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Sample records for agglomerated debris particles

  1. Air agglomeration of hydrophobic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The agglomeration of hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension was accomplished by introducing small amounts of air into the suspension while it was agitated vigorously. The extent of aggregation was proportional both to the air to solids ratio and to the hydrophobicity of the solids. For a given air/solids ratio, the extent of aggregation of different materials increased in the following order: graphite, gilsonite, coal coated with heptane, and Teflon. The structure of agglomerates produced from coarse Teflon particles differed noticeably from the structure of bubble-particle aggregates produced from smaller, less hydrophobic particles.

  2. Particle Agglomeration in Bipolar Barb Agglomerator Under AC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Ma, Xiuqin; Sun, Youshan; Wang, Meiyan; Zhang, Changping; Lou, Yueya

    2015-04-01

    The development of an efficient technology for removing fine particles in flue gas is essential as the haze is becoming more and more serious. To improve agglomeration effectiveness of fine particles, a dual zone electric agglomeration device consisting of a charging chamber and an agglomeration chamber with bipolar barb electrodes was developed. The bipolar barb electric agglomerator with a polar distance of 200 mm demonstrates good agglomeration effectiveness for particles with a size less than 8.0 μm under applied AC electric field. An optimal condition for achieving better agglomeration effectiveness was found to be as follows: flue gas flow velocity of 3.00 m/s, particle concentration of 2.00 g/m3, output voltage of 35 kV and length of the barb of 16 mm. In addition, 4.0-6.0 μm particles have the best effectiveness with the variation of particle volume occupancy of -3.2. supported by the Key Technology R&D Program of Hebei, China (No. 13211207D)

  3. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  4. Method for producing ceramic particles and agglomerates

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Gleiman, Seth S.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2001-01-01

    A method for generating spherical and irregularly shaped dense particles of ceramic oxides having a controlled particle size and particle size distribution. An aerosol containing precursor particles of oxide ceramics is directed into a plasma. As the particles flow through the hot zone of the plasma, they melt, collide, and join to form larger particles. If these larger particles remain in the hot zone, they continue melting and acquire a spherical shape that is retained after they exit the hot zone, cool down, and solidify. If they exit the hot zone before melting completely, their irregular shape persists and agglomerates are produced. The size and size distribution of the dense product particles can be controlled by adjusting several parameters, the most important in the case of powder precursors appears to be the density of powder in the aerosol stream that enters the plasma hot zone. This suggests that particle collision rate is responsible for determining ultimate size of the resulting sphere or agglomerate. Other parameters, particularly the gas flow rates and the microwave power, are also adjusted to control the particle size distribution.

  5. Coagulation of Agglomerates Consisting of Polydisperse Primary Particles.

    PubMed

    Goudeli, E; Eggersdorfer, M L; Pratsinis, S E

    2016-09-13

    The ballistic agglomeration of polydisperse particles is investigated by an event-driven (ED) method and compared to the coagulation of spherical particles and agglomerates consisting of monodisperse primary particles (PPs). It is shown for the first time to our knowledge that increasing the width or polydispersity of the PP size distribution initially accelerates the coagulation rate of their agglomerates but delays the attainment of their asymptotic fractal-like structure and self-preserving size distribution (SPSD) without altering them, provided that sufficiently large numbers of PPs are employed. For example, the standard asymptotic mass fractal dimension, Df, of 1.91 is attained when clusters are formed containing, on average, about 15 monodisperse PPs, consistent with fractal theory and the literature. In contrast, when polydisperse PPs with a geometric standard deviation of 3 are employed, about 500 PPs are needed to attain that Df. Even though the same asymptotic Df and mass-mobility exponent, Dfm, are attained regardless of PP polydispersity, the asymptotic prefactors or lacunarities of Df and Dfm increase with PP polydispersity. For monodisperse PPs, the average agglomerate radius of gyration, rg, becomes larger than the mobility radius, rm, when agglomerates consist of more than 15 PPs. Increasing PP polydispersity increases that number of PPs similarly to the above for the attainment of the asymptotic Df or Dfm. The agglomeration kinetics are quantified by the overall collision frequency function. When the SPSD is attained, the collision frequency is independent of PP polydispersity. Accounting for the SPSD polydispersity in the overall agglomerate collision frequency is in good agreement with that frequency from detailed ED simulations once the SPSD is reached. Most importantly, the coagulation of agglomerates is described well by a monodisperse model for agglomerate and PP sizes, whereas the detailed agglomerate size distribution can be obtained by

  6. Agglomeration of soot particles in diffusion flames under microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Fujita, O.; Ito, K.

    1994-11-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the behavior of soot particles in diffusion flames under microgravity conditions using a 490-m drop shaft (10-s microgravity duration) in Hokkaido, Japan. Flames from the combustion of paper sheets and butane jet diffusion flames are observed under microgravity. The oxygen concentration of the surroundings, the butane flow rate,and the burner diameter are varied as experimental parameters. The generated soot particles are sampled under microgravity and observed using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. The flames with a residual convection or forced convection are also observed to examine the influence of flow field on soot particle generation under microgravity. From these results, it is found that a number of large luminous spots appear in diffusion flames under microgravity. From the observation of TEM images, the luminous spots are the result of agglomerated soot particles and the growth of their diameters to a discernible level. The diameter of the agglomerated particles measure about 0.1 mm, 200 to 500 times as large as those generated under normal gravity. It is suggested that these large soot particles are generated in the limited areas where the conditions for the formation of these particles, such as gas velocity (residence time) and oxygen concentration, are satisfied.

  7. DETERMINATION OF STOKES SHAPE FACTOR FOR SINGLE PARTICLES AND AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Schaible, Micah J.; Vienna, John D.

    2011-09-01

    The large octahedral crystals of spinel can precipitate from glass during the high-level waste vitrification process and potentially block the glass discharge riser of electrically heated ceramic melters. To help predict the settling behavior of spinel in the riser, the settling of single particles and agglomerates was studied in stagnant and transparent viscosity oils at room temperature with developed optical particle-dynamics-analyzer. Determined dimensions and terminal settling velocities of particles were used for calculation of their Stokes shape factors. Calculated shape factor for the glass beads was almost identical with the theoretical shape factor of 2/9 for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for single spinel crystal was about 7.6 % higher compare to the theoretically predicted value for octahedron. Stokes shape factor of irregularly shaped multi-particle agglomerates was lower than that of the glass beads and individual spinel crystals because of the higher surface drag caused by the larger surface area to volume ratio.

  8. Reducing adhesion and agglomeration within a cloud of combustible particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.

    1988-01-01

    The study of combustible particle clouds inside flame tubes is of fundamental scientific interest as well as a practical concern. Only the suspended concentration is important to the combustion process, so that assurances must be provided that a minimum of particles adheres to the tube wall. This paper demonstrates experimentally the ability to minimize adhesion and agglomeration of acoustically-mixed lycopodium particles within a 5-cm diameter lexan flame tube. The area density of particles (ADP) adhering to the wall of bare lexan tubes was measured at greater than 100 particles/sq mm. The nature of adhesion was found to be clearly electrostatic, with the ADP level aggravated by increased mixing time, vigor, and the concentration of particles. Increases in the conductivity of the air and the tube wall did not affect ADP levels substantially. However, the observed adhesion was reduced to less than 10 p/sq mm when the air was ionized by use of an alpha emitter mounted on the inner walls of the flame tube.

  9. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  10. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  11. Development and scale-up of particle agglomeration processes for coal beneficiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meiyu

    The development of two modified agglomeration processes for coal beneficiation is presented separately in Parts I and II of this dissertation. Part I is based on research which was conducted to study the mechanism and characteristics of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Part II is based on research which was carried out to develop a newer and more innovative method for agglomerating coal particles with microscopic gas bubbles in aqueous suspensions. In Part I, the development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During batch agglomeration tests the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspension. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. It was shown that gas bubbles trigger the process of agglomeration and participate in a very complex mechanism involving the interaction of particles, oil droplets, and gas bubbles. The process takes place in stages involving dispersion of oil and gas, flocculation, coagulation, and agglomerate building. Numerous agglomeration tests were conducted with two kinds of coal in concentrated suspensions to determine the important characteristics of the process and to study the effects of the following operating parameters: i-octane concentration, air concentration, particle concentration, tank diameter, impeller diameter, and impeller speed

  12. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup. PMID:24152872

  13. Influence of primary-particle density in the morphology of agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Camejo, M D; Espeso, D R; Bonilla, L L

    2014-07-01

    Agglomeration processes occur in many different realms of science, such as colloid and aerosol formation or formation of bacterial colonies. We study the influence of primary-particle density in agglomerate structures using diffusion-controlled Monte Carlo simulations with realistic space scales through different regimes (diffusion-limited aggregation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation). The equivalence of Monte Carlo time steps to real time scales is given by Hirsch's hydrodynamical theory of Brownian motion. Agglomerate behavior at different time stages of the simulations suggests that three indices (the fractal exponent, the coordination number, and the eccentricity index) characterize agglomerate geometry. Using these indices, we have found that the initial density of primary particles greatly influences the final structure of the agglomerate, as observed in recent experimental works. PMID:25122302

  14. Influence of primary-particle density in the morphology of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camejo, M. D.; Espeso, D. R.; Bonilla, L. L.

    2014-07-01

    Agglomeration processes occur in many different realms of science, such as colloid and aerosol formation or formation of bacterial colonies. We study the influence of primary-particle density in agglomerate structures using diffusion-controlled Monte Carlo simulations with realistic space scales through different regimes (diffusion-limited aggregation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation). The equivalence of Monte Carlo time steps to real time scales is given by Hirsch's hydrodynamical theory of Brownian motion. Agglomerate behavior at different time stages of the simulations suggests that three indices (the fractal exponent, the coordination number, and the eccentricity index) characterize agglomerate geometry. Using these indices, we have found that the initial density of primary particles greatly influences the final structure of the agglomerate, as observed in recent experimental works.

  15. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 °C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption. PMID:26069936

  16. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 °C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption.

  17. Direct numerical simulations of agglomeration of circular colloidal particles in two-dimensional shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Joon; Djilali, Ned

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal agglomeration of nanoparticles in shear flow is investigated by solving the fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions in a 2D system. We use an extended finite element method in which the dynamics of the particles is solved in a fully coupled manner with the flow, allowing an accurate description of the fluid-particle interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes or of empirical correlations to account for the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. Adaptive local mesh refinement using a grid deformation method is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm, and the particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones potential. Motivated by the process used in fabricating fuel cell catalysts from a colloidal ink, the model is applied to investigate agglomeration of colloidal particles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame with varying shear rates and particle fraction ratios. Both external shear and particle fraction are found to have a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension. Segregation intensity and graph theory are used to analyze the underlying agglomeration patterns and structures, and three agglomeration regimes are identified.

  18. Method of producing non-agglomerating submicron size particles

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Roy S.; Eichman, Clarence C.; Welbon, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in "metallic inks".

  19. Combined deterministic-stochastic framework for modeling the agglomeration of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortuza, S. M.; Kariyawasam, Lahiru K.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2015-07-01

    We present a multiscale model, based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC), to study the aggregation driven growth of colloidal particles. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations are employed to detect key agglomeration events and calculate the corresponding rate constants. The kMC simulations employ these rate constants in a stochastic framework to track the growth of the agglomerates over longer time scales and length scales. One of the hallmarks of the model is a unique methodology to detect and characterize agglomeration events. The model accounts for individual cluster-scale effects such as change in size due to aggregation as well as local molecular-scale effects such as changes in the number of neighbors of each molecule in a colloidal cluster. Such definition of agglomeration events allows us to grow the cluster to sizes that are inaccessible to molecular simulations as well as track the shape of the growing cluster. A well-studied system, comprising fullerenes in NaCl electrolyte solution, was simulated to validate the model. Under the simulated conditions, the agglomeration process evolves from a diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) regime to percolating cluster in transition and finally to a gelation regime. Overall the data from the multiscale numerical model shows good agreement with existing theory of colloidal particle growth. Although in the present study we validated our model by specifically simulating fullerene agglomeration in electrolyte solution, the model is versatile and can be applied to a wide range of colloidal systems.

  20. Particle Trajectories and Agglomeration/Accumulation in Branching Arteries subjected to Orbital Atherectomy

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Zach L; Jenkins, Jed S; Abraham, John P; Sparrow, Ephraim M

    2011-01-01

    Background: The transport of particles in surrogate and actual arterial geometries has been investigated synergistically by experimentation and numerical simulation. The motivating application for this work is orbital atherectomy which spawns a particle cloud in the process of debulking plaque from arterial walls. Methods: Paired simulations and experiments were performed to prove the capability of the simulation model to predict both fluid and particle motions in branched arterial geometries. The verified model was then employed to predict the pattern of fluid flow in an actual multi-branched arterial geometry, including the flowrates passing through each of the individual branches. These predictions are in very good agreement with experimental data. Focus was then shifted to the issues of particle agglomeration within the flowing fluid and particle accumulation on the vessel walls. Once again, a synergistic approach was used. Flow visualization was employed to track the particle motions and to identify possible particle agglomeration within the fluid. Results and Conclusions: Accumulation of particles on walls was identified by measuring size distributions of effluent and residue within the artery. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) evaluation showed evidence of a size-based sorting as the particles passed through vessels. It was found that plaque-facsimile particles resisted particle-particle agglomeration. They also did not accumulate to the wall of the facsimile artery. In addition, simulations showed that if particle-wall accumulation were to occur, it would be limited to very small regions in the artery branches. PMID:21643425

  1. Combustion of single and agglomerated aluminum particles in solid rocket motor flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, John Charles, IV

    2001-07-01

    Single and agglomerated aluminum droplets were studied in a solid rocket motor (SRM) test chamber with optical access to the internal flow at 6--22 atm and 2300 K. The chamber was pressurized by burning a main grain AP/HTPB propellant, and the burning aluminum droplets were generated by a smaller aluminized solid propellant sample, center-mounted in the flow. A 35 mm camera was used with a chopper wheel to give droplet flame diameter vs. time measurements of the burning droplets in flight, from which bum-rate laws were developed. A high-speed video CCD was used with high-magnification optics in order to image the flame/smoke cloud surrounding the burning liquid droplets. The intensity profiles of the droplet images were de-convoluted using an Abel inversion to give true intensity profiles. Both single and agglomerated droplets were studied, where agglomerates are comprised of hundreds of parent particles or more. The Abel inversion results show that the relative smoke cloud size is not constant with diameter, but instead grows as the droplet shrinks, by ˜D -0.5, for both the single and agglomerated droplets. Measured diameter trajectories show that for single droplets, the diameter law is D 0.75 = DO0.75 = 8·t [mu m, msec], and for agglomerated droplets, D 1.0 = Do1.0 - 20·t, such that the single droplets burn faster than the agglomerates. For both single and agglomerated droplets, the burning rate slope k did not change significantly over the chamber pressure studied. Lastly, a model was developed to describe the oxide cap accumulation on the droplet surface from the oxide smoke cloud surrounding the droplet. Results suggest that less oxide accumulates in high-pressure SRMs when considering mass burning rates for different relative cap sizes. The thermophoretic force, which can control oxide transport only over the cap, decreases with pressure.

  2. Hebbian learning in the agglomeration of conducting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperl, M.; Chang, A.; Weber, N.; Hübler, A.

    1999-03-01

    The Hebbian learning rule is a fundamental concept in the learning of a neuronal net, where a frequently used connection of two neurons is continually reinforced. We study the properties of self-assembling connections of conducting particles in a dielectric liquid, and find that the strength of the connection between different electrodes represents a memory for the history of the system. Optimal parameters and sequences of stimulation for effective training are determined. We discuss a future application of our results for the implementation of a nonvolatile neuronal network based on self-assembling nanowires on a semiconductor surface.

  3. Magnetophoretic velocities of superparamagnetic particles, agglomerates and complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Naomi; Grob, Tim; Morten, Karl; Thompson, Ian; Sheard, Steve

    2015-06-01

    A study into the magnetically induced mobility of four types of superparamagnetic particles (SMPs) was conducted using a video camera, an inverted light microscope and ImageJ tracking software. The objective is to improve the understanding of how SMP-capture assays perform by measuring mobilities of SMPs, when aggregated together or attached to non-magnetic beads (NMB). The magnetically induced velocities of self-assembled SMP chains were measured and found to meet the proposed models. A study into the zeta potential of the SMPs was completed to determine a scenario for maximal electrostatic interactions and efficient capture of the SMPs to a target. SMPs were bound to biotinylated NMBs, representing attachment to a disease biomarker. The drift velocity of SMP chains and SMP-NMB complexes in a gradient magnetic field was compared. It is expected that the observable changes to the magnetophoretic mobility of SMPs attached to a disease biomarker will lead to new biosensor technology.

  4. Model for coal ash agglomeration based on two-particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, J.L.; O'Brien, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The agglomeration of coal and coal ash in fluidized-bed gasifiers (FBG's) is of great interest in coal conversion. However, only limited work has been done to develop analytical models in order to understand ash agglomeration in FBG's. This paper focuses on two-particle collision dynamics, which is then used to develop a criterion for the agglutination of the two particles. The main assumption of this mechanism is that the binding force can be modeled as ''piecewise'' conservative. This makes it possible to compute the maximum energy that can be dissipated by the system. Comparison of this quantity with the initial kinetic energy provides the agglutination criteria. A specific version of this model is obtained by making specific choices for the contact force and the binding force. An analytic formula for the critical velocity, the relative collision velocity below which agglutination takes place, is obtained for head-on collisions; a numerical technique is developed for collisions which are not head-on. A process change which increases the critical velocity increases the likelihood of agglutination of particles with random relative velocities. To examine the critical velocity as a function of temperature, the model requires correlations for the shear modulus and surface adhesiveness coefficient of the particles. Although these correlations are derived from limited experimental information, they lead to reasonable results and agreement with existing experimental data on agglomeration and defluidization. By considering the agglutination of particles of average size and temperature, a measure of the agglomeration tendency of a FBG can be obtained. Finally, the sensitivity of the model to system parameters is also investigated and an assessment of needed additional work is made. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Acoustic agglomeration of fine particles based on a high intensity acoustical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic agglomeration (AA) is considered to be a promising method for reducing the air pollution caused by fine aerosol particles. Removal efficiency and energy consuming are primary parameters and generally have a conflict with each other for the industry applications. It was proved that removal efficiency is increased with sound intensity and optimal frequency is presented for certain polydisperse aerosol. As a result, a high efficiency and low energy cost removal system was constructed using acoustical resonance. High intensity standing wave is generated by a tube system with abrupt section driven by four loudspeakers. Numerical model of the tube system was built base on the finite element method, and the resonance condition and SPL increase were confirmd. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the acoustic field in the agglomeration chamber. Removal efficiency of fine particles was tested by the comparison of filter paper mass and particle size distribution at different operating conditions including sound pressure level (SPL), and frequency. The experimental study has demonstrated that agglomeration increases with sound pressure level. Sound pressure level in the agglomeration chamber is between 145 dB and 165 dB from 500 Hz to 2 kHz. The resonance frequency can be predicted with the quarter tube theory. Sound pressure level gain of more than 10 dB is gained at resonance frequency. With the help of high intensity sound waves, fine particles are reduced greatly, and the AA effect is enhanced at high SPL condition. The optimal frequency is 1.1kHz for aerosol generated by coal ash. In the resonace tube, higher resonance frequencies are not the integral multiplies of the first one. As a result, Strong nonlinearity is avoided by the dissonant characteristic and shock wave is not found in the testing results. The mechanism and testing system can be used effectively in industrial processes in the future.

  6. Counting and sizing of particles and particle agglomerates in a microfluidic device using laser light scattering: application to a particle-enhanced immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Pamme, Nicole; Koyama, Ryuji; Manz, Andreas

    2003-08-01

    A microfluidic device for counting and sizing particles and particle agglomerates based on laser light scattering is demonstrated. The particles were confined hydrodynamically and passed through a focused laser beam. Scattering at two different angles, 15 degree and 45 degree, was detected. At an acquisition rate of 10 kHz, a throughput of 150 particles s(-1) was achieved. Scattering intensity was found to depend on particle volume for 2 to 9 microm diameter particles. Size discrimination of particles with a diameter ratio of 1: 2 was accomplished. In addition, the scattering signals of particle agglomerates formed in a particle-enhanced immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Scattering intensity was found to be dependent on the CRP concentration, 100 ng CRP per mL could be detected. The particle counting method presented is generic and can be employed in a wide variety of assays as well as for cell counting and particle counting.

  7. Quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma containing spherical particles and their binary agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, M.; Semenov, I.; Nosenko, V.; Thomas, H. M.

    2016-05-01

    A unique type of quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma system was observed which consisted of monodisperse microspheres and their binary agglomerations (dimers). The particles and their dimers levitated in a plasma sheath at slightly different heights and formed two distinct sublayers. The system did not crystallize and may be characterized as a disordered solid. The dimers were identified based on their characteristic appearance in defocused images, i.e., rotating interference fringe patterns. The in-plane and interplane particle separations exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the discharge pressure.

  8. Quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma containing spherical particles and their binary agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, M; Semenov, I; Nosenko, V; Thomas, H M

    2016-05-01

    A unique type of quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma system was observed which consisted of monodisperse microspheres and their binary agglomerations (dimers). The particles and their dimers levitated in a plasma sheath at slightly different heights and formed two distinct sublayers. The system did not crystallize and may be characterized as a disordered solid. The dimers were identified based on their characteristic appearance in defocused images, i.e., rotating interference fringe patterns. The in-plane and interplane particle separations exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the discharge pressure. PMID:27300990

  9. A comparison study of the agglomeration mechanism of nano- and micrometer aluminum particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.X.; Deng, J.; Luo, Z.M.

    2010-02-15

    The agglomeration mechanism of micro- and nanosize aluminum particles with a primary mean particle diameter of 4.5 {mu}m and 75 nm, respectively, was comparatively investigated under an incident shock wave. The morphology, particle size, and agglomeration process of micro- and nanometer alumina particles were comprehensibly compared by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Images of X-ray diffraction reveal that a varied of phases of alumina ({gamma}-, {delta}-, {epsilon}-, and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were simultaneously found in the nanosize alumina products, which may give some detail information of the wide variety of reacting temperature of aluminum nanoparticles, while Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was detected in micrometer alumina products, which also gives some dynamic information of aluminum to alumina, i.e., aluminas have actually reacted with the free active carbon atoms to produce their intermediates. The microstructure of aluminas induced by the incident shock waves was detected and analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectrum. These results are an additive evidence to support that the initial stage sintering of the alumina nanosize powders is dominated by grain boundary diffusion, while the volume diffusion is the main character for the initial stage sintering of the micrometer alumina powders.

  10. Effect of starting material particle size on its agglomeration behavior in high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Sherif I Farag; Hussain, Munir A

    2004-05-11

    The effect of anhydrous lactose particle size distribution on its performance in the wet granulation process was evaluated. Three grades of anhydrous lactose were used in the study: "as is" manufacturer grade and 2 particle size fractions obtained by screening of the 60M lactose. Particle growth behavior of the 3 lactose grades was evaluated in a high shear mixer. Compactibility and porosity of the resulting granules were also evaluated. A uniaxial compression test on moist agglomerates of the 3 lactose grades was performed in an attempt to explain the mechanism of particle size effect observed in the high shear mixer. Particle growth of anhydrous lactose in the high shear mixer was inversely related to the particle size of the starting material. In addition, granulation manufactured using the grade with the smallest particle size was more porous and demonstrated enhanced compactibility compared with the other grades. Compacts with similar porosity and low liquid saturation demonstrated brittle behavior and their breakage strength was inversely related to lactose particle size in the uniaxial compression test, suggesting that material with smaller particle size may exhibit more pronounced nucleation behavior during wet granulation. On the other hand, compacts prepared at higher liquid saturation and similar compression force exhibited more plastic behavior and showed lower yield stress for the grade with smallest particle size. The lower yield stress of compacts prepared with this grade may indicate a higher coalescence tendency for its granules during wet granulation. PMID:15760071

  11. Steric stabilization of nonaqueous silicon slips. I - Control of particle agglomeration and packing. II - Pressure casting of powder compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerkar, Awdhoot V.; Henderson, Robert J. M.; Feke, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    The application of steric stabilization to control particle agglomeration and packing of silicon powder in benzene and trichloroethylene is reported. The results provide useful guidelines for controlling unfavorable particle-particle interactions during nonaqueous processing of silicon-based ceramic materials. The application of steric stabilization to the control and improvement of green processing of nonaqueous silicon slips in pressure consolidation is also demonstrated.

  12. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VI. EROSION OF LARGE AGGREGATES AS A SOURCE OF MICROMETER-SIZED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen

    2011-06-20

    Observed protoplanetary disks consist of a large amount of micrometer-sized particles. Dullemond and Dominik pointed out for the first time the difficulty in explaining the strong mid-infrared excess of classical T Tauri stars without any dust-retention mechanisms. Because high relative velocities in between micrometer-sized and macroscopic particles exist in protoplanetary disks, we present experimental results on the erosion of macroscopic agglomerates consisting of micrometer-sized spherical particles via the impact of micrometer-sized particles. We find that after an initial phase, in which an impacting particle erodes up to 10 particles of an agglomerate, the impacting particles compress the agglomerate's surface, which partly passivates the agglomerates against erosion. Due to this effect, the erosion halts for impact velocities up to {approx}30 m s{sup -1} within our error bars. For higher velocities, the erosion is reduced by an order of magnitude. This outcome is explained and confirmed by a numerical model. In a next step, we build an analytical disk model and implement the experimentally found erosive effect. The model shows that erosion is a strong source of micrometer-sized particles in a protoplanetary disk. Finally, we use the stationary solution of this model to explain the amount of micrometer-sized particles in the observational infrared data of Furlan et al.

  13. The effect of particle agglomeration on the formation of a surface-connected compartment induced by hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human monocyte-derived macrophages☆

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Karin H.; Motskin, Michael; Philpott, Alistair J.; Routh, Alexander F.; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Duer, Melinda J.; Skepper, Jeremy N.

    2014-01-01

    Agglomeration dramatically affects many aspects of nanoparticle–cell interactions. Here we show that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles formed large agglomerates in biological medium resulting in extensive particle uptake and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in human macrophages. Particle citration and/or the addition of the dispersant Darvan 7 dramatically reduced mean agglomerate sizes, the amount of particle uptake and concomitantly cytotoxicity. More surprisingly, agglomeration governed the mode of particle uptake. Agglomerates were sequestered within an extensive, interconnected membrane labyrinth open to the extracellular space. In spite of not being truly intracellular, imaging studies suggest particle degradation occurred within this surface-connected compartment (SCC). Agglomerate dispersion prevented the SCC from forming, but did not completely inhibit nanoparticle uptake by other mechanisms. The results of this study could be relevant to understanding particle–cell interactions during developmental mineral deposition, in ectopic calcification in disease, and during application of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle vectors in biomedicine. PMID:24183166

  14. Impact Of Particle Agglomeration On Accumulation Rates In The Glass Discharge Riser Of HLW Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Matyas, J.; Owen, A. T.; Jansik, D. P.; Lang, J. B.

    2012-11-12

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185+-155 {mu}m, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 deg C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

  15. Composite propellant aluminum agglomeration reduction using tailored Al/PTFE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Travis R.

    can be ignited via optical flash. Propellant aluminum agglomeration is assessed through replacement of reference aluminum powders (spherical, flake, or nanoscale) with Al/PTFE (90/10 or 70/30 wt.%) particles. The effects on burning rate, pressure dependence, and aluminum ignition, combustion, and agglomeration are quantified. Microscopic imaging shows tailored particles promptly ignite at the burning surface and appear to breakup into smaller particles. Replacement of spherical aluminum with Al/PTFE 70/30 wt.% also increases the pressure exponent from 0.36 to 0.58, which results in a 50% increase in propellant burning rate at 13.8 MPa. Combustion products were quench collected using a liquid-free technique at 2.1 and 6.9 MPa. Sizing of products indicates that composite particles result in nominally 25 μm coarse products, which are smaller than the original, average particle size and are also 66% smaller in diameter (96% by volume) than the 76 μm products collected from reference spherical aluminized propellant. Smaller diameter condensed phase products and more gaseous products will likely decrease two-phase flow loss and reduce slag accumulation in solid rocket motors.

  16. Rat pulmonary responses to inhaled nano-TiO2: effect of primary particle size and agglomeration state

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The exact role of primary nanoparticle (NP) size and their degree of agglomeration in aerosols on the determination of pulmonary effects is still poorly understood. Smaller NP are thought to have greater biological reactivity, but their level of agglomeration in an aerosol may also have an impact on pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of primary NP size and the agglomeration state in aerosols, using well-characterized TiO2 NP, on their relative pulmonary toxicity, through inflammatory, cytotoxic and oxidative stress effects in Fisher 344 male rats. Methods Three different sizes of TiO2 NP, i.e., 5, 10–30 or 50 nm, were inhaled as small (SA) (< 100 nm) or large agglomerates (LA) (> 100 nm) at 20 mg/m3 for 6 hours. Results Compared to the controls, bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) showed that LA aerosols induced an acute inflammatory response, characterized by a significant increase in the number of neutrophils, while SA aerosols produced significant oxidative stress damages and cytotoxicity. Data also demonstrate that for an agglomeration state smaller than 100 nm, the 5 nm particles caused a significant increase in cytotoxic effects compared to controls (assessed by an increase in LDH activity), while oxidative damage measured by 8-isoprostane concentration was less when compared to 10–30 and 50 nm particles. In both SA and LA aerosols, the 10–30 nm TiO2 NP size induced the most pronounced pro-inflammatory effects compared to controls. Conclusions Overall, this study showed that initial NP size and agglomeration state are key determinants of nano-TiO2 lung inflammatory reaction, cytotoxic and oxidative stress induced effects. PMID:24090040

  17. Instrumentation for near-Earth measurement of orbital debris and cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    Dust instrumentation based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust sensor arrays is described which will measure the masses, fluxes, velocities, and trajectories of orbital debris particles and natural micrometeoroids. Orbital debris particles are distinguished from natural particles (cosmic dust) by means of the velocity/trajectory information. The instrumentation will measure particle trajectory with a mean error of approximately 7 degrees (for isotropic flux) and is designed for measurements over the particle diameter range of approximately 2 to 200 micro-m. For future missions having Earth-return capabilities, arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the PVDF trajectory system would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust.

  18. The surface properties of nanoparticles determine the agglomeration state and the size of the particles under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Galla, Hans-Joachim; Kirkpatrick, C James; Stauber, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Due to the recent widespread application of nanomaterials to biological systems, a careful consideration of their physiological impact is required. This demands an understanding of the complex processes at the bio–nano interface. Therefore, a comprehensive and accurate characterization of the material under physiological conditions is crucial to correlate the observed biological impact with defined colloidal properties. As promising candidates for biomedical applications, two SiO2-based nanomaterial systems were chosen for extensive size characterization to investigate the agglomeration behavior under physiological conditions. To combine the benefits of different characterization techniques and to compensate for their respective drawbacks, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were applied. The investigated particle systems were (i) negatively charged silica particles and (ii) poly(organosiloxane) particles offering variable surface modification opportunities (positively charged, polymer coated). It is shown that the surface properties primarily determine the agglomeration state of the particles and therefore their effective size, especially under physiological conditions. Thus, the biological identity of a nanomaterial is clearly influenced by differentiating surface properties. PMID:25383289

  19. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  20. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  1. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-11-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide.

  2. Particle size reduction in debris flows: Laboratory experiments compared with field data from Inyo Creek, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabnia, O.; Sklar, L. S.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Rock particles in debris flows are reduced in size through abrasion and fracture. Wear of coarse sediments results in production of finer particles, which alter the bulk material rheology and influence flow dynamics and runout distance. Particle wear also affects the size distribution of coarse particles, transforming the initial sediment size distribution produced on hillslopes into that delivered to the fluvial channel network. A better understanding of the controls on particle wear in debris flows would aid in the inferring flow conditions from debris flow deposits, in estimating the initial size of sediments entrained in the flow, and in modeling debris flow dynamics and mapping hazards. The rate of particle size reduction with distance traveled should depend on the intensity of particle interactions with other particles and the flow boundary, and on rock resistance to wear. We seek a geomorphic transport law to predict rate of particle wear with debris flow travel distance as a function of particle size distribution, flow depth, channel slope, fluid composition and rock strength. Here we use four rotating drums to create laboratory debris flows across a range of scales. Drum diameters range from 0.2 to 4.0 m, with the largest drum able to accommodate up to 2 Mg of material, including boulders. Each drum has vanes along the boundary to prevent sliding. Initial experiments use angular clasts of durable granodiorite; later experiments will use less resistant rock types. Shear rate is varied by changing drum rotational velocity. We begin experiments with well-sorted coarse particle size distributions, which are allowed to evolve through particle wear. The fluid is initially clear water, which rapidly acquires fine-grained wear products. After each travel increment all coarse particles (mass > 0.4 g) are weighed individually. We quantify particle wear rates using statistics of size and mass distributions, and by fitting various comminution functions to the data

  3. Debris flow impact on mitigation barriers: a new method for particle-fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchelli, Maddalena; Pirulli, Marina; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Channelized debris-flows are a type of mass movements that involve water-charged, predominantly coarse-grained inorganic and organic material flowing rapidly down steep confined pre-existing channels (Van Dine, 1985). Due to their rapid movements and destructive power, structural mitigation measures have become an integral part of counter measures against these phenomena, to mitigate and prevent damages resulting from debris-flow impact on urbanized areas. In particular, debris barriers and storage basins, with some form of debris-straining structures incorporated into the barrier constructed across the path of a debris-flow, have a dual role to play: (1) to stimulate deposition by presenting a physical obstruction against flow, and (2) to guarantee that during normal conditions stream water and bedload can pass through the structure; while, during and after an extreme event, the water that is in the flow and some of the fine-grained sediment can escape. A new method to investigate the dynamic interactions between the flowing mass and the debris barrier is presented, with particular emphasis on the effect of the barrier in controlling the water and sediment content of the escaping mass. This aspect is achieved by implementing a new mechanical model into an enhanced two-phase dynamical mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012), in which solid particles mixture and viscous fluid are taken into account. The complex mechanical model is defined as a function of the energy lost during impact, the physical and geometrical properties of the debris barrier, separate but strongly interacting dynamics of boulder and fluid flows during the impact, particle concentration distribution, and the slope characteristics. The particle-filtering-process results in a large variation in the rheological properties of the fluid-dominated escaping mass, including the substantial reduction in the bulk density, and the inertial forces of the debris-flows. Consequently, the destructive power and run

  4. Agglomeration of Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Annaratone, B. M.; Arnas, C.; Elskens, Y.

    2008-09-07

    The agglomeration of the matter in plasma, from the atomic level up to millimetre size particles, is here considered. In general we identify a continuous growth, due to deposition, and two agglomeration steps, the first at the level of tens of nanometres and the second above the micron. The agglomeration of nano-particles is attributed to electrostatic forces in presence of charge polarity fluctuations. Here we present a model based on discrete currents. With increasing grain size the positive charge permanence decreases, tending to zero. This effect is only important in the range of nanometre for dust of highly dispersed size. When the inter-particle distance is of the order of the screening length another agglomeration mechanism dominates. It is based on attractive forces, shadow forces or dipole-dipole interaction, overcoming the electrostatic repulsion. In bright plasma radiation pressure also plays a role.

  5. An adaptive extended finite element method for the analysis of agglomeration of colloidal particles in a flowing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Jorshari, Razzi Movassaghi; Djilali, Ned

    2015-03-10

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow-nanoparticle interaction in a colloidal suspension are presented using an extended finite element method (XFEM) in which the dynamics of the nanoparticles is solved in a fully-coupled manner with the flow. The method is capable of accurately describing solid-fluid interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes to investigate the dynamics of particles in complex flows. In order to accurately compute the high interparticle shear stresses and pressures while minimizing computing costs, an adaptive meshing technique is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm. The particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and the corresponding potential parameters are determined by a scaling procedure. The study is relevant to the preparation of inks used in the fabrication of catalyst layers for fuel cells. In this paper, we are particularly interested in investigating agglomeration of the nanoparticles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame. The results indicate that the external shear has a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension.

  6. Particle Hydrodynamics with Material Strength for Multi-Layer Orbital Debris Shield Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1999-01-01

    Three dimensional simulation of oblique hypervelocity impact on orbital debris shielding places extreme demands on computer resources. Research to date has shown that particle models provide the most accurate and efficient means for computer simulation of shield design problems. In order to employ a particle based modeling approach to the wall plate impact portion of the shield design problem, it is essential that particle codes be augmented to represent strength effects. This report describes augmentation of a Lagrangian particle hydrodynamics code developed by the principal investigator, to include strength effects, allowing for the entire shield impact problem to be represented using a single computer code.

  7. Effect of mechanical vibration on platinum particle agglomeration and growth in proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diloyan, Georgiy

    The objective of the current research is to study the effect of mechanical vibration on catalyst layer degradation via Platinum (Pt) particle agglomeration and growth in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM Fuel Cell). This study is of great importance, since many PEM fuel cells operate under a vibrating environment, such as the case of vehicular applications, and this may influence the catalyst layer degradation and fuel cell performance. Through extensive literature review, there are only few researches that have been studied the effect of mechanical vibration on PEM fuel cells. These studies focused only on PEM fuel cell performance under vibration for less than 50 hours and none of them considered the degradation of the fuel cell components, such as MEA and its catalyst layer. To study the effect of the mechanical vibration on the catalyst layer an accelerated test with potential cycling was specially designed to simulate a typical vehicle driving condition. The length of the accelerated test was designed to be 300 hour with potential cycling comprised of idle running, constant load, triangle (variable) load and overload running at various mechanical vibration conditions. These mechanical vibration conditions were as follows: 1g 20 Hz, 1g 40 Hz, 4g 20 Hz and 4g 40 Hz. No vibration tests were also conducted to study the influence of operating time and were used as a baseline for comparison study. The series of accelerated tests were followed by microscopy and spectroscopy analyses using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-Ray diffraction (XRD). An ESEM was used to qualitatively analyze pristine and degraded catalyst. TEM and XRD were used to quantitatively analyze catalyst layer degradation via Pt agglomeration and growth in pristine and degraded states. For each test condition, PEM fuel cell performance by means of Voltage - Current (VI) curves was

  8. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  9. Predicting the growth of fractal particle agglomeration networks with graph theoretical methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubler, Alfred

    2007-03-01

    We study an electromechanical system [J. Jun, A. Hubler, PNAS 102, 536 (2005); J. Jun, Ph.D. thesis, UIUC (2004)], where conducting particles self-organize into dendritic patterns under the influence of an electric field for the purpose of collecting and transporting charge. The system forms stable open-loop networks with many reproducible statistical quantities, such as the number of termini and the number of branch points, but the final topology of the network is sensitive to the initial conditions of the particles. Small differences in the initial configuration may lead to very different stationary states. We present robust and reliable ensemble prediction algorithms for the growth of such fractal charge transportation networks. These predictors may lead to the discovery of common properties and serve a prototype to predict fractal growth in other areas, including neural systems; blood vessel systems, river networks, and dielectric break through.

  10. Particle-Scale Controls on Entrainment and Deposition due to Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Maki, L.; Kaitna, R.

    2013-12-01

    When a debris flow - a large flow of boulders, gravels, sands, and mud - course down mountains, it can entrain materials many times the initial mass of the debris flow. The material is deposited at lower slopes. The amount of material they entrain and deposit can influence both the potential damage they do to habitat and communities in their paths and the landscape along the way. There is little quantitative understanding of the controls of entrainment and deposition along a debris flow path. We present experiments in a novel laboratory flume developed at the University of Minnesota to study particle-scale controls on entrainment and deposition due to debris flows. We control particle size distribution and water content in the flow itself and in an erodible bed over which the mixture flows, independently. Particle velocities, pore pressures, and local particle size distributions can be monitored, as can total erosion and deposition. Here, we first demonstrate how subtle differences in the bed structure or 'fabric' induced by the bed preparation can have dramatic differences on the entrainment rate of bed particles by the flowing mixture. Then we demonstrate the dependence of entrainment on particle size distribution in the flow and in the bed itself as it varies with angle of inclination of the bed. In all cases, we find that the erosion increases (or at lower angles, deposition decreases) with increasing angle of inclination of the bed. When the particles in the flow are uniform and the same size as those in the bed, we find the dependence of erosion on angle of inclination is linear. We find that single-sized systems exhibit more erosion and less deposition under the same conditions as their mixed counterparts. When the flow has a larger or smaller average particle size than that in the bed, the dependence of erosion on angle is somewhat more complicated. We model the variability by considering granular temperature in the flow, average stress on the bed, and the

  11. Particle-Scale Controls on Entrainment and Deposition due to Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, M. D.; Mudd, S. M.; Walcott, R.; Attal, M.; Yoo, K.; Weinman, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    When a debris flow - a large flow of boulders, gravels, sands, and mud - course down mountains, it can entrain materials many times the initial mass of the debris flow. The material is deposited at lower slopes. The amount of material they entrain and deposit can influence both the potential damage they do to habitat and communities in their paths and the landscape along the way. There is little quantitative understanding of the controls of entrainment and deposition along a debris flow path. We present experiments in a novel laboratory flume developed at the University of Minnesota to study particle-scale controls on entrainment and deposition due to debris flows. We control particle size distribution and water content in the flow itself and in an erodible bed over which the mixture flows, independently. Particle velocities, pore pressures, and local particle size distributions can be monitored, as can total erosion and deposition. Here, we first demonstrate how subtle differences in the bed structure or 'fabric' induced by the bed preparation can have dramatic differences on the entrainment rate of bed particles by the flowing mixture. Then we demonstrate the dependence of entrainment on particle size distribution in the flow and in the bed itself as it varies with angle of inclination of the bed. In all cases, we find that the erosion increases (or at lower angles, deposition decreases) with increasing angle of inclination of the bed. When the particles in the flow are uniform and the same size as those in the bed, we find the dependence of erosion on angle of inclination is linear. We find that single-sized systems exhibit more erosion and less deposition under the same conditions as their mixed counterparts. When the flow has a larger or smaller average particle size than that in the bed, the dependence of erosion on angle is somewhat more complicated. We model the variability by considering granular temperature in the flow, average stress on the bed, and the

  12. Space Debris Symposium (A6.) Measurements and Space Surveillance (1.): Measurements of the Small Particle Debris Cloud from the 11 January, 2007 Chinese Anti-satellite Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark J.; Stansbery, Eugene; J.-C Liou; Stokely, Christopher; Horstman, Matthew; Whitlock, David

    2008-01-01

    On January 11, 2007, the Chinese military conducted a test of an anti-satellite (ASAT) system, destroying their own Fengyun-1C spacecraft with an interceptor missile. The resulting hypervelocity collision created an unprecedented number of tracked debris - more than 2500 objects. These objects represent only those large enough for the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) to track - typically objects larger than about 5-10 cm in diameter. There are expected to be even more debris objects at sizes too small to be seen and tracked by the SSN. Because of the altitude of the target satellite (865 x 845 km orbit), many of the debris are expected to have long orbital lifetimes and contribute to the orbital debris environment for decades to come. In the days and weeks following the ASAT test, NASA was able to use Lincoln Laboratory s Haystack radar on several occasions to observe portions of the ASAT debris cloud. Haystack has the capability of detecting objects down to less than one centimeter in diameter, and a large number of centimeter-sized particles corresponding to the ASAT cloud were clearly seen in the data. While Haystack cannot track these objects, the statistical sampling procedures NASA uses can give an accurate statistical picture of the characteristics of the debris from a breakup event. For years computer models based on data from ground hypervelocity collision tests (e.g., the SOCIT test) and orbital collision experiments (e.g., the P-78 and Delta-180 on-orbit collisions) have been used to predict the extent and characteristics of such hypervelocity collision debris clouds, but until now there have not been good ways to verify these models in the centimeter size regime. It is believed that unplanned collisions of objects in space similar to ASAT tests will drive the long-term future evolution of the debris environment in near-Earth space. Therefore, the Chinese ASAT test provides an excellent opportunity to test the models used to predict the future debris

  13. Aqueous Hg(2+) associates with TiO2 nanoparticles according to particle size, changes particle agglomeration, and becomes less bioavailable to zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Boran, Halis; Boyle, David; Altinok, Ilhan; Patsiou, Danae; Henry, Theodore B

    2016-05-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have unique physicochemistry and potential to interact with other substances in the aqueous phase. Here, gene [metallothionein 2 (mt2)] expression changes in larval zebrafish were used to evaluate the association between aqueous Hg(2+) and TiO2 (NPs and bulk particle size control) to investigate the relationship between changes in Hg(2+) behavior and TiO2 size. During 24h exposures, TiO2 agglomerates increased in size and in the presence of 25μg Hg(2+)/L, greater increases in size were observed. The concentration of Hg(2+) in suspension also decreased in the presence of TiO2-NPs. Mercury increased expression of mt2 in larval zebrafish, but this response was lessened when zebrafish were exposed to Hg(2+) in the presence of TiO2-NPs, and which suggests that TiO2-NPs alter the bioavailability of Hg(2+) to zebrafish larvae. This ameliorative effect of TiO2 was also likely due to surface binding of Hg(2+) because a greater decrease in mt2 expression was observed in the presence of 1mg/L TiO2-NPs than 1mg/L TiO2-bulk. In conclusion, the results show that Hg(2+) will associate with TiO2-NPs, TiO2-NPs that have associated Hg(2+) will settle out of the aqueous phase more rapidly, and agglomerates will deliver associated Hg(2+) to sediment surfaces. PMID:26970871

  14. In vitro studies on the effect of particle size on macrophage responses to nanodiamond wear debris

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Vinoy; Halloran, Brian A.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Catledge, Shane A.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured diamond coatings improve the smoothness and wear characteristics of the metallic component of total hip replacements and increase the longevity of these implants, but the effect of nanodiamond wear debris on macrophages needs to be determined to estimate the long-term inflammatory effects of wear debris. The objective was to investigate the effect of the size of synthetic nanodiamond particles on macrophage proliferation (BrdU incorporation), apoptosis (Annexin-V flow cytometry), metabolic activity (WST-1 assay) and inflammatory cytokine production (qPCR). RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to varying sizes (6, 60, 100, 250 and 500 nm) and concentrations (0, 10, 50, 100 and 200 μg ml−1) of synthetic nanodiamonds. We observed that cell proliferation but not metabolic activity was decreased with nanoparticle sizes of 6–100 nm at lower concentrations (50 μg ml−1), and both cell proliferation and metabolic activity were significantly reduced with nanodiamond concentrations of 200 μg ml−1. Flow cytometry indicated a significant reduction in cell viability due to necrosis irrespective of particle size. Nanodiamond exposure significantly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, chemokine Ccl2 and platelet-derived growth factor compared to serum-only controls or titanium oxide (anatase 8 nm) nanoparticles, with variable effects on chemokine Cxcl2 and vascular endothelial growth factor. In general, our study demonstrates a size and concentration dependence of macrophage responses in vitro to nanodiamond particles as possible wear debris from diamond-coated orthopedic joint implants. PMID:22342422

  15. Modeling the propagation of volcanic debris avalanches by a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosio, Rosanna; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Hazard from collapses of volcanic edifices threatens million of people which currently live on top of volcanic deposits or around volcanoes prone to fail. Nevertheless, no much effort has been dedicated for the evaluation of the hazard posed by volcanic debris avalanches (e.g. emergency plans, hazard zoning maps). This work focuses at evaluating the exceptional mobility of volcanic debris avalanches for hazard analyses purposes by providing a set of calibrated cases. We model the propagation of eight debris avalanche selected among the best known historical events originated from sector collapses of volcanic edifices. The events have large volumes (ranging from 0.01-0.02 km3 to 25 km3) and are well preserved so that their main features are recognizable from satellite images. The events developed in a variety of settings and condition and they vary with respect to their morphological constrains, materials, styles of failure. The modeling has been performed using a Lagragian numerical method adapted from Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics to solve the depth averaged quasi-3D equation for motion (McDougall and Hungr 2004). This code has been designed and satisfactorily used to simulate rock and debris avalanches in non-volcanic settings (McDougall and Hungr, 2004). Its use is here extended to model volcanic debris avalanches which may differ from non-volcanic ones by dimensions, water content and by possible thermodynamic effects or degassing caused by active volcanic processes. The resolution of the topographic data is generally low for remote areas like the ones considered in this study, while the pre event topographies are more often not available. The effect of the poor topographic resolution on the final results has been evaluated by replicating the modeling on satellite-derived topographical grids with varying cell size (from 22 m to 90 m). The event reconstructions and the back analyses are based on the observations available from the literature. We test the

  16. Colloidal Instability Fosters Agglomeration of Subvisible Particles Created by Rupture of Gels of a Monoclonal Antibody Formed at Silicone Oil-Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shyam B; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of ionic strength (1.25-231 mM) on viscoelastic interfacial gels formed by a monoclonal antibody at silicone oil-water interfaces, and the formation of subvisible particles due to rupture of these gels. Rates of gel formation and their elastic moduli did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Likewise, during gel rupture no significant effects of ionic strength were observed on particle formation and aggregation as detected by microflow imaging, resonance mass measurement, and size exclusion chromatography. Subvisible particles formed by mechanical rupturing of the gels agglomerated over time, even during quiescent incubation, due to the colloidal instability of the particles. PMID:27422087

  17. Coal Cleaning by Gas Agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Meiyu Shen; Royce Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1998-03-01

    The gas agglomeration method of coal cleaning was demonstrated with laboratory scale mixing equipment which made it possible to generate microscopic gas bubbles in aqueous suspensions of coal particles. A small amount of i-octane was introduced to enhance the hydrophobicity of the coal. Between 1.0 and 2.5 v/w% i-octane was sufficient based on coal weight. Coal agglomerates or aggregates were produced which were bound together by small gas bubbles.

  18. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  19. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  20. IMPACT OF PARTICLE SIZE AND AGGLOMERATION ON SETTLING OF SOLIDS IN CONTINUOUS MELTERS PROCESSING RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    HRMA PR

    2008-12-18

    The major factor limiting waste loading for many waste compositions in continuous waste glass melters is the settling of crystalline materials. The currently used constraints, i.e., the minimum liquidus temperature or the maximum fraction of equilibrium crystallinity at a given temperature, are based on thennodynamic equilibria. Because of the rapid circular convection in the melter, these constraints are probably irrelevant and cannot prevent large crystals from settling. The main factor that detennines the rate of settling ofindividual crystals, such as those ofspinel, is their size. The tiny crystals of RU02 are too small to settle, but they readily fonn large agglomerates that accelerate their rate ofsettling by severalorders ofmagnitude. The RU02 agglomerates originate early in the melting process and then grow by the shear-flocculation mechanism. It is estimated that these agglomerates must either be ofhundreds micrometers in size or have an elongated shape to match the observed rates ofthe sludge-layer fonnation. PACS: 47.57.ef, 81.05.Kj, 81.10.Fg

  1. Numerical modeling of debris flow runout for a case in southwestern China with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Anika; Cuomo, Sabatino; Wang, Xueliang; Zhang, Luqing

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows and landslide dams are a major natural hazard causing high socioeconomic risk in inhabited mountainous areas. This is also true for vast parts of southwestern China, which are highly prone to slope failures due to several factors, such as a humid climate with high precipitation in the summer months, geological predisposing factors with highly weathered sedimentary rocks and a high seismicity. Not only do the landslides and flooding related to landslide dams threaten residents, buildings and transportation structures, but also do flooding conditions endanger power supply, which relies in this region partly on hydropower. In order to assess the potential of landslides to block rivers, it is crucial to understand which factors influence possible run-out distances and how they can be quantified. In the study we are presenting a numerical modeling analysis for a particular case of a complex landslide in Ningnan county, southwestern China, which transformed into a debris flow and blocked the river and the major road leading through the valley after heavy rainfall. For this purpose a quasi-3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model was implemented that can account for geotechnical slope parameters, run-out distance, velocities and deposition heights. A digital terrain model and the geometry information of the landslide were used as input data in order to estimate the relevant geotechnical parameters by back-analysis. The results of the analysis can be used for the prediction of run-out distances for future events at this site and other similar sites.

