac; Manulis, Shulamit

    2002-03-01

    summary HsvG is a virulence factor that determines the host specificity of Erwinia herbicola pathovars gypsophilae and betae on gypsophila. We used the calmodulin adenylate cyclase reporter (CyaA) to demonstrate that HsvG is secreted and translocated into HeLa cells by the type III secretion system (TTSS) of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). A fusion of HsvG-CyaA containing 271 amino acids of the N-terminus of HsvG were introduced into a wild-type EPEC, espB mutant deficient in translocation and an escV mutant deficient in secretion. A significant secretion was detected in EPEC/HsvG-CyaA and its espB mutant, but not with the escV mutant. Translocation was only observed with the wild-type EPEC, and not with the other two mutants. To localize the secretion and translocation signals of HsvG, fusions containing 39, 11 and 3 amino acids of the N-terminus of HsvG were constructed and expressed in EPEC. A fusion containing the first 39 N-terminal amino acids of HsvG was secreted and translocated at significant level (31-35%) as compared to the original fusion. In contrast, fusions containing the 3 and 11 amino acids failed to be secreted and translocated. PMID:20569314

  16. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    (Arrhenatherum elatius). Some plant-pathogenic strains of P. agglomerans are tumourigenic, inducing gall formation on table beet, an ornamental plant gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata), wisteria, Douglas-fir and cranberry. Recently, a Pantoea species closely related to P. agglomerans has been identified as a cause of bacterial blight disease in the edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii cultivated in China. The genetically governed determinants of plant pathogenicity in Pantoea agglomerans include such mechanisms as the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system, phytohormones, the quorum-sensing (QS) feedback system and type III secretion system (T3SS) injecting the effector proteins into the cytosol of a plant cell. PMID:27294620

  17. Allelochemical phenolic acids from Gypsophila paniculata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Gypsophila paniculata L. (Caryophyllaceae) resulted in the isolation of the phenolics p-coumaric acid (1), dihydroferulic acid (2), and syringic acid (3). In addition to their noted weak antimicrobial activity, compounds 1 and 3 are known to be potent exuded alleloc...

  18. Two new triterpenoids from Gypsophila oldhamiana.

    PubMed

    Xie, Long-Xiao; Zhang, Hao-Chao; Wang, Hai-Yang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Feng-Ling; Sun, Jing-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Two new triterpenoids (1-2) were isolated and elucidated from the roots of Gypsophila oldhamiana, together with four known triterpenoids (3-6). Their structures were identified to be 3β-hydroxyolean-13(18)-ene-23, 28-dioic acid (1), 3β, 12α-dihydroxy-23-carboxyolean-28, 13β-olide (2), 3β, 16α-dihydroxy-23-oxoolean-13(18)-en-28-oic acid (3), gypsogenin (4), quillaic acid (5) and gypsogenic acid (6) by spectral methods. All compounds were tested for their cytotoxicities against human tumour cell lines (lung cancer H460 and gastric cancer SGC-7901) and for their antiangiogenic effects using a zebra fish model. All compounds showed interesting antiangiogenic activities and the significant cytotoxicities against H460. PMID:26539898

  19. [Characterization of Pantoea agglomerans lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Brovarskaya, O S; Bulygina, T N; Garkavaya, E G; Zhitkevich, N V

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from seven Pantoea agglomerans strains isolated from various plants were purified and chemically identified. LPS of the studied P. agglomerans strains were heterogeneous in monosaccharide composition. Thus, the LPS of P. agglomerans 8606 differed considerably from the LPSs of other strains, containing mannose as the predominant monosaccharide (69.8%), as well as ribose (15.1%) and xylose (12.6%), while the content of rhamnose, one of the predominant monosaccharides in other LPS samples, was 2.5%. Analysis of the fatty acid composition revealed the presence of C12-C16 acids. In lipids A of all the studied strains, 3-OH-C14:0 was the predominant acid (31.7 to 39.1%, depending on the strain). C12:0 (8.2 to 31.5%), C14:0 (12.9 to 30.8%), and C16:0 acids (3.4 to 16.9%) were also revealed. The studied P. agglomerans strains fell into three groups according to their fatty acid composition. The differences stemmed from the presence or absence of two fatty acids, 2-OH-C14:0 and C16:1. Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion in agar revealed that all the LPS under study exhibited antigenic activity in homologous systems. The results of serological cross reactions indicated immunochemical heterogeneity of the species P. agglomerans. Comparative investigation of the complex of parameters of peripheral blood cells from a healthy donor before and after treatment with LPS solutions showed that the values of no parameters exceeded the normal range. PMID:25941715

  20. Effects of Gypsophila saponins on bacterial growth kinetics and on selection of subterranean clover rhizosphere bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fons, F; Amellal, N; Leyval, C; Saint-Martin, N; Henry, M

    2003-06-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as saponins, have a considerable impact in agriculture because of their allelopathic effects. They also affect the growth of soil microorganisms, especially fungi. We investigated the influence of saponins on rhizosphere bacteria in vitro and in soil conditions. The effects of gypsophila saponins on the growth kinetics of rhizosphere bacteria were studied by monitoring the absorbance of the cultures in microtiter plates. Gypsophila saponins (1%) increased the lag phase of bacterial growth. The impact of gypsophila saponins on subterranean clover rhizosphere was also investigated in a pot experiment. The addition of gypsophila saponins did not modify clover biomass but significantly increased (twofold with 1% saponins) the weight of adhering soil. The number of culturable heterotrophic bacteria of the clover rhizosphere was not affected by the addition of gypsophila saponins. Nevertheless, the phenotypical characterization of the dominant Gram-negative strains of the clover rhizosphere, using the Biolog system, showed qualitative and quantitative differences induced by 1% saponins. With the addition of saponins, the populations of Chryseomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., the two dominant culturable genera of control clover, were no longer detectable or were significantly decreased, while that of Aquaspirillum dispar increased and Aquaspirillum spp. became the major genus. Aquaspirillum dispar and Aquaspirillum spp. were also the dominant rhizosphere bacteria of Gypsophila paniculata, which greatly accumulates these saponins in its roots. These results suggest that saponins may control rhizosphere bacteria in soil through rhizodeposition mechanisms. PMID:14569290

  1. Genome Sequence of Pantoea agglomerans Strain IG1

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Mori, Kazuki; Kadowaki, Takeshi; Shimada, Misato; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Soma, Gen-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is a Gram-negative bacterium that grows symbiotically with various plants. Here we report the 4.8-Mb genome sequence of P. agglomerans strain IG1. The lipopolysaccharides derived from P. agglomerans IG1 have been shown to be effective in the prevention of various diseases, such as bacterial or viral infection, lifestyle-related diseases. This genome sequence represents a substantial step toward the elucidation of pathways for production of lipopolysaccharides. PMID:22328756

  2. Enhancement of saporin cytotoxicity by Gypsophila saponins--more than stimulation of endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Weng, A; Bachran, C; Fuchs, H; Krause, E; Stephanowitz, H; Melzig, M F

    2009-10-30

    Saporin is a type I ribosome-inactivating protein with N-glycosidase activity. It removes adenine residues from the 28S ribosomal RNA resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. Recently we have shown that saporin exerts no cytotoxicity on seven human cell lines. However, the combination of saporin with a special mixture of Gypsophila saponins (Soapwort saponins) from Gypsophila paniculata L. (baby's breath) rendered saporin to a potent cytotoxin comparable to viscumin, a highly toxic type II ribosome-inactivating protein. In this study we investigated whether the enhancement of the saporin-cytotoxicity by Gypsophila saponins is mediated by a saponin-triggered modulation of endocytosis, exocytosis or impaired degradation processes of his-tagged saporin ((his)saporin) in ECV-304 cells. For this purpose (his)saporin was labelled with tritium and cytotoxicity of the toxin alone and in combination with Gypsophila saponins was scrutinized. The transport and degradation processes of (his)saporin were not different in Gypsophila saponin-treated and control cells. However, after ultracentrifugation of a post-nuclear supernatant the amount of cytosolic (his)saporin was significantly higher in saponin-treated cells than in cells, which were only incubated with (his)saporin. This indicates a saponin mediated endosomal escape of saporin. PMID:19615984

  3. Four triterpenoid saponins from dried roots of Gypsophila species.

    PubMed

    Frechet, D; Christ, B; du Sorbier, B M; Fischer, H; Vuilhorgne, M

    1991-01-01

    Four new triterpenoid saponins were isolated from the roots of Gypsophila paniculata and G. arrostii. Their structures were elucidated using a combination of homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques, without having recourse to chemical degradation or modification. The saponins investigated are: 3-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----2)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1----3)]-bet a-D- glucuronopyranosyl quillaic acid 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----3)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1----4)]-alph a- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1----2)-beta-D-fucopyranoside; 3-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----2)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1----3)]-bet a- D-glucuronopyranosyl quillaic acid 28-O-beta-D-arabinopyranosyl-(1----4)-beta-D-arabinopyranosyl++ +-(1----3)-beta-D- xylopyranosyl-(1----4)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1----2)-beta-D-fucopyran oside; 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----2)-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl gypsogenin 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----3)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1----4)]-alph a- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1----2)-beta-D-fucopyranoside; 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1----3)-[beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1----2)]-bet a- D-glucuronopyranosyl gypsogenin 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1----3)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1----4)-alpha -L- rhamnopyranosyl-(1----2)-beta-D-fucopyranoside. PMID:1367588

  4. The combination Enterobacter agglomerans is to be cited as Enterobacter agglomerans (Beijerinck 1888) Ewing and Fife 1972 and the combination Pantoea agglomerans is to be cited as Pantoea agglomerans (Beijerinck 1888) Gavini et al. 1989. Opinion 90. Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tindall, B J

    2014-10-01

    The Judicial Commission affirms that, according to information presented to it, the combination Enterobacter agglomerans is to be cited as Enterobacter agglomerans (Beijerinck 1888) Ewing and Fife 1972 and the combination Pantoea agglomerans is to be cited as Pantoea agglomerans (Beijerinck 1888) Gavini et al. 1989. PMID:25288660

  5. Genotypic comparison of Pantoea agglomerans plant and clinical strains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pantoea agglomerans strains are among the most promising biocontrol agents for a variety of bacterial and fungal plant diseases, particularly fire blight of apple and pear. However, commercial registration of P. agglomerans biocontrol products is hampered because this species is currently listed as a biosafety level 2 (BL2) organism due to clinical reports as an opportunistic human pathogen. This study compares plant-origin and clinical strains in a search for discriminating genotypic/phenotypic markers using multi-locus phylogenetic analysis and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphisms (fAFLP) fingerprinting. Results Majority of the clinical isolates from culture collections were found to be improperly designated as P. agglomerans after sequence analysis. The frequent taxonomic rearrangements underwent by the Enterobacter agglomerans/Erwinia herbicola complex may be a major problem in assessing clinical associations within P. agglomerans. In the P. agglomerans sensu stricto (in the stricter sense) group, there was no discrete clustering of clinical/biocontrol strains and no marker was identified that was uniquely associated to clinical strains. A putative biocontrol-specific fAFLP marker was identified only in biocontrol strains. The partial ORF located in this band corresponded to an ABC transporter that was found in all P. agglomerans strains. Conclusion Taxonomic mischaracterization was identified as a major problem with P. agglomerans, and current techniques removed a majority of clinical strains from this species. Although clear discrimination between P. agglomerans plant and clinical strains was not obtained with phylogenetic analysis, a single marker characteristic of biocontrol strains was identified which may be of use in strain biosafety determinations. In addition, the lack of Koch's postulate fulfilment, rare retention of clinical strains for subsequent confirmation, and the polymicrobial nature of P. agglomerans clinical reports

  6. Early Onset Neonatal Septicaemia Caused by Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Mallika; Das, Niloy Kumar; Guchhait, Partha; Misra, Saheli

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is an opportunistic pathogen causing infection in the immunocompromised patients. It is a plant pathogen and a rare human pathogen causing neonatal sepsis, joint infection, urinary tract infection and bloodstream infections. Neonatal Gram negative septicaemia may have an unusual presentation of subtle generalised neonatal seizures without any other cardinal features of sepsis. An appropriate diagnosis is therefore the key to proper management. P. agglomerans being an unusual cause of neonatal sepsis should be diagnosed early with proper antibiogram for clinical cure. Here, we report a case of neonatal sepsis caused by P. agglomerans in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India. PMID:27437219

  7. Pantoea agglomerans, a Plant Pathogen Causing Human Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Andrea T.; Cazacu, Andreea C.; Allen, Coburn H.

    2007-01-01

    We present 53 pediatric cases of Pantoea agglomerans infections cultured from normally sterile sites in patients seen at a children's hospital over 6 years. Isolates included 23 from the bloodstream, 14 from abscesses, 10 from joints/bones, 4 from the urinary tract, and 1 each from the peritoneum and the thorax. P. agglomerans was most associated with penetrating trauma by vegetative material and catheter-related bacteremia. PMID:17442803

  8. Assessment of the relevance of the antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine from Pantoea agglomerans biological control strains against bacterial plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Ulrike F; Reiher, Katharina; Spiteller, Dieter; Wensing, Annette; Völksch, Beate

    2012-12-01

    The epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans 48b/90 (Pa48b) is a promising biocontrol strain against economically important bacterial pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora. Strain Pa48b produces the broad-spectrum antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine (APV) in a temperature-dependent manner. An APV-negative mutant still suppressed the E. amylovora population and fire blight disease symptoms in apple blossom experiments under greenhouse conditions, but was inferior to the Pa48b wild-type indicating the influence of APV in the antagonism. In plant experiments with the soybean pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea both, Pa48b and the APV-negative mutant, successfully suppressed the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the P. agglomerans strain Pa48b is an efficient biocontrol organism against plant pathogens, and we prove its ability for fast colonization of plant surfaces over a wide temperature range. PMID:23233458

  9. Intergeneric somatic hybrid plantlets between Dianthus barbatus and Gypsophila paniculata obtained by electrofusion.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Hoshino, Y; Mii, M

    1996-02-01

    Hypocotyl-derived protoplasts of Dianthus barbatus that had been pretreated with iodoacetamide were fused electrically with cell suspension culture-derived protoplasts of Gypsophila paniculata that could divide to form callus but could not regenerate shoots under the culture conditions used in this study. Electrofusion-derived calli which produced shoots were selected as putative somatic hybrids, and plantlets were subsequently regenerated from 2 of these selected calli. These plantlets, which in vitro produced flowers precociously, were identified as intergeneric somatic hybrids by nuclear ribosomal DNA analysis. Normal plants have not been established up to the present. PMID:24166164

  10. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    PubMed

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor. PMID:26829835

  11. 40 CFR 180.1272 - Pantoea agglomerans strain E325; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pantoea agglomerans strain E325... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1272 Pantoea agglomerans strain E325; exemption from the... Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 when used on apples and pears....

  12. 40 CFR 180.1267 - Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1267 Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1; exemption from the... Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1 when used on apples and pears....

  13. Draft genome sequence of Pantoea agglomerans R190, a producer of antibiotics against phytopathogens and foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Byoung-Young; Heu, Sunggi

    2014-10-20

    Pantoea agglomerans R190, isolated from an apple orchard, showed antibacterial activity against various spoilage bacteria, including Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. Here, we report the genome sequence of P. agglomerans R190. This report will raise the value of P. agglomerans as an agent for biocontrol of disease. PMID:25087741

  14. Simenoside A, a new triterpenoid saponin from Gypsophila simonii Hub.-Mor.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Idris

    2014-03-01

    Saponins are amphiphilic glycoconjugates which give soap-like foams in H2 O. A new triterpenoid saponin, simenoside A (1), based on gypsogenin aglycone, and the known saponin 2 were isolated from Gypsophila simonii Hub.-Mor. The structure of the new saponin was elucidated as 3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosylgypsogenin 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→4)]-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-fucopyranosyl ester on the basis of extensive spectral analyses and chemical evidence. Saponins 1 and 2 were isolated from G. simonii for the first time. PMID:24634074

  15. Identification of differentially expressed transcripts from leaves of the boron tolerant plant Gypsophila perfoliata L.

    PubMed

    Unver, Turgay; Bozkurt, Osman; Akkaya, Mahinur S

    2008-08-01

    Very recently some of the species of Gypsophila genus collected from the boron rich soils in Turkey were shown to be remarkably tolerant to high levels of boron. A limited amount of boron is necessary for the normal development of plants; however, a high level of boron in soil is generally toxic. Nevertheless, the adaptability of plant species allows them to withstand the presence of extreme amounts of metal ion by various strategies. This study is conducted on highly boron tolerant Gypsophila perfoliata L. collected from a location in the boron mining area. The plant samples were transferred into plant nutritional medium in the presence high; approximately 500 (35 mg/kg), 1,000, and 30 microM (considered normal) boron concentrations. We compared the transcriptome of the plant sample treated with the excess levels of boron to that of the samples grown under normal concentration using differential display PCR (DDRT-PCR) method. Thirty bands showing differential expression levels (presence or absence of bands or varying intensities) in either of approximately 500 or 30 microM B concentrations at varying time points were excised, cloned, and sequenced. Among which, 18 of them were confirmed via quantitative reverse transcription real time PCR (qRT-PCR). We are reporting the first preliminary molecular level study of boron tolerance on this organism by attempting to identify putative genes related in the tolerance mechanism. The gene fragments are consistent with the literature data obtained from a proteomics study and a metabolomics study performed in barley under varying boron concentrations. PMID:18504585

  16. Supported PV module assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  17. The endocytic uptake pathways of targeted toxins are influenced by synergistically acting Gypsophila saponins.

    PubMed

    Bachran, Diana; Schneider, Stefanie; Bachran, Christopher; Weng, Alexander; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2011-12-01

    The expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is upregulated in many human tumors. We developed the targeted toxin SE, consisting of the plant toxin saporin-3 and human EGF. The cytotoxic effect of SE drastically increases in a synergistic manner by a combined treatment with Saponinum album (Spn), a saponin composite from Gypsophila paniculata L. Here we analyzed which endocytic pathways are involved in the uptake of SE and which are mandatory for the Spn-mediated enhancement. We treated HER14 cells (NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGF receptor) with either chlorpromazine, dynasore, latrunculin A, chloroquine, bafilomycin A1 or filipin and analyzed the effect on the cytotoxicity of SE alone or in combination with Spn. We demonstrated that SE in combination with Spn enters cells via clathrin- and actin-dependent pathways and the acidification of the endosomes after endocytosis is relevant for the cytotoxicity of SE. Notably, our data suggest that SE without Spn follows a different endocytic uptake pathway. SE cytotoxicity is independent of blocking of clathrin or actin, and the decrease in endosomal pH is irrelevant for SE cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Spn has no influence on the retrograde transport. This work is important for the better understanding of the underlying mechanism of Spn-enhanced cytotoxicity and helps to describe the role of Spn better. PMID:21981719

  18. Association and attraction of blueberry maggot fly Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae) to Pantoea (Enterobacter) agglomerans.

    PubMed

    MacCollom, G B; Lauzon, C R; Sjogren, R E; Meyer, W L; Olday, F

    2009-02-01

    The attraction of washed, medium-free cells of Pantoea (Enterobacter) agglomerans to wild, adult Rhagoletis mendax Curran, the blueberry maggot fly, was evaluated in managed blueberry fields in Maine. Attraction was evaluated using Pherocon AM and Ladd traps, each tested with or without washed bacterial cells. Field studies showed significant increases in fly captures on the Pherocon AM traps. Apple volatiles odors on Ladd traps seemed to cancel the effects of bacterial odors. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and identified from alimentary organs within wild R. mendax. Isolates indentified included P. agglomerans. Blueberries collected in the field were surveyed for the presence of P. agglomerans and blueberries containing blueberry maggot larvae and noninfested blueberries were analyzed for amino acid content. Maggot-infested blueberry contained twice the amino acid nitrogen than that of noninfested blueberry. P. agglomerans, like with other pest tephritids, seems to be a cosmopolite with blueberry maggot. PMID:19791604

  19. Pantoea agglomerans in Immunodeficient Patients with Different Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Flores Popoca, Erika Odilia; Miranda García, Maximino; Romero Figueroa, Socorro; Mendoza Medellín, Aurelio; Sandoval Trujillo, Horacio; Silva Rojas, Hilda Victoria; Ramírez Durán, Ninfa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine in 32 patients from 4 different Mexican hospitals the frequency of opportunistic bacteria in the 2010 to 2011 time period. The patients were divided in 4 groups. Group 1 included 21 HIV positive patients with acute respiratory syndrome. Four HIV positive patients with tuberculosis symptoms were included in Group 2; two patients with tuberculosis symptoms and one asymptomatic person formed Group 3. Reference Group 4 included 4 patients from whom 4 strains of Mycobacterium spp. had been reported. The strains were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene amplification, API 20E and 50CH, biochemical test, and antibiotic sensitivity. The strains found were 10 Pantoea agglomerans, 6 Mycobacterium spp., 6 Pseudomonas spp. and 10 strains of normal floral species: Thermoactinomycetes bacterium (1), Enterococcus faecium (2), Bacillus licheniformis (1), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (2), Streptococcus oralis (2), Streptococcus anginosus (1), and Enterobacter hormaechei (1). PMID:22619600

  20. Pantoea agglomerans in immunodeficient patients with different respiratory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Flores Popoca, Erika Odilia; Miranda García, Maximino; Romero Figueroa, Socorro; Mendoza Medellín, Aurelio; Sandoval Trujillo, Horacio; Silva Rojas, Hilda Victoria; Ramírez Durán, Ninfa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine in 32 patients from 4 different Mexican hospitals the frequency of opportunistic bacteria in the 2010 to 2011 time period. The patients were divided in 4 groups. Group 1 included 21 HIV positive patients with acute respiratory syndrome. Four HIV positive patients with tuberculosis symptoms were included in Group 2; two patients with tuberculosis symptoms and one asymptomatic person formed Group 3. Reference Group 4 included 4 patients from whom 4 strains of Mycobacterium spp. had been reported. The strains were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene amplification, API 20E and 50CH, biochemical test, and antibiotic sensitivity. The strains found were 10 Pantoea agglomerans, 6 Mycobacterium spp., 6 Pseudomonas spp. and 10 strains of normal floral species: Thermoactinomycetes bacterium (1), Enterococcus faecium (2), Bacillus licheniformis (1), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (2), Streptococcus oralis (2), Streptococcus anginosus (1), and Enterobacter hormaechei (1). PMID:22619600

  1. Nitrogen-fixing Enterobacter agglomerans isolated from guts of wood-eating termites.

    PubMed Central

    Potrikus, C J; Breznak, J A

    1977-01-01

    Two strains of facultatively anaerobic, N2-fixing bacteria were isolated from guts of Coptotermes formosanus and identified as Enterobacter agglomerans. The deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of isolates was 52.6 and 53.1 mol% guanine plus cytosine. Both isolates and a known strain of E. agglomerans carried out a mixed acid type of glucose fermentation. N2 fixation by E. agglomerans was inhibited by O2; consequently, N2 served as an N source only for cells growing anaerobically in media lacking a major source of combined N. However, peptone, NH4Cl, or KNO3 served as an N source under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. It was estimated that 2 x 10(2) cells of E. agglomerans were present per termite gut. This value was 100-fold lower than expected, based on N2 fixation, low recoveries of E. agglomerans may be related to the marked decrease in N2 fixation rates observed when intact termites or their extracted guts were manipulated for the isolation of bacteria. It was concluded that the N2-fixing activity of E. agglomerans may be important to the N economy of C. formosanus. PMID:848958

  2. Effect of Nutrition on Deformation Disease in Gypsophila paniculata Mother Plants.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yephet, Y; Reuven, M; Zviebil, A; Szmulewich, Y; Lavkovits, I; Markovits, T; Soriano, S; Bar-Yosef, B

    2006-07-01

    ABSTRACT Deformation disease of Gypsophila paniculata mother plants reduces cutting yields as much as 50% but does not kill the mother plants. In preliminary experiments, fertigation of G. paniculata mother plants with a 20:20:20 compound fertilizer (N, P, K, plus microelements) at an N concentration of 720 mg/liter reduced the expression of deformation disease compared with the conventional N concentration of 360 mg/liter. The current study determined which component of the compound fertilizer reduced the disease. Experiments were carried out in 10-liter buckets packed with naturally infested 0- to 8-mm black tuff (Scoria = crushed volcanic stones). Irrigation was applied once a day at 0.5 liter per bucket with the nutrient under test being added at 1.0 liter per bucket via the water once a week. Treatments included: (i) four levels of 20:20:20 fertilizer; (ii) four levels of each of N, P, K, and Fe-Zn-Mn mixture (ME) corresponding to their concentrations in the compound fertilizer; (iii) different N sources (20:20:20, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), KNO(3), NH(4)NO(3), urea); and (iv) three pHs of the irrigation water at each of three NO(3) and NH(4) application levels. Increasing the 20:20:20 fertilizer concentration reduced the disease level from 82 to 96% with N at 180 mg/liter to 6 to 10% with N at 720 mg/liter. When either P, K, or ME was the sole variable, increasing concentrations had no significant effect on the disease, but elevating a mixed source nitrogen concentration from 0 to 180, 360, and 720 mg/liter (as 50% urea, 40% NH(4)NO(3), and 10% KNO(3)) significantly reduced deformation similar to that observed with increasing concentrations of the 20:20:20 fertilizer. mong tested N sources, NH(4) was the most effective in reducing the disease (almost to zero at an N concentration of 360 g/liter). Low disease incidence (0 to 10%) was always associated with effluent pH of 6 or lower. Irrigating with acidified water pH 5.5) in the presence of N, as NH(4) at 180 mg

  3. Distribution and Replication of the Pathogenicity Plasmid pPATH in Diverse Populations of the Gall-Forming Bacterium Pantoea agglomerans▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Weinthal, Dan M.; Barash, Isaac; Panijel, Mary; Valinsky, Lea; Gaba, Victor; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit

    2007-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans has been transformed from a commensal bacterium into two related gall-forming pathovars by acquisition of pPATH plasmids containing a pathogenicity island (PAI). This PAI harbors an hrp/hrc gene cluster, type III effectors, and phytohormone biosynthetic genes. DNA typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two major groups of P. agglomerans pv. gypsophilae and one group of P. agglomerans pv. betae. The pPATH plasmids of the different groups had nearly identical replicons (98% identity), and the RepA protein showed the highest level of similarity with IncN plasmid proteins. A series of plasmids, designated pRAs, in which the whole replicon region (2,170 bp) or deleted derivatives of it were ligated with nptI were generated for replicon analysis. A basic 929-bp replicon (pRA6) was sufficient for replication in Escherichia coli and in nonpathogenic P. agglomerans. However, the whole replicon region (pRA1) was necessary for expulsion of the pPATH plasmid, which resulted in the loss of pathogenicity. The presence of direct repeats in the replicon region suggests that the pPATH plasmid is an iteron plasmid and that the repeats may regulate its replication. The pPATH plasmids are nonconjugative but exhibit a broad host range, as shown by replication of pRA1 in Erwinia, Pseudomonas, and Xanthomonas. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses indicated that the PAIs in the two groups of P. agglomerans pv. gypsophilae are similar but different from those in P. agglomerans pv. betae. The results could indicate that the pPATH plasmids evolved from a common ancestral mobilizable plasmid that was transferred into different strains of P. agglomerans. PMID:17921271

  4. Enhancement of toxicity of saporin-based toxins by Gypsophila saponins--kinetic of the saponin.

    PubMed

    Weng, Alexander; Görick, Cornelia; Melzig, Matthias F

    2009-08-01

    Saponins are amphiphilic substances consisting of a hydrophobic backbone with one or two hydrophilic sugar units. Recently it was shown that saponinum album (SA) from Gypsophila paniculata L. enhanced cytotoxicity of a saporin-based chimeric toxin (up to 385,000-fold) as well as the toxicity of saporin (up to 100,000-fold) with N-glycosidase activity. Previously we have shown that toxicity of other N-glycosidases such as ricin A-chain, nigrin b, and toxins such as diphtheria toxin or microcystin-LR was not enhanced by SA. This points to a specific SA-dependent mechanism of toxicity enhancement on saporin and saporin-based toxins. Although the cytotoxicity enhancing effect was observed in up to 10 different cell lines, nothing is known about the kinetic of SA under cell culture conditions. Therefore SA was titrated, and the uptake respective liberation profile of SA was investigated in ECV-304 cells. Treatment of cells with [(3)H]-SA leads to an immediate uptake of saponin molecules. After cells were saturated with [(3)H]-SA, a first equilibrium (first eq.) was reached. The first eq. was disturbed by washing until a second equilibrium was reached between the activity observed within cells and that seen in the supernatant. After a further extensive washing, a small portion of saponin molecules remained durable associated with the cell. This portion was sufficient to induce a drastic toxicity enhancement on saporin indicating a long-lasting sensitization of cells against the toxin. PMID:19491365

  5. Energy 101: Solar PV

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. This video shows how a PV panel converts the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses.

  6. Energy 101: Solar PV

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. This video shows how a PV panel converts the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses.

  7. Stabilized PV system

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2002-12-17

    A stabilized PV system comprises an array of photovoltaic (PV) assemblies mounted to a support surface. Each PV assembly comprises a PV module and a support assembly securing the PV module to a position overlying the support surface. The array of modules is circumscribed by a continuous, belt-like perimeter assembly. Cross strapping, extending above, below or through the array, or some combination of above, below and through the array, secures a first position along the perimeter assembly to at least a second position along the perimeter assembly thereby stabilizing the array against wind uplift forces. The first and second positions may be on opposite sides on the array.

  8. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequences of Pantoea agglomerans Isolates Exhibiting Antagonistic Interactions with Wheat Seed-Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Links, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans isolates 3 and 4 were retrieved from the bacterial community associated with wheat seeds. These isolates differ in their pattern of growth antagonism toward Alternaria species. A comparison of the genome sequences of these two isolates revealed a high sequence identity with previously sequenced strains of P. agglomerans. PMID:27313290

  9. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequences of Pantoea agglomerans Isolates Exhibiting Antagonistic Interactions with Wheat Seed-Associated Fungi.

    PubMed

    Town, Jennifer; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans isolates 3 and 4 were retrieved from the bacterial community associated with wheat seeds. These isolates differ in their pattern of growth antagonism toward Alternaria species. A comparison of the genome sequences of these two isolates revealed a high sequence identity with previously sequenced strains of P. agglomerans. PMID:27313290

  10. Survival of Pantoea agglomerans E325 as fire blight biocontrol agent when osmoadapted in high-saline medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 is available commercially as the active ingredient in a freeze-dried product (Bloomtime FDTM) of Northwest Agricultural Products (NAP) for biological control of fire blight. Osmoadaptation, which involves the combination of Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 is available...

  11. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  12. Draft genome sequences of Pantoea agglomerans and Pantoea vagans isolates associated with termites.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Marike; de Maayer, Pieter; Poulsen, Michael; Steenkamp, Emma T; van Zyl, Elritha; Coutinho, Teresa A; Venter, Stephanus N

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pantoea incorporates many economically and clinically important species. The plant-associated species, Pantoea agglomerans and Pantoea vagans, are closely related and are often isolated from similar environments. Plasmids conferring certain metabolic capabilities are also shared amongst these two species. The genomes of two isolates obtained from fungus-growing termites in South Africa were sequenced, assembled and annotated. A high number of orthologous genes are conserved within and between these species. The difference in genome size between P. agglomerans MP2 (4,733,829 bp) and P. vagans MP7 (4,598,703 bp) can largely be attributed to the differences in plasmid content. The genome sequences of these isolates may shed light on the common traits that enable P. agglomerans and P. vagans to co-occur in plant- and insect-associated niches. PMID:26937267

  13. Sugarcane Growth Promotion by the Endophytic Bacterium Pantoea agglomerans 33.1

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, P. B.; Ferreira, A.; Tsui, S.; Lacava, P. T.; Mondin, M.; Azevedo, J. L.; Pizzirani-Kleiner, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The promotion of sugarcane growth by the endophytic Pantoea agglomerans strain 33.1 was studied under gnotobiotic and greenhouse conditions. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged strain P. agglomerans 33.1::pNKGFP was monitored in vitro in sugarcane plants by microscopy, reisolation, and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Using qPCR and reisolation 4 and 15 days after inoculation, we observed that GFP-tagged strains reached similar density levels both in the rhizosphere and inside the roots and aerial plant tissues. Microscopic analysis was performed at 5, 10, and 18 days after inoculation. Under greenhouse conditions, P. agglomerans 33.1-inoculated sugarcane plants presented more dry mass 30 days after inoculation. Cross-colonization was confirmed by reisolation of the GFP-tagged strain. These data demonstrate that 33.1::pNKGFP is a superior colonizer of sugarcane due to its ability to colonize a number of different plant parts. The growth promotion observed in colonized plants may be related to the ability of P. agglomerans 33.1 to synthesize indoleacetic acid and solubilize phosphate. Additionally, this strain may trigger chitinase and cellulase production by plant roots, suggesting the induction of a plant defense system. However, levels of indigenous bacterial colonization did not vary between inoculated and noninoculated sugarcane plants under greenhouse conditions, suggesting that the presence of P. agglomerans 33.1 has no effect on these communities. In this study, different techniques were used to monitor 33.1::pNKGFP during sugarcane cross-colonization, and our results suggested that this plant growth promoter could be used with other crops. The interaction between sugarcane and P. agglomerans 33.1 has important benefits that promote the plant's growth and fitness. PMID:22865062

  14. A simple method for isolation of Gypsophila saponins for the combined application of targeted toxins and saponins in tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Weng, Alexander; Bachran, Diana; Görick, Cornelia; Bachran, Christopher; Fuchs, Hendrik; Melzig, Matthias F

    2009-10-01

    Saponinum album (SAP) is a complex mixture of triterpene saponins from Gypsophila paniculata L. Although most of the saponins from SAP are characterized, the separation of pure saponins remains time consuming and costly, involving different chromatographic techniques. Recently it was shown that SAP drastically enhanced the cytotoxicity of a chimeric toxin consisting of the N-glycosidase saporin and human epidermal growth factor (Sap-EGF) in cell culture experiments. In view of a potential therapeutic use of the coadministration of SAP and Sap-EGF in tumor therapy, an economic and time-saving method for the isolation of pure saponins from the crude SAP mixture in high amounts is required. In this study we isolated a single saponin by a simple chromatographic method. The isolated saponin was characterized by mass spectrometry and was shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of Sap-EGF on HER14 cells. PMID:19452437

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Commercial Biocontrol Strain Pantoea agglomerans P10c

    PubMed Central

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Abelli, Azzurra; Kron Morelli, Roberto; Vanneste, Joël L.; Duffy, Brion

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the biocontrol strain Pantoea agglomerans P10c, composed of a draft chromosome and two plasmids: the 559-kb large Pantoea plasmid 1 (pPag3) and a 182-kb plasmid (pPag1). A genomic island containing pantocin A biosynthesis genes was identified. PMID:26659685

  16. Antibiosis and acidification by Panoea agglomerans strain E325 may contribute to suppression of Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325, a commercially-available antagonist for fire blight of apple and pear, was originally selected through broad screening based on suppression of Erwinia amylovora on flower stigmas, but specific mechanisms were unknown. Bacterial modification of pH was evaluated as a p...

  17. Mechanisms of Pantoea agglomerans Strain E325 as Antagonist of Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325, the active ingredient in Bloomtime Biological (superscript)TM, was originally isolated from apple blossoms and selected based on broad screening with detached crab apple flowers. To evaluate pH modification on Gala apple stigmas as a possible mode of antagonism, exud...

  18. Antibiosis by Pantoea agglomerans biocontrol strain E325 against Erwinia amylovora on apple blossom stigmas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans E325, the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight control, was previously shown in vitro to produce a unique alkaline- and phosphate-sensitive antibiotic specific to Erwinia amylovora. Antibiosis was evaluated as a mode of antagonism on blossom stigmas using two...

  19. Controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans E325 for biocontrol of fire blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microencapsulation and controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 (E325), which is an antagonist to bacterial pathogen (Erwinia amylovora) of fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear, have been investigated. Uniform core-shell alginate microcapsules (AMCs), 60-300 µm in diamet...

  20. Immigrant Pantoea agglomerans embedded within indigenous microbial aggregates: a novel spatial distribution of epiphytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing; Ma, Anzhou; Cui, Mengmeng; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2014-02-01

    Immigrant bacteria located on leaf surfaces are important to the health of plants as well as to people who consume fresh fruits and vegetables. However, the spatial distribution and organization of these immigrant bacteria on leaf surfaces are still poorly understood. To examine the spatial organization of these strains, two bacterial strains on tobacco leaves: (1) an indigenous strain, Pseudomonas stutzeri Nov. Y2011 labeled with green fluorescent protein, and (2) an immigrant strain Pantoea agglomerans labeled with cyan fluorescent protein isolated from pear, were studied. Under moist conditions, P. agglomerans cells quickly disappeared from direct observation by laser-scanning confocal microscopy, although elution results indicated that large amounts of live cells were still present on the leaves. Following exposure to desiccation stress, particles of cyan fluorescent protein-labeled P. agglomerans were visible within cracked aggregates of P. stutzeri Nov. Y2011. Detailed observation of sectioned aggregates showed that colonies of immigrant P. agglomerans were embedded within aggregates of P. stutzeri Nov. Y2011. Furthermore, carbon-resource partitioning studies suggested that these two species could coexist without significant nutritional competition. This is the first observation of an immigrant bacterium embedding within aggregates of indigenous bacteria on leaves to evade harsh conditions in the phyllosphere. PMID:25076531

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Commercial Biocontrol Strain Pantoea agglomerans P10c.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Abelli, Azzurra; Kron Morelli, Roberto; Vanneste, Joël L; Duffy, Brion

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the biocontrol strain Pantoea agglomerans P10c, composed of a draft chromosome and two plasmids: the 559-kb large Pantoea plasmid 1 (pPag3) and a 182-kb plasmid (pPag1). A genomic island containing pantocin A biosynthesis genes was identified. PMID:26659685

  2. Unusual causes of peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient: Alcaligenes faecalis and Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An 87 -year-old female who was undergoing peritoneal dialysis presented with peritonitis caused by Alcaligenes faecalis and Pantoea agglomerans in consecutive years. With the following report we discuss the importance of these unusual microorganisms in peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:21477370

  3. PV_LIB Toolbox

    2012-09-11

    While an organized source of reference information on PV performance modeling is certainly valuable, there is nothing to match the availability of actual examples of modeling algorithms being used in practice. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a PV performance modeling toolbox (PV_LIB) for Matlab. It contains a set of well-documented, open source functions and example scripts showing the functions being used in practical examples. This toolbox is meant to help make the multi-stepmore » process of modeling a PV system more transparent and provide the means for model users to validate and understand the models they use and or develop. It is fully integrated into Matlab’s help and documentation utilities. The PV_LIB Toolbox provides more than 30 functions that are sorted into four categories« less

  4. PV_LIB Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-11

    While an organized source of reference information on PV performance modeling is certainly valuable, there is nothing to match the availability of actual examples of modeling algorithms being used in practice. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a PV performance modeling toolbox (PV_LIB) for Matlab. It contains a set of well-documented, open source functions and example scripts showing the functions being used in practical examples. This toolbox is meant to help make the multi-step process of modeling a PV system more transparent and provide the means for model users to validate and understand the models they use and or develop. It is fully integrated into Matlab’s help and documentation utilities. The PV_LIB Toolbox provides more than 30 functions that are sorted into four categories

  5. GridPV Toolbox

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feedermore » on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.« less

  6. GridPV Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert; Quiroz, Jimmy; Grijalva, Santiago; Reno, Matthew; Coogan, Kyle

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.

  7. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part IV. Beneficial effects.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a gammaproteobacterium of plant origin, possesses many beneficial traits that could be used for the prevention and/or treatment of human and animal diseases, combating plant pathogens, promotion of plant growth and bioremediation of the environment. It produces a number of antibiotics (herbicolin, pantocins, microcin, agglomerins, andrimid, phenazine, among others) which could be used for combating plant, animal and human pathogens or for food preservation. Japanese researchers have demonstrated that the low-molecular-mass lipopolysaccharide of P. agglomerans isolated by them and described as 'Immunopotentiator from Pantoea agglomerans 1 (IP-PA1)' reveals the extremely wide spectrum of healing properties, mainly due to its ability for the maintenance of homeostasis by macrophage activation. IP-PA1 was proved to be effective in the prevention and treatment of a broad range of human and animal disorders, such as tumours, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, ulcer, various infectious diseases, atopic allergy and stress-induced immunosuppression; it also showed a strong analgesic effect. It is important that most of these effects could be achieved by the safe oral administration of IP-PA1. Taking into account that P. agglomerans occurs commonly as a symbiont of many species of insects, including mosquitoes transmitting the Plasmodium parasites causing malaria, successful attempts were made to apply the strategy of paratransgenesis, in which bacterial symbionts are genetically engineered to express and secrete anti-Plasmodium effector proteins. This strategy shows prospects for a successful eradication of malaria, a deadly disease killing annually over one million people, as well as of other vector-borne diseases of humans, animals and plants. Pantoea agglomerans has been identified as an antagonist of many plant pathogens belonging to bacteria and fungi, as a result of antibiotic production, competition mechanisms or induction of plant resistance. Its use as

  8. Grid integrated distributed PV (GridPV).

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Coogan, Kyle

    2013-08-01

    This manual provides the documentation of the MATLAB toolbox of functions for using OpenDSS to simulate the impact of solar energy on the distribution system. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions. Each function in the toolbox is documented with the function use syntax, full description, function input list, function output list, example use, and example output.

  9. Environmental scanning electron microscopy of the surface of normal and vitrified leaves of Gypsophila paniculata (Babies Breath) cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gribble, K; Sarafis, V; Nailon, J; Holford, P; Uwins, P

    1996-06-01

    Leaf surfaces of non-tissue-cultured, vitrified and non-vitrified plantlets of Gypsophila paniculata (Babies Breath) were examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope. Non-tissue-cultured plants had a complete epidermal surface, recessed stomata and wax present on the leaf surface. The surface of tissue-cultured plantlets appeared similar to non-tissue-cultured plants excepting stomata were slightly protruding and less wax appeared to be present. In both non-tissue-cultured and tissue-cultured plants stomata were found both opened and closed and were observed closing. In contrast vitrified plantlets had abnormal, malformed stomata which appeared non-functional. The ventral surfaces of leaves seemed more normal than the dorsal, this may be due to the former receiving more light. Additionally, discontinuities were found in the epidermis. Often epidermal holes were found in association with stomatal apertures. It is suggested that the main cause of desiccation of vitrified G. paniculata plantlets ex vitro is due to loss of water from the discontinuity in epidermis and not because of non-functional stomata. Liquid water could be seen through the epidermal holes indicating that at least some of the extra water in vitrified plantlets is contained in the intercellular spaces. PMID:24178169

  10. Hepatoprotective and Antioxidant Effects of Saponarin, Isolated from Gypsophila trichotoma Wend. on Paracetamol-Induced Liver Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vitcheva, Vessela; Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Krasteva, Ilina; Manov, Vassil; Mitcheva, Mitka

    2013-01-01

    The hepatoprotective potential of saponarin, isolated from Gypsophila trichotoma, was evaluated in vitro/in vivo using a hepatotoxicity model of paracetamol-induced liver injury. In freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, paracetamol (100 μmol) led to a significant decrease in cell viability, increased LDH leakage, decreased levels of cellular GSH, and elevated MDA quantity. Saponarin (60–0.006 μg/mL) preincubation, however, significantly ameliorated paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. The beneficial effect of saponarin was also observed in vivo. Rats were challenged with paracetamol alone (600 mg/kg, i.p.) and after 7-day pretreatment with saponarin (80 mg/kg, oral gavage). Paracetamol toxicity was evidenced by increase in MDA quantity and decrease in cell GSH levels and antioxidant defence system. No changes in phase I enzyme activities of AH and EMND and cytochrome P 450 quantity were detected. Saponarin pretreatment resulted in significant increase in cell antioxidant defence system and GSH levels and decrease in lipid peroxidation. The biochemical changes are in good correlation with the histopathological data. Protective activity of saponarin was similar to the activity of positive control silymarin. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that saponarin exerts antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity against paracetamol liver injury in vitro/in vivo. PMID:23878818

  11. Decolorization of azo dyes with Enterobacter agglomerans immobilized in different supports by using fluidized bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Moutaouakkil, Adnane; Zeroual, Youssef; Dzayri, Fatima Zohra; Talbi, Mohamed; Lee, Kangmin; Blaghen, Mohamed

    2004-02-01

    Immobilized cells of Enterobacter agglomerans, able to reduce azo dyes enzymatically, were used as a biocatalyst for the decolorization of synthetic medium containing the toxic azo dye methyl red (MR). This bacterial strain exhibits high ability to completely decolorize 100 mg/L of MR after only 6 h of incubation under aerobic conditions. Cells of E. agglomerans were immobilized in calcium alginate, polyacylamide, cooper beech, and vermiculite, and were used for the decolorization of MR from synthetic water by using a fluidized bed bioreactor. The highest specific decolorization rate was obtained when E. agglomerans was entrapped in calcium alginate beads and was of about 3.04 mg MR/g cell/h with a 50% conversion time ( t(1/2)) of about 1.6 h. Moreover, immobilized cells in calcium alginate continuously decolorized MR even after seven repeated experiments without significant loss of activity, while polyacrylamide-, cooper beech-, and vermiculite-immobilized cells retained only 62, 15, and 13% of their original activity, respectively. PMID:15057480

  12. Endophthalmitis caused by Pantoea agglomerans: clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Venincasa, Vincent D; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W; Sridhar, Jayanth; Miller, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical findings, antibiotic sensitivities, and visual outcomes associated with endophthalmitis caused by Pantoea agglomerans. Methods A consecutive case series of patients with vitreous culture-positive endophthalmitis caused by P. agglomerans from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2012 at a large university referral center. Findings from the current study were compared to prior published studies. Results Of the three study patients that were identified, clinical settings included trauma (n=2) and post-cataract surgery (n=1). Presenting visual acuity was hand motion or worse in all three cases. All isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime, gentamicin, imipenem, and fluoroquinolones. All isolates were resistant to ampicillin. Initial treatment strategies were vitreous tap and intravitreal antibiotic injection (n=1) and pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotic injection (n=2). At last follow-up, one patient had no light perception vision, while the other two had best-corrected visual acuity of 20/200 and 20/400. Conclusion All Pantoea isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime, gentamicin, imipenem, and fluoroquinolones. All patients in the current study received at least one intravitreal antibiotic to which P. agglomerans was shown to be sensitive in vitro. In spite of this, the visual outcomes were generally poor. PMID:26185411

  13. AHL-type quorum sensing and its regulation on symplasmata formation in Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Wu, Suisui; Wang, Jieru; Feng, Yongjun

    2015-05-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19, an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rice, is characterized by the formation of multicellular aggregate structure called symplasmata, which not only bestow the strong stress-resistance of the bacterium, but also contribute to the specific adaptation in the endophyte-host association. Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), as the important signal molecule in the quorum sensing (QS) system of gram-negative bacteria, were demonstrated to regulate motility, cell-aggregation, and other bacterial behaviors. Here, the production of AHL by P. agglomerans YS19 and its regulation on the symplasmata formation were studied. It was revealed that the production of AHL by YS19 was initiated at the exponential growth stage and from then on, reached the peak values at the stationary growth stage in LB medium. The AHL was identified as N-3-oxooctanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OOHL) by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The AHL synthesis gene pagI and receptor gene pagR in YS19 were cloned and phylogenetic analysis showed that they were high conservative among strains in species of P. agglomerans. It was revealed that AHL promoted the bacterial growth and symplasmata formation of YS19. Meanwhile, the colonization ability and growth-promoting effect of YS19 on the host plant were also enhanced by AHL. These results strongly suggest the pleiotropic effects of the AHL-type QS system in endophytic life of the strain. PMID:25283544

  14. Absence of lysogeny in wild populations of Erwinia amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R; Sjaarda, David R; Sjaarda, Calvin P; Ayala, Carlos Juarez; Howcroft, Brittany; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2015-01-01

    Lytic bacteriophages are in development as biological control agents for the prevention of fire blight disease caused by Erwinia amylovora. Temperate phages should be excluded as biologicals since lysogeny produces the dual risks of host resistance to phage attack and the transduction of virulence determinants between bacteria. The extent of lysogeny was estimated in wild populations of E. amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans with real–time polymerase chain reaction primers developed to detect E. amylovora phages belonging to the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Pantoea agglomerans, an orchard epiphyte, is easily infected by Erwinia spp. phages, and it serves as a carrier in the development of the phage-mediated biological control agent. Screening of 161 E. amylovora isolates from 16 distinct geographical areas in North America, Europe, North Africa and New Zealand and 82 P. agglomerans isolates from southern Ontario, Canada showed that none possessed prophage. Unstable phage resistant clones or lysogens were produced under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a stable lysogen was recovered from infection of bacterial isolate Ea110R with Podoviridae phage ΦEa35-20. These laboratory observations suggested that while lysogeny is possible in E. amylovora, it is rare or absent in natural populations, and there is a minimal risk associated with lysogenic conversion and transduction by Erwinia spp. phages. PMID:25678125

  15. Absence of lysogeny in wild populations of Erwinia amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Roach, Dwayne R; Sjaarda, David R; Sjaarda, Calvin P; Ayala, Carlos Juarez; Howcroft, Brittany; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2015-05-01

    Lytic bacteriophages are in development as biological control agents for the prevention of fire blight disease caused by Erwinia amylovora. Temperate phages should be excluded as biologicals since lysogeny produces the dual risks of host resistance to phage attack and the transduction of virulence determinants between bacteria. The extent of lysogeny was estimated in wild populations of E. amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans with real-time polymerase chain reaction primers developed to detect E. amylovora phages belonging to the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Pantoea agglomerans, an orchard epiphyte, is easily infected by Erwinia spp. phages, and it serves as a carrier in the development of the phage-mediated biological control agent. Screening of 161 E. amylovora isolates from 16 distinct geographical areas in North America, Europe, North Africa and New Zealand and 82 P. agglomerans isolates from southern Ontario, Canada showed that none possessed prophage. Unstable phage resistant clones or lysogens were produced under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a stable lysogen was recovered from infection of bacterial isolate Ea110R with Podoviridae phage ΦEa35-20. These laboratory observations suggested that while lysogeny is possible in E. amylovora, it is rare or absent in natural populations, and there is a minimal risk associated with lysogenic conversion and transduction by Erwinia spp. phages. PMID:25678125

  16. Open PV Project: Unlocking PV Installation Data (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    This brochure summarizes the Open PV Project, a collaborative effort of government, industry, and the public to compile a comprehensive database of PV installations in the United States. The brochure outlines the purpose and history of the project as well as the main capabilities and benefits of the online Open PV tool. The brochure also introduces how features of the tool are used, and it describes the sources and characteristics of Open PV's data and data collection processes.

