Science.gov

Sample records for agglomeration procedures developed

  1. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report presents the findings of the project entitled ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration.`` The purpose is to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1993. Engineering development included bench-scale process development, component development adaptation or modification of existing unit operations, proof-of-concept (POC) module design, fabrication, testing, data evaluation, and conceptual design of a commercial facility. The information obtained during POC operation resulted in a technical and economic design base sufficient to support construction and operation of a commercial plant. Throughout this project performance targets for the engineering development of selective agglomeration process were to achieve 85% or greater Btu recovery at 85% or greater pyritic sulfur rejection (PSR). Additional objectives included producing a final clean-coal product with an ash content of 6% or less which is suitable for conventional coal handling systems. The selective agglomeration process, as applied to coal cleaning, is based on differences in the surface chemistry of coal and its associated impurities. Coal particles are hydrophobic (i.e., repel water) while the majority of its impurities are hydrophilic (i.e., stabilized in water). During selective agglomeration, a liquid (the agglomerant) that is immiscible with water is introduced into a coal-water slurry and agitated to disperse it in the slurry, thereby allowing it to come into contact with all particles in the slurry. The coal particles, due to their hydrophobic nature, are attracted to the agglomerant phase. The hydrophilic mineral impurities remain in the water phase. Continued agitation of the agglomerant-coated coal particles causes them to coalesce to form agglomerates. Once the agglomerates are formed, they are separated from the mineral matter-bearing aqueous phase by subsequent processing steps.

  2. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the findings of the project entitled {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration.{close_quotes} In 1989 the US Department of Energy contracted with Southern Company Services, Inc. (DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC88879) to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1993. This project is part of DOE`s program to advance the state of physical coal cleaning technologies in order to accelerate the utilization of high-sulfur coals while complying with environmental regulations. Such projects assume added importance in light of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Appropriate utilization of the abundant reserves of high-sulfur coal in the United States can make a significant contribution to achieving the goal of energy independence.

  3. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nelson; F. Zhang; J. Drzymala; M. Shen; R. Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1997-11-01

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During a batch agglomeration test the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspensions or by observing changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. Dilute suspensions were employed for investigating the kinetics of agglomeration, whereas concentrated suspensions were used for determining parameters that characterize the process of agglomeration. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. Each tank was enclosed to control the amount of air present. A variable speed agitator fitted with a six blade turbine impeller was used for agitation. Tests were conducted with moderately hydrophobic Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and with more hydrophobic Upper Freeport coal using either n-heptane, i-octane, or hexadecane as an agglomerant.

  4. Development and Application of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    We report progress in the development of agglomerated multigrid techniques for fully un- structured grids in three dimensions, building upon two previous studies focused on efficiently solving a model diffusion equation. We demonstrate a robust fully-coarsened agglomerated multigrid technique for 3D complex geometries, incorporating the following key developments: consistent and stable coarse-grid discretizations, a hierarchical agglomeration scheme, and line-agglomeration/relaxation using prismatic-cell discretizations in the highly-stretched grid regions. A signi cant speed-up in computer time is demonstrated for a model diffusion problem, the Euler equations, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for 3D realistic complex geometries.

  5. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Executive summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Project performance targets for the selective agglomeration process were to achieve 85% or greater Btu recovery at 85% or greater pyritic sulfur rejection (PSR) on a run-of-mine (ROM) coal basis, while producing a final clean-coal product with an ash content of 6% or less which is handleable by conventional coal handling systems. Engineering development of selective agglomeration included: (1) Batch and continuous bench-scale precess development testing; (2) Continuous pilot-scale (3-t/h) component development testing to evaluate the adaptation and/or modification of existing unit operations for selective agglomeration; (3) Continuous pilot-scale (2-t/h) POC testing to optimize the selective agglomeration process and demonstrate precess reliability; (4) Vendor testing to evaluate pelletization and thermal drying precesses as applied to selective agglomeration; (5) Conceptual design of a commercial-scale (200-V/h) selective agglomeration facility; (6) Economic analysis of the selective agglomeration precess at a commercial (200-t/h) scale. The information obtained from the various modes of testing and analysis, particularly POC operations, resulted in a technical and economic design base sufficient to support construction and operation of a commercial plant.

  6. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

  7. Development of methods to predict agglomeration and disposition in FBCs

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.K.; Erickson, T.A.

    1995-11-01

    This 3-year, multiclient program is providing the information needed to determine the behavior of inorganic components in FBC units using advanced methods of analysis coupled with bench-scale combustion experiments. The major objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To develop further our advanced ash and deposit characterization techniques to quantify the effects of the liquid-phase components in terms of agglomerate formation and ash deposits, (2) To determine the mechanisms of inorganic transformations that lead to bed agglomeration and ash deposition in FBC systems, and (3) To develop a better means to predict the behavior of inorganic components as a function of coal composition, bed material characteristics, and combustion conditions.

  8. Development of a full scale selective oil agglomeration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, J.C.; Cooney, B.; Hoare, I.; Waugh, B.; Robinson, R.

    1998-12-31

    A research and development program managed by Australian Mining Investments Limited (AMI) on behalf of an investment syndicate was conducted with the objective of improving the efficiency and economy of the Selective Oil Agglomeration Process (SOAP), and developing viable commercial sized operating plants. Fewer than half the coal preparation plants in Australia beneficiate fine coal by froth flotation, the only viable alternative to SOAP for the recovery of low ash, fine and ultra fine coal. Those plants without flotation generally dispose of the ultra fine material, approximately {minus}100{micro}m in size, as tailings to waste. In the majority of cases this ultra fine waste contains more than 50% relatively low ash coal of saleable quality. It is believed that this coal constitutes a loss of 8--10 million tonnes per annum and that the coal mining industry would welcome a recovery process which has low capital and operating costs and will function automatically with minimal operator attention. The authors carried out a comprehensive literature study of selective oil agglomeration in order to gain a full understanding of the process and to plan the research program. Extensive studies were then undertaken on oil dispersion in the water phase, formation of oil water emulsions with surfactants and the optimization of surfactant selection. Oil and emulsion properties were investigated including stability, viscosity, temperature, concentration of components, time of formation, and cost. This work was followed by characterization studies on coals from the Gunnedah Basin and agglomeration test work on these coals. These agglomeration studies were performed firstly at bench level and then by using a small, 200 kg/hr continuous process development unit. The results were sufficiently encouraging to justify the design and construction of a fully instrumented, PLC controlled, 2 tph pilot plant at Gunnedah Colliery Coal Preparation Plant. Extensive trials were carried out on

  9. Development and scale-up of particle agglomeration processes for coal beneficiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meiyu

    The development of two modified agglomeration processes for coal beneficiation is presented separately in Parts I and II of this dissertation. Part I is based on research which was conducted to study the mechanism and characteristics of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Part II is based on research which was carried out to develop a newer and more innovative method for agglomerating coal particles with microscopic gas bubbles in aqueous suspensions. In Part I, the development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During batch agglomeration tests the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspension. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. It was shown that gas bubbles trigger the process of agglomeration and participate in a very complex mechanism involving the interaction of particles, oil droplets, and gas bubbles. The process takes place in stages involving dispersion of oil and gas, flocculation, coagulation, and agglomerate building. Numerous agglomeration tests were conducted with two kinds of coal in concentrated suspensions to determine the important characteristics of the process and to study the effects of the following operating parameters: i-octane concentration, air concentration, particle concentration, tank diameter, impeller diameter, and impeller speed

  10. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Site closeout report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Selective Agglomeration POC facility consisted of a coal crushing and grinding circuit, followed by an agglomeration circuit and product dewatering. (A plot plan of the facility is shown in Figure 1-2.) The coal crushing and grinding system consisted of a hammermill coal crusher, weigh-belt feeder, two ball mills (primary and secondary), and necessary hoppers, pumps, and conveyors. The mills were capable of providing coal over a range of grinds from a d{sub 50} of 125 to 25 microns. Slurry discharged from the ball mills was pumped to the agglomeration circuit. The agglomeration circuit began with a high-shear mixer, where diesel was added to the slurry to begin the formation of microagglomerates. The high-shear mixer was followed by two stages of conventional flotation cells for microagglomerate recovery. The second-stage-flotation-cell product was pumped to either a rotary-drum vacuum filter or a high-G centrifuge for dewatering. The dewatered product was then convoyed to the product pad from which dump trucks were used to transfer it to the utility plant located next to the facility. Plant tailings were pumped to the water clarifier for thickening and then dewatered in plate-and-frame filter presses. These dewatered tailings were also removed to the utility via dump truck. Clarified water (thickener overflow) was recycled to the process via a head tank.

  11. Influence of excipients and processing conditions on the development of agglomerates of racecadotril by crystallo-co-agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to improve the flow and mechanical properties of racecadotril by a crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA) technique. Direct tableting is a requirement of pharmaceutical industries. Poor mechanical properties of crystalline drug particles require wet granulation which is uneconomical, laborious, and tedious. Materials and Methods: The objective of this work was to study the influence of various polymers/excipients and processing conditions on the formation of directly compressible agglomerates of the water-insoluble drug, racecadotril, an antidiarrheal agent. The agglomerates of racecadotril were prepared using dichloromethane (DCM)–water as the crystallization system. DCM acted as a good solvent for racecadotril as well as a bridging liquid for the agglomeration of the crystallized drug and water as the nonsolvent. The prepared agglomerates were tested for micromeritic and mechanical properties. Results: The process yielded ~90 to 96% wt/ wt spherical agglomerates containing racecadotril with the diameter between 299 and 521 μ. A higher rotational speed of crystallization system reduces the size of the agglomerates and disturbs the sphericity. Spherical agglomerates were generated with a uniform dispersion of the crystallized drug. CCA showed excellent flowability and crushing strength. Conclusion: Excipients and processing conditions can play a key role in preparing spherical agglomerates of racecadotril by CCA, an excellent alternative to the wet granulation process to prepare intermediates for direct compression. PMID:23580935

  12. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  13. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,`` there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  14. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 7, Evaluation of bench-scale and component tests

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report presents the Task 7 findings of the project entitled Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration'' to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1992. The objectives of this report are to summarize the work completed as a part of Task 7, which includes engineering analysis of process deficiencies, analysis of all project test results, and evaluation and selection of an agglomeration process for further development in Phase II. Other objectives of this task included evaluation of the selective agglomeration technology and analysis of all the major deficiencies remaining at the conclusion of Phase I of the project. An overview of the agglomeration processes that were under consideration is presented, along with a discussion of the various test parameters that were found to be important during project testing. This report includes a comprehensive evaluation of all test data and a summary of the major findings; it also provides characterization data for all the project coals and presents the agglomeration process selected for Phase II along with a discussion of the criteria and rationale for the selection.

  15. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal advanced in three major research areas. One area of research resulted in the development of a method for measuring the rate of agglomeration of dilute particle suspensions and using the method to relate the rate of agglomeration of coal particles to various key parameters. A second area of research led to the development of a method for monitoring a batch agglomeration process by measuring changes in agitator torque. With this method it was possible to show that the agglomeration of a concentrated coal particle suspension is triggered by the introduction of a small amount of gas. The method was also used in conjunction with optical microscopy to study the mechanism of agglomeration. A third area of research led to the discovery that highly hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension can be agglomerated by air alone.