  2. Porous Chromatographic Materials as Substrates for Preparing Synthetic Nuclear Explosion Debris Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Liezers, Martin; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Garcia, Ben J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2013-06-13

    In this study, we investigated several porous chromatographic materials as synthetic substrates for preparing surrogate nuclear explosion debris particles. The resulting synthetic debris materials are of interest for use in developing analytical methods. Eighteen metals, including some of forensic interest, were loaded onto materials by immersing them in metal solutions (556 mg/L of each metal) to fill the pores, applying gentle heat (110°C) to drive off water, and then treating them at high temperatures (up to 800°C) in air to form less soluble metal species. High-boiling-point metals were uniformly loaded on spherical controlled-pore glass to emulate early fallout, whereas low-boiling-point metals were loaded on core-shell silica to represent coated particles formed later in the nuclear fallout-formation process. Analytical studies were applied to characterize solubility, material balance, and formation of recalcitrant species. Dissolution experiments indicated loading was 1.5 to 3 times higher than expected from the pore volume alone, a result attributed to surface coating. Analysis of load solutions before and after filling the material pores revealed that most metals were passively loaded; that is, solutions filled the pores without active metal discrimination. However, niobium and tin concentrations were lower in solutions after pore filling, and were found in elevated concentrations in the final products, indicating some metals were selectively loaded. High-temperature treatments caused reduced solubility of several metal species, and loss of some metals (rhenium and tellurium) because volatile species were formed. Sample preparation reproducibility was high (the inter-batch relative standard deviation was 7.8%, and the intra-batch relative standard deviation was 0.84%) indicating that this material is suitable for use as a working standard for analytical methods development. We anticipate future standardized radionuclide-loaded materials will find use in

  3. Natural and orbital debris particles on LDEF's trailing and forward-facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; See, Thomas H.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Brownlee, Donald E.

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 1000 impact craters on the Chemistry of Meteoroid Experiment (CME) have been analyzed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) to determine the compositional make-up of projectile residues. This report completes our systematic survey of gold and aluminum surfaces exposed at the trailing-edge (A03) and forward-facing (A11) LDEF sites, respectively. The major categories for the projectile residues were (1) natural, with diverse subgroups such as chondritic, monomineralic silicates, and sulfides, and (2) man made, that were classified into aluminum (metallic or oxide) and miscellaneous materials (such as stainless steel, paint flakes, etc). On CME gold collectors on LDEF's trailing edge approximately 11 percent of all craters greater than 100 micron in diameter were due to man-made debris, the majority (8.6 percent) caused by pure aluminum, approximately 31.4 percent were due to cosmic dust, while the remaining 58 percent were indeterminate via the analytical techniques utilized in this study. The aluminum surfaces located at the A11 forward-facing site did not permit analysis of aluminum impactors, but approximately 9.4 percent of all craters were demonstratably caused by miscellaneous debris materials and approximately 39.2 percent were the result of natural particles, leaving approximately 50 percent which were indeterminate. Model considerations and calculations are presented that focus on the crater-production rates for features greater than 100 micron in diameter, and on assigning the intermediate crater population to man-made or natural particles. An enhancement factor of 6 in the crater-production rate of natural impactors for the 'forward-facing' versus the 'trailing-edge' CME collectors was found to best explain all observations (i.e., total crater number(s), as well as their computational characteristics). Enhancement factors of 10 and 4 are either too high or too low. It is also suggested that

  4. Inflammatory MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways differentiated hepatitis potential of two agglomerated titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Zhang, Jianying; Cao, Junmei; Xia, Zongping; Gan, Jay

    2016-03-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) consumption and deposit in liver have possible implications for hepatitis risks. Specific signal dysregulation at early inflammatory responses needs to be characterized in TiO2NP-induced hepatopathy. MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways are known to participate in inflammation and respond sensitively to chemical agents, making them preferable biomarkers for hepatitis. In the present study, dynamic activation of MAPK and NF-κB pathways were explored by immunoblotting and NF-κB luciferase reporter assay depending on characterization of TiO2NP agglomeration in human HepG2 cells. Inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of TiO2NPs were determined by qRT-PCR and WST-1 assay. AFM and TEM analyses uncovered ultrastructure damages underlying hepatotoxicity of TiO2NPs. Rod-like rutile agglomerated smaller and induced more pronounced cytotoxicity and immunogenicity than anatase. Correspondingly, though both rutile and anatase significantly activated p38, ERK1/2 and NF-κB pathways, rutile accelerated the maximum phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and elevated the potency of IκBα phosphorylation to its bell curve shape in comparison with a lower and sigmoid type of IκBα phosphorylation for anatase. Furthermore, cell elasticity indicated by Young's modulus and adhesion force increased accompanied with mitochondria damage, contributing to signal dysregulation and hepatotoxicity. The results suggested that differential activation of MAPK and NF-κB pathways could be early predictors for distinct hepatitis risks of two agglomerated TiO2NPs.

  5. Powder agglomeration in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG3-755 entitled 'Powder Agglomeration in a Microgravity Environment.' The research program included both two types of numerical models and two types of experiments. The numerical modeling included the use of Monte Carlo type simulations of agglomerate growth including hydrodynamic screening and molecular dynamics type simulations of the rearrangement of particles within an agglomerate under a gravitational field. Experiments included direct observation of the agglomeration of submicron alumina and indirect observation, using small angle light scattering, of the agglomeration of colloidal silica and aluminum monohydroxide. In the former class of experiments, the powders were constrained to move on a two-dimensional surface oriented to minimize the effect of gravity. In the latter, some experiments involved mixture of suspensions containing particles of opposite charge which resulted in agglomeration on a very short time scale relative to settling under gravity.

  6. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    Work continued on the basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for beneficiating aqueous suspensions of coal by selective agglomeration with oil. A new method was demonstrated for characterizing the agglomerability of coal suspensions. This method utilizes a photometric dispersion analyzer to monitor changes in the turbidity of a particle suspension as increasing amounts of oil are added to the suspension in a batch agglomeration test. Agglomeration of the particles leads to a marked decrease in the turbidity of the suspension. Another experimental technique was also demonstrated for characterizing oil agglomeration. This technique involves measuring the rate of growth of agglomerates in a continuous flow system operating under stead-state conditions. The data are analyzed by means of a population balance. The results of a preliminary set of experiments in which Indiana V seam coal was agglomerated with tetralin seemed to fit a particular growth model very well. Equipment was also constructed for studying the kinetics of agglomeration in a batch process. While earlier work showed that quebracho (a commercially available dispersant) is a strong agglomeration depressant for pyrite, recent experiments with mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and mineral pyrite showed that quebracho does not appear to be sufficiently selective. Further consideration was given to the separation of mixtures of coal and pyrite agglomeration with heptane. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Enhancement of the Wear Particle Monitoring Capability of Oil Debris Sensors Using a Maximal Overlap Discrete Wavelet Transform with Optimal Decomposition Depth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Peng, Juan; Liang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Oil debris sensors are effective tools to monitor wear particles in lubricants. For in situ applications, surrounding noise and vibration interferences often distort the oil debris signature of the sensor. Hence extracting oil debris signatures from sensor signals is a challenging task for wear particle monitoring. In this paper we employ the maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform (MODWT) with optimal decomposition depth to enhance the wear particle monitoring capability. The sensor signal is decomposed by the MODWT into different depths for detecting the wear particle existence. To extract the authentic particle signature with minimal distortion, the root mean square deviation of kurtosis value of the segmented signal residue is adopted as a criterion to obtain the optimal decomposition depth for the MODWT. The proposed approach is evaluated using both simulated and experimental wear particles. The results show that the present method can improve the oil debris monitoring capability without structural upgrade requirements. PMID:24686730

  8. Shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.Y.; Kushner, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    Dust particle contamination of wafers in reactive ion etching (RIE) plasma tools is a continuing concern in the microelectronics industry. It is common to find that particles collected on surfaces or downstream of the etch chamber are agglomerates of smaller monodisperse spherical particles. The shapes of the agglomerates vary from compact, high fractal dimension structures to filamentary, low fractal dimension structures. These shapes are important with respect to the transport of particles in RIE tools under the influence electrostatic and ion drag forces, and the possible generation of polarization forces. A molecular dynamics simulation has been developed to investigate the shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors. We find that filamentary, low fractal dimension structures are generally produced by smaller ({lt}100s nm) particles in low powered plasmas where the kinetic energy of primary particles is insufficient to overcome the larger Coulomb repulsion of a compact agglomerate. This is analogous to the diffusive regime in neutral agglomeration. Large particles in high powered plasmas generally produce compact agglomerates of high fractal dimension, analogous to ballistic agglomeration of neutrals. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Electrostatic formation of liquid marbles and agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanaarachchi, K. R.; Ireland, P. M.; Webber, G. B.; Galvin, K. P.

    2013-07-01

    We report observations of a sudden, explosive release of electrostatically charged 100 μm glass beads from a particle bed. These cross an air gap of several millimeters, are engulfed by an approaching pendant water drop, and form a metastable spherical agglomerate on the bed surface. The stability transition of the particle bed is explained by promotion of internal friction by in-plane electrostatic stresses. The novel agglomerates formed this way resemble the "liquid marbles" formed by coating a drop with hydrophobic particles. Complex multi-layered agglomerates may also be produced by this method, with potential industrial, pharmaceutical, environmental, and biological applications.

  10. Dust agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  11. Investigation of Gear and Bearing Fatigue Damage Using Debris Particle Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage to spur gears, spiral bevel gears, and rolling element bearings. This diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig, Spiral Bevel Gear Test Facility, and the 500hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. During each test, data from an online, in-line, inductance type oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. Results indicate oil debris alone cannot discriminate between bearing and gear fatigue damage.

  12. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report presents the findings of the project entitled ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration.`` The purpose is to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1993. Engineering development included bench-scale process development, component development adaptation or modification of existing unit operations, proof-of-concept (POC) module design, fabrication, testing, data evaluation, and conceptual design of a commercial facility. The information obtained during POC operation resulted in a technical and economic design base sufficient to support construction and operation of a commercial plant. Throughout this project performance targets for the engineering development of selective agglomeration process were to achieve 85% or greater Btu recovery at 85% or greater pyritic sulfur rejection (PSR). Additional objectives included producing a final clean-coal product with an ash content of 6% or less which is suitable for conventional coal handling systems. The selective agglomeration process, as applied to coal cleaning, is based on differences in the surface chemistry of coal and its associated impurities. Coal particles are hydrophobic (i.e., repel water) while the majority of its impurities are hydrophilic (i.e., stabilized in water). During selective agglomeration, a liquid (the agglomerant) that is immiscible with water is introduced into a coal-water slurry and agitated to disperse it in the slurry, thereby allowing it to come into contact with all particles in the slurry. The coal particles, due to their hydrophobic nature, are attracted to the agglomerant phase. The hydrophilic mineral impurities remain in the water phase. Continued agitation of the agglomerant-coated coal particles causes them to coalesce to form agglomerates. Once the agglomerates are formed, they are separated from the mineral matter-bearing aqueous phase by subsequent processing steps.

  13. Large-scale Particle Simulations for Debris Flows using Dynamic Load Balance on a GPU-rich Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Satori; Aoki, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations for debris flows including a countless of objects is one of important topics in fluid dynamics and many engineering applications. Particle-based method is a promising approach to carry out the simulations for flows interacting with objects. In this paper, we propose an efficient method to realize a large-scale simulation for fluid-structure interaction by combining SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method for fluid with DEM (Discrete Element Method) for objects on a multi-GPU system. By applying space filling curves to decomposition of the computational domain, we are able to contain the same number of particles in each decomposed domain. In our implementation, several techniques for particle counting and data movement have been introduced. Fragmentation of the memory used for particles happens during the time-integration and the frequency of de-fragmentation is examined by taking account for computational load balance and the communication cost between CPU and GPU. A link-list technique of the particle interaction is introduced to save the memory drastically. It is found that the sorting of particle data for the neighboring particle list using linked-list method improves the memory access greatly with a certain interval. The weak and strong scalabilities for a SPH simulation using 111 Million particles was measured from 4 GPUs to 512 GPUs for three types of space filling curves. A large-scale debris flow simulation of tsunami with 10,368 floating rubbles using 117 Million particles were successfully carried out with 256 GPUs on the TSUBAME 2.5 supercomputer at Tokyo Institute of Technology.

  14. Engineering a new class of thermal spray nano-based microstructures from agglomerated nanostructured particles, suspensions and solutions: an invited review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Montavon, G.; Lima, R. S.; Marple, B. R.

    2011-03-01

    From the pioneering works of McPherson in 1973 who identified nanometre-sized features in thermal spray conventional alumina coatings (using sprayed particles in the tens of micrometres size range) to the most recent and most advanced work aimed at manufacturing nanostructured coatings from nanometre-sized feedstock particles, the thermal spray community has been involved with nanometre-sized features and feedstock for more than 30 years. Both the development of feedstock (especially through cryo-milling, and processes able to manufacture coatings structured at the sub-micrometre or nanometre sizes, such as micrometre-sized agglomerates made of nanometre-sized particles for feedstock) and the emergence of thermal spray processes such as suspension and liquid precursor thermal spray techniques have been driven by the need to manufacture coatings with enhanced properties. These techniques result in two different types of coatings: on the one hand, those with a so-called bimodal structure having nanometre-sized zones embedded within micrometre ones, for which the spray process is similar to that of conventional coatings and on the other hand, sub-micrometre or nanostructured coatings achieved by suspension or solution spraying. Compared with suspension spraying, solution precursor spraying uses molecularly mixed precursors as liquids, avoiding a separate processing route for the preparation of powders and enabling the synthesis of a wide range of oxide powders and coatings. Such coatings are intended for use in various applications ranging from improved thermal barrier layers and wear-resistant surfaces to thin solid electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cell systems, among other numerous applications. Meanwhile these processes are more complex to operate since they are more sensitive to parameter variations compared with conventional thermal spray processes. Progress in this area has resulted from the unique combination of modelling activities, the evolution of

  15. Agglomeration of microparticles in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Konopka, Uwe; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2010-11-15

    Agglomeration of highly charged microparticles was observed and studied in complex plasma experiments carried out in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The agglomeration was caused by strong waves triggered in a particle cloud by decreasing neutral gas pressure. Using a high-speed camera during this unstable regime, it was possible to resolve the motion of individual microparticles and to show that the relative velocities of some particles were sufficiently high to overcome the mutual Coulomb repulsion and hence to result in agglomeration. After stabilizing the cloud again through the increase of the pressure, we were able to observe the aggregates directly with a long-distance microscope. We show that the agglomeration rate deduced from our experiments is in good agreement with theoretical estimates. In addition, we briefly discuss the mechanisms that can provide binding of highly charged microparticles in a plasma.

  16. Successfully use agglomeration for size enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, W.

    1996-04-01

    The processing of fine and ultrafine particles by size enlargement finds an ever increasing application. At the same time, undesirable agglomeration such as buildup, caking, bridging, and uncontrolled aggregation of fine particles can occur during processing and handling of these particulate solids. This article will provide a survey of the phenomena of agglomeration and discuss the unit operation of size enlargement by agglomeration. This article is also an invitation, particularly to young engineers, to become interested in agglomeration. Considering that mechanical process technologies are requiring more energy every year than any other group of consumers and efficiencies are typically in the single digits or teens at best, considerable rewards can be expected from the development of scientifically modified, more energy-efficient methods and equipment.

  17. Advances in food powder agglomeration engineering.

    PubMed

    Cuq, B; Gaiani, C; Turchiuli, C; Galet, L; Scher, J; Jeantet, R; Mandato, S; Petit, J; Murrieta-Pazos, I; Barkouti, A; Schuck, P; Rondet, E; Delalonde, M; Dumoulin, E; Delaplace, G; Ruiz, T

    2013-01-01

    Food powders are used in everyday life in many ways and offer technological solutions to the problem of food production. The natural origin of food powders, diversity in their chemical composition, variability of the raw materials, heterogeneity of the native structures, and physicochemical reactivity under hydrothermal stresses contribute to the complexity in their behavior. Food powder agglomeration has recently been considered according to a multiscale approach, which is followed in the chapter layout: (i) at the particle scale, by a presentation of particle properties and surface reactivity in connection with the agglomeration mechanisms, (ii) at the mechanisms scale, by describing the structuration dynamics of agglomerates, (iii) at the process scale, by a presentation of agglomeration technologies and sensors and by studying the stress transmission mode in the powder bed, and finally (iv) by an integration of the acquired knowledge, thanks to a dimensional analysis carried out at each scale.

  18. Multifrequency scanning probe microscopy study of nanodiamond agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Vasudeva; Lippold, Stephen; Li, Qian; Strelcov, Evgheny; Okatan, Baris; Legum, Benjamin; Kalinin, Sergei; Clarion University Team; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Team

    Due to their rich surface chemistry and excellent mechanical properties and non-toxic nature, nanodiamond particles have found applications such as biomedicine, tribology and lubrication, targeted drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and surgical implants. Although single nanodiamond particles have diameters about 4-5nm, they tend to form agglomerates. While these agglomerates can be useful for some purposes, many applications of nanodiamonds require single particle, disaggregated nanodiamonds. This work is oriented towards studying forces and interactions that contribute to agglomeration in nanodiamonds. In this work, using multifrequency scanning probe microscopy techniques, we show that agglomerate sizes can vary between 50-100nm in raw nanodiamonds. Extremeties of particles and Interfaces between agglomerates show dissipative forces with scanning probe microscope tip, indicating agglomerates could act as points of increased adhesion, thus reducing lubricating efficiency when nanodiamonds are used as lubricant additives. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  19. Video monitoring in the Gadria debris flow catchment: preliminary results of large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theule, Joshua; Crema, Stefano; Comiti, Francesco; Cavalli, Marco; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) is a technique mostly used in rivers to measure two dimensional velocities from high resolution images at high frame rates. This technique still needs to be thoroughly explored in the field of debris flow studies. The Gadria debris flow monitoring catchment in Val Venosta (Italian Alps) has been equipped with four MOBOTIX M12 video cameras. Two cameras are located in a sediment trap located close to the alluvial fan apex, one looking upstream and the other looking down and more perpendicular to the flow. The third camera is in the next reach upstream from the sediment trap at a closer proximity to the flow. These three cameras are connected to a field shelter equipped with power supply and a server collecting all the monitoring data. The fourth camera is located in an active gully, the camera is activated by a rain gauge when there is one minute of rainfall. Before LSPIV can be used, the highly distorted images need to be corrected and accurate reference points need to be made. We decided to use IMGRAFT (an opensource image georectification toolbox) which can correct distorted images using reference points and camera location, and then finally rectifies the batch of images onto a DEM grid (or the DEM grid onto the image coordinates). With the orthorectified images, we used the freeware Fudaa-LSPIV (developed by EDF, IRSTEA, and DeltaCAD Company) to generate the LSPIV calculations of the flow events. Calculated velocities can easily be checked manually because of the already orthorectified images. During the monitoring program (since 2011) we recorded three debris flow events at the sediment trap area (each with very different surge dynamics). The camera in the gully was in operation in 2014 which managed to record granular flows and rockfalls, which particle tracking may be more appropriate for velocity measurements. The four cameras allows us to explore the limitations of camera distance, angle, frame rate, and image

  20. Mechanics and charging of nanoparticle agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Weon Gyu

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first part concerns studies on mechanics of real agglomerate particles and the second part involves studies on unipolar diffusion charging of agglomerates. Understanding mechanics of real agglomerate particles consisting of multiple primary particles is important for aerosol sizing instrumentation using electrical mobility and nanoparticle manufacturing process where coagulation and sedimentation occur. A key quantity determining transport properties of agglomerates is the friction coefficient. However, quantitative studies for the friction coefficient of agglomerates are very limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) image analysis results of silver agglomerates provides a basis for the comparison of experimental data with estimates based on free molecular models. A new quantitative method to determine the dynamic shape factor and the two exponents, eta and Dfm, which characterize the power law dependence of friction coefficient on the number of primary spheres and the mass on the mobility diameter, was developed using Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA)-Aerosol Particle Mass (APM) analyzer. Model predictions indicate that eta is independent of agglomerate size while Dfm is sensitive to agglomerate size. Experimentally, it appears the opposite is true. Tandem DMA (TDMA) results also show that the mass-mobility diameter scaling exponent is not dependent on mobility size range. Estimates of non-ideal effects on the agglomerate dynamics were computed as perturbations to the Chan-Dahneke agglomerate model. After the corrections, an agreement between experimental data and model predictions becomes significantly improved. Unipolar diffusion charging becomes more attractive because it has higher charging efficiency than bipolar charging as well as important applications in aerosol sizing instrumentation using electrical mobility, powder coating, and the removal of toxic particles from air stream using Electrostatic

  1. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nelson; F. Zhang; J. Drzymala; M. Shen; R. Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1997-11-01

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During a batch agglomeration test the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspensions or by observing changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. Dilute suspensions were employed for investigating the kinetics of agglomeration, whereas concentrated suspensions were used for determining parameters that characterize the process of agglomeration. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. Each tank was enclosed to control the amount of air present. A variable speed agitator fitted with a six blade turbine impeller was used for agitation. Tests were conducted with moderately hydrophobic Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and with more hydrophobic Upper Freeport coal using either n-heptane, i-octane, or hexadecane as an agglomerant.

  2. Microstickies agglomeration by electric field.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaotang Tony; Hsieh, Jeffery S

    2016-01-01

    Microstickies deposits on both paper machine and paper products when it agglomerates under step change in ionic strength, pH, temperature and chemical additives. These stickies increase the down time of the paper mill and decrease the quality of paper. The key property of microstickies is its smaller size, which leads to low removal efficiency and difficulties in measurement. Thus the increase of microstickies size help improve both removal efficiency and reduce measurement difficulty. In this paper, a new agglomeration technology based on electric field was investigated. The electric treatment could also increase the size of stickies particles by around 100 times. The synergetic effect between electric field treatment and detacky chemicals/dispersants, including polyvinyl alcohol, poly(diallylmethylammonium chloride) and lignosulfonate, was also studied. PMID:27332828

  3. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated.

  4. Bipolar charged aerosol agglomeration and collection by a two-zone agglomerator.

    PubMed

    Xiang, X D; Chen, B Z; Colbeck, I

    2001-07-01

    In older to collect fine particles more efficiently, a new-type electrostatic agglomerator with two zones was developed. The distinguishing feature of this electrostatic agglomerator is that the particles are bipolarly charged and coagulated in the same alternating electric field simultaneously. The silica flour with 2 microns mass median diameter and the smoke from burning wood powder were used as test aerosol. The comparison experimental results have shown that when the mean electric field is 4 kV/cm the collection efficiency of the new electrostatic agglomerator was 98.2% for silica flour and 67.4% for wood powder smoke. Under the same experimental condition, the collection efficiency of the electrostatic agglomerator with three zones was 97.4% for collecting silica flour and the collection efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator was 56.3% for wood powder smoke.

  5. The orbital characteristics of debris particle rings as derived from IDE observations of multiple orbit intersections with LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Oliver, John P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1995-01-01

    During the first 346 days of the LDEF's almost 6 year stay in space, the metal oxide silicon detectors of the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) recorded over 15,000 impacts, most of which were separated in time by integer multiples of the LDEF orbital period (called multiple orbit event sequences, or MOES). Simple celestial mechanics provides ample reason to expect that a good deal of information about the orbits of the impacting debris particles can be extracted from these MOES, and so a procedure, based on the work of Greenberg, has been developed and applied to one of these events, the so-called 'May swarm'. This technique, the 'Method of Differential Precession,' allows for the determination of the geometrical elements of a particle orbit from the change in the position of the impact point with time. The application of this approach to the May swarm gave the following orbital elements for the orbit of the particles striking LDEF during this MOES: a = 6746.5 km; 0.0165 less than e less than 0.025; i = 66.55 deg; Omega(sub 0) = 179.0 deg plus or minus 0.2 deg; omega = 178.1 deg plus or minus 0.2 deg.

  6. The orbital characteristics of debris particle rings as derived from IDE observations of multiple orbit intersections with LDEF

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, W.J.; Oliver, J.P.; Simon, C.G.

    1995-02-01

    During the first 346 days of the LDEF`s almost 6 year stay in space, the metal oxide silicon detectors of the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) recorded over 15,000 impacts, most of which were separated in time by integer multiples of the LDEF orbital period (called multiple orbit event sequences, or MOES). Simple celestial mechanics provides ample reason to expect that a good deal of information about the orbits of the impacting debris particles can be extracted from these MOES, and so a procedure, based on the work of Greenberg, has been developed and applied to one of these events, the so-called `May swarm`. This technique, the `Method of Differential Precession,` allows for the determination of the geometrical elements of a particle orbit from the change in the position of the impact point with time. The application of this approach to the May swarm gave the following orbital elements for the orbit of the particles striking LDEF during this MOES: a = 6746.5 km; 0.0165 less than e less than 0.025; i = 66.55 deg; Omega(sub 0) = 179.0 deg plus or minus 0.2 deg; omega = 178.1 deg plus or minus 0.2 deg.

  7. Rapid determination of plasmonic nanoparticle agglomeration status in blood.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samir V; Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak; Ingle, Taylor M; Wang, Rongrong; Wang, Feng; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Jingyi; Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic nanomaterials as drug delivery or bio-imaging agents are typically introduced to biological systems through intravenous administration. However, the potential for agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological systems could dramatically affect their pharmacokinetic profile and toxic potential. Development of rapid screening methods to evaluate agglomeration is urgently needed to monitor the physical nature of nanoparticles as they are introduced into blood. Here, we establish novel methods using darkfield microscopy with hyperspectral detection (hsDFM), single particle inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS), and confocal Raman microscopy (cRM) to discriminate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their agglomerates in blood. Rich information about nanoparticle agglomeration in situ is provided by hsDFM monitoring of the plasmon resonance of primary nanoparticles and their agglomerates in whole blood; cRM is an effective complement to hsDFM to detect AuNP agglomerates in minimally manipulated samples. The AuNPs and the particle agglomerates were further distinguished in blood for the first time by quantification of particle mass using spICP-MS with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the agglomeration status of synthesized and commercial NPs incubated in blood was successfully assessed using the developed methods. Together, these complementary methods enable rapid determination of the agglomeration status of plasmonic nanomaterials in biological systems, specifically blood.

  8. Rapid determination of plasmonic nanoparticle agglomeration status in blood.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samir V; Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak; Ingle, Taylor M; Wang, Rongrong; Wang, Feng; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Jingyi; Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic nanomaterials as drug delivery or bio-imaging agents are typically introduced to biological systems through intravenous administration. However, the potential for agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological systems could dramatically affect their pharmacokinetic profile and toxic potential. Development of rapid screening methods to evaluate agglomeration is urgently needed to monitor the physical nature of nanoparticles as they are introduced into blood. Here, we establish novel methods using darkfield microscopy with hyperspectral detection (hsDFM), single particle inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS), and confocal Raman microscopy (cRM) to discriminate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their agglomerates in blood. Rich information about nanoparticle agglomeration in situ is provided by hsDFM monitoring of the plasmon resonance of primary nanoparticles and their agglomerates in whole blood; cRM is an effective complement to hsDFM to detect AuNP agglomerates in minimally manipulated samples. The AuNPs and the particle agglomerates were further distinguished in blood for the first time by quantification of particle mass using spICP-MS with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the agglomeration status of synthesized and commercial NPs incubated in blood was successfully assessed using the developed methods. Together, these complementary methods enable rapid determination of the agglomeration status of plasmonic nanomaterials in biological systems, specifically blood. PMID:25771013

  9. Rapid Determination of Plasmonic Nanoparticle Agglomeration Status in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Samir V.; Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak; Ingle, Taylor; Wang, RongRong; Wang, Feng; Howard, Paul C.; Chen, Jingyi; Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanomaterials as drug delivery or bio-imaging agents are typically introduced to biological systems through intravenous administration. However, the potential for agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological systems could dramatically affect their pharmacokinetic profile and toxic potential. Development of rapid screening methods to evaluate agglomeration is urgently needed to monitor the physical nature of nanoparticles as they are introduced into blood. Here, we establish novel methods using darkfield microscopy with hyperspectral detection (hsDFM), single particle inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS), and confocal Raman microscopy (cRM) to discriminate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their agglomerates in blood. Rich information about nanoparticle agglomeration in situ is provided by hsDFM monitoring of the plasmon resonance of primary nanoparticles and their agglomerates in whole blood; cRM is an effective complement to hsDFM to detect AuNP agglomerates in minimally manipulated samples. The AuNPs and the particle agglomerates were further distinguished in blood for the first time by quantification of particle mass using spICP-MS with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the agglomeration status of synthesized and commercial NPs incubated in blood was successfully assessed using the developed methods. Together, these complementary methods enable rapid determination of the agglomeration status of plasmonic nanomaterials in biological systems, specifically blood. PMID:25771013

  10. Modeling of crushed ore agglomeration for heap leach operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Nikhil

    The focus of this dissertation is modeling of the evolution of size distribution in batch agglomeration drum. There has been no successful work on modeling of crushed ore agglomeration although the framework for population balance modeling of pelletization and granulation is readily available. In this study three different batch agglomeration drums were used to study the agglomeration kinetics of copper, gold and nickel ores. The agglomerate size distribution is inherently subject to random fluctuation due the very nature of the process. Yet, with careful experimentation and size analysis the evolution of size distribution can be followed. The population balance model employing the random coalesce model with a constant rate kernel was shown to work well in a micro and lab scale agglomerator experiments. In small drums agglomerates begin to break in a short time, whereas the growth is uniform in the lab scale drum. The experimental agglomerate size distributions exhibit self-preserving size spectra which confirms the applicability of coalescence rate based model. The same spectra became a useful fact for predicting the size distribution with an empirical model. Since moisture is a principal variable, the absolute deviation from optimum moisture was used as the primary variable in the empirical model. Having established a model for the size distribution, the next step was to delve into the internal constituents of each agglomerate size class. To this end, an experimental scheme known as dip test was devised. The outcome of the test was the size distribution of progeny particles which make up a given size class of agglomerate. The progeny size distribution was analyzed with a model that partitions the particles into a host and guest category. The ensuing partition coefficient is a valuable in determining how a particle in a size class participates in larger agglomerates. This dissertation lays out the fundamentals for applying the population balance concept to batch

  11. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  12. Analysis and synthesis of solutions for the agglomeration process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babuk, V. A.; Dolotkazin, I. N.; Nizyaev, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The present work is devoted development of model of agglomerating process for propellants based on ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium dinitramide (ADN), HMX, inactive binder, and nanoaluminum. Generalization of experimental data, development of physical picture of agglomeration for listed propellants, development and analysis of mathematical models are carried out. Synthesis of models of various phenomena taking place at agglomeration implementation allows predicting of size and quantity, chemical composition, structure of forming agglomerates and its fraction in set of condensed combustion products. It became possible in many respects due to development of new model of agglomerating particle evolution on the surface of burning propellant. Obtained results correspond to available experimental data. It is supposed that analogical method based on analysis of mathematical models of particular phenomena and their synthesis will allow implementing of the agglomerating process modeling for other types of metalized solid propellants.

  13. The effects of general atmospheric perturbations on small debris particle orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenberg, Joshua; Broucke, Roger A.

    1992-08-01

    The atmospheric perturbations due to the aerodynamic lift and orthogonal force were included in the Gauss' form of the variational equations. These additional perturbations are relevant to orbital objects with high ratio of surface area to mass, especially flat particles. The equations for the orbital elements were averaged and expanded in a small eccentricity. The analytical formulation in this paper is applicable to the general case of orbiting aerodynamical bodies while the numerical results emphasize the particular case of flat particles. The results indicate that although the drag is the dominant force, the nondissipative additional forces cannot be neglected. The additional perturbations mostly contribute periodic terms in addition to secular terms especially in eccentric orbits and in the case of periodic aerodynamic coefficients.

  14. Unstructured multigrid through agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Berger, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the compressible Euler equations are solved using finite volume techniques on unstructured grids. The spatial discretization employs a central difference approximation augmented by dissipative terms. Temporal discretization is done using a multistage Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid technique is used to accelerate convergence to steady state. The coarse grids are derived directly from the given fine grid through agglomeration of the control volumes. This agglomeration is accomplished by using a greedy-type algorithm and is done in such a way that the load, which is proportional to the number of edges, goes down by nearly a factor of 4 when moving from a fine to a coarse grid. The agglomeration algorithm has been implemented and the grids have been tested in a multigrid code. An area-weighted restriction is applied when moving from fine to coarse grids while a trivial injection is used for prolongation. Across a range of geometries and flows, it is shown that the agglomeration multigrid scheme compares very favorably with an unstructured multigrid algorithm that makes use of independent coarse meshes, both in terms of convergence and elapsed times.

  15. Agglomeration and Sedimentation of MWCNTS in Chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yu. S.; Kolesnikova, A. A.; Grekhov, A. M.

    The kinetics of agglomeration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in chloroform has been studied by the methods of optical spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. With the use of the models of the diffusion of cylindrical particles, the sizes of particles obtained by this method can be recalculated to the DLS data and the concentration at which the dispersion of individual МWCNTs occurs can be determined.

  16. Influence of excipients and processing conditions on the development of agglomerates of racecadotril by crystallo-co-agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to improve the flow and mechanical properties of racecadotril by a crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA) technique. Direct tableting is a requirement of pharmaceutical industries. Poor mechanical properties of crystalline drug particles require wet granulation which is uneconomical, laborious, and tedious. Materials and Methods: The objective of this work was to study the influence of various polymers/excipients and processing conditions on the formation of directly compressible agglomerates of the water-insoluble drug, racecadotril, an antidiarrheal agent. The agglomerates of racecadotril were prepared using dichloromethane (DCM)–water as the crystallization system. DCM acted as a good solvent for racecadotril as well as a bridging liquid for the agglomeration of the crystallized drug and water as the nonsolvent. The prepared agglomerates were tested for micromeritic and mechanical properties. Results: The process yielded ~90 to 96% wt/ wt spherical agglomerates containing racecadotril with the diameter between 299 and 521 μ. A higher rotational speed of crystallization system reduces the size of the agglomerates and disturbs the sphericity. Spherical agglomerates were generated with a uniform dispersion of the crystallized drug. CCA showed excellent flowability and crushing strength. Conclusion: Excipients and processing conditions can play a key role in preparing spherical agglomerates of racecadotril by CCA, an excellent alternative to the wet granulation process to prepare intermediates for direct compression. PMID:23580935

  17. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of

  18. Research approach and first results on agglomerate compaction in protoplanetary dust simulation in the Cloud Manipulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Blum, Jurgen; Ingo Von Borstel, Olaf; Schraepler, Rainer; Balapanov, Daniyar; Cecere, Anselmo

    2016-07-01

    Nanometre and micrometre-sized solid particles are ubiquitous in space and on Earth - from galaxies, interstellar space, protoplanetary and debris disks to planetary rings and atmospheres, planetary surfaces, comets, interplanetary space, Earth's atmosphere. Apparently, the most intriguing problem in the picture of the formation of planets is the transition from individual microscopic dust grains to kilometre-sized planetesimals. Revealing the mechanisms of this transition is one of the main tasks of the European Space Agency's project Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS). It was found that Brownian motion driven agglomeration could not provide the transition within reasonable time scale. As a result, at this stage top scientific goals shifted towards forced agglomeration and concentration of particles, targeting revealing the onset of compaction, experimental study of the evolution of fractal dimensions, size and mass distribution, occurrence of bouncing. The main tasks comprise 1) development of the rapid agglomeration model 2) development of the experimental facilities creating big fractal-type agglomerates from 10 to 1000 μm from a cloud of micrometre-size grains; 3) experimental realization of the rapid agglomeration in microgravity and ground conditions; and 4) in situ investigation of the morphology, mobility, mechanical and optical properties of the free-floating agglomerates, including investigation of thermophoresis, photophoresis of the agglomerates and of the two-phase flow phenomena. To solve the experimental part of the tasks we developed a Cloud Manipulation System, realized as a breadboard (CMS BB) for long duration microgravity platforms and a simplified laboratory version (CMS LV) mostly oriented on short duration microgravity and ground tests. The new system is based on the use of thermophoresis, most favourable for cloud manipulation without creating additional particle-particle forces in the cloud with a possibility

  19. Effects of coarse grain size distribution and fine particle content on pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in experimental debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa C.; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2016-02-01

    Debris flows are typically a saturated mixture of poorly sorted particles and interstitial fluid, whose density and flow properties depend strongly on the presence of suspended fine sediment. Recent research suggests that grain size distribution (GSD) influences excess pore pressures (i.e., pressure in excess of predicted hydrostatic pressure), which in turn plays a governing role in debris flow behaviors. We report a series of controlled laboratory experiments in a 4 m diameter vertically rotating drum where the coarse particle size distribution and the content of fine particles were varied independently. We measured basal pore fluid pressures, pore fluid pressure profiles (using novel sensor probes), velocity profiles, and longitudinal profiles of the flow height. Excess pore fluid pressure was significant for mixtures with high fines fraction. Such flows exhibited lower values for their bulk flow resistance (as measured by surface slope of the flow), had damped fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress, and had velocity profiles where the shear was concentrated at the base of the flow. These effects were most pronounced in flows with a wide coarse GSD distribution. Sustained excess fluid pressure occurred during flow and after cessation of motion. Various mechanisms may cause dilation and contraction of the flows, and we propose that the sustained excess fluid pressures during flow and once the flow has stopped may arise from hindered particle settling and yield strength of the fluid, resulting in transfer of particle weight to the fluid. Thus, debris flow behavior may be strongly influenced by sustained excess fluid pressures controlled by particle settling rates.

  20. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling of volcanic debris flows: Application to Huiloac Gorge lahars (Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David; Pastor, Manuel; Zamorano, José Juan

    2016-09-01

    Lahars are among the most catastrophic volcanic processes, and the ability to model them is central to mitigating their effects. Several lahars recently generated by the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) moved downstream through the Huiloac Gorge towards the village of Santiago Xalitzintla. The most dangerous was the 2001 lahar, in which the destructive power of the debris flow was maintained throughout the extent of the flow. Identifying the zone of hazard can be based either on numerical or empirical models, but a calibration and validation process is required to ensure hazard map quality. The Geoflow-SPH depth integrated numerical model used in this study to reproduce the 2001 lahar was derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model, and was discretized using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The results of the calibrated SPH model were validated by comparing the simulated deposit depth with the field depth measured at 16 cross sections distributed strategically along the gorge channel. Moreover, the dependency of the results on topographic mesh resolution, initial lahar mass shape and dimensions is also investigated. The results indicate that to accurately reproduce the 2001 lahar flow dynamics the channel topography needed to be discretized using a mesh having a minimum 5 m resolution, and an initial lahar mass shape that adopted the source area morphology. Field validation of the calibrated model showed that there was a satisfactory relationship between the simulated and field depths, the error being less than 20% for 11 of the 16 cross sections. This study demonstrates that the Geoflow-SPH model was able to accurately reproduce the lahar path and the extent of the flow, but also reproduced other parameters including flow velocity and deposit depth.

  1. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    SciTech Connect

    M. Shen; T. D. Wheelock

    1998-10-30

    Further agglomeration tests were conducted in a series of tests designed to determine the effects of various parameters on the size and structure of the agglomerates formed, the rate of agglomeration, coal recovery, and ash rejection. For this series of tests, finely ground Pittsburgh No. 8 coal has been agglomerated with i-octane in a closed mixing system with a controlled amount of air present to promote particle agglomeration. The present results provide further evidence of the role played by air. As the concentration of air in the system was increased from 4.5 to 18 v/w% based on the weight of coal, coal recovery and ash rejection both increased. The results also show that coal recovery and ash rejection were improved by increasing agitator speed. On the other hand, coal recovery was not affected by a change in solids concentration from 20 to 30 w/w%.

  2. Selective oil agglomeration of lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Halime Abakay Temel; Volkan Bozkurt; Arun Kumar Majumder

    2009-01-15

    In this study, desulfurization and deashing of Adiyaman-Glbai lignite by the agglomeration method were studied. For this purpose, three groups of agglomeration experiments were made. The effects of solid concentration, bridging liquid type and dosage, pH, and screen size on the agglomeration after desliming were investigated in the first group of experiments. The effects of lake water and sea water (the Mediterranean Sea water, the Aegean Sea water, and the Black Sea water) on the agglomeration were investigated in the second group of experiments. The effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3}) on the agglomeration were investigated in the third group of experiments. Agglomeration results showed that the usage of sea waters and soda lake water in the agglomeration medium had a positive effect on the reduction of total sulfur content of agglomerates. In addition, the usage of NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3} in the agglomeration medium had a positive effect on the ash content reduction of the agglomerates. 27 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  4. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  5. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Huber, Dale L.

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  6. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VII. THE LOW-VELOCITY COLLISION BEHAVIOR OF LARGE DUST AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen; Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-10-10

    We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s{sup -1} to 0.5 m s{sup -1}, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

  7. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    PubMed Central

    Rothenbacher, Sonja; Messerer, Armin; Kasper, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging") was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot. PMID:18533015

  8. Spectral Element Agglomerate AMGe

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, T; Falgout, R; Henson, V E; Jones, J E; Vassilevski, P S; Manteuffel, T A; McCormick, S F; Ruge, J W

    2005-05-20

    The purpose of this note is to describe an algorithm resulting from the uniting of two ideas introduced and applied elsewhere. For many problems, AMG has always been difficult due to complexities whose natures are difficult to discern from the entries of matrix A alone. Element-based interpolation has been shown to be an effective method for some of these problems, but it requires access to the element matrices on all levels. One way to obtain these has been to perform element agglomeration to form coarse elements, but in complicated situations defining the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is not easy. The spectral approach to coarse dof selection is very attractive due to its elegance and simplicity. The algorithm presented here combines the robustness of element interpolation, the ease of coarsening by element agglomeration, and the simplicity of defining coarse dofs through the spectral approach. As demonstrated in the numerical results, the method does yield a reasonable solver for the problems described. It can, however, be an expensive method due to the number and cost of the local, small dense linear algebra problems; making it a generally competitive method remains an area for further research.

  9. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-09-30

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  10. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  11. Antioxidant Impregnated Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Wear Debris Particles Display Increased Bone Remodeling and a Superior Osteogenic:Osteolytic Profile vs. Conventional UHMWPE Particles in a Murine Calvaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J.; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M.; Xie, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX™), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX™ containing UHMWPE (AOX™), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n=10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p<0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p<0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope=1.13±0.10 vs. 0.97±0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. PMID:26495749

  12. Ligand-dominated temperature dependence of agglomeration kinetics and morphology in alkyl-thiol-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Born, Philip; Kraus, Tobias

    2013-06-01

    The stability of nanoparticle suspensions and the details of their agglomeration depend on the interactions between particles. We study this relationship in gold nanoparticles stabilized with different alkyl thiols in heptane. Temperature-dependent interactions were inferred from small-angle x-ray scattering, agglomeration kinetics from dynamic light scattering, and agglomerate morphologies from transmission electron microscopy. We find that the particles precipitate at temperatures below the melting temperatures of the dry ligands. Agglomerates grow with rates that depend on the temperature: Around precipitation temperature, globular agglomerates form slowly, while at lower temperatures, fibrilar agglomerates form rapidly. All agglomerates contain random dense packings rather than crystalline superlattices. We conclude that ligand-ligand and ligand-solvent interactions of the individual particles dominate suspension stability and agglomeration kinetics. The microscopic packing is dominated by interactions between the ligands of different nanoparticles.

  13. Improving the de-agglomeration and dissolution of a poorly water soluble drug by decreasing the agglomerate strength of the cohesive powder.

    PubMed

    Allahham, Ayman; Stewart, Peter J; Das, Shyamal C

    2013-11-30

    Influence of ternary, poorly water-soluble components on the agglomerate strength of cohesive indomethacin mixtures during dissolution was studied to explore the relationship between agglomerate strength and extent of de-agglomeration and dissolution of indomethacin (Ind). Dissolution profiles of Ind from 20% Ind-lactose binary mixtures, and ternary mixtures containing additional dibasic calcium phosphate (1% or 10%; DCP), calcium sulphate (10%) and talc (10%) were determined. Agglomerate strength distributions were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation of particle size, work of cohesion and packing fraction distributions. The agglomerate strength of Ind decreased from 1.19 MPa for the binary Ind mixture to 0.84 MPa for 1DCP:20Ind mixture and to 0.42 MPa for 1DCP:2Ind mixture. Both extent of de-agglomeration, demonstrated by the concentration of the dispersed indomethacin distribution, and extent of dispersion, demonstrated by the particle size of the dispersed indomethacin, were in descending order of 1DCP:2Ind>1DCP:20Ind>binary Ind. The addition of calcium sulphate dihydrate and talc also reduced the agglomerate strength and improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of indomethacin. While not definitively causal, the improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug by poorly water soluble components was related to the agglomerate strength of the cohesive matrix during dissolution.

  14. Space Debris & its Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Sourabh; Arora, Nishant

    2012-07-01

    : In this technique we will use the nano tubes. We will create a mesh that will act as a touch panel of the touch screen cell phone. When any small or tiny particle will come on this mesh and touch it then the mesh will act as a touch panel and so that the corresponding processor or sensor will come to know the co-ordinates of it then further by using Destructive laser beam we can destroy that particle. B. Use of the Nano tubes and Nano Bots for the collection of the Space Debris: In this method also we will use a nano mesh which is made up of the nano tubes and the corresponding arrangement will be done so that that mesh will act as a touch panel same as that of the touch screen phones. So when tiny particles will dash on the nano mesh then the Nano Bots which will be at the specific co-ordinates collect the particles and store them into the garbage storage. C. Further the space Debris can be use for the other purposes too:- As we know that the space debris can be any tiny particle in the space. So instead of decomposing that particles or destroying it we can use those particles for the purpose of energy production by using the fuel cells, but for this the one condition is that the particle material should be capable of forming the ionize liquid or solution which can be successfully use in the fuel cell for energy production. But this is useful for only the big projects where in smallest amount of energy has also the great demand or value. D. RECYCLING OF SPACE DEBRIS The general idea of making space structures by recycling space debris is to capture the aluminum of the upper stages, melt it, and form it into new aluminum structures, perhaps by coating the inside of inflatable balloons, to make very large structures of thin aluminum shells. CONCLUSION Space debris has become the topic of great concern in recent years. Space debris creation can't be stopped completely but it can be minimized by adopting some measures. Many methods of space debris mitigation have been

  15. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal advanced in three major research areas. One area of research resulted in the development of a method for measuring the rate of agglomeration of dilute particle suspensions and using the method to relate the rate of agglomeration of coal particles to various key parameters. A second area of research led to the development of a method for monitoring a batch agglomeration process by measuring changes in agitator torque. With this method it was possible to show that the agglomeration of a concentrated coal particle suspension is triggered by the introduction of a small amount of gas. The method was also used in conjunction with optical microscopy to study the mechanism of agglomeration. A third area of research led to the discovery that highly hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension can be agglomerated by air alone.

  16. Agglomerate behaviour of fluticasone propionate within dry powder inhaler formulations.

    PubMed

    Le, V N P; Robins, E; Flament, M P

    2012-04-01

    Due to their small size, the respirable drug particles tend to form agglomerates which prevent flowing and aerosolisation. A carrier is used to be mixed with drug in one hand to facilitate the powder flow during manufacturing, in other hand to help the fluidisation upon patient inhalation. Depending on drug concentration, drug agglomerates can be formed in the mixture. The aim of this work was to study the agglomeration behaviour of fluticasone propionate (FP) within interactive mixtures for inhalation. The agglomerate phenomenon of fluticasone propionate after mixing with different fractions of lactose without fine particles of lactose (smaller than 32 μm) was demonstrated by the optical microscopy observation. A technique measuring the FP size in the mixture was developed, based on laser diffraction method. The FP agglomerate sizes were found to be in a linear correlation with the pore size of the carrier powder bed (R(2)=0.9382). The latter depends on the particle size distribution of carrier. This founding can explain the role of carrier size in de-agglomeration of drug particles in the mixture. Furthermore, it gives more structural information of interactive mixture for inhalation that can be used in the investigation of aerosolisation mechanism of powder. According to the manufacturing history, different batches of FP show different agglomeration intensities which can be detected by Spraytec, a new laser diffraction method for measuring aerodynamic size. After mixing with a carrier, Lactohale LH200, the most cohesive batch of FP, generates a lower fine particle fraction. It can be explained by the fact that agglomerates of fluticasone propionate with very large size was detected in the mixtures. By using silica-gel beads as ball-milling agent during the mixing process, the FP agglomerate size decreases accordingly to the quantity of mixing aid. The homogeneity and the aerodynamic performance of the mixtures are improved. The mixing aid based on ball

  17. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    SciTech Connect

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  18. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler

    2004-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process. As a result, operators of acidic heap-leach facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of other agglomeration applications, particularly advanced primary ironmaking.

  19. Fragmentation and restructuring of soft-agglomerates under shear.

    PubMed

    Eggersdorfer, M L; Kadau, D; Herrmann, H J; Pratsinis, S E

    2010-02-15

    Soft-agglomerate restructuring, break-up (or fragmentation) and relaxation are studied in a simple shear flow by a discrete element method (DEM). The agglomerates, held together by van der Waals forces, rotate in the shear flow and are stretched into nearly linear structures (fractal dimension approaches unity) until they fracture at their weakest point resulting in lognormally-shaped fragment size distributions asymptotically. Individual fragments relax in the flow towards more compact agglomerates than the parent ones. The evolution of the average number of particles per fragment is described by generalized scaling laws between shear rate, onset (time-lag) of fragmentation, asymptotic fragment mass and size consistent with experimental and theoretical studies in the literature. The initial effective fractal dimension of the agglomerates influences the final one of the fragments. PMID:19948345

  20. Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Compiler); Su, S. Y. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Earth orbital debris issues and recommended future activities are discussed. The workshop addressed the areas of environment definition, hazards to spacecraft, and space object management. It concluded that orbital debris is a potential problem for future space operations. However, before recommending any major efforts to control the environment, more data are required. The most significant required data are on the population of debris smaller than 4 cm in diameter. New damage criteria are also required. When these data are obtained, they can be combined with hypervelocity data to evaluate the hazards to future spacecraft. After these hazards are understood, then techniques to control the environment can be evaluated.

  1. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.; McDaniel, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    The work has shown that acoustic agglomeration at practical acoustic intensities and frequencies is technically and most likely economically viable. The following studies were performed with the listed results: The physics of acoustic agglomeration is complex particularly at the needed high acoustic intensities in the range of 150 to 160 dB and frequencies in the 2500 Hz range. The analytical model which we developed, although not including nonlinear acoustic efforts, agreed with the trends observed. We concentrated our efforts on clarifying the impact of high acoustic intensities on the generation of turbulence. Results from a special set of tests show that although some acoustically generated turbulence of sorts exists in the 150 to 170 dB range with acoustic streaming present, such turbulence will not be a significant factor in acoustic agglomeration compared to the dominant effect of the acoustic velocities at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. Studies of the robustness of the agglomerated particles using the Anderson Mark III impactor as the source of the shear stresses on the particles show that the agglomerates should be able to withstand the rigors of flow through commercial cyclones without significant break-up. We designed and developed a 700/sup 0/F tubular agglomerator of 8'' internal diameter. The electrically heated system functioned well and provided very encouraging agglomeration results at acoustic levels in the 150 to 160 dB and 2000 to 3000 Hz ranges. We confirmed earlier results that an optimum frequency exists at about 2500 Hz and that larger dust loadings will give better results. Studies of the absorption of acoustic energy by various common gases as a function of temperature and humidity showed the need to pursue such an investigation for flue gas constituents in order to provide necessary data for the design of agglomerators. 65 references, 56 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Recent Advances in Agglomerated Multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Hammond, Dana P.