  17. PV System Performance and Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during fiscal year (FY) 2005 of the Photovoltaic (PV) System Performance and Standards Subtask, which is part of the PV Systems Engineering Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

  18. PV module degradation-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themelis, M. P.

    1982-06-01

    The energy potential of photovoltaic (PV) components in various test applications were evaluated. Visual and electrical degradation analyses were performed on 47 PV modules. Discoloration, cracking, scratches, and electrical degradation were detected.

  19. Testing for PV Reliability (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Bansal, S.

    2014-09-01

    The DOE SUNSHOT workshop is seeking input from the community about PV reliability and how the DOE might address gaps in understanding. This presentation describes the types of testing that are needed for PV reliability and introduces a discussion to identify gaps in our understanding of PV reliability testing.

  20. PV Hourly Simulation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Metzger, Ian

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple general building characteristics and usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV based primarily on the area available on the rooftop. It uses a simplified efficiency calculation method and real panel characteristics. It includes a detailed rate structure to account for time-of-use rates, on-peak and off-peak pricing, and multiple rate seasons. This tool includes the option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  1. PV Hourly Simulation Tool

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple general building characteristics and usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV based primarily on the area available on the rooftop. It uses a simplified efficiency calculation method and real panel characteristics. It includes a detailed rate structure to account for time-of-use rates, on-peak and off-peak pricing, and multiple rate seasons. This tool includes themore » option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  2. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  3. Antibiosis Contributes to Biological Control of Fire Blight by Pantoea agglomerans Strain Eh252 in Orchards.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, V O; Johnson, K B; Sugar, D; Loper, J E

    2002-11-01

    ABSTRACT Fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, is the most serious bacterial disease of pear and apple trees. Biological control with strains of Pantoea agglomerans (syn. Erwinia herbicola) may provide an effective disease management strategy for fire blight. Most strains of P. agglomerans evaluated for suppression of fire blight produce compounds that inhibit the growth of E. amylovora in culture. The role of these inhibitory compounds in fire blight suppression in orchard environments has not been studied. In seven field trials in Oregon, we compared the population dynamics and disease suppression with P. agglomerans Eh252, a strain that produces a single antibiotic, with its near-isogenic antibiotic-deficient derivative, strain 10:12. Water or suspensions of Eh252 or 10:12 (1 x 10(8) CFU/ml) were applied at 30 and 70% bloom to pear or apple trees. Aqueous suspensions of freeze-dried cells of E. amylovora (3 x 10(5) CFU/ml) were applied at full bloom. Additional trees were treated with streptomycin or oxytetracycline at 30 and 70% bloom and in some experiments, 1 day after application of the pathogen. Population sizes of Eh252 or 10:12 on pear blossoms were estimated by spreading dilutions of blossom washes on culture media. Average population sizes of Eh252 and 10:12 on blossoms ranged from 10(5) to 10(7) CFU, and in five of six trials, the relative area under the population curve of Eh252 was not significantly different than that of its derivative 10:12. Both Eh252 and 10:12 reduced the growth of the pathogen on blossoms compared with inoculated water-treated controls. Eh252 significantly decreased the incidence of fire blight in six of seven field trials compared with the incidence on water-treated trees, and 10:12 similarly reduced the incidence of fire blight in four of seven trials. In three of seven field trials, trees treated with Eh252 had a significantly lower incidence of fire blight compared with trees treated 3 with 10:12. Overall,3 Eh252 reduced

  4. Molecular cloning, structural analysis, and expression in Escherichia coli of a chitinase gene from Enterobacter agglomerans.

    PubMed Central

    Chernin, L S; De la Fuente, L; Sobolev, V; Haran, S; Vorgias, C E; Oppenheim, A B; Chet, I

    1997-01-01

    The gene chiA, which codes for endochitinase, was cloned from a soilborne Enterobacter agglomerans. Its complete sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme designated Chia_Entag yielded an open reading frame coding for 562 amino acids of a 61-kDa precursor protein with a putative leader peptide at its N terminus. The nucleotide and polypeptide sequences of Chia_Entag showed 86.8 and 87.7% identity with the corresponding gene and enzyme, Chia_Serma, of Serratia marcescens, respectively. Homology modeling of Chia_Entag's three-dimensional structure demonstrated that most amino acid substitutions are at solvent-accessible sites. Escherichia coli JM109 carrying the E. agglomerans chiA gene produced and secreted Chia_Entag. The antifungal activity of the secreted endochitinase was demonstrated in vitro by inhibition of Fusarium oxysporum spore germination. The transformed strain inhibited Rhizoctonia solani growth on plates and the root rot disease caused by this fungus in cotton seedlings under greenhouse conditions. PMID:9055404

  5. [A case of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to Pantoea agglomerans].

    PubMed

    Kurşun, Ozlem; Unal, Nesrin; Cesur, Salih; Altın, Nilgün; Canbakan, Başol; Argun, Cem; Koldaş, Kamer; Sencan, Irfan

    2012-04-01

    Pantoea species, which are the members of Enterobacteriaceae family are gram-negative bacilli that are frequently found on many plants and in soil. They may lead to localized infections in healthy subjects and systemic infections in immunosuppressed patients. In this case report a ventilator-associated pneumoniae due to Pantoea agglomerans was presented. A 55 year-old male patient with chronic renal failure was hospitalized in intensive care unit following cardiopulmonary arrest. The patient developed fever (38.8°C), had pulmonary infiltrations in chest X-ray and leucocytosis. Treatment with piperacillintazobactam was initiated upon diagnosis of nosocomial pneumoniae. Bacterial growth from the deep tracheal aspirate of the patient was identified as P.agglomerans by VITEK2 automated system (bioMérieux, France) and the identification was confirmed by conventional microbiological methods. Since the strain was susceptible to the cephoperazon-sulbactam, tobramycin, tetracycline, gentamicin and levofloxacine, the treatment was changed to levofloxacine and cephoperazon-sulbactam and the patient improved. This case was presented to withdraw attention to rare opportunistic pathogens that may lead to nosocomial infections particularly in patients with underlying diseases. PMID:22639319

  6. PV at the Pentagon

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, J.

    2000-02-01

    The US Department of Defense joins the battle against global warming with a photovoltaic installation at the Pentagon heating and refrigeration plant. Sitting in a line between the Pentagon and the Oval Office are four concentric arcs of iridescent silicon. In June 1999, the first half of this thirty kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) system was dedicated on the grounds of the heating and refrigeration plant that serves the Pentagon near Washington, DC. This first half of the system (the two center arcs) is the world's largest array composed solely of Ascension Technology's SunSine{reg{underscore}sign}300 AC modules. Each of these photovoltaic panels has its own DC to AC inverter mounted directly on its back side. The second half of the installation, brought on line in October 1999, includes a conventional DC array that powers a pair of newly developed Trace Technologies 10 kW inverters. The AC output of these two unique PV systems is combined at a central collection point and funneled into the electric grid that supplies power to the Pentagon. The project is a collaboration of the US Department of Defense (DoD) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), with cost-sharing support from Virginia Power, Johnson Controls, the Utility Photovoltaic Group (UPVG), and Applied Power Corporation. The systems were designed and installed by Ascension Technology, a division of Applied Power Corporation, with modules supplied by ASE Americas. This installation provides a unique real-world environment for researchers, utility engineers and power plant managers to test and compare the reliability, scalability, noise immunity and power quality of these two distinct approaches to PV energy production.

  7. Development of species-, strain- and antibiotic biosynthesis-specific quantitative PCR assays for Pantoea agglomerans as tools for biocontrol monitoring.

    PubMed

    Braun-Kiewnick, Andrea; Lehmann, Andreas; Rezzonico, Fabio; Wend, Chris; Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2012-09-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is a cosmopolitan plant epiphytic bacterium that includes some of the most effective biological antagonists against the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora, a major threat to pome fruit production worldwide. Strain E325 is commercially available as Bloomtime Biological™ in the USA and Canada. New quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed for species- and strain -specific detection in the environment, and for detection of indigenous strains carrying the biocontrol antibacterial peptide biosynthesis gene paaA. The qPCR assays were highly specific, efficient and sensitive, detecting fewer than three cells per reaction or 700 colony forming units per flower, respectively. The qPCR assays were tested on field samples, giving first indications to the incidence of P. agglomerans E325 related strains, total P. agglomerans and pantocin A producing bacteria in commercial orchards. These assays will facilitate monitoring the environmental behavior of biocontrol P. agglomerans after orchard application for disease protection, proprietary strain-tracking, and streamlined screening for discovery of new biocontrol strains. PMID:22705381

  8. Identification of Candida tropicalis BH-6 and synergistic effect with Pantoea agglomerans BH-18 on hydrogen production in marine culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Daling; Ma, Yingchao; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua

    2015-03-01

    A marine yeast was isolated from mangrove sludge and named Candida tropicalis BH-6. The optimum temperature and the initial pH value for growth of the isolated strain were 37 °C and 5.0, respectively. The strain had high salt tolerance and could survive at NaCl concentrations of 0-6 %. Additionally, the yield of hydrogen production by C. tropicalis BH-6 was only 66.30 ml/l. However, when the yeast was mixed with Pantoea agglomerans BH-18, hydrogen production increased significantly to a maximum of 1707.5 ml/l, which was 36.94 and 247.54 % higher than the monoculture of P. agglomerans BH-18 and C. tropicalis BH-6, respectively. Taken together, these results revealed that in mixed culture, the yeast strain isolated from the same ecosystem as P. agglomerans BH-18 likely consumed the organic acids produced by fermentation, thus eliminating the factor inhibiting hydrogen production by P. agglomerans BH-18. As a result, the yield of hydrogen production during mixed culture increased significantly. PMID:25561052

  9. Evidence that antibiotic of Pantoea agglomerans E325 is produced and active against Erwinia amylovora on stigmas of pomaceous blossoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325, the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight, previously was shown to produce a unique pH-sensitive inhibitor in vitro that is specific to E. amylovora. To evaluate antibiosis as a mode of antagonism of E325, Tn5 mutagenesis was used to generate...

  10. Potential of osmoadaptation for improving Pantoea agglomerans E325 as biocontrol agent for fire blight of apple and pear

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans biocontrol strain E325 is the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight, a destructive disease of apple and pear initiated by Erwinia amylovora in flowers. Osmoadaptation, involving the combination of saline osmotic stress and osmolyte amendment to growth media, w...

  11. PV water pumping: NEOS Corporation recent PV water pumping activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, C.

    1995-11-01

    NEOS Corporation has been very active in PV-powered water pumping, particularly with respect to electric utilities. Most of the recent activity has been through the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN). The PSN is an independent, not-for-profit organization comprised of all types of electric utilities: rural electric coops, public power districts, investor-owned utilities, and power marketing agencies. The PSN`s mission is to work pro-actively to promote utility involvement in PV through education and training. PV information is distributed by the PSN in three primary forms: (1) consultation with PSN technical service representatives: (2) literature generated by the PSN; and (3) literature published by other organizations. The PSN can also provide assistance to members in developing PV customer service programs. The PSN`s product support activities include consolidation of information on existing packaged PV systems and facilitation of the development of new PV product packages that meet utility-defined specifications for cost performance, and reliability. The PSN`s initial product support efforts will be focused on commercially available packaged PV systems for a variety of off-grid applications. In parallel with this effort, if no products exist that meet the PSN`s functional specifications, the PSN will initiate the second phase of product development support process by encouraging the development of new packaged systems. Through these services and product support activities, the PSN anticipates engaging all segments for the PV industry, thus providing benefits to PV systems suppliers as well as local PV service contractors.This paper describes field testing of pv power systems for water pumping.

  12. Outdoor PV Degradation Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Smith, R. M.; Osterwald, C. R.; Gelak, E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output; may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined; accurately. At the Performance and Energy Rating Testbed (PERT) at the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) at the; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 40 modules from more than 10 different manufacturers; were compared for their long-term outdoor stability. Because it can accommodate a large variety of modules in a; limited footprint the PERT system is ideally suited to compare modules side-by-side under the same conditions.

  13. Interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) architecture for PV devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Rui Q.; Tian, Zhaobing; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Klem, John F.

    2015-10-20

    A photovoltaic (PV) device, comprising a PV interband cascade (IC) stage, wherein the IC PV stage comprises an absorption region with a band gap, the absorption region configured to absorb photons, an intraband transport region configured to act as a hole barrier, and an interband tunneling region configured to act as an electron barrier. An IC PV architecture for a photovoltaic device, the IC PV architecture comprising an absorption region, an intraband transport region coupled to the absorption region, and an interband tunneling region coupled to the intraband transport region and to the adjacent absorption region, wherein the absorption region, the intraband transport region, and the interband tunneling region are positioned such that electrons will flow from the absorption region to the intraband transport region to the interband tunneling region.

  14. An unusual cause of peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients: Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Kazancioglu, Rumeyza; Buyukaydin, Banu; Iraz, Meryem; Alay, Murat; Erkoc, Reha

    2014-07-01

    Peritonitis is a serious infection and early diagnosis and treatment is mandatory. A variety of microorganisms are identified in these cases and during recent years a new one was included, Pantoea agglomerans. In this case report, a female patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis therapy with a peritonitis episode caused by this organism is described. The source of infection was thought to be due to contact of catheter with non-sterile surfaces. In microbiologic culture, this organism was identified and the patient successfully treated with a three week course of gentamicin therapy. The number of reported cases with this organism has increased in last years and various infection localizations and clinical progress patterns have been identified. In peritoneal dialysis patients presenting with peritonitis, this organism must be kept in mind. PMID:25022305

  15. Pressure-equalizing PV assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2004-10-26

    Each PV assembly of an array of PV assemblies comprises a base, a PV module and a support assembly securing the PV module to a position overlying the upper surface of the base. Vents are formed through the base. A pressure equalization path extends from the outer surface of the PV module, past the PV module, to and through at least one of the vents, and to the lower surface of the base to help reduce wind uplift forces on the PV assembly. The PV assemblies may be interengaged, such as by interengaging the bases of adjacent PV assemblies. The base may include a main portion and a cover and the bases of adjacent PV assemblies may be interengaged by securing the covers of adjacent bases together.

  16. PV module mounting method and mounting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.S.; Johnson, Kurt M.

    2013-04-23

    A method for mounting PV modules to a deck includes selecting PV module layout pattern so that adjacent PV module edges are spaced apart. PV mounting and support assemblies are secured to the deck according to the layout pattern using fasteners extending into the deck. The PV modules are placed on the PV mounting and support assemblies. Retaining elements are located over and secured against the upper peripheral edge surfaces of the PV modules so to secure them to the deck with the peripheral edges of the PV modules spaced apart from the deck. In some examples a PV module mounting assembly, for use on a shingled deck, comprises flashing, a base mountable on the flashing, a deck-penetrating fastener engageable with the base and securable to the deck so to secure the flashing and the base to the shingled deck, and PV module mounting hardware securable to the base.

  17. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  18. New therapeutic approaches in PV

    PubMed Central

    Falchi, Lorenzo; Newberry, Kate J.; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Polycytemia vera (PV) is one of the three Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Clinically, PV is an indolent disease but its course can be complicated by arterial and venous vascular accidents, evolution to myelofibrosis or leukemic transformation. Treatment of PV is, therefore, aimed at preventing such acute complications. The cornerstone of therapy of low-risk patients remains strict control of cardiovascular risk factors, the use of phlebotomy and low dose aspirin. Higher risk patients should also receive cytoreductive treatments. Hydroxyurea and interferon-α represent standard first-line options for newly diagnosed high-risk PV patients. Recommendations for patients who fail these therapies are less clearly defined. The discovery of a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (V617F) in almost all cases of PV has prompted the development of molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of these patients. In this review we will discuss key clinical aspects, the current therapeutic armamentarium and data on the use of novel agents in patients with PV. PMID:26297275

  19. Low concentrator PV optics optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Leonard; Chang, Ben

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Cost reduction is a major focus of the solar industry. Thin film technologies and concentration systems are viable ways to reducing cost, with unique strengths and weakness for both. Most of the concentrating PV work focuses on high concentration systems for reducing energy cost. Meanwhile, many believe that low concentrators provide significant cost reduction potential while addressing the mainstream PV market with a product that acts as a flat panel replacement. This paper analyzes the relative benefit of asymmetric vs. symmetric optics for low-concentrators in light of specific PV applications. Approach: Symmetric and asymmetric concentrating PV module performance is evaluated using computer simulation to determine potential value across various geographic locations and applications. The selected optic design is modeled against standard cSi flat panels and thin film to determine application fit, system level energy density and economic value. Results: While symmetric designs may seem ideal, asymmetric designs have an advantage in energy density. Both designs are assessed for aperture, optimum concentration ratio, and ideal system array configuration. Analysis of performance across climate specific effects (diffuse, direct and circumsolar) and location specific effects (sunpath) are also presented. The energy density and energy production of low concentrators provide a compelling value proposition. More significantly, the choice of optics for a low concentrating design can affect real world performance. With the goal of maximizing energy density and return on investment, this paper presents the advantages of asymmetric optic concentration and illustrates the value of this design within specific PV applications.

  20. Transmission of Pantoea ananatis and P. agglomerans, causal agents of center rot of onion (Allium cepa), by onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) through feces.

    PubMed

    Dutta, B; Barman, A K; Srinivasan, R; Avci, U; Ullman, D E; Langston, D B; Gitaitis, R D

    2014-08-01

    Frankliniella fusca, the tobacco thrips, has been shown to acquire and transmit Pantoea ananatis, one of the causal agents of the center rot of onion. Although Thrips tabaci, the onion thrips, is a common pest of onions, its role as a vector of P. ananatis has been unknown. The bacterium, P. agglomerans, is also associated with the center rot of onion, but its transmission by thrips has not been previously investigated. In this study, we investigated the relationship of T. tabaci with P. ananatis and P. agglomerans. Surface-sterilized T. tabaci were provided with various acquisition access periods (AAP) on onion leaves inoculated with either P. ananatis or P. agglomerans. A positive exponential relationship was observed between thrips AAP duration and P. ananatis (R² = 0.967; P = 0.023) or P. agglomerans acquisition (R² = 0.958; P = 0.017). Transmission experiments conducted with T. tabaci adults indicated that 70% of the seedlings developed center rot symptoms 15 days after inoculation. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to P. ananatis revealed that the bacterium was localized only in the gut of T. tabaci adults. Mechanical inoculation of onion seedlings with fecal rinsates alone produced center rot but not with salivary secretions. Together these results suggested that T. tabaci could efficiently transmit P. ananatis and P. agglomerans. PMID:24548212

  1. Lightweight flexible rooftop PV module

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.; Ovshinsky, H.C.; Whelan, K.

    1994-12-31

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) and United Solar Systems Corp. (United Solar) are developing lightweight, flexible photovoltaic modules that can replace conventional roofing materials and be economically and aesthetically integrated into residential and commercial buildings. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency multi-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. These cells are produced on thin, flexible, stainless steel substrates. Two types of products 1 ft by 10 ft overlapping PV shingles and 1.3 ft by 20 ft PV roof panels are being developed by United Solar and ECD, respectively. United Solar`s shingle type design uses a roof mounting procedures similar to those used with conventional asphalt shingles, while ECD`s PV panel uses mounting procedures conforming to metal roof systems. Thus, they can be installed on roof sheathings, replacing ordinary shingles or metal roofing panels, on a standard wood roof construction.

  2. Diversity of endophytic bacteria from Eucalyptus species seeds and colonization of seedlings by Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Anderson; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Oda, Shinitiro; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2008-10-01

    The diversity and beneficial characteristics of endophytic microorganisms have been studied in several host plants. However, information regarding naturally occurring seed-associated endophytes and vertical transmission among different life-history stages of hosts is limited. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from seeds and seedlings of 10 Eucalyptus species and two hybrids. The results showed that endophytic bacteria, such as Bacillus, Enterococcus, Paenibacillus and Methylobacterium, are vertically transferred from seeds to seedlings. In addition, the endophytic bacterium Pantoea agglomerans was tagged with the gfp gene, inoculated into seeds and further reisolated from seedlings. These results suggested a novel approach to change the profile of the plants, where the bacterium is a delivery vehicle for desired traits. This is the first report of an endophytic bacterial community residing in Eucalyptus seeds and the transmission of these bacteria from seeds to seedlings. The bacterial species reported in this work have been described as providing benefits to host plants. Therefore, we suggest that endophytic bacteria can be transmitted vertically from seeds to seedlings, assuring the support of the bacterial community in the host plant. PMID:18710397

  3. Pantoea agglomerans strain EH318 produces two antibiotics that inhibit Erwinia amylovora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wright, S A; Zumoff, C H; Schneider, L; Beer, S V

    2001-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans (synonym: Erwinia herbicola) strain Eh318 produces through antibiosis a complex zone of inhibited growth in an overlay seeded with Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. This zone is caused by two antibiotics, named pantocin A and B. Using a genomic library of Eh318, two cosmids, pCPP702 and pCPP704, were identified that conferred on Escherichia coli the ability to inhibit growth of E. amylovora. The two cosmids conferred different antibiotic activities on E. coli DH5alpha and had distinct restriction enzyme profiles. A smaller, antibiotic-conferring DNA segment from each cosmid was cloned. Each subclone was characterized and mutagenized with transposons to generate clones that were deficient in conferring pantocin A and B production, respectively. Mutated subclones were introduced into Eh318 to create three antibiotic-defective marker exchange mutants: strain Eh421 (pantocin A deficient); strain Eh439 (pantocin B deficient), and Eh440 (deficient in both pantocins). Cross-hybridization results, restriction maps, and spectrum-of-activity data using the subclones and marker exchange mutants, supported the presence of two distinct antibiotics, pantocin A and pantocin B, whose biosynthetic genes were present in pCPP702 and pCPP704, respectively. The structure of pantocin A is unknown, whereas that of pantocin B has been determined as (R)-N-[((S)-2-amino-propanoylamino)-methyl]-2-methanesulfonyl-s uccina mic acid. The two pantocins mainly affect other enteric bacteria, based on limited testing. PMID:11133457

  4. Anaerobic pathways of glycerol dissimilation by Enterobacter agglomerans CNCM 1210: limitations and regulations.

    PubMed

    Barbirato, F; Astruc, S; Soucaille, P; Camarasa, C; Salmon, J M; Bories, A

    1997-07-01

    Continuous cultures of Enterobacter agglomerans CNCM 1210 were performed under regulated pH conditions (pH 7.0) with glycerol or glucose (20 g l-1) as carbon source. Cultures grown on glucose produced mainly acetate, ethanol and formate. In contrast, 1,3-propanediol (PPD) was the main product with glycerol. The carbon flow distribution at branching metabolic points was investigated. Higher PPD yields with increased dilution rate were correlated with an important increase in the relative ratio of glycerol dehydratase to glycerol dehydrogenase. Determination of intracellular triose-phosphate and fructose 1,6-biphosphate concentrations demonstrated that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is the limiting step in glycerol dissimilation. At the pyruvate branching point, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity was systematically detected. The pyruvate flow shifted to PDH is suspected to represent up to 22% of the acetyl-CoA formed. In addition, this enzyme pattern combined with the enhanced in vivo lactate dehydrogenase activity at high growth rates, was correlated with a decrease in the pyruvate formate-lyase activity. A regulation of this latter enzyme by the accumulation of triose-phosphate is suspected. PMID:9245823

  5. Indole affects the formation of multicellular aggregate structures in Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuemei; Jiang, Jing; Liang, Chen; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Jieru; Shen, Delong; Feng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19 is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rice. As well as having the ability to form a biofilm, as do most bacteria, it is characterized by the formation of a unique multicellular aggregate structure called symplasmata. Indole is traditionally known as a metabolite of the amino acid tryptophan, which, however, has recently been shown to participate in various regulations of bacterial physiological processes, including stress resistance, quorum sensing and biofilm formation. Here, an indole signal was found to promote symplasmata formation, yet inhibit biofilm formation, indicating different regulatory pathways of indole in the construction of the two structures. However, symplasmata showed almost an equivalent stress-resistant capability, as compared with biofilms, for YS19 to confront acids, heavy metals (Cu(2+)), and UV treatments. Moreover, indole was tested to show a promoting effect on exopolysaccharides (EPS) production and an inhibition effect on the expression of an outer membrane protein OmpW. These results provide evidence for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of indole on such multicellular aggregates. PMID:26923129

  6. Phenotypic comparison of clinical and plant-beneficial strains of Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Bonaterra, Anna; Badosa, Esther; Rezzonico, Fabio; Duffy, Brion; Montesinos, Emilio

    2014-06-01

    Certain strains of Pantoea are used as biocontrol agents for the suppression of plant diseases. However, their commercial registration is hampered in some countries because of biosafety concerns. This study compares clinical and plant-beneficial strains of P. agglomerans and related species using a phenotypic analysis approach in which plant-beneficial effects, adverse effects in nematode models, and toxicity were evaluated. Plant-beneficial effects were determined as the inhibition of apple fruit infection by Penicillium expansum and apple flower infection by Erwinia amylovora. Clinical strains had no general inhibitory activity against infection by the fungal or bacterial plant pathogens, as only one clinical strain inhibited P. expansum and three inhibited E. amylovora. By contrast, all biocontrol strains showed activity against at least one of the phytopathogens, and three strains were active against both. The adverse effects in animals were evaluated in the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne javanica and the bacterial-feeding nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Both models indicated adverse effects of the two clinical strains but not of any of the plant-beneficial strains. Toxicity was evaluated by means of hemolytic activity in blood, and genotoxicity with the Ames test. None of the strains, whether clinical or plant-beneficial, showed any evidence of toxicity. PMID:26418852

  7. Controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans E325 for biocontrol of fire blight disease of apple.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Yong; Pusey, Paul Lawrence; Zhao, Youfu; Korban, Schuyler S; Choi, Hyungsoo; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin

    2012-07-10

    Microencapsulation and controlled release of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 (E325), an antagonist to the bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora that causes fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear, have been investigated. Uniform core-shell alginate microcapsules (AMCs), 60-300 μm in diameter, were fabricated to encapsulate E325 within the core, along with nutrients, to preserve viability and promote proliferation. Controlled release of E325 was achieved by separately adjusting alginate concentrations in the shell and core solutions, and by modifying the AMC size. Viability of E325 was monitored via fluorescent staining, revealing either lack of or minimal stress during or after encapsulation. Proliferation of E325 within AMCs, followed by their subsequent release, and colonization activities within confines of apple flowers were studied under different encapsulation conditions using rfp-labeled E325 to obtain highly promising results. This study provided a 'proof of concept' of the successful use of a microencapsulated biocontrol agent, E325, against E. amylovora, and could serve as a model for further studies on the development of effective plant disease management strategies. PMID:22516094

  8. A novel beta-galactosidase capable of glycosyl transfer from Enterobacter agglomerans B1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Xiao, Min; Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Zhengyi; Li, Yumei

    2007-04-27

    A novel transglycosylating beta-galactosidase was purified from Enterobacter agglomerans B1. It was a homodimer of approximately 248 kDa. The optimal pH and temperature for oNPGal hydrolysis were 7.5-8.0 and 37-40 degrees C, respectively. The K(m) values for oNPGal and lactose were 0.06 and 114 mM, respectively. The enzyme produced galacto-oligosaccharides in a 38% yield at the lactose concentration of 12.5% (w/v). When using oNPGal as donor, the enzyme was able to catalyze glycosyl transfer to a series of acceptors, including hexose, pentose, beta- or alpha-disaccharides, hexahydroxy alcohol, cyclitol, and aromatic glycosides. This suggested the enzyme to be a potential synthetic tool for preparing galactose-containing chemicals. The gene encoding this enzyme was cloned by degenerate PCR and TAIL-PCR. It revealed an ORF of 3090 nucleotides encoding a 1029 amino-acid protein, which had been expressed in Escherichia coli. Transferase activities in both recombinant and natural enzymes were similar. PMID:17336932

  9. Physiologic Mechanisms Involved in Accumulation of 3-Hydroxypropionaldehyde during Fermentation of Glycerol by Enterobacter agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Barbirato, F.; Soucaille, P.; Bories, A.

    1996-01-01

    When grown in 700 mM glycerol within the pH range 6.0 to 7.5, anaerobic pH-regulated cultures of Enterobacter agglomerans exhibited an extracellular accumulation of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA). This phenomenon, which causes fermentation cessation, occurred earlier when pH was low. In contrast, substrate consumption was complete at pH 8. Levels of glycerol-catabolizing enzymes, i.e., glycerol dehydrogenase and dihydroxyacetone kinase for the oxidative route and glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase for the reductive route, as well as the nucleotide pools were determined periodically in the pH 7- and pH 8-regulated cultures. A NAD/NADH ratio of 1.7 was correlated with the beginning of the production of the inhibitory metabolite. Further accumulation was dependent on the ratio of glycerol dehydratase activity to 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase activity. For a ratio higher than 1, 3-HPA was produced until fermentation ceased, which occurred for the pH 7-regulated culture. At pH 8, a value below 1 was noticed and 3-HPA accumulation was transient, while the NAD/NADH ratio decreased. The low rate of glycerol dissimilation following the appearance of 3-HPA in the culture medium was attributed to the strong inhibitory effect exerted by 3-HPA on glycerol dehydrogenase activity. PMID:16535461

  10. Comparison of Pyranometers vs. PV Reference Cells for Evaluation of PV Array Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, L.; Gostein, M.; Emery, K.

    2012-09-01

    As the photovoltaics (PV) industry has grown, the need for accurately monitoring the solar resource of PV power plants has increased. Historically, the PV industry has relied on thermopile pyranometers for irradiance measurements, and a large body of historical irradiance data taken with pyranometers exists. However, interest in PV reference devices is increasing. In this paper, we discuss why PV reference devices are better suited for PV applications, and estimate the typical uncertainties in irradiance measurements made with both pyranometers and PV reference devices. We assert that the quantity of interest in monitoring a PV power plant is the equivalent irradiance under the IEC 60904-3 reference solar spectrum that would produce the same electrical response in the PV array as the incident solar radiation. For PV-plant monitoring applications, we find the uncertainties in irradiance measurements of this type to be on the order of +/-5% for thermopile pyranometers and +/-2.4% for PV reference devices.

  11. Grid Integrated Distributed PV (GridPV) Version 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Coogan, Kyle

    2014-12-01

    This manual provides the documentation of the MATLAB toolbox of functions for using OpenDSS to simulate the impact of solar energy on the distribution system. The majority of the functio ns are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in th e OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions. Each function i n the toolbox is documented with the function use syntax, full description, function input list, function output list, example use, and example output.

  12. Lightweight IMM PV Flexible Blanket Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) photovoltaic (PV) integrated modular blanket assembly (IMBA) that can be rolled or z-folded. This IMM PV IMBA technology enables a revolutionary flexible PV blanket assembly that provides high specific power, exceptional stowed packaging efficiency, and high-voltage operation capability. DSS's technology also accommodates standard third-generation triple junction (ZTJ) PV device technologies to provide significantly improved performance over the current state of the art. This SBIR project demonstrated prototype, flight-like IMM PV IMBA panel assemblies specifically developed, designed, and optimized for NASA's high-voltage solar array missions.

  13. Heritage Park Facilities PV Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hobaica, Mark

    2013-09-26

    Project Objective: To procure a photovoltaic array (PV) system which will generate approximately 256kW of power to be used for the operations of the Aquatic Complex and the adjacent Senior Facility at the Heritage Park. This project complies with the EERE’s work and objectives by promoting the development and deployment of an energy system that will provide current and future generations with clean, efficient, affordable, and reliable energy.

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on cotransport of Pantoea agglomerans cells and Zn through clean and iron oxide coated sand columns.

    PubMed

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2012-12-18

    Recent observations that subsurface bacteria quickly adsorb metal contaminants raise concerns that they may enhance metal transport, given the high mobility of bacteria themselves. However, metal adsorption to bacteria is also reversible, suggesting that mobility within porous medium will depend on the interplay between adsorption-desorption kinetics and thermodynamic driving forces for adsorption. Till now there has been no systematic investigation of these important interactions. This study investigates the thermodynamic and kinetic controls of cotransport of Pantoea agglomerans cells and Zn in quartz and iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) packed columns. Batch kinetic studies show that significant Zn sorption on IOCS takes place within two hours. Adsorption onto P. agglomerans surfaces reaches equilibrium within 30 min. Experiments in flow through quartz sand systems demonstrate that bacteria have negligible effect on zinc mobility, regardless of ionic strength and pH conditions. Zinc transport exhibits significant retardation in IOCS columns at high pH in the absence of cells. Yet, when mobile bacteria (non attached) are passed through simultaneously with zinc, no facilitated transport is observed. Adsorption onto cells becomes significant and plays a role in mobile metal speciation only once the IOCS is saturated with zinc. This suggests that IOCS exhibits stronger affinity for Zn than cell surfaces. However, when bacteria and Zn are preassociated on entering the column, zinc transport is initially facilitated. Subsequently, zinc partly desorbs from the cells and redistributes onto the IOCS as a result of the higher thermodynamic affinity for IOCS. PMID:23153272

  15. Control of Diatraea saccharalis by the endophytic Pantoea agglomerans 33.1 expressing cry1Ac7.

    PubMed

    Quecine, M C; Araújo, W L; Tsui, S; Parra, J R P; Azevedo, J L; Pizzirani-Kleiner, A A

    2014-04-01

    Despite the fact that Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is found in more than 90 % of the products used against insects, it has some difficulty reaching the internal regions where the larvae feed. To solve this problem, many genetically modified microorganisms that colonize the same pests have been developed. Thus, the endophytic bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (33.1), which has been recently described as a promising sugarcane growth promoter, was genetically modified with the pJTT vector (which carries the gene cry1Ac7) to control the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis. Firstly, the bioassays for D. saccharalis control by 33.1:pJTT were conducted with an artificial diet. A new in vivo methodology was also developed, which confirmed the partial control of larvae by 33.1:pJTT. The 33.1:pJTT strain was inoculated into sugarcane stalks containing the D. saccharalis larvae. In the sugarcane stalks, 33.1:pJTT was able to increase the mortality of D. saccharalis larvae, impair larval development and decrease larval weight. Sugarcane seedlings were inoculated with 33.1:pJTT, and re-isolation confirmed the capacity of 33.1:pJTT to continuously colonize the sugarcane. These results prove that P. agglomerans (33.1), a sugarcane growth promoter, can be improved by expressing the Cry protein, and the resulting strain is able to control the sugarcane borer. PMID:24531524

  16. [Ability of representatives of Pantoea agglomerans, as well as Bacillus subtilis and some Pseudomonas species to suppress the development of phytopathgenic bacteria and micromycetes in regulating plant growth].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, V M; Alimov, D M

    2000-01-01

    The ability of representatives of Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola (Lohnis) Dye [21]), Bacillus subtilis and some species of Pseudomonas genus to inhibit the growth of phytopathogenic bacteria and micromycetes and to regulate the growth of plants has been comparatively studied. The ability to inhibit the growth of mycellium of phytopathogenic Fusarium avenaceum, F. gibbosum, F. oxysporum was found out in all of 13 investigated strains of P. agglomerans, while the growth of F. culmorum is inhibited by 2 strains and Bipolaris sorokiniana is inhibited by 7 strains. The strains of P. agglomerans and Bacillus subtilis inhibit the growth of mycellium of these mycromycetes to the greater extent than the representatives of Pseudomonas genus. The mycellium growth of B. sorokiniana is better inhibited by B. subtilis and representatives of Pseudomonas genus. Besides the antifungal action 8 strains of P. agglomerans manifested the antagonistic activity in respect to phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and representatives of genera Clavibacter, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas and also in respect to the microflora which is present in the cabbage and wheat seeds. The strains have been revealed which, parallel with high antagonistic activity in respect to phytopathogenic micromycetes and bacteria, stimulate the seed germination and increase the weight of the cabbage and wheat sprouts. PMID:11421000

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Copper-Resistant Marine Bacterium, Pantoea agglomerans Strain LMAE-2, a Bacterial Strain with Potential Use in Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Corsini, Gino; Valdés, Natalia; Pradel, Paulina; Tello, Mario; Cottet, Luis; Karahanian, Eduardo; Castillo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans LMAE-2 was isolated from seabed sediment moderately contaminated with Cu2+. Here, we report its draft genome sequence, which has a size of 4.98 Mb. The presence of cop genes related with copper homeostasis in its genome may explain the resistance and strengthen its potential for use as bioremediation agent. PMID:27313292

  18. [Seven cases of port-a-cath contamination caused by Pantoea agglomerans in the Oncological Service of Iseo Hospital, Brescia (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Izzo, Ilaria; Lania, Donatella; Castro, Antonino; Lanzini, Fernanda; Bella, Daniele; Pagani, Adriano; Colombini, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a gram negative bacillus in the Enterobacteriaceae family, has been isolated from feculent material, plants and soil. Soft tissue and bone-joint infections due to P. agglomerans following penetrating trauma by vegetation and bacteraemia in association with intravenous fluid, total parenteral nutrition, blood products and anaesthetic agent contamination have been reported. Between October 2009 and January 2010 seven cases of port a cath contamination caused by P. agglomerans were observed in the Oncological Service of our hospital. All patients presented with septic fever after heparinization of the central venous catheter. 5/7 patients were female; mean age was 67 years (range 58-75). 6/7 patients were affected by colorectal adenocarcinoma, 1/7 by mammarian cancer. Mean time from CVC insertion was 23.8 months (range 13-42) at the time of fever. In three cases, port a cath was removed following the oncologist prescription. P. agglomerans was isolated from the catheter tip in one case and from CVC blood culture in 6-7 cases. In all cases peripheral blood cultures were negative. Patients were treated with ciprofloxacin lock therapy and systemic therapy (per os), obtaining negative cultures from port a cath. Notwithstanding the absence of isolation of Pantoea strains from environmental cultures, after educational intervention, which underlined some faulty procedures in CVC management, no further cases were observed. PMID:24955805

  19. Preventive and curative activity of combined treatments of sodium carbonates and Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 to control postharvest green mold of citrus fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preventive and curative activity of 2 min dips in 3% sodium carbonate (SC) or sodium bicarbonate (SBC) aqueous solutions heated to 40ºC, alone of followed by the application of 2 x 108 CFU/ml of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 (BA), in the control of postharvest green mold, caused by ...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of a Copper-Resistant Marine Bacterium, Pantoea agglomerans Strain LMAE-2, a Bacterial Strain with Potential Use in Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Gino; Valdés, Natalia; Pradel, Paulina; Tello, Mario; Cottet, Luis; Muiño, Laura; Karahanian, Eduardo; Castillo, Antonio; Gonzalez, Alex R

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans LMAE-2 was isolated from seabed sediment moderately contaminated with Cu(2+) Here, we report its draft genome sequence, which has a size of 4.98 Mb. The presence of cop genes related with copper homeostasis in its genome may explain the resistance and strengthen its potential for use as bioremediation agent. PMID:27313292

  1. PV output smoothing with energy storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2012-03-01

    This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

  2. Ensuring Quality of PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Hacke, P.; Kempe, M.; Sample, T.; Yamamichi, M.; Kondo, M.; Doi, T.; Otani, K.; Amano, J.

    2011-07-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) customers need to have confidence in the PV modules they purchase. Currently, no test can quantify a module's lifetime with confidence, but stress tests are routinely used to differentiate PV product designs. We suggest that the industry would be strengthened by using the wisdom of the community to develop a single set of tests that will help customers quantify confidence in PV products. This paper evaluates the need for quality assurance (QA) standards and suggests a path for creating these. Two types of standards are needed: 1) QA of the module design and 2) QA of the manufacturing process.

  3. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  4. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  5. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  6. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  7. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  8. In vitro adsorption revealing an apparent strong interaction between endophyte Pantoea agglomerans YS19 and host rice.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuxuan; Zhou, Jia; Chen, Cuicui; Shen, Delong; Song, Wei; Feng, Yongjun

    2008-12-01

    Pantoea (formerly Enterobacter) agglomerans YS19 is a dominant diazotrophic endophyte isolated from rice (Oryza sativa cv. Yuefu) grown in a temperate-climate region in west Beijing, China. In vitro adsorption and invasion of YS19 on host plant root were studied in this research. Adsorption of YS19 on rice seedling roots closely resembled the Langmuir adsorption and showed a higher adsorption quantity than the control strains Paenibacillus polymyxa WY110 (a rhizospheric bacterium from the same rice cultivar) and Escherichia coli HB101 (a general model bacterium). Adsorption dynamics study revealed high rates and a long duration of the YS19-rice root adsorption process. Adsorption of YS19 was mainly observed on the root hair, though which it enters the plant. This in vitro adsorption study revealed an apparent strong interaction between YS19 and rice at the early endophyte-host recognition stage. PMID:18781359

  9. Characterization and properties of intracellular proteins after cold acclimation of the ice-nucleating bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) IFO12686.

    PubMed

    Koda, N; Aoki, M; Kawahara, H; Yamade, K; Obata, H

    2000-11-01

    The ice-nucleating bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) IFO12686 (INA(+)) responds to a decrease in temperature by the induction of proteins. The pattern of protein bands from strain IFO12686 following a shift in temperature from 30 to 12 degrees C could be divided into four major groups: (1) increasing protein bands, (2) decreasing protein bands, (3) increasing--decreasing protein bands, and (4) almost constant protein bands. We identified a cryoprotective function in the increasing protein band found in strain IFO12686. The increasing protein bands that followed a reduction in temperature were considered to have an important role in cold acclimation or adaptation. We showed that these proteins possessed cryoprotective activity when tested against the freeze-labile enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The strain IFO12686 had greater cryotolerance than Pa. agglomerans IAM1595 (INA(-)), and the degree of cryotolerance was increased by cold acclimation. PMID:11161552

  10. Draft Genome Assemblies of Enterobacter aerogenes CDC 6003-71, Enterobacter cloacae CDC 442-68, and Pantoea agglomerans UA 0804-01.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae are environmental and enteric microbes. We sequenced the genomes of two Enterobacter reference strains, E. aerogenes CDC 6003-71 and E. cloacae CDC 442-68, as well as one near neighbor used as an exclusionary reference for diagnostics, Pantoea agglomerans CDC UA0804-01. The genome sizes range from 4.72 to 5.55 Mbp and have G+C contents from 54.6 to 55.1%. PMID:25342683

  11. Degradation of acephate by Enterobacter asburiae, Bacillus cereus and Pantoea agglomerans isolated from diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (L), a pest of cruciferous crops.

    PubMed

    Ramya, Shanivarsanthe Leelesh; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Murthy, Kottilingam Srinivasa; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Varghese, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Acephate-degrading bacterial isolates were isolated from the larval gut of diamondback moth Plutella xylostella, a notorious pest of cruciferous crops worldwide that has developed resistance to insecticides. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified the isolates as Bacillus cereus (PX-B.C.Or), Enterobacter asburiae (PXE), and Pantoae agglomerans (PX-Pt.ag.Jor). All isolates grew on minimal media (MM) in the presence of acephate at 100 and 200 ppm, with maximum growth at 200 ppm. LC-MS analyses of spent medium showed that E. asburiae degraded acephate to methamidophos and O, O-dimethyl phosporamidate and B. cereus O,S-dimethyl to phosphorothioate but P. agglomerans to an unnamed compound. All three isolates used acephate as a source of carbon and energy for growth; however, P. agglomerans used it also as source of sulphur. Strong evidence revealed that the bacterial communities present in the gut of diamondback moth might aid in acephate degradation and play a role in the development of insecticide resistance. PMID:27498509

  12. Jebel Ali Hotel PV lighting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, M.

    1984-05-01

    A large stand-alone PV lighting project was installed in June 1983 at the Jebel Ali Hotel in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. A high mast lighting system provides illumination for a 130 meter diameter traffic roundabout. The high mast system is powered by a 15 kilowatt peak array of Mobil Solar ribbon PV modules. Along the 700 meter access road leading to the hotel entrance, twenty-one PV powered streetlights provide low-level lighting. Each streetlight consists of a 20 watt fluorescent tube powered by two 35 Wp modules. Operation of both systems is completely automatic. Design, installation, and operating experience to date are reviewed.

  13. Terawatt Challenge for Thin-Film PV

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, K.

    2005-08-01

    The evolution of PV into one of the world's largest industries is not going to happen without major unforeseen problems. However, this study attempts to address the obvious ones, so that we can put aside the mythology of PV (for example, that it is only ''boutique power'' or that one must pave the world with it to be useful) and get on with changing the world's energy infrastructure. With the years of rapid market growth now under way in PV, the author is sure this will not be the last effort to understand the real potential and pitfalls of meeting the Challenge.

  14. PV Module Reliability Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its PV module reliability research. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed and recent publications are listed.

  15. Distributed PV Adoption in Maine Through 2021

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Pieter; Sigrin, Ben

    2015-11-06

    NREL has used its dSolar (distributed solar) model to generate low-medium-high estimates of distributed PV adoption in Maine through 2021. This presentation gives a high-level overview of the model and modeling results.

  16. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens - focus on cotton dust.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola) is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor) that cause

  17. PV System Energy Evaluation Method (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes a comparison of the "predicted" energy (based on historical weather data) with the "expected" energy (based on the measured weather data) to determine whether a PV system is performing as modeled in order to verify the accuracy of a model. A key factor in defining this energy test is determining the test boundary so that weather variations are not inadvertently included in what is considered to be PV system performance.

  18. Updating Technical Screens for PV Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Ellis, A.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Key, T.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hill, R.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-08-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) is the dominant type of distributed generation (DG) technology interconnected to electric distribution systems in the United States, and deployment of PV systems continues to increase rapidly. Considering the rapid growth and widespread deployment of PV systems in United States electric distribution grids, it is important that interconnection procedures be as streamlined as possible to avoid unnecessary interconnection studies, costs, and delays. Because many PV interconnection applications involve high penetration scenarios, the process needs to allow for a sufficiently rigorous technical evaluation to identify and address possible system impacts. Existing interconnection procedures are designed to balance the need for efficiency and technical rigor for all DG. However, there is an implicit expectation that those procedures will be updated over time in order to remain relevant with respect to evolving standards, technology, and practical experience. Modifications to interconnection screens and procedures must focus on maintaining or improving safety and reliability, as well as accurately allocating costs and improving expediency of the interconnection process. This paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offers potential short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen.

  19. PV Working with Industry, 2nd Quarter, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.; Moon, S.

    2000-06-29

    NREL PV Working With Industry is a quarterly newsletter devoted to the research, development, and deployment performed by NREL staff in concert with their industry and university partners. The Second Quarter, 2000, issue is titled ``Our Shared PV Future''. It contains a review of several important PV-related meetings held in the prior three months: the NCPV Program Review, the 16 European PV Conference, and year-2000 Earth Day activities in Denver, CO. The editorialist is Paul Maycock, Publisher of PV News.