  16. Experimental development of a two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.; Bryan, B.G.; Lau, F.S. ); Shearer, T.L. ); Duggan, P.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting an experimental program to develop and test through pilot-plant scale of operation, IGT's two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator (TSI). The TSI is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration/gasification technology and the cyclonic combustion/incineration technology, which have been developed at IGT over many years. The TSI is a unique and extremely flexible combustor that can operate over a wide range of conditions in the fluidized-bed first stage from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration) including gasification of high-Btu wastes. The TSI can easily and efficiently destroy solid, liquid and gaseous organic wastes, while containing solid inorganic contaminants within an essentially non-leachable glassy matrix, suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. This paper presents the results of tests conducted in a batch, fluidized-bed bench-scale unit (BSU) with commercially available clean'' top soil and the same soil spiked with lead and chromium compounds. The objectives of these tests were to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve soil agglomeration and to evaluate the leaching characteristics of the soil agglomerates formed. 7 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Cosponsored by EPRI; DOE; Praxis Engineers, Inc.; and Southern Company Services, Inc., this project was an effort to scale up a selective agglomeration concept that EPRI and the Alberta Research Council jointly developed. So that as-mined high-sulfur coals can meet environmental regulations, investigators defined, tested, scaled up the selective agglomeration physical coal cleaning technology for rejecting pyritic sulfur while maintaining high Btu recoveries. Among the project`s goals was 85% recovery or greater of Btu recoveries. Among the project`s goals was 85% recovery or greater of Btu values with 85% pyritic sulfur rejection based on run-of-mine coal, creating a product with ash content of 6% or less that is usable in conventional coal handling systems. To achieve these goals, researchers divided the project into two phases. In Phase 1, they performed more than 1000 bench-scale continuous and batch tests and product forming component development. Proof-of-concept testing in Phase II used the most promising configurations from Phase I with diesel oil as the agglomerate and pelletization product forming. Research estimates for cleaning the entire product from conventional cleaning circuits with selective agglomeration was approximately $25/ton product or $490/ton SO{sub 2} removed. These figures suggest that precombustion sulfur removal is competitive with postcombustion strategies. The project also demonstrated that the degree of trace element reduction is coal specific and that significant reductions are possible using conventional coal cleaning and selective agglomeration. Since many of the trace elements in coal are hazardous air pollutants, removal of the elements before burning will eliminate their release into the atmosphere.

  18. Crew procedures development techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Hawk, M. L.; Mangiaracina, A. A.; Mcgavern, J. L.; Spangler, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    The study developed requirements, designed, developed, checked out and demonstrated the Procedures Generation Program (PGP). The PGP is a digital computer program which provides a computerized means of developing flight crew procedures based on crew action in the shuttle procedures simulator. In addition, it provides a real time display of procedures, difference procedures, performance data and performance evaluation data. Reconstruction of displays is possible post-run. Data may be copied, stored on magnetic tape and transferred to the document processor for editing and documentation distribution.

  19. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 7, Evaluation of bench-scale and component tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report presents the Task 7 findings of the project entitled ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration`` to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1992. The objectives of this report are to summarize the work completed as a part of Task 7, which includes engineering analysis of process deficiencies, analysis of all project test results, and evaluation and selection of an agglomeration process for further development in Phase II. Other objectives of this task included evaluation of the selective agglomeration technology and analysis of all the major deficiencies remaining at the conclusion of Phase I of the project. An overview of the agglomeration processes that were under consideration is presented, along with a discussion of the various test parameters that were found to be important during project testing. This report includes a comprehensive evaluation of all test data and a summary of the major findings; it also provides characterization data for all the project coals and presents the agglomeration process selected for Phase II along with a discussion of the criteria and rationale for the selection.

  20. Environmental influence of Wuhan urban agglomeration development and strategies of environmental protection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qun; Liu, Ying-Tao; Mao, Han-Ying

    2006-01-01

    In Wuhan urban agglomeration (WUA), the population growth and concentration, the industrial development and urban sprawl have been affecting the environment fundamentally. Comparing with Yangtze delta metropolitan region, the level of urbanization and industrialization of WUA has lagged behind for about 10 years; but the problems in environmental protection and rehabilitation are commonly serious. In the future, WUA should avoid unnecessary mistakes and seek a win-win strategy for economy and environment in its large-scale development stage. Based on the analysis of the changing of main environmental pollutants and the coupled curves in past decades, the paper discussed the important links among the urban environmental pollutions, industry growth and urban sprawl in WUA. It is concluded that the integration of economic and environmental policies in urban development is more required and significant at the large urban agglomeration region. Four proactive and long-term strategies need to be adopted to provide prior guidance and better protection for the development of WUA. PMID:17294667

  1. PLATO Courseware Development Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, William A.; And Others

    This is an exploratory study of methods for the preparation of computer curriculum materials. It deals with courseware development procedures for the PLATO IV computer-based education system, and draws on interviews with over 100 persons engaged in courseware production. The report presents a five stage model of development: (1) planning, (2)…

  2. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process: Air-promoted oil agglomeration of moderately hydrophobic coals. 2: Effect of air dosage in a model mixing system

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-07-01

    In a selective oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal, fine-size particles are suspended in water and treated with a water-immiscible hydrocarbon which can range from pentane to heavy fuel oil. Vigorous agitation is applied to disperse the oil and to produce frequent contacts between oil-coated particles. In Part 1 of this series of papers, it was shown that a definite amount of air had to be present in a laboratory mixing unit which produced a moderate shear rate in order to form compact, spherical agglomerates in an aqueous suspension of moderately hydrophobic coal using heptane or hexadecane as an agglomerate. In this paper, the effects of different amounts of air including dissolved air are discussed. The results indicate that a small amount of air will trigger the process of agglomeration, and even the air dissolved in water under equilibrium conditions at room temperature and pressure is sufficient to promote agglomeration provided it is released from solution.

  3. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Zhang, F.; Nelson, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. The design and construction of a model mixing system for conducting oil agglomeration tests were reported previously as well as the results of a series of calibration and shakedown tests. The system consists of a flat bottom tank which is fitted with four vertical baffles, a cover, and a turbine agitator. The tank has an inside diameter of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), height of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), and net volume of 2.87 L. The tank is connected to a photometric dispersion analyzer so that the turbidity of a coal particle suspension undergoing agglomeration can be monitored. Measuring the turbidity of a particle suspension requires application of the Beer-Lambert law. However, since this law applies for dilute suspensions, it is questionable whether or not it applies to the somewhat more concentrated coal suspensions required for the present project. Therefore, to determine the law`s applicability, a series of turbidity measurements was conducted on particle suspensions which varied in particle concentration over a wide range, and the results were analyzed to see how well they agreed with the law. To determine the effect of air in promoting the oil agglomeration of coal particles in an aqueous suspension, a number of agglomeration tests were conducted with the model mixing system. Finely ground Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was used for these tests, and the amount of air present was controlled carefully. The agglomeration process was monitored by observing the change in turbidity of the system.

  4. Development of advanced fluid-bed agglomeration and cyclonic incineration for simultaneous waste disposal and energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Khinkis, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is currently developing a two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incineration system for waste disposal that is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration/incineration and cyclonic combustion techologies. Both technologies have been developed individually at IGT over many years. This combination has resulted in a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes including municipal sludges. The system can operate over a wide range of conditions in the first stage, from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of wastes. In the combined system, solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes are incinerated with ease and great efficiency (>99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE)), while solid inorganic contaminants contained within a glassy matrix are rendered benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. The heat generated within the incinerator can be recovered using the state-of-the-art boilers. The development of the two-stage incinerator is a culmination of extensive research and development efforts on each stage of the incinerator. The variety of data obtained with solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes for both stages includes agglomeration of ash, incineration and reclamation of used blast grit and foundry sand, partial combustion of carbonaceous fuels, in-situ desulfurization, combustion of low-Btu gases, incineration of industrial wastewater, and incineration of carbon tetrachloride. 5 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-09-30

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  6. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  7. Development of clean coal and clean soil technologies using advanced agglomeration technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ignasiak, B.; Pawlak, W.; Szymocha, K.; Marr, J.

    1990-04-01

    The specific objectives of the bituminous coal program were to explore and evaluate the application of advanced agglomeration technology for: (1)desulphurization of bituminous coals to sulphur content acceptable within the current EPA SO{sub 2} emission guidelines; (2) deashing of bituminous coals to ash content of less than 10 percent; and (3)increasing the calorific value of bituminous coals to above 13,000 Btu/lb. (VC)

  8. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Task 6 -- Selective agglomeration laboratory research and engineering development for premium fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-06-27

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and benchscale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report represents the findings of Subtask 6.5 Selective Agglomeration Bench-Scale Testing and Process Scale-up. During this work, six project coals, namely Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Sunnyside, Taggart, Indiana VII, and Hiawatha were processed in a 25 lb/hr continuous selective agglomeration bench-scale test unit.

  9. Advanced crew procedures development techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Mangiaracina, A. A.; Mcgavern, J. L.; Spangler, M. C.; Tatum, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    The development of an operational computer program, the Procedures and Performance Program (PPP), is reported which provides a procedures recording and crew/vehicle performance monitoring capability. The PPP provides real time CRT displays and postrun hardcopy of procedures, difference procedures, performance, performance evaluation, and training script/training status data. During post-run, the program is designed to support evaluation through the reconstruction of displays to any point in time. A permanent record of the simulation exercise can be obtained via hardcopy output of the display data, and via magnetic tape transfer to the Generalized Documentation Processor (GDP). Reference procedures data may be transferred from the GDP to the PPP.

  10. Adapting agglomeration techniques to today's needs

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    New industries and economic trends have created new problems and opportunities for which applications of agglomeration have been developed. These applications are presented and discussed briefly. The areas include sintering of finely divided ores, briquetting feed stocks, agglomerate forms for air pollution control, hazardous waste immobilization, briquetting solid fuels for energy conservation, manufacturing synfuel charges, biomass densification, and agglomerate forms for metallurgical coke.

  11. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Power Plate Transducers in Dense Gas Extraction and Aerosol Agglomeration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, E.; Cardoni, A.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.; Acosta, V. M.; Blanco, A.; Rodríguez, G.; Blasco, M.; Herranz, L. E.