    2013-01-01

    We report recent advancements of the agglomerated multigrid methodology for complex flow simulations on fully unstructured grids. An agglomerated multigrid solver is applied to a wide range of test problems from simple two-dimensional geometries to realistic three- dimensional configurations. The solver is evaluated against a single-grid solver and, in some cases, against a structured-grid multigrid solver. Grid and solver issues are identified and overcome, leading to significant improvements over single-grid solvers.

  3. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process: Air-promoted oil agglomeration of moderately hydrophobic coals. 2: Effect of air dosage in a model mixing system

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-07-01

    In a selective oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal, fine-size particles are suspended in water and treated with a water-immiscible hydrocarbon which can range from pentane to heavy fuel oil. Vigorous agitation is applied to disperse the oil and to produce frequent contacts between oil-coated particles. In Part 1 of this series of papers, it was shown that a definite amount of air had to be present in a laboratory mixing unit which produced a moderate shear rate in order to form compact, spherical agglomerates in an aqueous suspension of moderately hydrophobic coal using heptane or hexadecane as an agglomerate. In this paper, the effects of different amounts of air including dissolved air are discussed. The results indicate that a small amount of air will trigger the process of agglomeration, and even the air dissolved in water under equilibrium conditions at room temperature and pressure is sufficient to promote agglomeration provided it is released from solution.

  4. Antioxidant impregnated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris particles display increased bone remodeling and a superior osteogenic:osteolytic profile vs. conventional UHMWPE particles in a murine calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX(™) ), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX(™) containing UHMWPE (AOX(™) ), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n = 10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p < 0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p < 0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope = 1.13 ± 0.10 vs. 0.97 ± 0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:845-851, 2016. PMID:26495749

  5. Antioxidant impregnated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris particles display increased bone remodeling and a superior osteogenic:osteolytic profile vs. conventional UHMWPE particles in a murine calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX(™) ), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX(™) containing UHMWPE (AOX(™) ), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n = 10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p < 0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p < 0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope = 1.13 ± 0.10 vs. 0.97 ± 0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:845-851, 2016.

  6. Generation of nanoparticle agglomerates and their dispersion in lung serum simulant or water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B. A.; Nash, D. G.; Moss, O. R.

    2009-02-01

    Nanoparticles released into the atmosphere, due to their high diffusivity, will likely begin to agglomerate. The state of agglomeration upon inhalation and the potential to disperse back into nanoparticles may affect the toxicity of the inhaled material. In order to investigate particle dispersion, a system was set up to generate aggregates from agglomerates. Primary particles, composed of zinc, were generated using zinc rods in a spark generator (Palas GFG-1000, Karlsrhue, Germany). These particles formed agglomerates which were passed through a room temperature aging chamber or through a tube furnace (Carbolite HST, Derbyshire, UK). Agglomerate size was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS model 3936, TSI Inc., Shoreview, MN). When furnace temperature was set near the zinc coalescence temperature, instead of decreasing in size, agglomerate size increased up to 30%; a percentage increase duplicated with the room temperature aging chamber. Starting with an aerosol of primary zinc particles, equal concentrations of agglomerate and aggregrate aerosol were produced. The extent of breakup and dispersion of agglomerates and aggregates to individual nanoparticles in lung serum simulant will be assessed using transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Anti-oxidation treatment of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene components to decrease periprosthetic osteolysis: evaluation of osteolytic and osteogenic properties of wear debris particles in a murine calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Green, Justin M; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2013-05-01

    Wear debris-induced osteolysis remains the greatest limitation of long-term success for total joint replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. To address oxidative degradation post-gamma irradiation, manufacturers are investigating the incorporation of antioxidants into PE resins. Similarly, larger molecular weight monomers have been developed to increase crosslinking and decrease wear debris, and ultimately osteolysis. However, the effects of modifying monomer size, crosslink density, and antioxidant incorporation on UHMWPE particle-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and coupled osteoblastic bone formation have never been tested. Here, we review the field of antioxidant-containing UHMWPE, and present an illustrative pilot study evaluating the osteolytic and osteogenic potential of wear debris generated from three chemically distinct particles (MARATHON®, XLK, and AOX™) as determined by a novel 3D micro-CT algorithm designed for the murine calvaria model. The results demonstrate an approach by which the potential osteoprotective effects of antioxidants in UHMWPE can be evaluated.

  8. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore processing which are intended to improve the

  9. Light extinction at agglomerates of spheres--a practical test on the submicroscale.

    PubMed

    Kätzel, Uwe; Gruy, Frederic; Babick, Frank; Klöden, Wolfgang

    2005-09-01

    Today's theories applied to the inversion of measurement data from optical measurement devices are restricted to single spherical particles. However, particles formed in industrial processes such as precipitation and crystallization are often nonspherical or agglomerates. Theoretical approaches to describe the optical behavior of such particle systems have already been proposed. The verification of these theories has mostly been done using microwave scattering experiments with agglomerates in the millimeter range. This paper provides a first but surely not all-embracing practical test for a general extension of the Mie theory to agglomerates of submicroscale spheres. For the sake of simplicity and from practical viewpoints of online-sensor development only light extinction of an agglomerated suspension has been examined. The required rigid agglomerates have been produced using a spray-drying method that generates particles with a much higher mechanical stability than can be obtained by the usual procedures. Subsequent fractionation of the suspension delivers systems with only a limited number of agglomerate configurations. Extinction measurements at multiple wavelengths using dynamic extinction spectroscopy have been conducted to determine the extinction cross section of the agglomerated dispersions. These data are compared with computations of agglomerates scattering.

  10. Hydroclimatic influence on particle size distribution of suspended sediments evacuated from debris-covered Chorabari Glacier, upper Mandakini catchment, central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Gokhale, Anupam Anand; Shukla, Tanuj; Dobhal, Dwarika Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Sediments released from high altitude glaciers exhibit varying evacuation patterns and transport characteristics owing to the presence of thick debris cover over the glacier. Despite the recent needs for integrated hydrometeorological studies in the Himalaya, little is known about the impacts of suspended sediment on hydropower generation, reservoir sedimentation, and abrasion of turbine components. Present study involves analysis of particle size distribution of suspended sediments to understand sediment evacuation patterns and transport characteristics in variable energy conditions during the ablation season. Peak suspended sediments were evacuated during extreme rainfall events. The estimated seasonal modern sediment erosion rate varies from 0.6 to 2.3 mm y- 1 for the study period (2009-2012). The analysis shows dominance of medium silt-sized to fine sand-sized particles having sediment size of 0.0156-0.25 mm corresponding to 70-80% without any significant seasonal variation. These transported sediments show that they are poorly sorted, coarser in nature with a nearly symmetrical to coarse skewed texture and kurtosis analysis suggesting mesokurtic distribution of sediments. The particle size fraction ranges between 4.65 and 5.23 ϕ, which is dominantly medium to coarse silty in texture. Results indicate that suspended sediments are evacuated in highly variable energy conditions through subglacial transport pathways because of increase in availability of meltwater with the progressive ablation season. Bulk geochemical characterization has been carried out to differentiate the source of suspended sediments and intensity of weathering. Chemical Index of Alterations (CIA) values of sediment flux range from 54.68 to 55.18 compared to the Upper Continental Crust (UCC) ~ 50, indicating moderate intensity of weathering. Mean seasonal (2009-2012) elemental fluxes and their contribution to the suspended sediment flux reflect that Si and Al are responsible for about 85% of

  11. A pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the purpose of estimating the fraction of aluminum powder that will form agglomerates at the surface of deflagrating composite propellants. The basic idea is that the fraction agglomerated depends upon the amount of aluminum that melts within effective binder pocket volumes framed by oxidizer particles. The effective pocket depends upon the ability of ammonium perchlorate modals to encapsulate the aluminum and provide a local temperature sufficient to ignite the aluminum. Model results are discussed in the light of data showing effects of propellant formulation variables and pressure.

  12. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Hayashi, Kanetoshi

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  13. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined ‘geometric surface area’ of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60–350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility–mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility–mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility–mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3–10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3. PMID:26692585

  14. Observations of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA: Part 1, in-situ measurements of flow dynamics, tracer particle movement and video imagery from the summer of 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, Scott W.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Kean, Jason W.; Tucker, Greg E.; Staley, Dennis M.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.

    2011-01-01

    Debris flows initiated by surface-water runoff during short duration, moderate- to high-intensity rainfall are common in steep, rocky, and sparsely vegetated terrain. Yet large uncertainties remain about the potential for a flow to grow through entrainment of loose debris, which make formulation of accurate mechanical models of debris-flow routing difficult. Using a combination of in situ measurements of debris flow dynamics, video imagery, tracer rocks implanted with passive integrated transponders (PIT) and pre- and post-flow 2-cm resolution digital terrain models (terrain data presented in a companion paper by STALEY et alii, 2011), we investigated the entrainment and transport response of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, CO, USA. Four monitored events during the summer of 2009 all initiated from surface-water runoff, generally less than an hour after the first measurable rain. Despite reach-scale morphology that remained relatively constant, the four flow events displayed a range of responses, from long-runout flows that entrained significant amounts of channel sediment and dammed the main-stem river, to smaller, short-runout flows that were primarily depositional in the upper basin. Tracer-rock travel-distance distributions for these events were bimodal; particles either remained immobile or they travelled the entire length of the catchment. The long-runout, large-entrainment flow differed from the other smaller flows by the following controlling factors: peak 10-minute rain intensity; duration of significant flow in the channel; and to a lesser extent, peak surge depth and velocity. Our growing database of natural debris-flow events can be used to develop linkages between observed debris-flow transport and entrainment responses and the controlling rainstorm characteristics and flow properties.

  15. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  16. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous measurements of the heat of immersion of coal were conducting using several different particle size fractions of No. 2 Gas Seam coal from Raleigh County, West Virginia. The heat of immersion was determined in water, methanol, heptane, hexadecane and neohexane (2,2-dimethybutane). A comparison of the results with those determined previously for Illinois No. 6 coal is discussed. A number of potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of coal were screened by testing the response of sulfidized mineral pyrite to agglomeration with heptane in the presence of the potential depressant. The following were tested; sodium dithionite, sodium thiosulfate, ferrous sulfate, ferric sulfate, titanous chloride, hydrogen peroxide, Oxone (a form of potassium monopersulfate), pyrogallol, quebracho (colloidal dispersant derived from tree bark), milk whey, and several organic thiols. Ferric chloride was applied to mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and sulfidized mineral pyrite before subjecting the mixtures to agglomeration with heptane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1980-02-01

    Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

  18. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-01

    Several scale model mixing systems have been built and are being utilized to study the gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal. Numerous batch agglomeration tests have been conducted with these systems. During an individual test the progress of agglomeration has been monitored by observing either changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated particle suspensions or changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. A mathematical model has been developed for relating the rate of agglomeration of coal particles to the rate of change of turbidity of a dilute particle suspension undergoing agglomeration. The model has been utilized for analyzing and interpreting the results of a number of oil agglomeration tests in which several different system parameters were varied.

  19. Biological response to prosthetic debris

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  20. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  1. Coal beneficiation by gas agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Meiyu, Shen

    2003-10-14

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  2. Agglomeration of food powder and applications.

    PubMed

    Dhanalakshmi, K; Ghosal, S; Bhattacharya, S

    2011-05-01

    Agglomeration has many applications in food processing and major applications include easy flow table salt, dispersible milk powder and soup mix, instant chocolate mix, beverage powder, compacted cubes for nutritional-intervention program, health bars using expanded/puffed cereals, etc. The main purpose of agglomeration is to improve certain physical properties of food powders such as bulk density, flowability, dispersability, and stability. Agglomerated products are easy to use by the consumers and hence are preferred over the traditional non-agglomerated products that are usually non-flowable in nature. The properties of food agglomerates and the process of agglomeration like employing pressure, extrusion, rewetting, spray-bed drying, steam jet, heat/sintering, and binders have been reviewed. The physical and instant properties of agglomerated food products have also been discussed.

  3. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  4. TMI-2 leadscrew debris pyrophoricity study

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R L; Allen, R P; McCoy, M W

    1984-04-01

    Debris removed from the surface of a leadscrew from the TMI-2 Reactor Building was examined to assess the potential for the debris to become pyrophoric. Elemental analyses were performed to identify candidate phases that could be pyrophoric, and x-ray diffraction was used to determine if any of these phases was actually present. However, none of the candidate phases were found. Based on differential scanning calorimetry, no exothermic reactions were observed upon heating the debris to 500/sup 0/C in air. Particle size distributions for the debris were obtained from analyses of micrographs of the debris. A light blockage instrument was also used to determine the particle size distribution. These analyses indicated that particles larger than 10 ..mu..m accounted for most of the debris volume, although the majority of the particles were actually smaller than 10 ..mu..m. Gamma spectroscopy indicated that most of the radioactivity in the debris, and on the leadscrew after debris removal, was due to mixed fission products such as /sup 137/Cs and /sup 134/Cs.

  5. Agglomeration characteristics of river sand and wheat stalk ash mixture at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Linlin; Li, Shiyuan; Lu, Qinggang

    2013-02-01

    The agglomeration characteristics of river sand and wheat stalk ash mixture at various temperatures are investigated using a muffle furnace. The surface structural changes, as well as the elemental makeup of the surface and cross-section of the agglomerates, are analyzed by polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Multi-phase equilibrium calculation is performed with FactSage in identifying the melting behavior of the river sand-wheat stalk ash mixture at high temperatures. No indication of agglomeration is detected below 850°C. At a temperature of 900-1000°C, however, obvious agglomeration is observed and the agglomerates solidify further as temperature increases. The presence of potassium and calcium enrichment causes the formation of a sticky sand surface that induces agglomeration. The main component of the agglomerate surface is K2O-CaO-SiO2, which melts at low temperatures. The formation of molten silicates causes particle cohesion. The main ingredient of the binding phase in the cross-section is K2O-SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO; the agglomeration is not the result of the melting behavior of wheat stalk ash itself but the comprehensive results of chemical reaction and the melting behavior at high temperatures. The multi-phase equilibrium calculations agree well with the experimental results.

  6. Soot oxidation and agglomeration modeling in a microgravity diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Ezekoye, O.A.; Zhang, Z.

    1997-07-01

    The global evolution of a microgravity diffusion flame is detailed. Gas species evolution is computed using a reduced finite rate chemical mechanism. Soot evolution is computed using various combinations of existing soot mechanisms. Radiative transfer is coupled to the soot and gas phase chemistry processes using a P1 spherical harmonics radiation model. The soot agglomeration model was examined to note the dependence of soot growth and oxidation processes on soot surface area predictions. For limiting cases where agglomeration was excluded from the soot evolution model, soot primary particle sizes and number concentrations were calculated, and the number of primary particles per aggregate was inferred. These computations are compared with experimental results for microgravity and nonbuoyant flame conditions.

  7. Investigation of spherical oil agglomeration properties of celestite.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Yakup; Sönmez, Ibrahim

    2004-05-01

    In this study, concentration of celestite particles was investigated by using oil agglomeration. For this purpose, effects of operating parameters were investigated, and zeta potential measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) analyses have also been carried out. In the experiments, effects of operating parameters such as pH, stirring speed, amount of Na oleate as a anionic type collector and kerosene as a bridging liquid, solid ratio, agglomeration time, collector stirring time, conditioning time, and amount of EDTA were investigated to obtain optimum conditions. Zeta potential measurements were carried out for various pH values and amounts of Na oleate. FTIR analyses were investigated to determine the adsorption type of Na oleate on celestite surface. By evaluation of the experimental results, optimum oil agglomeration conditions of celestite were determined as follows: pH 7, stirring speed 1500 rpm, amount of kerosene 100 l/t, amount of Na oleate 10 kg/t, solid ratio 5 wt%, conditioning time 5 min, collector stirring time 1 min, agglomeration time 5 min, and amount of EDTA 1.0 kg/t. In the optimum conditions, celestite was concentrated with recovery of 89.47 wt%.

  8. Nanoparticle agglomeration in an evaporating levitated droplet for different acoustic amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijerino, Erick; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Radiatively heated levitated functional droplets with nanosilica suspensions exhibit three distinct stages namely pure evaporation, agglomeration, and finally structure formation. The temporal history of the droplet surface temperature shows two inflection points. One inflection point corresponds to a local maximum and demarcates the end of transient heating of the droplet and domination of vaporization. The second inflection point is a local minimum and indicates slowing down of the evaporation rate due to surface accumulation of nanoparticles. Morphology and final precipitation structures of levitated droplets are due to competing mechanisms of particle agglomeration, evaporation, and shape deformation. In this work, we provide a detailed analysis for each process and propose two important timescales for evaporation and agglomeration that determine the final diameter of the structure formed. It is seen that both agglomeration and evaporation timescales are similar functions of acoustic amplitude (sound pressure level), droplet size, viscosity, and density. However, we show that while the agglomeration timescale decreases with initial particle concentration, the evaporation timescale shows the opposite trend. The final normalized diameter can be shown to be dependent solely on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation timescales for all concentrations and acoustic amplitudes. The structures also exhibit various aspect ratios (bowls, rings, spheroids) which depend on the ratio of the deformation timescale (tdef) and the agglomeration timescale (tg). For tdef

  9. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  10. Space Shuttle Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Reynaldo J., III

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the assessment of debris damage to the Space Shuttle, and the use of computation to assist in the space shuttle applications. The presentation reviews the sources of debris, a mechanism for determining the probability of damaging debris impacting the shuttle, tools used, eliminating potential damaging debris sources, the use of computation to assess while inflight damage, and a chart showing the applications that have been used on increasingly powerful computers simulate the shuttle and the debris transport.

  11. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  12. Analyzing turbidity, suspended-sediment concentration, and particle-size distribution resulting from a debris flow on Mount Jefferson, Oregon, November 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    A debris flow and sediment torrent occurred on the flanks of Mt Jefferson in Oregon on November 6, 2006, inundating 150 acres of forest. The massive debris flow was triggered by a rock and snow avalanche from the Milk Creek glaciers and snowfields during the early onset of an intense storm originating near the Hawaiian Islands. The debris flow consisted of a heavy conglomerate of large boulders, cobbles, and coarse-grained sediment that was deposited at depths of up to 15 ft and within 3 mi of the glaciers, and a viscous slurry that deposited finer-grained sediments at depths of 0.5 to 3 ft. The muddy slurry coated standing trees within the lower reaches of Milk Creek as it moved downslope.

  13. Synthesis and agglomeration of gold nanoparticles in reverse micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Resto, Oscar; Briano, Julio G.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2005-07-01

    Reverse micelles prepared in the system water, sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfoccinate (AOT), and isooctane were investigated as a templating system for the production of gold nanoparticles from Au(III) and the reducing agent sulfite. A core-shell Mie model was used to describe the optical properties of gold nanoparticles in the reverse micelles. Dynamic light scattering of gold colloids in aqueous media and in reverse micelle solution indicated agglomeration of micelles containing particles. This was verified theoretically with an analysis of the total interaction energy between pairs of particles as a function of particle size. The analysis indicated that particles larger than about 8 nm in diameter should reversibly flocculate. Transmission electron microscopy measurements of gold nanoparticles produced in our reverse micelles showed diameters of 8-10 nm. Evidence of cluster formation was also observed. Time-correlated UV-vis absorption measurements showed a red shift for the peak wavelength. This was interpreted as the result of multiple scattering and plasmon interaction between particles due to agglomeration of micelles with particles larger than 8 nm.

  14. Effects of baffle configuration and tank size on spherical agglomerates of dimethyl fumarate in a common stirred tank.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po Yen; Lee, Hung Lin; Chen, Chih Wei; Lee, Tu

    2015-11-30

    To pave the way for technology transfer and scale up of the spherical agglomeration (SA) process for dimethyl fumarate, effects of the US, European and Kawashima type baffles and 0.5, 2.0 and 10 L-sized common stirred tank were studied. It was found that the particle size distribution varied significantly. However, the size-related properties such as dissolution profile and flowability of agglomerates from the same size cut after sieving could remain unchanged. The interior structure-related properties such as particle density and mechanical property of agglomerates upon baffle change and scale up from the same size cut were decayed and the agglomerates could become denser and stronger by prolonged maturation time. To maintain the same size distribution, agglomerates from any batch could have been separated and classified by sieving and then blended back together artificially by the desired weight% of each cut. PMID:26417848

  15. Preparation of sustained release matrix pellets by melt agglomeration in the fluidized bed: influence of formulation variables and modelling of agglomerate growth.

    PubMed

    Pauli-Bruns, Anette; Knop, Klaus; Lippold, Bernhard C

    2010-03-01

    The one-step preparation of sustained release matrix pellets, using a melting procedure in a fluidized bed apparatus, was tested in a 2(3) full factorial design of experiments, using microcrystalline wax as lipophilic binder, theophylline as model drug and talc as additional matrix forming agent. The three influence parameters were (A) size of binder particles, (B) fraction of theophylline in solid particles and (C) fraction of microcrystalline wax in formulation. The response variables were agglomerate size and size distribution, dissolution time, agglomerate crush resistance, sphericity, yield and porosity. Nearly spherical pellets comprising a smooth, closed surface could be obtained with the used method, exhibiting the hollow core typical for the immersion and layering mechanism. The reproducibility was very good concerning all responses. The size of agglomerates is proportional to the size of the binder particles, which serve as cores for pellet formation in the molten state in the fluidized bed. Additionally, the agglomerate size is influenced by the volume of the solid particles in relation to the binder particles, with more solid particles leading to larger agglomerates and vice versa. Dissolution times vary in a very wide range, resulting from the interplay between amount of drug in relation to the meltable matrix substance microcrystalline wax and the non-meltable matrix substance talc. The change of binder particle size does not lead to a structural change of the matrix; both dissolution times and porosity are not significantly altered. Agglomerate crush resistance is low due to the hollow core of the pellets. However, it is significantly increased if the volume fraction of microcrystalline wax in the matrix is high, which means that the matrix is mechanically better stabilized. A theoretical model has been established to quantitatively explain agglomerate growth and very good accordance of the full particle size distributions between predicted and

  16. Orbital Debris: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, Davis S. F. (Editor); Loftus, Joseph P., Jr. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This chronology covers the 37-year history of orbital debris concerns. It tracks orbital debris hazard creation, research, observation, experimentation, management, mitigation, protection, and policy. Included are debris-producing, events; U.N. orbital debris treaties, Space Shuttle and space station orbital debris issues; ASAT tests; milestones in theory and modeling; uncontrolled reentries; detection system development; shielding development; geosynchronous debris issues, including reboost policies: returned surfaces studies, seminar papers reports, conferences, and studies; the increasing effect of space activities on astronomy; and growing international awareness of the near-Earth environment.

  17. Chemical and physicochemial properties of submicron aerosol agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.; Ehrman, S.; Friedlander, S.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The formation of nanometer-sized aerosol particles in a premixed methane flame from both solid-phase aerosol precursors and gas-phase precursors was investigated. Techniques were developed to determine the distribution of the individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). To determine the distribution of chemical species both from particle to particle and within the particles on a nanometer scale, we used the analytical electron microscopy techniques of energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed distribution of individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size was linked to the material properties of the solid-phase precursors. For aerosol formed from gas-phase precursors by gas-to-particle conversion, the distribution of species on a manometer scale was found to correspond to the equilibrium phase distribution expected from equilibrium for the system at the flame temperatures.

  18. Report on orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The success of space endeavors depends upon a space environment sufficiently free of debris to enable the safe and dependable operation of spacecraft. An environment overly cluttered with debris would threaten the ability to utilize space for a wide variety of scientific, technological, military, and commercial purposes. Man made space debris (orbital debris) differs from natural meteoroids because it remains in earth orbit during its lifetime and is not transient through the space around the Earth. The orbital debris environment is considered. The space environment is described along with sources of orbital debris. The current national space policy is examined, along with ways to minimize debris generation and ways to survive the debris environment. International efforts, legal issues and commercial regulations are also examined.

  19. Turbomachinery debris remover

    DOEpatents

    Krawiec, Donald F.; Kraf, Robert J.; Houser, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

  20. Debris exhaust system

    DOEpatents

    McBride, D.D.; Bua, D.; Domankevitz, Y.; Nishioka, N.

    1998-06-23

    A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping. 9 figs.

  1. Debris exhaust system

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Donald D.; Bua, Dominic; Domankevitz, Yacov; Nishioka, Norman

    1998-01-01

    A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping.

  2. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Shcherbina, M. E.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Kirichenko, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 1014 particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  3. On the Mechanism of Ultrasound-Driven Deagglomeration of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Aluminum Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey

    2016-05-01

    One of the promising directions in the technology of composite alloys with improved mechanical properties is reinforcement of the metallic matrix with nanopowders introduced in the liquid metal. Ultrasonic processing is known to significantly improve the introduction of submicrone particles to the metallic melt. This study focuses on the mechanisms of deagglomeration and wettability of such particles by the melt under the action of ultrasound. The suggested mechanism involves the penetration of the liquid metal into the pores and cracks of the agglomerates under the excess pressure created by imploding cavitation bubbles and further destruction of the agglomerate by the sound wave. The main dependences connecting the acoustic parameters and processing time with the physical and chemical properties of particles and the melt are obtained through analytical modeling. The mathematical description of the ultrasonic deagglomeration in liquid metal is presented; a dependence of the threshold intensity of ultrasound for the break-up of agglomerates on their size is reported.

  4. A Novel Equivalent Agglomeration Model for Heat Conduction Enhancement in Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Sui, Jize; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multilevel equivalent agglomeration (MEA) model in which all particles in an irregular cluster are treated as a new particle with equivalent volume, the liquid molecules wrapping the cluster and in the gaps are considered to assemble on the surface of new particle as mixing nanolayer (MNL), the thermal conductivity in MNL is assumed to satisfy exponential distribution. Theoretical predictions for thermal conductivity enhancement are highly in agreement with the classical experimental data. Also, we first try to employ TEM information quantitatively to offer probable reference agglomeration ratio (not necessary a very precise value) to just test rational estimations range by present model. The comparison results indicate the satisfactory priori agglomeration ratio estimations range from renovated model. PMID:26777389

  5. A Novel Equivalent Agglomeration Model for Heat Conduction Enhancement in Nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Jize; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multilevel equivalent agglomeration (MEA) model in which all particles in an irregular cluster are treated as a new particle with equivalent volume, the liquid molecules wrapping the cluster and in the gaps are considered to assemble on the surface of new particle as mixing nanolayer (MNL), the thermal conductivity in MNL is assumed to satisfy exponential distribution. Theoretical predictions for thermal conductivity enhancement are highly in agreement with the classical experimental data. Also, we first try to employ TEM information quantitatively to offer probable reference agglomeration ratio (not necessary a very precise value) to just test rational estimations range by present model. The comparison results indicate the satisfactory priori agglomeration ratio estimations range from renovated model. PMID:26777389

  6. Debris Flows and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.

    Torrential floods are a major natural hazard, claiming thousands of lives and millions of dollars in lost property each year in almost all mountain areas on the Earth. After a catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helen in the USA in May 1980, water from melting snow, torrential rains from the eruption cloud, and water displaced from Spirit Lake mixed with deposited ash and debris to produce very large debris flows and cause extensive damage and loss of life [1]. During the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in Colombia, more than 20,000 people perished when a large debris flow triggered by the rapid melting of snow and ice at the volcano summit, swept through the town of Armero [2]. In 1991, the eruption of Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines disperses more than 5 cubic kilometres of volcanic ash into surrounding valleys. Much of that sediment has subsequently been mobilised as debris flows by typhoon rains and has devastated more than 300 square kilometres of agricultural land. Even, in Eur opean countries, recent events that torrential floods may have very destructive effects (Sarno and Quindici in southern Italy in May 1998, where approximately 200 people were killed). The catastrophic character of these floods in mountainous watersheds is a consequence of significant transport of materials associated with water flows. Two limiting flow regimes can be distinguished. Bed load and suspension refer to dilute transport of sediments within water. This means that water is the main agent in the flow dynamics and that the particle concentration does not exceed a few percent. Such flows are typically two-phase flows. In contrast, debris flows are mas s movements of concentrated slurries of water, fine solids, rocks and boulders. As a first approximation, debris flows can be treated as one-phase flows and their flow properties can be studied using classical rheological methods. The study of debris flows is a very exciting albeit immature science, made up of disparate elements

  7. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  8. Detailed analysis of a quench bomb for the study of aluminum agglomeration in solid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallier, S.; Kratz, J.-G.; Quaglia, N.; Fouin, G.

    2016-07-01

    A standard quench bomb (QB) - widely used to characterize condensed phase from metalized solid propellant combustion - is studied in detail. Experimental and numerical investigations proved that collected particles are mostly unburned aluminum (Al) agglomerates despite large quenching distances. Particles are actually found to quench early as propellant surface is swept by inert pressurant. Further improvements of the QB are proposed which allow measuring both Al agglomerates and alumina residue with the same setup. Finally, the results obtained on a typical aluminized ammonium perchlorate (AP) / hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant are briefly discussed.

  9. Erosion of steepland valleys by debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, J.D.; Dietrich, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Episodic debris flows scour the rock beds of many steepland valleys. Along recent debris-flow runout paths in the western United States, we have observed evidence for bedrock lowering, primarily by the impact of large particles entrained in debris flows. This evidence may persist to the point at which debris-flow deposition occurs, commonly at slopes of less than ???0.03-0.10. We find that debris-flow-scoured valleys have a topographic signature that is fundamentally different from that predicted by bedrock river-incision models. Much of this difference results from the fact that local valley slope shows a tendency to decrease abruptly downstream of tributaries that contribute throughgoing debris flows. The degree of weathering of valley floor bedrock may also decrease abruptly downstream of such junctions. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that valley slope is adjusted to the long-term frequency of debris flows, and that valleys scoured by debris flows should not be modeled using conventional bedrock river-incision laws. We use field observations to justify one possible debris-flow incision model, whose lowering rate is proportional to the integral of solid inertial normal stresses from particle impacts along the flow and the number of upvalley debris-flow sources. The model predicts that increases in incision rate caused by increases in flow event frequency and length (as flows gain material) downvalley are balanced by rate reductions from reduced inertial normal stress at lower slopes, and stronger, less weathered bedrock. These adjustments lead to a spatially uniform lowering rate. Although the proposed expression leads to equilibrium long-profiles with the correct topographic signature, the crudeness with which the debris-flow dynamics are parameterized reveals that we are far from a validated debris-flow incision law. However, the vast extent of steepland valley networks above slopes of ???0.03-0.10 illustrates the need to understand debris

  10. Factors affecting the oil agglomeration of Sivas-Divrigi Ulucayir lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, I.; Gorgun Ersan, M.

    2007-07-01

    In the coal industry, the coal particles need to be decreased to a very fine size because of the need of removing inorganic materials from coal. Oil agglomeration is a kind of coal cleaning technique that is used for separation of organic and inorganic parts of fine sized coal. In this study, the oil agglomeration of Sivas-Divrigi (S-D) Ulucayir lignite was carried out by using kerosene, diesel oil, fuel oil, poppy oil, and sunflower oil. The amount of bridging oil was varied from 5% to 25% of the amount of lignite. The effect of oil amount, oil type, solid content, agitation rate and time, pH on agglomeration performance was investigated. Maximum recovery value of 98.18% was observed by using poppy oil. In order to investigate the effect of pH on agglomeration NaOH and HCl is added to the slurry in various amounts. It is decided that the best agglomeration condition is obtained at low pH values. The effect of nonionic surface active agent (Igepal-CA 630) on agglomeration is investigated by adding to the slurry and it is observed that the grade is increased with the amount of surface active agent.

  11. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  12. Tracking Debris Shed by a Space-Shuttle Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Phillip C.; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2009-01-01

    The DEBRIS software predicts the trajectories of debris particles shed by a space-shuttle launch vehicle during ascent, to aid in assessing potential harm to the space-shuttle orbiter and crew. The user specifies the location of release and other initial conditions for a debris particle. DEBRIS tracks the particle within an overset grid system by means of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the local flow field and a ballistic simulation that takes account of the mass of the particle and its aerodynamic properties in the flow field. The computed particle trajectory is stored in a file to be post-processed by other software for viewing and analyzing the trajectory. DEBRIS supplants a prior debris tracking code that took .15 minutes to calculate a single particle trajectory: DEBRIS can calculate 1,000 trajectories in .20 seconds on a desktop computer. Other improvements over the prior code include adaptive time-stepping to ensure accuracy, forcing at least one step per grid cell to ensure resolution of all CFD-resolved flow features, ability to simulate rebound of debris from surfaces, extensive error checking, a builtin suite of test cases, and dynamic allocation of memory.

  13. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-10-01

    During the first year of the project two model mixing systems, which differed in size but were similar in design, were constructed and tested. The systems were equipped for measuring agitator speed and torque and for measuring the turbidity of coal particle suspensions undergoing agglomeration. Preliminary measurements of aqueous suspensions of coal particles showed that the Beer-Lambert law applies to such suspensions at least for low concentrations. Therefore, the measured turbidity can be used as an indicator of particle concentration and a means for monitoring the progress of oil agglomeration. However, the method is not applicable for large particle concentrations so a different technique was tested for monitoring the agglomeration of large concentrations. This technique involves measuring agitator torque and observing changes in torque while agitator speed is held constant. The results of preliminary tests of the technique were encouraging. In these tests significant changes in agitator torque were observed when particle agglomeration took place as long as solids concentration of 25 w/v % or more were utilized. A number of agglomeration tests were conducted using either one or the other of the two monitoring techniques. Both methods showed that even very small amounts of air can promote the oil agglomeration of coal particles suspended in water. Even the amount of air dissolved in water at room temperature and pressure can affect the process providing the air is displaced from the solution by a slightly soluble agglomerant such as heptane. The apparent rate of agglomeration was observed to increase as more air was introduced and also as agitator speed was increased.

  14. Reduced bed agglomeration by co-combustion biomass with peat fuels in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Karin Lundholm; Anders Nordin; Marcus Oehman; Dan Bostroem

    2005-12-01

    Fluidized bed combustion is an energy conversion technology that is very suitable for biomass combustion because of its fuel flexibility and low process temperatures. However, agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems. To prevent or at least reduce this, peat has been suggested as an additive to the main fuels. Nevertheless, the characteristics of peat fuels vary and there is limited information of the effect of different peat fuels and of the mechanisms behind the agglomeration prevention. The objectives of the present work were therefore to: (I) quantify the potential positive effect by co-combustion peat with forest fuels in terms of initial agglomeration temperatures; (ii) determine the amount of peat fuel that is needed to significantly reduce the agglomeration tendencies; and, if possible, (iii) elucidate the governing mechanisms. The results showed that all peat fuels prevented agglomeration in the studied interval of 760-1020{sup o}C and even as little as 5% peat fuel was found to have significant effects. The results also indicated that the mechanism of the agglomeration prevention varies between different peat fuels. Possible mechanisms are the minerals in the peat fuel retain alkali, which then is either elutriated up from the bed or captured in the bed; calcium and other refractory elements increase the melting temperature and thereby counteract the melting of alkali; and sulfur reacts with alkali metals and the alkali sulfates is either elutriated up from the bed or prevents agglomeration by increased melting temperature and lowered viscosity. Results from elemental analysis of the coating on bed particles showed that all mixtures with peat fuel resulted in a decreased or unchanged fraction of potassium and an increased fraction of aluminum in the coatings. The results also indicated a complex relationship between the fuel inorganic contents and the agglomeration process. 21 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Effect of Drying Phase on the Agglomerates Prepared by Spherical Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam; Yari, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, differences in porosity, compressive strength and tablet- forming ability of carbamazepine crystals agglomerated under similar condition, but subjected to different drying temperatures are reported. The agglomerates were prepared by spherical crystallization method and thereafter dried without agitation at different temperature. An increased drying temperature did not affect the shape and structure texture of dried particles and did not cause them to fracture. Drying of particles at higher temperature suppressed the particle contraction as a consequence of fast evaporation and hence produced particles of larger mean diameter, higher porosity and thus lower compressive strength than those dried at lower temperature. Through a relationship with particle porosity, the drying rate also affected the ability of particles to form tablets. PMID:25561911

  16. Identification of micro parameters for discrete element simulation of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Dosta, Maksym; Heinrich, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of solid particles like agglomerates, granules or crystals strongly depends on their micro structure, e.g. structural defects and porosity. In order to model the mechanical behaviour of these inhomogeneous media the discrete element method has been proven to be an appropriate tool. The model parameters used are typically micro parameters like bond stiffness, particle-particle contact stiffness, strength of the bonds. Due to the lack of general methods for a direct micro parameter determination, normally laborious parameter adaptation has to be done in order to fit experiment and simulation. In this contribution a systematic and automatic way for parameter adaptation using real experiments is proposed. Due to the fact, that discrete element models are typically systems of differential equations of very high order, gradient based methods are not suitable. Hence, the focus will be on derivative free methods.

  17. Debris transport around high-speed snowplows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhla, Hany Kamel

    2001-08-01

    The distribution of airborne debris around high-speed snowplows affects visibility and thus road safety. A combination of calculations, windtunnel experiments, and road trials are presented to provide knowledge of debris distributions and to obtain understanding of the mechanisms that can reduce suspended debris. Measurements obtained around windtunnel models show the influence of a variety of plow geometries on the location of debris around plowing trucks. Debris trajectories were calculated around plows with and without overplow deflectors by solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with cutting-edge and particle-tracking models. Calculations extrapolated windtunnel results over the wide range of snow conditions from light powder to slushy ice. Road trials compared visibility of conventional and modified snowplows with image analysis that quantified visible area, contrast and color intensity. In full scale tests, snow did not blow overtop of plow configurations that had trap angles less than 50 degrees, as predicted in windtunnel and computational results. Packing and junction flaps deflected discharge snow back into the consolidated discharge stream and decreased the amount of loose debris. Side-mounted hopper vanes kept rearward- facing surfaces clearer and made rear lighting and signage more effective. The visible area of high-speed snowplows outfitted with overplow deflector, packing flap, junction flap and hopper vanes was measured to be more than 50% larger than conventional plows for following motorists in all wind conditions and this was linked to reductions in the quantity of debris in the downstream snow cloud.

  18. Characterization of the fretting corrosion behavior, surface and debris from head-taper interface of two different modular hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Claudio T; Barbosa, Cassio; Monteiro, Maurício J; Abud, Ibrahim C; Caminha, Ieda M V; Roesler, Carlos R M

    2016-09-01

    Modular hip prostheses are flexible to match anatomical variations and to optimize mechanical and tribological properties of each part by using different materials. However, micromotions associated with the modular components can lead to fretting corrosion and, consequently, to release of debris which can cause adverse local tissue reactions in human body. In the present study, the surface damage and residues released during in vitro fretting corrosion tests were characterized by stereomicroscope, SEM and EDS. Two models of modular hip prosthesis were studied: Model SS/Ti Cementless whose stem was made of ASTM F136 Ti-6Al-4V alloy and whose metallic head was made of ASTM F138 austenitic stainless steel, and Model SS/SS Cemented with both components made of ASTM F138 stainless steel. The fretting corrosion tests were evaluated according to the criteria of ASTM F1875 standard. Micromotions during the test caused mechanical wear and material loss in the head-taper interface, resulting in fretting-corrosion. Model SS/SS showed higher grade of corrosion. Different morphologies of debris predominated in each model studied. Small and agglomerated particles were observed in the Model SS/Ti and irregular particles in the Model SS/SS. After 10 million cycles, the Model SS/Ti was more resistant to fretting corrosion than the Model SS/SS. PMID:27179766

  19. Characterization of the fretting corrosion behavior, surface and debris from head-taper interface of two different modular hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Claudio T; Barbosa, Cassio; Monteiro, Maurício J; Abud, Ibrahim C; Caminha, Ieda M V; Roesler, Carlos R M

    2016-09-01

    Modular hip prostheses are flexible to match anatomical variations and to optimize mechanical and tribological properties of each part by using different materials. However, micromotions associated with the modular components can lead to fretting corrosion and, consequently, to release of debris which can cause adverse local tissue reactions in human body. In the present study, the surface damage and residues released during in vitro fretting corrosion tests were characterized by stereomicroscope, SEM and EDS. Two models of modular hip prosthesis were studied: Model SS/Ti Cementless whose stem was made of ASTM F136 Ti-6Al-4V alloy and whose metallic head was made of ASTM F138 austenitic stainless steel, and Model SS/SS Cemented with both components made of ASTM F138 stainless steel. The fretting corrosion tests were evaluated according to the criteria of ASTM F1875 standard. Micromotions during the test caused mechanical wear and material loss in the head-taper interface, resulting in fretting-corrosion. Model SS/SS showed higher grade of corrosion. Different morphologies of debris predominated in each model studied. Small and agglomerated particles were observed in the Model SS/Ti and irregular particles in the Model SS/SS. After 10 million cycles, the Model SS/Ti was more resistant to fretting corrosion than the Model SS/SS.

  20. In-Situ Agglomeration and De-agglomeration by Milling of Nano-Engineered Lubricant Particulate Composites for Cold Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.

    2014-10-01

    Nano-engineered self-lubricating particles comprised of hexagonal-boron-nitride powder (hBN) encapsulated in nickel have been developed for cold spray coating of aluminum components. The nickel encapsulant consists of several nano-sized layers, which are deposited on the hBN particles by electroless plating. In the cold spray deposition, the nickel becomes the matrix in which hBN acts as the lubricant. The coating demonstrated a very promising performance by reducing the coefficient of friction by almost 50% and increasing the wear resistance more than tenfold. The coatings also exhibited higher bond strength, which was directly related to the hardenability of the particles. During the encapsulation process, the hBN particles agglomerate and form large clusters. De-agglomeration has been studied through low- and high-energy ball milling to create more uniform and consistent particle sizes and to improve the cold spray deposition efficiency. The unmilled and milled particles were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, BET, and hardness tests. It was found that in low-energy ball milling, the clusters were compacted to a noticeable extent. However, the high-energy ball milling resulted in breakup of agglomerations and destroyed the nickel encapsulant.

  1. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1994-07-01

    The authors are investigating the use of a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concepts is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 {mu}m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 {mu}m) the problems of froth overload water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response. The research program has been organized into several specific tasks: Task 1, interfacial studies; Task 2, emulsification; Task 3, agglomerate growth and structure; and Task 4, agglomerate flotation. This report summarizes the status of Tasks 2, 3, and 4.

  2. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  3. The fast debris evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  4. Short-term changes in drug agglomeration within interactive mixtures following blending.

    PubMed

    Andreou, J G; Stewart, P J; Morton, D A V

    2009-05-01

    The objective was to investigate the nature and extent of short-term dynamic changes to dissolution within specific interactive mixtures following blending. Two micronized drugs, nitrazepam and flunitrazepam, were formulated into lactose-based interactive mixtures containing a micronized surfactant. The dissolution rate of the drugs decreased significantly over a period of days after preparation. The dissolution was modelled using a multi-exponential equation, allowing estimation of agglomeration and dissolution rate. From this model, decreasing dissolution rates were consistent with increasing agglomeration. Particle-sizing studies provided evidence of an increase in drug agglomerates over the same timescale. This is the first study to report short-term dissolution changes immediately following secondary processing. Several hypotheses are proposed for increases in agglomeration, which potentially relate to changes in surface charge, particle rearrangements, recrystallisation at surfaces and the role of moisture, although the role of mechanical processing on agglomerate behaviour remains poorly understood. The observations from this study may have wider implications, for dissolution and for other powder-based drug delivery systems which include interactive mixtures with fine powders. This study emphasizes the need for improved understanding if we are to implement a "Quality by Design" ethos to improve control and risk management over the performance and stability of these systems.

  5. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1997-01-15

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {micro}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In this investigation a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation was studied. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles and to use froth flotation to separate these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units will be relatively large agglomerates (30--50 {micro}m in size) rather than fine coal particles (1--10 {micro}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is demonstrated in this study that the process is very sensitive to fluctuations in operating parameters. It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases as well as the agitation conditions in order to promote selectivity. Both kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors play a critical role in determining overall system response.

  6. In-Situ Observations of Interaction Between Particulate Agglomerates and an Advancing Planar Solid/Liquid Interface: Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Juretzko, F.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Results are reported of directional solidification experiments on particulate agglomerate pushing and engulfment by a planar solid/liquid (s/1) interface. These experiments were conducted on the Space Shuttle Columbia during the United States Microgravity Payload 4 (USMP-4) Mission. It was found that the pushing to engulfment transition velocity, V(sub ct),, for agglomerates depends not only on their effective size but also their orientation with respect to the s/l interface. The analytical model for predicting V(sub cr) of a single particle was subsequently enhanced to predict V(sub cr) of the agglomerates by considering their shape factor and orientation.

  7. In Situ Observations of Interaction Between Particulate Agglomerates and an Advancing Planar Solid/Liquid Interface: Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Juretzko, F.; Stafanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Results are reported of directional solidification experiments on particulate agglomerate pushing and engulfment by a planar solid/liquid (s/l) interface. These experiments were conducted on the Space Shuttle Columbia during the United States Microgravity Payload 4 (USMP-4) Mission. It was found that the pushing to engulfment transition velocity, V(sub cr) for agglomerates depends not only on their effective size but also their orientation with respect to the s,1 interface. The analytical model for predicting V(sub cr) of a single particle was subsequently enhanced to predict V(sub cr) of the agglomerates by considering their shape factor and orientation.

  8. Mechanism of nanoparticle agglomeration during the combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Igor S.; Agranovski, Igor E.; Choi, Mansoo

    2005-08-01

    The mechanism of agglomeration of nanoparticles generated during combustion synthesis is discussed. This is based on the analysis of the transmission electron microscope images of probes collected at different heights. Although direct temperature measurements were not available, the qualitative temperature dependence of the particle formation streamlines is taken into account. It is demonstrated that agglomeration of the MgO nanoparticles, which are formed during a Mg particle combustion, occurs as the result of bonding the mature nanoparticles by the supercritical clusters existing in the system. Accumulation of these supercritical clusters in the flame has been revealed and their nature has been explained in our recent paper [I.S. Altman, I.E. Agranovski, and M. Choi, Phys. Rev E 70, 062603 (2004)]. Also, some inspection of the previously published experimental data on the nanoparticle generation shows that the similar supercritical clusters may exist in another flame reactor generating titania nanopaprticles. If this is the case, the cluster-based process of nanoparticle bonding we suggest can be considered to be general.

  9. Gravitational agglomeration of post-HCDA LMFBR nonspherical aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, R. F.

    1980-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of collisional dynamics of two particle interactions in a gravitational field is reported. This research is unique in that it is the first attempt at modeling the hydrodynamic interactions between a nonspherical particle and a spherical particle undergoing gravitational collisions in an LMFBR environment. Basic definitions and expressions are developed for nonspherical particles and related to spherical particles by means of shape factors. Using volume equivalent diameter as the defining length in the gravitational collision kernel, the aerodynamic shape factor, k, the density correction factor, alpha, and the gravitational collision shape factor, beta, are used to correct the collision kernel for the case of collisions between aerosol agglomerates. The Navier-Stokes equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates is solved to model a nonspherical particle and then the dynamic equations for two particle motions are developed. A computer program NGCEFF is constructed, the Navier-Stokes equation is solved by the finite difference method, and the dynamical equations are solved by Gear's method. It is concluded that the aerosol gravitational collision shape factor can be determined by further theoretical work based on the concepts and methods developed in this dissertation.

  10. Orbiting meteoroid and debris counting experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Armstrong, Dwayne; Crockett, Sharon K.; Jones, James L., Jr.; Kassel, Philip C., Jr.; Wortman, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Orbiting Meteoroid and Debris Counting Experiment (OMDC) flew for approximately 90 days in a highly elliptical earth orbit onboard the Clementine Interstage Adapter (ISA) Spacecraft. This experiment obtained data on the impact flux of natural micrometeoroids and it provided limited information on the population of small mass man-made debris as a function of altitude in near earth space. The flight of the OMDC experiment on the ISA spacecraft also demonstrated that the ultra-lightweight, low-power, particle impact detector system that was used is a viable system for flights on future spacecraft to monitor the population of small mass man-made debris particles and to map the cosmic dust environment encountered on interplanetary missions. An overview of the ISA spacecraft mission, the approach to the OMDC experiment, and the data obtained by the experiment are presented.

  11. Procedures for analysis of debris relative to Space Shuttle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hae Soo; Cummings, Virginia J.

    1993-01-01

    Debris samples collected from various Space Shuttle systems have been submitted to the Microchemical Analysis Branch. This investigation was initiated to develop optimal techniques for the analysis of debris. Optical microscopy provides information about the morphology and size of crystallites, particle sizes, amorphous phases, glass phases, and poorly crystallized materials. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry is utilized for information on surface morphology and qualitative elemental content of debris. Analytical electron microscopy with wavelength dispersive spectrometry provides information on the quantitative elemental content of debris.

  12. Characterizing Secondary Debris Impact Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, W. P.

    1999-01-01

    All spacecraft in low-Earth orbit are subject to high-speed impacts by meteoroids and orbital debris particles. These impacts can damage flight-critical systems which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for an Earth-orbiting mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystem components. In addition to threatening the operation of the spacecraft itself, on-orbit impacts also generate a significant amount of ricochet particles. These high-speed particles can destroy critical external spacecraft subsystem and also increase the contamination of the orbital environment. This report presents a summary of the work performed towards the development of an empirical model that characterizes the secondary ejecta created by a high-speed impacta on a typical aerospace structural surface.

  13. Interaction between solar energetic particles and interplanetary grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.; Sheng, K. L.

    Some laboratory-studied effects induced by the fluence of fast ions on frosts of astrophysical interest are summarized. The results are applied to the interaction between energetic solar ions and interplanetary dust grains assumed to be cometary debris which spends about one-million yr before being collected in the earth's atmosphere or colliding on the moon's surface. The importance of erosion by particles to the stability of ice grains is confirmed. The build up of carbonaceous material by ion fluence on hydrocarbon containing grains is discussed. It is suggested that these new materials could be the glue which cements submicron silicate particles to form a complex agglomeration whose density increases with increasing proton fluence (packing effect). The IR spectra of laboratory synthesized carbonaceous material are compared with those observed in some carbonaceous meteoritic extracts.

  14. Modeling debris-covered glaciers: response to steady debris deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in rapidly eroding alpine landscapes. When thicker than a few centimeters, surface debris suppresses melt rates. If continuous debris cover is present, ablation rates can be significantly reduced leading to increases in glacier length. In order to quantify feedbacks in the debris-glacier-climate system, we developed a 2-D long-valley numerical glacier model that includes englacial and supraglacial debris advection. We ran 120 simulations on a linear bed profile in which a hypothetical steady state debris-free glacier responds to a step increase of surface debris deposition. Simulated glaciers advance to steady states in which ice accumulation equals ice ablation, and debris input equals debris loss from the glacier terminus. Our model and parameter selections can produce 2-fold increases in glacier length. Debris flux onto the glacier and the relationship between debris thickness and melt rate strongly control glacier length. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude, where ice discharge is high, results in the greatest glacier extension when other debris-related variables are held constant. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude re-emerges high in the ablation zone and therefore impacts melt rate over a greater fraction of the glacier surface. Continuous debris cover reduces ice discharge gradients, ice thickness gradients, and velocity gradients relative to initial debris-free glaciers. Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR). Our simulations reproduce the "general trends" between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocity patterns from modern debris-covered glaciers. We provide a quantitative, theoretical foundation to interpret the effect of debris cover on the moraine record, and to assess the effects of climate change on debris-covered glaciers.

  15. GEO Debris and Interplanetary Dust: Fluxes and Charging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graps, A. L.; Green, S. F.; McBride, N. M.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Drolshagen, G.; Svedhem, H.; Bunte, K. D.