  20. Kinetics of bacterial potentiometric titrations: the effect of equilibration time on buffering capacity of Pantoea agglomerans suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2011-07-15

    Several recent studies have made use of continuous acid-base titration data to describe the surface chemistry of bacterial cells as a basis for accurately modelling metal adsorption to bacteria and other biomaterials of potential industrial importance. These studies do not share a common protocol; rather they titrate in different pH ranges and they use different stability criteria to define equilibration time during titration. In the present study we investigate the kinetics of bacterial titrations and test the effect they have on the derivation of functional group concentrations and acidity constants. We titrated suspensions of Pantoea agglomerans by varying the equilibration time between successive titrant additions until stability of 0.1 or 0.001 mV s(-1) was attained. We show that under longer equilibration times, titration results are less reproducible and suspensions exhibit marginally higher buffering. Fluorescence images suggest that cell lysis is not responsible for these effects. Rather, high DOC values and titration reversibility hysterisis after long equilibration times suggest that variability in buffering is due to the presence of bacterial exudates, as demonstrated by titrating supernatants separated from suspensions of different equilibration times. It is recommended that an optimal equilibration time is always determined with variable stability control and preliminary reversibility titration experiments. PMID:21543082

  1. Pantoea agglomerans lipopolysaccharide maintains bone density in premenopausal women: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kazue; Nakata, Yoko; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Takeru; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide fromPantoea agglomerans (LPSp) facilitates Ca and P turnover in chicken calvaria and femurs. This study investigated osteoporosis prevention by the oral administration of LPSp in mice and in double-blind clinical tests. Using ovariectomized (OVX) osteoporosis mice model, we investigated the effects of LPSp on the bone density and Ca concentration after ingesting LPSp-containing water for 4 weeks. Oral administration of LPSp tended to suppress the decline in the bone density and the cortical bone thickness in the OVX mice. Moreover, the Ca concentrations were maintained in the OVX-LPSp mice. The effects of LPSp on bone turnover were tested in randomized and double-blind clinical test subjects, who were healthy women aged 40-79 years. The subjects ingested either soy milk without LPSp (control group) or with LPSp (LPSp group) for 3 months. The results showed that the LPSp group on premenopause maintained their bone density compared with the control group pre- and postmenopause. Moreover, these effects were maintained for 2 months postobservation. LPSp maintains bone volume and density in vivo. Thus, a combination of soy milk and LPSp may be useful for osteoporosis prevention. PMID:25493180

  2. [Enterobacter agglomerans B1 producing beta-galactosidase with transglycosylation activity: screening, identification, fermentation conditions, and galacto-oligosaccharides synthesis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Xiao, Min; Xu, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) are promising non-digestible oligosaccharides recognized as prebiotics. Commercial GOS containing galactose as subunit, are synthesized from lactose using the galactosyl-transferase activity of beta-galactosidase. A strain producing beta-galactosidase with transglycosylation activity was screened from the soil. Phenotypic analysis including morphology and physiology characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis were carried out. Based on taxonomy results, the strain was identified as Enterobacter agglomerans B1. Medium and fermentation conditions were optimized by single factor and orthogonal experiments. The enzyme reached 9.7 U/mL in the medium (pH 7.5) containing 1% lactose, 1% yeast extract, and 0.5% peptone when cultured at 25 degrees C for 26 h. Effects of pH, temperature, lactose concentration, and reaction time on transgalactosylation by whole cells were studied. Yield of GOS reached 40.7% in 30% lactose (pH 7.5) at 50 degrees C for 12 h, as analyzed by HPLC and TLC. The results of an MS analysis showed that GOS were composed of di, tri-, and tetrasaccharides. PMID:18338574

  3. Pantoea agglomerans lipopolysaccharide maintains bone density in premenopausal women: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Kazue; Nakata, Yoko; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Takeru; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide fromPantoea agglomerans (LPSp) facilitates Ca and P turnover in chicken calvaria and femurs. This study investigated osteoporosis prevention by the oral administration of LPSp in mice and in double-blind clinical tests. Using ovariectomized (OVX) osteoporosis mice model, we investigated the effects of LPSp on the bone density and Ca concentration after ingesting LPSp-containing water for 4 weeks. Oral administration of LPSp tended to suppress the decline in the bone density and the cortical bone thickness in the OVX mice. Moreover, the Ca concentrations were maintained in the OVX-LPSp mice. The effects of LPSp on bone turnover were tested in randomized and double-blind clinical test subjects, who were healthy women aged 40–79 years. The subjects ingested either soy milk without LPSp (control group) or with LPSp (LPSp group) for 3 months. The results showed that the LPSp group on premenopause maintained their bone density compared with the control group pre- and postmenopause. Moreover, these effects were maintained for 2 months postobservation. LPSp maintains bone volume and density in vivo. Thus, a combination of soy milk and LPSp may be useful for osteoporosis prevention. PMID:25493180

  4. DOE High Performance Concentrator PV Project

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.

    2005-08-01

    Much in demand are next-generation photovoltaic (PV) technologies that can be used economically to make a large-scale impact on world electricity production. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV) Project to substantially increase the viability of PV for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to both our energy supply and environment. To accomplish such results, the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices with the goal of enabling progress of high-efficiency technologies toward commercial-prototype products. We will describe the details of the subcontractor and in-house progress in exploring and accelerating pathways of III-V multijunction concentrator solar cells and systems toward their long-term goals. By 2020, we anticipate that this project will have demonstrated 33% system efficiency and a system price of $1.00/Wp for concentrator PV systems using III-V multijunction solar cells with efficiencies over 41%.

  5. PV performance modeling workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2011-05-01

    During the development of a solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project, predicting expected energy production from a system is a key part of understanding system value. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, annual energy yield (kWh/kWp) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. A number of PV system performance models have been developed and are in use, but little has been published on validation of these models or the accuracy and uncertainty of their output. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a PV Performance Modeling Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22-23, 2010. The workshop was intended to address the current state of PV system models, develop a path forward for establishing best practices on PV system performance modeling, and set the stage for standardization of testing and validation procedures for models and input parameters. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop, as well as examines opportunities for collaborative efforts to develop objective comparisons between models and across sites and applications.

  6. PV in the Netherlands, learning while growing

    SciTech Connect

    Kimman, J.T.N.; Horst, E.W. ter; Lysen, E.H.

    1994-12-31

    The main goal of the Netherlands Photovoltaic Program is to create conditions to let photovoltaic solar energy play an important role in the dutch energy supply for the 21st century. Four of the most important conditions are: to create social support; to achieve progress in solar cell and PV-system R and D; to create a market for stand-alone PV-systems; and to gain experience with grid-connected systems in the built environment. For the grid-connected systems a plan has been adopted to reach 250 MWp of installed solar capacity in 2010. The main purpose of this so-called PV pilot plan is not just a scaling up of the production volume but to reach specific learning goals. In this way the scaling-up is an important and justified by-product.

  7. Real time PV manufacturing diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kochergin, Vladimir; Crawford, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    The main obstacle Photovoltaic (PV) industry is facing at present is the higher cost of PV energy compared to that of fossil energy. While solar cell efficiencies continue to make incremental gains these improvements are so far insufficient to drive PV costs down to match that of fossil energy. Improved in-line diagnostics however, has the potential to significantly increase the productivity and reduce cost by improving the yield of the process. On this Phase I/Phase II SBIR project MicroXact developed and demonstrated at CIGS pilot manufacturing line a high-throughput in-line PV manufacturing diagnostic system, which was verified to provide fast and accurate data on the spatial uniformity of thickness, an composition of the thin films comprising the solar cell as the solar cell is processed reel-to-reel. In Phase II project MicroXact developed a stand-alone system prototype and demonstrated the following technical characteristics: 1) ability of real time defect/composition inconsistency detection over 60cm wide web at web speeds up to 3m/minute; 2) Better than 1mm spatial resolution on 60cm wide web; 3) an average better than 20nm spectral resolution resulting in more than sufficient sensitivity to composition imperfections (copper-rich and copper-poor regions were detected). The system was verified to be high vacuum compatible. Phase II results completely validated both technical and economic feasibility of the proposed concept. MicroXact’s solution is an enabling technique for in-line PV manufacturing diagnostics to increase the productivity of PV manufacturing lines and reduce the cost of solar energy, thus reducing the US dependency on foreign oil while simultaneously reducing emission of greenhouse gasses.

  8. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  9. Updating Interconnection Screens for PV System Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Ellis, A.; Hill, R.; Key, T.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-02-01

    This white paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offer short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen. Short-term and longer-term alternatives approaches are offered as examples; however, specific modifications to screening procedures should be discussed with stakeholders and must ultimately be adopted by state and federal regulatory bodies.

  10. International PV QA Task Force's Proposed Comparative Rating System for PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-10-01

    The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force is developing a rating system that provides comparative information about the relative durability of PV modules. Development of accelerated stress tests that can provide such comparative information is seen as a major step toward being able to predict PV module service life. This paper will provide details of the ongoing effort to determine the format of such an overall module rating system. The latest proposal is based on using three distinct climate zones as defined in IEC 60721-2-1 for two different mounting systems. Specific stresses beyond those used in the qualification tests are being developed for each of the selected climate zones.

  11. Colonization of wheat roots by an exopolysaccharide-producing pantoea agglomerans strain and its effect on rhizosphere soil aggregation

    PubMed

    Amellal; Burtin; Bartoli; Heulin

    1998-10-01

    The effect of bacterial secretion of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) on rhizosphere soil physical properties was investigated by inoculating strain NAS206, which was isolated from the rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum durum L.) growing in a Moroccan vertisol and was identified as Pantoea aglomerans. Phenotypic identification of this strain with the Biotype-100 system was confirmed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. After inoculation of wheat seedlings with strain NAS206, colonization increased at the rhizoplane and in root-adhering soil (RAS) but not in bulk soil. Colonization further increased under relatively dry conditions (20% soil water content; matric potential, -0.55 MPa). By means of genetic fingerprinting using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR, we were able to verify that colonies counted as strain NAS206 on agar plates descended from inoculated strain NAS206. The intense colonization of the wheat rhizosphere by these EPS-producing bacteria was associated with significant soil aggregation, as shown by increased ratios of RAS dry mass to root tissue (RT) dry mass (RAS/RT) and the improved water stability of adhering soil aggregates. The maximum effect of strain NAS206 on both the RAS/RT ratio and aggregate stability was measured at 24% average soil water content (matric potential, -0.20 MPa). Inoculated strain NAS206 improved RAS macroporosity (pore diameter, 10 to 30 &mgr;m) compared to the noninoculated control, particularly when the soil was nearly water saturated (matric potential, -0.05 MPa). Our results suggest that P. agglomerans NAS206 can play an important role in the regulation of the water content (excess or deficit) of the rhizosphere of wheat by improving soil aggregation. PMID:9758793

  12. Colonization of Wheat Roots by an Exopolysaccharide-Producing Pantoea agglomerans Strain and Its Effect on Rhizosphere Soil Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Amellal, N.; Burtin, G.; Bartoli, F.; Heulin, T.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of bacterial secretion of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) on rhizosphere soil physical properties was investigated by inoculating strain NAS206, which was isolated from the rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum durum L.) growing in a Moroccan vertisol and was identified as Pantoea aglomerans. Phenotypic identification of this strain with the Biotype-100 system was confirmed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. After inoculation of wheat seedlings with strain NAS206, colonization increased at the rhizoplane and in root-adhering soil (RAS) but not in bulk soil. Colonization further increased under relatively dry conditions (20% soil water content; matric potential, −0.55 MPa). By means of genetic fingerprinting using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR, we were able to verify that colonies counted as strain NAS206 on agar plates descended from inoculated strain NAS206. The intense colonization of the wheat rhizosphere by these EPS-producing bacteria was associated with significant soil aggregation, as shown by increased ratios of RAS dry mass to root tissue (RT) dry mass (RAS/RT) and the improved water stability of adhering soil aggregates. The maximum effect of strain NAS206 on both the RAS/RT ratio and aggregate stability was measured at 24% average soil water content (matric potential, −0.20 MPa). Inoculated strain NAS206 improved RAS macroporosity (pore diameter, 10 to 30 μm) compared to the noninoculated control, particularly when the soil was nearly water saturated (matric potential, −0.05 MPa). Our results suggest that P. agglomerans NAS206 can play an important role in the regulation of the water content (excess or deficit) of the rhizosphere of wheat by improving soil aggregation. PMID:9758793

  13. Partial purification and characterization of an inducible indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartic acid hydrolase from Enterobacter agglomerans

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Jyh-Ching |; Cohen, J.D.; Mulbry, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-amino acid conjugate hydrolases are believed to be important in the regulation of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) metabolism in plants and therefore have potential uses for the alteration of plant IAA metabolism. To isolate bacterial strains exhibiting significant indole-3-acetyl-aspartate (IAA-Asp) hydrolase activity, a sewage sludge inoculation was cultured under conditions in which IAA-Asp served as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. One isolate, Enterobacter agglomerans, showed hydrolase activity inducible by IAA-L-Asp or N-acetyl-L-Asp but not by IAA, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, urea, or indoleacetamide. Among a total of 17 IAA conjugates tested as potential substrates, the enzyme had an exclusively high substrate specificity for IAA-L-Asp of 13.5 mM. The optimal pH for this enzyme was between 8.0 and 8.5. In extraction buffer containing 0.8 mM Mg{sup 2+} the hydrolase activity was inhibited to 80% by 1 mM dithiothreitol and to 60% by 1 mm CuSO{sub 4}; the activity was increased by 40% with 1mM MnSO{sub 4}. However, in extraction buffer with no trace elements, the hydrolase activity was inhibited to 50% by either 1 mM dithiothreitol or 1% Triton X-100 (Sigma). These results suggest that disulfide bonding might be essential for enzyme activity. Purification of the hydrolase by hydroxyapatite and TSK-phenyl (HP-Genenchem, South San Francisco, CA) preparative high-performance liquid chromatography yielded a major 45-kD polypeptide as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. 45 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part II--Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens--focus on grain dust, other agricultural dusts and wood dust.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Skórska, Czesława; Góra-Florek, Anna; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a Gram-negative bacterium developing in a variety of plants as epiphyte or endophyte is particularly common in grain and grain dust, and has been identified by an interdisciplinary group from Lublin, eastern Poland, as a causative agent of work-related diseases associated with exposure to grain dust and other agricultural dusts. The concentration of P. agglomerans in grain as well as in the settled grain and flour dust was found to be high, ranging from 10(4)-10(8) CFU/g, while in the air polluted with grain or flour dust it ranged from 10(3)-10(5) CFU/m(3) and formed 73.2-96% of the total airborne Gram-negative bacteria. The concentration of P. agglomerans was also relatively high in the air of the facilities processing herbs and other plant materials, while it was lower in animal farms and in wood processing facilities. Pantoea agglomerans produces a biologically-potent endotoxin (cell wall lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The significant part of this endotoxin occurs in dusts in the form of virus-sized globular nanoparticles measuring 10-50 nm that could be described as the 'endotoxin super-macromolecules'. A highly significant relationship was found (R=0.804, P=0.000927) between the concentration of the viable P. agglomerans in the air of various agricultural and wood industry settings and the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in the air, as assessed by the Limulus test. Although this result may be interfered by the presence of endotoxin produced by other Gram-negative species, it unequivocally suggests the primary role of the P. agglomerans endotoxin as an adverse agent in the agricultural working environment, causing toxic pneumonitis (ODTS). Numerous experiments by the inhalation exposure of animals to various extracts of P. agglomerans strains isolated from grain dust, including endotoxin isolated with trichloroacetic acid (LPS-TCA), endotoxin nanoparticles isolated in sucrose gradient (VECN), and mixture of proteins and endotoxin obtained

  15. NREL PV System Performance and Standards Technical Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during Fiscal Year (FY)2004 of the Photovoltaic (PV) System Performance & Standards Subtask, which is part of PV Systems Engineering Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae NCPPB 2254.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenjun; Jiang, Hongshan; Tian, Qian; Hu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae is a pathogen that causes bacterial decline of stone fruit. Here, we report the draft genome sequence for P. syringae pv. persicae, which was isolated from Prunus persica. PMID:26044420

  17. National solar technology roadmap: Film-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Brian

    2007-06-01

    Silicon photovoltaic (PV) technologies are addressed in two different technology roadmaps: Film-Silicon PV and Wafer-Silicon PV. This Film-Silicon PV roadmap applies to all silicon-film technologies that rely on a supporting substrate such as glass, polymer, aluminum, stainless steel, or metallurgical-grade silicon. Such devices typically use amorphous, nanocrystalline, fine-grained polycrystalline, or epitaxial silicon layers that are 1–20 μm thick.

  18. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  19. TRNSYS HYBRID wind diesel PV simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, P.J.A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.; Blair, N.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Solar Energy Laboratory (SEL) has developed a wind diesel PV hybrid systems simulator, UW-HYBRID 1.0, an application of the TRNSYS 14.2 time-series simulation environment. An AC/DC bus links up to five diesels and wind turbine models, along with PV modules, a battery bank, and an AC/DC converter. Multiple units can be selected. PV system simulations include solar angle and peak power tracking options. Weather data are Typical Meteorological Year data, parametrically generated synthesized data, or external data files. PV performance simulations rely on long-standing SEL-developed algorithms. Loads data are read as scalable time series. Diesel simulations include estimated fuel-use and waste heat output, and are dispatched using a least-cost of fuel strategy. Wind system simulations include varying air density, wind shear and wake effects. Time step duration is user-selectable. UW-HYBRID 1.0 runs in Windows{reg_sign}, with TRNSED providing a customizable user interface. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Role of Polycrystalline Thin-Film PV Technologies in Competitive PV Module Markets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    von Roedern, B.; Ullal, H. S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses the developments in thin-film PV technologies and provides an outlook on future commercial module efficiencies achievable based on today's knowledge about champion cell performance.

  1. Commercialization of PV-powered pumping systems for use in utility PV service programs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The project described in this report was a commercialization effort focused on cost-effective remote water pumping systems for use in utility-based photovoltaic (PV) service programs. The project combined a commercialization strategy tailored specifically for electric utilities with the development of a PV-powered pumping system that operates conventional ac pumps rather than relying on the more expensive and less reliable PV pumps on the market. By combining these two attributes, a project goal was established of creating sustained utility purchases of 250 PV-powered water pumping systems per year. The results of each of these tasks are presented in two parts contained in this Final Summary Report. The first part summarizes the results of the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN) as a new business venture, while the second part summarizes the results of the Golden Photon system installations. Specifically, results and photographs from each of the system installations are presented in this latter part.

  2. NATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF EMISSIONS REDUCTION IMPACT FROM ROOFTOP PV

    EPA Science Inventory

    This effort will determine the emissions impacts to the U.S. PV generated electricity when PV systems are installed on building rooftops and employed as demand-side power supplies. The national assessment will be based on data provided by existing rooftop PV systems that have be...

  3. High Resolution PV Power Modeling for Distribution Circuit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B. L.; Dise, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    NREL has contracted with Clean Power Research to provide 1-minute simulation datasets of PV systems located at three high penetration distribution feeders in the service territory of Southern California Edison (SCE): Porterville, Palmdale, and Fontana, California. The resulting PV simulations will be used to separately model the electrical circuits to determine the impacts of PV on circuit operations.

  4. Beacons In Brief. P/PV In Brief. Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Susan; Farley, Chelsea

    2004-01-01

    This second issue in P/PV's "In Brief" series focuses on the San Francisco Beacon Initiative and P/PV's recently released evaluation results. The Beacon Initiative established after-school programs in eight public schools in low-income San Francisco neighborhoods. P/PV's 36-month evaluation examined key developmental and academic outcomes.…

  5. Isolation of Bioactive Phenazine-1-Carboxamide from the Soil Bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and Study of Its Anticancer Potency on Different Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hayssam M; El-Shikh, Mohamed S; Salem, Mohamed Z M; M, Muzaheed

    2016-09-01

    The study was designed to investigate the anticancer effect of phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) isolated from the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans naturally present in soil. PCN showed cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, and inhibitory concentrations on the cancer cell lines A549, HeLa, and SW480 were between 32 and 40 μM. Significantly increased concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase were found with increasing concentrations of PCN, which resulted in increased destruction of the cancer cell membrane. A significantly increased p53 level was accompanied by the increased production of cytochrome c protein in all cancer cell lines studied. This condition in cells leads to the overexpression of caspase 3 and Bcl-2 family proteins. Upregulation and downregulation of proapoptotic and antiproapoptotic proteins were analyzed for their messenger RNA and protein expression. The activation of caspases and their cleavage compounds paves the way for the complete apoptosis process in cancer cells. We conclude that P. agglomerans-derived PCN acts as an effective anticancer drug or compound. PMID:27349444

  6. PV_LIB Toolbox v. 1.3

    2015-12-09

    PV_LIB comprises a library of Matlab? code for modeling photovoltaic (PV) systems. Included are functions to compute solar position and to estimate irradiance in the PV system’s plane of array, cell temperature, PV module electrical output, and conversion from DC to AC power. Also included are functions that aid in determining parameters for module performance models from module characterization testing. PV_LIB is open source code primarily intended for research and academic purposes. All algorithms aremore » documented in openly available literature with the appropriate references included in comments within the code.« less

  7. PV_LIB Toolbox v. 1.3

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-09

    PV_LIB comprises a library of Matlab? code for modeling photovoltaic (PV) systems. Included are functions to compute solar position and to estimate irradiance in the PV system’s plane of array, cell temperature, PV module electrical output, and conversion from DC to AC power. Also included are functions that aid in determining parameters for module performance models from module characterization testing. PV_LIB is open source code primarily intended for research and academic purposes. All algorithms are documented in openly available literature with the appropriate references included in comments within the code.

  8. Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan Rich Antigen PvTRAg36.6 Interacts with PvETRAMP and PvTRAg56.6 Interacts with PvMSP7 during Erythrocytic Stages of the Parasite.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Kriti; Hossain, Mohammad Enayet; Thakur, Vandana; Aggarwal, Praveen; Malhotra, Pawan; Mohmmed, Asif; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is most wide spread and a neglected malaria parasite. There is a lack of information on parasite biology of this species. Genome of this parasite encodes for the largest number of tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to 'Pv-fam-a' family and some of them are potential drug/vaccine targets but their functional role(s) largely remains unexplored. Using bacterial and yeast two hybrid systems, we have identified the interacting partners for two of the P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg36.6 and PvTRAg56.2. The PvTRAg36.6 interacts with early transcribed membrane protein (ETRAMP) of P.vivax. It is apically localized in merozoites but in early stages it is seen in parasite periphery suggesting its likely involvement in parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) development or maintenance. On the other hand, PvTRAg56.2 interacts with P.vivax merozoite surface protein7 (PvMSP7) and is localized on merozoite surface. Co-localization of PvTRAg56.2 with PvMSP1 and its molecular interaction with PvMSP7 probably suggest that, PvTRAg56.2 is part of MSP-complex, and might assist or stabilize the protein complex at the merozoite surface. In conclusion, the PvTRAg proteins have different sub cellular localizations and specific associated functions during intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle. PMID:26954579

  9. Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan Rich Antigen PvTRAg36.6 Interacts with PvETRAMP and PvTRAg56.6 Interacts with PvMSP7 during Erythrocytic Stages of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Kriti; Hossain, Mohammad Enayet; Thakur, Vandana; Aggarwal, Praveen; Malhotra, Pawan; Mohmmed, Asif; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is most wide spread and a neglected malaria parasite. There is a lack of information on parasite biology of this species. Genome of this parasite encodes for the largest number of tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to ‘Pv-fam-a’ family and some of them are potential drug/vaccine targets but their functional role(s) largely remains unexplored. Using bacterial and yeast two hybrid systems, we have identified the interacting partners for two of the P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg36.6 and PvTRAg56.2. The PvTRAg36.6 interacts with early transcribed membrane protein (ETRAMP) of P.vivax. It is apically localized in merozoites but in early stages it is seen in parasite periphery suggesting its likely involvement in parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) development or maintenance. On the other hand, PvTRAg56.2 interacts with P.vivax merozoite surface protein7 (PvMSP7) and is localized on merozoite surface. Co-localization of PvTRAg56.2 with PvMSP1 and its molecular interaction with PvMSP7 probably suggest that, PvTRAg56.2 is part of MSP-complex, and might assist or stabilize the protein complex at the merozoite surface. In conclusion, the PvTRAg proteins have different sub cellular localizations and specific associated functions during intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle. PMID:26954579

  10. Cascaded Microinverter PV System for Reduced Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bellus, Daniel R.; Ely, Jeffrey A.

    2013-04-29

    In this project, a team led by Delphi will develop and demonstrate a novel cascaded photovoltaic (PV) inverter architecture using advanced components. This approach will reduce the cost and improve the performance of medium and large-sized PV systems. The overall project objective is to develop, build, and test a modular 11-level cascaded three-phase inverter building block for photovoltaic applications and to develop and analyze the associated commercialization plan. The system will be designed to utilize photovoltaic panels and will supply power to the electric grid at 208 VAC, 60 Hz 3-phase. With the proposed topology, three inverters, each with an embedded controller, will monitor and control each of the cascade sections, reducing costs associated with extra control boards. This report details the final disposition on this project.

  11. Development of a dispatchable PV peak shaving system. Final report on PV:BONUS Phase 2 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, W.D.; Nigro, R.M.

    1999-01-20

    In July 1993, the Delmarva Power and Light Company (now Conectiv, Inc.) was awarded a contract for the development of a Dispatchable Photovoltaic Peak Shaving System under the US Department of Energy PV:BONUS Program. The rationale for the dispatchable PV peak shaving system is based on the coincidence between the solar resource and the electrical load in question. Where poor coincidence exists, a PV array by itself does little to offset peak demands. However, with the addition of a relatively small amount of energy storage, the energy from the PV array can be managed and the value of the PV system increases substantially. In Phase 2, Delmarva Power continued the refinement of the system deployed in Phase 1. Four additional dispatchable PV peak shaving systems were installed for extended testing and evaluation at sites in Delaware, Maryland, Wisconsin and North Carolina. A second type of system that can be used to provide back-up power as well as peak shaving was also developed in Phase 2. This PV-UPS system used a packaging approach nearly identical to the PV peak shaving system, although there were significant differences in the design of the power electronics and control systems. Conceptually, the PV-UPS system builds upon the idea of adding value to PV systems by increasing functionality. A prototype of the PV-UPS system was installed in Delaware for evaluation near the end of the contract period.

  12. Periplasmic glucans of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Talaga, P; Fournet, B; Bohin, J P

    1994-01-01

    We report the initial characterization of glucans present in the periplasmic space of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (strain R32). These compounds were found to be neutral, unsubstituted, and composed solely of glucose. Their size ranges from 6 to 13 glucose units/mol. Linkage studies and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses demonstrated that the glucans are linked by beta-1,2 and beta-1,6 glycosidic bonds. In contrast to the periplasmic glucans found in other plant pathogenic bacteria, the glucans of P. syringae pv. syringae are not cyclic but are highly branched structures. Acetolysis studies demonstrated that the backbone consists of beta-1,2-linked glucose units to which the branches are attached by beta-1,6 linkages. These periplasmic glucans were more abundant when the osmolarity of the growth medium was lower. Thus, P. syringae pv. syringae appears to synthesize periplasmic glucans in response to the osmolarity of the medium. The structural characteristics of these glucans are very similar to the membrane-derived oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli, apart from the neutral character, which contrasts with the highly anionic E. coli membrane-derived oligosaccharides. PMID:7961404

  13. PV Manufacturing R&D Project -- Trends in the U.S. PV Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K. E.; Mitchell, R. L.; Bower, W. I.; King, R.

    2005-01-01

    To foster continued growth in the U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMR&D) Project--a partnership with U.S. PV industry participants to perform cost-shared manufacturing research and development. Throughout FY 2004, PVMR&D managed fourteen subcontracts across the industry. The impact of PVMR&D is quantified by reductions in direct module manufacturing costs, scale-up of existing PV production capacity, and accrual of cost savings to the public and industry. An analysis of public and industry investment shows that both recaptured funds by mid-1998 based on estimated manufacturing cost savings from PVMR&D participation. Since project inception, total PV manufacturing capacity has increased from 14 MW to 201 MW at the close of 2003, while direct manufacturing costs declined from $5.55/W to $2.49/W. These results demonstrate continued progress toward the overriding goals of the PVMR&D project.

  14. Energy balance of the global photovoltaic (PV) industry--is the PV industry a net electricity producer?

    PubMed

    Dale, Michael; Benson, Sally M

    2013-04-01

    A combination of declining costs and policy measures motivated by greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction and energy security have driven rapid growth in the global installed capacity of solar photovoltaics (PV). This paper develops a number of unique data sets, namely the following: calculation of distribution of global capacity factor for PV deployment; meta-analysis of energy consumption in PV system manufacture and deployment; and documentation of reduction in energetic costs of PV system production. These data are used as input into a new net energy analysis of the global PV industry, as opposed to device level analysis. In addition, the paper introduces a new concept: a model tracking energetic costs of manufacturing and installing PV systems, including balance of system (BOS) components. The model is used to forecast electrical energy requirements to scale up the PV industry and determine the electricity balance of the global PV industry to 2020. Results suggest that the industry was a net consumer of electricity as recently as 2010. However, there is a >50% that in 2012 the PV industry is a net electricity provider and will "pay back" the electrical energy required for its early growth before 2020. Further reducing energetic costs of PV deployment will enable more rapid growth of the PV industry. There is also great potential to increase the capacity factor of PV deployment. These conclusions have a number of implications for R&D and deployment, including the following: monitoring of the energy embodied within PV systems; designing more efficient and durable systems; and deploying PV systems in locations that will achieve high capacity factors. PMID:23441588

  15. Integrating Solar PV in Utility System Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, A.; Botterud, A.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Hodge, B-M.; Heany, M.

    2013-10-31

    This study develops a systematic framework for estimating the increase in operating costs due to uncertainty and variability in renewable resources, uses the framework to quantify the integration costs associated with sub-hourly solar power variability and uncertainty, and shows how changes in system operations may affect these costs. Toward this end, we present a statistical method for estimating the required balancing reserves to maintain system reliability along with a model for commitment and dispatch of the portfolio of thermal and renewable resources at different stages of system operations. We estimate the costs of sub-hourly solar variability, short-term forecast errors, and day-ahead (DA) forecast errors as the difference in production costs between a case with “realistic” PV (i.e., subhourly solar variability and uncertainty are fully included in the modeling) and a case with “well behaved” PV (i.e., PV is assumed to have no sub-hourly variability and can be perfectly forecasted). In addition, we highlight current practices that allow utilities to compensate for the issues encountered at the sub-hourly time frame with increased levels of PV penetration. In this analysis we use the analytical framework to simulate utility operations with increasing deployment of PV in a case study of Arizona Public Service Company (APS), a utility in the southwestern United States. In our analysis, we focus on three processes that are important in understanding the management of PV variability and uncertainty in power system operations. First, we represent the decisions made the day before the operating day through a DA commitment model that relies on imperfect DA forecasts of load and wind as well as PV generation. Second, we represent the decisions made by schedulers in the operating day through hour-ahead (HA) scheduling. Peaking units can be committed or decommitted in the HA schedules and online units can be redispatched using forecasts that are improved

  16. PV solar electricity: status and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Winfried

    2006-04-01

    Within the four main market segments of PV solar electricity there are already three areas competitive today. These are off-grid industrial and rural as well as consumer applications. The overall growth within the past 8 years was almost 40 % p.a. with a "normal" growth of about 18 % p.a. for the first three market segments whereas the grid connected market increased with an astonishing 63 % p.a. The different growth rates catapulted the contribution of grid connected systems in relation to the total market from about one quarter 6 years ago towards more than three quarters today. The reason for this development is basically due to industry-politically induced market support programs in the aforementioned countries. It is quite important to outline under which boundary conditions grid connected systems will be competitive without support programs like the feed in tariff system in Germany, Spain and some more to come in Europe as well as investment subsidies in Japan, US and some other countries. It will be shown that in a more and more liberalized utility market worldwide electricity produced by PV solar electricity systems will be able to compete with their generating cost against peak power prices from utilities. The point of time for this competitiveness is mainly determined by the following facts: 1. Price decrease for PV solar electricity systems leading to an equivalent decrease in the generated cost for PV produced kWh. 2. Development of a truly liberalized electricity market. 3. Degree of irradiation between times of peak power demand and delivery of PV electricity. The first topic is discussed using price experience curves. Some explanations will be given to correlate the qualitative number of 20 % price decrease for doubling cumulative worldwide sales derived from the historic price experience curve with a more quantitative analysis based on our EPIA-Roadmap (productivity increase and ongoing improvements for existing technologies as well as development

  17. Real Power and Reactive Power Control of a Three-Phase Single-Stage-PV System and PV voltage Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huijuan; Xu, Yan; Adhikari, Sarina; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Irminger, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems with power electronic interfaces can provide both real and reactive power to meet power system needs with appropriate control algorithms. This paper presents the control algorithm design for a three-phase single-stage grid-connected PV inverter to achieve either maximum power point tracking (MPPT) or a certain amount of real power injection, as well as the voltage/var control. The switching between MPPT control mode and a certain amount of real power control mode is automatic and seamless. Without the DC-to-DC booster stage, PV DC voltage stability is an important issue in the control design especially when the PV inverter is operating at maximum power point (MPP) with voltage/var control. The PV DC voltage collapse phenomenon and its reason are discussed. The method based on dynamic correction of the PV inverter output is proposed to ensure PV DC voltage stability. Simulation results of the single-stage PV system during system disturbances and fast solar irradiation changes confirm that the proposed control algorithm for single-stage PV inverters can provide appropriate real and reactive power services and ensure PV DC voltage stability during dynamic system operation and atmospheric conditions.

  18. PV technology and success of solar electricity in Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Dung, T.Q.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1990 the PV Technology and the Solar electricity have been strongly developed in Vietnam. The PV experts of Solarlab have studied and set up an appropriate PV Technology responding to local Market needs. It has not only stood well but has been also transferred to Mali Republic and Lao P.D.R. The PV off grid systems of Solarlab demonstrate good efficiency and low prices. Over 60 solar stations and villages have been built to provide solar lighting for about 3000 families along the country in remote, mountainous areas and islands. 400 families are using stand-alone Solar Home Systems. The Solar electricity has been chosen for Rural Electrification and National Telecommunication Network in remote and mountainous regions. Many International projects in cooperation with FONDEM-France, SELF USA and Governmental PV projects have been realized by Solarlab. The experiences of maintenance, management and finance about PV development in Vietnam are also mentioned.

  19. PV-MCT working standard radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, George P.; Podobedov, V. B.

    2012-06-01

    Sensitive infrared working-standard detectors with large active area are needed to extend the signal dynamic range of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) pyroelectric transfer-standards used for infrared spectral power responsivity calibrations. Increased sensitivity is especially important for irradiance mode responsivity measurements. The noise equivalent power (NEP) of the NIST used pyroelectric transfer-standards is about 8 nW/Hz1/2, equal to a D*= 5.5 x 107 cm Hz1/2/W. A large-area photovoltaic HgCdTe (PV-MCT) detector was custom made for the 2.5 μm to 11 μm wavelength range using a 4-stage thermoelectric cooler. At least an order of magnitude lower NEP was expected than that of the pyroelectric transfer-standards to measure irradiance. The large detector area was produced with multiple p-n junctions. The periodical, multiple-junction structure produced a spatial non-uniformity in the detector response. The PV-MCT radiometer was characterized for spatial non-uniformity of response using different incident beam sizes to evaluate the uncertainty component caused by the spatial non-uniformity. The output voltage noise and also the current and voltage responsivities were evaluated at different signal gains and frequencies. The output voltage noise was decreased and the voltage responsivity was increased to lower the NEP of the radiometer. The uncertainty of the spectral power responsivity measurements was evaluated. It is recommended to use a bootstrap type trans-impedance amplifier along with a cold field-of-view limiter to improve the NEP of the PV-MCT radiometer.

  20. NREL PV Working With Industry, v. 27, Third Quarter 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.; Nahan, R.

    2000-09-12

    NREL PV Working With Industry is a quarterly newsletter devoted to the research, development, and deployment performed by NREL staff in concert with their industry and university partners. The third quarter, contains articles on several important PV-related conferences held in the prior three months: the REAP/HBCU Conference and the IPS-2000 Photochemistry Conference. The issue also contains a preview article of the PV Specialists conference held in Alaska in September. The editorialist is John Benner, PV Specialist Conference Program Chairman.

  1. Verification Test of Power Fluctuation Suppression System for Large PV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noro, Yasuhiro; Naoi, Shinya; Toba, Koji; Kimura, Misao; Minegishi, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Masanao; Aoki, Shinichi; Okuda, Yasuo

    The large scale photovoltaic (PV) generation station is expected to spread in the future. However, output power of renewable energy sources such as PV is affected by weather conditions and their output tends to be unstable. As a result, the penetration of PV power station makes it difficult to maintain frequency of power system in allowable range. The authors have developed a suppression system to stabilize output power fluctuation of a large PV generation station. To reduce short term fluctuation, storage batteries applying SCiBTM are used. In this paper, verification test results are explained and simulation results to improve control performance are also shown.

  2. Development of a Dispatchable PV Peak Shainv System. PV: Bonus Program - Phase 1 Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Delmarva Power and Light and its subcontractors in Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy's PV:BONUS Program. The purpose of the program is to develop products and systems for buildings which utilize photovoltaic (N) technology. Beginning with a cooperative research effort with the University of Delaware's Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research Delmarva Power developed and demonstrated the concept of Dispatchable PV Peak Shaving. This concept and the system which resulted horn the development work are unique from other grid-connected PV systems because it combines a PV, battery energy storage, power conversion and control technologies into an integrated package. Phase 1 began in July 1993 with the installation of a test and demonstration system at Delmarva's Northern Division General Office building near Newark, Delaware. Following initial testing throughout the summer and fall of 1993, significant modifications were made under an amendment to the DOE contract. Work on Phase 1 concluded in the early spring of 1995. Significant progress towards the goal of commercializing the system was made during Phase 1, and is summarized. Based on progress in Phase 1, a proposal to continue the work in Phase 2 was submitted to the US DOE in May 1995. A contract amendment and providing funds for the Phase 2 work is expected in July 1995.

  3. A fatal case of poisoning related to new cathinone designer drugs, 4-methoxy PV8, PV9, and 4-methoxy PV9, and a dissociative agent, diphenidine.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Keiko; Usumoto, Yosuke; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Sameshima, Naomi; Tsuji, Akiko; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2015-09-01

    A woman in her thirties was found dead on a bed. Considerable amounts of "aroma liquid" and "bath salt" products and hypnotic drug tablets were scattered beside the bed. Autopsy showed pulmonary congestion and edema. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses of "aroma liquid" and "bath salt" products showed the presence of new cathinone designer drugs, 4-methoxy PV8 (4-methoxy PHPP), PV9 (α-POP), and 4-methoxy PV9 (4-methoxy α-POP), and a dissociative agent, diphenidine. Drug screening in stomach contents, blood and hydrolyzed urine of the woman by GC-MS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) revealed the presence of the above 4 types of drugs and 3 types of benzodiazepines, triazolam, flunitrazepam, and nitrazepam, and their metabolites. The above 7 drugs and 3 benzodiazepine metabolites were simultaneously determined by LC-MS/MS after modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, Safe) extraction using diazepam-d5 as the internal standard. The concentrations of 4-methoxy PV8, PV9, 4-methoxy PV9, and diphenidine in the femoral blood were 2.69, 0.743, 0.261, and 1.38μg/ml, respectively, which were significantly higher than concentrations reported in previous cases. Alcohol concentration in the femoral blood was 1.52mg/ml. Based on the pathological and toxicological findings, the cause of death was determined to be 3 types of cathinone drugs, 4-methoxy PV8, PV9, and 4-methoxy PV9, and diphenidine poisoning under the influence of 3 benzodiazepines and alcohol. PMID:26162997

  4. Development of NIL processes for PV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, H.; Tucher, N.; Tokai, K.; Schneider, P.; Wellens, Ch.; Volk, A.; Barke, S.; Müller, C.; Glinsner, T.; Bläsi, B.

    2015-03-01

    Due to its high resolution and applicability for large area patterning, Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) is a promising technology for photovoltaic (PV) applications. However, a successful industrial application of NIL processes is only possible if large-area processing on thin, brittle and potentially rough substrates can be achieved in a high-throughput process. In this work, the development of NIL processes using the novel SmartNILTM technology from EV Group with a focus on PV applications is described. We applied this tooling to realize a honeycomb texture (8 μm period) on the front side of multicrystalline silicon solar cells leading to an improvement in optical efficiency of 7% relative and a total efficiency gain of 0.5% absolute compared to the industrial standard texture (isotexture). On the rear side of monocrystalline silicon solar cells, we realized diffraction gratings to make use of light trapping effects. An absorption enhancement of up to 35% absolute at a wavelength of 1100 nm is demonstrated. Furthermore, we combined photolithography and NIL processes to introduce features for metal contacts into honeycomb master structures, which initially were realized using interference lithography. As final application, we investigated the realization of very fine contact fingers with prismatic shape in order to minimize reflection losses.

  5. Grid tied PV system energy smoothing.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Keith Phillip; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Hund, Thomas D.

    2010-06-01

    Grid-tied PV energy smoothing was implemented by using a valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery as a temporary energy storage device to both charge and discharge as required to smooth the inverter energy output from the PV array. Inverter output was controlled by the average solar irradiance over the previous 1h time interval. On a clear day the solar irradiance power curve is offset by about 1h, while on a variable cloudy day the inverter output power curve will be smoothed based on the average solar irradiance. Test results demonstrate that this smoothing algorithm works very well. Battery state of charge was more difficult to manage because of the variable system inefficiencies. Testing continued for 30-days and established consistent operational performance for extended periods of time under a wide variety of resource conditions. Both battery technologies from Exide (Absolyte) and East Penn (Advanced Valve Regulated Lead-Acid) proved to cycle well at a partial state of charge over the time interval tested.

  6. Grid-tied PV battery systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Keith Phillip; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Hund, Thomas D.

    2010-09-01

    Grid tied PV energy smoothing was implemented by using a valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery as a temporary energy storage device to both charge and discharge as required to smooth the inverter energy output from the PV array. Inverter output was controlled by the average solar irradiance over the previous 1h time interval. On a clear day the solar irradiance power curve is offset by about 1h, while on a variable cloudy day the inverter output power curve will be smoothed based on the average solar irradiance. Test results demonstrate that this smoothing algorithm works very well. Battery state of charge was more difficult to manage because of the variable system inefficiencies. Testing continued for 30-days and established consistent operational performance for extended periods of time under a wide variety of resource conditions. Both battery technologies from Exide (Absolyte) and East Penn (ALABC Advanced) proved to cycle well at a Partial state of charge over the time interval tested.

  7. Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S. H.; delCueto, J. A.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2005-11-01

    Dielectric thin-film barrier and adhesion-promoting layers consisting of silicon oxynitride materials (SiOxNy, with various stoichiometry) were investigated. For process development, films were applied to glass (TCO, conductive SnO2:F; or soda-lime), polymer (PET, polyethylene terephthalate), aluminized soda-lime glass, or PV cell (a-Si, CIGS) substrates. Design strategy employed de-minimus hazard criteria to facilitate industrial adoption and reduce implementation costs for PV manufacturers or suppliers. A restricted process window was explored using dilute compressed gases (3% silane, 14% nitrous oxide, 23% oxygen) in nitrogen (or former mixtures, and 11.45% oxygen mix in helium and/or 99.999% helium dilution) with a worst-case flammable and non-corrosive hazard classification. Method employed low radio frequency (RF) power, less than or equal to 3 milliwatts per cm2, and low substrate temperatures, less than or equal to 100 deg C, over deposition areas less than or equal to 1000 cm2. Select material properties for barrier film thickness (profilometer), composition (XPS/FTIR), optical (refractive index, %T and %R), mechanical peel strength and WVTR barrier performance are presented.

  8. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  9. Solar PV O&M standards and best practices :

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John R.; Keating, T. J.

    2014-11-01

    As greater numbers of photovoltaic (PV) systems are being installed, operations & maintenance (O&M) activities will need to be performed to ensure the PV system is operating as designed over its useful lifetime. To mitigate risks to PV system availability and performance, standardized procedures for O&M activities are needed to ensure high reliability and long-term system bankability. Efforts are just getting underway to address the need for standard O&M procedures as PV gains a larger share of U.S. generation capacity. Due to the existing landscape of how and where PV is installed, including distributed generation from small and medium PV systems, as well as large, centralized utility-scale PV, O&M activities will require different levels of expertise and reporting, making standards even more important. This report summarizes recent efforts made by solar industry stakeholders to identify the existing standards and best practices applied to solar PV O&M activities, and determine the gaps that have yet to be, or are currently being addressed by industry.

  10. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  12. MONITOR THE PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) SYSTEM ON THE NCC ROOFTOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will investigate the pollution emission reduction and demand-side management potential of a
    100 kW PV system located on the roof of the National Computer Center (NCC). Standardized instrumentation to measure meteorological and PV system performance variables will b...

  13. Codes, standards, and PV power systems. A 1996 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, J

    1996-06-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) electrical power systems gain increasing acceptance for both off-grid and utility-interactive applications, the safety, durability, and performance of these systems gains in importance. Local and state jurisdictions in many areas of the country require that all electrical power systems be installed in compliance with the requirements of the National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}). Utilities and governmental agencies are now requiring that PV installations and components also meet a number of Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) standards. PV installers are working more closely with licensed electricians and electrical contractors who are familiar with existing local codes and installation practices. PV manufacturers, utilities, balance of systems manufacturers, and standards representatives have come together to address safety and code related issues for future PV installations. This paper addresses why compliance with the accepted codes and standards is needed and how it is being achieved.

  14. Fire hazard and other safety concerns of PV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2011-09-01

    Photovoltaic modules are usually considered safe and reliable. But in case of grid-connected PV systems that are becoming very popular, the issue of fire safety of PV modules is becoming increasingly important due to the employed high voltages of 600 V to 1000 V. The two main factors i.e. open circuiting of the bypass diode and ground fault that are responsible for the fire in the PV systems have been discussed in detail along with numerous real life examples. Recommendations are provided for preventing the fire hazards such as having at least class C fire rated PV modules, proper bypass and blocking diodes and interestingly, having an ungrounded PV system.

  15. Previous reports of bacterial diseases on crucifers attributed to Pseuomonas syringae pv. maculicola were caused by P. cannabina pv. alisalensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis (Pca) causes bacterial blight on crucifers, which can reduce crucifer yields and result in economic losses in the US. Prior to the late 1990s Pca was not distinguished from the pepper spot pathogen of crucifers, Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm), althoug...

  16. Molecular detection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Burkholderia glumae in infected rice seeds and leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is particularly useful for plant pathogen detection. In the present study, multiplex PCR and SYBR green real-time PCR were developed to facilitate simultaneous detection of three important rice pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Bur...

  17. Innovations in Wind and Solar PV Financing

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, K.; Coughlin, J.; Jenkin, T.; Pater, J.; Swezey, B.

    2008-02-01

    There is growing national interest in renewable energy development based on the economic, environmental, and security benefits that these resources provide. Historically, greater development of our domestic renewable energy resources has faced a number of hurdles, primarily related to cost, regulation, and financing. With the recent sustained increase in the costs and associated volatility of fossil fuels, the economics of renewable energy technologies have become increasingly attractive to investors, both large and small. As a result, new entrants are investing in renewable energy and new business models are emerging. This study surveys some of the current issues related to wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project financing in the electric power industry, and identifies both barriers to and opportunities for increased investment.

  18. LWR-PV damage estimate methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wagschal, J.J.; Maerker, R.E.; Broadhead, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    A credible estimate of the pressure vessel lifetime due to neutron-induced embrittlement is studied. The first step toward this goal is the accurate prediction of fluence and neutron energy spectrum at the pressure vessel. This, in turn, is obtained from least squares unfolding techniques of dosimetry measurements at a surveillance position, transport calculations, and a translation of information obtained at the surveillance position to the damage position. Including a prototypic neutron field like the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly, in which measurements are performed to serve as benchmarks for the LWR-PV surveillance dosimetry program, involves the use of approximate calculational methods. These approximate methods are supplemented by correction factors also known as calculational bias factors, the proper utilization of which requires estimated uncertainties of these biases as well. The source of a few biases for the PCA and some biases and correlations for the group fluxes at two PCA locations are presented.

  19. Electrochemical Approaches to PV Busbar Application

    SciTech Connect

    Pankow, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Busbars are an integral component of any thin-film photovoltaic module and must be easy and quick to apply by PV manufacturers, as well as provide long-term reliability in deployed modules. Potential reliability issues include loss of adhesion and delamination, chemical instability under current collection conditions (electromigration or corrosion), compatibility of material and application method with subsequent encapsulation steps. Several new and novel busbar materials and application methods have been explored, including adhering metal busbars with various one- and two-part conductive epoxies or conductive adhesive films, ultrasonic bonding of metal busbar strips, and bonding of busbar strips using low-temperature solders. The most promising approach to date has been the direct application of metal busbars via various electrochemical techniques, which offers a variety of distinct advantages.

  20. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  1. Progress in PV:BONUS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaeth, James J.; Pierce, Lizana K.

    1996-01-01

    The PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) program, to develop photovoltaic products and the associated infrastructure for a sustainable photovoltaic market in the building sector, has attracted a variety of promising projects ranging from integrated modular homes, rooftop integrated photovoltaic systems, dispatchable peak shaving systems, alternating-current module, photovoltaic glazing systems, and curtain wall systems. The mutual commitment by the Department of Energy and the program recipients has inspired diverse partnerships among manufacturers, utilities, construction companies, and universities for the development of niche markets for building-integrated photovoltaics. Many of the photovoltaic systems are currently being demonstrated with market campaigns underway to commercialize these innovative renewable energy, building-integrated products.

  2. Managing PV Power on Mars - MER Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Chin, Keith; Wood, Eric; Herman, Jennifer; Ewell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The MER Rovers have recently completed over 5 years of operation! This is a remarkable demonstration of the capabilities of PV power on the Martian surface. The extended mission required the development of an efficient process to predict the power available to the rovers on a day-to-day basis. The performance of the MER solar arrays is quite unlike that of any other Space array and perhaps more akin to Terrestrial PV operation, although even severe by that comparison. The impact of unpredictable factors, such as atmospheric conditions and dust accumulation (and removal) on the panels limits the accurate prediction of array power to short time spans. Based on the above, it is clear that long term power predictions are not sufficiently accurate to allow for detailed long term planning. Instead, the power assessment is essentially a daily activity, effectively resetting the boundary points for the overall predictive power model. A typical analysis begins with the importing of the telemetry from each rover's previous day's power subsystem activities. This includes the array power generated, battery state-of-charge, rover power loads, and rover orientation, all as functions of time. The predicted performance for that day is compared to the actual performance to identify the extent of any differences. The model is then corrected for these changes. Details of JPL's MER power analysis procedure are presented, including the description of steps needed to provide the final prediction for the mission planners. A dust cleaning event of the solar array is also highlighted to illustrate the impact of Martian weather on solar array performance

  3. Lessons Learned from the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D and Thin Film PV Partnership Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.; Mitchell, R.; Zweibel, K.