    Power ultrasound (PU) is an emerging, innovative, energy saving and environmental friendly technology that is generating a great interest in sectors such as food and pharmaceutical industries, green chemistry, environmental pollution, and other processes, where sustainable and energy efficient methods are required to improve and/or produce specific effects. Two typical effects of PU are the enhancement of mass transfer in gases and liquids, and the induction of particle agglomeration in aerosols. These effects are activated by a variety of mechanisms associated to the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves such as diffusion, agitation, entrainment, turbulence, etc. During the last years a great effort has been jointly made by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the company Pusonics towards introducing novel processes into the market based on airborne ultrasonic plate transducers. This technology was specifically developed for the treatment of gas and multiphasic media characterized by low specific acoustic impedance and high acoustic absorption. Different strategies have been developed to mitigate the effects of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of such ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers in order to enhance and stabilize their response at operational power conditions. This work deals with the latter advances in the mitigation of nonlinear problems found in power transducers; besides it describes two applications assisted by ultrasound developed at semi-industrial and laboratory scales and consisting in extraction via dense gases and particle agglomeration. Dense Gas Extraction (DGE) assisted by PU is a new process with a potential to enhance the extraction kinetics with supercritical CO2. Acoustic agglomeration of fine aerosol particles has a great potential for the treatment of air pollution problems generated by particulate materials. Experimental and numerical results in both processes will be shown and discussed.

  12. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 6, Operation of the Component Development Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the component development and laboratory binder test work at Wilsonville during Task 6. This Task included the construction and startup of the Component Development Test Facility (CDTF), coal procurement, evaluation of unit operation and dewatering performance, laboratory binder tests for diesel and heptane, production characterization, and vendor tests. Data evaluation, interpretation, and analysis are not included in this report, but will be discussed in the Task 7 report.

  13. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    SciTech Connect

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  14. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler

    2004-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process. As a result, operators of acidic heap-leach facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of other agglomeration applications, particularly advanced primary ironmaking.

  15. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    SciTech Connect

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not breakdown during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process. As a result, operators of many facilities see large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching.

  16. Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications: Task 9 - Selective agglomeration Module Testing and Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.` Jha, M.C.

    1997-09-29

    The primary goal of this project was the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing of both processes on six coals to optimize the processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report summarizes the findings of all the selective agglomeration (SA) test work performed with emphasis on the results of the PDU SA Module testing. Two light hydrocarbons, heptane and pentane, were tested as agglomerants in the laboratory research program which investigated two reactor design concepts: a conventional two-stage agglomeration circuit and a unitized reactor that combined the high- and low-shear operations in one vessel. The results were used to design and build a 25 lb/hr bench-scale unit with two-stage agglomeration. The unit also included a steam stripping and condensation circuit for recovery and recycle of heptane. It was tested on six coals to determine the optimum grind and other process conditions that resulted in the recovery of about 99% of the energy while producing low ash (1-2 lb/MBtu) products. The fineness of the grind was the most important variable with the D80 (80% passing size) varying in the 12 to 68 micron range. All the clean coals could be formulated into coal-water-slurry-fuels with acceptable properties. The bench-scale results were used for the conceptual and detailed design of the PDU SA Module which was integrated with the existing grinding and dewatering circuits. The PDU was operated for about 9 months. During the first three months, the shakedown testing was performed to fine tune the operation and control of various equipment. This was followed by parametric testing, optimization/confirmatory testing, and finally a

  17. Advance crew procedures development techniques: Procedures generation program requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Hawk, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Procedures Generation Program (PGP) is described as an automated crew procedures generation and performance monitoring system. Computer software requirements to be implemented in PGP for the Advanced Crew Procedures Development Techniques are outlined.

  18. Fuel agglomerates and method of agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Wen, Wu-Wey

    1986-01-01

    Solid fuel agglomerates are prepared of particulate coal or other carbonaceous material with a binder having a high humic acid or humate salt content. The humic acid is extracted from oxidized carbonaceous material with a mild aqueous alkali solution of, for instance, ammonia. The particulate material is blended with the extract which serves as the binder for the agglomerates. The water-resistant agglomerates are formed such as by pelletizing, followed by drying to remove moisture and solidify the humic acid binder throughout the agglomerate.

  19. Particle Agglomeration in Bipolar Barb Agglomerator Under AC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Ma, Xiuqin; Sun, Youshan; Wang, Meiyan; Zhang, Changping; Lou, Yueya

    2015-04-01

    The development of an efficient technology for removing fine particles in flue gas is essential as the haze is becoming more and more serious. To improve agglomeration effectiveness of fine particles, a dual zone electric agglomeration device consisting of a charging chamber and an agglomeration chamber with bipolar barb electrodes was developed. The bipolar barb electric agglomerator with a polar distance of 200 mm demonstrates good agglomeration effectiveness for particles with a size less than 8.0 μm under applied AC electric field. An optimal condition for achieving better agglomeration effectiveness was found to be as follows: flue gas flow velocity of 3.00 m/s, particle concentration of 2.00 g/m3, output voltage of 35 kV and length of the barb of 16 mm. In addition, 4.0-6.0 μm particles have the best effectiveness with the variation of particle volume occupancy of -3.2. supported by the Key Technology R&D Program of Hebei, China (No. 13211207D)

  20. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore processing which are intended to improve the

  1. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system: Topical report, Process analysis, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1987-07-31

    KRW Energy Systems, Inc., is engaged in the continuing development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally-acceptable production of low- and medium-Btu fuel gas from a variety of fossilized carbonaceous feedstocks and industrial fuels. This report presents process analysis of the 24 ton-per-day Process Development Unit (PDU) operations and is a continuation of the process analysis work performed in 1980 and 1981. Included is work performed on PDU process data; gasification; char-ash separation; ash agglomeration; fines carryover, recycle, and consumption; deposit formation; materials; and environmental, health, and safety issues. 63 figs., 43 tabs.

  2. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  3. Development of clean coal and clean soil technologies using advanced agglomeration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ignasiak, B.; Ignasiak, T.; Szymocha, K.

    1990-01-01

    Three major topics are discussed in this report: (1) Upgrading of Low Rank Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Test data, procedures, equipment, etc., are described for co-upgrading of subbituminous coals and heavy oil; (2) Upgrading of Bituminous Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Experimental procedures and data, bench and pilot scale equipments, etc., for beneficiating bituminous coals are described; (3) Soil Clean-up and Hydrocarbon Waste Treatment Process. Batch and pilot plant tests are described for soil contaminated by tar refuse from manufactured gas plant sites. (VC)

  4. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-10-01

    During the first year of the project two model mixing systems, which differed in size but were similar in design, were constructed and tested. The systems were equipped for measuring agitator speed and torque and for measuring the turbidity of coal particle suspensions undergoing agglomeration. Preliminary measurements of aqueous suspensions of coal particles showed that the Beer-Lambert law applies to such suspensions at least for low concentrations. Therefore, the measured turbidity can be used as an indicator of particle concentration and a means for monitoring the progress of oil agglomeration. However, the method is not applicable for large particle concentrations so a different technique was tested for monitoring the agglomeration of large concentrations. This technique involves measuring agitator torque and observing changes in torque while agitator speed is held constant. The results of preliminary tests of the technique were encouraging. In these tests significant changes in agitator torque were observed when particle agglomeration took place as long as solids concentration of 25 w/v % or more were utilized. A number of agglomeration tests were conducted using either one or the other of the two monitoring techniques. Both methods showed that even very small amounts of air can promote the oil agglomeration of coal particles suspended in water. Even the amount of air dissolved in water at room temperature and pressure can affect the process providing the air is displaced from the solution by a slightly soluble agglomerant such as heptane. The apparent rate of agglomeration was observed to increase as more air was introduced and also as agitator speed was increased.

  5. Development of agglomerated directly compressible diluent consisting of brittle and ductile materials.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Mukesh C; Jogani, Pranav D; Bariya, Shital E H

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a novel multifunctional coprocessed adjuvant consisting of three known diluents that show different consolidation mechanisms. The method of wet granulation was adopted for the preparation of coprocessed product. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and colloidal silicon dioxide (X1), lactose monohydrate (X2), and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (X3, DCP) were used as independent variables in a simplex lattice design. Croscarmellose sodium was used at 4% level intragranularly in all the batches. The granules (44/120 #) were characterized for angle of repose, bulk density, tapped density, and Carr's index. The tablets of coprocessed adjuvants were characterized for crushing strength, friability, and disintegration time. Multiple linear regression was adopted for evolving refined mathematical models. A checkpoint batch was prepared and evaluated for particle size distribution, moisture uptake, and dilution potential by using nimesulide as a model drug. Microcrystalline cellulose shows poor flowability due to irregular shape and interlocking. Moreover, it loses a part of its compactibility on wet granulation. To attend these problems, a physical blend of 97% microcrystalline cellulose and 3% colloidal silicon dioxide M5 was prepared and used. The blend of MCC and colloidal silicon dioxide showed better flow than that of the original MCC. Hence, it may be easier to mix with lactose and dibasic calcium phosphate. The loss in compactibility of microcrystalline cellulose on wet granulation was also reduced due to presence of colloidal silicon dioxide. As expected, all the batches exhibited acceptable angle of repose (<35 degrees) and quick disintegration (<1 min). Full and refined models for Carr's index and crushing strength were evaluated. Based on the results of grid analysis, a checkpoint (50% MCC, 40% lactose, and 10% DCP) that satisfies both the conditions of Carr's index and crushing strength was selected. The

  6. Developing Competency in Payroll Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen L.

    1975-01-01

    The author describes a sequence of units that provides for competency in payroll procedures. The units could be the basis for a four to six week minicourse and are adaptable, so that the student, upon completion, will be able to apply his learning to any payroll procedures system. (Author/AJ)

  7. Modeling of Particle Agglomeration in Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagala, Hari Krishna

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nano sized particles (<100nm in diameter) in dispersion mediums. They are of great interest in industrial applications as heat transfer fluids owing to their enhanced thermal conductivities. Stability of nanofluids is a major problem hindering their industrial application. Agglomeration and then sedimentation are some reasons, which drastically decrease the shelf life of these nanofluids. Current research addresses the agglomeration effect and how it can affect the shelf life of a nanofluid. The reasons for agglomeration in nanofluids are attributable to the interparticle interactions which are quantified by the various theories. By altering the governing properties like volume fraction, pH and electrolyte concentration different nanofluids with instant agglomeration, slow agglomeration and no agglomeration can be produced. A numerical model is created based on the discretized population balance equations which analyses the particle size distribution at different times. Agglomeration effects have been analyzed for alumina nanoparticles with average particle size of 150nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the particle size distribution became broader and moved to bigger sizes rapidly with time. Particle size distributions became broader and moved to bigger sizes more quickly with time with increase in the electrolyte concentration. The two effects together can be used to create different temporal trends in the particle size distributions. Faster agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces which is due to decrease in the induced charge and the double layer thickness around the particle. Bigger particle clusters show lesser agglomeration due to reaching the equilibrium size. The procedures and processes described in this work can be used to generate more stable nanofluids.

  8. Agglomeration of Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Annaratone, B. M.; Arnas, C.; Elskens, Y.

    2008-09-07

    The agglomeration of the matter in plasma, from the atomic level up to millimetre size particles, is here considered. In general we identify a continuous growth, due to deposition, and two agglomeration steps, the first at the level of tens of nanometres and the second above the micron. The agglomeration of nano-particles is attributed to electrostatic forces in presence of charge polarity fluctuations. Here we present a model based on discrete currents. With increasing grain size the positive charge permanence decreases, tending to zero. This effect is only important in the range of nanometre for dust of highly dispersed size. When the inter-particle distance is of the order of the screening length another agglomeration mechanism dominates. It is based on attractive forces, shadow forces or dipole-dipole interaction, overcoming the electrostatic repulsion. In bright plasma radiation pressure also plays a role.