    2005-08-01

    A population of cosmic dust mixed with a population of man-made debris exists within the Earth's magnetosphere. Measurements of these provide the data samples for studies of the interplanetary dust particles that travel through our magnetosphere from the outside and for studies of the local byproducts of our space endeavours. Even though instruments to detect natural meteoroids and space debris particles have been flown in Low Earth Orbits (LEO) and on interplanetary missions, very little information on the particle environment for Earth orbits above about 600 km altitude have been available. In particular, knowledge about particles smaller than 1 m in the geostationary (GEO) region was largely unknown before GORID. In September 1996, a dust/debris detector: GORID was launched into GEO as a piggyback instrument on the Russian Express-2 telecommunications spacecraft. The instrument began its normal operation in April 1997 and ended its mission in July 2002. The goal of this work was to use GORID's particle data to identify and separate the space debris from the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in GEO, to more finely determine the instrument's measurement characteristics and to derive impact fluxes. Here we present some results of that study. We give GORID flux distributions for debris and IDPs and then present intriguing debris clustering features that might be the result of electrostatic fragmentation of the rocket slag particles.

  16. GEO Debris and interplanetary dust: fluxes and charging behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graps, A. L.; Green, S. F.; McBride, N. M.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Drolshagen, G.; Svedhem, H.; Bunte, K. D.

    A population of cosmic dust mixed with a population of man-made debris exists within the Earth's magnetosphere. Measurements of these provide the data samples for studies of the interplanetary dust particles that travel through our magnetosphere from the outside and for studies of the local byproducts of our space endeavours. Even though instruments to detect natural meteoroids and space debris particles have been flown in Low Earth Orbits (LEO) and on interplanetary missions, very little information on the particle environment for Earth orbits above about 600 km altitude have been available. In particular, knowledge about particles smaller than 1 m in the geostationary (GEO) region was largely unknown before GORID. In September 1996, a dust/debris detector: GORID was launched into GEO as a piggyback instrument on the Russian Express-2 telecommunications spacecraft. The instrument began its normal operation in April 1997 and ended its mission in July 2002. The goal of this work was to use GORID's particle data to identify and separate the space debris from the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in GEO, to more finely determine the instrument's measurement characteristics and to derive impact fluxes. Here we present some results of that study. We give GORID flux distributions for debris and IDPs and then present intriguing debris clustering features that might be the result of electrostatic fragmentation of the slag particles.

  17. Molecular mechanisms responsible for hydrate anti-agglomerant performance.

    PubMed

    Phan, Anh; Bui, Tai; Acosta, Erick; Krishnamurthy, Pushkala; Striolo, Alberto

    2016-09-28

    Steered and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the coalescence of a sI hydrate particle and a water droplet within a hydrocarbon mixture. The size of both the hydrate particle and the water droplet is comparable to that of the aqueous core in reverse micelles. The simulations were repeated in the presence of various quaternary ammonium chloride surfactants. We investigated the effects due to different groups on the quaternary head group (e.g. methyl vs. butyl groups), as well as different hydrophobic tail lengths (e.g. n-hexadecyl vs. n-dodecyl tails) on the surfactants' ability to prevent coalescence. Visual inspection of sequences of simulation snapshots indicates that when the water droplet is not covered by surfactants it is more likely to approach the hydrate particle, penetrate the protective surfactant film, reach the hydrate surface, and coalesce with the hydrate than when surfactants are present on both surfaces. Force-distance profiles obtained from steered molecular dynamics simulations and free energy profiles obtained from umbrella sampling suggest that surfactants with butyl tripods on the quaternary head group and hydrophobic tails with size similar to the solvent molecules can act as effective anti-agglomerants. These results qualitatively agree with macroscopic experimental observations. The simulation results provide additional insights, which could be useful in flow assurance applications: the butyl tripod provides adhesion between surfactants and hydrates; when the length of the surfactant tail is compatible with that of the hydrocarbon in the liquid phase a protective film can form on the hydrate; however, once a molecularly thin chain of water molecules forms through the anti-agglomerant film, connecting the water droplet and the hydrate, water flows to the hydrate and coalescence is inevitable. PMID:27436688

  18. A new debris sensor based on dual excitation sources for online debris monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Shaoping; Tomovic, Mileta M.; Liu, Haokuo; Wang, Xingjian

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical systems could be severely damaged by loose debris generated through wear processes between contact surfaces. Hence, debris detection is necessary for effective fault diagnosis, life prediction, and prevention of catastrophic failures. This paper presents a new in-line debris sensor for hydraulic systems based on dual excitation sources. The proposed sensor makes magnetic lines more concentrated while at the same time improving magnetic field uniformity. As a result the sensor has higher sensitivity and improved precision. This paper develops the sensor model, discusses sensor structural features, and introduces a measurement method for debris size identification. Finally, experimental verification is presented indicating that that the sensor can effectively detect 81 μm (cube) or larger particles in 12 mm outside diameter (OD) organic glass pipe.

  19. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  20. Riding a Trail of Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the comet Encke riding along its pebbly trail of debris (long diagonal line) between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. This material actually encircles the solar system, following the path of Encke's orbit. Twin jets of material can also be seen shooting away from the comet in the short, fan-shaped emission, spreading horizontally from the comet.

    Encke, which orbits the Sun every 3.3 years, is well traveled. Having exhausted its supply of fine particles, it now leaves a long trail of larger more gravel-like debris, about one millimeter in size or greater. Every October, Earth passes through Encke's wake, resulting in the well-known Taurid meteor shower.

    This image was captured by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer when Encke was 2.6 times farther away than Earth is from the Sun. It is the best yet mid-infrared view of the comet at this great distance. The data are helping astronomers understand how rotating comets eject particles as they circle the Sun.

  1. Orbital debris: A technical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleghorn, George; Asay, James; Atkinson, Dale; Flury, Walter; Johnson, Nicholas; Kessler, Donald; Knowles, Stephen; Rex, Dietrich; Toda, Susumu; Veniaminov, Stanislav

    1995-01-01

    To acquire an unbiased technical assessment of (1) the research needed to better understand the debris environment, (2) the necessity and means of protecting spacecraft against the debris environment, and (3) potential methods of reducing the future debris hazard, NASA asked the National Research Council to form an international committee to examine the orbital debris issue. The committee was asked to draw upon available data and analyses to: characterize the current debris environment, project how this environment might change in the absence of new measures to alleviate debris proliferation, examine ongoing alleviation activities, explore measures to address the problem, and develop recommendations on technical methods to address the problems of debris proliferation.

  2. Influence of the nanoparticles agglomeration state in the quantum-confinement effects: Experimental evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Romero, J. J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2015-03-15

    The agglomeration state facilitates particle-particle interaction which produces important effects in the phonon confinement effects at the nanoscale. A partial phonon transmission between close nanoparticles yields a lower momentum conservation relaxation than in a single isolated nanoparticle. It means a larger red shift and broadening of the Raman modes than the expected ones for Raman quantum confinement effects. This particle-particle interaction can drive to error when Raman responses are used to estimate the size of the nanoscaled materials. In this work different corrections are suggested to overtake this source of error.

  3. Agglomerating combustor-gasifier method and apparatus for coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Joseph L. P.; Archer, David H.

    1976-09-21

    A method and apparatus for gasifying coal wherein the gasification takes place in a spout fluid bed at a pressure of about 10 to 30 atmospheres and a temperature of about 1800.degree. to 2200.degree.F and wherein the configuration of the apparatus and the manner of introduction of gases for combustion and fluidization is such that agglomerated ash can be withdrawn from the bottom of the apparatus and gas containing very low dust loading is produced. The gasification reaction is self-sustaining through the burning of a stoichiometric amount of coal with air in the lower part of the apparatus to form the spout within the fluid bed. The method and apparatus are particularly suitable for gasifying coarse coal particles.

  4. Upgrading of coal liquefaction feedstock by selective agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, R.; Sinha, K.; Richardson, A.; Killmeyer, R.; Utz, B.; Hickey, R.; Cillo, D.

    1994-03-01

    The technical feasibility study of using selective agglomeration (with coal-derived oil) to upgrade Illinois No. 6 coal for a liquefaction feedstock was completed. Effects of coal particle size, slurry pH, oil-to-coal ratio, and operating temperature on mineral matter reduction, clean coal weight recovery, and clean coal moisture content were studied. The addition of coal-derived naphtha or kerosene as conditioners to increase hydrophobicity and recovery of coal was also investigated. Results showed that approximately 70% of the mineral matter could be removed from this coal at a clean coal weight recovery of over 85% by grinding the coal to a mean volume diameter of about 10 microns and properly selecting of the operation variables.

  5. Investigations on Agglomeration and Haemocompatibility of Vitamin E TPGS Surface Modified Berberine Chloride Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vuddanda, Parameswara Rao; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar Mahalingam; Yaspal, Madhu; Singh, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of surface modification on systemic stability of NPs. Vitamin E TPGS (1% w/v) was used for surface modification of berberine chloride nanoparticles. Naked and surface modified NPs were incubated in different SBFs (pH 6.8 and 7.4) with or without bile salts and human plasma. NPs were observed for particle agglomeration and morphology by particle size analyzer and TEM, respectively. The haemocompatibility studies were conducted on developed NPs to evaluate their safety profile. The surface modified NPs were stable compared to naked NPs in different SBFs due to the steric stabilization property of vitamin E TPGS. Particle agglomeration was not seen when NPs were incubated in SBF (pH 6.8) with bile salts. No agglomeration was observed in NPs after their incubation in plasma but particle size of the naked NPs increased due to adhesion of plasma proteins. The TEM images confirmed the particle size results. DSC and FT-IR studies confirmed the coexistence of TPGS in surface modified NPs. The permissible haemolysis, LDH release, and platelet aggregation revealed that NPs were compatible for systemic administration. Thus, the study illustrated that the surface modification is helpful in the maintenance of stability of NPs in systemic conditions. PMID:25162037

  6. Assessment of methods for collecting fallout brake pad wear debris for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Sondhi, Akash; Imhoff, Paul T; Dentel, Steven K; Allen, Herbert E

    2010-01-01

    Three methods for collecting or generating fallout brake pad wear debris for environmental analysis were assessed: collection from wheels or hubs of automobiles (natural), generation from an inexpensive sanding process (sanded), and collection of fallout debris from dynamometer tests using the Los Angeles City Traffic protocol (LACT). Brake wear debris was collected from four automobiles with semimetalic brake pads and analyzed for physicochemical properties. For automobiles where all three types of debris were collected, bulk copper mass fractions ranged from 22-23% in sanded particles and 24-27% in LACTparticles, but were reduced to 1-6% in natural debris. The smaller copper mass fraction in natural debris was attributed to contamination with road dust, which was found to comprise 37-97% of the natural particles. The ratio of surface to bulk copper mass fraction was up to five times larger for natural than LACT debris, suggesting that copper may leach into stormwater faster and to a greater extent for natural particles. While the LACT method appears best for collecting only fallout particles, significant differences in copper distributions in the natural and LACT debris suggests that metal distribution in LACT debris may not be representative of fallout particles generated under actual driving conditions, where airborne road dust may play a role. Although dynamometer tests have been the preferred method for generating debris for assessment of metal dissolution from brake particles, data from this study indicate that such samples may result in biased estimates of metal leaching.

  7. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration. Fossil energy interim report, October 1, 1983--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1992-12-31

    Numerous agglomeration tests were conducted with several types of low-ash coal and graphite, high grade mineral pyrite, and other materials. Relatively pure hydrocarbons, including heptane and hexadecane, were used as agglomerants. Access of air to the system was controlled. Particle recovery by agglomeration was observed to depend on a number of system parameters. Among the most important parameters are the hydrophobicity of the particles and the oil dosage, so that the, recovery of solids per unit of oil administered is proportional to the hydrophobicity. The pH and ionic strength of the aqueous suspension affect particle recovery in different ways depending on the surface properties of the particles. On the other hand, the presence of air in the system generally improves particle recovery. The greatest effect of air was observed in a closely related study which showed that air had to be present to produce good agglomerates from a moderately hydrophobic coal in a mixer producing a lower shear rate. The rate of agglomeration was found to be much greater for a strongly hydrophobic coal than for a moderately hydrophobic coal, and the rate was observed to be proportional to the oil dosage. Also the rate was enhanced by the presence of air in the, system. For hydrophobic coals, the rate increased with increasing ionic strength of the aqueous medium, but it was not affected greatly by pH over a wide range. The separation of coal and pyrite particles by selective agglomeration was found to depend on the relative hydrophobicity of the materials, the oil dosage, and the properties of the aqueous medium.

  8. Agglomeration in Stripper Ash Coolers and Its Possible Remedial Solutions: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravi Inder

    2016-04-01

    The bottom ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler contains large amounts of physical heat. When low quality coals are used in these types of boilers, the ash content is normally more than 40 % and the physical heat loss is approximately 3 % if the bottom ash is discharged without cooling. Bottom ash cooler (BAC) is often used to treat the high temperature bottom ash to reclaim heat, and to facilitate the easily handling and transportation of ash. The CFB boiler at BLA Power, Newari, MP (India) is facing problems of clinker formation in strip ash coolers of plant since the installation of unit. These clinkers are basically agglomerates, which leads to defluidization of stripper ash cooler (BAC) units. There are two strip ash coolers in unit. Each strip ash cooler is capable of working independently. The proper functioning of both strip coolers is very important as it is going to increase the combustion efficiency of boiler by stripping of fine unburnt coal particles from ash, which are injected into the furnace. In this paper causes, characterization of agglomerates, thermo gravimetric analysis of fuel used, particular size distribution of coal and sand and possible remedial solution to overcome these agglomerates in strip ash coolers has also been presented. High temperature in compact separators, non uniform supply of coal and not removing small agglomerates from stripper ash cooler are among main causes of agglomeration in stripper ash cooler. Control of compact separator temperature, replacing 10-12 % of bed material and cleaning stripper ash cooler periodically will decrease agglomeration in stripper ash cooler of unit.

  9. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  10. Intensive drying and the related microstructure features in agglomerate spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudlyk, Rostyslav

    Most metal ore concentrates are fine particulates with a wide particle-size distribution. Industrially they are pelletized by tumbling in balling discs or drums into spheres, an operation which requires the addition of typically up to 10% by weight of water. Further processing of these agglomerates involves first drying and then induration by heating up to 1250°C. The main objective of this thesis was the study of the interrelationship between the microstructure of the agglomerates with, on the one hand, the mechanical and physical properties of the pellets and their behaviour during intensive drying, on the other. The previously developed model of the drying process identified the loss of capillarity, resulting from the vapour lock, to be a critical component of the mechanism of intense as opposed to 'classical' drying. It was shown that the absence of the constant-rate drying period is a natural consequence of this effect. Several significant shortcomings of the previous model have been identified. This model treats the period of transition between surface- and shrinking-core drying as an instantaneous event. The new extended model, which overcomes the original model limitations, was developed in this project. In its formalism, the new model includes the pore-size distribution and thus simulates a gradual surface/shrinking-core transition. It was shown that the nature of the transition between the surface- and shrinking-core drying regimes during intensive drying is fundamentally different from that of classical drying, i.e. carried out at mild temperatures. In the latter case, liquid is being delivered to the surface through the network of interconnected small pores reaching the surface. The transition occurs when the larger pores, also reaching the surface, are being drained. On the other hand, under intense-drying conditions, the rate-limiting factor is the vapour lock. The latter phenomenon will occur in the smaller pores first, as they have smaller liquid

  11. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Zhang, F.; Nelson, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. The design and construction of a model mixing system for conducting oil agglomeration tests were reported previously as well as the results of a series of calibration and shakedown tests. The system consists of a flat bottom tank which is fitted with four vertical baffles, a cover, and a turbine agitator. The tank has an inside diameter of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), height of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), and net volume of 2.87 L. The tank is connected to a photometric dispersion analyzer so that the turbidity of a coal particle suspension undergoing agglomeration can be monitored. Measuring the turbidity of a particle suspension requires application of the Beer-Lambert law. However, since this law applies for dilute suspensions, it is questionable whether or not it applies to the somewhat more concentrated coal suspensions required for the present project. Therefore, to determine the law`s applicability, a series of turbidity measurements was conducted on particle suspensions which varied in particle concentration over a wide range, and the results were analyzed to see how well they agreed with the law. To determine the effect of air in promoting the oil agglomeration of coal particles in an aqueous suspension, a number of agglomeration tests were conducted with the model mixing system. Finely ground Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was used for these tests, and the amount of air present was controlled carefully. The agglomeration process was monitored by observing the change in turbidity of the system.

  12. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.; Bader, N.F. III; Dorfman, M.R.

    1984-05-22

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate.

  13. Debris flows in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona: magnitude, frequency and effects on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melis, Theodre S.; Webb, Robert H.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Debris flows are recurrent sediment-transport processes in 525 tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Arizona. Initiated by slope failures in bedrock and (or) colluvium during intense rainfall, Grand Canyon debris flows are high-magnitude, short-duration floods. Debris flows in these tributaries transport very large boulders into the river where they accumulate on debris fans and form rapids. The frequency of debris flows range from less than 1 per century to 10 or more per century in these tributaries. Before regulation by Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, high-magnitude floods on the Colorado River reworked debris fans by eroding all particles except large boulders. Because flow regulation has substantially decreased the river's competence, debris flows occurring after 1963 have increased accumulation of finer-grained sediments on debris fans and in rapids.

  14. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters

    PubMed

    König; Rabin; Schulze; Ertl

    1996-11-22

    The agglomeration of copper or silver atoms in a matrix of noble gas atoms to form small clusters may be accompanied by the emission of visible light. Spectral analysis reveals the intermediate formation of electronically excited atoms and dimers as the source of the chemiluminescence. A mechanism is proposed, according to which the gain in binding energy upon cluster formation may even lead to the ejection of excited fragments as a result of unstable intermediate configurations. A similar concept was introduced in the field of nuclear reactions by Niels Bohr 60 years ago.

  15. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steini Moura, Cassio; Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio; Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A.

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  16. Benefits of Active Debris Removal on the LEO Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniwa, Kazuaki; Hanada, Toshiya; Kawamoto, Satomi

    Since the launch of Sputnik, orbital debris population continues to increase due to ongoing space activities, on-orbit explosions, and accidental collisions. In the future, a great deal of fragments can be expected to be created by explosions and collisions. In spite of prevention of satellite and rocket upper stage explosions and other mitigation measures, debris population in low Earth orbit may not be stabilized. To better limit the growth of the future debris population, it is necessary to remove the existing debris actively. This paper studies about the effectiveness of active debris removal in low Earth orbit where the collision rate with and between space debris is high. This study does not consider economic problems, but investigates removing debris which may stabilize well the current debris population based on the concept of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

  17. The orbital debris detector consortium: Suppliers of instruments for in-situ measurements of small-particles in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Muenzenmeyer, R.; Tanner, W. G., Jr.; Uy, O. M.; Skrivanek, R. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.; Maag, C.; Wortman, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Industry and university participants have joined together to form the IMPA:Ct consortium (In-situ Monitors of the Particulate Ambient: Circumterrestrial) which offers a broad range of flight qualified instruments for monitoring the small particle (0.1 micron to 10 cm) environment in space. Instruments are available in 12 months or less at costs ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 million dollars (US) for the total program. Detector technologies represented by these groups are: impact-induced capacitor-discharge (MOS, metal-oxide-silicon), cratering or penetration of electroactive thin film (polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)), impact-plasma detection, acoustic detection, CCD tracking of optical scatter of sunlight, and photodiode detection of optical scatter of laser light. The operational characteristics, general spacecraft interface and resource requirements (mass/power/telemetry), cost and delivery schedules, and points of contact for seven different instruments are presented.

  18. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  19. Debris flow deposition and reworking by the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanites, B.J.; Webb, R.H.; Griffiths, P.G.; Magirl, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    Flow regulation by large dams affects downstream flow competence and channel maintenance. Debris flows from 740 tributaries in Grand Canyon, Arizona, transport coarse-grained sediment onto debris fans adjacent to the Colorado River. These debris fans constrict the river to form rapids and are reworked during river flows that entrain particles and transport them downstream. Beginning in 1963, flood control operations of Glen Canyon Dam limited the potential for reworking of aggraded debris fans. We analyzed change in debris fans at the mouths of 75-Mile and Monument Creeks using photogrammetry of aerial photography taken from 1965 to 2000 and supplemented with ground surveys performed from 1987 to 2005. Our results quantify the debris fan aggradation that resulted from debris flows from 1984 to 2003. Volume, area, and river constriction increased at both debris fans. Profiles of the two debris fans show that net aggradation occurred in the middle of debris fans at stages above maximum dam releases, and surface shape shifted from concave to convex. Dam releases above power plant capacity partially reworked both debris fans, although reworking removed much less sediment than what was added by debris flow deposition. Large dam releases would be required to create additional reworking to limit the rate of debris fan aggradation in Grand Canyon.

  20. Apparatus and method for compacting, degassing and carbonizing carbonaceous agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, F.W.

    1980-08-19

    An apparatus for compacting, degassing and carbonizing carbonaceous agglomerates is described. The apparatus comprises a rotary kiln having an agglomerate inlet means for introducing green agglomerates into the kiln near the inlet of the kiln and a heating medium inlet for introducing a heating medium comprising a finely divided solid into the kiln at a preselected location intermediate the inlet end of the kiln and the outlet end of the kiln to produce a mixture at a temperature above the carbonizing temperature of the agglomerates and a sieve positioned to receive the products from the rotary kiln and separate the heating medium and the compacted, degassed, carbonized agglomerate product. A method for producing compacted, degassed, carbonized carbonaceous agglomerates by the use of the apparatus is also disclosed.

  1. Agglomeration due to Brownian motion of fractal-structured combustion aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    A dynamic Monte-Carlo type lattice model has been developed to simulate the agglomeration of non-spherical chain-line aggregate combustion aerosols due to Brownian motion. Simulations are carried out in the free molecular and continuum regimes, for both initial monodisperse and initial log-normally distributed aerosols, with and without source mechanisms. Preservation of the chain-like structure of the aggregate is accomplished throughout the simulation by describing the agglomerate as fractal, that is, scale-invariant, self-similar with a noninteger dimensionality. Simulation results indicate that cluster growth is more rapid in the free molecular regime than in the continuum. Aerosols and log-normal distributions retain their log-normal characteristics even after long coagulation times. The effect of the clusters' fractal dimension on the cluster growth rate is determined; the rate of agglomeration increases when the structure of the agglomerate is more fragmented (lower fractal dimension). An analytical solution to the coagulation equation is obtained for log-normal aerosols by calculating moments of the distribution and solving sets of moment equations to determine the size distribution parameters. Condition numbers are employed to determine which moments should be calculated to most accurately determine these parameters. Excellent agreement is obtained between the simulations and the solution to the moment equations. Experimental measurements of soot particle velocity in a premixed methane/air flame are made using laser Doppler velocimetry.

  2. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  3. Development of in-situ micro-debris measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Maki; Kitazawa, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Okudaira, Osamu; Hanada, Toshiya; Sakurai, Akira; Funakoshi, Kunihiro; Yasaka, Tetsuo; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kobayashi, Masanori

    2015-08-01

    The in-situ debris environment awareness system has been developed. The objective of the system is to measure small debris (between 100 μm and several cm) in orbit. The orbital distribution and the size distribution of the debris are not well understood. The size distribution is difficult to measure from the ground, although the size distribution is very important for the risk evaluation of the impact of debris on spacecraft. The in-situ measurement of the size distribution is useful for: (1) verification of meteoroid and debris environment models, (2) verification of meteoroid and debris environment evolution models, (3) real time detection of unexpected events, such as explosions and/or collisions on an orbit. This paper reports the development study of the in-situ debris measurement system and shows demonstration experiments and their results to describe the performance of the micro-debris sensor system. The sensor system for monitoring micro-debris with sizes ranging from 100 μm to a few mm must have a large detection area, while the constraints of space deployment require that these systems be low in mass, low in power, robust and have low telemetry requirements. For this reason, we have been developing a simple trans-film sensor. Thin and conductive stripes (copper) are formed with fine pitch (100 μm) on a thin film of nonconductive material (12.5-μm thick polyimide). A hypervelocity micro-particle impact is detected when one or more stripes are severed by perforation of the film. We designed a debris detector specialized for measuring the micro-debris size and collision rate. We then manufactured and calibrated the detector.

  4. Orbital Debris: A Policy Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing orbital debris from a policy perspective is shown. The contents include: 1) Voyage through near-Earth Space-animation; 2) What is Orbital Debris?; 3) Orbital Debris Detectors and Damage Potential; 4) Hubble Space Telescope; 5) Mir Space Station Solar Array; 6) International Space Station; 7) Space Shuttle; 8) Satellite Explosions; 9) Satellite Collisions; 10) NASA Orbital Debris Mitigation Guidelines; 11) International Space Station Jettison Policy; 12) Controlled/Uncontrolled Satellite Reentries; 13) Return of Space Objects; 14) Orbital Debris and U.S. National Space Policy; 15) U.S Government Policy Strategy; 16) Bankruptcy of the Iridium Satellite System; 17) Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC); 18) Orbital Debris at the United Nations; 19) Chinese Anti-satellite System; 20) Future Evolution of Satellite Population; and 21) Challenge of Orbital Debris

  5. Method for recovering light hydrocarbons from coal agglomerates

    DOEpatents

    Huettenhain, Horst; Benz, August D.; Getsoian, John

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing light hydrocarbons, such as heptane, from coal agglomerates includes an enclosed chamber having a substantially horizontal perforate surface therein. The coal agglomerates are introduced into a water bath within the chamber. The agglomerates are advanced over the surface while steam is substantially continuously introduced through the surface into the water bath. Steam heats the water and causes volatilization of the light hydrocarbons, which may be collected from the overhead of the chamber. The resulting agglomerates may be collected at the opposite end from the surface and subjected to final draining processes prior to transportation or use.

  6. Direct preparation of spherically agglomerated salicylic acid crystals during crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Y; Okumura, M; Takenaka, H; Kojima, A

    1984-11-01

    Needle-like salicylic acid crystals were transformed into a spherically shaped dense form during crystallization by the spherical crystallization technique. Agitation of a mixture of ethanol-water-chloroform containing salicylic acid yielded spherically agglomerated salicylic acid crystals. The crystallinity of the agglomerated salicylic acid the amount of ethanol in the solvent mixture was decreased. The wettability of the agglomerated crystals increased when the amount of ethanol in the solvent mixture was decreased, and this enhanced the dissolution rate of the crystals. The remarkable improvements in the flow and packing of the agglomerated crystals enabled the direct compression of the crystals.

  7. Development and Application of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    We report progress in the development of agglomerated multigrid techniques for fully un- structured grids in three dimensions, building upon two previous studies focused on efficiently solving a model diffusion equation. We demonstrate a robust fully-coarsened agglomerated multigrid technique for 3D complex geometries, incorporating the following key developments: consistent and stable coarse-grid discretizations, a hierarchical agglomeration scheme, and line-agglomeration/relaxation using prismatic-cell discretizations in the highly-stretched grid regions. A signi cant speed-up in computer time is demonstrated for a model diffusion problem, the Euler equations, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for 3D realistic complex geometries.

  8. Constitutive Models for Debris-bearing Ice Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Rock debris is incorporated within many glaciers and ice sheets, particularly in basal ice layers and englacial debris bands. Field observations and laboratory experiments have shown that debris inclusions can both strengthen and weaken ice by as much as two orders of magnitude compared to debris-free ice under the same conditions. Nevertheless, models of glacier flow usually neglect any effect of debris-bearing layers. Where debris-bearing ice is present, proper treatment of its deformation could profoundly impact model results. A three-phase mechanical model is presented that reproduces many of the key observations of debris-bearing ice rheology. First order variables in the model are limited to debris concentration, particle size, solute concentration and temperature. At low debris concentrations (less than about 40% by volume), the mixture is treated under the framework of a dispersion-strengthened metal alloy but with a fluidity that is enhanced by premelted water at ice-debris interfaces. While debris strengthens the ice by interfering with the motion of dislocations, thermally-activated detachment can reduce the effect at temperatures close to melting. At these warm temperatures, recovery aided by unfrozen interfacial water acts to weaken the mixture, an effect that is further ehnanced by the presence of solutes at particle surfaces. Whether the debris-bearing ice is stronger or weaker than debris-free ice in the model depends strongly on the specific surface area of the debris and on a parameter that describes the thermal detachment of dislocations. As debris concentrations exceed about 40%, dispersion-strengthened ice flow still governs bulk deformation but the effective viscosity is further increased by enhanced strain rates in the ice "matrix" as the average inter-particle distance declines. At still higher concentrations (greater than about 52% by volume for sand), deformation is primarily frictional. The mixture is thus treated as a dilatant Coulomb

  9. Nanoparticle agglomerates of indomethacin: The role of poloxamers and matrix former on their dissolution and aerosolisation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Malamatari, Maria; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Bloxham, Mark; Buckton, Graham

    2015-11-10

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared and assembled to microsized agglomerates with and without matrix formers (mannitol and L-leucine) by coupling wet milling and spray drying to harmonise the advantages of NPs with handling and aerodynamics of microparticles without induction of amorphisation. Indomethacin was selected as poorly water-soluble drug and poloxamers with different ratios of hydrophilic to hydrophobic domains were evaluated as stabilisers comparatively to D-α-Tocopherol polyethylene-glycol succinate (TPGS). Particle size of nanosuspensions and morphology, size, crystal form, drug loading, redispersibility, in vitro dissolution, and in vitro aerosolisation of NP-agglomerates were determined. Molecular weight of stabilisers affected the rate but not the limit of NP size reduction and the length of hydrophilic segment in poloxamers was found important for the nanosuspension stabilisation. SEM revealed the structure of agglomerates consisting of nanocrystal assemblies. XRPD with DSC proved that NP agglomerates retained their crystallinity. NP-agglomerates exhibited enhanced dissolution compared to physical mixtures of drug and stabilisers while incorporation of matrix formers enabled redispersibility upon hydration and further increased the drug dissolution. Also, matrix formers resulted in significantly improved aerosolisation with higher fine particle fractions (49-62%) and smaller mass median aerodynamic diameters (<3.5 μm), compared to cases without matrix formers (34-43% and <4.5 μm). PMID:26364709

  10. In Brief: Marine debris plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-09-01

    A new U.S. federal interagency report on preventing and reducing marine debris focuses on responses to debris already in the environment, prevention of debris, research and development, and coordination among agencies. The report, released on 22 September, was prepared by 11 federal agencies and is intended to guide the strategies of federal agencies and the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee. The report is available at http://ocean.ceq.gov/about/docs/SIMOR_IMDCC_Report.pdf.

  11. Collisional Cascade in a Debris Disk from an External Perturber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika; Naoz, Smadar; Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, Benjamin; Holmbeck, Erika

    2015-11-01

    The study of circumstellar debris disks has often been coupled with the study of planet formation. A thermally warm debris disk (~300 K) may indicate the presence of an exoplanet orbiting within and stirring the disk. However, there is another possible mechanism for heating a debris disk: an external stellar-mass perturber exciting the eccentricities and inclinations of the particles in a disk.We explore the consequences of an external perturber on the evolution of a debris disk. The perturber excites the eccentricities of the particles in the disk via the Kozai-Lidov mechanism, triggering a collisional cascade among the planetesimals. These collisions produce smaller dust grains and damp the particles’ larger eccentricities.We present the results of our study of a such a disk using secular analysis and collisional N-body simulations. We will discuss the connections to observations of warm disks and the implications for planet formation.

  12. DEBIE - first standard in-situ debris monitoring instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuitunen, J.; Drolshagen, G.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Svedhem, H.; Leese, M.; Mannermaa, H.; Kaipiainen, M.; Sipinen, V.

    2001-10-01

    Objects larger than a few centimetres can be tracked with radar or with optical telescopes. The population of smaller particles can only be investigated by the analysis of retrieved spacecraft and passive detectors or by in-situ monitors in orbit. Patria Finavitec together with UniSpace Kent have developed the DEBIE (DEBris In-orbit Evaluator) instrument to determine the parameters of sub-millimetre sized space debris and micrometeoroids in-situ by their impact with a detecting surface. The main goal has been to develop an economical and low-resource instrument, easy to integrate into any spacecraft, while providing reliable real-time data for space debris modelling.

  13. Orbital Debris Shape and Orientation Effects on Ballistic Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.; Williamsen, Joel E.

    2005-01-01

    The SPHC hydrodynamic code was used to evaluate the effects of orbital debris particle shape and orientation on penetration of a typical spacecraft dual-wall shield. Impacts were simulated at near-normal obliquity at 12 km/sec. Debris cloud characteristics and damage potential are compared with those from impacts by spherical projectiles. Results of these simulations indicate the uncertainties in the predicted ballistic limits due to modeling uncertainty and to uncertainty in the impactor orientation.

  14. Nearshore dynamics of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.; McLaughlin, Molly R.

    2015-01-01

    Weathered oil can mix with sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) that can cause beach re-oiling for years after a spill. Few studies have focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. In this study, artificial SOAs (aSOAs) were created and deployed in the nearshore, and shear stress-based mobility formulations were assessed to predict SOA response. Prediction sensitivity to uncertainty in hydrodynamic conditions and shear stress parameterizations were explored. Critical stress estimates accounting for large particle exposure in a mixed bed gave the best predictions of mobility under shoaling and breaking waves. In the surf zone, the 10-cm aSOA was immobile and began to bury in the seafloor while smaller size classes dispersed alongshore. aSOAs up to 5 cm in diameter were frequently mobilized in the swash zone. The uncertainty in predicting aSOA dynamics reflects a broader uncertainty in applying mobility and transport formulations to cm-sized particles.

  15. Retrieval of dust-particle refractive index using the phenomenon of negative polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Videen, Gorden; Shkuratov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of negative polarization in irregularly shaped agglomerated debris particles. We find that the location of the negative polarization minimum is unambiguously governed by Re(m). Furthermore, the amplitude of the negative polarization puts a strong constraint on the material absorption in target particles regardless of their real part of refractive index Re(m). The interrelation can be parameterized with a simple formula and it can be utilized in remote sensing. We apply our finding to laboratory optical measurements of Allende meteorite at λ=0.633 μm and estimate its complex refractive index to be m≈(1.68-1.83)+(0.01-0.02)i.

  16. GEO Debris and Interplanetary Dust: Fluxes and Charging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graps, A. L.; Green, S. F.; McBride, N.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Bunte, K.; Svedhem, H.; Drolshagen, G.

    2007-01-01

    In September 1996, a dust/debris detector: GORID was launched into the geostationary (GEO) region as a piggyback instrument on the Russian Express-2 telecommunications spacecraft. The instrument began its normal operation in April 1997 and ended its mission in July 2002. The goal of this work was to use GORID's particle data to identify and separate the space debris to interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in GEO, to more finely determine the instrument's measurement characteristics and to derive impact fluxes. While the physical characteristics of the GORID impacts alone are insufficient for a reliable distinction between debris and interplanetary dust, the temporal behavior of the impacts are strong enough indicators to separate the populations based on clustering. Non-cluster events are predominantly interplanetary, while cluster events are debris. The GORID mean flux distributions (at mass thresholds which are impact speed dependent) for IDPs, corrected for dead time, are 1.35 times 10^{-4} m^{-2} s^{-1} using a mean detection rate: 0.54 d^{-1 and for space debris are 6.1 times 10^{-4} m^{-2}s^{-1} using a mean detection rate: 2.5 d^{-1}. Beta-meteoroids were not detected. Clusters could be a closely-packed debris cloud or a particle breaking up due to electrostatic fragmentation after high charging.},

  17. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.; Chandran, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, added particulates may include a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  18. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.

    1993-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  19. Agglomeration multigrid for viscous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    Agglomeration multigrid, which has been demonstrated as an efficient and automatic technique for the solution of the Euler equations on unstructured meshes, is extended to viscous turbulent flows. For diffusion terms, coarse grid discretizations are not possible, and more accurate grid transfer operators are required as well. A Galerkin coarse grid operator construction and an implicit prolongation operator are proposed. Their suitability is evaluated by examining their effect on the solution of Laplace's equation. The resulting strategy is employed to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for aerodynamic flows. Convergence rates comparable to those obtained by a previously developed non-nested mesh multigrid approach are demonstrated, and suggestions for further improvements are given.

  20. Activities on Space Debris in U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-01-01

    In the U.S. space debris activities are addressed at all government levels, from the Executive Office of the President to the individual federal agencies to specialized centers, laboratories, organizations, and research groups. U.S. Space Policy specifically challenges government agencies to seek to minimize the creation of space debris and to promote debris minimization practices both domestically and internationally. A set of space debris mitigation standard practices has been developed and adopted by relevant US government agencies, and their application by the commercial aerospace community is highly encouraged. A growing number of US government agencies have issued their own space debris mitigation policies, directives, regulations, and standards. Space debris research, including the definition and modeling of the current and future near-Earth space environment and the development of debris protection technologies, is principally conducted by NASA and the Department of Defense. The U.S. Space Surveillance Network continues to provide the most complete and timely characterization of the population of space debris larger than 10 cm. During the past several years major advancements have been achieved in extending this environment definition in LEO to include particles as small as only a few millimeters. The inspection of returned spacecraft surfaces continues to shed light on the even smaller debris population. With improvements in computer technology, new and more capable programs have been and are being developed to solve a number of operational and research problems. Finally, the academic and industrial sectors of the U.S. are also increasing their participation in and contributions to space debris operations and research. The cooperation of satellite and launch vehicle developers and operators is essential to the U.S. objective of promoting the preservation of the space environment for future generations.

  1. Agglomeration processes sustained by dust density waves in Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} plasma: From C{sub 2}H{sub 2} injection to the formation of an organized structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dap, Simon; Hugon, Robert; Poucques, Ludovic de; Briancon, Jean-Luc; Bougdira, Jamal; Lacroix, David

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, an experimental investigation of dust particle agglomeration in a capacitively coupled RF discharge is reported. Carbonaceous particles are produced in an argon plasma using acetylene. As soon as the particle density becomes sufficient, dust density waves (DDWs) are spontaneously excited within the cathode sheath. Recently, it was proven that DDWs can significantly enhance the agglomeration rate between particles by transferring them a significant kinetic energy. Thus, it helps them to overcome Coulomb repulsion. The influence of this mechanism is studied from acetylene injection to the formation of very large agglomerates forming an organized structure after a few dozens of seconds. For this purpose, three diagnostic tools are used: extinction measurements to probe nanometer-sized particles, fast imaging for large agglomerates and a dust extraction technique developed for ex-situ analysis.

  2. Debris mapping sensor technology project summary: Technology flight experiments program area of the space platforms technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. Programmatic objectives are: (1) to improve characterization of the orbital debris environment; and (2) to provide a passive sensor test bed for debris collision detection systems. Technical objectives are: (1) to study LEO debris altitude, size and temperature distribution down to 1 mm particles; (2) to quantify ground based radar and optical data ambiguities; and (3) to optimize debris detection strategies.

  3. Agglomeration multigrid for the three-dimensional Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    A multigrid procedure that makes use of coarse grids generated by the agglomeration of control volumes is advocated as a practical approach for solving the three dimensional Euler equations on unstructured grids about complex configurations. It is shown that the agglomeration procedure can be tailored to achieve certain coarse grid properties such as the sizes of the coarse grids and aspect ratios of the coarse grid cells. The agglomeration is done as a preprocessing step and runs in linear time. The implications for multigrid of using arbitrary polyhedral coarse grids are discussed. The agglomeration multigrid technique compares very favorably with existing multigrid procedures both in terms of convergence rates and elapsed times. The main advantage of the present approach is the ease with which coarse grids of any desired degree of coarseness may be generated in three dimensions, without being constrained by considerations of geometry. Inviscid flows over a variety of complex configurations are computed using the agglomeration multigrid strategy.

  4. Recovery of coal fines from washery and power plant effluents by integrated technique of oil agglomeration and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Luxamikant; Dastidar, M G; RoyChoudhury, P K

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of applying an integrated technique of oil agglomeration and biofilm formation for recovery of coal fines from coal washeries and power plants effluents has been explored. Laboratory experiments with simulated slurries of different Indian coal fines demonstrate that vegetable oils are satisfactory agglomerating agents for recovery of most of the coal fines depending on the nature of coal and type of oil. The agglomeration behaviour of coal fines was assessed in terms of % yield, % organic matter recovery and % ash rejections. Maximum 85% agglomerate recovery was obtained in the agglomeration stage. Residual oil concentrations in some cases were found to exceed the permissible limit. Recovery of residual coal fines and reduction in residual oil concentration in the resultant slurry after oil agglomeration have been attempted using biofilm formation. A laboratory scale treatment reactor was put under complete recirculation to facilitate attached microbial growth on coal particles as carrier under aerobic conditions. The influence of various parameters on attached growth and stable biofilm formation were studied. The growth patterns of attached cell in suspension and consumption pattern of carbon substrate (oil) have been investigated. Steady decline in residual substrate concentration in the slurry with corresponding increase in the growth of attached and free cell mass is observed. The growth process was favoured in pH range of 6.5-7.0. The attached growth was found to be expanded in size in due course of time ultimately leading to the formation of stable biofilm in the treatment reactor which was subjected to the influent total suspended solids loading resulting from oil agglomeration step. Performance of the biofilm reactor in terms of % reduction in total suspended solids and residual oil concentration in the influent slurry was assessed in continuous mode. Complete recovery of coal fines and 60% degradation of oil was observed in the final

  5. Interplanetary meteoroid debris in LDEF metal craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D.; Bradley, J.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1993-01-01

    We have examined craters in Al and Au LDEF surfaces to determine the nature of meteoroid residue in the rare cases where projectile material is abundantly preserved in the crater floor. Typical craters contain only small amounts of residue and we find that less than 10 percent of the craters in Al have retained abundant residue consistent with survival of a significant fraction (greater than 20 percent) of the projectile mass. The residue-rich craters can usually be distinguished optically because their interiors are darker than ones with little or no apparent projectile debris. The character of the meteoroid debris in these craters ranges from thin glass liners, to thick vesicular glass containing unmelted mineral fragments, to debris dominated by unmelted mineral fragments. In the best cases of meteoroid survival, unmelted mineral fragments preserve both information on projectile mineralogy as well as other properties such as nuclear tracks caused by solar flare irradiation. The wide range of the observed abundance and alteration state of projectile residue is most probably due to differences in impact velocity. The crater liners are being studied to determine the composition of meteoroids reaching the Earth. The compositional types most commonly seen in the craters are: (1) chondritic (Mg, Si, S, Fe in approximately solar proportions), (2) Mg silicate. amd (3) iron sulfide. These are also the most common compositional types of extraterrestrial particle types collected in the stratosphere. The correlation between these compositions indicates that vapor fractionation was not a major process influencing residue composition in these craters. Although the biases involved with finding analyzable meteoroid debris in metal craters differ from those for extraterrestrial particles collected in and below the atmosphere, there is a common bias favoring particles with low entry velocity. For craters this is very strong and probably all of the metal craters with abundant

  6. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Smeenk, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which lead to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion of coal and to relate these reactions to specific causes. A survey of agglomeration and deposit formation in industrial fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) indicate that at least five boilers were experiencing some form of bed material agglomeration. Deposit formation was reported at nine sites with deposits most commonly at coal feed locations and in cyclones. Other deposit locations included side walls and return loops. Three general types of mineralogic reactions were observed to occur in the agglomerates and deposits. Although alkalies may play a role with some {open_quotes}high alkali{close_quotes} lignites, we found agglomeration was initiated due to fluxing reactions between iron (II) from pyrites and aluminosilicates from clays. This is indicated by the high amounts of iron, silica, and alumina in the agglomerates and the mineralogy of the agglomerates. Agglomeration likely originated in the dense phase of the FBC bed within the volatile plume which forms when coal is introduced to the boiler. Secondary mineral reactions appear to occur after the agglomerates have formed and tend to strengthen the agglomerates. When calcium is present in high amounts, most of the minerals in the resulting deposits are in the melilite group (gehlenite, melilite, and akermanite) and pyroxene group (diopside and augite). During these solid-phase reactions, the temperature of formation of the melilite minerals can be lowered by a reduction of the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (Diopside + Calcite {r_arrow}Akermanite).

  7. Development and Flight Demonstration of Space Debris Monitor (SDM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Yukihito; Hanada, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Kobayashi, Masanori; Sakurai, Akira; Yasaka, Tetsuo; Funakoshi, Kunihiro; Hasegawa, Sunao; Akahoshi, Yasuhiro; Kimoto, Yugo; Okudaira, Osamu; Kamiya, Koki; Nakamura, Maki

    2016-07-01

    The space debris monitor (SDM) is a large-area impact sensor for in situ measurements of micro-meteoroids and space debris of the sub-millimeter to millimeter size in the near-Earth space environment. These meteoroid and debris particles are very small to be detected by ground-based observations (radars and optical telescopes) but are sufficiently large to cause serious damage to spacecraft equipment in the low Earth orbit region. The nominal detection area of the SDM is 0.1 m^2 (0.35 m × 0.3 m), but its dimensions can be easily modified to accommodate different SDM constraints. The SDM is made from a flexible printed circuit, which is produced from a thin film of a nonconductive material (such as polyimide) on which thin conductive stripes are formed in parallel. The stripe width is approximately 50 μm, and the spatial separation is approximately 100 μm, as shown in Figure 1. When a micro-debris particle with an effective diameter near to or larger than the spatial separation of the stripes (here approximately 100 μm) collides with the sensor film at a velocity sufficient to penetrate it, one or more of the stripes are cut and become nonconductive. Debris impacts can thus be detected by monitoring the electrical conductivity (resistivity) of the stripes. This sensor system can measure the size of the incident micro-debris particles by detecting the number of severed stripes. The measurement concept is registered as a patent in many countries. The first SDM was launched with HTV-5 on August 19, 2015 and represented the world's first micro-debris measurement demonstration experiment to be conducted on the ISS using the concept of conductive (resistive) strip lines for real-time debris detection.

  8. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A J; Tielens, A G G M; Ruth, A A

    2016-07-14

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles' spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp(3)/sp(2) hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ. PMID:27421401

  9. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ruth, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles' spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp3/sp2 hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ.

  10. Space debris- ECSL Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferranderie, G.

    2002-01-01

    Despite several attempts and despite the worldwide recognition of the need of attacking it, the space debris legal issues has not been put in the agenda as a separate issue on the agenda of the COPUOS Legal Subcommittee. However for the first time, mention will appear in 2002 but only under item 5 of the Legal Subcommittee: report of activities of international organisations, here the European Centre for Space Law (ECSL). ECSL report will describe the method followed, a questionnaire widely distributed to interested persons and on a personal basis. The questionnaire tries to identify the basic concerns. From the responses received and from also analysis of positions expressed in various colloquia, articles, etc. some directions could be drawn up: do we need a "legal definition" of space debris? For which purposes? Are we in a situation fro presenting now such a legal definition able to cope with the technical evolution of the space object? Which type of legal or technical description "instrument" will be the most appropriate? Etc. One particular question is emerging: the basis of the liability for damages caused in outer space. The author wish is simply to draw the attention on concrete, immediate concerns while identifying also simple ways able to offer a framework to deal with the legal impacts coming from space debris issue. I have envisioned two other subjects that I have abandoned: .

  11. Debris Characterization Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.C.; Celeste, J.R. Stoyer, M.A.; Suter, L.J.; Tobin, M.T.; Grun, J.; Davis, J.F.; Barnes, C.W.; Wilson, D.C.

    2000-06-07

    Generation of debris from targets and by x-ray ablation of surrounding materials will be a matter of concern for experimenters and the operations staff at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Target chamber and final optics protection, for example debris shield damage, and efficient facility operation drive the interest for the NIF staff. Experimenters are primarily concerned with diagnostic survivability, separation of mechanical versus radiation induced test object response in the case of effects tests, and radiation transport through the debris field when the net radiation output is used to benchmark computer codes. In addition, radiochemical analysis of activated capsule debris during ignition shots can provide a measure of the ablator. Conceptual design of the Debris Monitor and Rad-Chem Station, one of the NIF core diagnostics, is presented. Methods of debris collection, particle size and mass analysis, impulse measurement, and radiochemical analysis are given. A description of recent experiments involving debris collection and impulse measurement on the OMEGA and Pharos lasers is also provided.

  12. Modeling the transport and accumulation floating debris generated by the 11 March 2011 Tohoku tsunami.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Laurent C-M; Borrero, Jose C

    2013-01-15

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a particle-tracking model to simulate the transport of floating debris washed into the North Pacific Ocean by the Tohoku tsunami. A release scenario for the tsunami debris is based on coastal population and measured tsunami runup. Archived 2011/2012 hindcast current data is used to model the transport of debris since the tsunami, while data from 2008 to 2012 is used to investigate the distribution of debris on timescales up to 4years. The vast amount of debris pushed into ocean likely represents thousands of years worth of 'normal' litter flux from Japan's urbanized coastline. This is important since a significant fraction of the debris will be comprised of plastics, some of which will degrade into tiny particles and be consumed by marine organisms, thereby allowing adsorbed organic pollutants to enter our food supply in quantities much higher than present.

  13. Warm Circumstellar Debris Disks: Dynamical Excitation by Massive External Perturbers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika; Naoz, Smadar; Vican, Laura; Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, Ben M.; Holmbeck, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Observations of circumstellar debris disks have revealed that a subset of this population are warm disks (~300 K). A dynamically excited disk may indicate the presence of an exoplanet orbiting within and stirring the disk. However, observations suggest another possible mechanism for heating a debris disk: an external stellar-mass perturber exciting the eccentricities and inclinations of the particles in a disk.We explore the consequences of an external perturber on the evolution of a debris disk using secular analysis and collisional N-body simulations. The perturber excites the eccentricities of the particles in the disk via the Kozai-Lidov mechanism, triggering a collisional cascade among the planetesimals. These collisions produce smaller dust grains and damp the particles' larger eccentricities.We present the results of our study and discuss the connections to observations of warm disks and the implications for planet formation.

  14. Operational source receptor calculations for large agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauss, Michael; Shamsudheen, Semeena V.; Valdebenito, Alvaro; Pommier, Matthieu; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For Air quality policy an important question is how much of the air pollution within an urbanized region can be attributed to local sources and how much of it is imported through long-range transport. This is critical information for a correct assessment of the effectiveness of potential emission measures. The ratio between indigenous and long-range transported air pollution for a given region depends on its geographic location, the size of its area, the strength and spatial distribution of emission sources, the time of the year, but also - very strongly - on the current meteorological conditions, which change from day to day and thus make it important to provide such calculations in near-real-time to support short-term legislation. Similarly, long-term analysis over longer periods (e.g. one year), or of specific air quality episodes in the past, can help to scientifically underpin multi-regional agreements and long-term legislation. Within the European MACC projects (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) and the transition to the operational CAMS service (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) the computationally efficient EMEP MSC-W air quality model has been applied with detailed emission data, comprehensive calculations of chemistry and microphysics, driven by high quality meteorological forecast data (up to 96-hour forecasts), to provide source-receptor calculations on a regular basis in forecast mode. In its current state, the product allows the user to choose among different regions and regulatory pollutants (e.g. ozone and PM) to assess the effectiveness of fictive emission reductions in air pollutant emissions that are implemented immediately, either within the agglomeration or outside. The effects are visualized as bar charts, showing resulting changes in air pollution levels within the agglomeration as a function of time (hourly resolution, 0 to 4 days into the future). The bar charts not only allow assessing the effects of emission

  15. Shields for Enhanced Protection Against High-Speed Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2003-01-01

    A report describes improvements over the conventional Whipple shield (two thin, spaced aluminum walls) for protecting spacecraft against high-speed impacts of orbiting debris. The debris in question arises mainly from breakup of older spacecraft. The improved shields include exterior "bumper" layers composed of hybrid fabrics woven from combinations of ceramic fibers and high-density metallic wires or, alternatively, completely metallic outer layers composed of high-strength steel or copper wires. These shields are designed to be light in weight, yet capable of protecting against orbital debris with mass densities up to about 9 g/cubic cm, without generating damaging secondary debris particles. As yet another design option, improved shields can include sparsely distributed wires made of shape memory metals that can be thermally activated from compact storage containers to form shields of predetermined shape upon arrival in orbit. The improved shields could also be used to augment shields installed previously.