    2006-09-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program initiates new cost-shared solar energy R&D under the Solar America Initiative (SAI), it is useful to analyze the experience gained from cost-shared R&D projects that have been funded through the program to date. This report summarizes lessons learned from two DOE-sponsored photovoltaic (PV) projects: the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMaT/PVMR&D) project and the Thin-Film PV Partnership project. During the past 10-15 years, these two projects have invested roughly $330 million of government resources in cost-shared R&D and leveraged another $190 million in private-sector PV R&D investments. Following a description of key findings and brief descriptions of the PVMaT/PVMR&D and Thin-Film PV Partnership projects, this report presents lessons learned from the projects.

  4. Interconnecting PV on New York City's Secondary Network Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K; Coddington, M; Burman, K; Hayter, S; Kroposki, B; Watson, and A

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has teamed with cities across the country through the Solar America Cities (SAC) partnership program to help reduce barriers and accelerate implementation of solar energy. The New York City SAC team is a partnership between the City University of New York (CUNY), the New York City Mayor s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability, and the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC).The New York City SAC team is working with DOE s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Con Edison, the local utility, to develop a roadmap for photovoltaic (PV) installations in the five boroughs. The city set a goal to increase its installed PV capacity from1.1 MW in 2005 to 8.1 MW by 2015 (the maximum allowed in 2005). A key barrier to reaching this goal, however, is the complexity of the interconnection process with the local utility. Unique challenges are associated with connecting distributed PV systems to secondary network distribution systems (simplified to networks in this report). Although most areas of the country use simpler radial distribution systems to distribute electricity, larger metropolitan areas like New York City typically use networks to increase reliability in large load centers. Unlike the radial distribution system, where each customer receives power through a single line, a network uses a grid of interconnected lines to deliver power to each customer through several parallel circuits and sources. This redundancy improves reliability, but it also requires more complicated coordination and protection schemes that can be disrupted by energy exported from distributed PV systems. Currently, Con Edison studies each potential PV system in New York City to evaluate the system s impact on the network, but this is time consuming for utility engineers and may delay the customer s project or add cost for larger installations. City leaders would like to streamline this process to facilitate faster, simpler, and

  5. Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) PV integration study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Mousseau, Tom

    2011-08-01

    This report investigates the effects that increased distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation would have on the Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) system operating requirements. The study focused on determining reserve requirements needed to mitigate the impact of PV variability on system frequency, and the impact on operating costs. Scenarios of 5-MW, 10-MW, and 15-MW nameplate capacity of PV generation plants distributed across the Kauai Island were considered in this study. The analysis required synthesis of the PV solar resource data and modeling of the KIUC system inertia. Based on the results, some findings and conclusions could be drawn, including that the selection of units identified as marginal resources that are used for load following will change; PV penetration will displace energy generated by existing conventional units, thus reducing overall fuel consumption; PV penetration at any deployment level is not likely to reduce system peak load; and increasing PV penetration has little effect on load-following reserves. The study was performed by EnerNex under contract from Sandia National Laboratories with cooperation from KIUC.

  6. Optimal Solar PV Arrays Integration for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Li, Xueping

    2012-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems hold great potential for distributed energy generation by installing PV panels on rooftops of residential and commercial buildings. Yet challenges arise along with the variability and non-dispatchability of the PV systems that affect the stability of the grid and the economics of the PV system. This paper investigates the integration of PV arrays for distributed generation applications by identifying a combination of buildings that will maximize solar energy output and minimize system variability. Particularly, we propose mean-variance optimization models to choose suitable rooftops for PV integration based on Markowitz mean-variance portfolio selection model. We further introduce quantity and cardinality constraints to result in a mixed integer quadratic programming problem. Case studies based on real data are presented. An efficient frontier is obtained for sample data that allows decision makers to choose a desired solar energy generation level with a comfortable variability tolerance level. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the tradeoffs between solar PV energy generation potential and variability.

  7. Identifying Critical Pathways to High-Performance PV: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Symko-Davies, M.; Noufi, R.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV)Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and our environment in the 21st century. To accomplish this, the NCPV directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices. Details of the subcontractor and in-house progress will be described toward identifying critical pathways of 25% polycrystalline thin-film tandem cells and developing multijunction concentrator modules to 33%.

  8. PV Validation and Bankability Workshop: San Jose, California

    SciTech Connect

    Granata, J.; Howard, J.

    2011-12-01

    This report is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). The report provides feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Program PV Validation and Bankability Workshop in San Jose, California on August 31, 2011. It focuses on the current state of PV in the United States, private funding to fund U.S. PV industry growth, roles and functions of the regional test center program, and ways to improve the current validation and bankability practices.

  9. Photovoltaic (PV) Impact Assessment for Very High Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Danling; Mather, Barry A.; Seguin, Richard; Hambrick, Joshua; Broadwater, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a granular approach for investigating the impacts of very high photovoltaic (PV) generation penetration. Studies on two real-world distribution feeders connected to PV plants are presented. The studies include both steady-state and time-series power flow analyses, which include the effects of solar variability. The goal of the study is to predict the effects of increasing levels of PV generation as it reaches very high penetration levels. The loss and return of generation with and without regulation is simulated to capture short-term problems such as voltage fluctuations. Impact results from the analyses are described along with potential mitigations.

  10. The influence of antibiotic production and pre-emptive colonization on the population dynamics of Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) Eh1087 and Erwinia amylovora in planta.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Stephen R; Houliston, Gary J; Mahanty, H Khris

    2003-10-01

    Stigma colonization by Erwinia amylovora is the crucial first step in the development of most fire blight infections in apple and pear trees. Suppression at this point of the disease process by antagonists of E. amylovora, such as Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) strain Eh1087, is a rational approach to control fire blight. We tested the hypothesis that the ability of E. amylovora to compete with Eh1087 for colonization of a stigma is reduced by the potential for Eh1087 to produce the phenazine antibiotic, d-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA). In competition experiments on the stigmas of apple flowers, E. amylovora was significantly less successful against Eh1087 (AGA+) than against EhDeltaAGA (AGA-). Further experiments to test the importance of pre-emptive colonization of the stigma by either the pathogen or the antagonist suggested that AGA production significantly enhanced the competitiveness of Eh1087 when it was applied at the same time or 24 h before the pathogen. We also found that pre-emptive stigma colonization by either the pathogen or the antagonist resulted in a population that was resilient to subsequent invasion by a second species suggesting that niche exclusion has a dominant influence on the dynamics of bacterial populations on stigmas. PMID:14510856

  11. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter spp., Pantoea agglomerans, and Serratia marcescens isolates from a Bulgarian hospital.

    PubMed

    Markovska, Rumyana Donkova; Stoeva, Temenuga Jekova; Bojkova, Kalina Dineva; Mitov, Ivan Gergov

    2014-04-01

    Forty-two extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates of Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Serratia marcescens, collected consecutively during the period January-November 2011 from the University Hospital in Varna, Bulgaria, were studied to characterize their ESBLs by isoelectric focusing, group-specific PCR, and sequencing. The epidemiological relationship was evaluated by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD). Transferability of ESBL genes was determined by conjugation experiments. Plasmid analysis was done by replicon typing and PstI fingerprinting. The overall rate of ESBL production was 20%. The most widespread enzyme was CTX-M-3, found in 64%. It was dominant in E. aerogenes (100%) and S. marcescens (83%). SHV-12, CTX-M-3, and CTX-M-15 were found among E. cloacae isolates in 50%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Three main CTX-M-3-producing epidemic clones of E. aerogenes and S. marcescens have been detected. Among E. cloacae isolates, six different RAPD profiles were discerned. The plasmids harboring blaCTX-M-3 belonged to IncL/M type and demonstrated similar PstI fingerprinting profiles. IncFII plasmids were detected in two CTX-M-15-producing E. cloacae isolates. Our results demonstrate wide intrahospital dissemination of clonal E. aerogenes and S. marcescens isolates, carrying IncL/M conjugative plasmids. PMID:24171449

  12. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Fukasaka, Masahiro; Asari, Daisuke; Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens. PMID:25978818

  13. Characterization of the mineral phosphate-solubilizing activity of Pantoea agglomerans MMB051 isolated from an iron-rich soil in southeastern Venezuela (Bolívar State).

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Miguel; Pérez, Elizabeth; Ball, María M; Bahsas, Alí; Yarzábal, Luis Andrés

    2009-04-01

    The mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) activity of a Pantoea agglomerans strain, namely MMB051, isolated from an iron-rich, acidic soil near Ciudad Piar (Bolívar State, Venezuela), was characterized on a chemically defined medium (NBRIP). Various insoluble inorganic phosphates, including tri-calcium phosphate [Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)], iron phosphate (FePO(4)), aluminum phosphate (AlPO(4)), and Rock Phosphate (RP) were tested as sole sources of P for bacterial growth. Solubilization of Ca(3)(PO(4))(2) was very efficient and depended on acidification of the external milieu when MMB051 cells were grown in the presence of glucose. This was also the case when RP was used as the sole P source. On the other hand, the solubilization efficiency toward more insoluble mineral phosphates (FePO(4) and AlPO(4)) was shown to be very low. Even though gluconic acid (GA) was detected on culture supernatants of strain MMB051, a consequence of the direct oxidation pathway of glucose, inorganic-P solubilization seemed also to be related to other processes dependent on active cell growth. Among these, proton release by ammonium (NH(4)(+) ) fixation appeared to be of paramount importance to explain inorganic-P solubilization mediated by strain MMB051. On the contrary, the presence of nitrate (NO(3)(-) ) salts as the sole N source affected negatively the ability of MMB051 cells to solubilize inorganic P. PMID:19067045

  14. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens. PMID:25978818

  15. 3-Port Single-Stage PV & Battery Converter Improves Efficiency and Cost in Combined PV/Battery Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bundschuh, Paul

    2013-03-23

    Due to impressive cost reductions in recent years, photovoltaic (PV) generation is now able to produce electricity at highly competitive prices, but PV’s inherent intermittency reduces the potential value of this energy. The integration of battery storage with PV will be transformational by increasing the value of solar. Utility scale systems will benefit by firming intermittency including PV ramp smoothing, grid support and load shifting, allowing PV to compete directly with conventional generation. For distributed grid-tied PV adding storage will reduce peak demand utility charges, as well as providing backup power during power grid failures. The largest long term impact of combined PV and battery systems may be for delivering reliable off-grid power to the billions of individuals globally without access to conventional power grids, or for billions more that suffer from daily power outages. PV module costs no longer dominate installed PV system costs. Balance-of-System (BOS) costs including the PV inverter and installation now contribute the majority of installed system costs. Battery costs are also dropping faster than installation and battery power converter systems. In each of these separate systems power converters have become a bottleneck for efficiency, cost and reliability. These bottlenecks are compounded in hybrid power conversion systems that combine separate PV and battery converters. Hybrid power conversion systems have required multiple power converters hardware units and multiple power conversion steps adding to efficiency losses, product and installation costs, and reliability issues. Ideal Power Converters has developed and patented a completely new theory of operation for electronic power converters using its indirect EnergyPacket Switching™ topology. It has established successful power converter products for both PV and battery systems, and its 3-Port Hybrid Converter is the first product to exploit the topology’s capability for the

  16. Effect of wind speed on performance of a solar-pv array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thousands of solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays have been installed over the past few years, but the effect of wind speed on the predicted performance of PV arrays is not usually considered by installers. An increase in wind speed will cool the PV array, and the electrical power of the PV modules will ...

  17. Full Steam Ahead for PV in US Homes?

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-15

    In October 2008, the United States Congress extended both the residential and commercial solar investment tax credits (ITCs) for an unprecedented eight years, lifted the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, removed the prohibition on utility use of the commercial credit, and eliminated restrictions on the use of both credits in conjunction with the Alternative Minimum Tax. These significant changes, which apply to systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009, will increase the value of the solar credits for residential system owners in particular, and are likely--in conjunction with state, local, and utility rebate programs targeting solar--to spur significant growth in residential, commercial, and utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) installations in the years ahead. This article focuses specifically on the residential credit, describing three areas in which removal of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC will have significant implications for PV rebate program administrators, PV system owners, and the PV industry.

  18. Market impact of a large-scale PV buildings program

    SciTech Connect

    Rannels, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper explores the rapidly changing solar technologies market and the potential impact of a new Federally sponsored Million Solar Roofs Initiative (MSRI) designed to encourage the domestic market for solar building technologies. Photovoltaic (PV) technology has reached a critical point in its development. Over the course of this decade, the PV industry has experienced tremendous growth through greater technology efficiency, the introduction of new solar technology applications (PV shingles, facades, etc.), and lower production costs. In order to achieve its full commercial potential, significant improvements are still needed along with the removal of existing market barriers. DOE`s analysis of the impact of the MSRI indicates that it could significantly reduce the cost of PV technology and improve efficiencies through manufacturing economies of scale, market experience, and industry competition.

  19. Instrumentation for Evaluating PV System Performance Losses from Snow

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Pruett, J.

    2009-01-01

    When designing a photovoltaic (PV) system for northern climates, the prospective installation should be evaluated with respect to the potentially detrimental effects of snow preventing solar radiation from reaching the PV cells. The extent to which snow impacts performance is difficult to determine because snow events also increase the uncertainty of the solar radiation measurement, and the presence of snow needs to be distinguished from other events that can affect performance. This paper describes two instruments useful for evaluating PV system performance losses from the presence of snow: (1) a pyranometer with a heater to prevent buildup of ice and snow, and (2) a digital camera for remote retrieval of images to determine the presence of snow on the PV array.

  20. The Ramakrishna Mission economic PV development initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.L.; Ullal, H.S.; Sherring, C.

    1998-09-01

    India is the world`s second most populous country, quickly approaching one billion persons. Although it has a well-developed electricity grid, many of the people have little or no access to electricity and all of the benefits associated with it. There are areas that are isolated from the grid and will not be connected for many years, if ever. One such area is the Sundarbans located in the delta region of the two great rivers, the Ganges and Brahmaputra, partially in India and partially in Bangladesh. It is estimated that 1.5 million people live in this area, crisscrossed by many islands and rivers, who have only marginal supplies of electricity generated primarily from diesel generators and batteries. Working with the regional non-governmental organization (NGO), the Ramakrishna Mission, and the West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Agency, the governments of India and the US initiated a rural electrification initiative to demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of photovoltaics to provide limited supplies of electricity for such applications as solar home lighting systems (SHS), water pumping, vaccine refrigeration, communications, and economic development activities. This paper details initial results from approximately 30 kilowatts of PV systems installed in the area, including socio-economic impacts and technical performance.

  1. Evaluation of PV Module Field Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, John; Silverman, Timothy; Miller, David C.; McNutt, Peter; Kempe, Michael; Deceglie, Michael

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes an effort to inspect and evaluate PV modules in order to determine what failure or degradation modes are occurring in field installations. This paper will report on the results of six site visits, including the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Hedge Array, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) Springerville, Central Florida Utility, Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), the TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification.

  2. pV3-Gold Visualization Environment for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babrauckas, Theresa L.

    1997-01-01

    A new visualization environment, pV3-Gold, can be used during and after a computer simulation to extract and visualize the physical features in the results. This environment, which is an extension of the pV3 visualization environment developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with guidance and support by researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center, features many tools that allow users to display data in various ways.

  3. Time-dependent first-principles approaches to PV materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2013-12-10

    Computational scheme for designing photovoltaic (PV) materials is presented. First-principles electron dynamics of photo-excitation and subsequent electron-hole splitting is performed based on the time-dependent density functional theory. Photo-induced enhancement of dipole moment was observed in a polar crystal and a donor-acceptor molecular pair. These experiences will pave a way to design PV material from first-principles simulations.

  4. Microgrid-Ready Solar PV; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Designing new solar projects to be 'microgrid-ready' enables the U.S. DoD, other federal agencies, and the private sector to plan future microgrid initiatives to utilize solar PV as a generating resource. This fact sheet provides background information with suggested language for several up-front considerations that can be added to a solar project procurement or request for proposal (RFP) that will help ensure that PV systems are built for future microgrid connection.

  5. P-V Criticality of Modified BTZ Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, J.; Kubeka, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the BTZ black hole in P-V critical point of view. As we know, the BTZ black hole does not have P-V critical behavior. So in this case, we introduce some anstaz that give us the modified BTZ black hole. Finally, we show that this modified BTZ black hole is satisfied by the equation of state of Liquid-gas phase transition.

  6. PV Derived Data for Predicting Performance; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Bill

    2015-09-14

    A method is described for providing solar irradiance data for modeling PV performance by using measured PV performance data and back-solving for the unknown direct normal irradiance (DNI) and diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), which can then be used to model the performance of PV systems of any size, PV array tilt, or PV array azimuth orientation. Ideally situated for using the performance data from PV modules with micro-inverters, the PV module operating current is used to determine the global tilted irradiance (GTI), and a separation model is then used to determine the DNI and DHI from the GTI.

  7. Draft genome sequences of three Xanthomonas translucens pathovar reference strains (pv. arrhenatheri, pv. poae and pv. phlei) with different specificities for forage grasses.

    PubMed

    Hersemann, Lena; Wibberg, Daniel; Widmer, Franco; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Kölliker, Roland

    2016-01-01

    As causal agents of bacterial wilt in pastures and meadows, bacteria of the species Xanthomonas translucens are a serious issue in forage grass production. So far, only little is known about host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level and the lack of comprehensive genome data impeded targeted breeding strategies towards resistant forage grass cultivars. Here we announce the draft genome sequences of three grass-pathogenic Xanthomonas translucens pathotype strains, i.e. pv. arrhenatheri LMG 727, pv. poae LMG 728 and pv. phlei LMG 730 isolated from Arrhenatherum elatius (L.) P. Beauv. ex J. Presl & C. Presl (Switzerland), Poa trivialis L. (Switzerland) and Phleum pratense L. (Norway), respectively. The genomes of all three strains revealed a non-canonical type III secretion system and a set of 22 type III effectors as common virulence-related traits. Distinct inter-pathovar differences were observed for the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene cluster and the presence of nonribosomal peptide synthetases. PMID:27536340

  8. Residential Solar PV Systems in the Carolinas: Opportunities and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Bandar Jubran; Holt, Kyra Moore; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia; Pratson, Lincoln

    2016-02-16

    This paper presents a first-order analysis of the feasibility and technical, environmental, and economic effects of large levels of solar photovoltaic (PV) penetration within the services areas of the Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC) and Duke Energy Progress (DEP). A PV production model based on household density and a gridded hourly global horizontal irradiance data set simulates hourly PV power output from roof-top installations, while a unit commitment and real-time economic dispatch (UC-ED) model simulates hourly system operations. We find that the large generating capacity of base-load nuclear power plants (NPPs) without ramping capability in the region limits PV integration levels to 5.3% (6510 MW) of 2015 generation. Enabling ramping capability for NPPs would raise the limit of PV penetration to near 9% of electricity generated. If the planned retirement of coal-fired power plants together with new installations and upgrades of natural gas and nuclear plants materialize in 2025, and if NPPs operate flexibly, then the share of coal-fired electricity will be reduced from 37% to 22%. A 9% penetration of electricity from PV would further reduce the share of coal-fired electricity by 4-6% resulting in a system-wide CO2 emissions rate of 0.33 to 0.40 tons/MWh and associated abatement costs of 225-415 (2015$ per ton). PMID:26745347

  9. Review of PV Inverter Technology Cost and Performance Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Navigant Consulting Inc.

    2006-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a major responsibility in the implementation of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has a major role in supporting inverter development, characterization, standards, certifications, and verifications. The Solar Energy Technologies Program recently published a Multiyear Technical Plan, which establishes a goal of reducing the Levelized Energy Cost (LEC) for photovoltaic (PV) systems to $0.06/kWh by 2020. The Multiyear Technical Plan estimates that, in order to meet the PV system goal, PV inverter prices will need to decline to $0.25-0.30 Wp by 2020. DOE determined the need to conduct a rigorous review of the PV Program's technical and economic targets, including the target set for PV inverters. NREL requested that Navigant Consulting Inc.(NCI) conduct a review of historical and projected cost and performance improvements for PV inverters, including identification of critical barriers identified and the approaches government might use to address them.

  10. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System

    PubMed Central

    El-Helw, Hadi M.; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  11. High Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, D.; Hambrick, J.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service (APS) and its partners have begun work on a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledgebase needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility and residential scale PV. Building upon the APS Community Power Project - Flagstaff Pilot, this project will analyze the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.5 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes as well as large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters are being designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models will be used to analyze the impacts of the PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/var control schemes. The goal of this paper is to provide insight and lessons learned on the early stages of high penetration PV deployment. Primarily focusing on modeling and data acquisition, this paper describes the overall project, early results, and plans for future phases of the project.

  12. Performance evaluation of stand alone hybrid PV-wind generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M. N. M.; Saharuddin, N. Z.; Sulaima, M. F.; Jali, Mohd Hafiz; Bukhari, W. M.; Bohari, Z. H.; Yahaya, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of standalone hybrid system on Photovoltaic (PV)-Wind generator at Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FKE), UTeM. The hybrid PV-Wind in UTeM system is combining wind turbine system with the solar system and the energy capacity of this hybrid system can generate up to charge the battery and supply the LED street lighting load. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the performance of PV-Wind hybrid generator. Solar radiation meter has been used to measure the solar radiation and anemometer has been used to measure the wind speed. The effectiveness of the PV-Wind system is based on the various data that has been collected and compared between them. The result shows that hybrid system has greater reliability. Based on the solar result, the correlation coefficient shows strong relationship between the two variables of radiation and current. The reading output current followed by fluctuate of solar radiation. However, the correlation coefficient is shows moderate relationship between the two variables of wind speed and voltage. Hence, the wind turbine system in FKE show does not operate consistently to produce energy source for this hybrid system compare to PV system. When the wind system does not fully operate due to inconsistent energy source, the other system which is PV will operate and supply the load for equilibrate the extra load demand.

  13. How Can We Make PV Modules Safer?: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    Safety is a prime concern for the photovoltaics (PV) industry. As a technology deployed on residential and commercial buildings, it is critical that PV not cause damage to the buildings nor harm the occupants. Many of the PV systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltage (300 to 600 Volts dc) that they may present potential hazards. These PV systems must be safe in terms of mechanical damage (nothing falls on someone), shock hazard (no risk of electrical shock when touching an exposed circuit element), and fire (the modules neither cause nor promote a fire). The present safety standards (IEC 61730 and UL 1703) do a good job of providing for design rules and test requirements for mechanical, shock, and spread of flame dangers. However, neither standard addresses the issue of electrical arcing within a module that can cause a fire. To make PV modules, they must be designed, built, and installed with an emphasis on minimizing the potential for open circuits and ground faults. This paper provides recommendations on redundant connection designs, robust mounting methods, and changes to the safety standards to yield safer PV modules.

  14. Continuing Developments in PV Risk Management: Strategies, Solutions, and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Speer, B.; Hill, R.

    2013-02-01

    As the PV industry matures, successful risk management practices will become more imperative to ensure investor confidence, control costs, and facilitate further growth. This report discusses several key aspects of risk management during the commercial- and utility-scale project life cycle, from identification of risks, to the process of mitigating and allocating those risks among project parties, to transferring those risks through insurance. The report also explores novel techniques in PV risk management, options to offload risks onto the capital markets, and innovative insurance policies (namely warranty policies) that address risks unique to the PV sector. One of the major justifications for robust risk management in the PV industry is the cost-reduction opportunities it affords. If the PV industry can demonstrate the capability to successfully manage its risks, thereby inspiring confidence in financiers, it may be able to obtain a lower cost of capital in future transactions. A lower cost of capital translates to a lower cost of energy, which will in turn enhance PV?s competitiveness at a time when it will have to rely less on subsidies to support its market penetration.

  15. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    PubMed

    El-Helw, Hadi M; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  16. Performance evaluation of stand alone hybrid PV-wind generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nasir, M. N. M.; Saharuddin, N. Z.; Sulaima, M. F.; Jali, Mohd Hafiz; Bukhari, W. M.; Bohari, Z. H.; Yahaya, M. S.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of standalone hybrid system on Photovoltaic (PV)-Wind generator at Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FKE), UTeM. The hybrid PV-Wind in UTeM system is combining wind turbine system with the solar system and the energy capacity of this hybrid system can generate up to charge the battery and supply the LED street lighting load. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the performance of PV-Wind hybrid generator. Solar radiation meter has been used to measure the solar radiation and anemometer has been used to measure the wind speed. The effectiveness of the PV-Wind system is based on the various data that has been collected and compared between them. The result shows that hybrid system has greater reliability. Based on the solar result, the correlation coefficient shows strong relationship between the two variables of radiation and current. The reading output current followed by fluctuate of solar radiation. However, the correlation coefficient is shows moderate relationship between the two variables of wind speed and voltage. Hence, the wind turbine system in FKE show does not operate consistently to produce energy source for this hybrid system compare to PV system. When the wind system does not fully operate due to inconsistent energy source, the other system which is PV will operate and supply the load for equilibrate the extra load demand.

  17. Lightweight PV Inverters: Dual Bi-Directional IGBTs Modules Enables Breakthrough PV Inverter Using Current Modulation Topology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-30

    Solar ADEPT Project: PV inverters convert DC power generated by modules into usable AC power. IPC’s initial 30kW 94lb. PV inverter reduces the weight of comparable 30kW PV inverters by 90%—reducing the cost of materials, manufacturing, shipping, and installation. With ARPA-E support, new bi-directional silicon power switches will be developed, commercialized, and utilized in IPC’s next-generation PV inverter. With these components, IPC will produce 100kW inverters that weight less than 100lb., reducing the weight of conventional 3,000lb. 100kW inverters by more than 95%. The new power switches will cut IPC’s $/W manufacturing cost in half, as well as further reduce indirect shipping and installation costs.

  18. All-AC, building integrated PV system for mass deployment of residential PV systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cammack, Kevin; Augenbraun, Joe; Sun, Dan

    2011-05-17

    Project Objective: Solar Red is developing novel PV installation methods and system designs that lower costs dramatically and allow seamless integration into the structure of any sloped roof using existing construction tools and processes. The overall objective of this project is to address the greatest barriers to massive adoption of residential and small commercial rooftop solar – scalability of installation and total cost of ownership - by moving Solar Red’s snap-in/snap-out PV installation method from the pre-prototype design phase to the development and construction of a deployed prototype system. Financial Summary: Funded through ARRA, DOE and Match Funding Original Project Budget: $229,310 o DOE/ARRA Funding: $150,000 o Match Funding: $79,310 Actual Cost: $216,598 o DOE/ARRA Funding: $150,000 o Match Funding: $120,087 Project Summary: Develop snap-in/snap-out mounting system for low-cost, thin-film solar panels – Lower installation cost – Lower sales costs – Lower training/expertise barriers

  19. Proposal of Xanthomonas translucens pv. pistaciae pv. nov., pathogenic to pistachio (Pistacia vera).

    PubMed

    Giblot-Ducray, Danièle; Marefat, Alireza; Gillings, Michael R; Parkinson, Neil M; Bowman, John P; Ophel-Keller, Kathy; Taylor, Cathy; Facelli, Evelina; Scott, Eileen S

    2009-12-01

    Strains of Xanthomonas translucens have caused dieback in the Australian pistachio industry for the last 15 years. Such pathogenicity to a dicotyledonous woody host contrasts with that of other pathovars of X. translucens, which are characterized by their pathogenicity to monocotyledonous plant families. Further investigations, using DNA-DNA hybridization, gyrB gene sequencing and integron screening, were conducted to confirm the taxonomic status of the X. translucens pathogenic to pistachio. DNA-DNA hybridization provided a clear classification, at the species level, of the pistachio pathogen as a X. translucens. In the gyrB-based phylogeny, strains of the pistachio pathogen clustered among the X. translucens pathovars as two distinct lineages. Integron screening revealed that the cassette arrays of strains of the pistachio pathogen were different from those of other Xanthomonas species, and again distinguished two groups. Together with previously reported pathogenicity data, these results confirm that the pistachio pathogen is a new pathovar of X. translucens and allow hypotheses about its origin. The proposed name is Xanthomonas translucens pv. pistaciae pv. nov. PMID:19748753

  20. Investigation of bias radiation effect on PV cell measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Chan, Joanne; Ng, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells are photo-electrical devices that convert light energy directly into electricity through the photovoltaic effect. PV cell assemblies are used to make solar modules employed in a variety of ways ranging from space applications to domestic energy consumption. Characterisation and performance testing of PV cells are critical to the development of PV technologies and growth of the solar industry. As new solar products are being developed, its energy conversion efficiency and other critical parameters must be accurately measured and tested against globally recognised metrological standards. The differential spectral responsivity (DSR) measurement is one of the primary methods for calibrating reference PV cells. This is done by calculating its spectral responsivities through measuring the AC short-circuit current produced by a PV cell under a modulated monochromatic radiation and different levels of steady-state broadband bias light radiation. It is observed that different types of bias light source will produce different signal-to-noise levels and significantly influence measurement accuracy. This paper aims to investigate the noise sources caused by different types of bias light sources (e.g. xenon arc and tungsten-halogen lamps) and the relevant measurement uncertainties so as to propose a guideline for selection of bias light source which can improve the signal-to-noise level and measurement uncertainty. The DSRs of the PV cells are measured using a commercial DSR measurement system under different levels of bias radiation from 0 to 1 kWm-2. The data analysis and uncertainty evaluation are presented in this paper using experimental data and mathematical tools.

  1. Regulation of nif gene expression in Enterobacter agglomerans: nucleotide sequence of the nifLA operon and influence of temperature and ammonium on its transcription.

    PubMed

    Siddavattam, D; Steibl, H D; Kreutzer, R; Klingmüller, W

    1995-12-20

    The nucleotide sequence of a plasmid-borne 3.9 kb XhoI-SmaI fragment comprising the 3'-region of the nifM gene, the nifL and nifA genes and the 5'-region of nifB gene of Enterobacter agglomerans was determined. The genes were identified by their homology to the corresponding nif genes of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A typical sigma 54-dependent promoter and a consensus NtrC-binding motif were identified upstream of nifL. The predicted amino acid sequence of NifL showed close similarities to NifL of K. pneumoniae and Azotobacter vinelandii. However, no histidine residue was found to correspond to histidine-304 of A. vinelandii NifL, which had been proposed to be required for the repressor activity of NifL. The NifA sequence with a putative DNA binding motif (Q(x3) A(x3) G(x5)I) and an ATP binding site in the C-terminal and central domains, respectively, resembles that of other known NifA proteins. The function of the nifL and nifA genes was demonstrated in vivo using a binary plasmid system by their ability to activate a nifH promoter-lacZ fusion at different temperatures and concentrations of NH4+. Maximal promoter activity occurred at 25 degrees C, and it appears that the sensitivity of NifA to elevated temperatures is independent of NifL. The expression of nifL inhibited promoter activity in the presence of NifA when the initial NH4+ concentration in the medium exceeded 4 mM. PMID:8544828

  2. DNA-based methodologies for the quantification of live and dead cells in formulated biocontrol products based on Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Torres, Rosario; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Solsona, Cristina; Teixidó, Neus

    2015-10-01

    Pantoea agglomerans strain CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against the major postharvest pathogens present on pome and citrus fruits. Dehydration, such as freeze-drying, spray-drying and fluidized bed drying is one of the best ways to formulate BCAs. In this work, the survival of CPA-2 cells after formulation was determined by dilution plating and molecular methods as qPCR alone and combined with a sample pretreatment with a propidium monoazide dye (PMA-qPCR) and they were used to calculate treatment concentrations in efficacy trials on postharvest oranges. Furthermore, no significant differences in CPA-2 survival were observed as determined by dilution plating and PMA-qPCR after both the freeze drying and fluidized bed drying processes; however, an interesting significant difference was observed in the spray dried product comparing all quantitative methods. A difference of 0.48 and 2.17 log10 CFU or cells g/dw was observed among PMA-qPCR with qPCR and dilution plating, respectively. According to our study, dilution plating was shown to be an unreliable tool for monitoring the survival of CPA-2 after spray drying. In contrast, the combination of PMA and qPCR enabled a quick and unequivocal methodology to enumerate viable and VBNC CPA-2 cells under stress-dried conditions. Efficacy trials showed that, after 3 days, spray drying formulation rehydrated with 10% non-fat skimmed milk (NFSM) was as effective as fresh cells to control Penicillium digitatum in oranges. PMID:26114590

  3. Planar holographic spectrum-splitting PV module design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael; Zhang, Deming; Vorndran, Shelby; Russo, Juan M.; Luscombe, Christine K.; Shaheen, Sean E.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2012-10-01

    A design is presented for a planar spectrum-splitting photovoltaic (PV) module using Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs). A repeating array of HOEs diffracts portions of the solar spectrum onto different PV materials arranged in alternating strips. Several combinations of candidate PV materials are explored, and theoretical power conversion efficiency is quantified and compared for each case. The holograms are recorded in dichromated gelatin (DCG) film, an inexpensive material which is easily encapsulated directly into the panel. If desired, the holograms can focus the light to achieve concentration. The side-by-side split spectrum layout has advantages compared to a stacked tandem cell approach: since the cells are electrically isolated, current matching constraints are eliminated. Combinations of dissimilar types of cells are also possible: including crystalline, thin film, and organic PV cells. Configurations which yield significant efficiency gain using relatively inexpensive PV materials are of particular interest. A method used to optimize HOE design to work with a different candidate cells and different package aspect ratios is developed and presented. (Aspect ratio is width of the cell strips vs. the thickness of the panel) The relationship between aspect ratio and HOE performance properties is demonstrated. These properties include diffraction efficiency, spectral selectivity, tracking alignment sensitivity, and uniformity of cell illumination.

  4. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: results from Gujarat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-10-01

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log-log domain at high frequencies f, ranging from {f}-1.23 to {f}-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a {f}-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an {f}-1.76 spectrum. This suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.

  5. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: Results from Gujarat

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-09-24

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log–log domain at high frequencies f,more » ranging from f-1.23 to f-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a f-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an f-1.76 spectrum. Furthermore, this suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.« less

  6. Monitoring results of PV for electric propulsion in recreational boating

    SciTech Connect

    Loois, G.; Wouters, F.P.H.; Koerts, G.M.; Weiden, T.C.J. van der

    1994-12-31

    In the future, grid connected systems will become the most important application of PV in Europe. Until that time a range of applications of autonomous systems needs to be developed to support the introduction of PV. Two projects concerning development and demonstration of PV-systems for powering ships with electric propulsion, aim to open a market with a technical potential of several hundreds of MWp in Europe. A secure energy supply, enhanced comfort (less noise and air pollution) and benevolence for the natural environment are the most significant advantages for introduction. Eighteen PV/battery-systems for electric propulsion of leisure boats (4 kWp in total) are currently realized and investigated in a pilot project in The Netherlands. The systems in use all run to the satisfaction of the users. Preliminary results of monitoring data on a few systems of these systems will be presented. A European project comprising about more than 75 PV-powered recreational ships (100 Wp to 2.5 kWp), involving shipbuilders, local authorities, utilities and interest groups has recently started.

  7. Recent Advances in PV Research and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Satyen K.

    1998-04-01

    The photovoltaic technology is making a major thrust in the commercial arena with 1997 worldwide production of PV modules reaching over 125 MW and growing at the rate of 20-25semiconductor materials and devices are emerging as strong contenders for PV applications even though silicon is still the 'work-horse' of the industry. Ultra-high efficiency solar cells fabricated from gallium arsenide (GaAs) and its ternary alloys like gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) are finding applications in space technology. Enormous progress has also been made on various thin-film solar cell technologies, which offer the promise for substantially reducing the cost of PV systems. Some of the leading contenders are amorphous and polycrystalline silicon, compound semiconductor thin films such as copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2) based alloys, and cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films. Exciting new developments are happening in the use of nano-particle semiconductor materials like titanium dioxide (TiO2) for low-cost PV devices. Intense research on these and other materials and devices is making a strong impact on the technology. In this presentation, a brief overview of recent advances in PV research will b e made and the trends and opportunities for future research directions will be identified.

  8. Estimation of PV energy production based on satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, G.

    2015-09-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) technology is an attractive source of power for systems without connection to power grid. Because of seasonal variations of solar radiation, design of such a power system requires careful analysis in order to provide required reliability. In this paper we present results of three-year measurements of experimental PV system located in Poland and based on polycrystalline silicon module. Irradiation values calculated from results of ground measurements have been compared with data from solar radiation databases employ calculations from of satellite observations. Good convergence level of both data sources has been shown, especially during summer. When satellite data from the same time period is available, yearly and monthly production of PV energy can be calculated with 2% and 5% accuracy, respectively. However, monthly production during winter seems to be overestimated, especially in January. Results of this work may be helpful in forecasting performance of similar PV systems in Central Europe and allow to make more precise forecasts of PV system performance than based only on tables with long time averaged values.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Pathogenic Variation of Common Blight Bacteria (Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans) Suggests Pathogen Coevolution with the Common Bean.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire, Alexander B C; Mabagala, Robert B; Guzmán, Pablo; Gepts, Paul; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2004-06-01

    ABSTRACT Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans, is one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Africa and other bean-growing regions. Xanthomonad-like bacteria associated with CBB in Malawi and Tanzania, East Africa, and in Wisconsin, U.S., were characterized based on brown pigment production, pathogenicity on common bean, detection with an X. campestris pv. phaseoli- or X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans-specific PCR primer pair, and repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses. The common bean gene pool (Andean or Middle American) from which each strain was isolated also was determined. In Malawi, X. campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans were isolated predominantly from Andean or Middle American beans, respectively. In Tanzania, X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans was most commonly isolated, irrespective of gene pool; whereas, in Wisconsin, only X. campestris pv. phaseoli was isolated from Andean red kidney beans. Three rep-PCR fingerprints were obtained for X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains; two were unique to East African strains, whereas the other was associated with strains collected from all other (mostly New World) locations. RFLP analyses with repetitive DNA probes revealed the same genetic diversity among X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains as did rep-PCR. These probes hybridized with only one or two fragments in the East African strains, but with multiple fragments in the other X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains. East African X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains were highly pathogenic on Andean beans, but were significantly less pathogenic on Middle American beans. In contrast, X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains from New World locations were highly pathogenic on beans of both gene pools. Together, these results indicate the

  10. PV Cell and Module Calibration Activities at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Anderberg, A.; Kiehl, J.; Mack, C.; Moriarty, T.; Ottoson, L.; Rummel, S.

    2005-11-01

    The performance of PV cells and modules with respect to standard reference conditions is a key indicator of progress of a given technology. This task provides the U.S. terrestrial PV community with the most accurate measurements that are technically possible in a timely fashion. The international module certification and accreditation program PVGap requires certification laboratories to maintain their calibration traceability path to groups like this one. The politics of a "world record" efficiency requires that an independent laboratory perform these measurements for credibility. Most manufacturers base their module peak watt rating upon standards and reference cells calibrated under this task. This task has been involved in reconciling disputes between manufacturers and their cell suppliers in terms of expected versus actual performance. This task has also served as a resource to the PV community for consultation on solar simulation, current versus voltage measurement instrumentation, measurement procedures and measurement artifacts.

  11. Budgeting for Solar PV Plant Operations & Maintenance: Practices and Pricing.

    SciTech Connect

    Enbar, Nadav; Weng, Dean; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2016-01-01

    With rising grid interconnections of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, greater attention is being trained on lifecycle performance, reliability, and project economics. Expected to meet production thresholds over a 20-30 year timeframe, PV plants require a steady diet of operations and maintenance (O&M) oversight to meet contractual terms. However, industry best practices are only just beginning to emerge, and O&M budgets—given the arrangement of the solar project value chain—appear to vary widely. Based on insights from in-depth interviews and survey research, this paper presents an overview of the utility-scale PV O&M budgeting process along with guiding rationales, before detailing perspectives on current plant upkeep activities and price points largely in the U.S. It concludes by pondering potential opportunities for improving upon existing O&M budgeting approaches in ways that can benefit the industry at-large.

  12. Budgeting for Solar PV Plant Operations & Maintenance: Practices and Pricing.

    SciTech Connect

    Enbar, Nadav; Weng, Dean; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2015-12-01

    With rising grid interconnections of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, greater attention is being trained on lifecycle performance, reliability, and project economics. Expected to meet production thresholds over a 20-30 year timeframe, PV plants require a steady diet of operations and maintenance (O&M) oversight to meet contractual terms. However, industry best practices are only just beginning to emerge, and O&M budgets—given the arrangement of the solar project value chain—appear to vary widely. Based on insights from in-depth interviews and survey research, this paper presents an overview of the utility-scale PV O&M budgeting process along with guiding rationales, before detailing perspectives on current plant upkeep activities and price points largely in the U.S. It concludes by pondering potential opportunities for improving upon existing O&M budgeting approaches in ways that can benefi t the industry at-large.

  13. Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyard, Glen E.; Lambarski, Timothy J.

    1997-02-01

    The Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems contract is a Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) cost-shared contract under Phase 4A1 for Product Driven Systems and Component Technologies. Phase 4A1 has the goals to improve the cost-effectiveness and manufacturing efficiency of PV end-products, optimize manufacturing and packaging methods, and generally improve balance-of-system performance, integration and manufacturing. This contract has the specific goal to reduce the installed PV system life cycle costs to the customer with the ultimate goal of increasing PV system marketability and customer acceptance. The specific objectives of the project are to develop certified, standardized, modular, pre-engineered products lines of our main stand-alone systems, the Modular Autonomous PV Power Supply (MAPPS) and PV-Generator Hybrid System (Photogenset). To date, we have designed a 200 W MAPPS and a 1 kW Photogenset and are in the process of having the MAPPS certified by Underwriters Laboratories (UL Listed) and approved for hazardous locations by Factory Mutual (FM). We have also developed a manufacturing plan for product line expansion for the MAPPS. The Photogenset will be fabricated in February 1997 and will also be UL Listed. Functionality testing will be performed at NREL and Sandia with the intentions of providing verification of performance and reliability and of developing test-based performance specifications. In addition to an expansion on the goals, objectives and status of the project, specific accomplishments and benefits are also presented in this paper.

  14. Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J.; Smith, Jeff; Dugan, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating

  15. Modular Power Converters for PV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2012-05-01

    This report describes technical opportunities to serve as parts of a technological roadmap for Shoals Technologies Group in power electronics for PV applications. There are many different power converter circuits that can be used for solar inverter applications. The present applications do not take advantage of the potential for using common modules. We envision that the development of a power electronics module could enable higher reliability by being durable and flexible. Modules would have fault current limiting features and detection circuits such that they can limit the current through the module from external faults and can identify and isolate internal faults such that the remaining modules can continue to operate with only minimal disturbance to the utility or customer. Development of a reliable, efficient, low-cost, power electronics module will be a key enabling technology for harnessing more power from solar panels and enable plug and play operation. Power electronics for computer power supplies, communication equipment, and transportation have all targeted reliability and modularity as key requirements and have begun concerted efforts to replace monolithic components with collections of common smart modules. This is happening on several levels including (1) device level with intelligent control, (2) functional module level, and (3) system module. This same effort is needed in power electronics for solar applications. Development of modular units will result in standard power electronic converters that will have a lower installed and operating cost for the overall system. These units will lead to increased adaptability and flexibility of solar inverters. Incorporating autonomous fault current limiting and reconfiguration capabilities into the modules and having redundant modules will lead to a durable converter that can withstand the rigors of solar power generation for more than 30 years. Our vision for the technology roadmap is that there is no need

  16. Outdoor PV Module Degradation of Current-Voltage Parameters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. M.; Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module degradation rate analysis quantifies the loss of PV power output over time and is useful for estimating the impact of degradation on the cost of energy. An understanding of the degradation of all current-voltage (I-V) parameters helps to determine the cause of the degradation and also gives useful information for the design of the system. This study reports on data collected from 12 distinct mono- and poly-crystalline modules deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Most modules investigated showed < 0.5%/year decrease in maximum power due to short-circuit current decline.

  17. Toward integrated PV panels and power electronics using printing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ababei, Cristinel; Yuvarajan, Subbaraya; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, we review the latest developments in the area of printing technologies with an emphasis on the fabrication of control-embedded photovoltaics (PV) with on-board active and passive devices. We also review the use of power converters and maximum power point tracking (MPPT) circuits with PV panels. Our focus is on the investigation of the simplest implementations of such circuits in view of their integration with solar cells using printing technologies. We see this concept as potentially enabling toward further cost reduction. Besides a discussion as to feasibility, we shall also present some projections and guidelines toward possible integration. (author)

  18. PV cell and module performance measurement capabilities at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Rummel, S.; Emery, K.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.; Anderberg, A.; Dunlavy, D.; Ottoson, L.

    1998-09-01

    The Photovoltaic (PV) Cell and Module Performance Characterization team at NREL supports the entire photovoltaic community by providing: secondary calibrations of photovoltaic cells and modules; efficiency measurements with respect to a given set of standard reporting conditions; verification of contract efficiency milestones; and current versus voltage (I-V) measurements under various conditions of temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Support is also provided to in-house programs in device fabrication, module stability, module reliability, PV systems evaluations, and alternative rating methods by performing baseline testing, specialized measurements and other assistance when required. The I-V and spectral responsivity equipment used to accomplish these tasks are described in this paper.

  19. Quantifying PV module microclimates and translation into accelerated weathering protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nancy H.; Scott, Kurt P.

    2014-10-01

    Long term reliability is not well addressed by current standards for PV modules or components, and developing accelerated weathering stress protocols to test the resistance of key components to wear-out is an active area of research. A first step is to understand and quantify the range of actual stresses modules will encounter in the various mounting configurations and in-service environments. In this paper, we use real-world data to benchmark PV module service environments in hot/dry, hot/wet, and temperate environments, with subsequent analysis to translate the microclimate data into a portfolio of practical weathering instrument settings.

  20. Progress Toward Sequestering Carbon Nanotubes in PmPV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-diocty-loxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV] is a candidate means of promoting dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into epoxies for making strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. Bare SWNTs cannot be incorporated because they are not soluble in epoxies. In the present approach, one exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around SWNTs without chemically bonding to them.

  1. Selecting Solar: Insights into Residential Photovoltaic (PV) Quote Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Carolyn; Margolis, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Before investing in a system, a prospective PV customer must not only have initial concept 'buy in,' but also be able to evaluate the tradeoffs associated with different system parameters. Prospective customers might need to evaluate disparate costs for each system attribute by comparing multiple bids. The difficulty of making such an evaluation with limited information can create a cognitive barrier to proceeding with the investment. This analysis leverages recently available data from EnergySage, an online solar marketplace, to offer the first data-driven characterization of quote variation faced by prospective PV customers, lending early insight into the decisions customers face once they have initial buy-in.

  2. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2008-07-06

    Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more

  3. Comparison of three different methods of perturbing the potential vorticity field in mesoscale forecasts of Mediterranean heavy precipitation events: PV-gradient, PV-adjoint and PV-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vich, M.; Romero, R.; Richard, E.; Arbogast, P.; Maynard, K.

    2010-09-01

    Heavy precipitation events occur regularly in the western Mediterranean region. These events often have a high impact on the society due to economic and personal losses. The improvement of the mesoscale numerical forecasts of these events can be used to prevent or minimize their impact on the society. In previous studies, two ensemble prediction systems (EPSs) based on perturbing the model initial and boundary conditions were developed and tested for a collection of high-impact MEDEX cyclonic episodes. These EPSs perturb the initial and boundary potential vorticity (PV) field through a PV inversion algorithm. This technique ensures modifications of all the meteorological fields without compromising the mass-wind balance. One EPS introduces the perturbations along the zones of the three-dimensional PV structure presenting the local most intense values and gradients of the field (a semi-objective choice, PV-gradient), while the other perturbs the PV field over the MM5 adjoint model calculated sensitivity zones (an objective method, PV-adjoint). The PV perturbations are set from a PV error climatology (PVEC) that characterizes typical PV errors in the ECMWF forecasts, both in intensity and displacement. This intensity and displacement perturbation of the PV field is chosen randomly, while its location is given by the perturbation zones defined in each ensemble generation method. Encouraged by the good results obtained by these two EPSs that perturb the PV field, a new approach based on a manual perturbation of the PV field has been tested and compared with the previous results. This technique uses the satellite water vapor (WV) observations to guide the correction of initial PV structures. The correction of the PV field intents to improve the match between the PV distribution and the WV image, taking advantage of the relation between dark and bright features of WV images and PV anomalies, under some assumptions. Afterwards, the PV inversion algorithm is applied to run

  4. Climatically Diverse Data Set for Flat-Plate PV Module Model Validations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, B.

    2013-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module I-V curves were measured at Florida, Colorado, and Oregon locations to provide data for the validation and development of models used for predicting the performance of PV modules.