  9. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  10. AMG by element agglomeration and constrained energy minimization interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, T V; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-02-17

    This paper studies AMG (algebraic multigrid) methods that utilize energy minimization construction of the interpolation matrices locally, in the setting of element agglomeration AMG. The coarsening in element agglomeration AMG is done by agglomerating fine-grid elements, with coarse element matrices defined by a local Galerkin procedure applied to the matrix assembled from the individual fine-grid element matrices. This local Galerkin procedure involves only the coarse basis restricted to the agglomerated element. To construct the coarse basis, one exploits previously proposed constraint energy minimization procedures now applied to the local matrix. The constraints are that a given set of vectors should be interpolated exactly, not only globally, but also locally on every agglomerated element. The paper provides algorithmic details, as well as a convergence result based on a ''local-to-global'' energy bound of the resulting multiple-vector fitting AMG interpolation mappings. A particular implementation of the method is illustrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  11. Agglomeration multigrid for the three-dimensional Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    A multigrid procedure that makes use of coarse grids generated by the agglomeration of control volumes is advocated as a practical approach for solving the three dimensional Euler equations on unstructured grids about complex configurations. It is shown that the agglomeration procedure can be tailored to achieve certain coarse grid properties such as the sizes of the coarse grids and aspect ratios of the coarse grid cells. The agglomeration is done as a preprocessing step and runs in linear time. The implications for multigrid of using arbitrary polyhedral coarse grids are discussed. The agglomeration multigrid technique compares very favorably with existing multigrid procedures both in terms of convergence rates and elapsed times. The main advantage of the present approach is the ease with which coarse grids of any desired degree of coarseness may be generated in three dimensions, without being constrained by considerations of geometry. Inviscid flows over a variety of complex configurations are computed using the agglomeration multigrid strategy.

  12. Successfully use agglomeration for size enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, W.

    1996-04-01

    The processing of fine and ultrafine particles by size enlargement finds an ever increasing application. At the same time, undesirable agglomeration such as buildup, caking, bridging, and uncontrolled aggregation of fine particles can occur during processing and handling of these particulate solids. This article will provide a survey of the phenomena of agglomeration and discuss the unit operation of size enlargement by agglomeration. This article is also an invitation, particularly to young engineers, to become interested in agglomeration. Considering that mechanical process technologies are requiring more energy every year than any other group of consumers and efficiencies are typically in the single digits or teens at best, considerable rewards can be expected from the development of scientifically modified, more energy-efficient methods and equipment.

  13. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-10-01

    Measurement and control of the surface properties of coal and pyrite are important in the application of selective oil agglomeration for coal beneficiation and both received further study and consideration. One method of surface characterization involves measuring the heat of immersion of coal in water or other liquids. To develop a useful and consistent measurement technique, numerous measurements were conducted with Illinois No. 6 coal to study the effects of coal particle size and moisture content on the heat of immersion in heptane, water, hexadecane and methanol. The effect of particle size was also studied. Also, ground mineral pyrite was pretreated with dilute solutions of sodium sulfide at various Ph and then agglomerated with heptane. To achieve better control over the oil agglomeration process, oil agglomeration experiments were conducted with aqueous suspensions of graphite which were first degassed with a vacuum pump. 7 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Continuation of advanced crew procedures development techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Evans, M. E.; Mangiaracina, A. A.; Mcgavern, J. L.; Spangler, M. C.; Tatum, I. C.

    1976-01-01

    An operational computer program, the Procedures and Performance Program (PPP) which operates in conjunction with the Phase I Shuttle Procedures Simulator to provide a procedures recording and crew/vehicle performance monitoring capability was developed. A technical synopsis of each task resulting in the development of the Procedures and Performance Program is provided. Conclusions and recommendations for action leading to the improvements in production of crew procedures development and crew training support are included. The PPP provides real-time CRT displays and post-run hardcopy output of procedures, difference procedures, performance data, parametric analysis data, and training script/training status data. During post-run, the program is designed to support evaluation through the reconstruction of displays to any point in time. A permanent record of the simulation exercise can be obtained via hardcopy output of the display data and via transfer to the Generalized Documentation Processor (GDP). Reference procedures data may be transferred from the GDP to the PPP. Interface is provided with the all digital trajectory program, the Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulator (SVDS) to support initial procedures timeline development.

  15. Unstructured multigrid through agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Berger, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the compressible Euler equations are solved using finite volume techniques on unstructured grids. The spatial discretization employs a central difference approximation augmented by dissipative terms. Temporal discretization is done using a multistage Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid technique is used to accelerate convergence to steady state. The coarse grids are derived directly from the given fine grid through agglomeration of the control volumes. This agglomeration is accomplished by using a greedy-type algorithm and is done in such a way that the load, which is proportional to the number of edges, goes down by nearly a factor of 4 when moving from a fine to a coarse grid. The agglomeration algorithm has been implemented and the grids have been tested in a multigrid code. An area-weighted restriction is applied when moving from fine to coarse grids while a trivial injection is used for prolongation. Across a range of geometries and flows, it is shown that the agglomeration multigrid scheme compares very favorably with an unstructured multigrid algorithm that makes use of independent coarse meshes, both in terms of convergence and elapsed times.

  16. Agglomeration rate and action forces between atomized particles of agglomerator and inhaled-particles from coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Zhang, Jun-ying; Zheng, Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    In order to remove efficiently haled-particles emissions from coal combustions, a new way was used to put forward the process of agglomeration and the atomization was produced by the nozzle and then sprayed into the flue before precipitation devices of power station boiler in order to make inhaled-particles agglomerate into bigger particles, which can be easily removed but not change existing running conditions of boiler. According to this idea, a model is set up to study agglomeration rate and effect forces between fly ash inhaled-particles and atomized agglomerator particles. The developed agglomeration rate was expressed by relative particle number decreasing speed per unit volume. The result showed that viscosity force and flow resistance force give main influences on agglomeration effect of inhaled-particles, while springiness force and gravity have little effect on agglomeration effect of theirs. Factors influencing the agglomeration rate and effect forces are studied, including agglomerator concentration, agglomerator flux and agglomerator density, atomized-particles diameters and inhaled-particles diameter and so on. PMID:16295917

  17. The Development of an Academic Grievance Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logsdon, Jann B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Discusses and describes the development of academic grievance procedures at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, to provide a formal mechanism within the educational institution to ensure that students' rights are not abridged. Presents procedural stages, the hearing, deliberation phase, rehearing and appeals, and the ombudsman role. (MF)

  18. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  19. Analysis and synthesis of solutions for the agglomeration process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babuk, V. A.; Dolotkazin, I. N.; Nizyaev, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The present work is devoted development of model of agglomerating process for propellants based on ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium dinitramide (ADN), HMX, inactive binder, and nanoaluminum. Generalization of experimental data, development of physical picture of agglomeration for listed propellants, development and analysis of mathematical models are carried out. Synthesis of models of various phenomena taking place at agglomeration implementation allows predicting of size and quantity, chemical composition, structure of forming agglomerates and its fraction in set of condensed combustion products. It became possible in many respects due to development of new model of agglomerating particle evolution on the surface of burning propellant. Obtained results correspond to available experimental data. It is supposed that analogical method based on analysis of mathematical models of particular phenomena and their synthesis will allow implementing of the agglomerating process modeling for other types of metalized solid propellants.

  20. LEVEL OF SOMATIC DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN AGED SIX YEARS FROM AN URBAN AGGLOMERATION IN POLAND WITH RESPECT TO SELECTED ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS.

    PubMed

    Trzcińska, Dorota; Tabor, Piotr; Olszewska, Elżbieta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the somatic development of children from an urban agglomeration in Poland at the end of preschool education and the beginning of primary education with respect to selected socioeconomic and educational conditions. Data were collected for 742 children from selected Warsaw kindergartens in spring 2011 and 2012. Their mean age was 5.84±0.31 years. The sex categories were equal: 371 boys and 371 girls. Kindergartens chosen for the study constituted a representative sample. The diagnostic survey method (questionnaire technique) was used to assess the selected environmental conditions of development in the participating children. Body height and the sum of six skin folds (over the biceps, over the triceps, under the scapula, on the abdomen, over the wing of ilium and on the calf) were chosen from the assessed anthropometric parameters for the purpose of determining somatic development of study participants. The obtained data were analysed using selected descriptive statistics methods (including cluster analysis), data standardization (normalization by mean values and SD) and the chi-squared test. The results showed certain relationships between the selected parameters of somatic development and family living conditions. These relationships involved differences between individual clusters depending on given living conditions and were most prominent for mother's education, for which variable differences between clusters were found for both sexes. The somatic build of boys (including body height and body adiposity) also differed depending on the number of offspring in the family, while the somatic build of girls differed depending on father's employment and father's education. Furthermore, the obtained results lead to the conclusion that the total number of differences between the analysed clusters was relatively low. This indicates that the biological effects of social stratification tend to diminish in the environment of an urban

  1. Advanced crew procedures development techniques: Procedures and performance program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Mangiaracina, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Procedures and Performance Program (PPP) for operation in conjunction with the Shuttle Procedures Simulator (SPS) is described. The PPP user interface, the SPS/PPP interface, and the PPP applications software are discussed.

  2. Selective oil agglomeration of lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Halime Abakay Temel; Volkan Bozkurt; Arun Kumar Majumder

    2009-01-15

    In this study, desulfurization and deashing of Adiyaman-Glbai lignite by the agglomeration method were studied. For this purpose, three groups of agglomeration experiments were made. The effects of solid concentration, bridging liquid type and dosage, pH, and screen size on the agglomeration after desliming were investigated in the first group of experiments. The effects of lake water and sea water (the Mediterranean Sea water, the Aegean Sea water, and the Black Sea water) on the agglomeration were investigated in the second group of experiments. The effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3}) on the agglomeration were investigated in the third group of experiments. Agglomeration results showed that the usage of sea waters and soda lake water in the agglomeration medium had a positive effect on the reduction of total sulfur content of agglomerates. In addition, the usage of NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3} in the agglomeration medium had a positive effect on the ash content reduction of the agglomerates. 27 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. On the development of procedural knowledge.