  16. Target debris collection studies for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Archuleta, T. N.; Bradley, P. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, G.; Obst, A. W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-08-01

    At the recently completed National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the initial set of diagnostics to be deployed are focused on measuring neutrons and γ's generated by d(t,n)α reactions in the imploded capsule. Although valuable for understanding pre-ignition experiments, this abbreviated diagnostic suite provides an incomplete picture of the plasma conditions obtained. Prompt radiochemical techniques, based on induced neutron and charged particle reactions within the imploded target, provide a novel and interesting new perspective. To enable these techniques requires the collection and assay of activated target material. In Nov. 2008, experiments were performed using the Omega Laser at the University of Rochester to study the efficiency of collecting debris from directly driven targets. Results from these experiments indicate that target debris was successfully collected, and the debris thermalization and transport scheme enhanced the debris collection up to 347% over direct collection.

  17. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  18. Shields for Enhanced Protection Against High-Speed Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2003-01-01

    A report describes improvements over the conventional Whipple shield (two thin, spaced aluminum walls) for protecting spacecraft against high-speed impacts of orbiting debris. The debris in question arise mainly from breakup of older spacecraft. The improved shields include exterior bumper layers composed of hybrid fabrics woven from combinations of ceramic fibers and high-density metallic wires or, alternatively, completely metallic outer layers composed of high-strength steel or copper wires. These shields are designed to be light in weight, yet capable of protecting against orbital debris with mass densities up to about 9 g/cm3, without generating damaging secondary debris particles. As yet another design option, improved shields can include sparsely distributed wires made of shape-memory metals that can be thermally activated from compact storage containers to form shields of predetermined shape upon arrival in orbit. The improved shields could also be used to augment shields installed previously.

  19. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-02-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  20. Variation in initiation condition of debris flows in the mountain regions surrounding Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Wang, Yu-jie; Du, Cui; Wang, Yun-qi; Li, Yun-peng

    2016-11-01

    Debris flows in the mountain regions surrounding Beijing have been occurring for a long time and have resulted in great economic losses. In this study, 23 rainstorm events, surficial sediments, and debris flow deposits were analyzed to quantify the area's rainfall threshold and to investigate how such conditions may be used to predict debris flow in this region. Rainfall threshold of intensity-duration (I-D) functions after vegetation recovery was higher than before recovery and also higher than I-D levels in other regions where debris flows are closely associated with runoff. Field investigations revealed that surficial sediments were characterized by coarse-grained sediments and that debris flow deposits lacked fine particles. Local debris flows can be triggered by runoff; however, no single standard equation is used to predict the conditions that lead to runoff-triggered debris flow; and commonly used equations give different values. Here, we propose an empirical function that takes into account peak discharge per width and particle diameter. This model should be verified with further investigations so that it can be used as a reference to analyze the conditions that lead to debris flow in the study area. Finally, debris flows may have been related to occasional storms in the study area, which has been experiencing substantially increased temperatures and decreased annual precipitation. This work provides important information about the conditions that initiated debris flow in the Beijing mountain regions in the last few decades.

  1. Agglomeration of proteins in acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Delissen, Friedmar; Leiterer, Jork; Bienert, Ralf; Emmerling, Franziska; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2008-09-01

    An ultrasonic trap (acoustic levitator) was used as an analytical tool to allow container-free handling of proteins in small sample volumes. This trap was combined for the first time with synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for structure analysis of biological macromolecules in a solution. The microfocus beamline at BESSY was used as a source of intense X-ray radiation. Apoferritin (APO) was used as a model protein, and its aggregation behavior in a levitator was followed from a diluted solution to the solid state. Different stages of APO agglomeration were observed without solid container walls, which may influence aggregation behavior and produce a parasitic scattering background. Starting with a volume of 5 microL we analyzed the concentration dependence of APO structure factors in the range from 5 to 1,200 mg/mL (solid protein). The solution was stirred automatically due to convection inside the droplet caused by the ultrasonic field. SAXS data recording of APO was performed in time intervals of 60 s during an aggregation experiment of 30 to 60 min. PMID:18607573

  2. Physical properties of soils in Rostov agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbov, S. N.; Bezuglova, O. S.; Abrosimov, K. N.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Tagiverdiev, S. S.; Morozov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    Physical properties of natural and anthropogenically transformed soils of Rostov agglomeration were examined. The data obtained by conventional methods and new approaches to the study of soil physical properties (in particular, tomographic study of soil monoliths) were used for comparing the soils of different functional zones of the urban area. For urban territories in the steppe zone, a comparison of humus-accumulative horizons (A, Asod, Ap, and buried [A] horizons) made it possible to trace tendencies of changes in surface soils under different anthropogenic impacts and in the buried and sealed soils. The microtomographic study demonstrated differences in the bulk density and aggregation of urban soils from different functional zones. The A horizon in the forest-park zone is characterized by good aggregation and high porosity, whereas buried humus-accumulative horizons of anthropogenically transformed soils are characterized by poor aggregation and low porosity. The traditional parameters of soil structure and texture also proved to be informative for the identification of urban pedogenesis.

  3. Review of ash agglomeration in fluidized bed gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Matulevicius, E.S.; Golan, L.P.

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the data and mathematical models which describe the phenomena involved in the agglomeration of ash in fluidized bed coal gasifiers (FBG). Besides highlighting the data and theoretical models, this review lists areas where there is a lack of information regarding the actual mechanisms of agglomeration. Also, potential areas for further work are outlined. The work is directed at developing models of agglomeration which could be included in computer codes describing fluidized bed gasifier phenomena, e.g., FLAG and CHEMFLUB which have been developed for the US Department of Energy. 134 references, 24 figures, 13 tables.

  4. Current Issues in Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    During the past two decades, great strides have been made in the international community regarding orbital debris mitigation. The majority of space-faring nations have reached a consensus on an initial set of orbital debris mitigation measures. Implementation of and compliance with the IADC and UN space debris mitigation guidelines should remain a high priority. Improvements of the IADC and UN space debris mitigation guidelines should continue as technical consensus permits. The remediation of the near-Earth space environment will require a significant and long-term undertaking.

  5. Agglomeration-Free Distributor for Fluidized Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, F.; Sinica, A.; Levenspiel, O.

    1986-01-01

    New gas distributor for fluidized beds prevents hot particles from reacting on it and forming hard crust. In reduction of iron ore in fluidized bed, ore particles do not sinter on distributor and perhaps clog it or otherwise interfere with gas flow. Distributor also relatively cool. In fluidized-bed production of silicon, inflowing silane does not decompose until within bed of hot silicon particles and deposits on them. Plates of spiral distributor arranged to direct incoming gas into spiral flow. Turbulence in flow reduces frequency of contact between fluidized-bed particles and distributor.

  6. Development of acoustic agglomerator. Test plan for high temperature high pressure acoustic agglomerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-08-01

    The design specifications for the HTHP AA Facility are listed. The facility is an open-loop, air flow system with subsystems and components to provide the high temperature, high pressure, residence time, dust loading and acoustic irradiation to simulate the aerosol and Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) AA system of a Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustor (PFBC), Combined Cycle Power Plant. Data sampling, instrumentation, and automatic controls and data analysis systems are also provided. This test plan describes the testing to be done on the high temperature, high pressure acoustic agglomerator (HTHP AA) at Pen State University's High Intensity Acoustic Laboratory.

  7. Microplastic debris in sandhoppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, A.; Ungherese, G.; Ciofini, M.; Lapucci, A.; Camaiti, M.

    2013-09-01

    Adults of the sandhopper Talitrus saltator were fed with dry fish food mixed with polyethylene microspheres (diameter 10-45 μm). Observations of homogenized guts revealed the presence of microspheres independently of their dimensions. The gut resident time (GRT) was recorded and most of the microspheres are expelled in 24 h. Microspheres are totally expelled in one week. Preliminary investigations did not show any consequence of microsphere ingestion on the survival capacity in the laboratory. FT-IR analyses carried out on faeces of freshly collected individuals revealed the presence of polyethylene and polypropylene. This confirms that microplastic debris could be swallowed by T. saltator in natural conditions.

  8. Space Debris Hazard Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, Elmer H.; Winslow, Paul C., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The hazard to space vehicles from natural space debris has been explored. A survey of the available information pertinent to this problem is presented. The hope is that this presentation gives a coherent picture of the knowledge to date in terms of the topic covered. The conclusion reached is that a definite hazard exists but that it can only be poorly assessed on the basis of present information. The need for direct measurement of this hazard is obvious, and some of the problems involved in making these direct measurements have been explored.

  9. Measurement of drug agglomerates in powder blending simulation samples by near infrared chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyong; Woldu, Abraham; Kelly, Richard; McCool, Jim; Bruce, Rick; Rasmussen, Henrik; Cunningham, John; Winstead, Denita

    2008-02-28

    This research note describes a powder blending simulation study conducted using 20-mL scintillation vials and a bench-top rotating mixer on a scale of 2g for each sample. In order to investigate the impact of mean particle size and size distribution on blending behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the drug substance was separated into sieve fractions using the US standard sieves of 60, 80, 100, 200, and 325mesh. Each of the fractions was mixed with two excipients (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and microcrystalline cellulose) for up to 20min. Then the blending samples were analyzed by a near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) system. The NIR-CI system was able to measure API particles/domains (agglomerates) at 0.001mm(2) and above within a 11.2mmx9.0mm field of view. It was found that blends prepared with larger API particles (60-200 mesh) contain agglomerated API domains > or =0.1mm(2). The blends prepared with finer API particles (< or =325 mesh) show the characteristics of a randomized mixing. This simple and effective method can be used for evaluation of blending behavior for APIs in formulation development. PMID:17951017

  10. De-agglomeration Effect of the US Pharmacopeia and Alberta Throats on Carrier-Based Powders in Commercial Inhalation Products.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Zhou, Qi Tony; Tong, Zhenbo; Leung, Cassandra; Decharaksa, Janwit; Yang, Runyu; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-11-01

    The US pharmacopeia (USP) and Alberta throats were recently reported to cause further de-agglomeration of carrier-free powders emitted from some dry powder inhalers (DPIs). This study assessed if they have similar influences on commercially available carrier-based DPIs. A straight tube, a USP throat, and an Alberta throat (non-coated and coated) were used for cascade impaction testing. Aerosol fine particle fraction (FPF ≤ 5 μm) was computed to evaluate throat-induced de-agglomeration. Computational fluid dynamics are employed to simulate airflow patterns and particle trajectories inside the USP and Alberta throats. For all tested products, no significant differences in the in vitro aerosol performance were observed between the USP throat and the straight tube. Using fine lactose carriers (<10 μm), Symbicort(®) and Oxis(™) showed minimal impaction inside the Alberta throat and resulted in similar FPF among all induction ports. For products using coarse lactose carriers (>10 μm), impaction frequency and energy inside the Alberta throat were significant. Further de-agglomeration was noted inside the non-coated Alberta throat for Seretide(®) and Spiriva(®), but agglomerates emitted from Relenza(®), Ventolin(®), and Foradil(®) did not further break up into smaller fractions. The coated Alberta throat considerably reduced the FPF values of these products due to the high throat retention, but they generally agreed better with the in vivo data. In conclusion, depending on the powder formulation (including carrier particle size), the inhaler, and the induction port, further de-agglomeration could happen ex-inhaler and create differences in the in vitro measurements.

  11. Column oil agglomeration of fly ash with ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.L.; Champagne, K.J.; Soong, Y.; Finseth, D.H.

    1999-07-01

    A promising oil agglomeration process has been developed for the beneficiation of fly ash using a six-foot agglomeration column. Carbon concentrates have been separated from fly ash with yields greater than 60 % and purities of 55 to 74 %. The parameters examined in the study include ultrasonic exposure, pulse rate, frequency, agitation speed, and blade configuration. The effects of the experimental variables on the quality of separation are discussed.

  12. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris generated in a sliding elastohydrodynamic contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Nagaraj, H. S.; Winer, W. O.

    1977-01-01

    The ferrograph was used to analyze wear debris generated in a sliding elastohydrodynamic contact. The amount of wear debris correlates well with the ratio of film thickness to composite surface roughness. Essentially all of the generated wear particles were of the normal rubbing wear type.

  13. Failure Analysis in Space: International Space Station (ISS) Starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, V. S.; Wright, M. C.; McDanels, S. J.; Lubas, D.; Tucker, B.; Marciniak, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the debris analysis of the Starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ), a mechanism that is designed to keep the solar arrays facing the sun. The goal of this was to identify the failure mechanism based on surface morphology and to determine the source of debris through elemental and particle analysis.

  14. Quantum dot agglomerates in biological media and their characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Moquin, Alexandre; Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica; Winnik, Françoise M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the biological environment of nanoparticles influences their physical properties and changes their pristine physicochemical identity. In order to understand, or predict, the interactions of cells with specific nanoparticles, it is critical to know their size, shape, and agglomeration state not only in their nascent state but also in biological media. Here, we use asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Visible absorption detections to determine the relative concentration of isolated nanoparticles and agglomerates in the case of three types of semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Media (DMEM) containing 10% of fetal bovine serum (DMEM-FBS). AF4 analysis also yielded the size and size distribution of the agglomerates as a function of the time of QDs incubation in DMEM-FBS. The preferred modes of internalization of the QDs are assessed for three cell-types, N9 microglia, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and human embryonic kidney cells (Hek293), by confocal fluorescence imaging of live cells, quantitative determination of the intracellular QD concentration, and flow cytometry. There is an excellent correlation between the agglomeration status of the three types of QDs in DMEM-FBS determined by AF4 analysis and their preferred mode of uptake by the three cell lines, which suggests that AF4 yields an accurate description of the nanoparticles as they encounter cells and advocates its use as a means to characterize particles under evaluation.

  15. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Potas, Todd A.; DeWall, Raymond A.; Musich, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  16. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

    1992-11-10

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  17. Orbital Debris Studies at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Gene; Krisko, Paula; Whitlock, Dave

    2007-01-01

    Any discussion of expanding the capabilities of Space Surveillance Networks to include tracking and cataloging smaller objects will require a good understanding of orbital debris. In the current U.S. catalog of over 11,000 objects, more than 50% are classified as "debris" to include fragmentation debris, operational debris, liquid metal coolant, and Westford needles. If the catalog is increased to 100,000 objects by lowering the tracked object size threshold, almost all of the additional objects will be orbital debris. The Orbital Debris Program Office has been characterizing the small orbital debris environment through measurements and modeling for many years. This presentation will specifically discuss two different studies conducted at NASA. The first study was done in 1992 and examined the requirements and produced a conceptual design for a Collision Avoidance Network to protect the Space Station Freedom from centimeter sized orbital debris while minimizing maneuvers. The second study was conducted last year and produced NASA s estimate of the orbital population for the years 2015 and 2030 for objects 2 cm and larger.

  18. Seabirds and floating plastic debris.

    PubMed

    Cadée, Gerhard C

    2002-11-01

    80% of floating plastic debris freshly washed ashore on a Dutch coast showed peckmarks made by birds at sea. They either mistake these debris for cuttlebones or simply test all floating objects. Ingestion of plastic is deleterious for marine organisms. It is urgent to set measures to plastic litter production.

  19. Space debris modeling at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-10-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOVLE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard (NSS) 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been completed with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NSS 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the application of

  20. Plastic debris in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    Cózar, Andrés; Echevarría, Fidel; González-Gordillo, J Ignacio; Irigoien, Xabier; Ubeda, Bárbara; Hernández-León, Santiago; Palma, Alvaro T; Navarro, Sandra; García-de-Lomas, Juan; Ruiz, Andrea; Fernández-de-Puelles, María L; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-07-15

    There is a rising concern regarding the accumulation of floating plastic debris in the open ocean. However, the magnitude and the fate of this pollution are still open questions. Using data from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation, regional surveys, and previously published reports, we show a worldwide distribution of plastic on the surface of the open ocean, mostly accumulating in the convergence zones of each of the five subtropical gyres with comparable density. However, the global load of plastic on the open ocean surface was estimated to be on the order of tens of thousands of tons, far less than expected. Our observations of the size distribution of floating plastic debris point at important size-selective sinks removing millimeter-sized fragments of floating plastic on a large scale. This sink may involve a combination of fast nano-fragmentation of the microplastic into particles of microns or smaller, their transference to the ocean interior by food webs and ballasting processes, and processes yet to be discovered. Resolving the fate of the missing plastic debris is of fundamental importance to determine the nature and significance of the impacts of plastic pollution in the ocean.

  1. Plastic debris in the open ocean

    PubMed Central

    Cózar, Andrés; Echevarría, Fidel; González-Gordillo, J. Ignacio; Irigoien, Xabier; Úbeda, Bárbara; Hernández-León, Santiago; Palma, Álvaro T.; Navarro, Sandra; García-de-Lomas, Juan; Ruiz, Andrea; Fernández-de-Puelles, María L.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a rising concern regarding the accumulation of floating plastic debris in the open ocean. However, the magnitude and the fate of this pollution are still open questions. Using data from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation, regional surveys, and previously published reports, we show a worldwide distribution of plastic on the surface of the open ocean, mostly accumulating in the convergence zones of each of the five subtropical gyres with comparable density. However, the global load of plastic on the open ocean surface was estimated to be on the order of tens of thousands of tons, far less than expected. Our observations of the size distribution of floating plastic debris point at important size-selective sinks removing millimeter-sized fragments of floating plastic on a large scale. This sink may involve a combination of fast nano-fragmentation of the microplastic into particles of microns or smaller, their transference to the ocean interior by food webs and ballasting processes, and processes yet to be discovered. Resolving the fate of the missing plastic debris is of fundamental importance to determine the nature and significance of the impacts of plastic pollution in the ocean. PMID:24982135

  2. Summary of Disposable Debris Shields (DDS) Analysis for Development of Solid Debris Collection at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D; Lindvall, R; Gostic, J M

    2011-11-20

    is simply falling to the bottom of the chamber. In either case, it was determined that using the DDS, or fielding a debris collector at the chamber wall, was not feasible for solid debris collection at NIF due to the small amount of debris that had been collected. In addition, since the glass shields suffered quite a bit of damage from particles impacting the surface, glass was ruled out as a collection medium.

  3. An Introduction to Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David

    2008-04-01

    Space debris is any human-made object in orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose, including defunct satellites, discarded equipment and rocket stages, and fragments from the breakup of satellites and rocket stages. It is a concern because--due to its very high speed in orbit--even relatively small pieces can damage or destroy satellites in a collision. Since debris at high altitudes can stay in orbit for decades or longer, it accumulates as more is produced and the risk of collisions with satellites grows. Since there is currently no effective way to remove large amounts of debris from orbit, controlling the production of debris is essential for preserving the long-term use of space. Today there are 860 active satellites in orbit, supporting a wide range of civil and military uses. The 50 years of space activity since the launch of Sputnik 1 has also resulted in well over half a million pieces of orbiting debris larger than 1 cm in size. There are two main sources of space debris: (1) routine space activity and the accidental breakup of satellites and stages placed in orbit by such activity, and (2) the testing or use of destructive anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons that physically collide with satellites at high speed. The international community is attempting to reduce the first category by developing strict guidelines to limit the debris created as a result of routine space activities. However, the destruction of a single large spy satellite by an ASAT weapon could double the total amount of large debris in low earth orbit, and there are currently no international restrictions on these systems. This talk will give an introduction to what's in space, the origins of space debris, efforts to stem its growth, the threat it poses to satellites in orbit, and the long-term evolution of the debris population.

  4. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold and silver nanoparticles dispersed in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of size distribution function, morphology, and extinction spectra of Ag nanoparticles and Au-Ag nanoparticles mixture dispersed in liquids under picosecond laser exposure are experimentally studied. It is shown that picosecond laser exposure of dense aqueous solutions of NPs (above 1014 particles per ml) leads to formation of elongated agglomerates. Time dependence of the size distribution function is monitored during irradiation process and compared to optical spectra and Transmission Electron Microscope images. Exposure of Au-Ag nanoparticles mixture is shown to result in formation of NPs chains consisting of Au and Ag, or Au-Ag alloy NPs.

  5. On the effects of solar storms to the decaying orbital space debris

    SciTech Connect

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Rachman, Abdul

    2014-03-24

    Any man-made object in Earth's orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose is classified as orbital debris. Debris objects come from a variety of sources. The majority is related to satellite fragmentation. Other major sources of debris are propulsion systems, and fragmentation of spent upper stages, payload and mission related debris. Serious concern about orbital debris has been growing. Knowledge of the future debris environment is important to both satellite designers, and mission planners, who need to know what hazards a satellite might encounter during the course of its mission. Therefore, it is important to know how much debris is in orbit, where it is located, and when it will decay. The debris environment is complex and dynamically evolving. Objects of different shape and size behave differently in orbit. The geoeffectiveness space environments include solar flux at 10.7 cm, solar energetic particles flux or speed, solar wind flow pressure, electric field, and geomagnetic indices. We study the decaying orbital debris from Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages in conjuction with geoeffectiveness space environments through time epoch correlation. We found that the decaying and reentry orbital debris are triggered by space environment enhancement within at least one week before reentry. It is not necessary a transient or high energetic and severe solar storm events are needed in decaying processes. We propose that the gradual enhancement processes of space environment will cause satellite surface charging due to energetic electron and enhance drag force.

  6. Vulnerability Assessment of Rainfall-Induced Debris Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G. Y.; Wong, D. W.; Chiu, L. S.

    2006-05-01

    Debris flow is a common hazard triggered by large amount of rainfall over mountainous areas. A debris flow event results from a complex interaction between rainfall and topographical properties of watersheds. Heavy rainfall facilitates this process by increasing pore water pressure, seepage force and reducing effective stress of soils (normal stress carried by soil particles at the points of contact). Since debris flow events are closely related to topography and rainfall, the goal of this research is to assess debris flow vulnerability related to these two factors. Objectives of this research are to: (1) examine new spatial interpolation techniques to estimate high spatial rainfall data relevant to debris flows. (2) develop topographical factors using Geography Information System (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) approaches and (3) combine the estimated rainfall and topographical factors to assess the vulnerability of debris flow. We examined three spatial interpolation techniques: adaptive inversed distance weight (AIDW), simple kriging and spatial disaggregation using wind induced-topographic effect that incorporates gauge measurements, satellite remote sensing data (TRMM). The topographical factors are derived from high resolution digital elevation model (DEM), and adopt fuzzy-based topographical models proposed by Tseng (2004). Estimated rainfall and topographical factors are processed by self-organizing maps (SOM) to provide vulnerability assessment. To demonstrate our technique, rainfall data collected by 39 rain gauges in the central part of Taiwan during the passage of Typhoon Tori-Ji around July 29, 2001 were used. Results indicate that the proposed spatial interpolation methods outperform existing methods (i.e. kriging, inverse distance weight, and co-kriging methods). The vulnerability assessment of 187 debris flows watersheds in the study area will be presented. Keyword: Debris flow, spatial interpolation, adaptive inverse distance weight, TRMM, self

  7. Debris and meteoroid proportions deduced from impact crater residue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthoud, Lucinda; Mandeville, Jean-Claude; Durin, Christian; Borg, Janet

    1995-01-01

    This study is a further investigation of space-exposed samples recovered from the LDEF satellite and the Franco-Russian 'Aragatz' dust collection experiment on the Mir Space Station. Impact craters with diameters ranging from 1 to 900 micron were found on the retrieved samples. Elemental analysis of residues found in the impact craters was carried out using Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). The analyses show evidence of micrometeoroid and orbital debris origins for the impacts. The proportions of these two components vary according to particle size and experimental position with respect to the leading edge of the spacecraft. On the LDEF leading edge 17 percent of the impacts were apparently caused by micrometeoroids and 11 percent by debris; on the LDEF trailing edge 23 percent of the impacts are apparently caused by micrometeoroids and 4 percent consist of debris particles - mostly larger than 3 micron in diameter - in elliptical orbits around the Earth. For Mir, the analyses indicate that micrometeoroids form 23 percent of impacts and debris 9 percent. However, we note that 60-70 percent of the craters are unidentifiable, so the definitive proportions of natural v. man-made particles are yet to be determined. Experiments carried out using a light gas gun to accelerate glass spheres and fragments demonstrate the influence of particle shape on crater morphology. The experiments also show that it is more difficult to analyze the residues produced by an irregular fragment than those produced by a spherical projectile. If the particle is travelling above a certain velocity, it vaporizes upon impact and no residues are left. Simulation experiments carried out with an electrostatic accelerator indicate that this limit is about 14 km/s for Fe particles impacting Al targets. This chemical analysis cut-off may bias interpretations of the relative populations of meteoroid and orbital debris. Oblique impacts and multiple foil detectors provide a higher likelihood

  8. Dispersion and Filtration of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Measurement of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Pui, David Y.H.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) tend to form bundles due to their geometry and van der Walls forces, which usually complicates studies of the CNT properties. Dispersion plays a significant role in CNT studies and we summarize dispersion techniques to generate airborne CNTs from suspensions or powders. We describe in detail our technique of CNT aerosolization with controlled degree of agglomeration using an electrospray system. The results of animal inhalation studies using the electrosprayed CNTs are presented. We have performed filtration experiments for CNTs through a screen filter. A numerical model has been established to simulate the CNT filtration experiments. Both the modeling and experimental results show that the CNT penetration is less than the penetration for a sphere with the same mobility diameter, which is mainly due to the larger interception length of the CNTs. There is a need for instruments capable of fast and online measurement of gas-borne nanoparticle agglomerates. We developed an instrument Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA) and the measurement results for diesel exhaust particulates are presented. The results presented here are pertinent to non-spherical aerosol particles, and illustrate the effects of particle morphology on aerosol behaviors. PMID:23355749

  9. Drug agglomeration and dissolution--what is the influence of powder mixing?

    PubMed

    Kale, Kamakshi; Hapgood, Karen; Stewart, Peter

    2009-05-01

    This study determined the influence of mixing speed and time on the dissolution and deagglomeration of a micronised, poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin, in lactose interactive mixtures. Mixing occurred in a Turbula mixer; dissolution studies were performed using the USP paddle method, and the extent of deagglomeration was determined using modelling strategies and laser diffraction particle sizing of the powder mixtures. During low energy mixing at low rates and short mixing times, dissolution profiles showed an unusual flat asymptote indicating incomplete extents of dissolution caused by agglomerates that did not readily disperse in the dissolution medium. The study showed that increasing both speed and time of mixing increased the extent of dissolution and deagglomeration of the indomethacin powder. Nonlinear least squares modelling of the dissolution data using a sigmoidal equation provided estimates of the extent and rate of dissolution. Mixing speed and time had a much greater influence on the extent of dissolution which was controlled by deagglomeration than on the initial dissolution rate which was related to dispersed indomethacin. While some deagglomeration did occur at higher mixing energies, the deagglomeration of the indomethacin was not complete with only about 58-80% of indomethacin particles overlapping with the primary indomethacin particle size distribution. The significant outcome of this study was that mixing conditions have a major influence on the mixing quality, especially in areas where agglomerate characteristics influence performance. PMID:19347972

  10. Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shield Engineering Development Practice and Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwitter, James G.; Adams, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    A document describes a series of models created for the determination of the probability of survival of critical spacecraft components from particle strike damage caused by hypervelocity impact of meteoroids and/or orbital debris. These models were integrated with both shield design and hypervelocity impact testing to develop adequate protection of said components to meet mission survivability requirements.

  11. Rheological changes induced by clast fragmentation in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Lizeth; Sarocchi, Damiano; Soto, Enrique; Borselli, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    On the basis of rotating drum analogue experiments, we describe a fragmentation process acting within debris flows during transport and its influence on rheologic behavior. Our hypothesis is based on a detailed textural analysis including granulometry, clast morphology, and rheologic properties of the fluid matrix. Results of the experiments point out that breakage of certain granulometric classes produces fine particles like fine sand and silt. The population growth of fine clasts with time leads to an increase in yield strength and viscosity that progressively modifies the rheologic behavior. From a textural point of view, this is reflected in a bimodal granulometric distribution. Up to now this characteristic has been explained as the effect of bulking and/or sedimentation processes during transport. Our experimental results show that the type of fragmentation depends on particle size and is the consequence of strong clast-clast interaction and clast-fluid interactions. Coarse particles develop small fractures which cause the loss of sharp edges and asperities. Medium-sized particles develop through-going fractures that cause them to break apart. The latter process explains why intermediate granulometric classes progressively diminish with time in debris flows. Analogue experiments enable us to study the efficacy of clast fragmentation in modifying the textural character and flow behavior of debris flows without the influence of external factors such as erosion and sedimentation. The obtained results constitute the base of a new approach for modeling debris flow dynamics.

  12. Characterisation of debris from laser and mechanical cutting of bone.

    PubMed

    Rachmanis, Nikolaos; McGuinness, Garrett B; McGeough, Joseph A

    2014-07-01

    Laser cutting of bones has been proposed as a technology in orthopaedic surgery. In this short study, the laser-bone interaction was examined using a pulsed erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser and compared to a conventional cutting technique. Microscopic analysis revealed the nature of waste debris and showed higher proportions of finer particles for conventional sagittal sawing compared to laser cutting.

  13. Implementation of the hazardous debris rule

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, J.E.

    1993-01-05

    Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

  14. Colloidal stability of coal-simulated suspensions in selective agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Schurger, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A coal suspension was simulated by using graphite to simulate the carbonaceous fraction and kaolinite clay to simulate the ash fraction. Separate studies on each material established their response to additions of oxidized pyrite (ferrous sulfate) and a humic acid simulate (salicylic acid) in terms of zeta potentials profiles with pH and Ionic strength. Concentrations of iron and salicylic acid evaluated were 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M and 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M, respectively. The zeta potentials profiles of graphite, clay and hexadecane were negative throughout the pH ranges studied. The addition of iron lowered the zeta potentials all of the suspensions under all pH and ionic strength conditions. Salicylic acid decreased the graphite and hexadecane zeta potentials but had no effect on the clay zeta potential profiles. Agglomeration of graphite with bridging liquid shows distinct time dependent rate mechanisms, a initial growth of graphite agglomerates followed by consolidation phase. Graphite agglomeration was rapid with the maximum amount of agglomerate volume growth occurring in under 2-4 minutes. Agglomeration in the first two minutes was characterized by a 1st order rate mechanism. The presence of either Iron and salicylic acid generally improved the first order rates. The addition of clay also improved the first order rates except in the presence of salicylic acid. Heteroagglomeration of graphite with clay was found by hydrodynamic arguments to be unfavored. A multicomponent population balance model which had been developed for evaluating collision efficiencies of coal, ash and pyrite selective agglomeration was evaluated to explain these results. The growth and consolidation characteristics of graphite agglomeration for the experimental conditions examined herein revealed the limitations of such as model for this application.

  15. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The website provides information about the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at JSC, which is the lead NASA center for orbital debris research. It is recognized world-wide for its leadership in addressing orbital debris issues. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has taken the international lead in conducting measurements of the environment and in developing the technical consensus for adopting mitigation measures to protect users of the orbital environment. Work at the center continues with developing an improved understanding of the orbital debris environment and measures that can be taken to control its growth. Major Contents: Orbital Debris research is divided into the following five broad efforts. Each area of research contains specific information as follows: 1) Modeling - NASA scientists continue to develop and upgrade orbital debris models to describe and characterize the current and future debris environment. Evolutionary and engineering models are described in detail. Downloadable items include a document in PDF format and executable software. 2) Measurements - Measurements of near-Earth orbital debris are accomplished by conducting ground-based and space-based observations of the orbital debris environment. The data from these sources provide validation of the environment models and identify the presence of new sources. Radar, optical and surface examinations are described. External links to related topics are provided. 3) Protection - Orbital debris protection involves conducting hypervelocity impact measurements to assess the risk presented by orbital debris to operating spacecraft and developing new materials and new designs to provide better protection from the environment with less weight penalty. The data from this work provides the link between the environment defined by the models and the risk presented by that environment to operating spacecraft and provides recommendations on design and operations procedures to reduce the risk as

  16. Investigation of Orbital Debris: Mitigation, Removal, and Modeling the Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotten, Joel

    The population of objects in orbit around Earth has grown since the late 1950s. Today there are over 21,000 objects over 10 cm in length in orbit, and an estimated 500,000 more between 1 and 10 cm. Only a small fraction of these objects are operational satellites. The rest are debris: old derelict spacecraft or rocket bodies, fragments created as the result of explosions or collisions, discarded objects, slag from solid rockets, or even flaked off paint. Traveling at up to 7 km/s, a collision with even a 1 cm piece of debris could severely damage or destroy a satellite. This dissertation examines three aspects of orbital debris. First, the concept of a self-consuming satellite is explored. This nanosatellite would use its own external structure as propellant to execute a deorbit maneuver at the end of its operational life, thus allowing it to meet current debris mitigation standards. Results from lab experiments examining potential materials for this concept have shown favorable results. Second, Particle in Cell techniques are modified and used to model the plasma plume from a micro-cathode arc thruster. This model is then applied to the concept of an ion beam shepherd satellite. This satellite would use its plasma plume to deorbit another derelict satellite. Results from these simulations indicate the micro-cathode arc thruster could potentially deorbit a derelict CubeSat in a matter of a few weeks. Finally, the orbital debris population at geosynchronous orbit is examined, focusing on variations in the density of the population as a function of longitude. New insights are revealed demonstrating that the variation in population density is slightly less than previously reported.

  17. Space Shuttle and Launch Pad Lift-Off Debris Transport Analysis: SRB Plume-Driven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Strutzenberg, Louis; Dougherty, Sam; Radke, Jerry; Liever, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the Space Shuttle Lift-Off model developed for potential Lift-Off Debris transport. A critical Lift-Off portion of the flight is defined from approximately 1.5 sec after SRB Ignition up to 'Tower Clear', where exhaust plume interactions with the Launch Pad occur. A CFD model containing the Space Shuttle and Launch Pad geometry has been constructed and executed. The CFD model works in conjunction with a debris particle transport model and a debris particle impact damage tolerance model. These models have been used to assess the effects of the Space Shuttle plumes, the wind environment, their interactions with the Launch Pad, and their ultimate effect on potential debris during Lift-Off. Emphasis in this paper is on potential debris that might be caught by the SRB plumes.

  18. A non-immersed induction conductivity system for controlling supersaturation in corrosive media: the case of gibbsite crystals agglomeration in Bayer liquors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyssiecq, I.; Veesler, S.; Boistelle, R.

    1996-11-01

    Agglomeration of gibbsite Al(OH) 3 crystallites is an important stage of the Bayer process, aiming at increasing the initial size of the particles. In the present work, a semi-continuous crystallizer working at constant and imposed supersaturation, and equipped with an automatic withdrawal system was developed to study the agglomeration of gibbsite crystals in supersaturated Bayer liquors. The liquor conductivity was measured using an induction conductivity system placed around the crystallizer, the conductivity regulation being used to work at constant supersaturation. Using this system allowed one to work with both a small crystallizer and a highly corrosive and abrasive suspension of gibbsite in a five molar caustic soda solution at 70°C. Analyses of the withdrawals were carried out with an Elzone particle counter, in order to draw {N(t)}/{N(0) = f(t)} plots, representing the decrease of crystal number with time, due to agglomeration.

  19. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Zhang, F.

    1994-05-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. A model mixing system has been previously designed and constructed for conducting oil agglomeration tests in such a way that agitator speed and torque can be measured as well as agglomeration performance. Equipment is also provided for monitoring the progress of agglomeration during a batch test. This equipment includes a photometric dispersion analyzer for measuring the turbidity of the particle suspension. In order to measure the turbidity a small stream of material is withdrawn from the mixing tank and conducted through an optical cell associated with the photometric dispersion analyzer. The material is then returned to the mixing tank. A peristaltic pump located between the optical cell and the mixing tank is used for circulating the material. During the past quarter a series of shakedown test were carried out to calibrate the equipment and to determine some of its operating characteristics. The accuracy of the agitator speed and torque measuring instrument was checked. Also the gas dispersing effectiveness of the mixing system was investigated. In addition, the effects of agitator speed and solids concentration on agitator torque and power requirements were studied.

  20. Aerosol-Assisted Solid Debris Collection for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S L; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Ivanov, V V; Astanovitskiy, A L; Lewis, L A; Rundberg, R S

    2010-05-21

    collection device entirely. Our goal is to use this primary ablation wave to our advantage, by the creation of ionized alkali metal halide salt aerosols. This technique is similar to that used by many particle accelerator groups for gas-jet transport. Ideally the salt would be ablated from a substrate, encounter the reaction debris, agglomerate, and be collected for further study. We have done studies at laser and pulsed-power facilities (Titan laser at LLNL, Trident laser at LANL, Zebra z-pinch at Nevada Terawatt Facility) evaluating the hardiness of materials for placement in the NIF target chamber, as well as testing aerosol generation by the incident x-rays generated in device shots. To test this method's potential success in the NIF environment, we have tested KCl, KI, RbI, and CsI films of 1 and 2 um linear thickness on aluminum and silicon wafer substrates in these aforementioned facilities, at varied distances. These salts do ablate in the presence of sufficient x-ray fluence. Further analysis to quantify the final ablation depth as a function of x-ray fluence is ongoing. Half of each sample was masked with a thick tungsten foil for photon opacity. KCl was the most difficult salt to ablate, from comparing the tungsten-masked side of the samples to the unmasked side of the samples. This is likely due to KCl's absorbance peak being at lower wavelengths than that of KI, {approx}160 nm vs. {approx}220 nm, respectively. Samples with and without collimation were tested to identify if any condensation of these ablated salts occurred after ablation. Visual inspection of the silicon wafer witness plates placed parallel to the direction of the incident photons showed that a vapor was deposited on the wafers next to the collimators. Further analysis with EDS in the case of the collimated samples conclusively identified the vapor as CsI. We also intend to examine samples of bare substrate exposed to the same experimental conditions for post-shot change via SEM images, optical

  1. Extrinsic lactose fines improve dry powder inhaler formulation performance of a cohesive batch of budesonide via agglomerate formation and consequential co-deposition.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Hanne; Hebbink, Gerald; Peters, Harry; Huck, Deborah; Makein, Lisa; Price, Robert

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate how the fine particle content of lactose carriers prepared with different types of lactose fines regulates dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation performance of a cohesive batch of micronised budesonide. Budesonide formulations (0.8 wt%) were prepared with three different lactose carriers (Lactohale (LH) LH100, 20 wt% LH210 in LH100 and 20 wt% LH300 in LH100). Fine particle fraction of emitted dose (FPFED) and mean mass aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of budesonide was assessed with a Next Generation Impactor (NGI) using a Cyclohaler at 90 l/min. Morphological and chemical characteristics of particles deposited on Stage 2 were determined using a Malvern Morphologi G3-ID. The results indicate that increasing concentration of lactose fines (<4.5 μm) not only increased the FPFED but also the MMAD of budesonide, suggesting drug deposition in agglomerates. Presence of agglomerates on Stage 2 was confirmed by morphological analysis of particles. Raman analysis of material collected on Stage 2 indicated that the more fine lactose particles were available the more agglomerates of budesonide and lactose were delivered to Stage 2. These results suggest drug-fines agglomerate formation is an important mechanism for how lactose fines improve and regulate DPI formulation performance.

  2. Formulation effects on the release of silica dioxide nanoparticles from paint debris to water.

    PubMed

    Zuin, Stefano; Massari, Andrea; Ferrari, Arlen; Golanski, Luana

    2014-04-01

    Waterborne paints with integrated nanoparticles have been recently introduced into the market as nanoparticles offer improved or novel functionalities to paints. However, the release of nanoparticles during the life cycle of nano-enhanced paint has only been studied to a very limited extent. The paint composition could determine in what quantities and forms the nanoparticles are released. In this work, paint formulations containing the same amount of silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles but differing in the pigment volume concentration (PVC) and in amount and type of binder and pigment, were studied through leaching test to investigate the influence of these parameters on release of Si from paint. The results indicate greater release of Si, about 1.7 wt.% of the SiO2 nanoparticles in the paint, for paint formulated with higher PVC value (63%), suggesting that the PVC is a crucial factor for release of SiO2 nanoparticles from paints. This hypothesis was also based on the fact that agglomerates of SiO2 nanoparticles were only found in leachates from paint with higher PVC. A paint sample with the higher amount of binder and less calcite filler exhibited a lower release of Si among the paints with a low PVC value (35%), and no SiO2 particles were detected in leachates collected from this paint. This could be due to the fact that a high portion of binder forms a suitable matrix to hold the SiO2 ENPs in paint. The paint sample in which the amount of calcite was partially substituted with TiO2 pigment did not show an important reduction on Si release. Our work suggests that paint debris containing SiO2 nanoparticles may release a limited amount of Si into the environment, and that by adjusting the properties of the binder in combination with common pigments it is possible to reduce the release of SiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:24468504

  3. Formulation effects on the release of silica dioxide nanoparticles from paint debris to water.

    PubMed

    Zuin, Stefano; Massari, Andrea; Ferrari, Arlen; Golanski, Luana

    2014-04-01

    Waterborne paints with integrated nanoparticles have been recently introduced into the market as nanoparticles offer improved or novel functionalities to paints. However, the release of nanoparticles during the life cycle of nano-enhanced paint has only been studied to a very limited extent. The paint composition could determine in what quantities and forms the nanoparticles are released. In this work, paint formulations containing the same amount of silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles but differing in the pigment volume concentration (PVC) and in amount and type of binder and pigment, were studied through leaching test to investigate the influence of these parameters on release of Si from paint. The results indicate greater release of Si, about 1.7 wt.% of the SiO2 nanoparticles in the paint, for paint formulated with higher PVC value (63%), suggesting that the PVC is a crucial factor for release of SiO2 nanoparticles from paints. This hypothesis was also based on the fact that agglomerates of SiO2 nanoparticles were only found in leachates from paint with higher PVC. A paint sample with the higher amount of binder and less calcite filler exhibited a lower release of Si among the paints with a low PVC value (35%), and no SiO2 particles were detected in leachates collected from this paint. This could be due to the fact that a high portion of binder forms a suitable matrix to hold the SiO2 ENPs in paint. The paint sample in which the amount of calcite was partially substituted with TiO2 pigment did not show an important reduction on Si release. Our work suggests that paint debris containing SiO2 nanoparticles may release a limited amount of Si into the environment, and that by adjusting the properties of the binder in combination with common pigments it is possible to reduce the release of SiO2 nanoparticles.

  4. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-28

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as 'self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here. PMID:26508277

  5. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  6. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  7. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as `self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here.

  8. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and highly stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Actual cycle results are verified using quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  9. Modeling collisions in circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika

    2015-10-01

    resonances near the chaotic zone. I investigate the effects of the initial eccentricity distribution of the disk particles and find a negligible effect on the gap size at Jovian planet masses, since collisions tend to erase memory of the initial particle eccentricity distributions. I also find that the presence of Trojan analogs is a potentially powerful diagnostic of planets in the mass range ˜1--10MJup. I apply my model to place new upper limits on planets around Fomalhaut, HR 4796 A, HD 202628, HD 181327, and beta Pictoris. Finally, to show how SMACK can be used to analyze a single debris disk in detail, I present a new model of the beta Pictoris disk and planet system that, for the first time, combines simulations of the colliding planetesimals and the dynamics of the dust grains, allowing me to model features and asymmetries in both submillimeter and scattered light images of the disk. I combine a 100,000 superparticle SMACK simulation with N-body integrations of the dust produced by the simulated collisions. I find that secular perturbations of the planet's measured inclination and eccentricity can explain the observed warp and planetesimal ring, while collisions between planetesimals shape the disk by eroding close-in material. The complex 3D structure of the disk due to the perturbations from the planet creates an azimuthally asymmetric spatial distribution of collisions, which could contribute to the observed azimuthal clump of CO gas seen with ALMA. My simulations of the small dust grains produced by collisions demonstrate that the "birth ring" approximation for beta Pictoris fails to account for the ˜54% of dust mass produced outside of the planetesimal ring. I also reproduce the gross morphology of high-resolution scattered light images of the disk, including the two-disk "x"-pattern seen in scattered light, which has not been replicated by previous dust dynamics models.

  10. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Debris analysis. 417.211 Section 417.211... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.211 Debris analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a debris analysis. For an orbital or suborbital launch, a debris...

  11. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Debris analysis. 417.211 Section 417.211... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.211 Debris analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a debris analysis. For an orbital or suborbital launch, a debris...

  12. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Debris analysis. 417.211 Section 417.211... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.211 Debris analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a debris analysis. For an orbital or suborbital launch, a debris...

  13. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Debris analysis. 417.211 Section 417.211... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.211 Debris analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a debris analysis. For an orbital or suborbital launch, a debris...

  14. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Debris analysis. 417.211 Section 417.211... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.211 Debris analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a debris analysis. For an orbital or suborbital launch, a debris...

  15. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  16. Quantifying Danger To Spacecraft Crews From Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamsen, Joel

    1996-01-01

    MSCSurv computer program designed to quantify conditional probability of losing one or more crew members following remote likelihood of penetration of orbital debris into cluster of spacecraft modules containing crew members. Contributions to probability of losing one or more crew members quantified from three significant penetration-induced hazards: rupture of pressure wall (explosive decompression), injuries induced by fragments, and "slow" depressurization. Uses Monte Carlo-style subroutine to simulate penetration of thousands of orbital debris particles of various sizes, velocities, and angles of approach into spacecraft of selected exterior geometry. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  17. Occurrence of spherical ceramic debris in indentation and sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Indenting experiments were conducted with the silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with a spherical diamond indenter in air. Sliding friction experiments were also conducted with silicon carbide in contact with iron and iron-based binary alloys at room temperature and 800 C. Fracture pits with a spherical particle and spherical wear debris were observed as a result of indenting and sliding. Spherical debris may be produced by a mechanism that involves a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories under the inelastic deformation zone.

  18. Fragmentation as a new hypothesis on the origin of granulometric bimodality of debris flow deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, E.; Caballero, L.; Sarocchi, D.; Borselli, L.

    2013-12-01

    Debris flows are mixtures of water with high concentrations of sediments. Their dynamic behavior is governed by mechanisms that involve clast interaction and fluid matrix characteristics among others. Both mechanisms are studied by means of analogical experiments using a rotating drum named Los Angeles abrasion machine. Four mixtures with compositions resembling cohesive and noncohesive debris flows were prepared. A detailed textural analysis of the mixtures based on granulometry, clast morphology and rheologic properties of the fluid matrix were performed. The results show that the fragmentation process occurs inside debris flows and is reflected in the final textural characteristics of the mixtures. The mode of particle breakage is related to particle size. Clast collisions between particles produce comminution of the coarsest fractions while finer particles fracture along their entire surface. Both modes produce fine sand and silt that continuously feed the fluid matrix during transport, producing bimodal distributions of the mixtures. Granulometric bimodality is a common characteristic in debris flows deposits and has often been explained by bulking or debulking processes related to external flow conditions. In this study, the experimental evidence suggests that this characteristic could also be explained only by internal processes. Fragmentation has a major influence on debris flow dynamics. It modifies rheologic behavior increasing yield stress and viscosity over time. The results show good agreement between real debris flow characteristics and analogic experiments. The proposed hypothesis has important implications to understand the rheological behavior of debris flows and could constitute a basis for new approaches to modeling these phenomena.

  19. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  20. Removing orbital debris with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude R.; Baker, Kevin L.; Libby, Stephen B.; Liedahl, Duane A.; Olivier, Scot S.; Pleasance, Lyn D.; Rubenchik, Alexander; Trebes, James E.; Victor George, E.; Marcovici, Bogdan; Reilly, James P.; Valley, Michael T.

    2012-05-01

    Orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) are now sufficiently dense that the use of LEO space is threatened by runaway collision cascading. A problem predicted more than thirty years ago, the threat from debris larger than about 1 cm demands serious attention. A promising proposed solution uses a high power pulsed laser system on the Earth to make plasma jets on the objects, slowing them slightly, and causing them to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere. In this paper, we reassess this approach in light of recent advances in low-cost, light-weight modular design for large mirrors, calculations of laser-induced orbit changes and in design of repetitive, multi-kilojoules lasers, that build on inertial fusion research. These advances now suggest that laser orbital debris removal (LODR) is the most cost-effective way to mitigate the debris problem. No other solutions have been proposed that address the whole problem of large and small debris. A LODR system will have multiple uses beyond debris removal. International cooperation will be essential for building and operating such a system.

  1. The fluidity of boulder debris flows is affected by fine sediment in the pore water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Norifumi; Kaneko, Takahiro; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Nishimoto, Haruo

    2013-04-01

    Basic equations for debris flows are frequently derived using the simple assumption of monogranular particles. However, actual debris flows include a great diversity of grain sizes, resulting in inherent features such as inverse grading, particle size segregation, and liquefaction of fine sediment. The liquefaction of fine sediment affects the fluidity of debris flows, although the behavior and influence of fine sediment in debris flows have not been examined sufficiently. This study used flume tests to detect the effect of fine sediment on the characteristics of laboratory debris flows consisting of particles with two diameters: one diameter was fixed at a large particle size, while the small diameters were varied with the experimental conditions. From the experiments, the greatest sediment concentration and flow depth were observed in the debris flows mixed with finer sediment, indicating increased flow resistance. Then, the experimental friction coefficient was compared with the theoretical friction coefficient derived by substituting the experimental values into the constitutive equations for debris flow. The theoretical friction coefficient was obtained from two models with different fine-sediment treatments: one assuming that all of the fine sediments were solid particles and the other that the particles consisted of a fluid phase involving pore water liquefaction. A discriminant index was introduced to clarify which contribution from the two models could better explain the experimental results. The comparison of the friction coefficients detected a fully liquefied state for the finest particle mixture with sediment. However, even with the same particle size, the debris flows could be regarded as a liquefied state, a solid state, or a partially liquefied transition state depending on the experimental conditions other than the sediment particle size. These results infer that the liquefaction of fine sediment in debris flows was induced not only by the

  2. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizations of subsurface flow problems.

  3. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizationsmore » of subsurface flow problems.« less

  4. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  5. Probing Nearby Planetary Systems by Debris Disk Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Many main-sequence stars possess tenuous circumstellar dust clouds believed to trace extrasolar analogs of the Sun's asteroidand Kuiper Belts. While most of these "debris disks" are known only from far-infrared photometry, a growing number of them are now spatially resolved. In this talk, I'll review what is currently known about the structure of debris disks. Using images from the Hubble, Spitzer, and Herschel Space Telescopes, I will show how modeling of these resolved systems can place strong constraints on dust particle properties in the disks. Some of the disks show disturbed structures suggestive of planetary perturbations: specific cases will be discussed where directly-imaged exoplanets are clearly affecting debris disk structure. I'll conclude with thoughts on the future of high contrast exoplanet imaging.

  6. Debris Disks as Tracers of Nearby Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Many main-sequence stars possess tenuous circumstellar dust clouds believed to trace extrasolar analogs of the Sun's asteroid and Kuiper Belts. While most of these "debris disks" are known only from far-infrared photometry, dozens are now spatially resolved. In this talk, I'll review the observed structural properties of debris disks as revealed by imaging with the Hubble, Spitzer, and Herschel Space Telescopes. I will show how modeling of the far-infrared spectral energy distributions of resolved disks can be used to constrain their dust particle sizes and albedos. I will review cases of disks whose substructures suggest planetary perturbations, including a newly-discovered eccentric ring system. I'll conclude with thoughts on the potential of upcoming and proposed facilities to resolve similar structures around a greatly expanded sample of nearby debris systems.