  5. Dynamic Model Validation of PV Inverters Under Short-Circuit Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Bravo, R.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) modules have dramatically decreased in price in the past few years, spurring the expansion of photovoltaic deployment. Residential and commercial rooftop installations are connected to the distribution network; large-scale installation PV power plants (PVPs) have benefited from tax incentives and the low cost of PV modules. As the level penetration of PV generation increases, the impact on power system reliability will also be greater. Utility power system planners must consider the role of PV generation in power systems more realistically by representing PV generation in dynamic stability analyses. Dynamic models of PV inverters have been developed in the positive sequence representation. NREL has developed a PV inverter dynamic model in PSCAD/EMTDC. This paper validates the dynamic model with an actual hardware bench test conducted by Southern California Edison's Distributed Energy Resources laboratory. All the fault combinations -- symmetrical and unsymmetrical -- were performed in the laboratory. We compare the simulation results with the bench test results.

  6. Draft genome sequences of five Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains isolated in France.

    PubMed

    Cunty, Amandine; Cesbron, Sophie; Briand, Martial; Carrère, Sébastien; Poliakoff, Françoise; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Manceau, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum causes necrotic spots on the leaves of Actinidia deliciosa and Actinidia chinensis. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum has been detected in New Zealand, Australia, France and Spain. Four lineages were previously identified within the P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum species group. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of five strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum representative of lineages 1, 2 and 4, isolated in France. The whole genomes of strains isolated in New Zealand, representative of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum lineages 1 and 3, were previously sequenced. The availability of supplementary P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum genome sequences will be useful for developing molecular tools for pathogen detection and for performing comparative genomic analyses to study the relationship between P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum and other kiwifruit pathogens, such as P. syringae pv. actinidiae. PMID:27237113

  7. Genital warts in Burmeister's porpoises: characterization of Phocoena spinipinnis papillomavirus type 1 (PsPV-1) and evidence for a second, distantly related PsPV.

    PubMed

    Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Cassonnet, Patricia; Rector, Annabel; Desaintes, Christian; Van Waerebeek, Koen; Alfaro-Shigueto, Joanna; Van Ranst, Marc; Orth, Gérard

    2007-07-01

    We identified sequences from two distantly related papillomaviruses in genital warts from two Burmeister's porpoises, including a PV antigen-positive specimen, and characterized Phocoena spinipinnis papillomavirus type 1 (PsPV-1). The PsPV-1 genome comprises 7879 nt and presents unusual features. It lacks an E7, an E8 and a bona fide E5 open reading frame (ORF) and has a large E6 ORF. PsPV-1 L1 ORF showed the highest percentage of nucleotide identity (54-55 %) with human papillomavirus type 5, bovine papillomavirus type 3 (BPV-3) and Tursiops truncatus papillomavirus type 2 (TtPV-2). This warrants the classification of PsPV-1 as the prototype of the genus Omikronpapillomavirus. PsPV-1 clustered with TtPV-2 in the E6 and E1E2 phylogenetic trees and with TtPV-2 and BPV-3 in the L2L1 tree. This supports the hypothesis that PV evolution may not be monophyletic across all genes. PMID:17554024

  8. The Biology and Biological Activity of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis (Pst) is a disease of plants in the family Asteraceae. A distinctive characteristic of this bacterial pathogen is the symptom of apical chlorosis in infected plants, caused by the phytotoxin tagetitoxin. Strains of Pst have been isolated from several plant species ...

  9. SCREENING CITRUS GERMPLASM FOR RESISTANCE TO XANTHOMONAS ANONOPODIS PV. CITRI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus bacterial canker (causal agent Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac)) is a serious threat to the citrus industry. Currently there are no effective means to control citrus canker. Our objective was to determine the resistance of selected Citrus species, citrus hybrids, and citrus relatives to...

  10. Ballast-mounted PV arrays: Phase 2 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Edward C. Kern

    2000-03-01

    The expansive flat rooftops of industrial and commercial buildings across America offer the largest, most secure, and potentially least-cost real estate opportunity to install massive amounts of solar photovoltaic generation in the building sector. Unfortunately, mechanical penetration of roofing membranes is very expensive and perceived by building owners and operators to increase the likelihood of leaking. In response Ascension Technology has pioneered the development of low-cost ballasted approaches for mounting PV arrays. Recently, however, we have experienced our first two instances in which strong winds have moved our arrays on rooftops and heightened our interest, and the PV industries' need, to develop zero-penetration mounting techniques that are more secure, yet remain low in cost. In this PV BONUS project, Ascension Technology and its partners addressed wind loading on solar panels and the suitability of using frictional forces between ballast trays and roofing materials to resist PV arrays sliding on rooftops. The primary goal of the project is to capture the potential cost savings made possible by ballast-mounting by showing under what conditions it can satisfy wind loading concerns. A secondary goal is to address a more geographically constrained concern regarding withstanding seismic forces.

  11. Lettuce cultivar influences Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians population levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial Leaf Spot, caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv), is a widespread and economically important disease of lettuce. Cultivars with resistance to Xcv have been identified, but mechanisms for resistance in this pathosystem have not been investigated. We hypothesized that susceptibl...

  12. Recent advances in PV systems technology development in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, M.; Grottke, M.; Weiss, I.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of the photovoltaics (PV) systems technology development were to study several aspects of plant design, monitoring, control, operation, and management of different types of photovoltaic plants. Unsolved problems were to be identified and analysed, and guidelines to improve the monitoring system were to be developed. Principal studies are summarized.

  13. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrova, Olga; Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  14. Selecting Solar. Insights into Residential Photovoltaic (PV) Quote Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Carolyn; Margolis, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This analysis leverages available data from EnergySage, an online solar marketplace, to offer the first data-driven characterization of quote variation faced by prospective PV customers, lending early insight into the decisions customers face once they have initial buy-in.

  15. Opportunities and Challenges for Power Electronics in PV Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Deline, C.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Marion, B.; Granata, J.

    2011-02-01

    The presentation describes the value of adding DC converters and other power electronics to modules to improve their output even when shading or bad cells would otherwise decrease the module output. The presentation was part of a workshop sponsored by ARPA-E exploring the opportunities for power electronics to support PV applications.

  16. Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae Strain LMG 941

    PubMed Central

    Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Sharma, Vikas; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We report the 5.1-Mb genome sequence of Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae strain LMG 941, the causal agent of bacterial black spot in mango. Apart from evolutionary studies, the draft genome will be a valuable resource for the epidemiological studies and quarantine of this phytopathogen. PMID:22582385

  17. Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae Strain LMG 859

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vikas; Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We report the 4.94-Mb genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae strain LMG 859, the causal agent of bacterial leaf blight disease in pomegranate. The draft genome will aid in comparative genomics, epidemiological studies, and quarantine of this devastating phytopathogen. PMID:22493202

  18. Detection of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. glycinea in soybean seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is one of 52 that will compose the second edition of the Laboratory Manual for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria from Seeds and other Planting Material, to be published by the American Phytopathological Society. The chapter presents a description of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. ...

  19. PV industry growth and module reliability in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenvidhya, Dhirayut; Seapan, Manit; Sangpongsanont, Yaowanee; Chenvidhya, Tanokkorn; Limsakul, Chamnan; Songprakorp, Roongrojana

    2015-09-01

    The PV applications in Thailand are now installed more than 1.2 GWp cumulatively. It is due to the National Renewable Energy Program and its targets. In the latest Alternative Energy Development Plan (AEDP), the PV electricity production target has increased from 2 GWp to 3 GWp. With this rapid growth, customers and manufacturers seek for module standard testing. So far over one thousands of PV modules per annum have been tested since 2012. The normal tests include type approval test according to TIS standard, acceptance test and testing for local standard development. For type test, the most module failure was found during damp heat test. For annual evaluation test, the power degradation and delamination of power was found between 0 to 6 percent from its nameplate after deployment of 0 to 5 years in the field. For thin-film module, the degradation and delamination was found in range of 0 to 13 percent (about 5 percent on average) from its nameplate for the modules in operation with less than 5 years. However, for the PV modules at the reference site on campus operated for 12 years, the power degradation was ranging from 10 to 15 percent. Therefore, a long term performance assessment needs to be considered to ensure the system reliability.

  20. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae strain LMG 859.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar; Patil, Prabhu B

    2012-05-01

    We report the 4.94-Mb genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae strain LMG 859, the causal agent of bacterial leaf blight disease in pomegranate. The draft genome will aid in comparative genomics, epidemiological studies, and quarantine of this devastating phytopathogen. PMID:22493202

  1. Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2006-10-03

    Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

  2. National solar technology roadmap: Wafer-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2007-06-01

    This report applies to all bulk-silicon-based PV technologies, including those based on Czochralski, multicrystalline, float-zone wafers, and melt-grown crystals that are 100 μm or thicker, such as ribbons, sheet, or spheral silicon.

  3. Development of PMA real-time PCR method to quantify viable cells of Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2, an antagonist to control the major postharvest diseases on oranges.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Crespo-Sempere, Ana; Torres, Rosario

    2014-06-16

    Dilution plating is the quantification method commonly used to estimate the population level of postharvest biocontrol agents, but this method does not permit a distinction among introduced and indigenous strains. Recently, molecular techniques based on DNA amplification such as quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) have been successfully applied for their high strain-specific detection level. However, the ability of qPCR to distinguish viable and nonviable cells is limited. A promising strategy to avoid this issue relies on the use of nucleic acid intercalating dyes, such as propidium monoazide (PMA), as a sample pretreatment prior to the qPCR. The objective of this study was to optimize a protocol based on PMA pre-treatment samples combined with qPCR to distinguish and quantify viable cells of the biocontrol agent P. agglomerans CPA-2 applied as a postharvest treatment on orange. The efficiency of PMA-qPCR method under the established conditions (30μM PMA for 20min of incubation followed by 30min of LED light exposure) was evaluated on an orange matrix. Results showed no difference in CFU or cells counts of viable cells between PMA-qPCR and dilution plating. Samples of orange matrix inoculated with a mixture of viable/dead cells showed 5.59log10 CFU/ml by dilution plating, 8.25log10 cells/ml by qPCR, and 5.93log10 cells/ml by PMA-qPCR. Furthermore, samples inoculated with heat-killed cells were not detected by dilution plating and PMA-qPCR, while by qPCR was of 8.16log10 cells/ml. The difference in quantification cycles (Cq) among qPCR and PMA-qPCR was approximately 16cycles, which means a reduction of 65,536 fold of the dead cells detected. In conclusion, PMA-qPCR method is a suitable tool for quantify viable CPA-2 cells, which could be useful to estimate the ability of this antagonist to colonize the orange surface. PMID:24786552

  4. Rooftop PV system. PV:BONUS Phase 3B, final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Under the PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar developed, demonstrated and commercialized two new lightweight, flexible BIPV modules specifically designed as replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and can be used to address the even larger roofing-replacement market. An important design feature of these modules, which minimizes the installation and balance-of-system costs, is their ability to be installed by conventional roofing contractors without special training. The modules are fabricated from high-efficiency, triple-junction spectrum-splitting a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. These cells are produced on thin, flexible stainless steel substrates and encapsulated with polymer materials. The Phase 3 program began in August 1995. The principal tasks and goals of this program, which have all been successfully completed by ECD and United Solar, are described in the body and appendices of this report.

  5. Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Model Group: Installed Solar PV System Prices (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, A. C.; Woodhouse, M.; James, T.

    2011-02-01

    EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Program is charged with leading the Secretary's SunShot Initiative to reduce the cost of electricity from solar by 75% to be cost competitive with conventional energy sources without subsidy by the end of the decade. As part of this Initiative, the program has funded the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop module manufacturing and solar PV system installation cost models to ensure that the program's cost reduction targets are carefully aligned with current and near term industry costs. The NREL cost analysis team has leveraged the laboratories' extensive experience in the areas of project finance and deployment, as well as industry partnerships, to develop cost models that mirror the project cost analysis tools used by project managers at leading U.S. installers. The cost models are constructed through a "bottoms-up" assessment of each major cost element, beginning with the system's bill of materials, labor requirements (type and hours) by component, site-specific charges, and soft costs. In addition to the relevant engineering, procurement, and construction costs, the models also consider all relevant costs to an installer, including labor burdens and overhead rates, supply chain costs, and overhead and materials inventory costs, and assume market-specific profits.

  6. DOE Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0000153 PV Manufacturing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-02-01

    This draft report summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy PV Manufacturing Request for Information (RFI), DE-FOA-0000153, that was released in September 2009. The PV Manufacturing Initiative is intended to help facilitate the development of a strong PV manufacturing industry in the United States.

  7. Distributed Solar PV for Electricity System Resiliency: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    Distributed Solar PV systems have the potential of increasing the grid's resiliency to unforeseen events, such as extreme weather events and attacks. This paper presents the role that distributed PV can play in electric grid resiliency, introduces basic system design requirements and options, and discusses the regulatory and policy options for supporting the use of distributed PV for the purpose of increased electricity resiliency.

  8. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: Results from Gujarat

    SciTech Connect

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-09-24

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log–log domain at high frequencies f, ranging from f-1.23 to f-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a f-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an f-1.76 spectrum. Furthermore, this suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.

  9. Experimental comparison of PV-smoothing controllers using distributed generators

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi; Morino, Kimio; Hawkins, John N.; Arellano, Brian; Shinji, Takao; Ogata, Takao; Tadokoro, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    The power output variability of photovoltaic systems can affect local electrical grids in locations with high renewable energy penetrations or weak distribution or transmission systems. In those rare cases, quick controllable generators (e.g., energy storage systems) or loads can counteract the destabilizing effects by compensating for the power fluctuations. Previously, control algorithms for coordinated and uncoordinated operation of a small natural gas engine-generator (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output were optimized using MATLAB/Simulink simulations. The simulations demonstrated that a traditional generation resource such as a natural gas genset in combination with a battery would smooth the photovoltaic output while using a smaller battery state of charge (SOC) range and extending the life of the battery. This paper reports on the experimental implementation of the coordinated and uncoordinated controllers to verify the simulations and determine the differences in the controllers. The experiments were performed with the PNM PV and energy storage Prosperity site and a gas engine-generator located at the Aperture Center at Mesa Del Sol in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two field demonstrations were performed to compare the different PV smoothing control algorithms: (1) implementing the coordinated and uncoordinated controls while switching off a subsection of the PV array at precise times on successive clear days, and (2) comparing the results of the battery and genset outputs for the coordinated control on a high variability day with simulations of the coordinated and uncoordinated controls. It was found that for certain PV power profiles the SOC range of the battery may be larger with the coordinated control, but the total amp-hours through the battery-which approximates battery wear-will always be smaller with the coordinated control.

  10. Phylogenetic relationships among global populations of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J R; Taylor, R K; Weir, B S; Romberg, M K; Vanneste, J L; Luck, J; Alexander, B J R

    2012-11-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, the causal agent of canker in kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) vines, was first detected in Japan in 1984, followed by detections in Korea and Italy in the early 1990s. Isolates causing more severe disease symptoms have recently been detected in several countries with a wide global distribution, including Italy, New Zealand, and China. In order to characterize P. syringae pv. actinidiae populations globally, a representative set of 40 isolates from New Zealand, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Australia, and Chile were selected for extensive genetic analysis. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of housekeeping, type III effector and phytotoxin genes was used to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships between P. syringae pv. actinidiae isolates worldwide. Four additional isolates, including one from China, for which shotgun sequence of the whole genome was available, were included in phylogenetic analyses. It is shown that at least four P. syringae pv. actinidiae MLSA groups are present globally, and that marker sets with differing evolutionary trajectories (conserved housekeeping and rapidly evolving effector genes) readily differentiate all four groups. The MLSA group designated here as Psa3 is the strain causing secondary symptoms such as formation of cankers, production of exudates, and cane and shoot dieback on some kiwifruit orchards in Italy and New Zealand. It is shown that isolates from Chile also belong to this MLSA group. MLSA group Psa4, detected in isolates collected in New Zealand and Australia, has not been previously described. P. syringae pv. actinidiae has an extensive global distribution yet the isolates causing widespread losses to the kiwifruit industry can all be traced to a single MLSA group, Psa3. PMID:22877312

  11. Field Demonstration of Using Advanced PV Inverter Functionality to Mitigate the Impacts of High-Penetration PV Grid Integration on the Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Barry; Gebeyehu, Araya

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes a field demonstration that was completed to show the ability of currently installed PV inverters to implement advanced PV inverter functionality and that such functionality was effective at reducing the voltage-related PV impacts of high-penetration PV integration. A distribution circuit was instrumented and then tested for a two week period using off-unity power factor operation. Specifically, an inductive power factor of -0.95 was demonstrated. The results show that the PV inverters were capable of such operation and that the use of off-unity power factor operation was highly effective at reducing the voltage-related impacts of the PV systems interconnected to the circuits used in the demonstration. The impacts of using off-unity power factor operation - resulting in additional reactive current flow on the distribution circuit - are also presented and analyzed.

  12. Impact of siderophore production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 on epiphytic fitness and biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea 1a/96.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annette; Braun, Sascha D; Büttner, Petra; Expert, Dominique; Völksch, Beate; Ullrich, Matthias S; Weingart, Helge

    2010-05-01

    The use of naturally occurring microbial antagonists to suppress plant diseases offers a favorable alternative to classical methods of plant protection. The soybean epiphyte Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93 shows great potential for controlling P. syringae pv. glycinea, the causal agent of bacterial blight of soybean. Its activity against P. syringae pv. glycinea is highly reproducible even in field trials, and the suppression mechanisms involved are of special interest. In this work we demonstrated that P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 produced a significantly larger amount of siderophores than the pathogen P. syringae pv. glycinea produced. While P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 and P. syringae pv. glycinea produce the same siderophores, achromobactin and pyoverdin, the regulation of siderophore biosynthesis in the former organism is very different from that in the latter organism. The epiphytic fitness of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 mutants defective in siderophore biosynthesis was determined following spray inoculation of soybean leaves. The population size of the siderophore-negative mutant P. syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93DeltaSid was 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild type 10 days after inoculation. The growth deficiency was compensated for when wound inoculation was used, indicating the availability of iron in the presence of small lesions on the leaves. Our results suggest that siderophore production has an indirect effect on the biocontrol activity of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93. Although siderophore-defective mutants of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 still suppressed development of bacterial blight caused by P. syringae pv. glycinea, siderophore production enhanced the epiphytic fitness and thus the competitiveness of the antagonist. PMID:20208028

  13. Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California: Year 2 Project Update; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.; Neal, R.

    2012-08-01

    Southern California Edison (SCE) is well into a five-year project to install a total of 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy within its utility service territory. Typical installations to date are 1-3 MW peak rooftop PV systems that interconnect to medium-voltage urban distribution circuits or larger (5 MW peak) ground-mounted systems that connect to medium-voltage rural distribution circuits. Some of the PV system interconnections have resulted in distribution circuits that have a significant amount of PV generation compared to customer load, resulting in high-penetration PV integration scenarios. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE have assembled a team of distribution modeling, resource assessment, and PV inverter technology experts in order to investigate a few of the high-penetration PV distribution circuits. Currently, the distribution circuits being studied include an urban circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 46% and a rural circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 60%. In both cases, power flow on the circuit reverses direction, compared to traditional circuit operation, during periods of high PV power production and low circuit loading. Research efforts during year two of the five-year project were focused on modeling the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, the development and installation of distribution circuit data acquisition equipment appropriate for quantifying the impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, and investigating high-penetration PV impact mitigation strategies. This paper outlines these research efforts and discusses the following activities in more detail: the development of a quasi-static time-series test feeder for evaluating high-penetration PV integration modeling tools; the advanced inverter functions being investigated for deployment in the project's field demonstration and a power hardware-in-loop test of a 500-kW PV inverter implementing a

  14. Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-01-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

  15. Solar Photovoltaic Economic Development: Building and Growing a Local PV Industry, August 2011 (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry is forecast to grow, and it represents an opportunity for economic development and job creation in communities throughout the United States. This report helps U.S. cities evaluate economic opportunities in the PV industry. It serves as a guide for local economic development offices in evaluating their community?s competitiveness in the solar PV industry, assessing the viability of solar PV development goals, and developing strategies for recruiting and retaining PV companies to their areas.

  16. Masked polycythemia vera (mPV): results of an international study.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Tiziano; Thiele, Jürgen; Gisslinger, Heinz; Finazzi, Guido; Carobbio, Alessandra; Rumi, Elisa; Luigia Randi, Maria; Betozzi, Irene; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Pieri, Lisa; Carrai, Valentina; Gisslinger, Bettina; Müllauer, Leonhard; Ruggeri, Marco; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2014-01-01

    We examined the baseline features and clinical outcomes of 140 patients presenting with JAK2V617F positivity and a bone marrow morphology conforming with WHO criteria of polycythemia vera (PV), but a hemoglobin level of <18.5 g/dL in males (range 16.0-18.4) and <16.5 g/dL in females (range 15.0-16.4). This cohort operationally referred to as masked PV (mPV) was compared with 257 patients with overt PV and displayed male predominance, a more frequent history of arterial thrombosis and thrombocytosis. Incidence of thrombosis was similar between the two groups but mPV displayed significantly higher rates of progression to myelofibrosis and acute leukemia and inferior survival. In multivariable analysis mPV diagnosis was an independent predictor of poor survival along with age >65 years and leukocyte count >10 × 10(9) /L. Our data suggest that mPV is a heterogeneous myeloproliferative neoplasia and not necessarily an early/ pre-polycythemic form of classical PV that at onset in a small fraction of patients clinically may mimic essential thrombocythemia. On the other hand, the majority mPV may have a longer prodrome of undiagnosed PV or a disease biology akin to primary myelofibrosis-post PV myelofibrosis that could explain the worsening of outcome in comparison to overt/classical manifestations. PMID:23996471

  17. How PV system ownership can impact the market value of residential homes

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Johnson, Jamie L.

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple ways for a homeowner to obtain the electricity generating and savings benefits offered by a photovoltaic (PV) system. These include purchasing a PV system through various financing mechanisms, or by leasing the PV system from a third party with multiple options that may include purchase, lease renewal or PV system removal. The different ownership options available to homeowners presents a challenge to appraisal and real estate professionals during a home sale or refinance in terms of how to develop a value that is reflective of the PV systems operational characteristics, local market conditions, and lender and underwriter requirements. This paper presents these many PV system ownership options with a discussion of what considerations an appraiser must make when developing the contributory value of a PV system to a residential property.

  18. High (500X) concentration PV array conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.L.

    1984-05-01

    A conceptual design of a high concentration PV array using the Stanford/EPRI 500X silicon cell is presented. Work objectives were to identify an array concept with promise for economic viability, develop prelimiary component (subsystem) designs for such an array, and identify key component developmental issues. Design criterion was minimum levelized busbar energy cost, BBEC. New methodology developed permitted meaningful trade studies based on variation of subsystem costs and a 15 /kWh current year dollars target for BBEC. Subsystem designs include the tracking support structure and the PV module. The module includes the Fresnel lens parquet, the cell package, the backplate heat rejector and the module housing. Estimated cost for the array is in the range of allowed costs established by BBEC target and balance-of-system cost estimates. Key developmental issues are attaching the cell to the cell mount, thermal transients, and panel lifetime.

  19. Maximizing Solar Energy Capture Through Multi-Azimuth PV Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    By orienting photovoltaic (PV) arrays in multiple directions, significantly greater energy capture can be realized in high latitude locations. Conventional wisdom dictates orienting PV panels south (in the northern hemisphere), but multi-azimuth arrays can confer several advantages during the summer months: - Nearly even power production over a large part of the day (20+ hours) - Reduced issues with power quality in grid interactive systems - Support higher loads in independent, off-grid systems - Reduced energy storage (battery) requirements in off-grid systems This poster will present two multi-azimuth systems, one a grid-interactive system deployed at Summit Station, Greenland; the second an independent, off-grid system supporting a science project near Toolik Field Station, Alaska.

  20. Best practices for PV solar home system projects

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove-Davies, M.; Cabraal, A.

    1994-12-31

    PV solar home systems (SHS) are increasingly employed as an energy supply option for rural populations. The past 20 years` experience with small-scale SHS programs in developing countries has had mixed results. However, efforts in recent years have been more successful. In support of World Bank lending operations, the Banks Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE) has undertaken a series of case studies of currently operating SHS programs in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, and the Dominican Republic. These programs have varying degrees of government, NGO, and private sector involvement. This paper summarizes ASTAE`s draft Solar Photovoltaics: Best Practices for Household Electrification report which identifies the institutional, financial, and technical factors fundamental to the success of a PV solar home system project. The final version of the ASTAE report will incorporate comments from an international group of peer reviewers.

  1. High-Penetration PV Integration Handbook for Distribution Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, Rich; Woyak, Jeremy; Costyk, David; Hambrick, Josh; Mather, Barry

    2016-01-01

    This handbook has been developed as part of a five-year research project which began in 2010. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Southern California Edison (SCE), Quanta Technology, Satcon Technology Corporation, Electrical Distribution Design (EDD), and Clean Power Research (CPR) teamed together to analyze the impacts of high-penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) systems interconnected onto the SCE distribution system. This project was designed specifically to leverage the experience that SCE and the project team would gain during the significant installation of 500 MW of commercial scale PV systems (1-5 MW typically) starting in 2010 and completing in 2015 within SCE’s service territory through a program approved by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC).

  2. PV modules, using color solar cells, designed for building

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, N.; Yamashita, H.; Goda, S.

    1994-12-31

    The designs and structures of a photovoltaic module to be installed in a curtain wall were examined with the object of sharply reducing PV power generation costs. As for the design, solar cells of different colors were produced and an opinion survey of designers and other construction-related persons was conducted. Renderings based on color solar cells were prepared using computer graphics. In general, the output of cells decreases for colors other than shades of dark blue. However, there is a good possibility that greater importance will be put on design, including color and surface condition, than on output. In this case, the market share may expand and as a result, the cost may drop. As for the structure, various materials that can be used for a building-material-integrated-module were investigated and methods to install PV modules into building materials were examined. Moreover, experimental module samples fitted with stainless steel sheets and aluminum-sash frames were made.

  3. High Penetration PV: How High Can We Go?

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Brochure highlighting NREL's partnership with SolarCity and Hawaiian Electric (HECO) to increase the penetration of solar photovoltaics on the electricity grid. To better understand the potential impact of transient overvoltages due to load rejection, NREL collaborated with SolarCity and HECO to run a series of tests measuring the magnitude and duration of load rejection overvoltage events and demonstrating the ability of advanced PV inverters to mitigate their impacts.

  4. PV Manufacturing R&D Project (Trifold Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-02-01

    This trifold brochure is especially for visitors to the SERF who are viewing the PV Manufacturing R&D project display cases. Information includes the company names, their projects, and the technologies they are pursuing. In addition is a description of the overall project, as well as several graphs that show the results of the project (e.g., cost/capacity curves and investment recapture plots).

  5. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  6. Stochastic PV performance/reliability model : preview of alpha version.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Miller, Steven P.

    2010-03-01

    Problem Statement: (1) Uncertainties in PV system performance and reliability impact business decisions - Project cost and financing estimates, Pricing service contracts and guarantees, Developing deployment and O&M strategies; (2) Understanding and reducing these uncertainties will help make the PV industry more competitive (3) Performance has typically been estimated without much attention to reliability of components; and (4) Tools are needed to assess all inputs to the value proposition (e.g., LCOE, cash flow, reputation, etc.). Goals and objectives are: (1) Develop a stochastic simulation model (in GoldSim) that can represent PV system performance as a function of system design, weather, reliability, and O&M policies; (2) Evaluate performance for an example system to quantify sources of uncertainty and identify dominant parameters via a sensitivity study; and (3) Example System - 1 inverter, 225 kW DC Array latitude tilt (90 strings of 12 modules {l_brace}1080 modules{r_brace}), Weather from Tucumcari, NM (TMY2 with annual uncertainty).

  7. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  8. Comparative Study Between Wind and Photovoltaic (PV) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Wesam

    This paper reviews two renewable energy systems; wind and photovoltaic (PV) systems. The common debate between the two of them is to conclude which one is better, in terms of cost and efficiency. Therefore, comparative study, in terms of cost and efficiency, is attempted. Regarding total cost of both, wind and PV systems, many parameters must be taken into consideration such as availability of energy (either wind or solar), operation and maintenance, availability of costumers, political influence, and the components used in building the system. The main components and parameters that play major role in determining the overall efficiency of wind systems are the wind turbine generator (WTG), gearbox and control technologies such as power, and speed control. On the other hand, in grid-connected PV systems (GCPVS), converter architecture along with maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm and inverter topologies are the issues that affects the efficiency significantly. Cost and efficiency analyses of both systems have been carried out based on the statistics available till today and would be useful in the progress of renewable energy penetration throughout the world.

  9. Analysis of Dissemination of Residential PV Systems in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Eiichi

    This paper focuses on residential PV systems in Japan. It projects installation and installed capacity of residential PV systems by analyzing correlation between their pay-back period and annual installation by new and existing houses. Exponential and hyperbolic curves are applied for correlation analysis. But exponential curve shows better fit than hyperbolic one. PV installation in new houses shows stronger correlation with pay-back period than that in existing houses. For the installation projection, target and delayed scenarios are assumed. In the target scenario, target price is achieved as planned. However it is achieved with delay in the delayed scenario. Ongoing subsidy and feed-in-tariff is also assumed. Based on the results of the analysis, the target cumulative installation and installed capacity are achieved in the target scenario. They are not so affected even if without subsidy and feed-in-tariff. But they become almost half in the delayed scenario compared with that in the target scenario. This means system price reduction by R&D and mass production is more effective than ongoing dissemination acceleration programs. To achieve the target capacity, not only cost reduction, but also conversion efficiency improvement by R&D is indispensable.

  10. Exploring the Economic Value of EPAct 2005's PV Tax Credits

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A; Wiser, Ryan; Ing, Edwin

    2009-08-01

    This CESA - LBNL Case Study examines how much economic value do new and expanded federal tax credits really provide to PV system purchasers, and what implications might they hold for state/utility PV grant programs. The report begins with a discussion of the taxability of PV grants and their interaction with federal credits, as this issue significantly affects the analysis that follows. We then calculate the incremental value of EPAct's new and expanded credits for PV systems of different sizes, and owned by different types of entities. The report concludes with a discussion of potential implications for purchasers of PV systems, as well as for administrators of state/utility PV programs. The market for grid-connected photovoltaics (PV) in the US has grown dramatically in recent years, driven in large part by PV grant or 'buy-down' programs in California, New Jersey, and many other states. The recent announcement of a new 11-year, $3.2 billion PV program in California suggests that state policy will continue to drive even faster growth over the next decade. Federal policy has also played a role, primarily by providing commercial PV systems access to tax benefits, including accelerated depreciation (5-year MACRS schedule) and a business energy investment tax credit (ITC). Since the signing of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) on August 8, the federal government has begun to play a much more significant role in supporting both commercial and residential PV systems. Specifically, EPAct increased the federal ITC for commercial PV systems from 10% to 30% of system costs, and also created a new 30% ITC (capped at $2000) for residential solar systems. Both changes went into effect on January 1, 2006, for an initial period of two years, and in late 2006 were extended for an additional year. Unless extended further, the new residential ITC will expire, and the 30% commercial ITC will revert back to 10%, on January 1, 2009. How much economic value do these new and

  11. An aquaporin PvTIP4;1 from Pteris vittata may mediate arsenite uptake.

    PubMed

    He, Zhenyan; Yan, Huili; Chen, Yanshan; Shen, Hongling; Xu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Haiyan; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ma, Mi

    2016-01-01

    The fern Pteris vittata is an arsenic hyperaccumulator. The genes involved in arsenite (As(III)) transport are not yet clear. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new P. vittata aquaporin gene, PvTIP4;1, which may mediate As(III) uptake. PvTIP4;1 was identified from yeast functional complement cDNA library of P. vittata. Arsenic toxicity and accumulating activities of PvTIP4;1 were analyzed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis. Subcellular localization of PvTIP4;1-GFP fusion protein in P. vittata protoplast and callus was conducted. The tissue expression of PvTIP4;1 was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Site-directed mutagenesis of the PvTIP4;1 aromatic/arginine (Ar/R) domain was studied. Heterologous expression in yeast demonstrates that PvTIP4;1 was able to facilitate As(III) diffusion. Transgenic Arabidopsis showed that PvTIP4;1 increases arsenic accumulation and induces arsenic sensitivity. Images and FM4-64 staining suggest that PvTIP4;1 localizes to the plasma membrane in P. vittata cells. A tissue location study shows that PvTIP4;1 transcripts are mainly expressed in roots. Site-directed mutation in yeast further proved that the cysteine at the LE1 position of PvTIP4;1 Ar/R domain is a functional site. PvTIP4;1 is a new represented tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) aquaporin from P. vittata and the function and location results imply that PvTIP4;1 may be involved in As(III) uptake. PMID:26372374

  12. Optimal Planning Strategy for Large PV/Battery System Based on Long-Term Insolation Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yona, Atsushi; Uchida, Kosuke; Senjyu, Tomonobu; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are rapidly gaining acceptance as some of the best alternative energy sources. Usually the power output of PV system fluctuates depending on weather conditions. In order to control the fluctuating power output for PV system, it requires control method of energy storage system. This paper proposes an optimization approach to determine the operational planning of power output for PV system with battery energy storage system (BESS). This approach aims to obtain more benefit for electrical power selling and to smooth the fluctuating power output for PV system. The optimization method applies genetic algorithm (GA) considering PV power output forecast error. The forecast error is based on our previous works with the insolation forecasting at one day ahead by using weather reported data, fuzzy theory and neural network(NN). The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by the computer simulations.

  13. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  14. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Burton, Patrick D.; Hansen, Clifford; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  15. Results from undergraduate PV projects at Seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Robert D.

    1999-03-01

    In 1995, the NREL/Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program funded seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in its HBCU Photovoltaic Research Associates Program for a period of three years. The program's purpose is to advance HBCU undergraduate knowledge of photovoltaics, primarily as a result of research investigations performed, and to encourage students to pursue careers in photovoltaics. This paper presents results from PV projects ranging from fundamental materials research on PV materials to field projects of PV systems.

  16. Results from Undergraduate PV Projects at Seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R. D.

    1999-03-03

    In 1995, the NREL/Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program funded seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in its HBCU Photovoltaic Research Associates Program for a period of three years. The program's purpose is to advance HBCU undergraduate knowledge of photovoltaics, primarily as a result of research investigations performed, and to encourage students to pursue careers in photovoltaics. This paper presents results from PV projects ranging from fundamental materials research on PV materials to field projects of PV systems.

  17. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  18. A modeling framework for potential induced degradation in PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermel, Peter; Asadpour, Reza; Zhou, Chao; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2015-09-01

    Major sources of performance degradation and failure in glass-encapsulated PV modules include moisture-induced gridline corrosion, potential-induced degradation (PID) of the cell, and stress-induced busbar delamination. Recent studies have shown that PV modules operating in damp heat at -600 V are vulnerable to large amounts of degradation, potentially up to 90% of the original power output within 200 hours. To improve module reliability and restore power production in the presence of PID and other failure mechanisms, a fundamental rethinking of accelerated testing is needed. This in turn will require an improved understanding of technology choices made early in development that impact failures later. In this work, we present an integrated approach of modeling, characterization, and validation to address these problems. A hierarchical modeling framework will allows us to clarify the mechanisms of corrosion, PID, and delamination. We will employ a physics-based compact model of the cell, topology of the electrode interconnection, geometry of the packaging stack, and environmental operating conditions to predict the current, voltage, temperature, and stress distributions in PV modules correlated with the acceleration of specific degradation modes. A self-consistent solution will capture the essential complexity of the technology-specific acceleration of PID and other degradation mechanisms as a function of illumination, ambient temperature, and relative humidity. Initial results from our model include specific lifetime predictions suitable for direct comparison with indoor and outdoor experiments, which are qualitatively validated by prior work. This approach could play a significant role in developing novel accelerated lifetime tests.

  19. Precursor Report of Data Needs and Recommended Practices for PV Plant Availability Operations and Maintenance Reporting.

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Roger R.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the factors that affect reliability of a photovoltaic (PV) power plant is an important aspect of optimal asset management. This document describes the many factors that affect operation and maintenance (O&M) of a PV plant, identifies the data necessary to quantify those factors, and describes how data might be used by O&M service providers and others in the PV industry. This document lays out data needs from perspectives of reliability, availability, and key performance indicators and is intended to be a precursor for standardizing terminology and data reporting, which will improve data sharing, analysis, and ultimately PV plant performance.

  20. Intelligent control of PV system on the basis of the fuzzy recurrent neuronet*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the fuzzy recurrent neuronet for PV system’s control. Based on the PV system’s state, the fuzzy recurrent neural net tracks the maximum power point under random perturbations. The validity and advantages of the proposed intelligent control of PV system are demonstrated by numerical simulations. The simulation results show that the proposed intelligent control of PV system achieves real-time control speed and competitive performance, as compared to a classical control scheme on the basis of the perturbation & observation algorithm.

  1. Pyranometers and Reference Cells: Part 2: What Makes the Most Sense for PV Power Plants?; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Meydbray, J.; Riley, E.; Dunn, L.; Emery, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-10-01

    As described in Part 1 of this two-part series, thermopile pyranometers and photovoltaic (PV) reference cells can both be used to measure irradiance; however, there are subtle differences between the data that are obtained. This two-part article explores some implications of uncertainty and subtleties of accurately measuring PV efficiency in the field. Part 2 of the series shows how reference cells can be used to more confidently predict PV performance, but how this could best be accomplished if historic irradiance data could be available in PV-technology-specific formats.

  2. Space shuttle Production Verification Motor 1 (PV-1) static fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    All inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the PV-1 static test firing conducted 18 Aug. 1988 was successful. With the exception of the intentionally flawed joints and static test modifications, PV-1 was flight configuration. Fail-safe flaws guaranteeing pressure to test the sealing capability of primary O-rings were included in the aft field joint, case-to-nozzle joint, and nozzle internal Joint 5. The test was conducted at ambient conditions, with the exception of the field joints and case/nozzle joints which were maintained at a minimum of 75 F. Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. The PV-1 motor exhibited chamber pressure oscillations similar to previously tested Space Shuttle redesigned solid rocket motors, particularly QM-7. The first longitudinal mode oscillations experienced by PV-1 were the strongest ever measured in a Space Shuttle motor. Investigation into this observation is being conducted. Joint insulation performed as designed with no evidence of gas flow within unflawed forward field joints. The intentionally flawed center and aft case field joint insulation performance was excellent. There was no evidence of hot gas past the center field joint capture feature O-ring, the case-to-nozzle joint primary O-ring, or the aft field joint primary O-ring. O-ring seals and barriers with assured pressure at the flaws showed erosion and heat effect, but all sealed against passage of hot gases with the exception of the aft field joint capture feature O-ring. There was no evidence of erosion, heat effect, or blowby on any O-ring seals or barriers at the unflawed joints. Nozzle performance was nominal with typical erosion. Post-test examination revealed that the forward nose ring was of the old high performance motor design configuration with the 150-deg ply angle. All nozzle components remained intact for post-test evaluation. The thrust vector control system operated correctly. The water deluge system, CO2 quench, and

  3. New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

  4. The effect of sandstorms on PV arrays and components

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J P

    1992-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems deployed in desert areas are exposed to wind-blown particles during most of their lifetimes. Here I describe the characteristics of wind-blown particles and with their effect on exposed surfaces. I provide insights for use in array design to minimize the effects of exposure and keep system costs as low as possible. Finally, I present some data describing the exposure of polymer-encapsulated arrays to both field and laboratory wind-blown sand environments, and I present evidence that an encapsulated or soft'' array has a higher abrasion resistance and, therefore, a much higher probability of surviving a severe sand environment.

  5. The effect of sandstorms on PV arrays and components

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.P.

    1992-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems deployed in desert areas are exposed to wind-blown particles during most of their lifetimes. Here I describe the characteristics of wind-blown particles and with their effect on exposed surfaces. I provide insights for use in array design to minimize the effects of exposure and keep system costs as low as possible. Finally, I present some data describing the exposure of polymer-encapsulated arrays to both field and laboratory wind-blown sand environments, and I present evidence that an encapsulated or ``soft`` array has a higher abrasion resistance and, therefore, a much higher probability of surviving a severe sand environment.

  6. Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High Penetration PV Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, C.; Burman, K.

    2010-04-01

    Overview of the solar resource assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in cooperation with Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) in Hawaii to determine the technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of solar renewable energy generation on the island of Kauaii through the use of photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The analysis, which was performed using a custom version of NREL's In My Back Yard (IMBY) software tool, showed that there is potential to generate enough energy to cover the peak load as reported for Kauai in 2007.

  7. Enhanced symbiotic nitrogen fixation with P. syringae pv tabaci

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J. New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces ); Sengupta-Gopalan, C. )

    1989-04-01

    Infestation of legumes such as alfalfa and soybeans with the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci is accompanied by increased plant growth, nodulation, overall nitrogen fixation, and total assimilated nitrogen. These effects are observed only in plants infested with Tox{sup +} pathogen; the toxin is tabtoxinine-{beta}-lactam, an active site-directed irreversible inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. The key to the legumes survival of this treatment is the insensitivity of the nodule-specific form of glutamine synthetase to the toxin. As expected, significant changes are observed in ammonia assimilation in these plants. The biochemical and molecular biological consequences of this treatment are being investigated.

  8. Optical investigation of a sun simulator for concentrator PV applications.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Christoph; Straub, Volker; van Rooyen, De Wet; Thor, Wei Yi; Siefer, Gerald; Bett, Andreas W

    2015-09-21

    In photovoltaics (PV), sun simulators are used to reproduce outdoor conditions in a lab environment such as irradiance level, light uniformity and spectral distribution. Concentrator (C)PV applications additionally require the sun simulators to provide rays with an angular distribution similar to that of the sun rays. However, different factors in CPV sun simulator setups make it difficult to achieve the perfect sun like angular distribution. This is mainly caused by the unavailability of appropriate light sources. Therefore, we investigated in this work, to which deviations such a non-ideal light source can lead and which impact is expected at the measurement of a CPV module. For this, two ray tracing models are presented - one for the simulation of natural sunrays, another one for the simulation of sun simulator conditions. The models are validated based on measurements and subsequently used to simulate the impact on a typical CPV module with silicone-on-glass Fresnel lenses. Here, significant deviations to outdoor conditions are found. PMID:26406756

  9. Trimode Power Converter optimizes PV, diesel and battery energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    O`Sullivan, G.; Bonn, R.; Bower, W.

    1994-07-01

    Conservatively, there are 100,000 localities in the world waiting for the benefits that electricity can provide, and many of these are in climates where sunshine is plentiful. With these locations in mind a prototype 30 kW hybrid system has been assembled at Sandia to prove the reliability and economics of photovoltaic, diesel and battery energy sources managed by an autonomous power converter. In the Trimode Power Converter the same power parts, four IGBT`s with an isolation transformer and filter components, serve as rectifier and charger to charge the battery from the diesel; as a stand-alone inverter to convert PV and battery energy to AC; and, as a parallel inverter with the diesel-generator to accommodate loads larger than the rating of the diesel. Whenever the diesel is supplying the load, an algorithm assures that the diesel is running at maximum efficiency by regulating the battery charger operating point. Given the profile of anticipated solar energy, the cost of transporting diesel fuel to a remote location and a five year projection of load demand, a method to size the PV array, battery and diesel for least cost is developed.

  10. Temperature Dependences on Various Types of Photovoltaic (PV) Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audwinto, I. A.; Leong, C. S.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, S. H.

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is one of the key roles in PV technology performance, since with the increases of temperature the open-circuit voltage will drop accordingly so do the electrical efficiency and power output generation. Different types of Photovoltaic (PV) panels- silicon solar panels and thin film solar panels; mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline, CIS, CIGS, CdTe, back-contact, and bi-facial solar panel under 40°C to 70°C approximately with 5°C interval have been comparatively analyzed their actual performances with uniformly distribution of light illumination from tungsten halogen light source, ±500W/m2. DC-Electronic Load and Data Logger devices with “Lab View” data program interface were used to collect all the necessary parameters in this study. Time needed to achieve a certain degree of temperature was recorded. Generally, each of the panels needed 15 minutes to 20 minutes to reach 70°C. Halogen based light source is not compatible in short wave-length in response to thin-film solar cell. Within this period of times, all the panels are facing a performance loss up to 15%. Other parameters; Pmax, Vmax, Imax, Voc, Isc, Rserries, Rshunt, Fillfactor were collected as study cases. Our study is important in determining Photovoltaic type selection and system design as for study or industrial needed under different temperature condition.

  11. Assuring long-term reliability of concentrator PV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Brown, J.; Crawford, C.; Darban, K.; Dutra, D.; Geer, S.; Ghassemian, V.; Gordon, R.; Kinsey, G.; Stone, K.; Turner, G.

    2009-08-01

    Concentrator PV (CPV) systems have attracted significant interest because these systems incorporate the world's highest efficiency solar cells and they are targeting the lowest cost production of solar electricity for the world's utility markets. Because these systems are just entering solar markets, manufacturers and customers need to assure their reliability for many years of operation. There are three general approaches for assuring CPV reliability: 1) field testing and development over many years leading to improved product designs, 2) testing to internationally accepted qualification standards (especially for new products) and 3) extended reliability tests to identify critical weaknesses in a new component or design. Amonix has been a pioneer in all three of these approaches. Amonix has an internal library of field failure data spanning over 15 years that serves as the basis for its seven generations of CPV systems. An Amonix product served as the test CPV module for the development of the world's first qualification standard completed in March 2001. Amonix staff has served on international standards development committees, such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), in support of developing CPV standards needed in today's rapidly expanding solar markets. Recently Amonix employed extended reliability test procedures to assure reliability of multijunction solar cell operation in its seventh generation high concentration PV system. This paper will discuss how these three approaches have all contributed to assuring reliability of the Amonix systems.

  12. A control strategy for PV stand-alone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slouma, S.; Baccar, H.

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system study in domestic applications. Because of the decrease in power of photovoltaic module as a consequence of changes in solar radiation and temperature which affect the photovoltaic module performance, the design and control of DC-DC buck converter was proposed for providing power to the load from a photovoltaic source.In fact, the control of this converter is carried out with integrated MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) algorithm which ensures a maximum energy generated by the PV arrays. Moreover, the output stage is composed by a battery energy storage system, dc-ac inverter, LCL filter which enables higher efficiency, low distortion ac waveforms and low leakage currents. The control strategy adopted is cascade control composed by two regulation loops.Simulations performed with PSIM software were able to validate the control system.The realization and testing of the photovoltaic system were achieved in the Photovoltaic laboratory of the Centre for Research and Energy Technologies at the Technopark Borj Cedria. Experimental results verify the effeciency of the proposed system.

  13. Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper seeks to understand what temporal and spatial scales of variability in global horizontal radiation are important to a PV plants and what measurements are needed to be able to characterize them. As solar radiation measuring instruments are point receivers it is important to understand how those measurements translate to energy received over a larger spatial extent. Also of importance is the temporal natural of variability over large spatial areas. In this research we use high temporal and spatial resolution measurements from multiple sensors at a site in Hawaii to create solar radiation fields at various spatial and temporal scales. Five interpolation schemes were considered and the high resolution solar fields were converted to power production for a PV power plant. It was found that the interpolation schemes are robust and create ramp distributions close to what would be computed if the average solar radiation field was used. We also investigated the possibility of using time averaged solar data from 1 sensor to recreate the ramp distribution from the 17 sensors. It was found that the ramping distribution from using appropriately time averaged data from 1 sensor can reasonably match the distribution created using the 17 sensor network.

  14. Endopathogenic lifestyle of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive knots

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez‐Moreno, Luis; Jiménez, Antonio J.; Ramos, Cayo

    2009-01-01

    Summary The endophytic phase of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive stems and the structural and ultrastructural histogenesis of olive knots have been studied. Construction of a stable plasmid vector expressing the green fluorescent protein, in combination with the use of in vitro olive plants, allowed real‐time monitoring of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi infection. The infection process was also examined by bright field and epifluorescence microscopy as well as by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Hypertrophy of the stem tissue was concomitant with the formation of bacterial aggregates, microcolonies and multilayer biofilms, over the cell surfaces and the interior of plasmolysed cells facing the air‐tissue interface of internal opened fissures, and was followed by invasion of the outer layers of the hypertrophied tissue. Pathogenic invasion of the internal lumen of newly formed xylem vessels, which were connected with the stem vascular system, was also observed in late stages of infection. Ultrastructural analysis of knot sections showed the release of outer membrane vesicles from the pathogen surface, a phenomenon not described before for bacterial phytopathogens during host infection. This is the first real‐time monitoring of P. savastanoi disease development and the first illustrated description of the ultrastructure of P. savastanoi‐induced knots. PMID:21255279

  15. Future of Grid-Tied PV Business Models: What Will Happen When PV Penetration on the Distribution Grid is Significant? Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.; Katofsky, R.; Frantzis, L.; Sawyer, H.; Margolis, R.

    2008-05-01

    Eventually, distributed PV will become a more significant part of the generation mix. When this happens, it is expected that utilities will have to take on a more active role in the placement, operation and control of these systems. There are operational complexities and concerns of revenue erosion that will drive utilities into greater involvement of distributed PV and will create new business models. This report summarizes work done by Navigant Consulting Inc. for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's work on Renewable System Integration. The objective of the work was to better understand the structure of these future business models and the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) required to support their deployment. This report describes potential future PV business models in terms of combinations of utility ownership and control of the PV assets, and the various relationships between end-users and third-party owners.