    PubMed

    Willingham, D B; Nissen, M J; Bullemer, P

    1989-11-01

    Amnesic patients demonstrate by their performance on a serial reaction time task that they learned a repeating spatial sequence despite their lack of awareness of the repetition (Nissen & Bullemer, 1987). In the experiments reported here, we investigated this form of procedural learning in normal subjects. A subgroup of subjects showed substantial procedural learning of the sequence in the absence of explicit declarative knowledge of it. Their ability to generate the sequence was effectively at chance and showed no savings in learning. Additional amounts of training increased both procedural and declarative knowledge of the sequence. Development of knowledge in one system seems not to depend on knowledge in the other. Procedural learning in this situation is neither solely perceptual nor solely motor. The learning shows minimal transfer to a situation employing the same motor sequence. PMID:2530305

  4. Rapid determination of plasmonic nanoparticle agglomeration status in blood.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samir V; Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak; Ingle, Taylor M; Wang, Rongrong; Wang, Feng; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Jingyi; Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic nanomaterials as drug delivery or bio-imaging agents are typically introduced to biological systems through intravenous administration. However, the potential for agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological systems could dramatically affect their pharmacokinetic profile and toxic potential. Development of rapid screening methods to evaluate agglomeration is urgently needed to monitor the physical nature of nanoparticles as they are introduced into blood. Here, we establish novel methods using darkfield microscopy with hyperspectral detection (hsDFM), single particle inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS), and confocal Raman microscopy (cRM) to discriminate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their agglomerates in blood. Rich information about nanoparticle agglomeration in situ is provided by hsDFM monitoring of the plasmon resonance of primary nanoparticles and their agglomerates in whole blood; cRM is an effective complement to hsDFM to detect AuNP agglomerates in minimally manipulated samples. The AuNPs and the particle agglomerates were further distinguished in blood for the first time by quantification of particle mass using spICP-MS with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the agglomeration status of synthesized and commercial NPs incubated in blood was successfully assessed using the developed methods. Together, these complementary methods enable rapid determination of the agglomeration status of plasmonic nanomaterials in biological systems, specifically blood. PMID:25771013

  5. Rapid Determination of Plasmonic Nanoparticle Agglomeration Status in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Samir V.; Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak; Ingle, Taylor; Wang, RongRong; Wang, Feng; Howard, Paul C.; Chen, Jingyi; Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanomaterials as drug delivery or bio-imaging agents are typically introduced to biological systems through intravenous administration. However, the potential for agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological systems could dramatically affect their pharmacokinetic profile and toxic potential. Development of rapid screening methods to evaluate agglomeration is urgently needed to monitor the physical nature of nanoparticles as they are introduced into blood. Here, we establish novel methods using darkfield microscopy with hyperspectral detection (hsDFM), single particle inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS), and confocal Raman microscopy (cRM) to discriminate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their agglomerates in blood. Rich information about nanoparticle agglomeration in situ is provided by hsDFM monitoring of the plasmon resonance of primary nanoparticles and their agglomerates in whole blood; cRM is an effective complement to hsDFM to detect AuNP agglomerates in minimally manipulated samples. The AuNPs and the particle agglomerates were further distinguished in blood for the first time by quantification of particle mass using spICP-MS with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the agglomeration status of synthesized and commercial NPs incubated in blood was successfully assessed using the developed methods. Together, these complementary methods enable rapid determination of the agglomeration status of plasmonic nanomaterials in biological systems, specifically blood. PMID:25771013

  6. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of

  7. Spectral Element Agglomerate AMGe

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, T; Falgout, R; Henson, V E; Jones, J E; Vassilevski, P S; Manteuffel, T A; McCormick, S F; Ruge, J W

    2005-05-20

    The purpose of this note is to describe an algorithm resulting from the uniting of two ideas introduced and applied elsewhere. For many problems, AMG has always been difficult due to complexities whose natures are difficult to discern from the entries of matrix A alone. Element-based interpolation has been shown to be an effective method for some of these problems, but it requires access to the element matrices on all levels. One way to obtain these has been to perform element agglomeration to form coarse elements, but in complicated situations defining the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is not easy. The spectral approach to coarse dof selection is very attractive due to its elegance and simplicity. The algorithm presented here combines the robustness of element interpolation, the ease of coarsening by element agglomeration, and the simplicity of defining coarse dofs through the spectral approach. As demonstrated in the numerical results, the method does yield a reasonable solver for the problems described. It can, however, be an expensive method due to the number and cost of the local, small dense linear algebra problems; making it a generally competitive method remains an area for further research.

  8. Development of fireside performance indices, Task 7.33, Development of methods to predict agglomeration and deposition in FBCS, Task 7.36, Enhanced air toxics control, Task 7.45

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, C.J.; Mann, M.D.; Laudal, D.L.; Miller, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been developing advanced indices that rank coals according to their fouling and slagging propensity in utility boilers. The indices are based on sophisticated analytical techniques for identifying and quantifying coal inorganics and are useful in predicting the effects of proposed operational changes on ash deposition in coal-fired boilers. These indices are intended to provide an economical way to reduce the amount of full-scale testing needed to determine the best means of minimizing ash-related problems. The successful design and operation of the fluidized-bed combustor requires the ability to control and mitigate ash-related problems. The major ash-related problems in FBC are agglomeration of bed material, ash deposition on heat-transfer surfaces, ash deposition on refractory and uncooled surfaces, corrosion, and erosion. The focus of the Development of Methods to Predict Agglomeration and Deposition in FBCs is on the agglomeration and deposition problems in atmospheric bubbling and circulating beds. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require study of air toxic emissions from coal combustion systems. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine-particle control appears to be the best approach to achieving a high level of air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and are not typically collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, the goal of this project is to develop methods that capture the vapor-phase metals while simultaneously achieving ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxics.

  9. Review of ash agglomeration in fluidized bed gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Matulevicius, E.S.; Golan, L.P.

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the data and mathematical models which describe the phenomena involved in the agglomeration of ash in fluidized bed coal gasifiers (FBG). Besides highlighting the data and theoretical models, this review lists areas where there is a lack of information regarding the actual mechanisms of agglomeration. Also, potential areas for further work are outlined. The work is directed at developing models of agglomeration which could be included in computer codes describing fluidized bed gasifier phenomena, e.g., FLAG and CHEMFLUB which have been developed for the US Department of Energy. 134 references, 24 figures, 13 tables.

  10. Coal Cleaning by Gas Agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Meiyu Shen; Royce Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1998-03-01

    The gas agglomeration method of coal cleaning was demonstrated with laboratory scale mixing equipment which made it possible to generate microscopic gas bubbles in aqueous suspensions of coal particles. A small amount of i-octane was introduced to enhance the hydrophobicity of the coal. Between 1.0 and 2.5 v/w% i-octane was sufficient based on coal weight. Coal agglomerates or aggregates were produced which were bound together by small gas bubbles.

  11. Recent Advances in Agglomerated Multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Hammond, Dana P.

    2013-01-01

    We report recent advancements of the agglomerated multigrid methodology for complex flow simulations on fully unstructured grids. An agglomerated multigrid solver is applied to a wide range of test problems from simple two-dimensional geometries to realistic three- dimensional configurations. The solver is evaluated against a single-grid solver and, in some cases, against a structured-grid multigrid solver. Grid and solver issues are identified and overcome, leading to significant improvements over single-grid solvers.

  12. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  13. Apollo experience report: Systems and flight procedures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    This report describes the process of crew procedures development used in the Apollo Program. The two major categories, Systems Procedures and Flight Procedures, are defined, as are the forms of documentation required. A description is provided of the operation of the procedures change control process, which includes the roles of man-in-the-loop simulations and the Crew Procedures Change Board. Brief discussions of significant aspects of the attitude control, computer, electrical power, environmental control, and propulsion subsystems procedures development are presented. Flight procedures are subdivided by mission phase: launch and translunar injection, rendezvous, lunar descent and ascent, and entry. Procedures used for each mission phase are summarized.

  14. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock

    1999-03-01

    The technical feasibility of a gas agglomeration method for cleaning coal was demonstrated by means of bench-scale tests conducted with a mixing system which enabled the treatment of ultra-fine coal particles with a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water. A suitable suspension of microbubbles was prepared by first saturating water with air or carbon dioxide under pressure then reducing the pressure to release the dissolved gas. The formation of microbubbles was facilitated by agitation and a small amount of i-octane. When the suspension of microbubbles and coal particles was mixed, agglomeration was rapid and small spherical agglomerates were produced. Since the agglomerates floated, they were separated from the nonfloating tailings in a settling chamber. By employing this process in numerous agglomeration tests of moderately hydrophobic coals with 26 wt.% ash, it was shown that the ash content would be reduced to 6--7 wt.% while achieving a coal recovery of 75 to 85% on a dry, ash-free basis. This was accomplished by employing a solids concentration of 3 to 5 w/w%, an air saturation pressure of 136 to 205 kPa (5 to 15 psig), and an i-octane concentration of 1.0 v/w% based on the weight of coal.

  15. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  16. Column oil agglomeration of fly ash with ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.L.; Champagne, K.J.; Soong, Y.; Finseth, D.H.

    1999-07-01

    A promising oil agglomeration process has been developed for the beneficiation of fly ash using a six-foot agglomeration column. Carbon concentrates have been separated from fly ash with yields greater than 60 % and purities of 55 to 74 %. The parameters examined in the study include ultrasonic exposure, pulse rate, frequency, agitation speed, and blade configuration. The effects of the experimental variables on the quality of separation are discussed.

  17. Comprehensive medication review: development of a collaborative procedure.

    PubMed

    Leikola, Saija; Tuomainen, Lea; Peura, Sirpa; Laurikainen, Antti; Lyles, Alan; Savela, Eeva; Airaksinen, Marja

    2012-08-01

    This commentary describes the development and evidence-base of the Comprehensive Medication Review (CMR) procedure for community and hospital settings in Finland. The development was coordinated by a national steering group. The group collaborated with 26 experienced pharmacists who developed and tested CMR procedures during a 1.5 year accreditation training for CMR. The development consisted of: (1) a literature review and inventory of medication review procedures in different countries; (2) the creation of potential procedures and related documentation; (3) integration of potential procedures into a national standard procedure; and (4) piloting the standard procedure in practice settings. The resulting comprehensive medication review procedure requires access to a patient's clinical information, an in-home patient interview and a case conference with the collaborating physician. This procedure covers the four main dimensions critical for safe and appropriate geriatric pharmacotherapy: aging and safety; co-morbidities; polypharmacy; and adherence. The CMR measures and documentation build on these dimensions. PMID:22711383

  18. Air agglomeration of hydrophobic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The agglomeration of hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension was accomplished by introducing small amounts of air into the suspension while it was agitated vigorously. The extent of aggregation was proportional both to the air to solids ratio and to the hydrophobicity of the solids. For a given air/solids ratio, the extent of aggregation of different materials increased in the following order: graphite, gilsonite, coal coated with heptane, and Teflon. The structure of agglomerates produced from coarse Teflon particles differed noticeably from the structure of bubble-particle aggregates produced from smaller, less hydrophobic particles.