  7. Numerical modelling of floating debris in the world's oceans.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, L C-M; Greer, S D; Borrero, J C

    2012-03-01

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking model to simulate 30 years of input, transport and accumulation of floating debris in the world ocean. Using both terrestrial and maritime inputs, the modelling results clearly show the formation of five accumulation zones in the subtropical latitudes of the major ocean basins. The relative size and concentration of each clearly illustrate the dominance of the accumulation zones in the northern hemisphere, while smaller seas surrounded by densely populated areas are also shown to have a high concentration of floating debris. We also determine the relative contribution of different source regions to the total amount of material in a particular accumulation zone. This study provides a framework for describing the transport, distribution and accumulation of floating marine debris and can be continuously updated and adapted to assess scenarios reflecting changes in the production and disposal of plastic worldwide.

  8. The fate of debris in the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullen, Rachel; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-05-01

    Pluto has recently been thrust into the spotlight with the fly-by of New Horizons. This dwarf planet and its moons provide an opportunity to study circumbinary dynamics close to home. We perform N-body simulations of a test-particle disk around the Pluto-Charon binary to study the fate of debris that should result from the formation of the Pluto-Charon binary. We not only investigate the stability and time evolution of debris within the Pluto system, but also track ejected debris to see where it may collect in the solar system. By studying the dynamics of the Pluto-Charon system, we may be able to place constraints on the cratering rates from its natal disk and identify tracers of the formation of this system.

  9. Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, R.H.; Pringle, P.T.; Rink, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    A reconnaissance of 36 tributaries of the Colorado River indicates that debris flows are a major process by which sediment is transported to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. Debris flows are slurries of sediment and water that have a water content < 40% by volume. Debris flows occur frequently in arid and semiarid regions. Slope failures commonly trigger debris flows, which can originate from any rock formation in the Grand Canyon. The largest and most frequent flows originate from the Permian Hermit Shale, the underlying Esplanade Sandstone of the Supai Group, and other formations of the Permian and Pennsylvanian Supai Group. Debris flows have reached the Colorado River on an average of once every 20 to 30 yr in the Lava-Chuar Creek drainage since about 1916. Two debris flows have reached the Colorado River in the last 25 yr in Monument Creek. The Crystal Creek drainage has had an average of one debris flow reaching the Colorado River every 50 yr, although the debris flow of 1966 has been the only flow that reached the Colorado River since 1900. Debris flows may actually reach the Colorado River more frequently in these drainages because evidence for all debris flows may not have been preserved in the channel-margin stratigraphy. Discharges were estimated for the peak flow of three debris flows that reached the Colorado River. The debris flow of 1966 in the Lava-Chuar Creek drainage had an estimated discharge of 4,000 cu ft/sec. The debris flow of 1984 in the Monument Creek drainage had a discharge estimated between 3,600 and 4,200 cu ft/sec. The debris flow of 1966 in the Crystal Creek drainage had a discharge estimated between 9,200 and 14,000 cu ft/sec. Debris flows in the Grand Canyon generally are composed of 10 to 40% sand by weight and may represent a significant source of beach-building sand along the Colorado River. The particle size distributions are very poorly sorted and the largest transported boulders were in the Crystal Creek

  10. Debris flows as geomorphic agents in the Huachuca Mountains of southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wohl, E.E.; Pearthree, P.P.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous debris flows occurred in the Huachuca Mountains of southeastern Arizona during the summer rainy season of 1988 in areas that were burned by a forest fire earlier in the summer. Debris flows occurred following a major forest fire in 1977 as well, suggesting a causal link between fires and debris flows. Abundant evidence of older debris flows preserved along channels and in mountain front fans indicates that debris flows have occurred repeteadly during the late Quaternary in this environment. Soil development in sequences of debris-flow deposits indicates that debris flows probably recur over time intervals of several hundred to a thousand years in individual drainage basins in the study area. Surface runoff in the steep drainage basins of the Huachuca Mountains is greatly enhanced following forest fires, as the hillslopes are denuded of their vegetative cover. Water and sediment eroded from the hillslope regolith are rapidly introduced into the upper reaches of tributary channels by widespread rilling and slope wash during rainfall events. This influx of water and sediment destabilizes regolith previously accumulated in the channel, triggering debris flows that scour the channel to bedrock in the upper reaches. Following a debris flow, the scoured, trapezoidally-shaped channel gradually assumes a swale shape and the percentage of exposed bedrock declines, as material is introduced from the slopes. Debris flows do a tremendous amount of work in a very short time, however, and are the major channel-forming events. Where the tributary channels enter larger, trunk channels, the debris flows serve as the main source of very coarse sediment. The local slope and coarse particle distribution of the trunk channel depend on the competence of water flows in the channel to transport the material introduced by debris flows. Where the smaller channels drain directly to the mountain front, debris flows create extensive alluvial fans which dominate the morphology of the

  11. Dust particles in controlled fusion devices: morphology, observations in the plasma and influence on the plasma performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, M.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Sergienko, G.; Biel, W.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Huber, A.; Philipps, V.

    2001-08-01

    The formation and release of particle agglomerates, i.e. debris and dusty objects, from plasma facing components and the impact of such materials on plasma operation in controlled fusion devices has been studied in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch and the TEXTOR tokamak. Several plasma diagnostic techniques, camera observations and surface analysis methods were applied for in situ and ex situ investigation. The results are discussed in terms of processes that are decisive for dust transfer: localized power deposition connected with wall locked modes causing emission of carbon granules, brittle destruction of graphite and detachment of thick flaking co-deposited layers. The consequences for large next step devices are also addressed.

  12. Microstructural evolution and macroscopic shrinkage in the presence of density gradients and agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peizhen

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) can characterize internal density gradients. An in-situ laser dilatometry has been constructed to track dimensional change at different positions of a sample during binder removal and sintering. This combination of tools not only allows us to better understand how microscopic change affects macroscopic dimensions, but also provides guidance for a variety of ceramic processes. Non-uniform agglomerate packing and deformation provide density gradients which drive binder migration during binder removal. Simultaneously, density undergoes a slight decrease accompanied by a 1.0% loss in dimensional tolerance. This and CT difference images suggest that capillary forces generated during binder melting can change the density distribution. During sintering, nonuniformities present in the green state persist into the fired state and become exaggerated. Regions of different initial density can occupy different stages sintering. At ˜88% sintered density, CT clearly showed that open porosity follows the distribution of low density areas. Mercury porosimetry detected three distinct levels of porosity. Microstructural examination correlated the porosity level with the coordination of (i) two to three or (ii) multiple grains around pores. Microstructural packing controls both the observed macroscopic expansion at T ≤ 1000°C and the onset of shrinkage. Neck formation initiates during expansion and not exclusively during shrinkage. Inter- and intra-agglomerate expansion/shrinkage proceed simultaneously but the effective 'transmission' of particle-level behavior to the macroscopic level appears to be controlled by the initial agglomerate bonding and internal agglomerate densities. Discrete element modeling provides corroborating evidence regarding the importance of compact continuity. Following the expansion-shrinkage transition, the higher the zone density the faster the initial shrinkage. The 25% RH sample shrank more rapidly than the same zone in

  13. Effect of Agglomeration on the Toxicity of Nano-sized Carbon Black in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingu; Han, Jeong-Hee; Yang, Jeong-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that nano-sized carbon black is more toxic than large respirable carbon black because of its higher surface area. However, it is not clear if carbon black made larger by agglomeration demonstrates decreased toxicity. The purpose of this study was to verify if agglomeration affects the toxicity of carbon black using three differently prepared nano-sized carbon black aerosols in nose-only inhalation chambers for 13 weeks. Methods Printex 90 was selected as a representative nano-sized carbon black. To generate aerosols of three different types of agglomerates, Printex 90 was dispersed in distilled water by three different methods: vortex, vortex+sonication, and vortex+sonication with dispersion in a stabilizer. Then, the three differently prepared solutions were aerosolized through venturi nozzles. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Printex 90 aerosols in a nose-only exposure chamber for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk for 13 weeks at a concentration of approximately 9 mg/m3. Results Numbers of total cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were increased and carbon black masses were clearly seen in BAL cells and lung tissues of rats exposed to Printex 90. However, few differences were found between the three differently agglomerated aerosols. In addition, there were no significant differences in other parameters, such as body weight, lung function or cytokine levels in BAL fluid following carbon black exposure. Conclusions Only mild to moderate respiratory effects were found in rats exposed to nano-sized carbon black at 9 mg/m3 for 13 weeks. Agglomeration did not affect the toxicity of nano-sized carbon particles. PMID:23106037

  14. Atmospheric collection of debris from the Revelstoke and Allende fireballs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    1970-01-01

    In two separate events, Revelstoke and Allende, the air through which a fireball had been observed to pass was sampled for meteoritic debris. Particulate matter was collected on fibrous filters, which were mounted on aircraft and flown downwind from the site of the meteorite fall at altitudes of 10,000-12,000 m. From Revelstoke, a highly distinctive assemblage of particles was collected. Included were large numbers of magnetite spherules, transparent siliceous spherules, and several types of irregular nickel-bearing particles. The Allende collections yielded only slightly more magnetite and siliceous spherules than background and no nickel-bearing particles. Revelstoke and Allende are believed to be representative of two different types of events. In the Revelstoke type, large amounts of meteoritic debris are left in the atmosphere and little reaches the ground in large coherent fragments; in the Allende type, little material remains in the atmosphere but large fragments reach the ground in the fall area. ?? 1970.

  15. Estimating Foreign-Object-Debris Density from Photogrammetry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Jason; Metzger, Philip; Lane, John

    2013-01-01

    Within the first few seconds after launch of STS-124, debris traveling vertically near the vehicle was captured on two 16-mm film cameras surrounding the launch pad. One particular piece of debris caught the attention of engineers investigating the release of the flame trench fire bricks. The question to be answered was if the debris was a fire brick, and if it represented the first bricks that were ejected from the flame trench wall, or was the object one of the pieces of debris normally ejected from the vehicle during launch. If it was typical launch debris, such as SRB throat plug foam, why was it traveling vertically and parallel to the vehicle during launch, instead of following its normal trajectory, flying horizontally toward the north perimeter fence? By utilizing the Runge-Kutta integration method for velocity and the Verlet integration method for position, a method that suppresses trajectory computational instabilities due to noisy position data was obtained. This combination of integration methods provides a means to extract the best estimate of drag force and drag coefficient under the non-ideal conditions of limited position data. This integration strategy leads immediately to the best possible estimate of object density, within the constraints of unknown particle shape. These types of calculations do not exist in readily available off-the-shelf simulation software, especially where photogrammetry data is needed as an input.

  16. Cooling of debris beds

    SciTech Connect

    Barleon, L.; Thomauske, K.; Werie, H.

    1984-04-01

    The dependence of the dryout heat flux for volume-heated particulate beds on bed height (less than or equal to40 cm), particle diameter (0.06 to 16 mm), stratification and boundary conditions (saturated and subcooled liquid, adiabatic and cooled bottom and sidewalls) has been determined for water and Freon-113. Channel penetration through subcooled layers and ''downward boiling'' due to capillarity effects have been observed. Different types of bed disturbances have been identified, and their effect on dryout has been studied. Using existing theoretical models, which have been verified by the experiments, the upper limit of the thermal load on support structures has been calculated as a function of the particle size and bottom temperature for reactor accident conditions (Pu/U-oxide particles in sodium).

  17. The physics of debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ???10 m3 of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  18. The physics of debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-08-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ˜10 m³ of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  19. Optical Observations of Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Abercromby, Kira; Rodriquez, Heather; Barker, Edwin S.; Kelecy, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of optical telescopes to observe space debris. .It will present a brief review of how the survey is conducted, and what some of the significant results encompass. The goal is to characterize the population of debris objects at GEO, with emphasis on the faint object population. Because the survey observations extend over a very short arc (5 minutes), a full six parameter orbit can not be determined. Recently we have begun to use a second telescope, the 0.9-m at CTIO, as a chase telescope to do follow-up observations of potential GEO debris candidates found by MODEST. With a long enough sequence of observations, a full six-parameter orbit including eccentricity can be determined. The project has used STK since inception for planning observing sessions based on the distribution of bright cataloged objects and the anti-solar point (to avoid eclipse). Recently, AGI's Orbit Determination Tool Kit (ODTK) has been used to determine orbits, including the effects of solar radiation pressure. Since an unknown fraction of the faint debris at GEO has a high area-to-mass ratio (A/M), the orbits are perturbed significantly by solar radiation. The ODTK analysis results indicate that temporal variations in the solar perturbations, possibly due to debris orientation dynamics, can be estimated in the OD process. Additionally, the best results appear to be achieved when solar forces orthogonal to the object-Sun line are considered. Determining the A/M of individual objects and the distribution of A/M values of a large sample of debris is important to understanding the total population of debris at GEO

  20. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  1. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  2. Universities' Entrepreneurial Performance: The Role of Agglomeration Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ping Penny

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the extensive research on universities' entrepreneurship, whether research strength fosters or dampens their entrepreneurial performance remains controversial. Much research claims an influential role of research universities in regional economy, however, little has been said about what a part that the agglomeration economies may play…

  3. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Site closeout report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Selective Agglomeration POC facility consisted of a coal crushing and grinding circuit, followed by an agglomeration circuit and product dewatering. (A plot plan of the facility is shown in Figure 1-2.) The coal crushing and grinding system consisted of a hammermill coal crusher, weigh-belt feeder, two ball mills (primary and secondary), and necessary hoppers, pumps, and conveyors. The mills were capable of providing coal over a range of grinds from a d{sub 50} of 125 to 25 microns. Slurry discharged from the ball mills was pumped to the agglomeration circuit. The agglomeration circuit began with a high-shear mixer, where diesel was added to the slurry to begin the formation of microagglomerates. The high-shear mixer was followed by two stages of conventional flotation cells for microagglomerate recovery. The second-stage-flotation-cell product was pumped to either a rotary-drum vacuum filter or a high-G centrifuge for dewatering. The dewatered product was then convoyed to the product pad from which dump trucks were used to transfer it to the utility plant located next to the facility. Plant tailings were pumped to the water clarifier for thickening and then dewatered in plate-and-frame filter presses. These dewatered tailings were also removed to the utility via dump truck. Clarified water (thickener overflow) was recycled to the process via a head tank.

  4. Reverse micelle synthesis of oxide nanopowders: mechanisms of precipitate formation and agglomeration effects.

    PubMed

    Graeve, Olivia A; Fathi, Hoorshad; Kelly, James P; Saterlie, Michael S; Sinha, Kaustav; Rojas-George, Gabriel; Kanakala, Raghunath; Brown, David R; Lopez, Enrique A

    2013-10-01

    We present an analysis of reverse micelle stability in four model systems. The first two systems, composed of unstable microemulsions of isooctane, water, and Na-AOT with additions of either iron sulfate or yttrium nitrate, were used for the synthesis of iron oxide or yttrium oxide powders. These oxide powders were of nanocrystalline character, but with some level of agglomeration that was dependent on calcination temperature and cleaning procedures. Results show that even though the reverse micellar solutions were unstable, nanocrystalline powders with very low levels of agglomeration could be obtained. This effect can be attributed to the protective action of the surfactant on the surfaces of the powders that prevents neck formation until after all the surfactant has volatilized. A striking feature of the IR spectra collected on the iron oxide powders is the absence of peaks in the ~1715 cm(-1) to 1750 cm(-1) region, where absorption due to the symmetric C=O (carbonyl) stretching occurs. The lack of such peaks strongly suggests the carbonyl group is no longer free, but is actively participating in the surfactant-precipitate interaction. The final two microemulsion systems, containing CTAB as the surfactant, showed that loss of control of the reverse micelle synthesis process can easily occur when the amount of salt in the water domains exceeds a critical concentration. Both model systems eventually resulted in agglomerated powders of broad size distributions or particles that were large compared to the sizes of the reverse micelles, consistent with the notion that the microemulsions were not stable and the powders were precipitated in an uncontrolled fashion. This has implications for the synthesis of nanopowders by reverse micelle synthesis and provides a benchmark for process control if powders of the highest quality are desired. PMID:23906861

  5. Debris-flow observations in the Zermatt Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    related slide and fall processes, increasingly large amounts of loose sediment are delivered into debris-flow systems. Extensive till, scree slopes and rock glaciers represent the principal and extensive sediment sources for debris flows which are commonly triggered at elevations between 2000 and 3000 m asl. Here, high annual and daily thermal ranges favour frost weathering and regolith production delivered to scree slopes. Slope angles in the initiation zones range from 27 to 41° and are dominated by permafrost in all of the catchments. Debris flows are triggered either through the wetting of material continuously delivered by the permafrost body to the channel or due to release at the rock glacier fronts during exceptional water input. The wetting typically occurs during rainstorms, but debris flows at these sites also happen when sediment shear resistance is reduced by the melting of ice particles, by snow melting and/or a combination of both. In the Dorfbach torrent near Randa, WSL operates an automated debris-flow observation station, measuring the typical parameters such as flow heights and velocities since several years. As part of an interdisciplinary project on data acquisition and numerical modelling of debris flows for hazard mapping, we monitor several other debris-flow prone torrents in the valley and combine these data with observations of ongoing processes in the headwater of the catchments. Several debris-flow events in some of the torrents could be observed and measured in the last years. Total volume, discharge per surge, frontal speed, run out length and impact on the inhabited fans varied considerably. Typically one first event cluster is dominated by snow melting controlled conditions starting late May until end of June and a second cluster are the rainstorm dominated events in midsummer. The largest events are expected in late summer or in fall, when long-lasting advective precipitation events over several days prevail.

  6. Hydroplaning and submarine debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blasio, Fabio V.; Engvik, Lars; Harbitz, Carl B.; ElverhøI, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Examination of submarine clastic deposits along the continental margins reveals the remnants of holocenic or older debris flows with run-out distances up to hundreds of kilometers. Laboratory experiments on subaqueous debris flows, where typically one tenth of a cubic meter of material is dropped down a flume, also show high velocities and long run-out distances compared to subaerial debris flows. Moreover, they show the tendency of the head of the flow to run out ahead of the rest of the body. The experiments reveal the possible clue to the mechanism of long run-out. This mechanism, called hydroplaning, begins as the dynamic pressure at the front of the debris flow becomes of the order of the pressure exerted by the weight of the sediment. In such conditions a layer of water can intrude under the sediment with a lubrication effect and a decrease in the resistance forces between the sediment and the seabed. A physical-mathematical model of hydroplaning is presented and investigated numerically. The model is applied to both laboratory- and field-scale debris flows. Agreement with laboratory experiments makes us confident in the extrapolation of our model to natural flows and shows that long run-out distances can be naturally attained.

  7. ORDEM 3.0 and the Risk of High-Density Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Anz-Meador, Philip

    2014-01-01

    NASA’s Orbital Debris Engineering Model was designed to calculate orbital debris fluxes on spacecraft in order to assess collision risk. The newest of these models, ORDEM 3.0, has a number of features not present in previous models. One of the most important is that the populations and fluxes are now broken out into material density groups. Previous models concentrated on debris size alone, but a particle’s mass and density also determine the amount of damage it can cause. ORDEM 3.0 includes a high-density component, primarily consisting of iron/steel particles that drive much of the risk to spacecraft. This paper will outline the methods that were used to separate and identify the different densities of debris, and how these new densities affect the overall debris flux and risk.

  8. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND LIPID MEDIATORS INDUCED IN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES BY ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In ambient aerosols, ultrafine particles (UFP) and their agglomerates are considered to be major factors contributing to adverse health effects. Reactivity of agglomerated UFP of elemental carbon (EC), Printex 90, Printex G, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) was evaluated by the...

  9. Charging of space debris in the LEO and GEO regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Abhijit; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    The near exponential rise of space debris at the satellite orbital altitudes (particularly in the low earth orbit (LEO) region) and the risk they pose for space assets is a source of major concern for all nations engaged in space activities. Considerable efforts are therefore being expended into accurate modeling and tracking of these objects and various ideas for the safe removal of these debris are being explored. The debris objects are likely to acquire a large amount of charge since they are typically found in a plasma environment - such as the earth’s ionospheric plasma in the LEO region (100 kms to 1000 kms) and the radiation belts in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) region. The consequent flow of electron and ion currents on them lead to the accumulation of a large amount of surface charge and the development of a surface potential on these objects. The influence of the plasma environment on the dynamics and charging of the debris is a relatively unexplored area of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Space Debris (SD) research and can be potentially important for the accurate prediction of the long-term evolution of debris orbits and their collision probabilities with other space objects. In this paper we will report on the charging of space debris under a variety of orbital conditions in the LEO and GEO regions using both analytic and particle-in-cell (PIC) modeling. The analytic estimates are obtained using refined Orbit Motion Limited (OML) modeling while the simulation studies are carried out using the SPIS code [1]. In the GEO region account is taken of charging due to photoemission processes as well as energetic beam charging. The PIC approach enables us to study charging of irregularly shaped debris objects as well as differential charging on objects that are composed of patches of conducting and insulated regions. The dynamical consequences of the debris charging on their orbital trajectories and rotational characteristics will be discussed. [1] J

  10. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOEpatents

    Gundel, Lara; Daisey, Joan M.; Stevens, Robert K.

    1998-01-01

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  11. A Collisional Algorithm for Modeling Circumstellar Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesvold, Erika; Kuchner, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Many planetary systems harbor circumstellar disks of dust and planetesimals thought to be debris left over from planet formation. These debris disks exhibit a range of morphological features which can arise from the gravitational perturbations of planets. Accurate models of these features, accounting for the interactions of the particles in a disk with each other and with whatever planets they contain, can act as signposts for planets in debris disks that otherwise could not be detected. Such models can also constrain the planet's mass and orbital parameters. Current models for many disks consider the gravitational and radiative effects of the star and planets on the disk, but neglect the morphological consequences of collisional interactions between the planetesimals. Many observed disk features are not satisfactorily explained by the current generation of models. I am developing a new kind of debris disk model that considers both the gravitational shaping of the disk by planets and the inelastic collisions between particles. I will use a hybrid N-body integrator to numerically solve the equations of motion for the particles and planets in the disk. To include the collisional effects, I begin with an algorithm that tests for collisions at each step of the orbit integration and readjusts the velocities of colliding particles. I am adapting this algorithm to the problem at hand by allowing each particle to represent a "swarm" of planetesimals with a range of masses. When the algorithm detects an encounter between swarms, two or three swarms are produced to approximate the range of possible trajectories of the daughter planetesimals. Here I present preliminary results from my collisional algorithm.

  12. Analysis of debris from Spacelab Space Life Sciences-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, S. V.; Rodgers, E. B.; Huff, T. L.

    1992-07-01

    Airborne microbiological and particulate contamination generated aboard Spacelab modules is a potential safety hazard. In order to shed light on the characteristics of these contaminants, microbial and chemical/particulate analyses were performed on debris vacuumed from cabin and avionics air filters in the Space Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) module of the Space Transportation System 40 (STS-40) mission 1 month after landing. The debris was sorted into categories (e.g., metal, nonmetal, hair/fur, synthetic fibers, food particles, insect fragments, etc.). Elemental analysis of particles was done by energy dispersive analysis of x rays (metals) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (nonmetals). Scanning electron micrographs were done of most particles. Microbiological samples were grown on R2A culture medium and identified. Clothing fibers dominated the debris by volume. Other particles, all attributed to the crew, resulted from abrasions and impacts during missions operations (e.g., paint chips, plastic, electronic scraps and clothing fibers). All bacterial species identified are commonly found in the atmosphere or on the human body. Bacillus sp. was the most frequently seen bacterium. One of the bacterial species, Enterobacter agglomerans, could cause illness in crew members with depressed immune systems.

  13. Analysis of debris from Spacelab Space Life Sciences-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, S. V.; Rodgers, E. B.; Huff, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne microbiological and particulate contamination generated aboard Spacelab modules is a potential safety hazard. In order to shed light on the characteristics of these contaminants, microbial and chemical/particulate analyses were performed on debris vacuumed from cabin and avionics air filters in the Space Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) module of the Space Transportation System 40 (STS-40) mission 1 month after landing. The debris was sorted into categories (e.g., metal, nonmetal, hair/fur, synthetic fibers, food particles, insect fragments, etc.). Elemental analysis of particles was done by energy dispersive analysis of x rays (metals) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (nonmetals). Scanning electron micrographs were done of most particles. Microbiological samples were grown on R2A culture medium and identified. Clothing fibers dominated the debris by volume. Other particles, all attributed to the crew, resulted from abrasions and impacts during missions operations (e.g., paint chips, plastic, electronic scraps and clothing fibers). All bacterial species identified are commonly found in the atmosphere or on the human body. Bacillus sp. was the most frequently seen bacterium. One of the bacterial species, Enterobacter agglomerans, could cause illness in crew members with depressed immune systems.

  14. Impact of agglomeration on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Luc; Gossuin, Yves; Hocq, Aline; Fortin, Marc-André

    2011-07-22

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (US-Gd(2)O(3)) are used to provide 'positive' contrast effects in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and are being considered for molecular and cellular imaging applications. However, these nanoparticles can aggregate over time in aqueous medium, as well as when internalized into cells. This study is aimed at measuring in vitro, in aqueous medium, the impact of aggregation on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic US-Gd(2)O(3) particles. First, the nanoparticle core size as well as aggregation behaviour was assessed by HRTEM. DLS (hydrodynamic diameter) was used to measure the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles and nanoaggregates. The relaxometric properties were measured by NMRD profiling, as well as with (1)H NMR relaxometers. Then, the positive contrast enhancement effect was assessed by using magnetic resonance scanners (at 1.5 and 7 T). At every magnetic field, the longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) decreased upon agglomeration, while remaining high enough to provide positive contrast. On the other hand, the transverse relaxivity (r(2)) slightly decreased at 0.47 and 1.41 T, but it was enhanced at higher fields (7 and 11.7 T) upon agglomeration. All NMRD profiles revealed a characteristic relaxivity peak in the range 60-100 MHz, suggesting the possibility to use US-Gd(2)O(3) as an efficient 'positive-T(1)' contrast agent at clinical magnetic fields (1-3 T), in spite of aggregation.

  15. Impact of agglomeration on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Luc; Gossuin, Yves; Hocq, Aline; Fortin, Marc-André

    2011-07-01

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (US-Gd2O3) are used to provide 'positive' contrast effects in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and are being considered for molecular and cellular imaging applications. However, these nanoparticles can aggregate over time in aqueous medium, as well as when internalized into cells. This study is aimed at measuring in vitro, in aqueous medium, the impact of aggregation on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic US-Gd2O3 particles. First, the nanoparticle core size as well as aggregation behaviour was assessed by HRTEM. DLS (hydrodynamic diameter) was used to measure the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles and nanoaggregates. The relaxometric properties were measured by NMRD profiling, as well as with 1H NMR relaxometers. Then, the positive contrast enhancement effect was assessed by using magnetic resonance scanners (at 1.5 and 7 T). At every magnetic field, the longitudinal relaxivity (r1) decreased upon agglomeration, while remaining high enough to provide positive contrast. On the other hand, the transverse relaxivity (r2) slightly decreased at 0.47 and 1.41 T, but it was enhanced at higher fields (7 and 11.7 T) upon agglomeration. All NMRD profiles revealed a characteristic relaxivity peak in the range 60-100 MHz, suggesting the possibility to use US-Gd2O3 as an efficient 'positive-T1' contrast agent at clinical magnetic fields (1-3 T), in spite of aggregation.

  16. What is the velocity profile of debris flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Fabian; McArdell, Brian

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of flow velocity within a debris flow is difficult to determine at full scale in the field due to the large forces and inherently destructive nature of the flow. However, knowledge of the distribution of velocity within a flow would be helpful to constrain rheological models and to better understand the internal dynamics of such flows. Here we describe recent efforts to determine the velocity of debris flows as a function of distance from the channel bed. Measurements were made at the Illgraben, Switzerland, which exhibits a wide variety of flows, ranging from turbulent debris floods to flows which resemble laminar mud flows to more classical debris flows with a clear granular front. The Illgraben observation station is therefore an ideal location to investigate debris flow dynamics. Our measurements were made using sensors embedded on a 14 m long, 2.5 m tall steel-reinforced concrete wall constructed flush with the torrent channel walls. The main instrumentation consists of 18 geophones (10 Hz natural frequency) installed on square steel plates with a side length of 0.3 m. Each steel plate is acoustically isolated from the wall and the other plates through the use of elastomer elements. The geophone plates are arranged in six rows of three sensors with a dimension of 1.8 m in the vertical direction and 1.5 m in the horizontal direction (i.e. parallel to the flow direction). A sensorless plate separates each plate in the horizontal direction. The data are collected at 2 kHz using a high-speed (synchronous) capture card in a pc. The elevation of the flow surface is determined at a cross-stream distance 1 m away from the wall, using a laser sensor installed on a bridge above the wall. We present a processing approach for the geophone data with the goal to track particle sliding across the sensor plates. For signals near or above the sensors' natural frequency (10 Hz), the measured time series are poorly correlated between sensors. Therefore, we use a

  17. DebriSat Project Update and Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, M.; Krisko, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    DebriSat Reporting Topics: DebriSat Fragment Analysis Calendar; Near-term Fragment Extraction Strategy; Fragment Characterization and Database; HVI (High-Velocity Impact) Considerations; Requirements Document.

  18. NASA Orbital Debris Requirements and Best Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Limitation of orbital debris accumulation is an international and national concern, reflectedin NASA debris limitation requirements. These requirements will be reviewed, along with some practices that can be employed to achieve the requirements.

  19. Physical Properties of Supraglacial Debris on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M. H.; Carter, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The thickness and physical properties of surface debris preserving glacial ice in the mid-latitudes of Mars is assessed using crater morphology and radar sounding data. We suggest that this debris layer is much thicker than has been hypothesized.

  20. Differentiation of debris-flow and flash-flood deposits: implications for paleoflood investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Jarrett, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Debris flows and flash floods are common geomorphic processes in the Colorado Rocky Mountain Front Range and foothills. Usually, debris flows and flash floods are associated with excess summer rainfall or snowmelt, in areas were unconsolidated surficial deposits are relatively thick and slopes are steep. In the Front Range and foothills, flash flooding is limited to areas below about 2300m whereas, debris flow activity is common throughout the foothill and alpine zones and is not necessarily elevation limited. Because flash floods and debris flows transport large quantities of bouldery sediment, the resulting deposits appear somewhat similar even though such deposits were produced by different processes. Discharge estimates based on debris-flow deposits interpreted as flash-flood deposits have large errors because techniques for discharge retrodiction were developed for water floods with negligible sediment concentrations. Criteria for differentiating between debris-flow and flash-flood deposits are most useful for deposits that are fresh and well-exposed. However, with the passage of time, both debris-flow and flash-flood deposits become modified by the combined effects of weathering, colluviation, changes in surface morphology, and in some instances removal of interstitial sediment. As a result, some of the physical characteristics of the deposits become more alike. Criteria especially applicable to older deposits are needed. We differentiate flash-flood from debris-flow and other deposits using clast fabric measurements and other morphologic and sedimentologic techniques (e.g., deposit morphology, clast lithology, particle size and shape, geomorphic setting).

  1. A review of the biologic effects of spine implant debris: Fact from fiction

    PubMed Central

    Hallab, Nadim James

    2009-01-01

    Background Biologic-reactivity to implant-debris is the primary determinant of long-term clinical performance. The following reviews: 1) the physical aspects of spinal-implant debris and 2) the local and systemic biologic responses to implant debris. Methods Methods included are: 1) gravimetric wear analysis; 2) SEM and LALLS; 3) metal-ion analysis; 4) ELISA, toxicity testing, patch testing; and 5) metal-lymphocyte transformation testing (metal-LTT). Results Wear and corrosion of spine-implants produce particles and ions. Particles (0.01–1000 μm) are generally submicron ( <1 µm). Wear rates of metal-on-polymer and metal-on-metal disc arthroplasties are approximately 2–20 and 1 mm3/yr, respectively. Metal-on-metal total disc replacement components have significant increases in circulating metal (less than 10-fold that of controls at 4 ppb-Co and 3 ppb-Cr or ng/mL). Debris reactivity is local and systemic. Local inflammation is caused primarily by ingestion of debris by local macrophages, which produce pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and PGE2. Systemic responses associated with implant-debris have been limited to hypersensitivity reactions. Elevated amounts of in the liver, spleen, etc of patients with failed TJA have not been associated with remote toxicological or carcinogenic pathology to date. Implant debris are differentially bioreactive. Greater numbers are pro-inflammatory; the smaller-sized debris are more bioreactive by virtue of their greater numbers (dose) for a given amount of implant mass loss (one 100-μm-diameter particle is equivalent in mass to 1 million 1-μm-diameter particles). Elongated particles are pro-inflammatory (ie, aspect ratio of greater than 3). Metal particles are more proinflammatory than polymers, ceteris paribus. Conclusion Spinal arthroplasty designs have been in use for more than 20 years internationally; therefore, concerns about neuropathology, toxicity, and carcinogenicity are mitigated. Debris

  2. The debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Christian; Löhne, Torsten; Krivov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme DUNES the debris disc around the K2 V star HIP 17439 was observed. In PACS images the disc emission is spatially clearly extended. A simultaneous analysis of photometric observations and radial brightness profiles from the resolved images provides valuable hints for the disc structure. In an analytical model we adopted power laws for the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust and tested two different scenarios: (1) a broad dust ring with a radial extent of about 200AU, (2) two independent dust rings separated by a gap of several tens of AU. Both models fit the spectral energy distribution and the radial profiles quite well. In case (1) the parameters found are consistent with dust stemming from an outer planetesimal belt at ~140AU and strong transport mechanisms that drag the particles inward. Model (2) would imply two planetesimal belts, producing a narrow inner and wider outer distribution of dust.

  3. ORDEM 3.0 and MASTER-2009 Modeled Small Debris Population Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.; Flegel, S.

    2014-01-01

    The latest versions of the two premier orbital debris engineering models, NASA's ORDEM 3.0 and ESA's MASTER-2009, have been publically released. Both models have gone through significant advancements since inception, and now represent the state-of-the-art in orbital debris knowledge of their respective agencies. The purpose of these models is to provide satellite designers/operators and debris researchers with reliable estimates of the artificial debris environment in low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO). The small debris environment within the size range of 1 mm to 1 cm is of particular interest to both human and robotic spacecraft programs, particularly in LEO. These objects are much more numerous than larger trackable debris and can have enough momentum to cause significant, if not catastrophic, damage to spacecraft upon impact. They are also small enough to elude routine detection by existing observation systems (radar and telescope). Without reliable detection the modeling of these populations has always coupled theoretical origins with supporting observational data in different degrees. In this paper, we present and detail the 1 mm to 1 cm orbital debris populations from both ORDEM 3.0 and MASTER-2009 in LEO. We review population categories: particle sources for MASTER-2009, particle densities for ORDEM 3.0. We describe data sources and their uses, and supporting models. Fluxes on spacecraft for chosen orbits are also presented and discussed within the context of each model.

  4. Bed Stability and Debris Flow Erosion: A Dynamic "Shields Criterion" Associated with Bed Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longjas, A.; Hill, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows are mass movements that play an important role in transporting sediment from steep uplands to rivers at lower slopes. As the debris flow moves downstream, it entrains materials such as loose boulders, gravel, sand and mud deposited locally by shorter flows such as slides and rockfalls. To capture the conditions under which debris flows entrain bed sediment, some models use something akin to the Shields' criterion and an excess shear stress of the flow. However, these models typically neglect granular-scale effects in the bed which can modify the conditions under which a debris flow is erosional or depositional. For example, it is well known that repeated shearing causes denser packing in loose dry soils, which undoubtedly changes their resistance to shear. Here, we present laboratory flume experiments showing that the conditions for entrainment by debris flows is significantly dependent on the aging of an erodible bed even for narrowly distributed spherical particles. We investigate this quantitatively using particle tracking measurements to quantify instantaneous erosion rates and the evolving bed structure or "fabric". With progressive experiments we find a signature that emerges in the bed fabric that is correlated with an increasing apparent "fragility" of the bed. Specifically, a system that is originally depositional may become erosional after repeated debris flow events, and an erodible bed becomes increasingly erodible with repeated flows. We hypothesize that related effects of bed aging at the field scale may be partly responsible for the increasing destructiveness of secondary flows of landslides and debris flows.

  5. Is the Sky Really Falling? An Overview of Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital debris has been a prominent topic for a while, even before the movie Gravity came out. An anti-satellite test and a collision with an operational satellite both produced large highly-publicized debris clouds within recent years. While large objects like abandoned satellites and rocket bodies may be the most recognizable and identifiable concerns, a majority of the daily threat comes from the much more numerous smaller particles. In fact, small particle penetration continues to rank among the leading risks for manned space missions to the International Space Station and beyond. How much 'stuff' is up there, where did it come from, what harm can it do, and what is being done about it? These questions and more will be discussed.

  6. Role of the effective electrical conductivity of nanosuspension in the generation of TiO2 agglomerates with electrospray

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto-Lopez, Luis B.; Biswas, Pratim

    2010-04-26

    Suspensions with varying volume fraction of TiO2 nanoparticles and ionic strength were electrosprayed to obtain agglomerates of different characteristics, which were then deposited to produce films with tailored morphology, thickness, and porosity. The role of the nanoparticle volume fraction in both the effective electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanosuspensions and the control of the size of agglomerates produced by electrospray was investigated. A simple modified equation for the effective electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanoparticle suspensions was derived. The equation, which accounted for nanoparticles' diffuse ionic layer and their agglomeration in a liquid, showed that the effective electrical conductivity is not only a function of the liquid and particle conductivities, and the particle volume fraction but also a function of both the thickness of the adsorbed ionic layer on the particles and the particle size. Gradual increase of particle volume fraction resulted in an increase in the suspension's effective electrical conductivity, when the initial liquid conductivity was in the range of 10-4–10-3 S m-1. When the liquid conductivity was in the range of 10-3–10-2 S m-1; however, addition of particles did not have any significant effect on the effective electrical conductivity. Control over the size of the TiO2 nanoparticle agglomerates was achieved by electrospraying suspensions with liquid electrical conductivity of the order of 10{sup -3} S m-1 and by varying the particle volume fraction. Electrospray deposition of suspensions with TiO2 volume fraction=0.04% resulted in a more compact film with lower porosity and showed better water-splitting performance.

  7. Predicted and observed directional dependence of meteoroid/debris impacts on LDEF thermal blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drolshagen, Gerhard

    1993-01-01

    The number of impacts from meteoroids and space debris particles to the various LDEF rows is calculated using ESABASE/DEBRIS, a 3-D numerical analysis tool. It is based on recent reference environment flux models and includes geometrical and directional effects. A comparison of model predictions and actual observations is made for penetrations of the thermal blankets which covered the UHCR experiment. The thermal blankets were located on all LDEF rows, except 3, 9, and 12. Because of their uniform composition and thickness, these blankets allow a direct analysis of the directional dependence of impacts and provide a test case for the latest meteoroid and debris flux models.

  8. UN COPUOS Space Debris Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portelli, Claudio

    The Space systems today provide growing benefits to enhance the quality of humankind. However as a by product, the orbiting objects inevitably leaves some debris which after 50 years of space activities represent a concern for all space agencies and manufacturers and operators. Since last year no international agreement was in place to mitigate the growing population of space debris objects. The successful result obtained at UN COPUOS in 2007 and available in the OOSA web site, now gives to the public, a set of voluntary international guidelines that could, if adopted by each space fairing Country, help in maintaining the present space environment. More further steps are necessary in the future to define a legal and normative framework. The paper will present the seven established UN Space Debris guidelines as well as examples of the minimum steps to be carried out at national level to enable the UN COPUOS to start the discussion of the legal aspect associated with the space debris issue.

  9. A Passive Nuclear Debris Collector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, John J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a nuclear debris collector which removes trace substances from the lower atmosphere during rainfall. Suggests that the collector could be implemented into courses at various educational levels and could result in developing a network for monitoring the geographical extent of nuclear contamination. (Author/SA)

  10. Simulations of SSLV Ascent and Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart; Aftosmis, Michael; Murman, Scott; Chan, William; Gomez, Ray; Gomez, Ray; Vicker, Darby; Stuart, Phil

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Simulation of Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle (SSLV) ascent and debris transport analysis is shown. The topics include: 1) CFD simulations of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle ascent; 2) Debris transport analysis; 3) Debris aerodynamic modeling; and 4) Other applications.

  11. Orbital Debris and Future Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the historical and current orbital debris environment. Included is information about: Projected growth of the future debris population, The need for active debris removal (ADR), A grand challenge for the 21st century and The forward path

  12. Applying Knowledge from Terrestrial Debris-Covered Glaciers to Constrain the Evolution of Martian Debris-Covered Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutnik, M. R.; Pathare, A. V.; Todd, C.; Waddington, E.; Christian, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We will discuss the application of terrestrial knowledge on debris emplacement, the effects of debris on glacier-surface topography, debris transport by ice flow, deformation of debris-laden ice, and atmosphere-glacier feedbacks to Mars ice.

  13. Physics of debris clouds from hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph

    1993-01-01

    The protection scheme developed for long duration space platforms relies primarily upon placing thin metal plates or 'bumpers' around flight critical components. The effectiveness of this system is highly dependent upon its ability to break up and redistribute the momentum of any particle which might otherwise strike the outer surface of the spacecraft. Therefore it is of critical importance to design the bumpers such that maximum dispersion of momentum is achieved. This report is devoted to an in-depth study into the design and development of a laboratory instrument which would permit the in-situ monitoring of the momentum distribution as the impact event occurs. A series of four designs were developed, constructed and tested culminating with the working instrument which is currently in use. Each design was individually tested using the Space Environmental Effects Facility (SEEF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Along with the development of the device, an experimental procedure was developed to assist in the investigation of various bumper materials and designs at the SEEF. Preliminary results were used to compute data which otherwise were not experimentally obtainable. These results were shown to be in relative agreement with previously obtained values derived through other methods. The results of this investigation indicated that momentum distribution could in fact be measured in-situ as the impact event occurred thus giving a more accurate determination of the effects of experimental parameters on the momentum spread. Data produced by the instrument indicated a Gaussian-type momentum distribution. A second apparatus was developed and it was placed before the shield in the line of travel utilized a plate to collect impact debris scattered backwards. This plate had a passage hole in the center to allow the particle to travel through it and impact the proposed shield material. Applying the law of conservation of angular momentum a

  14. On Some Versions of the Element Agglomeration AMGe Method

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuk, I; Vassilevski, P

    2007-08-09

    The present paper deals with element-based AMG methods that target linear systems of equations coming from finite element discretizations of elliptic PDEs. The individual element information (element matrices and element topology) is the main input to construct the AMG hierarchy. We study a number of variants of the spectral agglomerate element based AMG method. The core of the algorithms relies on element agglomeration utilizing the element topology (built recursively from fine to coarse levels). The actual selection of the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is based on solving large number of local eigenvalue problems. Additionally, we investigate strategies for adaptive AMG as well as multigrid cycles that are more expensive than the V-cycle utilizing simple interpolation matrices and nested conjugate gradient (CG) based recursive calls between the levels. The presented algorithms are illustrated with an extensive set of experiments based on a matlab implementation of the methods.

  15. Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand

    2009-01-15

    Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

  17. Functionally graded porous scaffolds made of Ti-based agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Keivan A; Hilditch, Tim; Dargusch, Matthew S; Nouri, Alireza

    2016-10-01

    Mono- and double-layer porous scaffolds were successfully fabricated using ball-milled agglomerates of Ti and Ti-10Nb-3Mo alloy. For selectively controlling the level of porosity and pore size, the agglomerates were sieved into two different size fractions of 100-300μm and 300-500μm. Compressive mechanical properties were measured on a series of cylindrical sintered compacts with different ratios of solid core diameter to porous layer width. The graded porous scaffolds exhibited stress-strain curves typical for metallic foams with a defined plateau region after yielding. The compressive strengths and elastic moduli ranged from 300 to 700MPa and 14 to 55GPa, respectively, depending on the core diameter and the material used. The obtained properties make these materials suitable for load-bearing implant applications.

  18. Development of methods to predict agglomeration and disposition in FBCs

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.K.; Erickson, T.A.

    1995-11-01

    This 3-year, multiclient program is providing the information needed to determine the behavior of inorganic components in FBC units using advanced methods of analysis coupled with bench-scale combustion experiments. The major objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To develop further our advanced ash and deposit characterization techniques to quantify the effects of the liquid-phase components in terms of agglomerate formation and ash deposits, (2) To determine the mechanisms of inorganic transformations that lead to bed agglomeration and ash deposition in FBC systems, and (3) To develop a better means to predict the behavior of inorganic components as a function of coal composition, bed material characteristics, and combustion conditions.

  19. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  20. Design of a shuttle-based space debris telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, E. H.; Talent, D. L.; Tritsch, C. L.; Vilas, F.

    1990-01-01

    A 1.6-meter diameter f/0.95 all-reflecting telescope was designed to observe orbital debris particles as small as 1 mm from the shuttle payload bay. The telescope was specified to have a flat focal surface without the imposition of refractive elements. Two design configurations involving three mirrors were evaluated - a reflective Schmidt-Cassegrain and a modified Paul corrector. The Paul system was found to be more compact and appropriate for this application.

  1. Debris and micrometeorite impact measurements in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resnick, J.; Grun, J.; Crawford, J.; Burris, R.; Manka, C. K.; Ford, J. L.; Ripin, B. H.

    1992-01-01

    A method was developed to simulate space debris in the laboratory. This method, which is an outgrowth of research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), uses laser ablation to accelerate material. Using this method, single 60 micron aluminum spheres were accelerated to 15 km/sec and larger 500 micron aluminum spheres were accelerated to 2 km/sec. Also, many small (less than 10 micron diameter) irregularly shaped particles were accelerated to speeds of 100 km/sec.

  2. Bed Agglomeration During the Steam Gasification of a High Lignin Corn Stover Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) Digester Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Daniel T.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Saraf, Laxmikant; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Wolcott, Michael P.

    2015-11-13

    This research investigates the bed agglomeration phenomena during the steam gasification of a high lignin residue produced from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of corn stover in a bubbling fluidized bed. The studies were conducted at 895°C using alumina as bed material. Biomass was fed at 1.5 kg/hr, while steam was fed to give a velocity equal to 2.5 times the minimum fluidization velocity, with a steam/carbon ratio of 0.9. The pelletized feedstock was co-fed with a cooling nitrogen stream to mitigate feed line plugging issues. Tar production was high at 50.3 g/Nm3, and the fraction of C10+ compounds was greater than that seen in the gasification of traditional lignocellulosic feedstocks. Carbon closures over 94 % were achieved for all experiments. Bed agglomeration was found to be problematic, indicated by pressure drop increases observed below the bed and upstream of the feed line. Two size categories of solids were recovered from the reactor, +60 mesh and -60 mesh. After a 2.75-hour experiment, 61.7 wt % was recovered as -60 mesh particles and 38.2 wt% of the recovered reactor solids were +60 mesh. A sizeable percentage, 31.8 wt%, was +20 mesh. The -60 mesh particles were mainly formed by the initial bed material (Al2O3). Almost 50 wt. % of the + 20 mesh particles was found to be formed by organics. The unreacted carbon remaining in the reactor resulted in a low conversion rate to product gas. ICP-AES, SEM, SEM-EDS, and XRD confirmed that the large agglomerates (+ 20 mesh) were not encapsulated bed material but rather un-gasified feedstock pellets with sand particles attached to it.

  3. Parallel Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-19

    ParFELAG is a parallel distributed memory C++ library for numerical upscaling of finite element discretizations. It provides optimal complesity algorithms ro build multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for solving a wide class of partial differential equations (elliptic, hyperbolic, saddle point problems) on general unstructured mesh (under the assumption that the topology of the agglomerated entities is correct). Additionally, a novel multilevel solver for saddle point problems with divergence constraint is implemented.

  4. Development of a full scale selective oil agglomeration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, J.C.; Cooney, B.; Hoare, I.; Waugh, B.; Robinson, R.

    1998-12-31

    A research and development program managed by Australian Mining Investments Limited (AMI) on behalf of an investment syndicate was conducted with the objective of improving the efficiency and economy of the Selective Oil Agglomeration Process (SOAP), and developing viable commercial sized operating plants. Fewer than half the coal preparation plants in Australia beneficiate fine coal by froth flotation, the only viable alternative to SOAP for the recovery of low ash, fine and ultra fine coal. Those plants without flotation generally dispose of the ultra fine material, approximately {minus}100{micro}m in size, as tailings to waste. In the majority of cases this ultra fine waste contains more than 50% relatively low ash coal of saleable quality. It is believed that this coal constitutes a loss of 8--10 million tonnes per annum and that the coal mining industry would welcome a recovery process which has low capital and operating costs and will function automatically with minimal operator attention. The authors carried out a comprehensive literature study of selective oil agglomeration in order to gain a full understanding of the process and to plan the research program. Extensive studies were then undertaken on oil dispersion in the water phase, formation of oil water emulsions with surfactants and the optimization of surfactant selection. Oil and emulsion properties were investigated including stability, viscosity, temperature, concentration of components, time of formation, and cost. This work was followed by characterization studies on coals from the Gunnedah Basin and agglomeration test work on these coals. These agglomeration studies were performed firstly at bench level and then by using a small, 200 kg/hr continuous process development unit. The results were sufficiently encouraging to justify the design and construction of a fully instrumented, PLC controlled, 2 tph pilot plant at Gunnedah Colliery Coal Preparation Plant. Extensive trials were carried out on

  5. Orbital debris and meteoroid population as estimated from LDEF impact data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jingchang; Kessler, Donald J.

    1995-01-01

    Examination of LDEF's various surfaces shows numerous craters and holes due to hypervelocity impacts of meteoroids and man-made orbital debris. In this paper, the crater numbers as reported by Humes have been analyzed in an effort to understand the orbital debris and natural meteoroid environment in LEO. To determine the fraction of man-made to natural impacts, the side to top ratio of impacts and results of the Chemistry of Micrometeoroids Experiment are used. For craters in the 100 micron to 500 micron size range, about 25 percent to 30 percent of the impacts on the forward-facing surfaces and about 10 percent of the impacts on the trailing surfaces were estimated due to man-made orbital debris. A technique has been developed to convert crater numbers to particle fluxes, taking the fact into account that the distributions of impact velocity and incidence angle vary over the different surfaces of LDEF, as well as the ratio of the surface area flux to the cross-sectional area flux. Applying this technique, Humes' data concerning craters with limiting lip diameters of 100 micron, 200 micron and 500 micron have been converted into orbital debris and meteoroid fluxes ranging from about 20 micron to 200 micron particle diameter. The results exhibit good agreement with orbital debris model and meteoroid model. The converted meteoroid flux is slightly larger than Grun's model (by 40 to 70 percent). The converted orbital debris flux is slightly lower than Kessler's model for particle diameter smaller than about 30 micron and slightly larger than the model for particle diameter larger than about 40 micron. Taking also into account the IDE data point at about 0.8 micron particle diameter, it suggests to change the slope log (flux) versus log (diameter) of orbital debris flux in the 1 micron to 100 micron particle diameter range from 2.5 to 1.9.

  6. Pebble orientation on large, experimental debris-flow deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Replicable, pronounced orientation of discoid pebbles (??? 8 mm) embedded on surfaces of large (??? 10 m3) experimental debris-flow deposits reveals that strongly aligned, imbricate fabric can develop rapidly over short distances in mass flows. Pebble long axes aligned subparallel to deposit margins as well as subparallel to margins of surge waves arrested within the deposits. Pebble alignment exhibited modes both parallel to (a(p)), and normal to (a(t)), the primary flow direction; intermediate axes dipped preferentially inward from surge-wave margins (b(i) orientation). Repetitive development of margin-parallel, imbricate fabric distributed across deposit surfaces provides compelling evidence that deposits formed dominantly through progressive incremental accretion rather than through simple en masse emplacement. Pronounced fabric along deposit and arrested surge-wave margins reflects significant grain interaction along flow margins. This sedimentological evidence for significant marginal grain interaction complements theoretical analyses (Iverson, 1997) and other experimental data (Major, 1996: Iverson, 1997) that indicate that resistance along flow margins is an important factor affecting debris-flow deposition. The fabric on the experimental deposits demonstrates that debris flows can develop strongly imbricate particle orientation that mimics fabric developed during fluvial deposition. Particle shape and local stress fields appear to have more control over fabric development than does general depositional process. Other criteria in addition to particle orientation are needed to discriminate mass flow from fluvial gravel deposits and to unravel depositional history. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatability Variance for Containerised Liquids in Mixed Debris Waste - 12101

    SciTech Connect

    Alstatt, Catherine M.