  16. Characterization of ISXax1, a Novel Insertion Sequence Restricted to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Variants fuscans and non-fuscans) and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria▿

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Poussier, Stéphane; Manceau, Charles

    2007-01-01

    ISXax1 is a novel insertion sequence belonging to the IS256 and Mutator families. Dot blot, Southern blot, and PCR analyses revealed that ISXax1 is restricted to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (variants fuscans and non-fuscans) and X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria strains. Directed AFLP also showed that a high degree of polymorphism is associated with ISXax1 insertion in these strains. PMID:17209062

  17. Genomic-associated Markers and comparative Genome Maps of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenjie; Wang, Yi; Huang, Lisha; Feng, Chuanshun; Chu, Zhaohui; Ding, Xinhua; Yang, Long

    2015-09-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) cause two major seed quarantine diseases in rice, bacterial blight and bacterial leaf streak, respectively. Xoo and Xoc share high similarity in genomic sequence, which results in hard differentiation of the two pathogens. Genomic-associated Markers and comparative Genome Maps database (GMGM) is an integrated database providing comprehensive information including compared genome maps and full genomic-coverage molecular makers of Xoo and Xoc. This database was established based on bioinformatic analysis of complete sequenced genomes of several X. oryzae pathovars of which the similarity of the genomes was up to 91.39 %. The program was designed with a series of specific PCR primers, including 286 pairs of Xoo dominant markers, 288 pairs of Xoc dominant markers, and 288 pairs of Xoo and Xoc co-dominant markers, which were predicted to distinguish two pathovars. Test on a total of 40 donor pathogen strains using randomly selected 120 pairs of primers demonstrated that over 52.5 % of the primers were efficacious. The GMGM web portal ( http://biodb.sdau.edu.cn/gmgm/ ) will be a powerful tool that can present highly specific diagnostic markers, and it also provides information about comparative genome maps of the two pathogens for future evolution study. PMID:26093644

  18. Genetic diversity in populations of Xanthomonas campestris pv. camestris in cruciferous weeds in central coastal California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris infects a large number of cruciferous plants, including weeds. California has one of the largest and most diverse populations of wild cruciferous plants in the world. Although considerable information is available on the genetic diversity of X. campestris pv. ca...

  19. Solar PV O&M Standards and Best Practices - Existing Gaps and Improvement Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John R.; Keating, T. J.

    2014-11-01

    As greater numbers of photovoltaic (PV) systems are being installed, operations & maintenance (O&M) activities will need to be performed to ensure the PV system is operating as designed over its useful lifetime. To mitigate risks to PV system availability and performance, standardized procedures for O&M activities are needed to ensure high reliability and long-term system bankability. Efforts are just getting underway to address the need for standard O&M procedures as PV gains a larger share of U.S. generation capacity. Due to the existing landscape of how and where PV is installed, including distributed generation from small and medium PV systems, as well as large, centralized utility-scale PV, O&M activities will require different levels of expertise and reporting, making standards even more important. This report summarizes recent efforts made by solar industry stakeholders to identify the existing standards and best practices applied to solar PV O&M activities, and determine the gaps that have yet to be, or are currently being addressed by industry.

  20. Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at the country level. An estimate of the current {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} scenario (defined by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30-year loan life, $6{sub 1994}/W system cost, and $4{sub 1994}/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. Several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption are modeled. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3{sub 1994}/W, rooftop systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the U.S. by 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4-kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 170 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

  1. Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A.; Markel, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential roof-top photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at a county-level. The estimate of the current best scenario (defined in 1994 dollars by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30 year loan life, $6/W system cost, and $4/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. The authors model several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3/W, roof-top systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the US. By 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4 kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 1709 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation (TD and G) losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

  2. Creating dynamic equivalent PV circuit models with impedance spectroscopy for arc-fault modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Strauch, Jason E.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2011-06-01

    Article 690.11 in the 2011 National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}) requires new photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed arc fault protection device. Currently there is little experimental or empirical research into the behavior of the arcing frequencies through PV components despite the potential for modules and other PV components to filter or attenuate arcing signatures that could render the arc detector ineffective. To model AC arcing signal propagation along PV strings, the well-studied DC diode models were found to inadequately capture the behavior of high frequency arcing signals. Instead dynamic equivalent circuit models of PV modules were required to describe the impedance for alternating currents in modules. The nonlinearities present in PV cells resulting from irradiance, temperature, frequency, and bias voltage variations make modeling these systems challenging. Linearized dynamic equivalent circuits were created for multiple PV module manufacturers and module technologies. The equivalent resistances and capacitances for the modules were determined using impedance spectroscopy with no bias voltage and no irradiance. The equivalent circuit model was employed to evaluate modules having irradiance conditions that could not be measured directly with the instrumentation. Although there was a wide range of circuit component values, the complex impedance model does not predict filtering of arc fault frequencies in PV strings for any irradiance level. Experimental results with no irradiance agree with the model and show nearly no attenuation for 1 Hz to 100 kHz input frequencies.

  3. Complete DNA Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, the Causal Agent of Kiwifruit Canker Disease.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Matthew D; Warren, Benjamin A; Andersen, Mark T; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is the causal agent of bacterial canker of kiwifruit, a disease that has rapidly spread worldwide. We have fully sequenced and assembled the chromosomal and plasmid DNA from P. syringae pv. actinidiae ICMP 18884 using the PacBio RS II platform. PMID:26383666

  4. Effective information channels for reducing costs of environmentally- friendly technologies: evidence from residential PV markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Varun; Robinson, Scott A.

    2013-03-01

    Realizing the environmental benefits of solar photovoltaics (PV) will require reducing costs associated with perception, informational gaps and technological uncertainties. To identify opportunities to decrease costs associated with residential PV adoption, in this letter we use multivariate regression models to analyze a unique, household-level dataset of PV adopters in Texas (USA) to systematically quantify the effect of different information channels on aspiring PV adopters’ decision-making. We find that the length of the decision period depends on the business model, such as whether the system was bought or leased, and on special opportunities to learn, such as the influence of other PV owners in the neighborhood. This influence accrues passively through merely witnessing PV systems in the neighborhood, increasing confidence and motivation, as well as actively through peer-to-peer communications. Using these insights we propose a new framework to provide public information on PV that could drastically reduce barriers to PV adoption, thereby accelerating its market penetration and environmental benefits. This framework could also serve as a model for other distributed generation technologies.

  5. Stabilization of hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles by axial silyloxy groups.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tamal; Lee, Way-Zen; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2016-05-01

    We report the stabilization of the hexa-coordination environment for P(v) corroles by using alkyl/aryl substituted silyloxy groups as axial ligands. The P(v) corroles are highly fluorescent in a hexa-coordination environment compared to in a penta-coordination environment. However, P(v) corroles generally undergo axial ligand dissociation to form a mixture of penta- and hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents such as toluene, CH2Cl2, CHCl3. The usage of moderately bulkier and electron-donating silyloxy groups helps to restrict the axial ligand dissociation of silyloxy substituted hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents. The crystal structure confirmed the hexa-coordination geometry for the P(v) corroles. The P(v) corroles strongly absorb and emit in the visible region, with decent quantum yields and singlet state lifetimes. The hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles are highly stable under electrochemical conditions. PMID:27063706

  6. NREL PV Module Reliability and Performance R&D Status and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during Fiscal Year (FY)2004 of the Photovoltaic (PV) Module Reliability and Performance R&D Subtask, which is part of the PV Module Reliability R&D Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

  7. Irrigation water is an unlikely source of inoculum of Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis causes severe bacterial blight on crucifers across the United States. These experiments examined the potential of irrigation water as a source of inoculum for P. cannabina pv. alisalensis. Water samples were collected from multiple irrigation reservoirs and spri...

  8. Moving to a Higher Level for PV Reliability through Comprehensive Standards Based on Solid Science (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.

    2014-11-01

    PV reliability is a challenging topic because of the desired long life of PV modules, the diversity of use environments and the pressure on companies to rapidly reduce their costs. This presentation describes the challenges, examples of failure mechanisms that we know or don't know how to test for, and how a scientific approach is being used to establish international standards.

  9. Seroepidemiology of TmPV1 infection in captive and wild Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dona, Maria Gabriella; Rehtanz, Manuela; Adimey, Nicole M.; Bossart, Gregory D.; Jenson, Alfred B.; Bonde, Robert K.; Ghim, Shin-je

    2011-01-01

    In 1997, cutaneous papillomatosis caused by Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris [Tm]) papillomavirus 1 (TmPV1) was detected in seven captive manatees at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida, USA, and, subsequently, in two wild manatees from the adjacent Homosassa River. Since then, papillomatosis has been reported in captive manatees housed in other locations, but not in wild animals. To determine TmPV1 antibody prevalence in captive and wild manatees sampled at various locations throughout Florida coastal regions, virus-like particles, composed of the L1 capsid protein of TmPV1, were generated with a baculovirus expression system and used to measure anti-TmPV1 antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serologic analysis of 156 manatees revealed a TmPV1 antibody prevalence of 26.3%, with no significant difference between captive (n=39) and wild (n=117) manatees (28.2% and 25.6%, respectively). No antibody-positive wild animal showed PV-induced cutaneous lesions, whereas papillomatosis was observed in 72.7% of antibody-positive captive manatees. Our data indicate that Florida manatees living in the wild are naturally infected by TmPV1 but rarely show TmPV1-induced papillomatosis. Hence, it appears that the wild population would not be harmed in a case of contact with captive animals without visible lesions and productive infections, which could be thus released into the wild.

  10. Seroepidemiology of TmPV1 infection in captive and wild Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Rehtanz, Manuela; Adimey, Nicole M; Bossart, Gregory D; Jenson, Alfred B; Bonde, Robert K; Ghim, Shin-je

    2011-07-01

    In 1997, cutaneous papillomatosis caused by Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris [Tm]) papillomavirus 1 (TmPV1) was detected in seven captive manatees at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida, USA, and, subsequently, in two wild manatees from the adjacent Homosassa River. Since then, papillomatosis has been reported in captive manatees housed in other locations, but not in wild animals. To determine TmPV1 antibody prevalence in captive and wild manatees sampled at various locations throughout Florida coastal regions, virus-like particles, composed of the L1 capsid protein of TmPV1, were generated with a baculovirus expression system and used to measure anti-TmPV1 antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serologic analysis of 156 manatees revealed a TmPV1 antibody prevalence of 26.3%, with no significant difference between captive (n=39) and wild (n=117) manatees (28.2% and 25.6%, respectively). No antibody-positive wild animal showed PV-induced cutaneous lesions, whereas papillomatosis was observed in 72.7% of antibody-positive captive manatees. Our data indicate that Florida manatees living in the wild are naturally infected by TmPV1 but rarely show TmPV1-induced papillomatosis. Hence, it appears that the wild population would not be harmed in a case of contact with captive animals without visible lesions and productive infections, which could be thus released into the wild. PMID:21719832

  11. Computer Modelling and Simulation of Solar PV Array Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Nalin Kumar

    2003-02-01

    The main objective of my PhD research work was to study the behaviour of inter-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The approach involved the construction of mathematical models to investigate different types of research problems related to the energy yield, fault tolerance, efficiency and optimal sizing of inter-connected solar PV array systems. My research work can be divided into four different types of research problems: 1. Modeling of inter-connected solar PV array systems to investigate their electrical behavior, 2. Modeling of different inter-connected solar PV array networks to predict their expected operational lifetimes, 3. Modeling solar radiation estimation and its variability, and 4. Modeling of a coupled system to estimate the size of PV array and battery-bank in the stand-alone inter-connected solar PV system where the solar PV system depends on a system providing solar radiant energy. The successful application of mathematics to the above-m entioned problems entailed three phases: 1. The formulation of the problem in a mathematical form using numerical, optimization, probabilistic and statistical methods / techniques, 2. The translation of mathematical models using C++ to simulate them on a computer, and 3. The interpretation of the results to see how closely they correlated with the real data. Array is the most cost-intensive component of the solar PV system. Since the electrical performances as well as life properties of an array are highly sensitive to field conditions, different characteristics of the arrays, such as energy yield, operational lifetime, collector orientation, and optimal sizing were investigated in order to improve their efficiency, fault-tolerance and reliability. Three solar cell interconnection configurations in the array - series-parallel, total-cross-tied, and bridge-linked, were considered. The electrical characteristics of these configurations were investigated to find out one that is comparatively less susceptible to

  12. Wind effect on PV module temperature: Analysis of different techniques for an accurate estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Petitta, Marcello; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Belluardo, Giorgio; Moser, David; Castelli, Mariapina; Zebisch, Marc; Tetzlaff, Anke

    2013-04-01

    In this abstract a study on the influence of wind to model the PV module temperature is presented. This study is carried out in the framework of the PV-Alps INTERREG project in which the potential of different photovoltaic technologies is analysed for alpine regions. The PV module temperature depends on different parameters, such as ambient temperature, irradiance, wind speed and PV technology [1]. In most models, a very simple approach is used, where the PV module temperature is calculated from NOCT (nominal operating cell temperature), ambient temperature and irradiance alone [2]. In this study the influence of wind speed on the PV module temperature was investigated. First, different approaches suggested by various authors were tested [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]. For our analysis, temperature, irradiance and wind data from a PV test facility at the airport Bolzano (South Tyrol, Italy) from the EURAC Institute of Renewable Energies were used. The PV module temperature was calculated with different models and compared to the measured PV module temperature at the single panels. The best results were achieved with the approach suggested by Skoplaki et al. [1]. Preliminary results indicate that for all PV technologies which were tested (monocrystalline, amorphous, microcrystalline and polycrystalline silicon and cadmium telluride), modelled and measured PV module temperatures show a higher agreement (RMSE about 3-4 K) compared to standard approaches in which wind is not considered. For further investigation the in-situ measured wind velocities were replaced with wind data from numerical weather forecast models (ECMWF, reanalysis fields). Our results show that the PV module temperature calculated with wind data from ECMWF is still in very good agreement with the measured one (R² > 0.9 for all technologies). Compared to the previous analysis, we find comparable mean values and an increasing standard deviation. These results open a promising approach for PV module

  13. Design and Implementation of an Innovative Residential PV System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najm, Elie Michel

    This work focuses on the design and implementation of an innovative residential PV system. In chapter one, after an introduction related to the rapid growth of solar systems' installations, the most commonly used state of the art solar power electronics' configurations are discussed, which leads to introducing the proposed DC/DC parallel configuration. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the power electronics' configurations are deliberated. The scope of work in the power electronics is defined in this chapter to be related to the panel side DC/DC converter. System integration and mechanical proposals are also within the scope of work and are discussed in later chapters. Operation principle of a novel low cost PV converter is proposed in chapter 2. The proposal is based on an innovative, simplified analog implementation of a master/slave methodology resulting in an efficient, soft-switched interleaved variable frequency flybacks, operating in the boundary conduction mode (BCM). The scheme concept and circuit configuration, operation principle and theoretical waveforms, design equations, and design considerations are presented. Furthermore, design examples are also given, illustrating the significance of the newly derived frequency equation for flybacks operating in BCM. In chapters 3, 4, and 5, the design implementation and optimization of the novel DC/DC converter illustrated in chapter 2 are discussed. In chapter 3, a detailed variable frequency BCM flyback design model leading to optimizing the component selections and transformer design, detailed in chapter 4, is presented. Furthermore, in chapter 4, the method enabling the use of lower voltage rating switching devices is also discussed. In chapter 5, circuitry related to Start-UP, drive for the main switching devices, zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) as well as turn OFF soft switching and interleaving control are fully detailed. The experimental results of the proposed DC/DC converter are presented in

  14. Evaluation of neural network based real time maximum power tracking controller for PV system

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyama, Takashi; Kouzuma, Shinichi; Imakubo, Tomofumi; Ortmeyer, T.H.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a neural network based maximum power tracking controller for interconnected PV systems to commercial power sources. The neural network is utilized to identify the optimal operating voltage of the PV system. The controller generates the control signal in real time, and the control signal is fed back to the voltage control loop of the inverter to shift the terminal voltage of the PV system to the identified optimal one, which yields the maximum power generation. The controller is a PI type one. The proportion an the integral gains are set to their optimal values to achieve the fast response and also to prevent the overshoot and also the undershoot. The continuous measurement is required for the open circuit voltage on the monitoring cell, and also for the terminal voltage of the PV system. Because of the accurate identification of the optimal operating voltage of the PV system, more than 99% power is drawn for the actual maximum power.

  15. Simplified Method for Modeling the Impact of Arbitrary Partial Shading Conditions on PV Array Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris

    2015-09-15

    It is often difficult to model the effects of partial shading conditions on PV array performance, as shade losses are nonlinear and depend heavily on a system's particular configuration. This work describes and implements a simple method for modeling shade loss: a database of shade impact results (loss percentages), generated using a validated, detailed simulation tool and encompassing a wide variety of shading scenarios. The database is intended to predict shading losses in crystalline silicon PV arrays and is accessed using basic inputs generally available in any PV simulation tool. Performance predictions using the database are within 1-2% of measured data for several partially shaded PV systems, and within 1% of those predicted by the full, detailed simulation tool on an annual basis. The shade loss database shows potential to considerably improve performance prediction for partially shaded PV systems.

  16. The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.; Nielsen, K. K.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system is examined using an analytical model for four different types of commercial PVs and a commercial bismuth telluride TEG. The TEG is applied directly on the back of the PV, so that the two devices have the same temperature. The PVs considered are crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous Si (a-Si), copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) cells. The degradation of PV performance with temperature is shown to dominate the increase in power produced by the TEG, due to the low efficiency of the TEG. For c-Si, CIGS and CdTe PV cells the combined system produces a lower power and has a lower efficiency than the PV alone, whereas for an a-Si cell the total system performance may be slightly increased by the TEG.

  17. Estimation of Battery Capacity for Fluctuation Suppression of a PV Power Station Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akatsuka, Motoki; Hara, Ryoichi; Kita, Hiroyuki; Ito, Takamitsu; Ueda, Yoshinobu; Saito, Yutaka

    Some MW-class PV power stations are now under construction and more PV power stations will be introduced in future. However, the penetration of PV power station may disturb a stable operation of the power system. The largest concerns are frequency variation and voltage variation caused by fluctuation of PV power station output. When these variations can not be eliminated by the conventional system operation and control schemes, installation of energy storage system might be needed. From this background, the authors have developed control method of battery system for fluctuation suppression of PV power station output. In this paper, battery capacity needed to satisfy the required fluctuation suppression level is estimated. In the estimation, two types of suppression control schemes; one can save the required power capacity and another can save energy capacity.

  18. Simplified Method for Modeling the Impact of Arbitrary Partial Shading Conditions on PV Array Performance

    SciTech Connect

    MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris

    2015-06-14

    It is often difficult to model the effects of partial shading conditions on PV array performance, as shade losses are nonlinear and depend heavily on a system's particular configuration. This work describes and implements a simple method for modeling shade loss: a database of shade impact results (loss percentages), generated using a validated, detailed simulation tool and encompassing a wide variety of shading scenarios. The database is intended to predict shading losses in crystalline silicon PV arrays and is accessed using basic inputs generally available in any PV simulation tool. Performance predictions using the database are within 1-2% of measured data for several partially shaded PV systems, and within 1% of those predicted by the full, detailed simulation tool on an annual basis. The shade loss database shows potential to considerably improve performance prediction for partially shaded PV systems.

  19. A Best Practice for Developing Availability Guarantee Language in Photovoltaic (PV) O&M Agreements.

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John

    2015-11-01

    This document outlines the foundation for developing language that can be utilized in an Equipment Availability Guarantee, typically included in an O&M services agreement between a PV system or plant owner and an O&M services provider, or operator. Many of the current PV O&M service agreement Availability Guarantees are based on contracts used for traditional power generation, which create challenges for owners and operators due to the variable nature of grid-tied photovoltaic generating technologies. This report documents language used in early PV availability guarantees and presents best practices and equations that can be used to more openly communicate how the reliability of the PV system and plant equipment can be expressed in an availability guarantee. This work will improve the bankability of PV systems by providing greater transparency into the equipment reliability state to all parties involved in an O&M services contract.

  20. Analysis of Photovoltaic (PV) Module during Partial Shading based on Simplified Two-Diode Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitti Babu, B.; Gurjar, Suresh; Meher, Ashish

    2015-02-01

    Generally, the characteristics of photovoltaic (PV) array are largely affected by solar temperature, solar irradiance, shading patterns, array configuration and location of shading modules. Partial shading is due to moving clouds and shadows of nearby obstacles and can cause a significant degradation in the output of PV system. Hence, the characteristics of PV array get more multifaceted with multiple peaks. The ultimate aim of the paper is to analyze the performance of PV module during such adverse condition based on simplified two-diode model. To reduce the computational time, the simplified two-diode model has a photocurrent source in parallel with two ideal diodes. Only four parameters are required to be calculated from datasheet in order to simulate the model. Moreover, the performance of PV array is evaluated at different shaded patterns and it is found that the model has less computational time and gives accurate results.

  1. PV Manufacturing R&D Project Status & Accomplishments Under ''In-Line Diagnostics & Intelligent Processing''

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K. E.; Mitchell, R. L.; Bower, W. I.; King, R.

    2005-02-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories embarked on a research partnership with the U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry by cost-sharing industry-based R&D efforts. The PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMR&D) Project, an extension of the earlier PV Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, aims at streamlining and improving the current PV manufacturing technology to enable U.S. manufacturers to compete in the global marketplace. Currently, PVMR&D has ten active subcontracts with manufacturers working in several facets of the U.S. PV industry; four subcontracts were completed within the past year.

  2. Technical evaluation of a USSC Integrated/Direct Mount PV Roofing Module system at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, T.; Hansen, R.; Mrig, L.

    1995-05-01

    The results of a 16 month technical evaluation performed on a nominal 1 kW{sub ac} utility-interconnect amorphous silicon PV system deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s PV outdoor test site are given here. The system employs 64 prototype United Solar Systems Corp. Integrated/Direct Mount PV Roofing Modules mounted on simulated attic/roof structures. In this paper we show that the PV array fill factor has been relatively stable with respect to time and that the seasonal variations in performance can be largely attributed to seasonal variations in current. We also show that in determining the summer and winter ac power output, the summation of the manufacturer-supplied module peak powers at STC for a similarly located and configured a-Si PV array should be derated by factors of approximately of 0.83 and 0.78 for summer and winter operation, respectively.

  3. Introduction of Break-Out Session 2 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum(Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.; Sample, T.; Yamamichi, M.

    2011-07-01

    This presentation outlines the goals and specific tasks of break-out session 2 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum, along with a review of accelerated stress tests used for photovoltaics (PV).

  4. Testing the PV-Theta Mapping Technique in a 3-D CTM Model Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frith, Stacey M.

    2004-01-01

    Mapping lower stratospheric ozone into potential vorticity (PV)- potential temperature (Theta) coordinates is a common technique employed to analyze sparse data sets. Ozone transformed into a flow-following dynamical coordinate system is insensitive to meteorological variations. Therefore data from a wide range of times/locations can be compared, so long as the measurements were made in the same airmass (as defined by PV). Moreover, once a relationship between ozone and PV/Theta is established, a full 3D ozone field can be estimated from this relationship and the 3D analyzed PV field. However, ozone data mapped in this fashion can be hampered by noisy PV fields, or "mis-matches" in the resolution and/or exact location of the ozone and PV measurements. In this study, we investigate the PV-ozone relationship using output from a recent 50-year run of the Goddard 3D chemical transport model (CTM). Model constituents are transported using off-line dynamics from the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). By using the internally consistent model PV and ozone fields, we minimize noise due to mis-matching and resolution issues. We calculate correlations between model ozone and PV throughout the stratosphere, and test the sensitivity of the technique to initial data resolution. To do this we degrade the model data to that of various satellite instruments, then compare the mapped fields derived from the sub-sampled data to the full resolution model data. With these studies we can determine appropriate limits for the PV-theta mapping technique in latitude, altitude, and as a function of original data resolution.

  5. An investigation of the maximum penetration level of a photovoltaic (PV) system into a traditional distribution grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalise, Santosh

    Although solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have remained the fastest growing renewable power generating technology, variability as well as uncertainty in the output of PV plants is a significant issue. This rapid increase in PV grid-connected generation presents not only progress in clean energy but also challenges in integration with traditional electric power grids which were designed for transmission and distribution of power from central stations. Unlike conventional electric generators, PV panels do not have rotating parts and thus have no inertia. This potentially causes a problem when the solar irradiance incident upon a PV plant changes suddenly, for example, when scattered clouds pass quickly overhead. The output power of the PV plant may fluctuate nearly as rapidly as the incident irradiance. These rapid power output fluctuations may then cause voltage fluctuations, frequency fluctuations, and power quality issues. These power quality issues are more severe with increasing PV plant power output. This limits the maximum power output allowed from interconnected PV plants. Voltage regulation of a distribution system, a focus of this research, is a prime limiting factor in PV penetration levels. The IEEE 13-node test feeder, modeled and tested in the MATLAB/Simulink environment, was used as an example distribution feeder to analyze the maximum acceptable penetration of a PV plant. The effect of the PV plant's location was investigated, along with the addition of a VAR compensating device (a D-STATCOM in this case). The results were used to develop simple guidelines for determining an initial estimate of the maximum PV penetration level on a distribution feeder. For example, when no compensating devices are added to the system, a higher level of PV penetration is generally achieved by installing the PV plant close to the substation. The opposite is true when a VAR compensator is installed with the PV plant. In these cases, PV penetration levels over 50% may be

  6. Painlevé equations from Darboux chains: I. PIII PV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willox, Ralph; Hietarinta, Jarmo

    2003-10-01

    We show that the Painlevé equations PIII-PVI can be derived in a unified way from a periodic sequence of Darboux transformations for a Schrödinger problem with quadratic eigenvalue dependence. The general problem naturally divides into three different branches, each described by an infinite chain of equations. The Painlevé equations are obtained by closing the chain periodically at the lowest nontrivial level(s). The chains provide 'symmetric forms' for the Painlevé equations, from which Hirota bilinear forms and Lax pairs are derived. In this paper (part I) we analyse in detail the cases PIII-PV, while PVI will be studied in part II.

  7. Final Technical Report - Photovoltaics for You (PV4You) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, J. M.; Sherwood, L.; Pulaski, J.; Cook, C.; Kalland, S.; Haynes, J.

    2005-08-14

    In September 2000, the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) began its 5-year work on contract # DE-FGO3-00SF22116, the Photovoltaics for You (PV4You) Project. The objective was to develop and distribute information on photovoltaics and to educate key stakeholder groups including state government agencies, local government offices, consumer representative agencies, school officials and students, and Million Solar Roofs Partnerships. In addition, the project was to identify barriers to the deployment of photovoltaics and implement strategies to overcome them. Information dissemination and education was accomplished by publishing newsletters; creating a base of information, guides, and models on the www.irecusa.org and the www.millionsolarroofs.org web sites; convening workshops and seminars; engaging multiple stakeholders; and widening the solar network to include new consumers and decision makers. Two major web sites were maintained throughout the project cycle. The www.irecusa.org web site housed dedicated pages for Connecting to the Grid, Schools Going Solar, Community Outreach, and Certification & Training. The www.millionsolarroofs.org web site was created to serve the MSR Partnerships with news, interviews, key documents, and resource material. Through the course of this grant, the Interstate Renewable Energy Council has been supporting the Department of Energy's solar energy program goals by providing the Department with expertise services for their network of city, state, and community stakeholders. IREC has been the leading force at the state and federal levels regarding net metering and interconnection policy for photovoltaic systems. The principal goal and benefit of the interconnection and net metering work is to lower both barriers and cost for the installation of PV. IREC typically plays a leadership role among small generator stakeholders and has come to be relied upon for its expertise by industry and regulators. IREC also took a leadership

  8. Packaging Materials and Design for Improved PV Module Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Kempe, M.; Pern, J.; Glick, S.; del Cueto, J.; Kennedy, C.; McMahon, T.

    2005-01-01

    A number of candidate alternative encapsulant and soft backsheet materials have been evaluated in terms of their suitability for photovoltaic (PV) module packaging applications. Relevant properties, including peel strength as a function of damp heat exposure and permeability, have been measured. Based on these tests, promising new encapsulants with adhesion-promoting primers have been identified that result in improved properties. Test results for backsheets provided by industry and prepared at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have suggested strategies to achieve significantly improved products. The ability of glass/glass and glass/breathable backsheet constructions laminated with various encapsulant and/or edge seal materials to protect thin-film aluminum coatings deposited onto glass substrates was assessed. Glass/glass laminate constructions can trap harmful compounds that catalyze moisture-driven corrosion of the aluminum. Constructions with breathable backsheets allow higher rates of moisture ingress, but also allow egress of deleterious substances that can result in decreased corrosion.

  9. Comparison of four MPPT techniques for PV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atik, L.; Petit, P.; Sawicki, J. P.; Ternifi, Z. T.; Bachir, G.; Aillerie, M.

    2016-07-01

    The working behavior of a module / PV array is non-linear and highly dependent on working conditions. As a given condition, there is only one point at which the level of available power at its output is maximum. This point varies with time, enlightenment and temperature. To ensure optimum operation, the use of MPPT control allows us to extract the maximum power. This paper presents a comparative study of four widely-adopted MPPT algorithms, such as Perturb and Observe, Incremental Conductance, Measurements of the variation of the open circuit voltage or of the short-circuit current. Their performance is evaluated using, for all these techniques. In particular, this study compares the behaviors of each technique in presence of solar irradiation variations and temperature fluctuations. These MPPT techniques will be compared using the Matlab / Simulink tool.

  10. The reliability and stability of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    Solarex is developing a manufacturing process for the commercial production of 8 ft{sup 2} multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules starting in 1996. The device structure used in these multijunction modules is: glass/textured tin oxide/p-i-n/p-i-n/ZnO/Al/EVA/Tedlar where the back junction of the tandem structure contains an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. As an interim step, 4 ft{sup 2} multijunction modules have been fabricated in a pilot production mode over the last several months. The distribution of initial conversion efficiencies for an engineering run of 67 modules (4 ft{sup 2}) is shown. Measurements recently performed at NREL indicate that the actual efficiencies are about 5% higher than those shown, and thus exhibit an average initial conversion efficiency of about 9.5%. The data indicates that the process is relatively robust since there were no modules with initial efficiencies less than 7.5%.

  11. Copper Antimony Chalcogenide Thin Film PV Device Development

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Toberer, Eric S.; Wolden, Colin A.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2015-06-14

    Emerging ternary chalcogenide thin film solar cell technologies, such as CuSbS2 and CuSbSe2, have recently attracted attention as simpler alternatives to quaternary Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS). Despite suitable photovoltaic properties, the initial energy conversion efficiency of CuSbS2 is rather low (0.3%). Here, we report on our progress towards improving the efficiency of CuSbS2 solar cells using a high throughput approach. The combinatorial methodology quickly results in baseline solar cell prototypes with 0.6% efficiency, and then modification of the back contact architecture leads to 1% PV devices. We then translate the optimal CuSbS2 synthesis parameters to CuSbSe2 devices, which show 3% efficiencies.

  12. Comparative analysis of DG and solar PV water pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharani, Kusum; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    Looking at present day electricity scenario, there is a major electricity crisis in rural areas. The farmers are still dependant on the monsoon rains for their irrigation needs and livestock maintenance. Some of the agrarian population has opted to use Diesel Generators for pumping water in their fields. But taking into consideration the economics and environmental conditions, the above choice is not suitable for longer run. An effort to shift from non-renewable sources such as diesel to renewable energy source such as solar has been highlighted. An approximate comparative analysis showing the life cycle costs of a PV pumping system with Diesel Generator powered water pumping is done using MATLAB/STMULTNK.

  13. Electronic processes in thin-film PV materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.C.; Chen, D.; Chen, S.L.

    1998-07-01

    The electronic and optical processes in an important class of thin-film PV materials, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, have been investigated using several experimental techniques designed for thin-film geometries. The experimental techniques include various magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopies and combinations of these two spectroscopies. Two-step optical excitation processes through the manifold of silicon dangling bond states have been identifies as important at low excitation energies. Local hydrogen motion has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and found to be much more rapid than long range diffusion as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A new metastable effect has been found in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur. Spin-one optically excited states have been unambiguously identified using optically detected electron spin resonance. Local hydrogen bonding in microcrystalline silicon films has been studied using NMR.

  14. The N-Glycan Cluster from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Dupoiron, Stéphanie; Zischek, Claudine; Ligat, Laetitia; Carbonne, Julien; Boulanger, Alice; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Lautier, Martine; Rival, Pauline; Arlat, Matthieu; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Albenne, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans are widely distributed in living organisms but represent only a small fraction of the carbohydrates found in plants. This probably explains why they have not previously been considered as substrates exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, possesses a specific system for GlcNAc utilization expressed during host plant infection. This system encompasses a cluster of eight genes (nixE to nixL) encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs). In this paper, we have characterized the enzymatic activities of these GHs and demonstrated their involvement in sequential degradation of a plant N-glycan using a N-glycopeptide containing two GlcNAcs, three mannoses, one fucose, and one xylose (N2M3FX) as a substrate. The removal of the α-1,3-mannose by the α-mannosidase NixK (GH92) is a prerequisite for the subsequent action of the β-xylosidase NixI (GH3), which is involved in the cleavage of the β-1,2-xylose, followed by the α-mannosidase NixJ (GH125), which removes the α-1,6-mannose. These data, combined to the subcellular localization of the enzymes, allowed us to propose a model of N-glycopeptide processing by X. campestris pv. campestris. This study constitutes the first evidence suggesting N-glycan degradation by a plant pathogen, a feature shared with human pathogenic bacteria. Plant N-glycans should therefore be included in the repertoire of molecules putatively metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle. PMID:25586188

  15. Transparent building-integrated PV modules. Phase 1: Comprehensive report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-28

    This Comprehensive Report encompasses the activities that have been undertaken by Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with Energy Photovoltaics, Incorporated (EPV), to develop a flexible patterning system for thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules for building applications. There are two basic methods for increasing transparency/light transmission by means of patterning the PV film: widening existing scribe lines, or scribing a second series of lines perpendicular to the first. These methods can yield essentially any degree of light transmission, but both result in visible patterns of light and dark on the panel surface. A third proposed method is to burn a grid of dots through the films, independent of the normal cell scribing. This method has the potential to produce a light-transmitting panel with no visible pattern. Ornamental patterns at larger scales can be created using combinations of these techniques. Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with EPV are currently developing a complementary process for the large-scale lamination of thin-film PVs, which enables building integrated (BIPV) modules to be produced in sizes up to 48 in. x 96 in. Flexible laser patterning will be used for three main purposes, all intended to broaden the appeal of the product to the building sector: To create semitransparent thin-film modules for skylights, and in some applications, for vision glazing.; to create patterns for ornamental effects. This application is similar to fritted glass, which is used for shading, visual screening, graphics, and other purposes; and to allow BIPV modules to be fabricated in various sizes and shapes with maximum control over electrical characteristics.

  16. Evaluation of the Performance of the PVUSA Rating Methodology Applied to Dual Junction PV Technology: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-07-01

    The PVUSA (Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications) project in the 1990's developed a rating methodology for PV performance evaluation which has become popular, and even incorporated into concentrating PV rating standards This report apply that method to rack-mounted dual-junction PV system, and produces a system rating.

  17. First report of the crucifer pathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis causing bacterial blight on radish (Raphanus sativus) in Germany

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis is a severe pathogen of crucifers across the U.S. We compared a strain isolated from diseased radish (Raphanus sativus) in Germany to pathotypes and additional strains of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis and P. syringae pv. maculicola. We demonstrated that the patho...

  18. Plug and Play Components for Building Integrated PV Systems, Phase II Final Report, 20 February 2003 - 31 May 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Rowell, D.

    2008-04-01

    Progress by Schott Solar, Inc. under NREL's PV Manufacturing R&D Project. Details progress on meter-interconnect device; free-standing mounting system; dark I-V curves to unearth problems with PV module strings; new 34-V version of ASE-300 PV module; and updated source-circuit protectors.

  19. High Performance Packaging Solutions for Low Cost, Reliable PV Modules: Final Subcontract Report, 26 May 2005 - 30 November 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Keotla, B. M.; Marinik, B. J.

    2009-06-01

    During this research effort, Dow Corning Corporation has addressed the PV manufacturing goals of: (i) improving PV manufacturing processes and equipment; (ii) accelerating manufacturing cost reductions of PV modules; (iii) increasing commercial product performance and reliability; and (iv) scaling up U.S. manufacturing capacity.

  20. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, Helene; Feil, William; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Larimer, Frank W; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Copeland, A; Lykidis, A; Trong, Stephen; Nolan, Matt; Goltsman, Eugene; Thiel, James; Malfatti, Stephanie; Loper, Joyce E.; Detter, J C; Lapidus, Alla L.; Land, Miriam L; Richardson, P M; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Lindow, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a (Pss B728a) has been determined and is compared with that of A syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). The two pathovars of this economically important species of plant pathogenic bacteria differ in host range and other interactions with plants, with Pss having a more pronounced epiphytic stage of growth and higher abiotic stress tolerance and Pst DC3000 having a more pronounced apoplastic growth habitat. The Pss B728a genome (6.1 Mb) contains a circular chromosome and no plasmid, whereas the Pst DC3000 genome is 6.5 mbp in size, composed of a circular chromosome and two plasmids. Although a high degree of similarity exists between the two sequenced Pseudomonads, 976 protein-encoding genes are unique to Pss B728a when compared with Pst DC3000, including large genomic islands likely to contribute to virulence and host specificity. Over 375 repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences unique to Pss B728a when compared with Pst DC3000 are widely distributed throughout the chromosome except in 14 genomic islands, which generally had lower GC content than the genome as a whole. Content of the genomic islands varies, with one containing a prophage and another the plasmid pKLC102 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Among the 976 genes of Pss B728a with no counterpart in Pst DC3000 are those encoding for syringopeptin, syringomycin, indole acetic acid biosynthesis, arginine degradation, and production of ice nuclei. The genomic comparison suggests that several unique genes for Pss B728a such as ectoine synthase, DNA repair, and antibiotic production may contribute to the epiphytic fitness and stress tolerance of this organism.

  1. Moving Toward Quantifying Reliability - The Next Step in a Rapidly Maturing PV Industry: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah; Sample, Tony; Wohlgemuth, John; Zhou, Wei; Bosco, Nick; Althaus, Joerg; Phillips, Nancy; Deceglie, Michael; Flueckiger, Chris; Hacke, Peter; Miller, David; Kempe, Michael; Yamamichi, Masaaki; Kondo, Michio

    2015-12-07

    Some may say that PV modules are moving toward being a simple commodity, but most major PV customers ask: 'How can I minimize chances of a module recall?' Or, 'How can I quantify the added value of a 'premium' module?' Or, 'How can I assess the value of an old PV system that I'm thinking of purchasing?' These are all questions that PVQAT (the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force) and partner organizations are working to answer. Defining standard methods for ensuring minimal acceptable quality of PV modules, differentiating modules that provide added value in the toughest of environments, and creating a process (e.g. through IECRE [1]) that can follow a PV system from design through installation and operation are tough tasks, but having standard approaches for these will increase confidence, reduce costs, and be a critical foundation of a mature PV industry. This paper summarizes current needs for new tests, some challenges for defining those tests, and some of the key efforts toward development of international standards, emphasizing that meaningful quantification of reliability (as in defining a service life prediction) must be done in the context of a specific product with design parameters defined through a quality management system.

  2. The Economic Value of PV and Net Metering to Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-05-17

    In this paper, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of the California's two largest electric utilities, under existing net metering tariffs as well as under several alternative compensation mechanisms. We find that economic value of PV to the customer is dependent on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate and can vary quite significantly from one customer to another. In addition, we find that the value of the bill savings from PV generally declines with PV penetration level, as increased PV generation tends to offset lower-priced usage. Customers in our sample from both utilities are significantly better off with net metering than with a feed-in tariff where all PV generation is compensated at long-run avoided generation supply costs. Other compensation schemeswhich allow customers to displace their consumption with PV generation within each hour or each month, and are also based on the avoided costs, yield similar value to the customer as net metering.

  3. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote Performance: A Reviewof Current Practice in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-10-06

    In the U.S., the increasing financial support for customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems provided through publicly-funded incentive programs has heightened concerns about the long-term performance of these systems. Given the barriers that customers face to ensuring that their PV systems perform well, and the responsibility that PV incentive programs bear to ensure that public funds are prudently spent, these programs should, and often do, play a critical role in addressing PV system performance. To provide a point of reference for assessing the current state of the art, and to inform program design efforts going forward, we examine the approaches to encouraging PV system performance used by 32 prominent PV incentive programs in the U.S. We identify eight general strategies or groups of related strategies that these programs have used to address factors that affect performance, and describe key implementation details. Based on this review, we then offer recommendations for how PV incentive programs can be effectively designed to mitigate potential performance issues.

  4. Integration, Validation, and Application of a PV Snow Coverage Model in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, David; Freeman, Janine

    2015-09-01

    Due to the increasing deployment of PV systems in snowy climates, there is significant interest in a method capable of estimating PV losses resulting from snow coverage that has been verified for a wide variety of system designs and locations. A scattering of independent snow coverage models have been developed over the last 15 years; however, there has been very little effort spent on verifying these models beyond the system design and location on which they were based. Moreover, none of the major PV modeling software products have incorporated any of these models into their workflow. In response to this deficiency, we have integrated the methodology of the snow model developed in the paper by Marion et al. [1] into the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) System Advisor Model (SAM). In this work we describe how the snow model is implemented in SAM and discuss our demonstration of the model's effectiveness at reducing error in annual estimations for two PV arrays. Following this, we use this new functionality in conjunction with a long term historical dataset to estimate average snow losses across the United States for a typical PV system design. The open availability of the snow loss estimation capability in SAM to the PV modeling community, coupled with our results of the nation-wide study, will better equip the industry to accurately estimate PV energy production in areas affected by snowfall.

  5. Advanced Inverter Technology for High Penetration Levels of PV Generation in Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schauder, C.

    2014-03-01

    This subcontract report was completed under the auspices of the NREL/SCE High-Penetration Photovoltaic (PV) Integration Project, which is co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD&D) program funded by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and managed by Itron. This project is focused on modeling, quantifying, and mitigating the impacts of large utility-scale PV systems (generally 1-5 MW in size) that are interconnected to the distribution system. This report discusses the concerns utilities have when interconnecting large PV systems that interconnect using PV inverters (a specific application of frequency converters). Additionally, a number of capabilities of PV inverters are described that could be implemented to mitigate the distribution system-level impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Finally, the main issues that need to be addressed to ease the interconnection of large PV systems to the distribution system are presented.

  6. Moving Toward Quantifying Reliability - The Next Step in a Rapidly Maturing PV Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah; Sample, Tony; Wohlgemuth, John; Zhou, Wei; Bosco, Nick; Althaus, Joerg; Phillips, Nancy; Deceglie, Michael; Flueckiger, Chris; Hacke, Peter; Miller, David; Kempe, Michael; Yamamichi, Masaaki; Kondo, Michio

    2015-06-14

    Some may say that PV modules are moving toward being a simple commodity, but most major PV customers ask: 'How can I minimize chances of a module recall?' Or, 'How can I quantify the added value of a 'premium' module?' Or, 'How can I assess the value of an old PV system that I'm thinking of purchasing?' These are all questions that PVQAT (the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force) and partner organizations are working to answer. Defining standard methods for ensuring minimal acceptable quality of PV modules, differentiating modules that provide added value in the toughest of environments, and creating a process (e.g. through IECRE [1]) that can follow a PV system from design through installation and operation are tough tasks, but having standard approaches for these will increase confidence, reduce costs, and be a critical foundation of a mature PV industry. This paper summarizes current needs for new tests, some challenges for defining those tests, and some of the key efforts toward development of international standards, emphasizing that meaningful quantification of reliability (as in defining a service life prediction) must be done in the context of a specific product with design parameters defined through a quality management system.

  7. PV Ramping in a Distributed Generation Environment: A Study Using Solar Measurements; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-06-01

    Variability in Photovoltaic (PV) generation resulting from variability in the solar radiation over the PV arrays is a topic of continuing concern for those involved with integrating renewables onto existing electrical grids. The island of Lanai, Hawaii is an extreme example of the challenges that integrators will face due to the fact that it is a small standalone grid. One way to study this problem is to take high-resolution solar measurements in multiple locations and model simultaneous PV production for various sizes at those locations. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected high-resolution solar data at four locations on the island where proposed PV plants will be deployed in the near future. This data set provides unique insight into how the solar radiation may vary between points that are proximal in distance, but diverse in weather, due to the formation of orographic clouds in the center of the island. Using information about each proposed PV plant size, power output was created at high resolution. The team analyzed this output to understand power production ramps at individual locations and the effects of aggregating the production from all four locations. Hawaii is a unique environment, with extremely variable events occurring on a daily basis. This study provided an excellent opportunity for understanding potential worst-case scenarios for PV ramping. This paper provides an introduction to the datasets that NREL collected over a year and a comprehensive analysis of PV variability in a distributed generation scenario.

  8. A hybrid life-cycle inventory for multi-crystalline silicon PV module manufacturing in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Chang, Yuan; Masanet, Eric

    2014-11-01

    China is the world’s largest manufacturer of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic (mc-Si PV) modules, which is a key enabling technology in the global transition to renewable electric power systems. This study presents a hybrid life-cycle inventory (LCI) of Chinese mc-Si PV modules, which fills a critical knowledge gap on the environmental implications of mc-Si PV module manufacturing in China. The hybrid LCI approach combines process-based LCI data for module and poly-silicon manufacturing plants with a 2007 China IO-LCI model for production of raw material and fuel inputs to estimate ‘cradle to gate’ primary energy use, water consumption, and major air pollutant emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen oxides). Results suggest that mc-Si PV modules from China may come with higher environmental burdens that one might estimate if one were using LCI results for mc-Si PV modules manufactured elsewhere. These higher burdens can be reasonably explained by the efficiency differences in China’s poly-silicon manufacturing processes, the country’s dependence on highly polluting coal-fired electricity, and the expanded system boundaries associated with the hybrid LCI modeling framework. The results should be useful for establishing more conservative ranges on the potential ‘cradle to gate’ impacts of mc-Si PV module manufacturing for more robust LCAs of PV deployment scenarios.

  9. Reconciling Consumer and Utility Objectives in the Residential Solar PV Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michael R.

    Today's energy market is facing large-scale changes that will affect all market players. Near the top of that list is the rapid deployment of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Yet that growing trend will be influenced multiple competing interests between various stakeholders, namely the utility, consumers and technology provides. This study provides a series of analyses---utility-side, consumer-side, and combined analyses---to understand and evaluate the effect of increases in residential solar PV market penetration. Three urban regions have been selected as study locations---Chicago, Phoenix, Seattle---with simulated load data and solar insolation data at each locality. Various time-of-use pricing schedules are investigated, and the effect of net metering is evaluated to determine the optimal capacity of solar PV and battery storage in a typical residential home. The net residential load profile is scaled to assess system-wide technical and economic figures of merit for the utility with an emphasis on intraday load profiles, ramp rates and electricity sales with increasing solar PV penetration. The combined analysis evaluates the least-cost solar PV system for the consumer and models the associated system-wide effects on the electric grid. Utility revenue was found to drop by 1.2% for every percent PV penetration increase, net metering on a monthly or annual basis improved the cost-effectiveness of solar PV but not battery storage, the removal of net metering policy and usage of an improved the cost-effectiveness of battery storage and increases in solar PV penetration reduced the system load factor. As expected, Phoenix had the most favorable economic scenario for residential solar PV, primarily due to high solar insolation. The study location---solar insolation and load profile---was also found to affect the time of year at which the largest net negative system load was realized.

  10. Experimental Performance Investigation of Photovoltaic/Thermal (PV-T) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgoren, M.; Aksoy, M. H.; Bakir, C.; Dogan, S.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic solar cells convert light energy from the sun into electricity. Photovoltaic cells are produced by semi-conducting materials to convert the energy into electricity and during this process heat is absorbed by the solar radiation. This heat causes a loss of electricity generation efficiencies.In this study, an experimental setup was designed and established to test two separate photovoltaic panel systems with alone PV and with water cooling system PV/T to examine the heat effect on PV systems. The absorbed heat energy behind the photovoltaic cell's surface in insulated ambient was removed by means of a water cooling system and the tests for both systems were simultaneously performed along the July 2011. It is found that without active water cooling, the temperature of the PV module was higher during day time and solar cells could only achieve around 8% conversion efficiency. On the other hand, when the PV module was operated with active water cooling condition, the temperature dropped significantly, leading to an increase in the efficiency of solarcells as much as 13.6%. Gained from absorbed solar heat and maximum thermal conversion efficiencies of the system are determined as 49% and 51% for two different mass flow rates. It is observed that water flow rate is effective on the increasing the conversion efficiency as well as absorption and transitionrates of cover glass in PV/T (PV-Thermal) collector, the insulation material and cell efficiency. As a conclusion, the conversion efficiency of the PV system with water cooling might be improved on average about 10%. Therefore, it is recommended that PV system should be designed with most efficient type cooling system to enhance the efficiency and to decrease the payback period.

  11. Establishment of an in vitro equine papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) neutralization assay and a VLP-based vaccine for protection of equids against EcPV2-associated genital tumors.