  19. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  20. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.; McDaniel, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    The work has shown that acoustic agglomeration at practical acoustic intensities and frequencies is technically and most likely economically viable. The following studies were performed with the listed results: The physics of acoustic agglomeration is complex particularly at the needed high acoustic intensities in the range of 150 to 160 dB and frequencies in the 2500 Hz range. The analytical model which we developed, although not including nonlinear acoustic efforts, agreed with the trends observed. We concentrated our efforts on clarifying the impact of high acoustic intensities on the generation of turbulence. Results from a special set of tests show that although some acoustically generated turbulence of sorts exists in the 150 to 170 dB range with acoustic streaming present, such turbulence will not be a significant factor in acoustic agglomeration compared to the dominant effect of the acoustic velocities at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. Studies of the robustness of the agglomerated particles using the Anderson Mark III impactor as the source of the shear stresses on the particles show that the agglomerates should be able to withstand the rigors of flow through commercial cyclones without significant break-up. We designed and developed a 700/sup 0/F tubular agglomerator of 8'' internal diameter. The electrically heated system functioned well and provided very encouraging agglomeration results at acoustic levels in the 150 to 160 dB and 2000 to 3000 Hz ranges. We confirmed earlier results that an optimum frequency exists at about 2500 Hz and that larger dust loadings will give better results. Studies of the absorption of acoustic energy by various common gases as a function of temperature and humidity showed the need to pursue such an investigation for flue gas constituents in order to provide necessary data for the design of agglomerators. 65 references, 56 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  2. Developing written inspection procedures for thermal/infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, J.

    1996-12-31

    Written inspection procedures are essential to acquiring valid data on a repeatable basis. They are also vital to the safety of the thermographer, and may, for that reason alone, be required by a company. Many thermographers are working with no written procedures. To date only a few of the necessary procedures have been developed by recognized standards organizations. The lack of procedures is limiting the use of thermography. Where thermography is being used without them, results are often less than optimum. This paper will (1) survey existing procedures and standards; (2) discuss current efforts by standards organizations to develop standards and procedures; and (3) present a general methodology from which written inspection procedures can be developed for many thermographic inspections.

  3. Microstickies agglomeration by electric field.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaotang Tony; Hsieh, Jeffery S

    2016-01-01

    Microstickies deposits on both paper machine and paper products when it agglomerates under step change in ionic strength, pH, temperature and chemical additives. These stickies increase the down time of the paper mill and decrease the quality of paper. The key property of microstickies is its smaller size, which leads to low removal efficiency and difficulties in measurement. Thus the increase of microstickies size help improve both removal efficiency and reduce measurement difficulty. In this paper, a new agglomeration technology based on electric field was investigated. The electric treatment could also increase the size of stickies particles by around 100 times. The synergetic effect between electric field treatment and detacky chemicals/dispersants, including polyvinyl alcohol, poly(diallylmethylammonium chloride) and lignosulfonate, was also studied. PMID:27332828

  4. Coal beneficiation by gas agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Meiyu, Shen

    2003-10-14

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  5. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Hayashi, Kanetoshi

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  6. 25 CFR 33.9 - Development of procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Development of procedures. 33.9 Section 33.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.9 Development of procedures. The Director, Office of Indian Education Programs shall prepare...

  7. 25 CFR 33.9 - Development of procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Development of procedures. 33.9 Section 33.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.9 Development of procedures. The Director, Office of Indian Education Programs shall prepare...

  8. 25 CFR 33.9 - Development of procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Development of procedures. 33.9 Section 33.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.9 Development of procedures. The Director, Office of Indian Education Programs shall prepare...

  9. Colloidal stability of coal-simulated suspensions in selective agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Schurger, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A coal suspension was simulated by using graphite to simulate the carbonaceous fraction and kaolinite clay to simulate the ash fraction. Separate studies on each material established their response to additions of oxidized pyrite (ferrous sulfate) and a humic acid simulate (salicylic acid) in terms of zeta potentials profiles with pH and Ionic strength. Concentrations of iron and salicylic acid evaluated were 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M and 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M, respectively. The zeta potentials profiles of graphite, clay and hexadecane were negative throughout the pH ranges studied. The addition of iron lowered the zeta potentials all of the suspensions under all pH and ionic strength conditions. Salicylic acid decreased the graphite and hexadecane zeta potentials but had no effect on the clay zeta potential profiles. Agglomeration of graphite with bridging liquid shows distinct time dependent rate mechanisms, a initial growth of graphite agglomerates followed by consolidation phase. Graphite agglomeration was rapid with the maximum amount of agglomerate volume growth occurring in under 2-4 minutes. Agglomeration in the first two minutes was characterized by a 1st order rate mechanism. The presence of either Iron and salicylic acid generally improved the first order rates. The addition of clay also improved the first order rates except in the presence of salicylic acid. Heteroagglomeration of graphite with clay was found by hydrodynamic arguments to be unfavored. A multicomponent population balance model which had been developed for evaluating collision efficiencies of coal, ash and pyrite selective agglomeration was evaluated to explain these results. The growth and consolidation characteristics of graphite agglomeration for the experimental conditions examined herein revealed the limitations of such as model for this application.

  10. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    Work continued on the basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for beneficiating aqueous suspensions of coal by selective agglomeration with oil. A new method was demonstrated for characterizing the agglomerability of coal suspensions. This method utilizes a photometric dispersion analyzer to monitor changes in the turbidity of a particle suspension as increasing amounts of oil are added to the suspension in a batch agglomeration test. Agglomeration of the particles leads to a marked decrease in the turbidity of the suspension. Another experimental technique was also demonstrated for characterizing oil agglomeration. This technique involves measuring the rate of growth of agglomerates in a continuous flow system operating under stead-state conditions. The data are analyzed by means of a population balance. The results of a preliminary set of experiments in which Indiana V seam coal was agglomerated with tetralin seemed to fit a particular growth model very well. Equipment was also constructed for studying the kinetics of agglomeration in a batch process. While earlier work showed that quebracho (a commercially available dispersant) is a strong agglomeration depressant for pyrite, recent experiments with mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and mineral pyrite showed that quebracho does not appear to be sufficiently selective. Further consideration was given to the separation of mixtures of coal and pyrite agglomeration with heptane. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Considerations for Developing Language Assessment Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Charlene; Lombardo, Maria

    A systematic approach for assessing language competencies of bilingual students is developed. Two issues are clarified. First, the issue of examining separately the four language skills is looked at, as well as the need to consider other related factors including cognitive functions operative in language processing, affective forces, and…

  12. Regional policy and procedure development: a seven-step process.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, M L

    1998-01-01

    In October 1997, Nova Scotia's Eastern Regional Health Board undertook the development of regional policies and procedures relating to both its governance and management responsibilities. The process that was adopted included delegation of tasks to work groups; development of general administrative policies and procedures in accordance with accreditation guidelines and present health restructuring initiatives; coordination of the development of the policies and procedures within a specific framework; and development of standardized clinical policies. A steering committee initiated the project, which involved 24 subgroups. PMID:10339207

  13. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  14. Powder agglomeration in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG3-755 entitled 'Powder Agglomeration in a Microgravity Environment.' The research program included both two types of numerical models and two types of experiments. The numerical modeling included the use of Monte Carlo type simulations of agglomerate growth including hydrodynamic screening and molecular dynamics type simulations of the rearrangement of particles within an agglomerate under a gravitational field. Experiments included direct observation of the agglomeration of submicron alumina and indirect observation, using small angle light scattering, of the agglomeration of colloidal silica and aluminum monohydroxide. In the former class of experiments, the powders were constrained to move on a two-dimensional surface oriented to minimize the effect of gravity. In the latter, some experiments involved mixture of suspensions containing particles of opposite charge which resulted in agglomeration on a very short time scale relative to settling under gravity.

  15. Multidimensional nature of fluidized nanoparticle agglomerates.

    PubMed

    de Martín, Lilian; Bouwman, Wim G; van Ommen, J Ruud

    2014-10-28

    We show that fluidized nanoparticle agglomerates are hierarchical fractal structures with three fractal dimensions: one characterizing sintered aggregates formed during nanoparticle synthesis, one that is also found in stored agglomerates and represents unbroken agglomerates, and one describing the large agglomerates broken during fluidization. This has been possible by using spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering-a relatively novel technique that, for the first time, allowed to characterize in situ the structure of fluidized nanoparticle agglomerates from 21 nm to ∼20 μm. The results show that serial agglomeration mechanisms in the gas phase can generate nanoparticle clusters with different fractal dimensions, contradicting the common approach that considers fluidized nanoparticle agglomerates as single fractals, in analogy to the agglomerates formed by micron-sized particles. This work has important implications for the fluidization field but also has a wider impact. Current studies deal with the formation and properties of clusters where the building blocks are particles and the structure can be characterized by only one fractal dimension. However, fluidized nanoparticle agglomerates are low-dimensional clusters formed by higher-dimensional clusters that are formed by low-dimensional clusters. This multifractality demands a new type of multiscale model able to capture the interplay between different scales. PMID:25313446

  16. Developing an emergency procedures writers' guide: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, L.T.; Hill, S.G.; Close, J.A.; Lash, J.D.; Hemming, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Three Mile Island Task Force identified the need for incorporating human factors and technical writing guidance into the development of function-oriented emergency operating procedures (EOPs). The NRC recommended that this guidance be contained in plant specific EOP writer's guides which should be developed by the plant for use by the plant's EOP developers (NUREG-0737 Supplement, 1982). Based on industry success with post-Three Mile Island procedure philosophy, Management of the Department of Energy's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility made the decision to restructure their EOPs using the post-Three Mile Island guidelines and incorporating human factors principles into the process. To further enhance the procedures, ATR Management wanted to ensure the lessons learned by the NRC while inspecting commercial reactor facilities' EOPs were incorporated. To meet these goals a multi-disciplinary team was assembled and tasked with the development of the writers' guide and procedures. The process of developing the writer's guide included a needs assessment, gathering procedure writing information, deciding on the EOPs' format, writing the writers' guide, and then revising the writers' guide based on the outcome of the verification and validation of the procedures and operator feedback. The resulting EOP writers' guide contains state-of-the-art human factors guidance for writing procedures. 12 ref., 1 fig.

  17. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizations of subsurface flow problems.

  18. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizationsmore » of subsurface flow problems.« less

  19. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  20. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1980-02-01

    Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

  1. A Tryout of Procedures for Developing a Technical Lexicon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronnell, Bruce; Rhode, Mary

    The Model 3 communication skills lexicon consists of three lists of words developed by the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) for use in communication skills instruction in K-6. This report documents the procedures used for developing a technical lexicon for subject areas in kindergarten and the elementary grades. To develop a music lexicon,…

  2. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.C.; Tyson, D.; Ziaoping, Qiu, Lessa, A.

    1990-04-01

    The overall objective is to determine the basic principles and mechanisms which underlie a number of selective oil agglomeration processes that have been proposed for beneficiating fine-size coal. An understanding of the basic principles and mechanisms will greatly facilitate technical development and application of such processes to various types of coal. 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  4. Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Implementing Procedures Document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    This implementing procedures document (IPD) was prepared for use in implementing tasks under the standard review plan update and development program (SRP-UDP). The IPD provides comprehensive guidance and detailed procedures for SRP-UDP tasks. The IPD is mandatory for contractors performing work for the SRP-UDP. It is guidance for the staff. At the completion of the SRP-UDP, the IPD will be revised (to remove the UDP aspects) and will replace NRR Office Letter No. 800 as long-term maintenance procedures.