    2012-07-01

    The TRU Waste Processing Center (TWPC) is a Department of Energy facility whose mission is to receive and process for appropriate disposal legacy Contact Handled (CH) and Remote Handled (RH) waste, including debris waste stored at various DOE Oak Ridge facilities. Acceptable Knowledge (AK) prepared for the waste characterizes the waste as mixed waste, meaning it is both radioactive and regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The AK also indicates that a number of the debris waste packages contain small amounts of containerised liquids. The documentation indicates liquid wastes generated in routine lab operations were typically collected for potential recovery of valuable isotopes. However, during activities associated with decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), some containers with small amounts of liquids were placed into the waste containers with debris waste. Many of these containers now hold from 2.5 milliliters (ml) to 237 ml of liquid; a few contain larger volumes. At least some of these containers were likely empty at the time of generation, but documentation of this condition is lacking. Since WIPP compliant AK is developed on a waste stream basis, rather than an individual container basis, and includes every potential RCRA hazardous constituent within the waste stream, it is insufficient for the purpose of characterizing individual containers of liquid. Debris waste is defined in 40 CFR 268.2(g) as 'solid material exceeding a 60 mm particle size that is intended for disposal and that is: a manufactured object; or plant or animal matter; or natural geologic material'. The definition further states that intact containers of hazardous waste that are not ruptured and that retain at least 75% of their original volume are not debris. The prescribed treatment is removal of intact containers from the debris waste, and treatment of their contents to meet specific Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) standards. This is true for

  8. Role of agglomeration in the dispersion of salmeterol xinafoate from mixtures for inhalation with differing drug to fine lactose ratios.

    PubMed

    Adi, Handoko; Larson, Ian; Chiou, Herbert; Young, Paul; Traini, Daniela; Stewart, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterise the role of agglomeration on salmeterol xinafoate (SX) dispersion from mixtures for inhalation by varying the SX concentration and the proportion of fine lactose (FL). SX concentrations and SX:FL ratios ranged from 1.0% to 5.0% (w/w) and from 1:0 to 1:8, respectively. The in vitro deposition of SX was measured using a twin stage impinger (TSI). The aerosol was characterized by particulate capture in the TSI stages and subsequent imaging by scanning electron microscopy and by real-time particle sizing. The presence of coarse lactose reduced SX dispersion compared with SX alone, and the dispersion was independent of SX concentration. SX dispersion in binary mixtures of SX and FL was independent of SX:FL ratio and was similar to that of carrier-based mixtures with high particulate loads. Increased concentrations of SX and proportions of FL in carrier-based mixtures resulted in increased SX dispersion. Agglomerate formation coincided with increased dispersion. The study demonstrated that agglomeration is one of the important factors in SX dispersion from carrier-based mixtures at high particulate loads.

  9. Evaluation of optical and electronic properties of silicon nano-agglomerates embedded in SRO: applying density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In systems in atomic scale and nanoscale such as clusters or agglomerates constituted by particles from a few to less than 100 atoms, quantum confinement effects are very important. Their optical and electronic properties are often dependent on the size of the systems and the way in which the atoms in these clusters are bonded. Generally, these nanostructures display optical and electronic properties significantly different to those found in corresponding bulk materials. Silicon agglomerates embedded in silicon rich oxide (SRO) films have optical properties, which have been reported to be directly dependent on silicon nanocrystal size. Furthermore, the room temperature photoluminescence (PL) of SRO has repeatedly generated a huge interest due to its possible applications in optoelectronic devices. However, a plausible emission mechanism has not been widely accepted in the scientific community. In this work, we present a short review about the experimental results on silicon nanoclusters in SRO considering different techniques of growth. We focus mainly on their size, Raman spectra, and photoluminescence spectra. With this as background, we employed the density functional theory with a functional B3LYP and a basis set 6-31G* to calculate the optical and electronic properties of clusters of silicon (constituted by 15 to 20 silicon atoms). With the theoretical calculation of the structural and optical properties of silicon clusters, it is possible to evaluate the contribution of silicon agglomerates in the luminescent emission mechanism, experimentally found in thin SRO films. PMID:25276105

  10. An optimal trajectory design for debris deorbiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Dong, Xin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The problem of deorbiting debris is studied in this paper. As a feasible measure, a disposable satellite would be launched, attach to debris, and deorbit the space debris using a technology named electrodynamic tether (EDT). In order to deorbit multiple debris as many as possible, a suboptimal but feasible and efficient trajectory set has been designed to allow a deorbiter satellite tour the LEO small bodies per one mission. Finally a simulation given by this paper showed that a 600 kg satellite is capable of deorbiting 6 debris objects in about 230 days.

  11. Detecting debris flows using ground vibrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Debris flows are rapidly flowing mixtures of rock debris, mud, and water that originate on steep slopes. During and following volcanic eruptions, debris flows are among the most destructive and persistent hazards. Debris flows threaten lives and property not only on volcanoes but far downstream in valleys that drain volcanoes where they arrive suddenly and inundate entire valley bottoms. Debris flows can destroy vegetation and structures in their path, including bridges and buildings. Their deposits can cover roads and railways, smother crops, and fill stream channels, thereby reducing their flood-carrying capacity and navigability.

  12. Orbital Debris Research in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Gene

    2009-01-01

    The presentation includes information about growth of the satellite population, the U.S. Space Surveillance Network, tracking and catalog maintenance, Haystack and HAX radar observation, Goldstone radar, the Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST), spacecraft surface examinations and sample of space shuttle impacts. GEO/LEO observations from Kwajalein Atoll, NASA s Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2008), a LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris Model (LEGEND), Debris Assessment Software (DAS) 2.0, the NASA/JSC BUMPER-II meteoroid/debris threat assessment code, satellite reentry risk assessment, optical size and shape determination, work on more complicated fragments, and spectral studies.

  13. The Dynamical Structure of HR 8799's Inner Debris Disk.

    PubMed

    Contro, B; Wittenmyer, Robert A; Horner, J; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The HR 8799 system, with its four giant planets and two debris belts, has an architecture closely mirroring that of our Solar system where the inner, warm asteroid belt and outer, cool Edgeworth-Kuiper belt bracket the giant planets. As such, it is a valuable laboratory for examining exoplanetary dynamics and debris disk-exoplanet interactions. Whilst the outer debris belt of HR 8799 has been well resolved by previous observations, the spatial extent of the inner disk remains unknown. This leaves a significant question mark over both the location of the planetesimals responsible for producing the belt's visible dust and the physical properties of those grains. We have performed the most extensive simulations to date of the inner, unresolved debris belt around HR 8799, using UNSW Australia's Katana supercomputing facility to follow the dynamical evolution of a model inner disk comprising 300,298 particles for a period of 60 Ma. These simulations have enabled the characterisation of the extent and structure of the inner disk in detail, and will in future allow us to provide a first estimate of the small-body impact rate and water delivery prospects for possible (as-yet undetected) terrestrial planet (s) in the inner system. PMID:25862330

  14. The Dynamical Structure of HR 8799's Inner Debris Disk.

    PubMed

    Contro, B; Wittenmyer, Robert A; Horner, J; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The HR 8799 system, with its four giant planets and two debris belts, has an architecture closely mirroring that of our Solar system where the inner, warm asteroid belt and outer, cool Edgeworth-Kuiper belt bracket the giant planets. As such, it is a valuable laboratory for examining exoplanetary dynamics and debris disk-exoplanet interactions. Whilst the outer debris belt of HR 8799 has been well resolved by previous observations, the spatial extent of the inner disk remains unknown. This leaves a significant question mark over both the location of the planetesimals responsible for producing the belt's visible dust and the physical properties of those grains. We have performed the most extensive simulations to date of the inner, unresolved debris belt around HR 8799, using UNSW Australia's Katana supercomputing facility to follow the dynamical evolution of a model inner disk comprising 300,298 particles for a period of 60 Ma. These simulations have enabled the characterisation of the extent and structure of the inner disk in detail, and will in future allow us to provide a first estimate of the small-body impact rate and water delivery prospects for possible (as-yet undetected) terrestrial planet (s) in the inner system.

  15. The dynamical structure of the HR8799 inner debris disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Contro de Godoy, Bruna; Horner, Jonathan; Marshall, Jonathan P.

    2014-11-01

    The HR 8799 system, with its four giant planets and two debris belts, has an architecture closely mirroring that of our Solar System where the inner, warm asteroid belt and outer, cool Edgeworth-Kuiper belt bracket the giant planets. As such, it is a valuable laboratory for examining exoplanet dynamics and debris disc-exoplanet interactions. Whilst the outer debris belt of HR 8799 has been well resolved by previous observations, the spatial extent of the inner disc remains unknown, leaving a question mark over both the location of the planetesimals responsible for producing the belt's visible dust and the physical properties of those grains. We have performed the most extensive simulations to date of the inner, unresolved debris belt around HR 8799, using University of New South Wales's Katana supercomputing facility to follow the dynamical evolution of a model inner disc comprising 250,000 particles for a period of 100 million years. These simulations will (1) characterise the extent and structure of the inner disk in detail and (2) provide the first estimate of the small-body impact rate and water delivery prospects for possible (as-yet undetected) terrestrial planet(s) in the inner system.

  16. The Dynamical Structure of HR 8799's Inner Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contro, B.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, J.; Marshall, Jonathan P.

    2015-06-01

    The HR 8799 system, with its four giant planets and two debris belts, has an architecture closely mirroring that of our Solar system where the inner, warm asteroid belt and outer, cool Edgeworth-Kuiper belt bracket the giant planets. As such, it is a valuable laboratory for examining exoplanetary dynamics and debris disk-exoplanet interactions. Whilst the outer debris belt of HR 8799 has been well resolved by previous observations, the spatial extent of the inner disk remains unknown. This leaves a significant question mark over both the location of the planetesimals responsible for producing the belt's visible dust and the physical properties of those grains. We have performed the most extensive simulations to date of the inner, unresolved debris belt around HR 8799, using UNSW Australia's Katana supercomputing facility to follow the dynamical evolution of a model inner disk comprising 300,298 particles for a period of 60 Ma. These simulations have enabled the characterisation of the extent and structure of the inner disk in detail, and will in future allow us to provide a first estimate of the small-body impact rate and water delivery prospects for possible (as-yet undetected) terrestrial planet (s) in the inner system.

  17. Mechanistic time scales in adhesive mixing investigated by dry particle sizing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy; Rasmuson, Anders; Niklasson Björn, Ingela; Thalberg, Kyrre

    2015-03-10

    This study exploits the mechanisms governing blending of adhesive mixtures, i.e. random mixing, de-agglomeration and adhesion, and their relative importance to achieve mixing homogeneity. To this end, blending of micronized particles (fines) with carrier particles was carried out using a high shear mixer. Dry particle sizing using laser diffraction coupled with a strong powder dispersion unit was employed to measure the fines content in samples collected during mixing, and hence to assess blend homogeneity. The method was also employed to evaluate the relative strength of the agglomerates present in the fines. Particle sizing using a non-destructive imaging technique was used to monitor changes in particle size during blending. It could be shown that the de-agglomeration of the fine-particle agglomerates is the slowest mechanism and hence the rate-limiting step as regards achieving a homogeneous adhesive mixture. Consequently, a longer mixing time is needed for blending of larger agglomerates. Being fast, simple and reproducible, the laser diffraction technique was shown to be an efficient method for measurement of fine particle content and homogeneity of a mixture, while the non-destructive image analysis was able to give relevant information on the rate of de-agglomeration of the fine-particle agglomerates as well as on the size of the resulting carrier-fine particle assemblies. PMID:25576090

  18. Orbiting space debris: Dangers, measurement and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ross T.

    1992-06-01

    Space debris is a growing environmental problem. Accumulation of objects in earth orbit threatens space systems through the possibility of collisions and runaway debris multiplication. The amount of debris in orbit is uncertain due to the lack of information on the population of debris between 1 and 10 centimeters diameter. Collisions with debris even smaller than 1 cm can be catastrophic due to the high orbital velocities involved. Research efforts are under way at NASA, United States Space Command and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to detect and catalog the debris population in near-earth space. Current international and national laws are inadequate to control the proliferation of space debris. Space debris is a serious problem with large economic, military, technical and diplomatic components. Actions need to be taken now to: determine the full extent of the orbital debris problem; accurately predict the future evolution of the debris population; decide the extent of the debris mitigation procedures required; implement these policies on a global basis via an international treaty. Action must be initiated now, before the loss of critical space systems such as the space shuttle or the space station.

  19. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  20. Study of the structuralization of the magnetic particles in magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomco, L.; Kopcansky, P.; Koneracka, M.; Kellnerova, V.

    1994-03-01

    A magnetic field induced agglomeration of magnetic particles in magnetic fluids (mineral oil and kerosene based) with several volume concentrations was studied by means of optical microscope equipped with a video camera. Scrutiny of the video revealed that time evolution of the aggregation process results from two processes i.e.: (1) the formation of new (or primary) agglomerations (t less than or equal to 2s); and (2) the coalescence of primary agglomerations (t greater than 2s).

  1. Comparison of debris flux models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdunnus, H.; Beltrami, P.; Klinkrad, H.; Matney, M.; Nazarenko, A.; Wegener, P.

    The availability of models to estimate the impact risk from the man-made space debris and the natural meteoroid environment is essential for both, manned and unmanned satellite missions. Various independent tools based on different approaches have been developed in the past years. Due to an increased knowledge of the debris environment and its sources e.g. from improved measurement capabilities, these models could be updated regularly, providing more detailed and more reliable simulations. This paper addresses an in-depth, quantitative comparison of widely distributed debris flux models which were recently updated, namely ESA's MASTER 2001 model, NASA's ORDEM 2000 and the Russian SDPA 2000 model. The comparison was performed in the frame of the work of the 20t h Interagency Debris Coordination (IADC) meeting held in Surrey, UK. ORDEM 2000ORDEM 2000 uses careful empirical estimates of the orbit populations based onthree primary data sources - the US Space Command Catalog, the H ystackaRadar, and the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft returned surfaces.Further data (e.g. HAX and Goldstone radars, impacts on Shuttle windows andradiators, and others) were used to adjust these populations for regions in time,size, and space not covered by the primary data sets. Some interpolation andextrapolation to regions with no data (such as projections into the future) wasprovided by the EVOLVE model. MASTER 2001The ESA MASTER model offers a full three dimensional description of theterrestrial debris distribution reaching from LEO up to the GEO region. Fluxresults relative to an orbiting target or to an inertial volume can be resolved intosource terms, impactor characteristics and orbit, as well as impact velocity anddirection. All relevant debris source terms are considered by the MASTERmodel. For each simulated source, a corresponding debris generation model interms of mass/diameter distribution, additional velocities, and directionalspreading has been developed. A

  2. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Power Plate Transducers in Dense Gas Extraction and Aerosol Agglomeration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, E.; Cardoni, A.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.; Acosta, V. M.; Blanco, A.; Rodríguez, G.; Blasco, M.; Herranz, L. E.

    Power ultrasound (PU) is an emerging, innovative, energy saving and environmental friendly technology that is generating a great interest in sectors such as food and pharmaceutical industries, green chemistry, environmental pollution, and other processes, where sustainable and energy efficient methods are required to improve and/or produce specific effects. Two typical effects of PU are the enhancement of mass transfer in gases and liquids, and the induction of particle agglomeration in aerosols. These effects are activated by a variety of mechanisms associated to the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves such as diffusion, agitation, entrainment, turbulence, etc. During the last years a great effort has been jointly made by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the company Pusonics towards introducing novel processes into the market based on airborne ultrasonic plate transducers. This technology was specifically developed for the treatment of gas and multiphasic media characterized by low specific acoustic impedance and high acoustic absorption. Different strategies have been developed to mitigate the effects of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of such ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers in order to enhance and stabilize their response at operational power conditions. This work deals with the latter advances in the mitigation of nonlinear problems found in power transducers; besides it describes two applications assisted by ultrasound developed at semi-industrial and laboratory scales and consisting in extraction via dense gases and particle agglomeration. Dense Gas Extraction (DGE) assisted by PU is a new process with a potential to enhance the extraction kinetics with supercritical CO2. Acoustic agglomeration of fine aerosol particles has a great potential for the treatment of air pollution problems generated by particulate materials. Experimental and numerical results in both processes will be shown and discussed.

  3. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) inhibits agglomeration and macrophage uptake of toxic amine modified nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Zofi; Kendall, Michaela; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Whitwell, Harry; Elgy, Christine; Ding, Ping; Mahajan, Sumeet; Morgan, Cliff; Griffiths, Mark; Clark, Howard; Madsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The lung provides the main route for nanomaterial exposure. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an important respiratory innate immune molecule with the ability to bind or opsonise pathogens to enhance phagocytic removal from the airways. We hypothesised that SP-A, like surfactant protein D, may interact with inhaled nanoparticulates, and that this interaction will be affected by nanoparticle (NP) surface characteristics. In this study, we characterise the interaction of SP-A with unmodified (U-PS) and amine-modified (A-PS) polystyrene particles of varying size and zeta potential using dynamic light scatter analysis. SP-A associated with both 100 nm U-PS and A-PS in a calcium-independent manner. SP-A induced significant calcium-dependent agglomeration of 100 nm U-PS NPs but resulted in calcium-independent inhibition of A-PS self agglomeration. SP-A enhanced uptake of 100 nm U-PS into macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner but in contrast inhibited A-PS uptake. Reduced association of A-PS particles in RAW264.7 cells following pre-incubation of SP-A was also observed with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Consistent with these findings, alveolar macrophages (AMs) from SP-A−/− mice were more efficient at uptake of 100 nm A-PS compared with wild type C57Bl/6 macrophages. No difference in uptake was observed with 500 nm U-PS or A-PS particles. Pre-incubation with SP-A resulted in a significant decrease in uptake of 100 nm A-PS in macrophages isolated from both groups of mice. In contrast, increased uptake by AMs of U-PS was observed after pre-incubation with SP-A. Thus we have demonstrated that SP-A promotes uptake of non-toxic U-PS particles but inhibits the clearance of potentially toxic A-PS particles by blocking uptake into macrophages. PMID:25676620

  4. Comparison of space debris estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.P.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-10-01

    Debris is thought to be a hazard to space systems through impact and cascading. The current environment is assessed as not threatening to defense systems. Projected reductions in launch rates to LEO should delay concerns for centuries. There is agreement between AFSPC and NASA analyses on catalogs and collision rates, but not on fragmentation rates. Experiments in the laboratory, field, and space are consistent with AFSPC estimates of the number of fragments per collision. A more careful treatment of growth rates greatly reduces long-term stability issues. Space debris has not been shown to be an issue in coming centuries; thus, it does not appear necessary for the Air Force to take additional steps to mitigate it.

  5. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  6. An online debris sensor system with vibration resistance for lubrication analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yongbin; Wang, Yanxue; Xiang, Jiawei

    2016-02-01

    The health condition of the lubricated systems can be directly indicated by the concentration and material type of the abrasive particles, which may provide very early warnings of faults/failures and benefit the condition based maintenance. Oil debris particle detecting techniques are thus important for machinery condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. This work proposes a new structure of online debris sensor (ODS), which applies the radial magnetic field, different from the traditional axial magnetic field. The designed ODS can effectively reduce the interferences of the background noise and the vibration of the machine in operation. Moreover, in order to optimally determine the number of turns of an inductive coil and the current of the drive coils, two methods are developed respectively in this work which can ensure sensitivity and anti-vibration features of the ODS. The instrumentation circuit system for detecting debris particles and sensing signals has been also designed to extract and to record the signatures of particles. The designed ODS device is then applied to analyze micro debris particles in the lubricating system on a test rig. Experimental results have demonstrated that ODS can successfully detect the 120 μm(H) ferrous particles and 500 μm(H) non-ferrous particles under vibration conditions.

  7. An online debris sensor system with vibration resistance for lubrication analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongbin; Wang, Yanxue; Xiang, Jiawei

    2016-02-01

    The health condition of the lubricated systems can be directly indicated by the concentration and material type of the abrasive particles, which may provide very early warnings of faults/failures and benefit the condition based maintenance. Oil debris particle detecting techniques are thus important for machinery condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. This work proposes a new structure of online debris sensor (ODS), which applies the radial magnetic field, different from the traditional axial magnetic field. The designed ODS can effectively reduce the interferences of the background noise and the vibration of the machine in operation. Moreover, in order to optimally determine the number of turns of an inductive coil and the current of the drive coils, two methods are developed respectively in this work which can ensure sensitivity and anti-vibration features of the ODS. The instrumentation circuit system for detecting debris particles and sensing signals has been also designed to extract and to record the signatures of particles. The designed ODS device is then applied to analyze micro debris particles in the lubricating system on a test rig. Experimental results have demonstrated that ODS can successfully detect the 120 μm(H) ferrous particles and 500 μm(H) non-ferrous particles under vibration conditions.

  8. Circumstellar Debris Disks and SIRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    At least 15% of nearby main sequence stars are found to have far-IR excesses representing thermal emission from optically thin dust clouds. Famous prototypes of this class of objects include the Vega and beta Pictoris systems. Because destruction times for observed grains are much shorter than the system ages, the dust is known to be ``2nd generation" material released recently from hypothetical asteroid or comet parent bodies and not primordial grains persisting since system formation. The best local analogs to the main sequence debris disk systems are the inner solar system's zodiacal dust cloud and a presumed dust component of the Kuiper Belt. Planetary masses are probably required to drive planetesimals into shattering collisions and star-grazing orbits that produce dust, thus debris disks may allow inference of presence and location of planets. SIRTF will give us much-improved understanding of the frequency of debris disks around field main sequence stars, as well as the amount, size and composition of dust grains versus stellar age. This will help place our solar system into context of evolution of planetary material around normal stars.

  9. Lightcurves of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Meng, Huan; Su, Kate

    2012-12-01

    We have recently discovered that some planetary debris disks with extreme fractional luminosities are variable on the timescale of a few years. This behavior opens a new possibility to understand planet building. Two of the known variable disks are around solar-like stars in the age range of 30 to 100+ Myr, which is the expected era of the final stages of terrestrial planet building. Such variability can be attributed to violent collisions (up to ones on the scale of the Moon-forming event between the proto-Earth and another proto-planet). The collisional cascades that are the aftermaths of these events can produce large clouds of tiny dust grains, possibly even condensed from silica vapor. A Spitzer pilot program has obtained the lightcurve of such a debris disk and caught two minor outbursts. Here we propose to continue the lightcurve monitoring with higher sampling rates and to expand it to more disks. The proposed time domain observations are a new dimension of debris disk studies that can bring unique insight to their evolution, providing important constraints on the collisional and dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation.

  10. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R.; Mann, B.; Read, M.; Kerr, T.; Irwin, M.; Cross, N.; Bold, M.,; Varricatt, W.; Madsen, G.

    2014-09-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU. This paper will present the January and February results of the orbital debris surveys with WFCAM.

  11. NASA Orbital Debris Large-Object Baseline Population in ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisco, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has created and validated high fidelity populations of the debris environment for the latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM 3.0). Though the model includes fluxes of objects 10 um and larger, this paper considers particle fluxes for 1 cm and larger debris objects from low Earth orbit (LEO) through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). These are validated by several reliable radar observations through the Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radars. ORDEM 3.0 populations were designed for the purpose of assisting, debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment includes a background derived from the LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris evolutionary model (LEGEND) with a Bayesian rescaling as well as specific events such as the FY-1C anti-satellite test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, and the Soviet/Russian Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) sodium-potassium droplet releases. The environment described in this paper is the most realistic orbital debris population larger than 1 cm, to date. We describe derivations of the background population and added specific populations. We present sample validation charts of our 1 cm and larger LEO population against Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  12. Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Robert H.; Pringle, Patrick T.; Rink, Glenn R.

    1989-01-01

    second. The debris flow of 1966 in the Crystal Creek drainage had a discharge estimated between 9,200 and 14,000 cubic feet per second. Determination of the effective cross-sectional area was a problem in all calculations involving superelevations on bends because areas near superelevation marks were 1.5 to 3.5 times larger than areas of upstream or downstream cross sections. Debris flows in the Grand Canyon generally are composed of 10 to 40 percent sand by weight and may represent a significant source of beach-building sand along the Colorado River. The particle-size distributions are very poorly sorted and the largest transported boulders were in the Crystal Creek drainage. The large boulders transported into the Colorado River by debris flows create or change hydraulic controls (rapids); these controls appear to be governed by the magnitude and frequency of tributary-flow events and the history of discharges on the Colorado River. Reworking of debris fans by the Colorado River creates debris bars that constrain the size of eddy systems and forms secondary rapids and riffles below tributary mouths.

  13. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Debris Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Kristin; Kanner, Howard; Yu, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident revealed a fundamental problem of the Space Shuttle Program regarding debris. Prior to the tragedy, the Space Shuttle requirement stated that no debris should be liberated that would jeopardize the flight crew and/or mission success. When the accident investigation determined that a large piece of foam debris was the primary cause of the loss of the shuttle and crew, it became apparent that the risk and scope of - damage that could be caused by certain types of debris, especially - ice and foam, were not fully understood. There was no clear understanding of the materials that could become debris, the path the debris might take during flight, the structures the debris might impact or the damage the impact might cause. In addition to supporting the primary NASA and USA goal of returning the Space Shuttle to flight by understanding the SRB debris environment and capability to withstand that environment, the SRB debris assessment project was divided into four primary tasks that were required to be completed to support the RTF goal. These tasks were (1) debris environment definition, (2) impact testing, (3) model correlation and (4) hardware evaluation. Additionally, the project aligned with USA's corporate goals of safety, customer satisfaction, professional development and fiscal accountability.

  14. Relationships among the abundances of plastic debris in different size classes on beaches in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongmyoung; Hong, Sunwook; Song, Young Kyung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Yong Chang; Jang, Mi; Heo, Nak Won; Han, Gi Myung; Lee, Mi Jeong; Kang, Daeseok; Shim, Won Joon

    2013-12-15

    Plastic debris on six beaches near the Nakdong River Estuary, South Korea, was sampled in May and September 2012 and classified into three size classes, large microplastics (1-5 mm), mesoplastics (5-25 mm), and macroplastics (>25 mm). The relationships among the abundances of the size classes were then examined. The abundances of each size category in May (before rainy season) and in September (after rainy season) were 8205 and 27,606 particles/m(2) for large microplastics, 238 and 237 particles/m(2) for mesoplastics, and 0.97 and 1.03 particles/m(2) for macroplastics, respectively. Styrofoam was the most abundant item both in microplastic and mesoplastic debris, while intact plastics were most common in macroplastic debris. The abundances of meso- and micro-plastics were the most strongly correlated. There was a higher correlation between the abundances of macro- and meso-plastics than between macro- and micro-plastics. PMID:24054782

  15. Active space debris charging for contactless electrostatic disposal maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Hanspeter; Sternovsky, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The remote charging of a passive object using an electron beam enables touchless re-orbiting of large space debris from geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using electrostatic forces. The advantage of this method is that it can operate with a separation distance of multiple craft radii, thus reducing the risk of collision. The charging of the tug-debris system to high potentials is achieved by active charge transfer using a directed electron beam. Optimal potential distributions using isolated- and coupled-sphere models are discussed. A simple charging model takes into account the primary electron beam current, ultra-violet radiation induced photoelectron emission, collection of plasma particles, secondary electron emission and the recapture of emitted particles. The results show that through active charging in a GEO space environment high potentials can be both achieved and maintained with about a 75% transfer efficiency. Further, the maximum electrostatic tractor force is shown to be insensitive to beam current levels. This latter later result is important when considering debris with unknown properties.

  16. Momentum distribution in debris cloud during hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaster, P.; Mount, A.; Zee, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The long term operation of the Space Station Freedom requires a scheme to protect it from high velocity impacts by both man-made particles and micrometeor fragments. One such scheme is the use of metal plates to serve as shields against such orbital debris. These 'bumper' plates, as they are referred to, serve to break up any incident particle and redistribute its momentum over a larger area. It is therefore necessary to determine the momentum distribution within the debris cloud produced by such collisions in order to evaluate a materials effectiveness at accomplishing this task. This paper details the design and development of an innovative device which has made this possible. Momentum profiles were obtained for a series of test conditions. Total momentum values in the debris cloud were then calculated from these profiles. These results indicated that a momentum amplification exists with a multiplication factor of between 2 and 3. Thus the role of the bumper to serve as a means for momentum redistribution and not reduction was verified.

  17. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  18. FracMAP: A user-interactive package for performing simulation and orientation-specific morphology analysis of fractal-like solid nano-agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Garro, Mark A.; Chancellor, Shammah; Herald, Christopher; Moosmüller, Hans

    2009-08-01

    Computer simulation techniques have found extensive use in establishing empirical relationships between three-dimensional (3d) and two-dimensional (2d) projected properties of particles produced by the process of growth through the agglomeration of smaller particles (monomers). In this paper, we describe a package, FracMAP, that has been written to simulate 3d quasi-fractal agglomerates and create their 2d pixelated projection images by restricting them to stable orientations as commonly encountered for quasi-fractal agglomerates collected on filter media for electron microscopy. Resulting 2d images are analyzed for their projected morphological properties. Program summaryProgram title: FracMAP Catalogue identifier: AEDD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4722 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 229 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: PC Operating system: Windows, Linux RAM: 2.0 Megabytes Classification: 7.7 Nature of problem: Solving for a suitable fractal agglomerate construction under constraints of typical morphological parameters. Solution method: Monte Carlo approximation. Restrictions: Problem complexity is not representative of run-time, since Monte Carlo iterations are of a constant complexity. Additional comments: The distribution file contains two versions of the FracMAP code, one for Windows and one for Linux. Running time: 1 hour for a fractal agglomerate of size 25 on a single processor.

  19. Intra-metropolitan migration in the Warsaw agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Rykiel, Z

    1984-01-01

    "Two questions of intra-metropolitan migration are analyzed in the paper, intra-metropolitan hierarchy and intra-metropolitan spatial barriers. The former embraces four detailed questions: ranking of centers; spatial pattern of hierarchical subordination; degree of unequivocalness of the subordinations, or degree of dominance; and degree of hierarchicality of interrelationships. Two specialties of the Warsaw [Poland] agglomeration are discussed, the influence of the present crisis, and the administrative restrictions to migration to the city, or the spatial barriers. Social connotations of the latter are also presented."

  20. Improving The Near-Earth Meteoroid And Orbital Debris Environment Definition With LAD-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Giovane, F. J.; Corsaro, R. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Drolshagen, G.; Kawai, H.; Tabata, M.; Stansbery, E. G.; Westphal, A. J.; Yano, H.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the near-Earth meteoroid and orbital debris environment definition, a large area particle sensor/collector is being developed to be placed on the International Space Station (ISS). This instrument, the Large Area Debris Collector (LAD-C), will attempt to record meteoroid and orbital debris impact flux, and capture the same particles with aerogel. After at least one year of deployment, the whole system will be brought back for additional laboratory analysis of the captured meteoroids and orbital debris. This project is led by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) while the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Space Test Program (STP) is responsible for the integration, deployment, and retrieval of the system. Additional contributing team members of the consortium include the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office, JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Chiba University (Japan), ESA Space Debris Office, University of Kent (UK), and University of California at Berkeley. The deployment of LAD-C on the ISS is planned for 2008, with the system retrieval in late 2009.

  1. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in human lung cells: the role of cellular uptake, agglomeration and Ag release

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently one of the most manufactured nanomaterials. A wide range of toxicity studies have been performed on various AgNPs, but these studies report a high variation in toxicity and often lack proper particle characterization. The aim of this study was to investigate size- and coating-dependent toxicity of thoroughly characterized AgNPs following exposure of human lung cells and to explore the mechanisms of toxicity. Methods BEAS-2B cells were exposed to citrate coated AgNPs of different primary particle sizes (10, 40 and 75 nm) as well as to 10 nm PVP coated and 50 nm uncoated AgNPs. The particle agglomeration in cell medium was investigated by photon cross correlation spectroscopy (PCCS); cell viability by LDH and Alamar Blue assay; ROS induction by DCFH-DA assay; genotoxicity by alkaline comet assay and γH2AX foci formation; uptake and intracellular localization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and cellular dose as well as Ag release by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Results The results showed cytotoxicity only of the 10 nm particles independent of surface coating. In contrast, all AgNPs tested caused an increase in overall DNA damage after 24 h assessed by the comet assay, suggesting independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity and DNA damage. However, there was no γH2AX foci formation and no increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reasons for the higher toxicity of the 10 nm particles were explored by investigating particle agglomeration in cell medium, cellular uptake, intracellular localization and Ag release. Despite different agglomeration patterns, there was no evident difference in the uptake or intracellular localization of the citrate and PVP coated AgNPs. However, the 10 nm particles released significantly more Ag compared with all other AgNPs (approx. 24 wt% vs. 4–7 wt%) following 24 h in cell medium. The released fraction in cell medium did not induce any

  2. Styrofoam Debris as a Source of Hazardous Additives for Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee

    2016-05-17

    There is growing concern over plastic debris and their fragments as a carrier for hazardous substances in marine ecosystem. The present study was conducted to provide field evidence for the transfer of plastic-associated chemicals to marine organisms. Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), brominated flame retardants, were recently detected in expanded polystyrene (styrofoam) marine debris. We hypothesized that if styrofoam debris acts as a source of the additives in the marine environment, organisms inhabiting such debris might be directly influenced by them. Here we investigated the characteristics of HBCD accumulation by mussels inhabiting styrofoam. For comparison, mussels inhabiting different substrates, such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), metal, and rock, were also studied. The high HBCD levels up to 5160 ng/g lipid weight and the γ-HBCD dominated isomeric profiles in mussels inhabiting styrofoam strongly supports the transfer of HBCDs from styrofoam substrate to mussels. Furthermore, microsized styrofoam particles were identified inside mussels, probably originating from their substrates.

  3. Styrofoam Debris as a Source of Hazardous Additives for Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee

    2016-05-17

    There is growing concern over plastic debris and their fragments as a carrier for hazardous substances in marine ecosystem. The present study was conducted to provide field evidence for the transfer of plastic-associated chemicals to marine organisms. Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), brominated flame retardants, were recently detected in expanded polystyrene (styrofoam) marine debris. We hypothesized that if styrofoam debris acts as a source of the additives in the marine environment, organisms inhabiting such debris might be directly influenced by them. Here we investigated the characteristics of HBCD accumulation by mussels inhabiting styrofoam. For comparison, mussels inhabiting different substrates, such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), metal, and rock, were also studied. The high HBCD levels up to 5160 ng/g lipid weight and the γ-HBCD dominated isomeric profiles in mussels inhabiting styrofoam strongly supports the transfer of HBCDs from styrofoam substrate to mussels. Furthermore, microsized styrofoam particles were identified inside mussels, probably originating from their substrates. PMID:27100560

  4. Measuring Small Debris - What You Can't See Can Hurt You

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While modeling gives us a tool to better understand the Earth orbit debris environment, it is measurements that give us "ground truth" about what is happening in space. Assets that can detect orbital debris remotely from the surface of the Earth, such as radars and telescopes, give us a statistical view of how debris are distributed in space, how they are being created, and how they are evolving over time. In addition, in situ detectors in space are giving us a better picture of how the small particle environment is actually damaging spacecraft today. IN addition, simulation experiments on the ground help us to understand what we are seeing in orbit. This talk will summarize the history of space debris measurements, how it has changed our view of the Earth orbit environment, and how we are designing the experiments of tomorrow.

  5. Evaluating tsunami hazards from debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows that enter water bodies may have significant kinetic energy, some of which is transferred to water motion or waves that can impact shorelines and structures. The associated hazards depend on the location of the affected area relative to the point at which the debris flow enters the water. Three distinct regions (splash zone, near field, and far field) may be identified. Experiments demonstrate that characteristics of the near field water wave, which is the only coherent wave to emerge from the splash zone, depend primarily on debris flow volume, debris flow submerged time of motion, and water depth at the point where debris flow motion stops. Near field wave characteristics commonly may be used as & proxy source for computational tsunami propagation. This result is used to assess hazards associated with potential debris flows entering a reservoir in the northwestern USA. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  6. Orbital debris: Technical issues and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Andrew (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    An international conference on orbital debris sponsored jointly by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, NASA, and the Department of Defense, was held in Baltimore, Maryland, 16-19 Apr. 1990. Thirty-three papers were presented. The papers were grouped into the areas of measurements, modeling, and implications of orbital debris for space flight. New radar and optical measurements of orbital debris were presented that showed the existence of a large population of small debris. Modeling of potential future environments showed that runaway growth of the debris population from random collisions was a real possibility. New techniques for shielding against orbital debris and methods for removal of satellites from orbit were discussed.

  7. The impact of debris on marine life.

    PubMed

    Gall, S C; Thompson, R C

    2015-03-15

    Marine debris is listed among the major perceived threats to biodiversity, and is cause for particular concern due to its abundance, durability and persistence in the marine environment. An extensive literature search reviewed the current state of knowledge on the effects of marine debris on marine organisms. 340 original publications reported encounters between organisms and marine debris and 693 species. Plastic debris accounted for 92% of encounters between debris and individuals. Numerous direct and indirect consequences were recorded, with the potential for sublethal effects of ingestion an area of considerable uncertainty and concern. Comparison to the IUCN Red List highlighted that at least 17% of species affected by entanglement and ingestion were listed as threatened or near threatened. Hence where marine debris combines with other anthropogenic stressors it may affect populations, trophic interactions and assemblages. PMID:25680883

  8. Pathways of marine debris in statistical and diagnostic ocean circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximenko, N.; Hafner, J.; Lumpkin, R.

    2012-04-01

    Statistical and diagnostic models are used in this study to describe long-term dynamics of objects floating at the sea surface. The statistical model is based of the particle displacement probability density function, derived from trajectories of drifting buoys, and is supplemented by the probability of running aground. This model reveals five main areas of debris accumulation in the subtropical ocean, all confirmed with direct observations. It also reveals the global pattern of shores impacted by marine debris, correlated with dominant winds. The diagnostic model (SCUD - Surface CUrrents from Diagnostic) utilizes satellite data of altimetry and QuikSCAT/ASCAT winds to assess near-real time surface velocities and its parameters are optimized using drifter trajectories. Numerical experiments with various sources and life times of the model debris help to understand main pathways of the tracer and distributions of its properties within and across individual oceans. Applications of statistical and diagnostic models help to assess probable motion of the debris, generated in Japan by tsunami of March 11, 2011. The timeline, derived from the statistical model, and maps, computed with SCUD, are used to coordinate operational at-sea and on-coast observations and preparations for the debris impact. Most of debris is drifting from Japan towards east, while dispersing over increasing area. After passing Hawaii in the north it is expected to recirculate into the so-called North Pacific Garbage Patch - the area, located between Hawaii and California, where convergent surface currents collect all floating waste. Only a small fraction of tsunami debris, on the edge of the debris field, will "touch" Hawaii and US/Canada west coast. Yet the amount and composition may be anomalous. Mixed with the older waste, tsunami debris will slowly leak from the patch, polluting Hawaiian Islands.

  9. The New NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has released its latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM 3.0. It supersedes ORDEM 2.0. This newer model encompasses the Earth satellite and debris flux environment from altitudes of low Earth orbit (LEO) through geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Debris sizes of 10 microns through 1 m in non-GEO and 10 cm through 1 m in GEO are modeled. The inclusive years are 2010 through 2035. The ORDEM model series has always been data driven. ORDEM 3.0 has the benefit of many more hours from existing data sources and from new sources that weren't available to past versions. Returned surfaces, ground tests, and remote sensors all contribute data. The returned surface and ground test data reveal material characteristics of small particles. Densities of fragmentation debris particles smaller than 10 cm are grouped in ORDEM 3.0 in terms of high-, medium-, and lowdensities, along with RORSAT sodium-potassium droplets. Supporting models have advanced significantly. The LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris model (LEGEND) includes an historical and a future projection component with yearly populations that include launched and maneuvered intacts, mission related debris (MRD), and explosion and collision fragments. LEGEND propagates objects with ephemerides and physical characteristics down to 1 mm in size. The full LEGEND yearly population acts as an a priori condition for a Bayesian statistical model. Specific, well defined populations are added like the Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) sodium-potassium (NaK) droplets, recent major accidental and deliberate collision fragments, and known anomalous debris event fragments. For microdebris of sizes 10 microns to 1 mm the ODPO uses an in-house Degradation/Ejecta model in which a MLE technique is used with returned surface data to estimate populations. This paper elaborates on the upgrades of this model over previous versions highlighting the material density splits and consequences of

  10. Variations in debris distribution and thickness on Himalayan debris-covered glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Morgan; Rowan, Ann; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram; Quincey, Duncan; Glasser, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Many Himalayan glaciers are characterised by extensive supraglacial debris coverage; in Nepal 33% of glaciers exhibit a continuous layer of debris covering their ablation areas. The presence of such a debris layer modulates a glacier's response to climatic change. However, the impact of this modulation is poorly constrained due to inadequate quantification of the impact of supraglacial debris on glacier surface energy balance. Few data exist to describe spatial and temporal variations in parameters such as debris thickness, albedo and surface roughness in energy balance calculations. Consequently, improved understanding of how debris affects Himalayan glacier ablation requires the assessment of surface energy balance model sensitivity to spatial and temporal variability in these parameters. Measurements of debris thickness, surface temperature, reflectance and roughness were collected across Khumbu Glacier during the pre- and post-monsoon seasons of 2014 and 2015. The extent of the spatial variation in each of these parameters are currently being incorporated into a point-based glacier surface energy balance model (CMB-RES, Collier et al., 2014, The Cryosphere), applied on a pixel-by-pixel basis to the glacier surface, to ascertain the sensitivity of glacier surface energy balance and ablation values to these debris parameters. A time series of debris thickness maps have been produced for Khumbu Glacier over a 15-year period (2000-2015) using Mihalcea et al.'s (2008, Cold Reg. Sci. Technol.) method, which utilised multi-temporal ASTER thermal imagery and our in situ debris surface temperature and thickness measurements. Change detection between these maps allowed the identification of variations in debris thickness that could be compared to discrete measurements, glacier surface velocity and morphology of the debris-covered area. Debris thickness was found to vary spatially between 0.1 and 4 metres within each debris thickness map, and temporally on the order of 1

  11. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions.

    PubMed

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells. PMID:27541815

  12. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions.

    PubMed

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  13. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-08-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  14. Single domain PEMFC model based on agglomerate catalyst geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, N. P.; Ellis, M. W.; Nelson, D. J.; von Spakovsky, M. R.

    A steady two-dimensional computational model for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is presented. The model accounts for species transport, electrochemical kinetics, energy transport, current distribution, and water uptake and release in the catalyst layer. The governing differential equations are solved over a single computational domain, which consists of a gas channel, gas diffusion layer, and catalyst layer for both the anode and cathode sides of the cell as well as the solid polymer membrane. The model for the catalyst regions is based on an agglomerate geometry, which requires water species to exist in both dissolved and gaseous forms simultaneously. Data related to catalyst morphology, which was required by the model, was obtained via a microscopic analysis of a commercially available membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The coupled set of differential equations is solved with the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver, CFDesign™, and is readily adaptable with respect to geometry and material property definitions. The results show that fuel cell performance is highly dependent on catalyst structure, specifically the relative volume fractions of gas pores and polymer membrane contained within the active region as well as the geometry of the individual agglomerates.

  15. Planetary Rings: Statistical Description of Fragmentation of Ring-agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Frank; Vieira Neto, E.; Guimaraes, A. H. F.; Brilliantov, N. V.; Gorban, A. N.

    2009-09-01

    We study the fragmentation dynamics of a two-dimensional agglomerate, hold together by adhesive bonds, caused by an impacting projectile of given mass and impact speed/energy. The agglomerate is made of identical adhering spheres (constituents) forming a regular cubic lattice. A rather simple "random walk model" of a crack propagation has been studied numerically and analytically, where subsequent breaking of adhesive bonds (defining the crack path) is organized randomly and the breakage continues until the impact energy of the projectile is exhausted. A large number of repeated numerical breakage experiments have yielded a surprising agreement with egg-shell crushing experiments (Hermann et al., Physica A 371 (2006), 59) - i.e. the size distribution of the fragments obeys a power law, p(s) sa with a = -3/2. This distribution can theoretically described by a one-dimensional random walk model to mimick the propagation of the crack. With this prerequisite the fragment sizes can be mapped to the mean time of two distant cracks to meet (mean free passage time) in this way justifying the above distribution. These studies will serve as an input for a kinetic description (Spahn et al. 2004, Europhys. Lett. 67 (2004), 545) of a balance between coagulation and fragmentation to describe the "meso-scopic" dynamics of dense planetary rings.

  16. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  17. Primary dispersal of supraglacial debris and debris cover formation on alpine glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkbride, M. P.; Deline, P.

    2009-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are receiving increased attention due to the modulation of runoff by supraglacial covers, and to the lake outburst flood hazard at many covered glacier termini. Observed increases in debris cover extents cannot presently be explained in terms of glaciological influences. The supply of englacial debris to the supraglacial zone has previously been understood only in terms of local dispersal due to differential ablation between covered and uncovered ice, for example on medial moraines. Here, we introduce the term primary dispersal to describe the process of migration of the outcrops of angled debris septa across melting, thinning ablation zones. Understanding primary debris dispersal is an essential step to understanding how supraglacial debris cover is controlled by glaciological variables, and hence is sensitive to climatically-induced fluctuation. Three measures of a glacier's ability to evacuate supraglacial debris are outlined: (1) a concentration factor describing the focussing of englacial debris into specific supraglacial mass loads; (2) the rate of migration of a septum outcrop relative to the local ice surface; and (3) a downstream velocity differential between a septum outcrop and the ice surface. (1) and (2) are inversely related, while (3) increases downglacier to explain why slow-moving, thinning ice rapidly becomes debris covered. Data from Glacier d'Estelette (Italian Alps) illustrate primary dispersal processes at a site where debris cover is increasing in common with many other shrinking alpine glaciers. We develop a model of the potential for debris cover formation and growth in different glaciological environments. This explains why glaciers whose termini are obstructed often have steep debris septa feeding debris covers which vary slowly in response to mass balance change. In contrast, at glaciers with gently-dipping debris-bearing foliation, the debris cover extent is sensitive to glaciological change. These findings

  18. Sedimentology, Behavior, and Hazards of Debris Flows at Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.; Pringle, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    Mount Rainier is potentially the most dangerous volcano in the Cascade Range because of its great height, frequent earthquakes, active hydrothermal system, and extensive glacier mantle. Many debris flows and their distal phases have inundated areas far from the volcano during postglacial time. Two types of debris flows, cohesive and noncohesive, have radically different origins and behavior that relate empirically to clay content. The two types are the major subpopulations of debris flows at Mount Rainier. The behavior of cohesive flows is affected by the cohesion and adhesion of particles; noncohesive flows are dominated by particle collisions to the extent that particle cataclasis becomes common during near-boundary shear. Cohesive debris flows contain more than 3 to 5 percent of clay-size sediment. The composition of these flows changed little as they traveled more than 100 kilometers from Mount Rainier to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound lowland. They originate as deep-seated failures of sectors of the volcanic edifice, and such failures are sufficiently frequent that they are the major destructional process of Mount Rainier's morphologic evolution. In several deposits of large cohesive flows, a lateral, megaclast-bearing facies (with a mounded or hummocky surface) contrasts with a more clay-rich facies in the center of valleys and downstream. Cohesive flows at Mount Rainier do not correlate strongly with volcanic activity and thus can recur without warning, possibly triggered by non-magmatic earthquakes or by changes in the hydrothermal system. Noncohesive debris flows contain less than 3 to 5 percent clay-size sediment. They form most commonly by bulking of sediment in water surges, but some originate directly or indirectly from shallow slope failures that do not penetrate the hydrothermally altered core of the volcano. In contrast with cohesive flows, most noncohesive flows transform both from and to other flow types and are, therefore, the

  19. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-09-01

    The series of agglomeration tests designed to study the agglomeration characteristics of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal with i-octane was continued using a larger agitated tank. This series is designed to determine the effects of various parameters on the size and structure of the agglomerates formed, the rate of agglomeration, coal recovery, and ash rejection. The results reported here show that once spherical agglomerates are formed they continue to grow at almost a constant rate which is proportional to the concentration of i-octane. The constant growth rate is interrupted when spherical agglomerates combine to form large clusters. This only seems to occur with a large concentration of i-octane (e.g., 30 v/w%) and limited agitator power. The present results also show that coal recovery and ash rejection are highly dependent on agglomerate size when the mean agglomerate diameter is less than the size of the openings in the screen used for recovering the agglomerates.

  20. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM) with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS), or silica, NM. Results Bright field (BF) TEM combined with systematic random imaging and semi-automatic image analysis allows measuring the properties of SAS NM quantitatively. Automation allows measuring multiple and arithmetically complex parameters simultaneously on high numbers of detected particles. This reduces operator-induced bias and assures a statistically relevant number of measurements, avoiding the tedious repetitive task of manual measurements. Access to multiple parameters further allows selecting the optimal parameter in function of a specific purpose. Using principle component analysis (PCA), twenty-three measured parameters were classified into three classes containing measures for size, shape and surface topology of the NM. Conclusion The presented method allows a detailed quantitative characterization of NM, like dispersions of precipitated and pyrogenic SAS based on the number-based distributions of their mean diameter, sphericity and shape factor. PMID:22709926

  1. Small Orbital Debris Mitigation Mission Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Small orbital debris in LEO (1-10 cm in size) presents a clear and present danger to operational LEO spacecraft. This debris field has dramatically increased (nearly doubled) in recent years following the Chinese ASAT Test in 2007 and the Iridium/Cosmos collision in 2009. Estimates of the number of small debris have grown to 500,000 objects after these two events; previously the population was 300,000 objects. These small, untracked debris objects (appproximately 500,000) outnumber the larger and tracked objects (appproximately 20,000) by a factor 25 to 1. Therefore, the risk of the small untracked debris objects to operational spacecraft is much greater than the risk posed by the larger and tracked LEO debris objects. A recent study by The Aerospace Corporation found that the debris environment will increase the costs of maintaining a constellation of government satellites by 5%, a constellation of large commercial satellites by 11%, and a constellation of factory built satellites by 26% from $7.6 billion to $9.57 billion. Based upon these facts, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) performed an architecture study on Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) using a space-based nonweapons- class laser satellite for LEO debris removal. The goal of the SODAR study was to determine the ability of a space-based laser system to remove the most pieces of debris (1 cm to 10 cm, locations unknown), in the shortest amount of time, with the fewest number of spacecraft. The ESA developed MASTER2005 orbital debris model was used to probabilistically classify the future debris environment including impact velocity, magnitude, and directionality. The study ground rules and assumptions placed the spacecraft into a high inclination Low Earth Orbit at 800 km as an initial reference point. The architecture study results found that a spacecraft with an integrated forward-firing laser is capable of reducing the small orbital debris flux within

  2. Internal characteristics of refractive-index matched debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollin, Devis; Bowman, Elisabeth; Sanvitale, Nicoletta

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are channelized masses of granular material saturated with water that travel at high speeds downslope. Their destructive character represents a hazard to lives and properties, especially in regions of high relief and runoff. The characteristics that distinguish their heterogeneous, multi-phase, nature are numerous: non-uniform surge formation, particle size ranging from clay to boulders, flow segregation with larger particles concentrating at the flow front and fluid at the tail making the composition and volume of the bulk varying with time and space. These aspects render these events very difficult to characterise and predict, in particular in the area of the deposit spread or runout - zones which are generally of most interest in terms of human risk. At present, considerable gaps exist in our understanding of the flow dynamics of debris flows, which originates from their complex motion and relatively poor observations available. Flume studies offer the potential to examine in detail the behaviour of model debris flows, however, the opaque nature of these flows is a major obstacle in gaining insight of their internal behaviour. Measurements taken at the sidewalls may be poorly representative leading to incomplete or misleading results. To probe internally to the bulk of the flow, alternative, nonintrusive techniques can be used, enabling, for instance, velocities and solid concentrations within the flowing material to be determined. We present experimental investigations into polydisperse granular flows of spherical immersed particles down an inclined flume, with specific attention directed to their internal behavior. To this end, the refractive indices of solids and liquid are closely matched allowing the two phases to be distinguished. Measurements are then made internally at a point in the channel via Plane Laser Induced Fluorescence, Particle Tracking Velocimetry, PTV and Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV. The objective is to to increase our

  3. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bold, Matthew; Cross, Nick; Irwin, Mike; Kendrick, Richard; Kerr, Thomas; Lederer, Susan; Mann, Robert; Sutorius, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU.