    PubMed

    Schellenbacher, Christina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Huber, Bettina; Fink, Dieter; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    The consistent and specific presence of Equus caballus papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) DNA and mRNA in equine genital squamous cell carcinoma (gSCC) is suggestive of an etiological role in tumor development. To further validate this concept, EcPV2-neutralizing serum antibody titers were determined by an EcPV2 pseudovirion (PsV) neutralization assay. Furthermore, an EcPV2 L1 virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine was generated and its prophylactic efficacy evaluated in vivo. All 6/6 gSCC-affected, but only 3/20 tumor-free age-matched animals revealed EcPV2-neutralizing serum antibody titers by PsV assay. Vaccination of NZW rabbits and BalbC mice with EcPV2 L1 VLP using Freund׳s or alum respectively as adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing serum antibodies (1600-12,800). Passive transfer with rabbit EcPV2-VLP immune sera completely protected mice from experimental vaginal EcPV2 PsV infection. These findings support the impact of EcPV2 in equine gSCC development and recommend EcPV2 L1 VLP as prophylactic vaccine against EcPV2 infection and associated disease in equids. PMID:26519597

  12. Transient Stability Study of One-Machine-to-Infinite-Bus Power System under Large Penetration of PV Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Naoya; Taniguchi, Haruhito; Ota, Yutaka; Nakajima, Tatsuhito; Chinuki, Tomoyuki

    Large penetration of PV may affect transient stability when fault occurs on a transmission line. Classical model for a synchronous generator, a constant current source model for PV and a constant impedance model for load are applied to the one-machine-to-infinite-bus model. The critical clearing time is calculated by using equal area criterion and Y method simulation. As a result, a case with larger PV penetration has longer CCT than the case without PV penetration and this result does not depend on the reduction of synchronous generator capacity according to PV output.

  13. PV Standards Work: Photovoltaic System and Component Certification, Test Facility Accreditation, and Solar Photovoltaic Energy Systems International Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, T. S.; Chalmers, S.; Barikmo, H. O.

    2005-11-01

    This paper discusses efforts led by two companies (PowerMark Corporation and Sunset Technologies Inc.) to support both U.S. domestic and international photovoltaic (PV) system and component certification and test facility accreditation programs and the operation of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC-82) Photovoltaic Energy Systems. International and national PV certification/accreditation programs are successfully facilitating entry of only the highest quality PV products into the marketplace. Standards also continue to be a cornerstone for assuring global PV product conformity assessment, reducing non-tariff trade barriers, and ultimately improving PV products while lowering cost.

  14. Overview of Scientific Issues Involved in Selection of Polymers for PV Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2011-07-01

    Encapsulant materials used in photovoltaic (PV) modules serve multiple purposes. They physically hold components in place, provide electrical insulation, reduce moisture ingress, optically couple superstrate materials (e.g., glass) to PV cells, protect components from mechanical stress by mechanically de-coupling components via strain relief, and protect materials from corrosion. To do this, encapsulants must adhere well to all surfaces, remain compliant, and transmit light after exposure to temperature, humidity, and UV radiation histories. Here, a brief review of some of the polymeric materials under consideration for PV applications is provided, with an explanation of some of their advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Results from undergraduate PV projects at Seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.D.

    1999-03-01

    In 1995, the NREL/Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program funded seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in its HBCU Photovoltaic Research Associates Program for a period of three years. The program{close_quote}s purpose is to advance HBCU undergraduate knowledge of photovoltaics, primarily as a result of research investigations performed, and to encourage students to pursue careers in photovoltaics. This paper presents results from PV projects ranging from fundamental materials research on PV materials to field projects of PV systems. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. User's Manual for Data for Validating Models for PV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W.; Anderberg, A.; Deline, C.; Glick, S.; Muller, M.; Perrin, G.; Rodriguez, J.; Rummel, S.; Terwilliger, K.; Silverman, T. J.

    2014-04-01

    This user's manual describes performance data measured for flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in Cocoa, Florida, Eugene, Oregon, and Golden, Colorado. The data include PV module current-voltage curves and associated meteorological data for approximately one-year periods. These publicly available data are intended to facilitate the validation of existing models for predicting the performance of PV modules, and for the development of new and improved models. For comparing different modeling approaches, using these public data will provide transparency and more meaningful comparisons of the relative benefits.

  17. Design and optimization of a self-deploying PV tent array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    A study was performed to design a self-deploying tent shaped PV (photovoltaic) array and optimize the design for maximum specific power. Each structural component of the design was analyzed to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces it would be subjected to. Through this analysis the component weights were determined. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power for a given PV blanket. This optimization was performed for both Lunar and Martian environmental conditions. The performance specifications for the array at both locations and with various PV blankets were determined.

  18. Exploring the Economic Value of EPAct 2005's PV Tax Credits

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Ing, Edwin

    2006-03-28

    The market for grid-connected photovoltaics (PV) in the US has grown dramatically in recent years, driven in large part by PV grant or ''buy-down'' programs in California, New Jersey, and many other states. The recent announcement of a new 11-year, $3.2 billion PV program in California suggests that state policy will continue to drive even faster growth over the next decade. Federal policy has also played a role, primarily by providing commercial PV systems access to tax benefits, including accelerated depreciation (5-year MACRS schedule) and a business energy investment tax credit (ITC). With the signing of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) on August 8, the federal government is poised to play a much more significant future role in supporting both commercial and residential PV systems. Specifically, EPAct increased the federal ITC for commercial PV systems from 10% to 30% of system costs, and also created a new 30% ITC (capped at $2000) for residential solar systems. Both changes went into effect on January 1, 2006, and--absent an extension (for which the solar industry has already begun lobbying)--will last for a period of two years: the new residential ITC will expire, and the 30% commercial ITC will revert back to 10%, on January 1, 2008. How much economic value do these new and expanded federal tax credits really provide to PV system purchasers? And what implications might they hold for state/utility PV grant programs? Using a generic (i.e., non-state-specific) cash flow model, this report explores these questions. We begin with a discussion of the taxability of PV grants and their interaction with federal credits, as this issue significantly affects the analysis that follows. We then calculate the incremental value of EPAct's new and expanded credits for PV systems of different sizes, and owned by different types of entities. We conclude with a discussion of potential implications for purchasers of PV systems, as well as for administrators of state

  19. Development of a Visual Inspection Checklist for Evaluation of Fielded PV Module Condition (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, C. E; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-03-01

    A visual inspection checklist for the evaluation of fielded photovoltaic (PV) modules has been developed to facilitate collection of data describing the field performance of PV modules. The proposed inspection checklist consists of 14 sections, each documenting the appearance or properties of a part of the module. This tool has been evaluated through the inspection of over 60 PV modules produced by more than 20 manufacturers and fielded at two different sites for varying periods of time. Aggregated data from a single data collection tool such as this checklist has the potential to enable longitudinal studies of module condition over time, technology evolution, and field location for the enhancement of module reliability models.

  20. Housekeeping Gene Sequencing and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis To Identify Subpopulations within Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato That Correlate with Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Gironde, S.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola causes bacterial spot on Brassicaceae worldwide, and for the last 10 years severe outbreaks have been reported in the Loire Valley, France. P. syringae pv. maculicola resembles P. syringae pv. tomato in that it is also pathogenic for tomato and causes the same types of symptoms. We used a collection of 106 strains of P. syringae to characterize the relationships between P. syringae pv. maculicola and related pathovars, paying special attention to P. syringae pv. tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and rpoD gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. maculicola, which causes diseases in Brassicaceae, forms six genetic lineages within genomospecies 3 of P. syringae strains as defined by L. Gardan et al. (Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49[Pt 2]:469–478, 1999), whereas P. syringae pv. tomato forms two distinct genetic lineages. A multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) conducted with eight minisatellite loci confirmed the genetic structure obtained with rpoD and gyrB sequence analyses. These results provide promising tools for fine-scale epidemiological studies on diseases caused by P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato. The two pathovars had distinct host ranges; only P. syringae pv. maculicola strains were pathogenic for Brassicaceae. A subpopulation of P. syringae pv. maculicola strains that are pathogenic for Pto-expressing tomato plants were shown to lack avrPto1 and avrPtoB or to contain a disrupted avrPtoB homolog. Taking phylogenetic and pathological features into account, our data suggest that the DC3000 strain belongs to P. syringae pv. maculicola. This study shows that P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato appear multiclonal, as they did not diverge from a single common ancestral group within the ancestral P. syringae genomospecies 3, and suggests that pathovar specificity within P. syringae may be due to independent genetic events. PMID:22389364

  1. NREL/SCE High-Penetration PV Integration Project: Report on Field Demonstration of Advanced Inverter Functionality in Fontana, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.

    2014-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Southern California Edison High-Penetration PV Integration Project is (1) researching the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) integration, (2) determining mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate those impacts, and (3) seeking to demonstrate these mitigation methods on actual high-penetration PV distribution circuits. This report describes a field demonstration completed during the fall of 2013 on the Fontana, California, study circuit, which includes a total of 4.5 MW of interconnected utility-scale rooftop PV systems. The demonstration included operating a 2-MW PV system at an off-unity power factor that had been determined during previously completed distribution system modeling and PV impact assessment analyses. Data on the distribution circuit and PV system operations were collected during the 2-week demonstration period. This demonstration reinforces the findings of previous laboratory testing that showed that utility-scale PV inverters are capable of operating at off-unity power factor to mitigate PV impacts; however, because of difficulties setting and retaining PV inverter power factor set points during the field demonstration, it was not possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-unity power factor operation to mitigate the voltage impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Lessons learned from this field demonstration are presented to inform future field demonstration efforts.

  2. A Survey of State and Local PV Program Response to Financial Innovation and Disparate Federal Tax Treatment in the Residential PV Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Holt, Edward

    2015-06-01

    High up-front costs and a lack of financing options have historically been the primary barriers to the adoption of photovoltaics (PV) in the residential sector. State clean energy funds, which emerged in a number of states from the restructuring of the electricity industry in the mid-to-late 1990s, have for many years attempted to overcome these barriers through PV rebate and, in some cases, loan programs. While these programs (rebate programs in particular) have been popular, the residential PV market in the United States only started to achieve significant scale in the last five years – driven in large part by an initial wave of financial innovation that led to the rise of third-party ownership.

  3. The poleward tilt of storm tracks from a PV tendency analysis of cyclone tracking composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamarin, Talia; Kaspi, Yohai

    2015-04-01

    Regions of enhanced eddy activity such as the Pacific and Atlantic storm tracks are characterized by a poleward deflection that influences significantly midlatitude climate. In this study, the poleward motion of storms is studied using a tracking algorithm in an idealized zonally symmetric GCM. The poleward propagation of mid-latitude cyclones and a possible 'baroclinic beta- drift' mechanism that explains the nonlinear meridional tendency are analyzed using a composite of all midlatitude cyclones. During the growth stage, the classic picture of baroclinic instability emerges, with an upper level potential vorticity (PV) to the west of a low level cyclone. This configuration not only promotes intensification, but also a poleward tendency that results from the nonlinear advection of the surface anomaly by the upper level PV. The separate contributions of each of the terms in the PV tendency equation shows the crucial role played by the upper level PV anomaly and the diabatic heating.

  4. New Berkeley Lab Report Tracks a Decade of PV Installed Cost Trends

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Peterman, Carla; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-04-15

    Installations of PV systems have been expanding at a rapid pace in recent years. In the United States, the market for PV is driven by national, state, and local government incentives, including upfront cash rebates, production-based incentives, requirements that electricity suppliers purchase a certain amount of solar energy, and Federal and state tax benefits. These programs are, in part, motivated by the popular appeal of solar energy and by the positive attributes of PV - e.g., modest environmental impacts, avoidance of fuel price risks, coincidence with peak electrical demand, and the location of PV at the point of use. Given the relatively high cost of PV, however, a key goal of these policies is to encourage cost reductions over time. Therefore, as policy incentives have become more significant and as PV deployment has accelerated, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of PV systems over time, by system characteristics, by system location, and by component. A new Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report, 'Tracking the Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2007', helps to fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed cost (i.e., the cost paid by the system owner) of grid-connected PV systems in the U.S. The report is based on an analysis of project-level cost data from nearly 37,000 residential and non-residential PV systems completed from 1998-2007 and installed on the utility-customer-side of the meter. These systems total 363 MW, equal to 76% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the U.S. through 2007, representing the most comprehensive data source available on the installed cost of PV in the United States. The data were obtained from administrators of PV incentive programs around the country, who typically collect installed cost data for systems receiving incentives. A total of 16 programs, spanning 12 states, ultimately provided data for the study. Reflecting the broader geographical trends in the

  5. Evolution of integrated panel structural design and interfaces for PV power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, J. C.; Anderson, A. J.; Robertson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of integrated photovoltaic (PV) panel design at ARCO Solar is discussed. Historically, framed PV modules of about 1 x 4-ft size were individually mounted in the field on fixed support structures and interconnected electrically with cables to build higher-power arrays. When ARCO Solar saw the opportunity in 1982 to marry its PV modules with state-of-the-art heliostat trackers developed by ARCO Power Systems, it became obvious that mounting individual modules was impractical. For this project, the framed modules were factory-assembled into panels and interconnected with cables before being mounted on the trackers. Since then, ARCO Solar made considerable progress and gained substantial experience in the design and fabrication of large PV panels. Constraints and criteria considered in these design activities included static and dynamic loads; assembly and transportation equipment and logistics, structural and electrical interfaces, and safety and grounding concerns.

  6. Passive thermal regulation of flat PV modules by coupling the mechanisms of evaporative and fin cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, M.; Senthilkumar, T.

    2015-08-01

    A passive thermal regulation technique with fins in conjunction with cotton wicks is developed in the present work for controlling the temperature of PV module during its operation. Experiments were conducted with the developed technique in the location of Tiruchirappalli (78.6°E and 10.8°N), Tamil Nadu, India with flat 25 Wp PV module and its viability was confirmed. The PV module temperature got reduced by 12 % while the electrical yield is increased by 14 % with the help of the developed cooling system. Basic energy balance equation applicable for PV module was used to evaluate the module temperatures and a fair agreement was obtained between the theoretical and experimental values for the cases of with cooling and without cooling.

  7. Suppression of Large-scaled PV Power Station Output Fluctuation using Sodium-Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akatsuka, Motoki; Hara, Ryoichi; Kita, Hiroyuki; Ito, Takamitsu; Ueda, Yoshinobu; Miwa, Shuya; Matsuno, Naoya; Takitani, Katsuyuki; Saito, Masami

    The large-scaled photovoltaic generation (PV) system that called “mega-solar” is expected to spread for penetrating PV system. But penetration of mega-solar may impact to stable operation of power system such as the load frequency control. As the one of solution for this problem, energy storage system (ESS) is tentatively installed to absorb short-term fluctuation of PV output. However, since the ESS is still expensive, it is favorable to reduce its required capacity of ESS for saving installation cost. In Wakkanai PV power station, sodium-sulfur (NAS) battery system is adopted as ESS and is operated to achieve suppression of short-term fluctuation and scheduled operation. In this paper, authors propose a control method of NAS battery system for reducing its MW capacity required for fluctuation suppressing based on characteristic of solar radiation.

  8. Modeling & power management of standalone PV-Wind Hybrid energy system for remote location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, M. J. A.

    This thesis mainly focuses on a novel design of a standalone PV-Wind hybrid energy system for remote locations where grid extension is not feasible or is expensive. The Hybrid PV-Wind standalone energy system shows higher reliability compared to Wind or PV standalone systems as wind and solar are complementary. A Matlab/Simulink model of an integrated standalone PV-Wind hybrid system using a battery for storage and backup protection is presented. The individual component of the system is discussed and modeled. A novel and unique control strategy is designed and simulated to control the power flow of the system while maintaining the battery charging and discharging limit. In addition, different converter design and maximum power point tracking control are applied to ensure efficient and reliable power supply under various atmospheric and loading conditions.

  9. Passive thermal regulation of flat PV modules by coupling the mechanisms of evaporative and fin cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, M.; Senthilkumar, T.

    2016-07-01

    A passive thermal regulation technique with fins in conjunction with cotton wicks is developed in the present work for controlling the temperature of PV module during its operation. Experiments were conducted with the developed technique in the location of Tiruchirappalli (78.6°E and 10.8°N), Tamil Nadu, India with flat 25 Wp PV module and its viability was confirmed. The PV module temperature got reduced by 12 % while the electrical yield is increased by 14 % with the help of the developed cooling system. Basic energy balance equation applicable for PV module was used to evaluate the module temperatures and a fair agreement was obtained between the theoretical and experimental values for the cases of with cooling and without cooling.

  10. Nationwide Analysis of U.S. Commercial Building Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Breakeven Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Carolyn; Gagnon, Pieter; Denholm, Paul; Margolis, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The commercial sector offers strong potential for solar photovoltaics (PV) owing to abundant available roof space suitable for PV and the opportunity to offset the sector's substantial retail electricity purchases. This report evaluated the breakeven price of PV for 15 different building types and various financing options by calculating electricity savings based on detailed rate structures for most U.S. utility territories (representing approximately two thirds of U.S. commercial customers). We find that at current capital costs, an estimated 1/3 of U.S. commercial customers break even in the cash scenario and approximately 2/3 break even in the loan scenario. Variation in retail rates is a stronger driver of breakeven prices than is variation in building load or solar generation profiles. At the building level, variation in the average breakeven price is largely driven by the ability for a PV system to reduce demand charges.

  11. Diffusion of environmentally-friendly energy technologies: buy versus lease differences in residential PV markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Varun; Sigrin, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    Diffusion of microgeneration technologies, particularly rooftop photovoltaic (PV), represents a key option in reducing emissions in the residential sector. We use a uniquely rich dataset from the burgeoning residential PV market in Texas to study the nature of the consumer’s decision-making process in the adoption of these technologies. In particular, focusing on the financial metrics and the information decision-makers use to base their decisions upon, we study how the leasing and buying models affect individual choices and, thereby, the adoption of capital-intensive energy technologies. Overall, our findings suggest that the leasing model more effectively addresses consumers’ informational requirements and that, contrary to some other studies, buyers and lessees of PV do not necessarily differ significantly along socio-demographic variables. Instead, we find that the leasing model has opened up the residential PV market to a new, and potentially very large, consumer segment—those with a tight cash-flow situation.

  12. Quantifying Reliability - The Next Step for a Rapidly Maturing PV Industry and China's Role

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-10-14

    PV customers wish to know how long their PV modules will last, but quantitatively predicting service life is difficult because of the large number of ways that a module can fail, the variability of the use environment, the cost of the testing, and the short product development time, especially when compared with the long desired lifetime. China should play a key role in developing international standards because China manufactures most of the world's PV modules. The presentation will describe the steps that need to be taken to create a service life prediction within the context of a defined bill of materials, process window and use environment. Worldwide standards for cost-effective approaches to service-life predictions will be beneficial to both PV customers and manufacturers since the consequences of premature module failure can be disastrous for both.

  13. Realworld maximum power point tracking simulation of PV system based on Fuzzy Logic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Ahmed M.; El-arini, Mahdi M. M.; Ghitas, Ahmed; Fathy, Ahmed

    2012-12-01

    In the recent years, the solar energy becomes one of the most important alternative sources of electric energy, so it is important to improve the efficiency and reliability of the photovoltaic (PV) systems. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) plays an important role in photovoltaic power systems because it maximize the power output from a PV system for a given set of conditions, and therefore maximize their array efficiency. This paper presents a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) using Fuzzy Logic theory for a PV system. The work is focused on the well known Perturb and Observe (P&O) algorithm and is compared to a designed fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The simulation work dealing with MPPT controller; a DC/DC Ćuk converter feeding a load is achieved. The results showed that the proposed Fuzzy Logic MPPT in the PV system is valid.

  14. A Modular PV System Using Chain-Link-Type Multilevel Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Nobuhiko; Ise, Toshifumi

    This paper presents a modular photovoltaic system (MPVS) that uses a chain-link-type multilevel converter (CLMC). In large-scale PV generating systems, the DC power supply is generally composed of a large number of PV panels. Hence, losses are caused by differences in the maximum power point at each PV panel. An MPVS has been proposed to address the above mentioned problem. It helps improve the photoelectric conversion efficiency by applying maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control to each group of PV panels. In addition, if a CLMC is used in an MPVS, a high voltage can be output from the AC side and transmission losses can be decreased. However, with this circuit configuration, the current output from the AC side may be unbalanced. Therefore, we propose a method to output balanced current from the AC side, even if the output of the DC power supply is unbalanced. The validity of the proposed method is examined by digital simulation.

  15. Economics and performance of PV hybrid power systems: Three case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.L.; Durand, S.J.; Thomas, M.G.; Post, H.N.

    1998-07-01

    The Photovoltaic Systems Assistance Center (PVSAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been supporting the development and implementation of off-grid PV hybrid power systems for many years. Technical support has included: refining hardware; understanding system design techniques; obtaining operation and maintenance data; studying use of energy produced. As part of the program, the PVSAC has provided technical expertise on hybrid systems to many federal agencies including the National Park Service, the Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Department of Defense. The goal of these partnerships has been to ensure that reliable and safe PV hybrid systems are specified and procured. At present, a critical review of performance and costs of several representative PV hybrid systems is underway. This paper presents a summary of the performance and economical analyses conducted on three PV hybrid systems.

  16. Introduction of Break-Out Session at the International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Yamamichi, M.; Sample, T.

    2011-07-01

    This presentation outlines review requirements for quality assurance (QA) rating systems, logical design of QA systems, and specific tasks for break-out session 1 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum.

  17. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-01-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  18. Data Filtering Impact on PV Degradation Rates and Uncertainty (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-03-01

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaics (PV) it becomes vital to know how power output decreases with time. In order to predict power delivery, degradation rates must be determined accurately. Data filtering, any data treatment assessment of long-term field behavior, is discussed as part of a more comprehensive uncertainty analysis and can be one of the greatest sources of uncertainty in long-term performance studies. Several distinct filtering methods such as outlier removal and inclusion of only sunny days on several different metrics such as PVUSA, performance ratio, DC power to plane-of-array irradiance ratio, uncorrected, and temperature-corrected were examined. PVUSA showed the highest sensitivity while temperature-corrected power over irradiance ratio was found to be the least sensitive to data filtering conditions. Using this ratio it is demonstrated that quantification of degradation rates with a statistical accuracy of +/- 0.2%/year within 4 years of field data is possible on two crystalline silicon and two thin-film systems.

  19. Comparative analysis of two bacteriophages of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis.

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Dóra; Frank, Tamara; Rákhely, Gábor; Doffkay, Zsolt; Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás

    2016-09-01

    Walnut blight caused by Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis (Xaj) is one of the most frequent infective diseases of walnut, resulting in serious economic losses. One potential solution to control this disease could be the application of bacteriophages. In this study, 24 phages were isolated from soil and walnut aerial tissues infected with Xaj. Two polyvalent bacteriophages, Xaj2 and Xaj24 were chosen for further characterization including their morphological, physiological and genomic analyses. Xaj2 was classified as Siphoviridae whereas Xaj24 belonged to the Podoviridae family. Both phages demonstrated lytic effect on Xaj in laboratory trials. Complete genomes of Xaj2 and Xaj24 were determined. Genomes of Xaj2 and Xaj24 consisted of 49.241 and 44.861 nucleotides encoding 80 and 53 genes, respectively. Comparative genome analyses have revealed that Xaj2 had a unique genome sequence, while Xaj24 was a phiKMV-like phage and it was most similar to the Prado phage which is virulent for Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas spp. In this study, we present the first two complete Xaj phage sequences enabling an insight into the genomics of Xaj phages. PMID:27275846

  20. Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar PV Racking System

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, Richard T.

    2015-01-23

    The objective of this project was to reduce the cost of racking for PV solar on flat commercial rooftops. Cost reductions would come from both labor savings and material savings related to the installation process. The rack would need to accommodate the majority of modules available on the market. Cascade Engineering has a long history of converting traditional metal type applications over to plastic. Injection molding of plastics have numerous advantages including selection of resin for the application, placing the material exactly where it is needed, designing in features that will speed up the installation process, and weight reduction of the array. A plastic rack would need to meet the requirements of UL2703, Mounting systems, mounting devices, clamping/retention devices, and ground lugs for use with flat-plate photovoltaic modules and panels. Comparing original data to the end of project racking design, racking material costs were reduced 50% and labor costs reduced 64%. The racking product accommodates all 60 and 72 cell panels on the market, meets UL2703 requirements, contributes only 1.3 pounds per square foot of weight to the array, requires little ballast to secure the array, automatically grounds the module when the module is secured, stacks/nests well for shipping/fewer lifts to the roof, provides integrated wire routing, allows water to drain on the roof, and accommodates various seismic roof connections. Project goals were achieved as noted in the original funding application.

  1. FTIR Laboratory in Support of the PV Program

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Bhattacharya, R.; Xu, Y.; Li, X.; Wang, Q.

    2005-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) Laboratory supports the Solar Energy Technologies Program through the measurement and characterization of solar energy-related materials and devices. The FTIR technique is a fast, accurate, and reliable method for studying molecular structure and composition. This ability to identify atomic species and their bonding environment is a powerful combination that finds use in many research and development efforts. A brief overview of the technical approach used is contained in Section 2 of this report. Because of its versatility and accessibility, the FTIR Laboratory is a valuable contributor to the Solar Energy Technologies Program. The laboratory provides support for, and collaborates with, several in-house programs as well as our industry and university partners. By the end of FY 2004, the FTIR Laboratory performed over 1100 measurements on PV-related materials. These contributions resulted in conference and workshop presentations and several peer-reviewed publications. A brief summary of a few of these efforts is contained in Section 3 of this report.

  2. Recent advances in outdoor performance evaluation of PV systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, M.A.; King, D.L.; Cannon, J.E.; Woodworth, J.R.; Boyson, W.E.; Adams, N.P.; Ellibee, D.E.

    1992-12-31

    Sandia`s Photovoltaic Technology Laboratory (PTEL) routinely performs outdoor tests of a variety of one-sun and concentrator PV modules. The authors experience is that while outdoor testing has its own set of problems, it can produce results that are more directly applicable to ``field`` conditions than testing in solar simulators. They have recently improved both the hardware and software at the PTEL to improve their accuracy and to deal with the special set of problems encountered in outdoor testing. Improvements in hardware include a computer-controlled solar tracker that allows us to test arrays up to 21 m{sup 2} in size; infrared imaging of modules; and electronic loads that allow us to test components with outputs up to 1,800 watts. Improvements in software include real-time monitoring of data collection; a relational data base that has improved the reliability of test setups, operations and analyses; and a standardized reporting process that relates module performance to a number of environmental parameters.

  3. Skin Deep: Highlights of NREL Surface Analysis PV Research

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, S.; Pankow, J.; Perkins, C.; Reedy, R.; Teeter, G.; Young, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Surface Analysis project provides measurement support and leadership for collaborative research activities involving surface chemistry and physics in all areas of the PV program. Significant results from the past fiscal year include the following: i) in-situ XPS, UPS, and AES studies of chemical-bath exposure of CIGS surfaces demonstrated that Group-III elements are preferentially removed from the surface, that type conversion of the surface occurs, and that the addition of a surfactant improves CdS deposition and thus device performance; ii) XPS studies of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) candidate backsheet materials have shown that plasma exposure prior to oxide-barrier deposition results in the formation of low-molecular-weight fragments that result in the formation of a weak interfacial layer that fails during damp-heat exposure; iii) an empirical relation was derived for the source geometry that leads to optimal film-thickness uniformity in rotating-substrate physical-vapor deposition (PVD) systems; and iv) PVD flux-distribution calculations were performed to develop a novel method for combinatorial thin-film synthesis.

  4. Water Impacts of High Solar PV Electricity Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Cohen, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    This analysis provides a detailed national and regional description of the water-related impacts and constraints of high solar electricity penetration scenarios in the U.S. in 2030 and 2050. A modified version of the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model that incorporates water resource availability and costs as a constraint in each of its 134 Balancing Area (BA) regions was utilized to explore national and regional differences in water use impacts and solar deployment locations under different solar energy cost and water availability scenarios (Macknick et al. 2015). Water resource availability and cost data are from recently completed research at Sandia National Laboratories (Tidwell et al. 2013a). Scenarios analyzed include two business-as-usual solar energy cost cases, one with and one without considering available water resources, and four solar energy cost cases that meet the SunShot cost goals (i.e., $1/watt for utility-scale PV systems), with varying levels of water availability restrictions. This analysis provides insight into the role solar energy technologies have in the broader electricity sector under scenarios of water constraints.

  5. Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-10-01

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this paper we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

  6. Technology and Climate Trends in PV Module Degradation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-10-01

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) technology it is vital to know how power output decreases with time. Unfortunately, it can take years to accurately measure the long-term degradation of new products, but past experience on older products can provide a basis for prediction of degradation rates of new products. An extensive search resulted in more than 2000 reported degradation rates with more than 1100 reported rates that include some or all IV parameters. In this presentation we discuss how the details of the degradation data give clues about the degradation mechanisms and how they depend on technology and climate zones as well as how they affect current and voltage differently. The largest contributor to maximum power decline for crystalline Si technologies is short circuit current (or maximum current) degradation and to a lesser degree loss in fill factor. Thin-film technologies are characterized by a much higher contribution from fill factor particularly for humid climates. Crystalline Si technologies in hot & humid climates also display a higher probability to show a mixture of losses (not just short circuit current losses) compared to other climates. The distribution for the module I-V parameters (electrical mismatch) was found to change with field exposure. The distributions not only widened but also developed a tail at the lower end, skewing the distribution.

  7. PV Technology for Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Pool, Frederick S.; Nicolet, Marc A.; Iles, Peter A.

    1994-01-01

    As a result of the recent NASA emphasis on smaller, lower cost space missions, PV is now being considered for a number of missions operating at solar distances of 3 AU or greater. In the past, many of these missions would utilize an RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator). Historically, silicon solar cell behavior at these distances has been compromised by a number of mechanisms including shunting, nonohmic back contacts, and the 'broken knee' curve shape. The former two can usually be neglected for modern silicon cells, but the latter has not been eliminated. This problem has been identified with localized diffusion at the top contact/silicon interface which leads to structural changes at the local junction. This is believed to create a resistive metal-semiconductor-like (MSL) interface in parallel with the junction which results in the characteristic forms of the LILT (low intensity, low temperature) 'broken knee'. This paper discusses a TaSiN contact barrier that will prevent the MSL structure in the junction.

  8. (abstract) PV Technology for Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Pool, Frederick S.; Nicolet, Marc A.; Iles, Peter A.

    1994-01-01

    As a result of the recent NASA emphasis on smaller, lower cost space missions, PV is now being considered for a number of missions operating at solar distances of 3 AU or greater. In the past, many of these missions would utilize an RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator). Historically, silicon solar cell behavior at these distances has been compromised by a number of mechanisms including shunting, nonohmic back contacts, and the 'broken knee' curve shape. The former two can usually be neglected for modern silicon cells, but the latter has not been eliminated. This problem has been identified with localized diffusion at the top contact/silicon interface which leads to structural changes at the local junction. This is believed to create a resistive metal-semiconductor-like (MSL) interface in parallel with the junction which results in the characteristic forms of the LILT (low intensity, low temperature) 'broken knee'. This paper discusses a TaSiN contact barrier that will prevent the MSL structure in the junction.

  9. Bioaugmentation treatment of PV wafer manufacturing wastewater by microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Chen, Maoxia; He, Xin; Xiao, Zili; Zhou, Houzhen; Tan, Zhouliang

    2015-01-01

    The wastewater of silicon photovoltaic (PV) battery manufacturing contained polyethylene glycol (PEG) and detergents, which possessed the characteristics of high content of organics and low bioavailability, and then resulted in high treatment costs. To address the difficulties of existing treatment facilities in stably meeting discharge standards, eight tons of microbial culture (consisting of Bacillus sp. and Rhodococcus sp.) were added into the aerobic treatment unit. Subsequently, the effectiveness of the microbial culture in small-scale biological wastewater treatment was evaluated, and the operating conditions for engineering applications were optimized. The application study showed that the average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency reached 95.0% when the pH value was 7, the gas-water ratio was 28:1, the reflux ratio was 50%, which indicated an increase of 51.2% contrasting with the situation without bioaugmentation. The volume load of the treatment facilities after augmentation increased by 127.9% and could tolerate the COD shock load reached 2,340 mg·L(-1). At last, the effluence met the class I standard of the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996). PMID:26287834

  10. Ultrastructural and sequence characterization of Penaeus vannamei nodavirus (PvNV) from Belize.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Pantoja, Carlos R; Redman, Rita M; Navarro, Solangel A; Lightner, Donald V

    2011-05-01

    The Penaeus vannamei nodavirus (PvNV), which causes muscle necrosis in Penaeus vannamei from Belize, was identified in 2005. Infected shrimp show clinical signs of white, opaque lesions in the tail muscle. Under transmission electron microscopy, the infected cells exhibit increases in various organelles, including mitochondria, Golgi stacks, and rough endoplasmic reticulum. Cytoplasmic inclusions containing para-crystalline arrays of virions were visualized. The viral particle is spherical in shape and 19 to 27 nm in diameter. A cDNA library was constructed from total RNA extracted from infected shrimp. Through nucleotide sequencing from the cDNA clones and northern blot hybridization, the PvNV genome was shown to consist of 2 segments: RNA1 (3111 bp) and RNA2 (1183 bp). RNA1 contains 2 overlapped open reading frames (ORF A and B), which may encode a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and a B2 protein, respectively. RNA2 contains a single ORF that may encode the viral capsid protein. Sequence analyses showed the presence of 4 RdRp characteristic motifs and 2 conserved domains (RNA-binding B2 protein and viral coat protein) in the PvNV genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the translated amino acid sequence of the RdRp reveals that PvNV is a member of the genus Alphanodavirus and closely related to Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). In a study investigating potential PvNV vectors, we monitored the presence of PvNV by RT-PCR in seabird feces and various aquatic organisms collected around a shrimp farm in Belize. PvNV was detected in mosquitofish, seabird feces, barnacles, and zooplankton, suggesting that PvNV can be spread via these carriers. PMID:21790065

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. lapsa Strain ATCC 10859, Isolated from Infected Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Jiang, Hongshan; Li, Baiyun; Zhao, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. lapsa is a pathovar of Pseudomonas syringae that can infect wheat. The complete genome of P. syringae pv. lapsa strain ATCC 10859 contains a 5,918,899-bp circular chromosome with 4,973 coding sequences, 16 rRNAs, 69 tRNAs, and an average GC content of 59.13%. The analysis of this genome revealed several gene clusters that are related to pathogenesis and virulence. PMID:26941133

  12. Comparative density of CCK- and PV-GABA cells within the cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Whissell, Paul D.; Cajanding, Janine D.; Fogel, Nicole; Kim, Jun Chul

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)- and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing neurons constitute the two major populations of perisomatic GABAergic neurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. As CCK- and PV-GABA neurons differ in an array of morphological, biochemical and electrophysiological features, it has been proposed that they form distinct inhibitory ensembles which differentially contribute to network oscillations and behavior. However, the relationship and balance between CCK- and PV-GABA neurons in the inhibitory networks of the brain is currently unclear as the distribution of these cells has never been compared on a large scale. Here, we systemically investigated the distribution of CCK- and PV-GABA cells across a wide number of discrete forebrain regions using an intersectional genetic approach. Our analysis revealed several novel trends in the distribution of these cells. While PV-GABA cells were more abundant overall, CCK-GABA cells outnumbered PV-GABA cells in several subregions of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral temporal cortex. Interestingly, CCK-GABA cells were relatively more abundant in secondary/association areas of the cortex (V2, S2, M2, and AudD/AudV) than they were in corresponding primary areas (V1, S1, M1, and Aud1). The reverse trend was observed for PV-GABA cells. Our findings suggest that the balance between CCK- and PV-GABA cells in a given cortical region is related to the type of processing that area performs; inhibitory networks in the secondary cortex tend to favor the inclusion of CCK-GABA cells more than networks in the primary cortex. The intersectional genetic labeling approach employed in the current study expands upon the ability to study molecularly defined subsets of GABAergic neurons. This technique can be applied to the investigation of neuropathologies which involve disruptions to the GABAergic system, including schizophrenia, stress, maternal immune activation and autism. PMID:26441554

  13. Biofilm formation, epiphytic fitness, and canker development in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Rigano, Luciano A; Siciliano, Florencia; Enrique, Ramón; Sendín, Lorena; Filippone, Paula; Torres, Pablo S; Qüesta, Julia; Dow, J Maxwell; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Vojnov, Adrián A; Marano, María Rosa

    2007-10-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is responsible for the canker disease affecting citrus plants throughout the world. Here, we have evaluated the role of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation in leaf colonization during canker development on lemon leaves. Crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of X. axonopodis pv. citri strains expressing the green fluorescent protein were used to evaluate attachment and biofilm formation on abiotic and biotic (leaf) surfaces. Wild-type X. axonopodis pv. citri attached to and formed a complex, structured biofilm on glass in minimal medium containing glucose. Similar attachment and structured biofilm formation also were seen on lemon leaves. An X. axonopodis pv. citri gumB mutant strain, defective in production of the extracellular polysaccharide xanthan, did not form a structured biofilm on either abiotic or biotic surfaces. In addition, the X. axonopodis pv. citri gumB showed reduced growth and survival on leaf surfaces and reduced disease symptoms. These findings suggest an important role for formation of biofilms in the epiphytic survival of X. axonopodis pv. citri prior to development of canker disease. PMID:17918624

  14. Specific Detection of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae in Anthurium (Anthurium andreanum) Tissues by Nested PCR†

    PubMed Central

    Robène-Soustrade, Isabelle; Laurent, Philippe; Gagnevin, Lionel; Jouen, Emmanuel; Pruvost, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Efficient control of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae, the causal agent of anthurium bacterial blight, requires a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool. A nested PCR test was developed from a sequence-characterized amplified region marker identified by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR for the detection of X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae. Serological and pathogenicity tests were performed concurrently with the nested PCR test with a large collection of X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains that were isolated worldwide and are pathogenic to anthurium and/or other aroids. The internal primer pair directed amplification of the expected product (785 bp) for all 70 X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains pathogenic to anthurium tested and for isolates originating from syngonium and not pathogenic to anthurium. This finding is consistent with previous studies which indicated that there is a high level of relatedness between strains from anthurium and strains from syngonium. Strains originating from the two host genera can be distinguished by restriction analysis of the amplification product. No amplification product was obtained with 98 strains of unrelated phytopathogenic bacteria or saprophytic bacteria from the anthurium phyllosphere, except for a weak signal obtained for one X. axonopodis pv. allii strain. Nevertheless, restriction enzyme analysis permitted the two pathovars to be distinguished. The detection threshold obtained with pure cultures or plant extracts (103 CFU ml−1) allowed detection of the pathogen from symptomless contaminated plants. This test could be a useful diagnostic tool for screening propagation stock plant material and for monitoring international movement of X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae. PMID:16461651

  15. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote System Performance: AReview of Current Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-11-12

    Some stakeholders continue to voice concerns about the performance of customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, particularly because these systems typically receive financial support through ratepayer- or publicly-funded programs. Although much remains to be understood about the extent and specific causes of poor PV system performance, several studies of the larger programs and markets have shed some light on the issue. An evaluation of the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s Emerging Renewables Program, for example, found that 7% of systems, in a sample of 95, had lower-than-expected power output due to shading or soiling (KEMA 2005). About 3% of a larger sample of 140 systems were not operating at all or were operating well below expected output, due to failed equipment, faulty installation workmanship, and/or a lack of basic maintenance. In a recent evaluation of the other statewide PV incentive program in California, the Self-Generation Incentive Program, 9 of 52 projects sampled were found to have annual capacity factors less than 14.5%, although reasons for these low capacity factors generally were not identified (Itron 2005). Studies of PV systems in Germany and Japan, the two largest PV markets worldwide, have also revealed some performance problems associated with issues such as shading, equipment and installation defects, inverter failure, and deviations from module manufacturers' specifications (Otani et al. 2004, Jahn & Nasse 2004). Although owners of PV systems have an inherent incentive to ensure that their systems perform well, many homeowners and building operators may lack the necessary information and expertise to carry out this task effectively. Given this barrier, and the responsibility of PV incentive programs to ensure that public funds are prudently spent, these programs should (and often do) play a critical role in promoting PV system performance. Performance-based incentives (PBIs), which are based on actual energy production rather than

  16. Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar systems simulation with Simulink/Matlab

    SciTech Connect

    da Silva, R.M.; Fernandes, J.L.M.

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this work consists in thermodynamic modeling of hybrid photovoltaic-thermal (PV/T) solar systems, pursuing a modular strategy approach provided by Simulink/Matlab. PV/T solar systems are a recently emerging solar technology that allows for the simultaneous conversion of solar energy into both electricity and heat. This type of technology present some interesting advantages over the conventional ''side-by-side'' thermal and PV solar systems, such as higher combined electrical/thermal energy outputs per unit area, and a more uniform and aesthetical pleasant roof area. Despite the fact that early research on PV/T systems can be traced back to the seventies, only recently it has gained a renewed impetus. In this work, parametric studies and annual transient simulations of PV/T systems are undertaken in Simulink/Matlab. The obtained results show an average annual solar fraction of 67%, and a global overall efficiency of 24% (i.e. 15% thermal and 9% electrical), for a typical four-person single-family residence in Lisbon, with p-Si cells, and a collector area of 6 m{sup 2}. A sensitivity analysis performed on the PV/T collector suggests that the most important variable that should be addressed to improve thermal performance is the photovoltaic (PV) module emittance. Based on those results, some additional improvements are proposed, such as the use of vacuum, or a noble gas at low-pressure, to allow for the removal of PV cells encapsulation without air oxidation and degradation, and thus reducing the PV module emittance. Preliminary results show that this option allows for an 8% increase on optical thermal efficiency, and a substantial reduction of thermal losses, suggesting the possibility of working at higher fluid temperatures. The higher working temperatures negative effect in electrical efficiency was negligible, due to compensation by improved optical properties. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained from other authors

  17. Characterization of high performance silicon-based VMJ PV cells for laser power transmission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perales, Mico; Yang, Mei-huan; Wu, Cheng-liang; Hsu, Chin-wei; Chao, Wei-sheng; Chen, Kun-hsien; Zahuranec, Terry

    2016-03-01

    Continuing improvements in the cost and power of laser diodes have been critical in launching the emerging fields of power over fiber (PoF), and laser power beaming. Laser power is transmitted either over fiber (for PoF), or through free space (power beaming), and is converted to electricity by photovoltaic cells designed to efficiently convert the laser light. MH GoPower's vertical multi-junction (VMJ) PV cell, designed for high intensity photovoltaic applications, is fueling the emergence of this market, by enabling unparalleled photovoltaic receiver flexibility in voltage, cell size, and power output. Our research examined the use of the VMJ PV cell for laser power transmission applications. We fully characterized the performance of the VMJ PV cell under various laser conditions, including multiple near IR wavelengths and light intensities up to tens of watts per cm2. Results indicated VMJ PV cell efficiency over 40% for 9xx nm wavelengths, at laser power densities near 30 W/cm2. We also investigated the impact of the physical dimensions (length, width, and height) of the VMJ PV cell on its performance, showing similarly high performance across a wide range of cell dimensions. We then evaluated the VMJ PV cell performance within the power over fiber application, examining the cell's effectiveness in receiver packages that deliver target voltage, intensity, and power levels. By designing and characterizing multiple receivers, we illustrated techniques for packaging the VMJ PV cell for achieving high performance (> 30%), high power (> 185 W), and target voltages for power over fiber applications.

  18. Molecular characterisation of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates from different outbreaks in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Romero, S; Rivera-Benítez, J F; Blomström, A-L; Ramliden, M; Hernández-Baumgarten, E; Hernández-Jáuregui, P; Ramírez-Mendoza, H; Berg, M

    2016-02-01

    Since the report of the initial outbreak of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) infection in pigs, only one full-length genome from 1984 (PorPV-LPMV/1984) has been characterised. To investigate the overall genetic variation, full-length gene nucleotide sequences of current PorPV isolates were obtained from different clinical cases of infected swine. Genome organisation and sequence analysis of the encoded proteins (NP, P, F, M, HN and L) revealed high sequence conservation of the NP protein and the expression of the P and V proteins in all PorPV isolates. The V protein of one isolate displayed a mutation that has been implicated to antagonise the antiviral immune responses of the host. The M protein indicated a variation in a short region that could affect the electrostatic charge and the interaction with the membrane. One PorPV isolate recovered from the lungs showed a mutation at the cleavage site (HRKKR) of the F protein that could represent an important factor to determine the tissue tropism and pathogenicity of this virus. The HN protein showed high sequence identity through the years (up to 2013). Additionally, a number of sequence motifs of very high amino acid conservation among the PorPV isolates important for polymerase activity of the L protein have been identified. In summary, genetic comparisons and phylogenetic analyses indicated that three different genetic variants of PorPV are currently spreading within the swine population, and a new generation of circulating virus with different characteristics has begun to emerge. PMID:26728078

  19. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, H; Feil, W S; Chain, P; Larimer, F; DiBartolo, G; Copeland, A; Lykidis, A; Trong, S; Nolan, M; Goltsman, E; Thiel, J; Malfatti, S; Loper, J E; Lapidus, A; Detter, J C; Land, M; Richardson, P M; Kyrpides, N C; Ivanova, N; Lindow, S E

    2005-07-14

    The complete genomic sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae B728a (Pss B728a), has been determined and is compared with that of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). The two pathovars of this economically important species of plant pathogenic bacteria differ in host range and other interactions with plants, with Pss having a more pronounced epiphytic stage of growth and higher abiotic stress tolerance and Pst DC3000 having a more pronounced apoplastic growth habitat. The Pss B728a genome (6.1 megabases) contains a circular chromosome and no plasmid, whereas the Pst DC3000 genome is 6.5 mbp in size, composed of a circular chromosome and two plasmids. While a high degree of similarity exists between the two sequenced Pseudomonads, 976 protein-encoding genes are unique to Pss B728a when compared to Pst DC3000, including large genomic islands likely to contribute to virulence and host specificity. Over 375 repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences (REPs) unique to Pss B728a when compared to Pst DC3000 are widely distributed throughout the chromosome except in 14 genomic islands, which generally had lower GC content than the genome as a whole. Content of the genomic islands vary, with one containing a prophage and another the plasmid pKLC102 of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Among the 976 genes of Pss B728a with no counterpart in Pst DC3000 are those encoding for syringopeptin (SP), syringomycin (SR), indole acetic acid biosynthesis, arginine degradation, and production of ice nuclei. The genomic comparison suggests that several unique genes for Pss B728a such as ectoine synthase, DNA repair, and antibiotic production may contribute to epiphytic fitness and stress tolerance of this organism.

  20. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonassyringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000.

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, Helene; Feil, William S.; Chain, Patrick; Larimer, Frank; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Copeland, Alex; Lykidis, Athanasios; Trong,Stephen; Nolan, Matt; Goltsman, Eugene; Thiel, James; Malfatti,Stephanie; Loper, Joyce E.; Lapidus, Alla; Detter, John C.; Land, Miriam; Richardson, Paul M.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lindow, StevenE.

    2005-04-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Pseudomonas syringaepathovar syringae B728a (Pss B728a), has been determined and is comparedwith that of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Thesetwo pathovars of this economically important species of plant pathogenicbacteria differ in host range and apparent patterns of interaction withplants, with Pss having a more pronounced epiphytic stage of growth andhigher abiotic stress tolerance and Pst DC3000 having a more pronouncedapoplastic growth habitat. The Pss B728a genome (6.1 megabases) containsa circular chromosome and no plasmid, whereas the Pst DC3000 genome is6.5 mbp in size, composed of a circular chromosome and two plasmids.While a high degree of similarity exists between the two sequencedPseudomonads, 976 protein-encoding genes are unique to Pss B728a whencompared to Pst DC3000, including large genomic islands likely tocontribute to virulence and host specificity. Over 375 repetitiveextragenic palindromic sequences (REPs) unique to Pss B728a when comparedto Pst DC3000 are widely distributed throughout the chromosome except in14 genomic islands, which generally had lower GC content than the genomeas a whole. Content of the genomic islands vary, with one containing aprophage and another the plasmid pKLC102 of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Among the976 genes of Pss B728a with no counterpart in Pst DC3000 are thoseencoding for syringopeptin (SP), syringomycin (SR), indole acetic acidbiosynthesis, arginine degradation, and production of ice nuclei. Thegenomic comparison suggests that several unique genes for Pss B728a suchas ectoine synthase, DNA repair, and antibiotic production may contributeto epiphytic fitness and stress tolerance of this organism. Pseudomonassyringae, a member of the gamma subgroup of the Proteobacteria, is awidespread bacterial pathogen of many plant species. The species P.syringae is subdivided into approximately 50 pathovars based onpathogenicity and host range. P. syringae is capable of

  1. BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Craig; Horowitz, Scott; Maguire, Jeff; Velasco, Paulo Tabrares; Springer, David; Coates, Peter; Bell, Christy; Price, Snuller; Sreedharan, Priya; Pickrell, Katie

    2014-04-01

    This project targeted the development of a software tool, BEopt-CA (Ex) (Building Energy Optimization Tool for California Existing Homes), that aims to facilitate balanced integration of energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), and photovoltaics (PV) in the residential retrofit1 market. The intent is to provide utility program managers and contractors in the EE/DR/PV marketplace with a means of balancing the integration of EE, DR, and PV

  2. PV-1 LABELS TRANS-CELLULAR OPENINGS IN MOUSE ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AND IS NEGATIVELY REGULATED BY VEGF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An N-glycosylated 60-kDa PV-1 protein that binds heparin was detected in mouse lung from a single mRNA transcript. In the absence of disulfide bond reduction PV-1 is detected as a dimer or large molecular weight oligomer. In the lung of Cav-1, but not Cav-2, null mice the amount of PV-1 protein is d...