  5. Agglomeration multigrid for viscous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    Agglomeration multigrid, which has been demonstrated as an efficient and automatic technique for the solution of the Euler equations on unstructured meshes, is extended to viscous turbulent flows. For diffusion terms, coarse grid discretizations are not possible, and more accurate grid transfer operators are required as well. A Galerkin coarse grid operator construction and an implicit prolongation operator are proposed. Their suitability is evaluated by examining their effect on the solution of Laplace's equation. The resulting strategy is employed to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for aerodynamic flows. Convergence rates comparable to those obtained by a previously developed non-nested mesh multigrid approach are demonstrated, and suggestions for further improvements are given.

  6. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Developing Departmental Safety Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfrew, Malcolm M., Ed.; Palladino, George F.

    1980-01-01

    Presents rationale and guidelines for development of Safety Standard Operating Procedures (Safety SOP) specific for local conditions. Includes an outline of a Safety SOP developed for a department primarily focused on undergraduate education with a wide variety of expertise from common laborer to PhD with 20 years experience. (Author/JN)

  7. Product assurance policies and procedures for flight dynamics software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Sandra; Jordan, Leon; Decker, William; Page, Gerald; Mcgarry, Frank E.; Valett, Jon

    1987-01-01

    The product assurance policies and procedures necessary to support flight dynamics software development projects for Goddard Space Flight Center are presented. The quality assurance and configuration management methods and tools for each phase of the software development life cycles are described, from requirements analysis through acceptance testing; maintenance and operation are not addressed.

  8. Library Collections Development and Maintenance Policies and Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubesing, Richard

    This manual for the College of the Southwest (New Mexico) library delineates collection development policies and procedures for library and teaching faculty. The first section deals with collection development and maintenance responsibilities: knowledge of the collection; knowledge of college and course needs; library materials budget allocations;…

  9. Impact assessment procedures for sustainable development: A complexity theory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nooteboom, Sibout

    2007-10-15

    The author assumes that effective Impact Assessment procedures should somehow contribute to sustainable development. There is no widely agreed framework for evaluating such effectiveness. The author suggests that complexity theories may offer criteria. The relevant question is 'do Impact Assessment Procedures contribute to the 'requisite variety' of a social system for it to deal with changing circumstances?' Requisite variety theoretically relates to the capability of a system to deal with changes in its environment. The author reconstructs how thinking about achieving sustainable development has developed in a sequence of discourses in The Netherlands since the 1970s. Each new discourse built on the previous ones, and is supposed to have added to 'requisite variety'. The author asserts that Impact Assessment procedures may be a necessary component in such sequences and derives possible criteria for effectiveness.

  10. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-01

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  11. Effect of particle agglomeration in nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Bruinink, Arie; Wang, Jing; Wick, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The emission of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into the environment in increasing quantity and variety raises a general concern regarding potential effects on human health. Compared with soluble substances, ENPs exhibit additional dimensions of complexity, that is, they exist not only in various sizes, shapes and chemical compositions but also in different degrees of agglomeration. The effect of the latter is the topic of this review in which we explore and discuss the role of agglomeration on toxicity, including the fate of nanomaterials after their release and the biological effects they may induce. In-depth investigations of the effect of ENP agglomeration on human health are still rare, but it may be stated that outside the body ENP agglomeration greatly reduces human exposure. After uptake, agglomeration of ENPs reduces translocation across primary barriers such as lungs, skin or the gastrointestinal tract, preventing exposure of "secondary" organs. In analogy, also cellular ENP uptake and intracellular distribution are affected by agglomeration. However, agglomeration may represent a risk factor if it occurs after translocation across the primary barriers, and ENPs are able to accumulate within the tissue and thus reduce clearance efficiency. PMID:25618546

  12. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  13. Percolative fragmentation and spontaneous agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.; Davis, K.

    1999-03-01

    Captive particle imaging experiments were performed on over 200 coal and char particles in the pulverized size range from four coals of various rank at oxygen concentration from 3--19 mol% and at gas temperatures of about 1250 K. Despite wide variations in single-particle behavior, the data set reveals two clear trends that provide new information on the nature of char combustion. First, the low-rank coal chars are observed to maintain their high reactivity through the late stages of combustion, thus avoiding the near-extinction events and long burnout tails observed for bituminous coal chars. Secondly, percolative fragmentation in the late stages of combustion is a rare event under these conditions. Some particles reach a percolation threshold rate in combustion, but typically undergo spontaneous agglomeration rather than liberation of the incipient fragments. It is concluded that percolative fragmentation behavior in the pulverized size range is determined not only by solid-phase connectivity, but also by a real competition between disruptive and cohesive forces present at the time of formation of the colloidal-sized incipient fragments.

  14. Task analysis method for procedural training curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Riggle, Jakeb D; Wadman, Michael C; McCrory, Bernadette; Lowndes, Bethany R; Heald, Elizabeth A; Carstens, Patricia K; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2014-06-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) is an important medical tool used in critical care and emergent situations. Integral to proper care in many circumstances, insertion of a CVC introduces the risk of central line-associated blood stream infections and mechanical adverse events; proper training is important for safe CVC insertion. Cognitive task analysis (CTA) methods have been successfully implemented in the medical field to improve the training of postgraduate medical trainees, but can be very time-consuming to complete and require a significant time commitment from many subject matter experts (SMEs). Many medical procedures such as CVC insertion are linear processes with well-documented procedural steps. These linear procedures may not require a traditional CTA to gather the information necessary to create a training curriculum. Accordingly, a novel, streamlined CTA method designed primarily to collect cognitive cues for linear procedures was developed to be used by medical professionals with minimal CTA training. This new CTA methodology required fewer trained personnel, fewer interview sessions, and less time commitment from SMEs than a traditional CTA. Based on this study, a streamlined CTA methodology can be used to efficiently gather cognitive information on linear medical procedures for the creation of resident training curricula and procedural skills assessments. PMID:24366759

  15. 32 CFR 202.7 - Developing operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... announcements, (c) Attendance requirements of members at meetings, (d) Development, approval and distribution... for the next meeting and issues to be addressed, and (n) Methods for resolving disputes. ... out. Areas that should be addressed in the procedures include: (a) Clearly defined goals...

  16. Development of Language Analysis Procedures With Application to Automatic Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Carol Elizabeth

    Specifically, the problem which this research addresses is the development of procedures which define the relational attributes to words in English text. These relational attributes are considered an essential part of any good index and therefore an antecedent to the production of good indexes by automated means. The organization of this…

  17. Agglomeration of microparticles in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Konopka, Uwe; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2010-11-15

    Agglomeration of highly charged microparticles was observed and studied in complex plasma experiments carried out in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The agglomeration was caused by strong waves triggered in a particle cloud by decreasing neutral gas pressure. Using a high-speed camera during this unstable regime, it was possible to resolve the motion of individual microparticles and to show that the relative velocities of some particles were sufficiently high to overcome the mutual Coulomb repulsion and hence to result in agglomeration. After stabilizing the cloud again through the increase of the pressure, we were able to observe the aggregates directly with a long-distance microscope. We show that the agglomeration rate deduced from our experiments is in good agreement with theoretical estimates. In addition, we briefly discuss the mechanisms that can provide binding of highly charged microparticles in a plasma.

  18. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which led to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. Survey of industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors is being conducted to determine the occurrence of bed agglomeration and the circumstances under which agglomeration took place. This task should be finished by the end of February. Samples of bed material, agglomerate material, and boiler deposits are being requested from boiler operators as part of the survey. Once received, these sample will be analyzed to determine chemical and mineralogic composition. The bulk chemical determination will be performed using x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission (ICP). Mineralogy will be detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical and mineral reactions will be determined by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and electron microprobe.

  19. Advances in food powder agglomeration engineering.

    PubMed

    Cuq, B; Gaiani, C; Turchiuli, C; Galet, L; Scher, J; Jeantet, R; Mandato, S; Petit, J; Murrieta-Pazos, I; Barkouti, A; Schuck, P; Rondet, E; Delalonde, M; Dumoulin, E; Delaplace, G; Ruiz, T

    2013-01-01

    Food powders are used in everyday life in many ways and offer technological solutions to the problem of food production. The natural origin of food powders, diversity in their chemical composition, variability of the raw materials, heterogeneity of the native structures, and physicochemical reactivity under hydrothermal stresses contribute to the complexity in their behavior. Food powder agglomeration has recently been considered according to a multiscale approach, which is followed in the chapter layout: (i) at the particle scale, by a presentation of particle properties and surface reactivity in connection with the agglomeration mechanisms, (ii) at the mechanisms scale, by describing the structuration dynamics of agglomerates, (iii) at the process scale, by a presentation of agglomeration technologies and sensors and by studying the stress transmission mode in the powder bed, and finally (iv) by an integration of the acquired knowledge, thanks to a dimensional analysis carried out at each scale. PMID:23522795

  20. The development of a hospital pharmacy policy and procedure manual.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S K

    1980-01-01

    The value of a complete and comprehensive departmental manual for a hospital pharmacy is well recognized as an important factor in establishing written acceptable policies and procedures by which the department operates. Other purposes include its use as an orientation guide for new employees and its fulfillment as a guide to the department's scope of service for hospital accreditation. The Department of Pharmacy at Sunnybrook Medical Centre formed a Policy and Procedure Committee with members representing each departmental division to develop such a manual. This paper outlines the establishment of the format, organization and writing style of the manual and the actual writing and review of chapters. PMID:10249577

  1. Proceedings, volume 17, Institute for Briquetting and Agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Papers presented discussed pelletizing of coal fines, graphite manufacture, compacting of coal, use of computers in agglomeration, HYL-III process, briquetting of iron ore fines, RECLAFORM, INMETCO process, binders for agglomeration, acoustic agglomeration, pelletizing of lime-fly ash mixtures, extrusion of aluminas for catalysts, and agglomeration of wastes. Seven papers have been abstracted separately.

  2. Handling Qualities Influences on Civil Tiltrotor Terminal Operating Procedure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Simmons, Rickey C.; Tucker, George E.; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The potential for tiltrotor aircraft as civil transports has been well recognized. Realization of that potential requires development of operating procedures tailored to take advantage of the tiltrotor's capabilities, including thrust vectoring independent of body pitch attitude and good low-speed control. While the tiltrotor shares flight characteristics with both fixed wing airplanes and helicopters, it must convert between those flight modes, typically within the context of precise terminal operations. A series of piloted simulation experiments has been conducted on the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to investigate the influence of tiltrotor cockpit design features on developing certification and operating criteria for civil tiltrotor transports. Handling qualities evaluations have shaped cockpit design guidelines and operating procedure development for a civil tiltrotor. In particular, four topics demonstrate the interplay of handling qualities and operations profile in the development of terminal operating procedures and cockpit or control equipment for a civil tiltrotor: conversion (airplane to helicopter mode), final approach path angle, operating profile speeds and speed changes (particularly under instrument conditions), and one engine inoperative operational considerations.

  3. The development of an efficient turbomachinery CFD analysis procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Matthew E.; Shimp, Nancy R.; Raw, Michael J.; Galpin, Paul F.; Raithby, George D.