  4. Liquid-phase agglomeration of Ag atoms in olefinic and ether media: electrocatalytic application. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.P.; Ozin, G.A.

    1986-06-19

    Liquid squalene, a C/sub 30/H/sub 50/ triterpene, a low molecular weight analogue of polyisoprene, was used in microscale Ag atom experiments as a growth and stabilization medium for Ag colloid, the development of which was monitored by optical spectroscopy. For Ag atom depositions with this liquid and a variety of others (e.g., polybutadiene, 1,10-diaza-18-crown-6, 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran), the bandwidth at half-maximum ..delta.. omega/sub 1/2/ and the lambda/sub max/ of the characteristic surface plasmon absorption remained unchanged with increasing amounts of silver, indicative of an unchanging particle size distribution. In other liquids like polyisoprene and poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-methylphenylsiloxane), the surface plasmon ..delta.. omega/sub 1/2/ increased markedly and the lambda/sub max/progressively shifted into the red with increasing amounts of silver atoms signalling the inability of these media to stabilize the initially formed particle size distribution. As a natural extension of this study, liquid-phase agglomeration of metal atoms in various olefinic, aromatic, and ether media was applied to prepare Pd and Ag carbon composites which were used to fabricate electrodes for evaluation of their current/voltage characteristics in the oxygen half-cell of a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell.

  5. Assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1993-01-01

    Study of debris-flow geomorphology and initiation mechanism has led to better understanding of debris-flow processes. This paper reviews how this understanding is used in current techniques for assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards.

  6. Interagency Report on Orbital Debris, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This 1995 report updates the findings and recommendations of the 1989 report and reflects the authors' progress in understanding and managing the orbital debris environment. It provides an up-to-date portrait of their measurement, modeling, and mitigation efforts; and a set of recommendations outlining specific steps they should pursue, both domestically and internationally, to minimize the potential hazard posed by orbital debris.

  7. Characterization of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling-element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A ferrographic analysis was used to determine the types and quantities of wear debris generated during accelerated rolling contact fatigue tests. The five-ball rolling contact fatigue tester was used. Ball specimens were made of a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a superrefined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.52 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear debris were observed: (1) normal rubbing wear particles, (2) fatigue microspall particles, (3) spheres, and (4) friction polymer deposits. The characterization of wear debris as a function of time was of limited use in predicting fatigue failures in these accelerated tests.

  8. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  9. Broad area optical debris impact sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, L. R., Jr.; Jansen, M. E.; Meyer, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Fiber optic sensors offer many advantages over electrical sensors for use in harsh environments. One advantage over distributed electrical sensors is the elimination of the need to route electrical power and wiring to the sensors, which, in general, improves safety and reduces power consumption. Another advantage is that the optical sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference that may be caused by radio frequency signals used for communications. Another benefit of using an optical approach for impact detectors is the implicit immunity from false detections that may otherwise be caused by unrelated mechanical shock or vibration events. Previous studies have documented the characteristics of the Optical Debris Impact Sensor (ODIS). With the ODIS, the impacts are inferred by detecting the brief triboluminescent optical pulses generated by the abrupt charge separation within a phosphor that is caused by the particle impacts. The main limitations of the ODIS are the small detection area and the limited sensitivity. This paper describes a method for extending the ODIS to accomplish broad area detection on a surface with potentially higher sensitivity. The sensing element is comprised of a stack of planar optical waveguides with phosphor-coated strips. The geometry of the design ensures optical pulses are automatically captured by the waveguides and routed to a fiber optic cable that transports the signal to a remote high-speed photodetector. Background light levels in the vicinity of the detector are filtered out by the tailored frequency response of the photodetector.

  10. Debris-flow susceptibility map of Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komac, M.; Kumelj, Š.; Ribičič, M.

    2009-04-01

    Until now debris-flow susceptibility was relatively poorly investigated in Slovenia. Regarding lack of such studies »Map of debris-flow susceptibility in Slovenia in scale 1.250.000« was elaborated using GIS and the latest spatial data was used; among them the latest lithological map of Slovenia in scale 1:250.000. For the creation of debris-flow susceptibility map of Slovenia in scale 1:250.000 seven considered most important factors were used that were divided into two groups: 1) initial factors that precondition debris-flows: lithology, slope angle, slope potential, 48-hours precipitation and 2) transport factors that contribute to higher probability of the transport of debris-flow material: terrain convexity, energy potential of streams, distance to surface water. Using linear weighted sum the precondition information layer was derived, and the same principal was used to derive transport information layer. Both layers were joined into final susceptibility assessment, again with consideration of their importance to contribute to debris-flow occurrence. Different weights were applied to chosen parameters, which resulted in several different models that were evaluated according to historical or recent debris-flow phenomena. Expert estimation was used to define the torrential areas with high probability of the debris-flow occurrence. The emphasis was on location rather than on the time of the debris-flow occurrence. There were unfortunately no adequate representative data about debris-flow in Slovenia (debris flow cadastre does not exist and not many historical studies have been done so far) for the quantitative statistical analysis. Hence only expert estimation approach was possible, based on the experience and historical events gathered from chronicles and eyewitness. Such an approach is mainly limited by subjectivity and has difficulties with sound argumentation, but at the given state it was the only possible approach. Based upon spatial analyses of four

  11. Constructing Political Region Agglomerations for Effective Science Communcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rising, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Often political regions form a better scale for modeling than regulargrids, since they are used for collecting socioeconomic data and aremore relevant to stakeholders and policy-makers. However, differentpolitical regions can enclose very different areas, populations,ranges of climatic variability, and for many countries there are anundesireable number of regions available at any administrative level.We provide a solution to this problem, by providing a general systemfor agglomerating regions to a larger scale, to approximately optimizearbitrary objectives. These regions provide an intermediate scale formodeling and greater comparability than unagglomerated regions. Wefirst apply the approach to the US, producing region agglomerationsthat normalize region size, population, income, and climaticvariability. We then apply the technique globally, generating acononical collection of regions for studying the impacts of climatechange.

  12. Innovations in thermoelectric materials research: Compound agglomeration, testing and preselection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez de Cardenas, Hugo Francisco Lopez

    Thermoelectric materials have the capacity to convert a temperature differential into electrical power and vice versa. They will represent the next revolution in alternative energies once their efficiencies are enhanced so they can complement other forms of green energies that depend on sources other than a temperature differential. Progress in materials science depends on the ability to discover new materials to eventually understand them and to finally improve their properties. The work presented here is aimed at dynamizing the screening of materials of thermoelectric interest. The results of this project will enable: theoretical preselection of thermoelectric compounds based on their bandgap and a rapid agglomeration method that does not require melting or sintering. A special interest will be given to Iodine-doped TiSe2 that generated extraordinary results and a new set of equations are proposed to accurately describe the dependence of the power factor and the figure of merit on the intrinsic properties of the materials.

  13. Remediation of Sucarnoochee soil by agglomeration with fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, P.S.; Arnold, D.W.; Rahnama, M.B. )

    1994-01-01

    Fine-sized Blue Creek coal was used to remove high molecular weight hydrocarbons from Sucarnoochee soil, a fine-sized high-organic soil. Fine coal in slurry form was blended with Sucarnoochee soil contaminated with 15.0% by wt of crude oil, and agglomerates were removed in a standard flotation cell. Crude oil in the remediated soil was reduced from the original 15.0% to less than a tenth of a wt% by a two-step process. Oil removal of approx. 99.3% was obtained. An added benefit was that the low-grade coal used in the process was simultaneously upgraded. The final level of cleaning was not affected by initial oil concentration. The process compared favorably with a hot water wash technique used to recovery oils from contaminated soil.

  14. Debris hazard for the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madler, Ronald A.; Maclay, Timothy D.; Mcnamara, Roger; Culp, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    The scientific mission of the Earth Observing System (EOS) is modeled to analyze the potential hazard of space debris and its impact on the effectiveness of the program. Specific attention is given to the hazard posed by untrackable debris and the velocities and impact rates of such debris. The NASA Debris Flux Model (DFM) is utilized, and the results are compared to those of the Frag model which predicts the background environment from known parameters and the Screen model for estimating collision probabilities. The probability of damaging impacts is shown to be significant and to increase over time; an EOS spacecraft has a 10 percent chance of being struck by a 1-cm object traveling at 14 km/s. The present analyses demonstrate the need to design the EOS spacecraft for a LEO environment in which collisions with debris are very likely.

  15. Debris flows: behavior and hazard assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows are water-laden masses of soil and fragmented rock that rush down mountainsides, funnel into stream channels, entrain objects in their paths, and form lobate deposits when they spill onto valley floors. Because they have volumetric sediment concentrations that exceed 40 percent, maximum speeds that surpass 10 m/s, and sizes that can range up to ~109 m3, debris flows can denude slopes, bury floodplains, and devastate people and property. Computational models can accurately represent the physics of debris-flow initiation, motion and deposition by simulating evolution of flow mass and momentum while accounting for interactions of debris' solid and fluid constituents. The use of physically based models for hazard forecasting can be limited by imprecise knowledge of initial and boundary conditions and material properties, however. Therefore, empirical methods continue to play an important role in debris-flow hazard assessment.

  16. Aquatic Debris Detection Using Embedded Camera Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Dianhong; Lu, Qian; Luo, Dapeng; Fang, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic debris monitoring is of great importance to human health, aquatic habitats and water transport. In this paper, we first introduce the prototype of an aquatic sensor node equipped with an embedded camera sensor. Based on this sensing platform, we propose a fast and accurate debris detection algorithm. Our method is specifically designed based on compressive sensing theory to give full consideration to the unique challenges in aquatic environments, such as waves, swaying reflections, and tight energy budget. To upload debris images, we use an efficient sparse recovery algorithm in which only a few linear measurements need to be transmitted for image reconstruction. Besides, we implement the host software and test the debris detection algorithm on realistically deployed aquatic sensor nodes. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach is reliable and feasible for debris detection using camera sensors in aquatic environments. PMID:25647741

  17. The debris-flow rheology myth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Models that employ a fixed rheology cannot yield accurate interpretations or predictions of debris-flow motion, because the evolving behavior of debris flows is too complex to be represented by any rheological equation that uniquely relates stress and strain rate. Field observations and experimental data indicate that debris behavior can vary from nearly rigid to highly fluid as a consequence of temporal and spatial variations in pore-fluid pressure and mixture agitation. Moreover, behavior can vary if debris composition changes as a result of grain-size segregation and gain or loss of solid and fluid constituents in transit. An alternative to fixed-rheology models is provided by a Coulomb mixture theory model, which can represent variable interactions of solid and fluid constituents in heterogeneous debris-flow surges with high-friction, coarse-grained heads and low-friction, liquefied tails. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  18. Rings of Earth detected by orbital debris radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.; Randolph, L.

    1990-01-01

    Small particles moving at an orbital velocity of 7.6 kilometers per second can present a considerable hazard to human activity in space. For astronauts outside of the protective shielding of their space vehicles, such particles can be lethal. The powerful radar at NASA's Goldstone Deep Communications Complex was used to monitor such orbital debris. This radar can detect metallic objects as small as 1.8 mm in diameter at 600 km altitude. The results of the preliminary survey show a flux (at 600 km altitude) of 6.4 objects per square kilometer per day of equivalent size of 1.8 mm or larger. Forty percent of the observed particles appear to be concentrated into two orbits. An orbital ring with the same inclination as the radar (35.1 degrees) is suggested. However, an orbital band with a much higher inclination (66 degrees) is also a possibility.

  19. Internet Based Simulations of Debris Dispersion of Shuttle Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2004-01-01

    The debris dispersion model (which dispersion model?) is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models are useful in understanding the complexity of launch and range operations. Modeling and simulation in this area mainly focuses on orbital dynamics and range safety concepts, including destruct limits, telemetry and tracking, and population risk. Particle explosion modeling is the process of simulating an explosion by breaking the rocket into many pieces. The particles are scattered throughout their motion using the laws of physics eventually coming to rest. The size of the foot print explains the type of explosion and distribution of the particles. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations of the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable modeling behaviors of Shuttle launches.

  20. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH STUDY OF DEBRIS DISKS AROUND PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Beichman, C. A.; Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, Geoffrey

    2011-01-15

    Since giant planets scatter planetesimals within a few tidal radii of their orbits, the locations of existing planetesimal belts indicate regions where giant planet formation failed in bygone protostellar disks. Infrared observations of circumstellar dust produced by colliding planetesimals are therefore powerful probes of the formation histories of known planets. Here we present new Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectrophotometry of 111 solar-type stars, including 105 planet hosts. Our observations reveal 11 debris disks, including two previously undetected debris disks orbiting HD 108874 and HD 130322. Combining the 32 {mu}m spectrophotometry with previously published MIPS photometry, we find that the majority of debris disks around solar-type stars have temperatures in the range 60 {approx}< T{sub dust} {approx}< 100 K. Assuming a dust temperature T{sub dust} = 70 K, which is representative of the nine debris disks detected by both IRS and MIPS, debris rings surrounding Sun-like stars orbit between 15 and 240 AU depending on the mean particle size. Our observations imply that the planets detected by radial-velocity searches formed within 240 AU of their parent stars. If any of the debris disks studied here have mostly large, blackbody emitting grains, their companion giant planets must have formed in a narrow region between the ice line and 15 AU.

  1. Spaceborne Sensors Track Marine Debris Circulation in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reahard, Ross; Mitchell, Brandie; Lee, Lucas; Pezold, Blaise; Brook, Chris; Mallett, Candis; Barrett, Shelby; Albin, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Marine debris is a problem for coastal areas throughout the world, including the Gulf of Mexico. To aid the NOAA Marine Debris Program in monitoring marine debris dispersal and regulating marine debris practices, sea surface height and height anomaly data provided by the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research at the University of Colorado, Boulder, were utilized to help assess trash and other discarded items that routinely wash ashore in southeastern Texas, at Padre Island National Seashore. These data were generated from the NASA radar altimeter satellites TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason 1, and Jason 2, as well as the European altimeter satellites ERS-1, ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite), and ENVISAT (Environmental Satellite). Sea surface temperature data from MODIS were used to study of the dynamics of the Loop Current. Sea surface height and MODIS data analysis were used to show that warm water in the core of eddies, which periodically separate from the Loop Current, can be as high as 30 cm above the surrounding water. These eddies are known to directly transfer marine debris to the western continental shelf and the elevated area of water can be tracked using satellite radar altimeter data. Additionally, using sea surface height, geostrophic velocity, and particle path data, foretracking and backtracking simulations were created. These simulation runs demonstrated that marine debris on Padre Island National Seashore may arise from a variety of sources, such as commercial fishing/shrimping, the oil and gas industry, recreational boaters, and from rivers that empty into the Gulf of Mexico.

  2. Distribution of small plastic debris in cross-section and high strandline on Heungnam beach, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Nak Won; Hong, Sang Hee; Han, Gi Myung; Hong, Sunwook; Lee, Jongmyoung; Song, Young Kyung; Jang, Mi; Shim, Won Joon

    2013-06-01

    The spatial distribution of small plastic debris on Heungnam beach in February 2011 was investigated. The abundances of small plastic debris over 2 mm in size along the high strandline and cross-sectional line of the beach were determined. The mean abundances of small plastics were 976 ± 405 particles/m2 at the high strandline in the upper tidal zone along the shoreline and 473 ± 866 particles/m2 at the cross-section perpendicular to the shoreline. Specifically, styrofoam (expanded polystyrene) spherules accounted for 90.7% of the total plastic abundance in the high strandline and 96.3% in the cross-section. The spatial distribution patterns of small plastic debris differed between the high strandline and cross-sectional line. The cross-sectional distribution of small plastic abundance differed among plastic types, indicating that representative sampling of small plastic debris on a beach is necessary.

  3. Investigation of Orbital Debris Impacts on Shuttle Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.; Kerr, Justin H.; Lyons, Frankel; Herrin, Jason H.; Ryan, Shannon J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the data collected from two hypervelocity micro-meteoroid orbital debris (MMOD) impact events where the shuttle payload bay door radiator sandwich panel was completely perforated. Scanning Electron Microscope/Energy-Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis of impact residue provided evidence to identify the source of each impact. Impact site features that indicate projectile directionality are discussed, along with hypervelocity impact testing on representative samples conducted to simulate the impact event. The paper provides results of a study of impact risks for the size of particles that caused the MMOD damage and the regions of the orbiter vehicle that would be vulnerable to an equivalent projectile

  4. Accumulation and fragmentation of plastic debris in global environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Galgani, Francois; Thompson, Richard C; Barlaz, Morton

    2009-07-27

    One of the most ubiquitous and long-lasting recent changes to the surface of our planet is the accumulation and fragmentation of plastics. Within just a few decades since mass production of plastic products commenced in the 1950s, plastic debris has accumulated in terrestrial environments, in the open ocean, on shorelines of even the most remote islands and in the deep sea. Annual clean-up operations, costing millions of pounds sterling, are now organized in many countries and on every continent. Here we document global plastics production and the accumulation of plastic waste. While plastics typically constitute approximately 10 per cent of discarded waste, they represent a much greater proportion of the debris accumulating on shorelines. Mega- and macro-plastics have accumulated in the highest densities in the Northern Hemisphere, adjacent to urban centres, in enclosed seas and at water convergences (fronts). We report lower densities on remote island shores, on the continental shelf seabed and the lowest densities (but still a documented presence) in the deep sea and Southern Ocean. The longevity of plastic is estimated to be hundreds to thousands of years, but is likely to be far longer in deep sea and non-surface polar environments. Plastic debris poses considerable threat by choking and starving wildlife, distributing non-native and potentially harmful organisms, absorbing toxic chemicals and degrading to micro-plastics that may subsequently be ingested. Well-established annual surveys on coasts and at sea have shown that trends in mega- and macro-plastic accumulation rates are no longer uniformly increasing: rather stable, increasing and decreasing trends have all been reported. The average size of plastic particles in the environment seems to be decreasing, and the abundance and global distribution of micro-plastic fragments have increased over the last few decades. However, the environmental consequences of such microscopic debris are still poorly

  5. Accumulation and fragmentation of plastic debris in global environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Galgani, Francois; Thompson, Richard C; Barlaz, Morton

    2009-07-27

    One of the most ubiquitous and long-lasting recent changes to the surface of our planet is the accumulation and fragmentation of plastics. Within just a few decades since mass production of plastic products commenced in the 1950s, plastic debris has accumulated in terrestrial environments, in the open ocean, on shorelines of even the most remote islands and in the deep sea. Annual clean-up operations, costing millions of pounds sterling, are now organized in many countries and on every continent. Here we document global plastics production and the accumulation of plastic waste. While plastics typically constitute approximately 10 per cent of discarded waste, they represent a much greater proportion of the debris accumulating on shorelines. Mega- and macro-plastics have accumulated in the highest densities in the Northern Hemisphere, adjacent to urban centres, in enclosed seas and at water convergences (fronts). We report lower densities on remote island shores, on the continental shelf seabed and the lowest densities (but still a documented presence) in the deep sea and Southern Ocean. The longevity of plastic is estimated to be hundreds to thousands of years, but is likely to be far longer in deep sea and non-surface polar environments. Plastic debris poses considerable threat by choking and starving wildlife, distributing non-native and potentially harmful organisms, absorbing toxic chemicals and degrading to micro-plastics that may subsequently be ingested. Well-established annual surveys on coasts and at sea have shown that trends in mega- and macro-plastic accumulation rates are no longer uniformly increasing: rather stable, increasing and decreasing trends have all been reported. The average size of plastic particles in the environment seems to be decreasing, and the abundance and global distribution of micro-plastic fragments have increased over the last few decades. However, the environmental consequences of such microscopic debris are still poorly

  6. Accumulation and fragmentation of plastic debris in global environments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, David K. A.; Galgani, Francois; Thompson, Richard C.; Barlaz, Morton

    2009-01-01

    One of the most ubiquitous and long-lasting recent changes to the surface of our planet is the accumulation and fragmentation of plastics. Within just a few decades since mass production of plastic products commenced in the 1950s, plastic debris has accumulated in terrestrial environments, in the open ocean, on shorelines of even the most remote islands and in the deep sea. Annual clean-up operations, costing millions of pounds sterling, are now organized in many countries and on every continent. Here we document global plastics production and the accumulation of plastic waste. While plastics typically constitute approximately 10 per cent of discarded waste, they represent a much greater proportion of the debris accumulating on shorelines. Mega- and macro-plastics have accumulated in the highest densities in the Northern Hemisphere, adjacent to urban centres, in enclosed seas and at water convergences (fronts). We report lower densities on remote island shores, on the continental shelf seabed and the lowest densities (but still a documented presence) in the deep sea and Southern Ocean. The longevity of plastic is estimated to be hundreds to thousands of years, but is likely to be far longer in deep sea and non-surface polar environments. Plastic debris poses considerable threat by choking and starving wildlife, distributing non-native and potentially harmful organisms, absorbing toxic chemicals and degrading to micro-plastics that may subsequently be ingested. Well-established annual surveys on coasts and at sea have shown that trends in mega- and macro-plastic accumulation rates are no longer uniformly increasing: rather stable, increasing and decreasing trends have all been reported. The average size of plastic particles in the environment seems to be decreasing, and the abundance and global distribution of micro-plastic fragments have increased over the last few decades. However, the environmental consequences of such microscopic debris are still poorly

  7. Debris-bed friction of hard-bedded glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500 kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which nonrotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if the power law exponent for ice flowing past large clasts is 1. A small exponent (n < 2) is likely because stresses in ice are small and flow is transient. Numerical calculations of the bed-normal drag force on a sphere in contact with a flat bed using n = 1 show that this force can reach values several hundred times that on a sphere isolated from the bed, thus drastically increasing frictional resistance. Various estimates of basal friction are obtained from this model. For example, the shear traction at the bed of a glacier sliding at 20 m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006 m a-1 and an effective pressure of 300 kPa can exceed 100 kPa. Debris-bed friction can therefore be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. LDEF meteoroid and debris database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardano, C. B.; See, Thomas H.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) database is maintained at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas, and consists of five data tables containing information about individual features, digitized images of selected features, and LDEF hardware (i.e., approximately 950 samples) archived at JSC. About 4000 penetrations (greater than 300 micron in diameter) and craters (greater than 500 micron in diameter) were identified and photodocumented during the disassembly of LDEF at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), while an additional 4500 or so have subsequently been characterized at JSC. The database also contains some data that have been submitted by various PI's, yet the amount of such data is extremely limited in its extent, and investigators are encouraged to submit any and all M&D-type data to JSC for inclusion within the M&D database. Digitized stereo-image pairs are available for approximately 4500 features through the database.

  9. Debris flow boundary stresses and bedrock erosion: large scale laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2008-12-01

    Field observations indicate that debris flows can cause erosional wear of bedrock channels. On steep slopes, where debris flows are dominant, this wear may be the primary means of long-term channel incision. However, we presently lack a large-scale, experimentally tested theory to predict bedrock erosion by debris flows. Here, we hypothesize that impact erosion by particles colliding with the bed removes more bedrock than sliding erosion from the bulk weight of the flow. To develop and test a process-based theory for bedrock incision by debris flows, we study the erosional processes of granular flows in a 4-meter diameter, 80-cm wide vertically rotating drum. Debris flow slurries are created with mixtures of natural sediment from clay-sized to 20-cm diameter combined with varying amounts of water. During the experimental runs, the normal force on the bed is directly measured by a 225-cm2 load plate and the corresponding longitudinal profile and plan-view velocity field of the debris slurry is measured with a laser profiler and video camera, respectively. The erosion volume is obtained by repeated topographic measurement of 60 cm by 60 cm synthetic and natural rock samples embedded in the floor of the drum. By varying the grain size distribution, water content, and flow volume, we created both impact-dominated and sliding-dominated erosion conditions. The erosion of the bedrock, instead of scaling with the mean bulk stress of the flow, scaled with the stress deviations from the mean, which are caused by impacts of individual grains on the bed. This result supports the hypothesis that for bedrock erosion, dynamic stresses caused by individual clasts are more important than mean stress at the bed of the flow. Stress deviations from the mean depend on grain size distribution and particle trajectories, and therefore these properties should be measured in natural debris flows and included in modeling efforts of dynamics and erosion.

  10. The International Space Station and the Space Debris Environment: 10 Years On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    For just over a decade the International Space Station (ISS), the most heavily protected vehicle in Earth orbit, has weathered the space debris environment well. Numerous hypervelocity impact features on the surface of ISS caused by small orbital debris and meteoroids have been observed. In addition to typical impacts seen on the large solar arrays, craters have been discovered on windows, hand rails, thermal blankets, radiators, and even a visiting logistics module. None of these impacts have resulted in any degradation of the operation or mission of the ISS. Validating the rate of small particle impacts on the ISS as predicted by space debris environment models is extremely complex. First, the ISS has been an evolving structure, from its original 20 metric tons to nearly 300 metric tons (excluding logistics vehicles) ten years later. Hence, the anticipated space debris impact rate has grown with the increasing size of ISS. Secondly, a comprehensive visual or photographic examination of the complete exterior of ISS has never been accomplished. In fact, most impact features have been discovered serendipitously. Further complications include the estimation of the size of an impacting particle without knowing its mass, velocity, and angle of impact and the effect of shadowing by some ISS components. Inadvertently and deliberately, the ISS has also been the source of space debris. The U.S. Space Surveillance Network officially cataloged 65 debris from ISS from November 1998 to November 2008: from lost cameras, sockets, and tool bags to intentionally discarded equipment and an old space suit. Fortunately, the majority of these objects fall back to Earth quickly with an average orbital lifetime of less than two months and a maximum orbital lifetime of a little more than 15 months. The cumulative total number of debris object-years is almost exactly 10, the equivalent of one piece of debris remaining in orbit for 10 years. An unknown number of debris too small to be

  11. Cometary dust particles fragmentation as observed with Rosetta COSIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Langevin, Yves; Hornung, Klaus; Merouane, Sihane

    2016-07-01

    The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser - COSIMA - instrument on board ESA's Rosetta mission has collected dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. Particles and particle agglomerates have been imaged and analyzed in the inner coma at distances between 400 km and 10 km off the cometary nucleus and between 1.3 to 3.4 AU from the Sun. The particles are collected at low impact velocities and constitute a sample of the cometary dust particles in the inner coma. On impact, most dust particles fragment and larger particles tend to stick, spread out or consist of single or a group of clumps, and the flocculent morphology of the fragmented particles is revealed. We discuss the observed particle size distributions and morphologies after collection and their impact on dust particle agglomeration models in the early solar system.

  12. Final Design for a Comprehensive Orbital Debris Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The rationale and specifics for the design of a comprehensive program for the control of orbital debris, as well as details of the various components of the overall plan, are described. The problem of orbital debris has been steadily worsening since the first successful launch in 1957. The hazards posed by orbital debris suggest the need for a progressive plan for the prevention of future debris, as well as the reduction of the current debris level. The proposed debris management plan includes debris removal systems and preventative techniques and policies. The debris removal is directed at improving the current debris environment. Because of the variance in sizes of debris, a single system cannot reasonably remove all kinds of debris. An active removal system, which deliberately retrieves targeted debris from known orbits, was determined to be effective in the disposal of debris tracked directly from earth. However, no effective system is currently available to remove the untrackable debris. The debris program is intended to protect the orbital environment from future abuses. This portion of the plan involves various environment from future abuses. This portion of the plan involves various methods and rules for future prevention of debris. The preventative techniques are protective methods that can be used in future design of payloads. The prevention policies are rules which should be employed to force the prevention of orbital debris.

  13. POST Earthquake Debris Management - AN Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Raju

    Every year natural disasters, such as fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, and tornadoes, challenge various communities of the world. Earthquakes strike with varying degrees of severity and pose both short- and long-term challenges to public service providers. Earthquakes generate shock waves and displace the ground along fault lines. These seismic forces can bring down buildings and bridges in a localized area and damage buildings and other structures in a far wider area. Secondary damage from fires, explosions, and localized flooding from broken water pipes can increase the amount of debris. Earthquake debris includes building materials, personal property, and sediment from landslides. The management of this debris, as well as the waste generated during the reconstruction works, can place significant challenges on the national and local capacities. Debris removal is a major component of every post earthquake recovery operation. Much of the debris generated from earthquake is not hazardous. Soil, building material, and green waste, such as trees and shrubs, make up most of the volume of earthquake debris. These wastes not only create significant health problems and a very unpleasant living environment if not disposed of safely and appropriately, but also can subsequently impose economical burdens on the reconstruction phase. In practice, most of the debris may be either disposed of at landfill sites, reused as materials for construction or recycled into useful commodities Therefore, the debris clearance operation should focus on the geotechnical engineering approach as an important post earthquake issue to control the quality of the incoming flow of potential soil materials. In this paper, the importance of an emergency management perspective in this geotechnical approach that takes into account the different criteria related to the operation execution is proposed by highlighting the key issues concerning the handling of the construction

  14. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, S.; Hogg, R.

    1996-04-01

    Goals are to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a micro-agglomerate flotation process (combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation) and to establish the essential criteria for reagent selection and system design and operation. The research program was organized into the following tasks: interfacial studies, emulsification, agglomerate growth and structure, and agglomerate flotation. Work on the first two tasks has been completed.

  15. Debris Flows Within The Greater Caucasus Northern Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panova, S.

    often are mudflows with volume up to 5000-10,000 m3. More powerful mudflows are less frequent (once in 5-10 years). For this region about 50% of mudflows are low density suspended streams with discharges 10-100 m3/sec. Mudflow dangerous period continues from January to October. The most active mudflow impact is recorded in May-June due to maximum of atmospheric precipitation. The most significant mudflows of 2-4 million m3 with an average volume of 100,000-500,000 m3 occur in the area of the Glavny, Peredovoy and Bokovoy ridges. These are regions of a significant mudflow hazard. Glacial and mixed mudflows (50-60%) prevail in the region. As for the rain mudflows they account to 40% and are typical for the areas without modern glaciation. Here the most powerful mudflows form in July-August during an intensive glaciers melting and rainstorms. Mudflows constituting of moraine and fluvial-glacial deposits form in the region. Thus, more than 80% of mudflows have high density (more than 2 tons/m3). Content of dustloamy particles varies from 0.4 to 10%. In the given area mudflows with volumes up to 100,000 m3 occur every year, up to 500,000 m3 U once in 3-5 years and 1,000,000 m3 U once in 8-10 years. The most powerful mudflows recorded in the region resulted from glaciers advancing and formation of lakes. The similar debris flow in the Kabakhi river valley (1832) transported to the Terek river valley about 15 mln. m3 of ice and rocks. Another debris flow in the Kardamon river basin (1902) had volume of 60 million m3mass transport of mudflow. Within last 20 years 2 the amount of precipitation increased both for the entire year and warm period due to the climate warming. Air temperature for cold and warm periods rose as well. Total and glacial river flow increased. According to the available climatic forecasts such a change of climatic conditions will continue during next decades leading to intensifica- tion of debris flow activity at altitudes higher than 2000 m. Within last 7

  16. Collector/Compactor for Waste or Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangialiardi, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Device collects and compacts debris by sweeping through volume with net. Consists of movable vane, fixed vane, and elastic net connected to both vanes. Movable vane is metal strip curved to follow general contour of container with clearance to prevent interference with other parts on inside wall of container. One end of movable vane mounted in bearing and other end connected to driveshaft equipped with handle. User rotates movable vane, net stretched and swept through container. Captures most of debris coarser than mesh as it moves, compressing debris as it arrives at fixed vane. Applications include cleaning swimming pools and tanks.

  17. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

  18. Understanding the influence of powder flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration characteristics on the aerosolization of pharmaceutical model powders.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Armstrong, Brian; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2010-08-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the intrinsic inter-particulate cohesion of model pharmaceutical powders on their aerosolization from a dry powder inhaler. Two cohesive poly-disperse lactose powders with median particle sizes of around 4 and 20 microm were examined. The results showed that after dry coating with magnesium stearate, their flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration behaviours could be substantially improved, as indicated by powder rheometry, shear testing and laser diffraction aerosol testing. This was achieved by reducing their cohesiveness via surface modification. In contrast to some previous reports, this study demonstrated how powder aerosolization may be improved more significantly and consistently (for widely varying air flow rates) by substantially reducing their inter-particulate cohesive forces. This study contributes to the understanding of the relationship between intrinsic cohesive nature and bulk properties such as flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration and its impact on their aerosolization, which is fundamental and critical in the optimal design of dry powder inhaler formulations. The intensive mechanical dry coating technique also demonstrated a promising potential to improve aerosolization efficiency of fine cohesive model powders.

  19. Nanoparticle assemblies as probes for self-assembled monolayer characterization: correlation between surface functionalization and agglomeration behavior.

    PubMed

    Feichtenschlager, Bernhard; Pabisch, Silvia; Peterlik, Herwig; Kickelbick, Guido

    2012-01-10

    The ordering of dodecyl chains has been investigated in mixed monolayers of phosphonic acid capping agents on the surface of hydrothermally prepared zirconia nanocrystals. Methyl-, phenyl-, pyryl-, and tert-butylphosphonic acids have been used to investigate series with different mixing ratios with dodecylphosphonic acid as the cocapping agent for the mixed monolayer formation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies revealed that an increasing amount (different for each type) of coadsorbed capping agent reduces the ordering of the dodecyl chains significantly. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) verified that with increasing amount of cocapping agent the agglomeration of the particles decreases. The strong correlation of the agglomeration behavior with the ordering of the surface-bound alkyl chains leads to the conclusion that interparticle bilayers, formed via long alkyl chain packing, are responsible and can be controlled on a molecular level by coadsorbing various molecules. On the basis of this correlation, nanoparticles can be used as probes for self-assembled monolayer investigation by an indirect structural method (SAXS) and correlated with the routine spectroscopical method for the chemical analysis of surface groups (FTIR).

  20. Evaluation of particle size distributions produced during ultra-violet nanosecond laser ablation and their relative contributions to ion densities in the inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Lance M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2015-11-01

    Relative contributions to ion densities in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) of particles of various sizes produced by laser ablation (LA) were investigated. Particles generated by 266 nm, ns LA of BaF2, CaF2, and a scandium aluminum alloy, characterized using SEM, consisted of hard and soft agglomerates, spherical particles, and irregularly-shaped particles. Although soft agglomerates and spherical particles were common to aerosols generated by LA in all cases, hard agglomerates appeared to be unique to the scandium aluminum alloy, while irregularly-shaped exfoliated particles were unique to the calcium and barium fluoride windows. The spatial distributions of Ca, Ba, and Sc ions in the ICP were determined from laser-induced fluorescence images taken with filters of pore sizes from 1-8 μm added in-line to the transport tube upstream from the ICP. In all cases, a significant fraction of the ions formed in the ICP originated from micron-sized particles. Differences in the penetration depths of nanometer-sized agglomerates and micron-sized particles were about 2 mm for Ca and 1 mm for Ba. Differences in the penetration depths of nanometer and micron-sized agglomerates observed in the case of aluminum scandium were much less significant. This suggests that micron-sized hard-agglomerates and nanometer-sized soft-agglomerates experience very similar vaporization patterns. Additionally, there was evidence that flow patterns in the transport tube affect the trajectories of particles entering the plasma.

  1. Evaluation of physico-mechanical properties of drug-excipients agglomerates obtained by crystallization.

    PubMed

    Maghsoodi, M; Tajalli Bakhsh, A S

    2011-06-01

    Spherical crystallization (SC) of carbamazepine (CBZ) was carried out for preparation of the agglomerates using the solvent change method. The potential of the intraagglomerate addition of sodium starch glycolate (SSG) as a disintegrant agent and povidone (PVP) as a hydrophilic polymer was also evaluated. The process of SC involved recrystallization of CBZ and its simultaneous agglomeration with additives. An ethanol:isopropyl acetate:water system was used where isopropyl acetate acted as a bridging liquid and ethanol and water as good and bad solvents, respectively. The agglomerates were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD), and Scanning electron microscopy and were evaluated for yield, flowability, disintegration time and drug release. CBZ agglomerates exhibited significantly improved micromeritic properties as well as dissolution behavior in comparison to conventional drug crystals. The dissolution rate of drug from agglomerates was enhanced by inclusion of SSG, while addition of PVP to CBZ/SSG agglomerates led to reduction in the release rate of CBZ even below that of the conventional drug crystals. SC process can be considered as a suitable alternative to conventional granulation process to obtain agglomerates of CBZ with excipients with improved micromeritic properties and modified dissolution rate. PMID:20175665

  2. The effect of shear flow on nanoparticle agglomeration and deposition in in vitro dynamic flow models.

    PubMed

    Grabinski, Christin; Sharma, Monita; Maurer, Elizabeth; Sulentic, Courtney; Mohan Sankaran, R; Hussain, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Traditional in vitro toxicity experiments typically involve exposure of a mono- or co-culture of cells to nanoparticles (NPs) in static conditions with the assumption of 100% deposition (i.e. dose) of well-dispersed particles. However, cellular dose can be affected by agglomeration and the unique transport kinetics of NPs in biological media. We hypothesize that shear flow can address these issues and achieve more predictable dosage. Here, we compare the behavior of gold NPs with diameters of 5, 10 and 30 nm in static and dynamic in vitro models. We also utilize transport modeling to approximate the shear rate experienced by the cells in dynamic conditions to evaluate physiological relevance. The transport kinetics show that NP behavior is governed by both gravity and diffusion forces in static conditions and only diffusion in dynamic conditions. Our results reveal that dynamic systems are capable of producing a more predictable dose compared to static systems, which has strong implications for improving repeatability in nanotoxicity assessments. PMID:25961858

  3. Coal-gold agglomeration: an alternative separation process in gold recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Akcil, A.; Wu, X.Q.; Aksay, E.K.

    2009-07-01

    Considering the increasing environmental concerns and the potential for small gold deposits to be exploited in the future, the uses of environmentally friendly processes are essential. Recent developments point to the potential for greatly increased plant performance through a separation process that combines the cyanide and flotation processes. In addition, this kind of alternative treatment processes to the traditional gold recovery processes may reduce the environmental risks of present small-scale gold mining. Gold recovery processes that applied to different types of gold bearing ore deposits show that the type of deposits plays an important role for the selection of mineral processing technologies in the production of gold and other precious metals. In the last 25 years, different alternative processes have been investigated on gold deposits located in areas where environmental issues are a great concern. In 1988, gold particles were first recovered by successful pilot trial of coal-gold agglomeration (CGA) process in Australia. The current paper reviews the importance of CGA in the production of gold ore and identifies areas for further development work.

  4. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  5. Agglomeration and defluidization in FBC of biomass fuels -- Mechanisms and measures for prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Nordin, A.; Oehman, M.; Skrifvars, B.J.; Hupa, M.

    1996-12-31

    The use of biomass fuels in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) and gasification (FBG) is becoming more important because of the environmental benefits associated with these fuel and processes. However, severe bed agglomeration and defluidization have been reported due to the special ash forming constituents of some biomass fuels. Previous results have indicated that this could possibly be prevented by intelligent fuel mixing. In the present work the mechanisms of bed agglomeration using two different biomass fuels as well as the mechanism of the prevention of agglomeration by co-combustion with coal (50/50 %{sub w}) were studied. Several repeated combustion tests with the two biomass fuels, alone (Lucerne and olive flesh), all resulted in agglomeration and defluidization of the bed within less than 30 minutes. By controlled defluidization experiments the initial cohesion temperatures for the two fuels were determined to be as low as 670 C and 940 C, respectively. However, by fuel mixing the initial agglomeration temperature increased to 950 C and more than 1050 C, respectively. When co-combusted with coal during ten hour extended runs, no agglomeration was observed for either of the two fuel mixtures. The agglomeration temperatures were compared with results from a laboratory method, based on compression strength measurements of ash pellets, and results from chemical equilibrium calculations. Samples of bed materials, collected throughout the experimental runs, as well as the produced agglomerated beds, were analyzed using SEM EDS and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that loss of fluidization resulted from formation of molten phases coating the bed materials; a salt melt in the case of Lucerne and a silicate melt in the case of the olive fuel. By fuel mixing, the in-bed ash composition is altered, conferring higher melting temperatures, and thereby agglomeration and defluidization can be prevented.

  6. Metod And Apparatus For Debris Mitigation For An Electrical Discharge Source

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Silfvast, William T.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2005-05-03

    Method and apparatus for mitigating the transport of debris generated and dispersed from electric discharge sources by thermophoretic and electrostatic deposition. A member is positioned adjacent the front electrode of an electric discharge source and used to establish a temperature difference between it and the front electrode. By flowing a gas between the member and the front electrode a temperature gradient is established that can be used for thermophoretic deposition of particulate debris on either the member or front electrode depending upon the direction of the thermal gradient. Establishing an electric field between the member and front electrode can aid in particle deposition by electrostatic deposition.

  7. Method and apparatus for debris mitigation for an electrical discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Silfvast, William T.

    2006-01-24

    Method and apparatus for mitigating the transport of debris generated and dispersed from electric discharge sources by thermophoretic and electrostatic deposition. A member is positioned adjacent the front electrode of an electric discharge source and used to establish a temperature difference between it and the front electrode. By flowing a gas between the member and the front electrode a temperature gradient is established that can be used for thermophoretic deposition of particulate debris on either the member or front electrode depending upon the direction of the thermal gradient. Establishing an electric field between the member and front electrode can aid in particle deposition by electrostatic deposition.

  8. Coupling continuous damage and debris fragmentation for energy absorption prediction by cfrp structures during crushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Christine; Lachaud, Frédéric; Limido, Jérome; Lacome, Jean-Luc; Bisson, Antoine; Charlotte, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Energy absorption during crushing is evaluated using a thermodynamic based continuum damage model inspired from the Matzenmiller-Lubliner-Taylors model. It was found that for crash-worthiness applications, it is necessary to couple the progressive ruin of the material to a representation of the matter openings and debris generation. Element kill technique (erosion) and/or cohesive elements are efficient but not predictive. A technique switching finite elements into discrete particles at rupture is used to create debris and accumulated mater during the crushing of the structure. Switching criteria are evaluated using the contribution of the different ruin modes in the damage evolution, energy absorption, and reaction force generation.

  9. Discharge source with gas curtain for protecting optics from particles

    DOEpatents

    Fornaciari, Neal R.; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2004-03-30

    A gas curtain device is employed to deflect debris that is generated by an extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation discharge source such as an electric discharge plasma source. The gas curtain device projects a stream of gas over the path of the radiation to deflect debris particles into a direction that is different from that of the path of the radiation. The gas curtain can be employed to prevent debris accumulation on the optics used in photolithography.

  10. Interaction of debris with a solid obstacle: numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosinska, Anna

    2010-05-15

    The subject of this research is the propagation of a cloud of solid particles formed from an explosion-damaged construction. The main objective is the interaction of the cloud (debris) with a solid beam located at some distance from the explosion. The mathematical model involves the flow of the gas using standard conservation equations, and this part of the model is solved numerically. The solid particles are treated as a system of solid points (so-called Lagrangian approach), whose motion is the result of the flowing gas as well as collisions with obstacles. These two issues are described respectively by Newton's second law and the hard-sphere model. The model is used to simulate various cases where the influence of different parameters like the value of the pressure of the explosion, the particle size, the number of particles and the obstacle location are investigated. The results are presented as snapshots of particle location, and also as the particle total momentum during collision with the beam.

  11. DRAGONS - A Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Impact Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. -C.; Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Anderson, C.; Sadilek, A.; Burchell, M.; Hamilton, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital Navy-NASA Sensor (DRAGONS) is intended to be a large area impact sensor for in situ measurements of micrometeoroids and orbital debris (MMOD) in the millimeter or smaller size regime. These MMOD particles are too small to be detected by ground-based radars and optical telescopes, but are still large enough to be a serious safety concern for human space activities and robotic missions in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region. The nominal detection area of a DRAGONS unit is 1 m2, consisting of several independently operated panels. The approach of the DRAGONS design is to combine different particle impact detection principles to maximize information that can be extracted from detected events. After more than 10 years of concept and technology development, a 1 m2 DRAGONS system has been selected for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS) in August 2016. The project team achieved a major milestone when the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) was completed in May 2015. Once deployed on the ISS, this multi-year mission will provide a unique opportunity to demonstrate the MMOD detection capability of the DRAGONS technologies and to collect data to better define the small MMOD environment at the ISS altitude.

  12. A global inventory of small floating plastic debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, Erik; Wilcox, Chris; Lebreton, Laurent; Maximenko, Nikolai; Hardesty, Britta Denise; van Franeker, Jan A.; Eriksen, Marcus; Siegel, David; Galgani, Francois; Lavender Law, Kara

    2015-12-01

    Microplastic debris floating at the ocean surface can harm marine life. Understanding the severity of this harm requires knowledge of plastic abundance and distributions. Dozens of expeditions measuring microplastics have been carried out since the 1970s, but they have primarily focused on the North Atlantic and North Pacific accumulation zones, with much sparser coverage elsewhere. Here, we use the largest dataset of microplastic measurements assembled to date to assess the confidence we can have in global estimates of microplastic abundance and mass. We use a rigorous statistical framework to standardize a global dataset of plastic marine debris measured using surface-trawling plankton nets and coupled this with three different ocean circulation models to spatially interpolate the observations. Our estimates show that the accumulated number of microplastic particles in 2014 ranges from 15 to 51 trillion particles, weighing between 93 and 236 thousand metric tons, which is only approximately 1% of global plastic waste estimated to enter the ocean in the year 2010. These estimates are larger than previous global estimates, but vary widely because the scarcity of data in most of the world ocean, differences in model formulations, and fundamental knowledge gaps in the sources, transformations and fates of microplastics in the ocean.

  13. Gap Clearing by Planets in a Collisional Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika R.; Kuchner, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    We apply our 3D debris disk model, SMACK, to simulate a planet on a circular orbit near a ring of planetesimals that are experiencing destructive collisions. Previous simulations of a planet opening a gap in a collisionless debris disk have found that the width of the gap scales as the planet mass to the 2/7th power (α = 2/7). We find that gap sizes in a collisional disk still obey a power law scaling with planet mass, but that the index α of the power law depends on the age of the system t relative to the collisional timescale t coll of the disk by α = 0.32(t/t coll)-0.04, with inferred planet masses up to five times smaller than those predicted by the classical gap law. The increased gap sizes likely stem from the interaction between collisions and the mean motion resonances near the chaotic zone. We investigate the effects of the initial eccentricity distribution of the disk particles and find a negligible effect on the gap size at Jovian planet masses, since collisions tend to erase memory of the initial particle eccentricity distributions. Finally, we find that the presence of Trojan analogs is a potentially powerful diagnostic of planets in the mass range ~1-10 M Jup. We apply our model to place new upper limits on planets around Fomalhaut, HR 4796 A, HD 202628, HD 181327, and β Pictoris.

  14. GAP CLEARING BY PLANETS IN A COLLISIONAL DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvold, Erika R.; Kuchner, Marc J. E-mail: Marc.Kuchner@nasa.gov

    2015-01-10

    We apply our 3D debris disk model, SMACK, to simulate a planet on a circular orbit near a ring of planetesimals that are experiencing destructive collisions. Previous simulations of a planet opening a gap in a collisionless debris disk have found that the width of the gap scales as the planet mass to the 2/7th power (α = 2/7). We find that gap sizes in a collisional disk still obey a power law scaling with planet mass, but that the index α of the power law depends on the age of the system t relative to the collisional timescale t {sub coll} of the disk by α = 0.32(t/t {sub coll}){sup –0.04}, with inferred planet masses up to five times smaller than those predicted by the classical gap law. The increased gap sizes likely stem from the interaction between collisions and the mean motion resonances near the chaotic zone. We investigate the effects of the initial eccentricity distribution of the disk particles and find a negligible effect on the gap size at Jovian planet masses, since collisions tend to erase memory of the initial particle eccentricity distributions. Finally, we find that the presence of Trojan analogs is a potentially powerful diagnostic of planets in the mass range ∼1-10 M {sub Jup}. We apply our model to place new upper limits on planets around Fomalhaut, HR 4796 A, HD 202628, HD 181327, and β Pictoris.

  15. Debris Examination Using Ballistic and Radar Integrated Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Anthony; Schottel, Matthew; Lee, David; Scully, Robert; Hamilton, Joseph; Kent, Brian; Thomas, Christopher; Benson, Jonathan; Branch, Eric; Hardman, Paul; Stuble, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Debris Examination Using Ballistic and Radar Integrated Software (DEBRIS) program was developed to provide rapid and accurate analysis of debris observed by the NASA Debris Radar (NDR). This software provides a greatly improved analysis capacity over earlier manual processes, allowing for up to four times as much data to be analyzed by one-quarter of the personnel required by earlier methods. There are two applications that comprise the DEBRIS system: the Automated Radar Debris Examination Tool (ARDENT) and the primary DEBRIS tool.

  16. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... property acquired through a FEMA hazard mitigation program to uses compatible with open space, recreation... to remove debris from private property in urban, suburban and rural areas, including large...

  17. Spacelab J air filter debris analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenhuber, Donald C.

    1993-01-01

    Filter debris from the Spacelab module SLJ of STS-49 was analyzed for microbial contamination. Debris for cabin and avionics filters was collected by Kennedy Space Center personnel on 1 Oct. 1992, approximately 5 days postflight. The concentration of microorganisms found was similar to previous Spacelab missions averaging 7.4E+4 CFU/mL for avionics filter debris and 4.5E+6 CFU/mL for the cabin filter debris. A similar diversity of bacterial types was found in the two filters. Of the 13 different bacterial types identified from the cabin and avionics samples, 6 were common to both filters. The overall analysis of these samples as compared to those of previous missions shows no significant differences.

  18. Canadian Activities in Space Debris Mitigation Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikanpour, Darius; Jiang, Xin Xiang; Goroshin, Samuel; Haddad, Emile; Kruzelecky, Roman; Hoa, Suong; Merle, Philippe; Kleiman, Jacob; Gendron, Stephane; Higgins, Andrew; Jamroz, Wes

    The space environment, and in particular the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), is becoming increasingly populated with space debris which include fragments of dysfunctional spacecraft parts and materials traveling at speeds up to 15 km per second. These pose an escalating potential threat to LEO spacecraft, the international space station, and manned missions. This paper presents the Canadian activities to address the concerns over space debris in terms of debris mitigation measures and technologies; these include novel spacecraft demise technologies to safely decommission the spacecraft at the end of the mission, integrated self-healing material technologies for spacecraft structures to facilitate self-repair and help maintain the spacecraft structural and thermal performance, hypervelocity ground test capability to predict the impact of space debris on spacecraft performance, and ways of raising awareness within the space community through participation in targeted Science and Technology conferences and international forums.

  19. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  20. TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Burdge, B.

    1992-08-01

    The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min.