  3. BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.; Maguire, J.; Tabares-Velasco, P.; Springer, D.; Coates, P.; Bell, C.; Price, S.; Sreedharan, P.; Pickrell, K.

    2014-04-01

    Opportunities for combining energy efficiency, demand response, and energy storage with PV are often missed, because the required knowledge and expertise for these different technologies exist in separate organizations or individuals. Furthermore, there is a lack of quantitative tools to optimize energy efficiency, demand response and energy storage with PV, especially for existing buildings. As technology costs evolve (e.g., the ongoing reduction in the cost of PV), design strategies need to be adjusted accordingly based on quantitative analysis.

  4. PV-1 IS NEGATIVELY REGULATED BY VEGF IN THE LUNG OF CAV-1, BUT NOT CAV-2, NULL MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An N-glycosylated 60-kDa PV-1 protein that binds heparin was detected in mouse lung from a single mRNA transcript. In the absence of disulfide bond reduction PV-1 is detected as a dimer or large molecular weight oligomer. In the lung of Cav-1, but not Cav-2, null mice the amount of PV-1 protein is d...

  5. A Decentralized Wireless Solution to Monitor and Diagnose PV Solar Module Performance Based on Symmetrized-Shifted Gompertz Functions.

    PubMed

    Molina-García, Angel; Campelo, José Carlos; Blanc, Sara; Serrano, Juan José; García-Sánchez, Tania; Bueso, María C

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes and assesses an integrated solution to monitor and diagnose photovoltaic (PV) solar modules based on a decentralized wireless sensor acquisition system. Both DC electrical variables and environmental data are collected at PV module level using low-cost and high-energy efficiency node sensors. Data is real-time processed locally and compared with expected PV module performances obtained by a PV module model based on symmetrized-shifted Gompertz functions (as previously developed and assessed by the authors). Sensor nodes send data to a centralized sink-computing module using a multi-hop wireless sensor network architecture. Such integration thus provides extensive analysis of PV installations, and avoids off-line tests or post-processing processes. In comparison with previous approaches, this solution is enhanced with a low-cost system and non-critical performance constraints, and it is suitable for extensive deployment in PV power plants. Moreover, it is easily implemented in existing PV installations, since no additional wiring is required. The system has been implemented and assessed in a Spanish PV power plant connected to the grid. Results and estimations of PV module performances are also included in the paper. PMID:26230694

  6. A Decentralized Wireless Solution to Monitor and Diagnose PV Solar Module Performance Based on Symmetrized-Shifted Gompertz Functions

    PubMed Central

    Molina-García, Angel; Campelo, José Carlos; Blanc, Sara; Serrano, Juan José; García-Sánchez, Tania; Bueso, María C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes and assesses an integrated solution to monitor and diagnose photovoltaic (PV) solar modules based on a decentralized wireless sensor acquisition system. Both DC electrical variables and environmental data are collected at PV module level using low-cost and high-energy efficiency node sensors. Data is real-time processed locally and compared with expected PV module performances obtained by a PV module model based on symmetrized-shifted Gompertz functions (as previously developed and assessed by the authors). Sensor nodes send data to a centralized sink-computing module using a multi-hop wireless sensor network architecture. Such integration thus provides extensive analysis of PV installations, and avoids off-line tests or post-processing processes. In comparison with previous approaches, this solution is enhanced with a low-cost system and non-critical performance constraints, and it is suitable for extensive deployment in PV power plants. Moreover, it is easily implemented in existing PV installations, since no additional wiring is required. The system has been implemented and assessed in a Spanish PV power plant connected to the grid. Results and estimations of PV module performances are also included in the paper. PMID:26230694

  7. Limits and Economic Effects of Distributed PV Generation in North and South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Kyra Moore

    The variability of renewable sources, such as wind and solar, when integrated into the electrical system must be compensated by traditional generation sources in-order to maintain the constant balance of supply and demand required for grid stability. The goal of this study is to analyze the effects of increasing large levels of solar Photovoltaic (PV) penetration (in terms of a percentage of annual energy production) on a test grid with similar characteristics to the Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC) and Progress Energy Carolinas (PEC) regions of North and South Carolina. PV production is modeled entering the system at the distribution level and regional PV capacity is based on household density. A gridded hourly global horizontal irradiance (GHI) dataset is used to capture the variable nature of PV generation. A unit commitment model (UCM) is then used determine the hourly dispatch of generators based on generator parameters and costs to supply generation to meet demand. Annual modeled results for six different scenarios are evaluated to determine technical, environmental and economic effects of varying levels of distributed PV penetration on the system. This study finds that the main limiting factor for PV integration in the DEC and PEC balancing authority regions is defined by the large generating capacity of base-load nuclear plants within the system. This threshold starts to affect system stability at integration levels of 5.7%. System errors, defined by imbalances caused by over or under generation with respect to demand, are identified in the model however the validity of these errors in real world context needs further examination due to the lack of high frequency irradiance data and modeling limitations. Operational system costs decreased as expected with PV integration although further research is needed to explore the impacts of the capital costs required to achieve the penetration levels found in this study. PV system generation was found to mainly displace

  8. Capacity Value of PV and Wind Generation in the NV Energy System

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Diao, Ruisheng; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

    2014-03-21

    Calculation of photovoltaic (PV) and wind power capacity values is important for estimating additional load that can be served by new PV or wind installations in the electrical power system. It also is the basis for assigning capacity credit payments in systems with markets. Because of variability in solar and wind resources, PV and wind generation contribute to power system resource adequacy differently from conventional generation. Many different approaches to calculating PV and wind generation capacity values have been used by utilities and transmission operators. Using the NV Energy system as a study case, this report applies peak-period capacity factor (PPCF) and effective load carrying capability (ELCC) methods to calculate capacity values for renewable energy sources. We show the connection between the PPCF and ELCC methods in the process of deriving a simplified approach that approximates the ELCC method. This simplified approach does not require generation fleet data and provides the theoretical basis for a quick check on capacity value results of PV and wind generation. The diminishing return of capacity benefit as renewable generation increases is conveniently explained using the simplified capacity value approach.

  9. A control system for improved battery utilization in a PV-powered peak-shaving system

    SciTech Connect

    Palomino, E; Stevens, J.; Wiles, J.

    1996-08-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) power systems offer the prospect of allowing a utility company to meet part of the daily peak system load using a renewable resource. Unfortunately, some utilities have peak system- load periods that do not match the peak production hours of a PV system. Adding a battery energy storage system to a grid-connected PV power system will allow dispatching the stored solar energy to the grid at the desired times. Batteries, however, pose system limitations in terms of energy efficiency, maintenance, and cycle life. A new control system has been developed, based on available PV equipment and a data acquisition system, that seeks to minimize the limitations imposed by the battery system while maximizing the use of PV energy. Maintenance requirements for the flooded batteries are reduced, cycle life is maximized, and the battery is operated over an efficient range of states of charge. This paper presents design details and initial performance results on one of the first installed control systems of this type.

  10. Integrating Solar PV in Utility System Operations: Analytical Framework and Arizona Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jing; Botterud, Audun; Mills, Andrew; Zhou, Zhi; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Mike, Heaney

    2015-06-01

    A systematic framework is proposed to estimate the impact on operating costs due to uncertainty and variability in renewable resources. The framework quantifies the integration costs associated with subhourly variability and uncertainty as well as day-ahead forecasting errors in solar PV (photovoltaics) power. A case study illustrates how changes in system operations may affect these costs for a utility in the southwestern United States (Arizona Public Service Company). We conduct an extensive sensitivity analysis under different assumptions about balancing reserves, system flexibility, fuel prices, and forecasting errors. We find that high solar PV penetrations may lead to operational challenges, particularly during low-load and high solar periods. Increased system flexibility is essential for minimizing integration costs and maintaining reliability. In a set of sensitivity cases where such flexibility is provided, in part, by flexible operations of nuclear power plants, the estimated integration costs vary between $1.0 and $4.4/MWh-PV for a PV penetration level of 17%. The integration costs are primarily due to higher needs for hour-ahead balancing reserves to address the increased sub-hourly variability and uncertainty in the PV resource. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Progress of the PV Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; Von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment total nearly $ 1.3 billion.

  12. A Novel Searching Method for Distribution Network Topology to Maximize Outputs of PV Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tsunaki; Saitoh, Hiroumi

    This paper proposes a novel searching method for radial distribution network to maximize outputs of PV generators. When a lot of PV generators are connected to distribution network, it is necessary to control PV outputs to keep the voltage within the regulated range of power quality. The aim of the paper is to find the optimal topology, that is the state of section switches so as to maximize the total PV outputs. This problem becomes a combinatorial optimization one and the exhaustive search results in enormous computation time. In this paper, a novel searching method is proposed which is based on the replacement of the complex combinatorial optimization problem with a minimization problem regarding with voltage profile of distribution network. The features of the proposed method are to utilize the relation between the total outputs of PV generators and the voltage profile, the superposition of radial electric circuit and a sequential algorithm for search in an optimal topology. In order to verify the proposed method, the comparison study has been done by using two distribution network models. As the result, there is possibility that the proposed method can find sub optimal topology in a short time compared with tabu search approach.

  13. Comparing the net cost of CSP-TES to PV deployed with battery storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Jennie; Mehos, Mark; Denholm, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Concentrated solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of renewable energy in that its energy can be shifted over time and it can provide the electricity system with dependable generation capacity. In this study, we provide a framework to determine if the benefits of CSP-TES (shiftable energy and the ability to provide firm capacity) exceed the benefits of PV and firm capacity sources such as long-duration battery storage or conventional natural gas combustion turbines (CTs). The results of this study using current capital cost estimates indicate that a combination of PV and conventional gas CTs provides a lower net cost compared to CSP-TES and PV with batteries. Some configurations of CSP-TES have a lower net cost than PV with batteries for even the lowest battery cost estimate. Using projected capital cost targets, however, some configurations of CSP-TES have a lower net cost than PV with either option for even the lowest battery cost estimate. The net cost of CSP-TES varies with configuration, and lower solar multiples coupled with less storage are more attractive at current cost levels, due to high component costs. However, higher solar multiples show a lower net cost using projected future costs for heliostats and thermal storage materials.

  14. Photovoltaics: Reviewing the European Feed-in-Tariffs and Changing PV Efficiencies and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H. L.; Van Gerven, T.; Baeyens, J.; Degrève, J.

    2014-01-01

    Feed-in-Tariff (FiT) mechanisms have been important in boosting renewable energy, by providing a long-term guaranteed subsidy of the kWh-price, thus mitigating investment risks and enhancing the contribution of sustainable electricity. By ongoing PV development, the contribution of solar power increases exponentially. Within this significant potential, it is important for investors, operators, and scientists alike to provide answers to different questions related to subsidies, PV efficiencies and costs. The present paper therefore (i) briefly reviews the mechanisms, advantages, and evolution of FiT; (ii) describes the developments of PV, (iii) applies a comprehensive literature-based model for the solar irradiation to predict the PV solar energy potential in some target European countries, whilst comparing output predictions with the monthly measured electricity generation of a 57 m² photovoltaic system (Belgium); and finally (iv) predicts the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in terms of investment and efficiency, providing LCOE values between 0.149 and 0.313 €/kWh, as function of the overall process efficiency and cost. The findings clearly demonstrate the potential of PV energy in Europe, where FiT can be considerably reduced or even be eliminated in the near future. PMID:24959614

  15. Design and optimization of a self-deploying single axis tracking PV array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    This study was performed in order to design a tracking photovoltaic (PV) array and optimize the design for maximum specific power. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. The array design was self-deployable, from a compact stowage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. The array structural components consist of a combination of beams, columns, and cables used to deploy and orient a flexible PV blanket. Each structural component of the design was analyzed to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power. The optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environments with 4 types of PV blankets (silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAs CLEFT, and amorphous silicon). For the lunar environment, the amorphous silicon array produced the highest specific power, whereas, for Mars the GaAs CLEFT array produced the highest specific power. A comparison was made to a fixed PV tent array of similar design. The tracking array produced a higher specific power with all types of the PV blankets examined except amorphous silicon at both locations.

  16. Design and optimization of a self-deploying single axis tracking PV array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    This study was performed in order to design a tracking photovoltaic (PV) array and optimize the design for maximum specific power. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. The array design was self-deployable, from a compact stowage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. The array structural components consist of a combination of beams, columns, and cables used to deploy and orient a flexible PV blanket. Each structural component of the design was analyzer to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power. The optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environments with 4 types of PV blankets (silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAs CLEFT, and amorphous Silicon). For the lunar environment, the amorphous silicon array produced the highest specific power, whereas, for Mars the GaAs CLEFT array produced the highest specific power. A comparison was made to a fixed PV tent array of similar design. The tracking array produced a higher specific power with all types of the PV blankets examined except amorphous silicon at both locations.

  17. Standards for PV Modules and Components -- Recent Developments and Challenges: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-10-01

    International standards play an important role in the Photovoltaic industry. Since PV is such a global industry it is critical that PV products be measured and qualified the same way everywhere in the world. IEC TC82 has developed and published a number of module and component measurement and qualification standards. These are continually being updated to take advantage of new techniques and equipment as well as better understanding of test requirements. Standards presently being updated include the third edition of IEC 61215, Crystalline Silicon Qualification and the second edition of IEC 61730, PV Module Safety Requirements. New standards under development include qualification of junction boxes, connectors, PV cables, and module integrated electronics as well as for testing the packaging used during transport of modules. After many years of effort, a draft standard on Module Energy Rating should be circulated for review soon. New activities have been undertaken to develop standards for the materials within a module and to develop tests that evaluate modules for wear-out in the field (International PV Module QA Task Force). This paper will discuss these efforts and indicate how the audience can participate in development of international standards.

  18. Design and optimization of a self-deploying single axis tracking PV array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1992-03-01

    This study was performed in order to design a tracking photovoltaic (PV) array and optimize the design for maximum specific power. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. The array design was self-deployable, from a compact stowage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. The array structural components consist of a combination of beams, columns, and cables used to deploy and orient a flexible PV blanket. Each structural component of the design was analyzed to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power. The optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environments with 4 types of PV blankets (silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAs CLEFT, and amorphous silicon). For the lunar environment, the amorphous silicon array produced the highest specific power, whereas, for Mars the GaAs CLEFT array produced the highest specific power. A comparison was made to a fixed PV tent array of similar design. The tracking array produced a higher specific power with all types of the PV blankets examined except amorphous silicon at both locations.

  19. Design, optimization, and analysis of a self-deploying PV tent array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collozza, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    A tent shaped PV array was designed and the design was optimized for maximum specific power. In order to minimize output power variation a tent angle of 60 deg was chosen. Based on the chosen tent angle an array structure was designed. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. To meet these considerations the array was chosen to be self-deployable, form a compact storage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. Each structural component of the design was analyzed to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. Through this analysis the component weights were determined. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power for a given PV blanket. This optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environmental conditions. Other factors such as PV blanket types, structural material, and wind velocity (for Mars array), were varied to determine what influence they had on the design point. The performance specifications for the array at both locations and with each type of PV blanket were determined. These specifications were calculated using the Arimid fiber composite as the structural material. The four PV blanket types considered were silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAsCLEFT, and amorphous silicon. The specifications used for each blanket represented either present day or near term technology. For both the Moon and Mars the amorphous silicon arrays produced the highest specific power.

  20. Design, optimization, and analysis of a self-deploying PV tent array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collozza, Anthony J.

    1991-06-01

    A tent shaped PV array was designed and the design was optimized for maximum specific power. In order to minimize output power variation a tent angle of 60 deg was chosen. Based on the chosen tent angle an array structure was designed. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. To meet these considerations the array was chosen to be self-deployable, form a compact storage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. Each structural component of the design was analyzed to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. Through this analysis the component weights were determined. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power for a given PV blanket. This optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environmental conditions. Other factors such as PV blanket types, structural material, and wind velocity (for Mars array), were varied to determine what influence they had on the design point. The performance specifications for the array at both locations and with each type of PV blanket were determined. These specifications were calculated using the Arimid fiber composite as the structural material. The four PV blanket types considered were silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAsCLEFT, and amorphous silicon. The specifications used for each blanket represented either present day or near term technology. For both the Moon and Mars the amorphous silicon arrays produced the highest specific power.

  1. Design and optimization of a self-deploying single axis tracking PV array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    This study was performed in order to design a tracking photovoltaic (PV) array and optimize the design for maximum specific power. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. The array design was self-deployable, from a compact stowage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. The array structural components consist of a combination of beams, columns, and cables used to deploy and orient a flexible PV blanket. Each structural component of the design was analyzer to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power. The optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environments with 4 types of PV blankets (silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAs CLEFT, and amorphous Silicon). For the lunar environment, the amorphous silicon array produced the highest specific power, whereas, for Mars the GaAs CLEFT array produced the highest specific power. A comparison was made to a fixed PV tent array of similar design. The tracking array produced a higher specific power with all types of the PV blankets examined except amorphous silicon at both locations.

  2. Detection and characterisation of delamination in PV modules by active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Sastry, O. S.; Gupta, R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a fast and efficient method for the detection and characterisation of delamination in photovoltaic (PV) modules by using active infrared thermography approach. A discrete part of PV module was irradiated by step heating and its thermal image sequence was used to detect and analyse delamination. Different types of heating source for thermal excitation for this application have been studied. An electro-thermal model was developed to simulate the active thermography approach for the characterisation of delamination in PV module by equivalent resistance-capacitance (RC) network using a circuit simulator. This simulation approach was used to estimate the extent of delamination in the module and to determine the optimum parameters for the characterisation of delamination. Different applications based on front and backsides of heating the module were also proposed in this paper. The proposed method has the potential to be employed for the quality check of PV modules during inline production as well as for the predictive maintenance of outdoor PV plants.

  3. High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System, Phase 1 Update: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hambrick, J.; Narang, D.

    2012-06-01

    In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners have begun work on a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale photovoltaics (PV). Building upon the APS Community Power Project -- Flagstaff Pilot, this project will analyze the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes as well as large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters are being designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models will be used to analyze the impacts of the PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/var control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2011 IEEE PVSC conference that introduces the project and describes some of the preliminary consideration, as well as project plans and early results. This paper gives a status update of the project and presents selected results from Phase 2 of the project. It discusses baseline feeder modeling, load allocation, data acquisition, utility-scale PV integration, preliminary model validation, and plans for future phases.

  4. Ota City : characterizing output variability from 553 homes with residential PV systems on a distribution feeder.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Nakashima, Eichi; Lave, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    This report describes in-depth analysis of photovoltaic (PV) output variability in a high-penetration residential PV installation in the Pal Town neighborhood of Ota City, Japan. Pal Town is a unique test bed of high-penetration PV deployment. A total of 553 homes (approximately 80% of the neighborhood) have grid-connected PV totaling over 2 MW, and all are on a common distribution line. Power output at each house and irradiance at several locations were measured once per second in 2006 and 2007. Analysis of the Ota City data allowed for detailed characterization of distributed PV output variability and a better understanding of how variability scales spatially and temporally. For a highly variable test day, extreme power ramp rates (defined as the 99th percentile) were found to initially decrease with an increase in the number of houses at all timescales, but the reduction became negligible after a certain number of houses. Wavelet analysis resolved the variability reduction due to geographic diversity at various timescales, and the effect of geographic smoothing was found to be much more significant at shorter timescales.

  5. Photovoltaics: reviewing the European Feed-in-Tariffs and changing PV efficiencies and costs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H L; Van Gerven, T; Baeyens, J; Degrève, J

    2014-01-01

    Feed-in-Tariff (FiT) mechanisms have been important in boosting renewable energy, by providing a long-term guaranteed subsidy of the kWh-price, thus mitigating investment risks and enhancing the contribution of sustainable electricity. By ongoing PV development, the contribution of solar power increases exponentially. Within this significant potential, it is important for investors, operators, and scientists alike to provide answers to different questions related to subsidies, PV efficiencies and costs. The present paper therefore (i) briefly reviews the mechanisms, advantages, and evolution of FiT; (ii) describes the developments of PV, (iii) applies a comprehensive literature-based model for the solar irradiation to predict the PV solar energy potential in some target European countries, whilst comparing output predictions with the monthly measured electricity generation of a 57 m² photovoltaic system (Belgium); and finally (iv) predicts the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in terms of investment and efficiency, providing LCOE values between 0.149 and 0.313 €/kWh, as function of the overall process efficiency and cost. The findings clearly demonstrate the potential of PV energy in Europe, where FiT can be considerably reduced or even be eliminated in the near future. PMID:24959614

  6. Development of flame retardant PV module encapsulants: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galica, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    This Phase 1 final report covers the work performed by Springborn Testing and Research, Inc., for the period October 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998 under the Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC36-97GO10255, entitled Development of Flame Retardant PV Module Encapsulants. While use of roof-mounted arrays has always been an attractive means of deploying PV, only within recent years have such building integrated concepts (BIPV) found renewed interest among module makers and end-users. Prior to building integrated and rooftop applications, flammability requirements for modules have not been a great industry concern. However, with growing interest in BIPV and the requirement for building code requirements for commercial and industrial structures, flammability issues have become a barrier to entry for many module constructions into this potentially huge domestic market for PV. The overall goal of the 3 phase PV BONUS two project is to develop and commercialize a line of fire retardant encapsulation materials to serve the emerging building integrated and building mounted PV market. The objectives of the Phase 1 effort are limited to concept development and business planning activities.

  7. Utility-scale grid-tied PV inverter reliability workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect

    Granata, Jennifer E.; Quintana, Michael A.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle; Atcitty, Stanley

    2011-07-01

    A key to the long-term success of the photovoltaic (PV) industry is confidence in the reliability of PV systems. Inverters are the most commonly noted cause of PV system incidents triggered in the field. While not all of these incidents are reliability-related or even necessarily failures, they still result in a loss of generated power. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a Utility-Scale Grid-Tied Inverter Reliability Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 27-28, 2011. The workshop addressed the reliability of large (100-kilowatt+) grid-tied inverters and the implications when such inverters fail, evaluated inverter codes and standards, and provided discussion about opportunities to enhance inverter reliability. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop and identifies opportunities for future efforts.

  8. Development of a Visual Inspection Data Collection Tool for Evaluation of Fielded PV Module Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, C. E.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    A visual inspection data collection tool for the evaluation of fielded photovoltaic (PV) modules has been developed to facilitate describing the condition of PV modules with regard to field performance. The proposed data collection tool consists of 14 sections, each documenting the appearance or properties of a part of the module. This report instructs on how to use the collection tool and defines each attribute to ensure reliable and valid data collection. This tool has been evaluated through the inspection of over 60 PV modules produced by more than 20 manufacturers and fielded at two different sites for varying periods of time. Aggregated data from such a single data collection tool has the potential to enable longitudinal studies of module condition over time, technology evolution, and field location for the enhancement of module reliability models.

  9. Public Response to Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado: A Qualitative Market Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B. C.; Buhrmann, J.

    1998-07-01

    The early adopters of residential grid-tied photovoltaics (PV) have complex motivations to pay today's costs, including altruistic, environmental, and financial reasons. Focused interviews were conducted with a self-selected purposive sample interested in purchasing 2-kW or 3-kW PV systems with an installed cost of $8,000 to $12,000. The sample tended to be men or married couples ranging in age from their early thirties to their mid-eighties; professionals, managers, or small business owners; relatively financially secure, with experience with energy efficiency and renewable energy. Product attributes they preferred were net metering, warranties, guarantees, utility financing, maintenance, an option to own or lease, a battery option, and an aesthetically pleasing system. Potential PV customers needed more information before making a purchase decision.

  10. Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

  11. Report of the Workshop on Next-Generation Space PV: Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R. P.

    2005-01-01

    A workshop on the future use of thin-film photovoltaic devices in space power was convened at the 16th Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology Conference held at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH. This workshop began by addressing: 1) What are the leading impediments or technological challenges to be overcome with regard to the use of thin-film PV in space? 2) What is the status of organic based cells? Will they have a role in space PV, if so when? and 3) What about an integrated PV/Li battery array-up and down sides? A discussion on these three questions pertaining to future use of thin film devices for space power systems is presented

  12. PV-BIDPAT: An evaluation and design tool for building-integrated photovoltaic installations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.; Keoleian, G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a software tool called PV-BIDPAT, that is used to evaluate, design, and plan building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) installations. The tool consists of life cycle inventory and life cycle cost components and performs comprehensive calculations of the environmental costs and benefits of BIPV technology. These calculations compare BIPV to the functionally equivalent combination of conventional building materials and grid electricity. Currently there are two roofing products and one module-level inverter in the PV-BIDPAT library. An example case for a 2kW array of PV shingles in the Detroit, MI area showed significant benefits for the BIPV system in lower resource and energy use, as well as reduced air emissions.

  13. Output Control Technologies for a Large-scale PV System Considering Impacts on a Power Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Akira

    The mega-solar demonstration project named “Verification of Grid Stabilization with Large-scale PV Power Generation systems” had been completed in March 2011 at Wakkanai, the northernmost city of Japan. The major objectives of this project were to evaluate adverse impacts of large-scale PV power generation systems connected to the power grid and develop output control technologies with integrated battery storage system. This paper describes the outline and results of this project. These results show the effectiveness of battery storage system and also proposed output control methods for a large-scale PV system to ensure stable operation of power grids. NEDO, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan conducted this project and HEPCO, Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc managed the overall project.

  14. Cellulose production in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae: a compromise between epiphytic and pathogenic lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Arrebola, Eva; Carrión, Víctor J; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Genome sequencing and annotation have revealed a putative cellulose biosynthetic operon in the strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, the causal agent of bacterial apical necrosis. Bioinformatics analyses and experimental methods were used to confirm the functionality of the cellulose biosynthetic operon. In addition, the results showed the contribution of the cellulose operon to important aspects of P. syringae pv. syringae biology, such as the formation of biofilms and adhesion to the leaf surface of mango, suggesting that this operon increases epiphytic fitness. However, based on the incidence and severity of the symptoms observed in tomato leaflets, cellulose expression reduces virulence, as cellulose-deficient mutants increased the area of necrosis, whereas the cellulose-overproducing strain decreased the area of necrosis compared with the wild type. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the epiphytic and pathogenic stages of the P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 lifestyle are intimately affected by cellulose production. PMID:26109133

  15. An efficient method for visualization and growth of fluorescent Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in planta

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Wook; Park, Chang-Jin; Lee, Sang-Won; Ronald, Pamela C

    2008-01-01

    Background Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight disease, is a serious pathogen of rice. Here we describe a fluorescent marker system to study virulence and pathogenicity of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Results A fluorescent X. oryzae pv. oryzae Philippine race 6 strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (PXO99GFP) was generated using the gfp gene under the control of the neomycin promoter in the vector, pPneo-gfp. The PXO99GFPstrain displayed identical virulence and avirulence properties as the wild type control strain, PXO99. Using fluorescent microscopy, bacterial multiplication and colonization were directly observed in rice xylem vessels. Accurate and rapid determination of bacterial growth was assessed using fluoremetry and an Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbant Assay (ELISA). Conclusion Our results indicate that the fluorescent marker system is useful for assessing bacterial infection and monitoring bacterial multiplication in planta. PMID:18826644

  16. Developing Market Opportunities for Flexible Rooftop Applications of PV Using Flexible CIGS Technology: Market Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Sabnani, L.; Skumanich, A.; Ryabova, E.; Noufi, R.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a recent upsurge in developments for building-integrated phototovoltaics (BiPV) roof top materials based on CIGS. Several new companies have increased their presence and are looking to bring products to market for this application in 2011. For roof-top application, there are significant key requirements beyond just having good conversion efficiency. Other attributes include lightweight, as well as moisture-proof, and fully functionally reliable. The companies bringing these new BIPV/BAPV products need to ensure functionality with a rigorous series of tests, and have an extensive set of 'torture' tests to validate the capability. There is a convergence of form, aesthetics, and physics to ensure that the CIGS BiPV deliver on their promises. This article will cover the developments in this segment of the BiPV market and delve into the specific tests and measurements needed to characterize the products. The potential market sizes are evaluated and the technical considerations developed.

  17. Classification of Papillomaviruses (PVs) Based on 189 PV Types and Proposal of Taxonomic Amendments

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Hans-Ulrich; Burk, Robert D.; Chen, Zigui; van Doorslaer, Koenraad; zur Hausen, Harald; de Villiers, Ethel-Michele

    2012-01-01

    We present an expansion of the classification of the family Papillomaviridae, which now contains 29 genera formed by 189 papillomavirus (PV) types isolated from humans (120 types), non-human mammals, birds and reptiles (64, 3 and 2 types, respectively). To accommodate the number of PV genera exceeding the Greek alphabet, the prefix “dyo” is used, continuing after the Omega-PVs with Dyodelta-PVs. The current set of human PVs are contained within five genera, whereas mammalian, avian and reptile PVs are contained within 20, 3 and 1 genera, respectively. We propose standardizations to the names of a number of animal PVs. As prerequisite for a coherent nomenclature of animal PVs, we propose founding a Reference Center for Animal PVs. We discuss that based on emerging species concepts derived from genome sequences, PV types could be promoted to the taxonomic level of species, but do not recommend implementing this change at the current time. PMID:20206957

  18. Analysis of the Impacts of Distribution-Connected PV Using High-Speed Data Sets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, J.; Mather, B.

    2013-03-01

    This paper, presented at the IEEE Green Technologies Conference 2013, utilizes information from high resolution data acquisition systems developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and deployed on a high-penetration PV distribution system to analyze the variability of different electrical parameters. High-resolution solar irradiance data is also available in the same area which is used to characterize the available resource and how it affects the electrical characteristics of the study circuit. This paper takes a data-driven look at the variability caused by load and compares those results against times when significant PV production is present. Comparisons between the variability in system load and the variability of distributed PV generation are made.

  19. Investigation of Synergy Between Electrochemical Capacitors, Flywheels, and Batteries in Hybrid Energy Storage for PV Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John; Sibley, Lewis, B.; Wohlgemuth, John

    1999-06-01

    This report describes the results of a study that investigated the synergy between electrochemical capacitors (ECs) and flywheels, in combination with each other and with batteries, as energy storage subsystems in photovoltaic (PV) systems. EC and flywheel technologies are described and the potential advantages and disadvantages of each in PV energy storage subsystems are discussed. Seven applications for PV energy storage subsystems are described along with the potential market for each of these applications. A spreadsheet model, which used the net present value method, was used to analyze and compare the costs over time of various system configurations based on flywheel models. It appears that a synergistic relationship exists between ECS and flywheels. Further investigation is recommended to quantify the performance and economic tradeoffs of this synergy and its effect on overall system costs.

  20. Design of a Net-Metering and PV Exhibit for the 2005 Solar Decathlon

    SciTech Connect

    Wassmer, M.; Warner, C.

    2005-01-01

    In the 2005 Solar Decathlon competition, 19 collegiate teams will design, build, and operate grid-independent homes powered by photovoltaic (PV) arrays on the National Mall. The prominence of grid-interconnected systems in the marketplace has provided the impetus for the development of a net-metering exhibit to be installed and operated during the competition. The exhibit will inform the visiting public about PV basics and appropriate alternatives to grid-independent systems. It will consist of four interactive components. One will be designed to educate people about the principles of net metering using a small PV array, a grid-interactive inverter, and a variable load. Additional components of the exhibit will demonstrate the effects of orientation, cloud cover, and nighttime on performance. The nighttime component will discuss appropriate storage options for different applications.

  1. Long-Term Modeling of Solar Energy: Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) and PV Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

    2007-08-16

    This report presents an overview of research conducted on solar energy technologies and their implementation in the ObjECTS framework. The topics covered include financing assumptions and selected issues related to the integration of concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics PV technologies into the electric grid. A review of methodologies for calculating the levelized energy cost of capital-intensive technologies is presented, along with sensitivity tests illustrating how the cost of a solar plant would vary depending on financing assumptions. An analysis of the integration of a hybrid concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) system into the electric system is conducted. Finally a failure statistics analysis for PV plants illustrates the central role of solar irradiance uncertainty in determining PV grid integration characteristics.

  2. Classification of papillomaviruses (PVs) based on 189 PV types and proposal of taxonomic amendments.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Hans-Ulrich; Burk, Robert D; Chen, Zigui; van Doorslaer, Koenraad; zur Hausen, Harald; de Villiers, Ethel-Michele

    2010-05-25

    We present an expansion of the classification of the family Papillomaviridae, which now contains 29 genera formed by 189 papillomavirus (PV) types isolated from humans (120 types), non-human mammals, birds and reptiles (64, 3 and 2 types, respectively). To accommodate the number of PV genera exceeding the Greek alphabet, the prefix "dyo" is used, continuing after the Omega-PVs with Dyodelta-PVs. The current set of human PVs is contained within five genera, whereas mammalian, avian and reptile PVs are contained within 20, 3 and 1 genera, respectively. We propose standardizations to the names of a number of animal PVs. As prerequisite for a coherent nomenclature of animal PVs, we propose founding a reference center for animal PVs. We discuss that based on emerging species concepts derived from genome sequences, PV types could be promoted to the taxonomic level of species, but we do not recommend implementing this change at the current time. PMID:20206957

  3. Efficient Power Converters for PV Arrays : Scalable Submodule Power Conversion for Utility-Scale Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-23

    Solar ADEPT Project: SolarBridge is developing a new power conversion technique to improve the energy output of PV power plants. This new technique is specifically aimed at large plants where many solar panels are connected together. SolarBridge is correcting for the inefficiencies that occur when two solar panels that encounter different amounts of sun are connected together. In most conventional PV system, the weakest panel limits the energy production of the entire system. That’s because all of the energy collected by the PV system feeds into a single collection point where a central inverter then converts it into useable energy for the grid. SolarBridge has found a more efficient and cost-effective way to convert solar energy, correcting these power differences before they reach the grid.

  4. Structural analyses of novel glycerophosphorylated alpha-cyclosophorohexadecaoses isolated from X. campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yunjung; Park, Heylin; Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2005-03-21

    Novel periplasmic anionic cyclic glucans produced by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris were isolated by trichloroacetic acid treatment and various chromatographic techniques. No report has been made on the presence of substituted cyclic glucans of the Xanthomonas species. We show, for the first time, that X. campestris pv. campestris produces the anionic cyclic glucans with phosphoglycerol residues, the presence of which can be predicted by analyzing the sequence database with the aid of the NCBI RefSeq database. To analyze the structure of isolated anionic cyclic glucans analyses, we used NMR spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS). The results suggest that the novel anionic forms of the cyclic glucans of X. campestris pv. campestris are glycerophosphorylated alpha-cyclosophorohexadecaose with one or two phosphoglycerol substituents at the C-6 positions of the glucose residues. PMID:15721339

  5. On the relationship factor between the PV module temperature and the solar radiation on it for various BIPV configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplanis, S. Kaplani, E.

    2014-10-06

    Temperatures of c-Si, pc-Si and a-Si PV modules making part of a roof in a building or hanging outside windows with various inclinations were measured with respect to the Intensity of the solar radiation on them under various environmental conditions. A relationship coefficient f was provided whose values are compared to those from a PV array operating in a free standing mode on a terrace. A theoretical model to predict f was elaborated. According to the analysis, the coefficient f takes higher values for PV modules embedded on a roof compared to the free standing PV array. The wind effect is much stronger for the free standing PV than for any BIPV configuration, either the PV is part of the roof, or placed upon the roof, or is placed outside a window like a shadow hanger. The f coefficient depends on various parameters such as angle of inclination, wind speed and direction, as well as solar radiation. For very low wind speeds the effect of the angle of inclination, β, of the PV module with respect to the horizontal on PV temperature is clear. As the wind speed increases, the heat transfer from the PV module shifts from natural flow to forced flow and this effect vanishes. The coefficient f values range from almost 0.01 m{sup 2°}C/W for free standing PV arrays at strong wind speeds, v{sub W}>7m/s, up to around 0.05 m{sup 2°}C/W for the case of flexible PV modules which make part of the roof in a BIPV system.

  6. On-grid PV implementation program. Phase I report, August 1994--January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-29

    Southern California Edison Company (Edison) is finalizing a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop high value On-Grid applications for electricity from Photovoltaics (PV). Edison`s efforts are the result of Edison`s long-standing commitment to the pursuit of Renewable Energy. Edison has been a world leader in the development and use of PV. As the technology becomes more commercial, Edison has been actively seeking more applications for PV. After strenuous effort, Edison has now received approval to offer off-grid PV packages within its service territory. In addition, Edison has been very interested in finding high-value on-grid PV applications that may have the potential to become cost effective as PV applications increase and prices decline. Such high-value applications at Edison and other utilities will accelerate the price reductions, which in turn will increase the number of cost-effective applications, driving towards a market competitive with traditional sources of energy. Edison`s efforts build upon the work done by Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) at their Kerman substation, but goes much further than that effort. Edison submitted its original proposal to the DOE on June 30, 1993. A revised proposal was submitted on February 1, 1994, in response to a letter from the DOE`s Director of Solar Energy, Robert H. Annan. In a letter dated March 30, 1994, from Paul K. Kearns, Head of Contracting Activity for the DOE`s Golden Field Office, the DOE conditionally approved certain pre-award contract costs. The Cooperative Agreement with DOE was executed on August 16, 1994.

  7. Specific detection of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae in anthurium (Anthurium andreanum) tissues by nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Robène-Soustrade, Isabelle; Laurent, Philippe; Gagnevin, Lionel; Jouen, Emmanuel; Pruvost, Olivier

    2006-02-01

    Efficient control of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae, the causal agent of anthurium bacterial blight, requires a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool. A nested PCR test was developed from a sequence-characterized amplified region marker identified by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR for the detection of X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae. Serological and pathogenicity tests were performed concurrently with the nested PCR test with a large collection of X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains that were isolated worldwide and are pathogenic to anthurium and/or other aroids. The internal primer pair directed amplification of the expected product (785 bp) for all 70 X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains pathogenic to anthurium tested and for isolates originating from syngonium and not pathogenic to anthurium. This finding is consistent with previous studies which indicated that there is a high level of relatedness between strains from anthurium and strains from syngonium. Strains originating from the two host genera can be distinguished by restriction analysis of the amplification product. No amplification product was obtained with 98 strains of unrelated phytopathogenic bacteria or saprophytic bacteria from the anthurium phyllosphere, except for a weak signal obtained for one X. axonopodis pv. allii strain. Nevertheless, restriction enzyme analysis permitted the two pathovars to be distinguished. The detection threshold obtained with pure cultures or plant extracts (10(3) CFU ml(-1)) allowed detection of the pathogen from symptomless contaminated plants. This test could be a useful diagnostic tool for screening propagation stock plant material and for monitoring international movement of X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae. PMID:16461651

  8. High-quality mutant libraries of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. campestris pv. campestris generated by an efficient transposon mutagenesis system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qihong; Wu, Wei; Qian, Wei; Hu, Jun; Fang, Rongxiang; He, Chaozu

    2003-09-12

    A novel transposon mutagenesis system for the phytopathogenic bacteria Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) was developed using a Tn5-based transposome. A highly efficient transformation up to 10(6) transformants per microg transposon DNA was obtained. Southern blot and thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction analyses of Tn5 insertion sites suggested a random mode of transposition. The transposition was stable in the transformants for 20 subcultures. Eighteen thousand and 17000 transformants for Xoo and Xcc, respectively, were generated, corresponding to 4X ORF coverage of the genomes. The libraries will facilitate the identification of pathogenicity-related genes as well as functional genomic analysis in Xoo and Xcc. PMID:13129620

  9. Wind/PV Generation for Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping in the Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R; Hadley, Stanton W; Liu, Yilu

    2013-12-01

    This report presents the control of renewable energy sources, including the variable-speed wind generators and solar photovoltaic (PV) generators, for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI). In this report, based on the user-defined wind/PV generator electrical control model and the 16,000-bus Eastern Interconnection dynamic model, the additional controllers for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are developed and incorporated and the potential contributions of renewable energy sources to the EI system frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are evaluated.

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Bacteriophages of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis.

    PubMed

    Retamales, Julio; Vasquez, Ignacio; Santos, Leonardo; Segovia, Cristopher; Ayala, Manuel; Alvarado, Romina; Nuñez, Pablo; Santander, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Three bacteriophages, f20-Xaj, f29-Xaj, and f30-Xaj, with lytic activity against Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis were isolated from walnut trees (VIII Bío Bío Region, Chile). These lytic bacteriophages have double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes of 43,851 bp, 41,865 bp, and 44,262 bp, respectively. These are the first described bacteriophages with lytic activity against X. arboricola pv. juglandis that can be utilized as biocontrol agents. PMID:27257210

  11. PV Optics: A Software Package for Solar Cells and Module Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2007-01-01

    PV Optics is a user-friendly software package developed to design and analyze solar cells and modules. It is applicable to a variety of optical structures, including thin and thick cells with light-trapping structures and metal optics. Using a combination of wave and ray optics to include effects of coherence and interference, it can be used to design single-junction and multijunction solar cells and modules. This paper describes some basic applications of PV Optics for crystalline and amorphous Si solar cell design. We present examples to examine the effects on solar cell performance of wafer thickness, antireflection coating thickness, texture height, and metal loss.

  12. Indigenous plasmids in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato: conjugative transfer and role in copper resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.L.; Cooksey, D.A.

    1986-02-01

    Twenty strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato were examined for the presence of plasmid DNA. P. syringae pv. tomato plasmids were grouped into five size classes: class A ranged from 95 to 103 kilobases (kb); class B ranged from 71 to 83 kb; class C ranged from 59 to 67 kb; class D ranged from 37 to 39 kb; and class E was 29 kb. All strains contained at least two plasmids in classes A and B. The conjugative ability of P. syringae pv. tomato plasmids in three strains was demonstrated by mobilization of the nonconjugative plasmid RSF1010 into Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae recipients. Plasmids from the three conjugative strains were labeled with Tn5. Four conjugative plasmids were identified by their repeated transfer to P. syringae pv. syringae recipients. P. syringae pv. tomato strains varied in sensitivity to copper sulfate (CuSO/sub 4/): MICs were 0.4 to 0.6 mM for sensitive strains, 1.2 mM for moderately resistant strains, and 1.6 to 2.0 mM for very resistant strains. One very resistant strain, PT23, functioned as a donor of copper resistance. Recipient P. syringae pv. syringae strains PS51 and PS 61 were inhibited by 0.1 mM CuSO/sub 4/, whereas the CuSO/sub 4/ MICs for transconjugant strains PS51(pPT23A) and PS61(pPT23C) were 1.8 and 2.6 mM, respectively. P. syringae pv. tomato strains PT12.2 and PT 17.2 were inhibited by 0.6 mM copper sulfate, but their copper sulfate MICs were 2.6 and 1.8 mM, respectively, when they acquired pPT23C. Therefore, copper resistance in PT23 was controlled by two conjugative plasmids, designated pPT23A (101 kb) and pPT23C (67 kb).

  13. Spectrum sensitivity, energy yield, and revenue prediction of PV and CPV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Geoffrey S.

    2015-09-01

    Impact on module performance of spectral irradiance variation has been determined for III-V multijunctions compared against the four most common flat-plate module types (cadmium telluride, multicrystalline silicon, copper indium gallium selenide, and monocrystalline silicon. Hour-by-hour representative spectra were generated using atmospheric variables for Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Convolution with published values for external quantum efficiency gave the predicted current output. When combined with specifications of commercial PV modules, energy yield and revenue were predicted. This approach provides a means for optimizing PV module design based on various site-specific temporal variables.

  14. Launch packaging options for the PV power module cargo element. [for space station power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.; Vogt, Scott T.

    1989-01-01

    NASA recently embarked on the Space Station Freedom program, which will utilize the Shuttle Orbiter for transportation to orbit. Each flight is unique in terms of the hardware that is manifested and the method by which it is integrated to form viable cargo elements. Various constraints determine the packaging options for the three PV power module combined assemblies. Several packaging options for the PV power module cargo element are presented. These options are discussed in terms of their impact on the overall flight hardware manifest as determined by the various constraints.

  15. Spectrum sensitivity, energy yield, and revenue prediction of PV and CPV modules

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, Geoffrey S.

    2015-09-28

    Impact on module performance of spectral irradiance variation has been determined for III-V multijunctions compared against the four most common flat-plate module types (cadmium telluride, multicrystalline silicon, copper indium gallium selenide, and monocrystalline silicon. Hour-by-hour representative spectra were generated using atmospheric variables for Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Convolution with published values for external quantum efficiency gave the predicted current output. When combined with specifications of commercial PV modules, energy yield and revenue were predicted. This approach provides a means for optimizing PV module design based on various site-specific temporal variables.

  16. A PV view of the zonal mean distribution of temperature and wind in the extratropical troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, De-Zheng; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1994-01-01

    The dependence of the temperature and wind distribution of the zonal mean flow in the extratropical troposphere on the gradient of pontential vorticity along isentropes is examined. The extratropics here refer to the region outside the Hadley circulation. Of particular interest is whether the distribution of temperature and wind corresponding to a constant potential vorticity (PV) along isentropes resembles the observed, and the implications of PV homogenization along isentropes for the role of the tropics. With the assumption that PV is homogenized along isentropes, it is found that the temperature distribution in the extratropical troposphere may be determined by a linear, first-order partial differential equation. When the observed surface temperature distribution and tropical lapse rate are used as the boundary conditions, the solution of the equation is close to the observed temperature distribution except in the upper troposphere adjacent to the Hadley circulation, where the troposphere with no PV gradient is considerably colder. Consequently, the jet is also stronger. It is also found that the meridional distribution of the balanced zonal wind is very sensitive to the meridional distribution of the tropopause temperature. The result may suggest that the requirement of the global momentum balance has no practical role in determining the extratropical temperature distribution. The authors further investigated the sensitivity of the extratropical troposphere with constant PV along isentropes to changes in conditions at the tropical boundary (the edge of the Hadley circulation). It is found that the temperature and wind distributions in the extratropical troposphere are sensitive to the vertical distribution of PV at the tropical boundary. With a surface distribution of temperature that decreases linearly with latitude, the jet maximum occurs at the tropical boundary and moves with it. The overall pattern of wind distribution is not sensitive to the change of

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Bacteriophages of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. Juglandis

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Ignacio; Santos, Leonardo; Segovia, Cristopher; Ayala, Manuel; Alvarado, Romina; Nuñez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Three bacteriophages, f20-Xaj, f29-Xaj, and f30-Xaj, with lytic activity against Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis were isolated from walnut trees (VIII Bío Bío Region, Chile). These lytic bacteriophages have double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes of 43,851 bp, 41,865 bp, and 44,262 bp, respectively. These are the first described bacteriophages with lytic activity against X. arboricola pv. juglandis that can be utilized as biocontrol agents. PMID:27257210

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the African Strain AXO1947 of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Huguet-Tapia, J. C.; Peng, Z.; Yang, B.; Yin, Z.; Liu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is the etiological agent of bacterial rice blight. Three distinct clades of X. oryzae pv. oryzae are known. We present the complete annotated genome of the African clade strain AXO194 using long-read single-molecule PacBio sequencing technology. The genome comprises a single chromosome of 4,674,975 bp and encodes for nine transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. The approach and data presented in this announcement provide information for complex bacterial genome organization and the discovery of new virulence effectors, and they facilitate target characterization of TAL effectors. PMID:26868406

  19. Smart multifunction diffractive lens experimental validation for future PV cell applications.

    PubMed

    Albarazanchi, Abbas; Gérard, Philippe; Ambs, Pierre; Meyrueis, Patrick; Nguyen, Giang-Nam; Heggarty, Kevin

    2016-01-25

    Recently, diffractive optical elements (DOE's) have attracted more attention for applications to third generation PV cells. Some DOE types can provide multiple functions such as spectrum splitting and beam concentration (SSBC) simultaneously. An off-axis diffractive lens has been designed and its ability to achieve the SSBC proved experimentally. This lens can be used to separate the solar spectrum in the Vis-NIR range into two bands with a low concentration factor, and about 70% optical efficiency. It is expected that this kind of lens can be integrated with the lateral multijunction PV cells to build an effective compact solar system. PMID:26832567

  20. The vital role of manufacturing quality in the reliability of PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The influence of manufacturing quality on the reliability of PV modules coming out of today's factories has been, and is still, under estimated among investors and buyers. The main reason is perception. Contrary to popular belief, PV modules are not a commodity. Module quality does differ among module brands. Certification alone does not guarantee the quality or reliability of a module. Cost reductions in manufacturing have unequivocally affected module quality. And the use of new, cheaper materials has had a measureable impact on module reliability. The need for meaningful manufacturing quality standards has been understood by the leading technical institutions and important industry players. The fact that most leading PV panel manufacturers have been certified according to ISO 9001 has led to some level of improvement and higher effectiveness. The new ISO 9001 PV QMS standards will be a major step in providing a tool to assess PV manufacturers' quality management systems. The current lack of sufficient standards has still got a negative influence on the quality of modules being installed today. Today every manufacturer builds their modules in their own way with little standardization or adherence to quality processes and methods, which are commonplace in other manufacturing industries. Although photovoltaic technology is to a great extent mature, the way modules are being produced has changed significantly over the past few years and it continues to change at a rapid pace. Investors, financiers and lenders stand the most to gain from PV systems over the long-term, but also the most to lose. Investors, developers, EPC, O&M and solar asset management companies must all manage manufacturing quality more proactively or they will face unexpected risks and failures down the road. Manufacturing quality deserves more transparency and attention, as it is a major driver of module performance and reliability. This paper will explain the benefits of good manufacturing