    1989-07-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD code has been developed for application to the turbomachinery design process within liquid propulsion systems. Accuracy, robustness, efficiency, convenient grid generation, and user friendly integration into the turbomachinery analysis and design procedure have been emphasized. This paper documents the progress made to date including code description, grid generation and integration into the design process. Three test cases are presented: a turbine cascade, a pump impeller, and a volute.

  4. Agglomeration multigrid methods with implicit Runge-Kutta smoothers applied to aerodynamic simulations on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    For unstructured finite volume methods an agglomeration multigrid with an implicit multistage Runge-Kutta method as a smoother is developed for solving the compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The implicit Runge-Kutta method is interpreted as a preconditioned explicit Runge-Kutta method. The construction of the preconditioner is based on an approximate derivative. The linear systems are solved approximately with a symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. To significantly improve this solution method grid anisotropy is treated within the Gauss-Seidel iteration in such a way that the strong couplings in the linear system are resolved by tridiagonal systems constructed along these directions of strong coupling. The agglomeration strategy is adapted to this procedure by taking into account exactly these anisotropies in such a way that a directional coarsening is applied along these directions of strong coupling. Turbulence effects are included by a Spalart-Allmaras model, and the additional transport-type equation is approximately solved in a loosely coupled manner with the same method. For two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical examples and a variety of differently generated meshes we show the wide range of applicability of the solution method. Finally, we exploit the GMRES method to determine approximate spectral information of the linearized RANS equations. This approximate spectral information is used to discuss and compare characteristics of multistage Runge-Kutta methods.

  5. From innovation to standard practice: Developing and disseminating behavioral procedures

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Stan C.; Bellamy, G. Thomas

    1982-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-stage continuum for discussing the development and dissemination of behavioral technology. At the level of behavioral techniques, researchers need only establish a functional relationship between technologically defined intervention procedures and socially significant target behaviors. Dissemination is conducted for informational purposes only, and the purposes and details surrounding subsequent use of the technique are left to the discretion of the user. At the level of behavioral demonstration, a collection of socially acceptable intervention procedures is refined and standardized and must be shown to produce behavior changes across a number of subjects. Here dissemination is conducted, in large part, to generate support for provision of services. At the level of behavioral models, procedural descriptions must be useroriented. Additionally, model effects must be obtainable by agents not associated with their development and must compare favorably with other treatment or service alternatives. The purpose of dissemination at this level is to obtain adoptions and replications of the model. Details of development and dissemination of behavioral technology at each of these three levels are discussed. PMID:22478555

  6. Development and Applications of a Stage Stacking Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Sameer; Celestina, Mark L.; Adamczyk, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The preliminary design of multistage axial compressors in gas turbine engines is typically accomplished with mean-line methods. These methods, which rely on empirical correlations, estimate compressor performance well near the design point, but may become less reliable off-design. For land-based applications of gas turbine engines, off-design performance estimates are becoming increasingly important, as turbine plant operators desire peaking or load-following capabilities and hot-day operability. The current work develops a one-dimensional stage stacking procedure, including a newly defined blockage term, which is used to estimate the off-design performance and operability range of a 13-stage axial compressor used in a power generating gas turbine engine. The new blockage term is defined to give mathematical closure on static pressure, and values of blockage are shown to collapse to curves as a function of stage inlet flow coefficient and corrected shaft speed. In addition to these blockage curves, the stage stacking procedure utilizes stage characteristics of ideal work coefficient and adiabatic efficiency. These curves are constructed using flow information extracted from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of groups of stages within the compressor. Performance estimates resulting from the stage stacking procedure are shown to match the results of CFD simulations of the entire compressor to within 1.6% in overall total pressure ratio and within 0.3 points in overall adiabatic efficiency. Utility of the stage stacking procedure is demonstrated by estimation of the minimum corrected speed which allows stable operation of the compressor. Further utility of the stage stacking procedure is demonstrated with a bleed sensitivity study, which estimates a bleed schedule to expand the compressors operating range.

  7. Potential effects of environmental regulatory procedures on geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Beeland, G.V.; Boies, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    The potential effects of several types of applicable environmental regulatory procedures on geothermal development were assessed, and particular problem areas were identified. The possible impact of procedures adopted pursuant to the following Federal statutes were analyzed: Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Safe Drinking Water Act; and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. State regulations applicable, or potentially applicable, to geothermal facilities were also reviewed to determine: permit information requirements; pre-permit air or water quality monitoring requirements; effect of mandated time frames for permit approval; and potential for exemption of small facilities. The regulations of the following states were covered in the review: Alaska; Arizona; California; Colorado; Hawaii; Idaho; Montana; Nevada; New Mexico; Oregon; Utah; Washington; and Wyoming. (MHR)

  8. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system: Phase 2, Final report, May 1, 1983-July 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1987-09-15

    KRW Energy Systems Inc. is engaged in the development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed, gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally acceptable production of low- and medium-Btu fuel gas from a variety of fossilized, carbonaceous feedstocks for electrical power generation, substitute natural gas, chemical feedstocks, and industrial fuels. This report covers Phase II of the contract period (May 1, 1983 to July 31, 1984) and is a continuation of the work performed in 1983 and reported in the Phase I final report, FE-19122-30. Included is work performed in fiscal 1983 to 1984 on PDU testing, process analysis, cold flow scaleup facility, process and component engineering and design, and laboratory support studies.

  9. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system. Third quarter progress report FY-1984, April 1-June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-31

    The overall objective of the KRW coal gasification program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW pressurized, fluidized-bed, gasification system for the production of medium-Btu fuel gas for syngas, electrical power generation, chemical feedstocks, or industrial fuels and to obtain performance and scaleup data for the process and hardware. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) operation and maintenance of the process development unit (PDU); (2) modifications to the PDU; (3) cold flow scaleup facility; (4) advanced process design and analysis; and (5) laboratory support studies. For laboratory support studies, coal and/or char fines from Wyoming Sub C, Western Kentucky, Republic of South Africa (RSA), and Pittsburgh seam coals processed in the PDU were characterized for reactivity on a thermogravimetric analyzer. The average relative reactivity of the fines (-120 x +140 mesh) was found to be nearly the same as that for larger size distribution (18 x 60 mesh, -1.0 + 0.25 mm). This is consistent with the observations of studies reported in literature on carbon gasification reactions.

  10. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1982-10-21

    The overall objective of the Westinghouse coal gasification program is to demonstrate the viability of the Westinghouse pressurized, fluidized bed, gasification system for the production of medium-Btu fuel gas for syngas, electrical power generation, chemical feedstocks, or industrial fuels and to obtain performance and scaleup data for the process and hardware. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) operation and maintenance of the process development unit (PDU); (2) process analysis; (3) cold flow scaleup facility; (4) process and component engineering and design; and (5) laboratory support studies. Some of the highlights for this period are: TP-032-1, a single stage, oxygen-steam blown gasifier test was conducted in three operational phases from March 30, 1982 through May 2, 1982; TP-032-2 was conducted in two operational phases from May 20, 1982 through May 27, 1982; TP-032-1 and TP-032-2 successfully served as shakedown and demonstrations of the full cyclone cold wall; no visible deposits were found on the cold wall after processing highly fouling coals; samples of product gas produced during TP-032-1, were passed through four different scrubbing solutions and analyzed for 78 EPA primary organic pollutants, all of which were found to be below detection limits; TP-M004, a CO/sub 2/ tracer gas test, was initiated and completed; data analysis of test TP-M002-2 was completed and conclusions are summarized in this report; design, procurement and fabrication of the solids injection device were completed; laboratory studies involved gas-solids flow modeling and coal/ash behavior. 2 references, 11 figures, 39 tables.

  11. Development test procedure High Pressure Water Jet System

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-06-05

    Development testing will be performed on the water jet cleaning fixture to determine the most effective arrangement of water jet nozzles to remove contamination from the surfaces of canisters and other debris. The following debris may be stained with dye to simulate surface contaminates: Mark O, Mark I, and Mark II Fuel Storage Canisters (both stainless steel and aluminum), pipe of various size, (steel, stainless, carbon steel and aluminum). Carbon steel and stainless steel plate, channel, angle, I-beam and other surfaces, specifically based on the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) inventory and observations of debris within the basin. Test procedure for developmental testing of High Pressure Water Jet System.

  12. Reversible or not? Distinguishing agglomeration and aggregation at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Stanislav V; Tschulik, Kristina; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles are prone to clustering either via aggregation (irreversible) or agglomeration (reversible) processes. It is exceedingly difficult to distinguish the two via conventional techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), or electron microscopy imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) as such techniques only generally confirm the presence of large particle clusters. Herein we develop a joint approach to tackle the issue of distinguishing between nanoparticle aggregation vs agglomeration by characterizing a colloidal system of Ag NPs using DLS, NTA, SEM imaging and the electrochemical nanoimpacts technique. In contrast to the conventional techniques which all reveal the presence of large clusters of particles, electrochemical nanoimpacts provide information regarding individual nanoparticles in the solution phase and reveal the presence of small nanoparticles (<30 nm) even in high ionic strength (above 0.5 M KCl) and allow a more complete analysis. The detection of small nanoparticles in high ionic strength media evidence the clustering to be a reversible process. As a result it is concluded that agglomeration rather than irreversible aggregation takes place. This observation is of general importance for all colloids as it provides a feasible analysis technique for a wide range of systems with an ability to distinguish subtly different processes. PMID:26352558

  13. Nanoparticle agglomerates of fluticasone propionate in combination with albuterol sulfate as dry powder aerosols

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Pornputtapitak, Warangkana; Berkland, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Particle engineering strategies remain at the forefront of aerosol research for localized treatment of lung diseases and represent an alternative for systemic drug therapy. With the hastily growing popularity and complexity of inhalation therapy, there is a rising demand for tailor-made inhalable drug particles capable of affording the most proficient delivery to the lungs and the most advantageous therapeutic outcomes. To address this formulation demand, nanoparticle agglomeration was used to develop aerosols of the asthma therapeutics, fluticasone or albuterol. In addition, a combination aerosol was formed by drying agglomerates of fluticasone nanoparticles in the presence of albuterol in solution. Powders of the single drug nanoparticle agglomerates or of the combined therapeutics possessed desirable aerodynamic properties for inhalation. Powders were efficiently aerosolized (~75% deposition determined by cascade impaction) with high fine particle fraction and rapid dissolution. Nanoparticle agglomeration offers a unique approach to obtain high performance aerosols from combinations of asthma therapeutics. PMID:21964203

  14. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhimin

    In coal preparation plant circuits, fine coal particles are aggregated either by oil agglomeration or by flocculation. In a new hydrophobic agglomeration process, recently developed hydrophobic latices are utilized. While the selectivity of such aggregation processes determines the beneficiation results, the degree of aggregation has a strong effect on fine coal filtration. The aim of this research was to study the fundamentals and analyze the common grounds for these processes, including the potential effect of the coal surface properties. The selective flocculation tests, in which three types of coal, which differed widely in surface wettability, and three additives (hydrophobic latices, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte) were utilized, showed that coal wettability plays a very important role in selective flocculation. The abstraction of a hydrophobic latex on coal and silica revealed that the latex had a much higher affinity towards hydrophobic coal than to hydrophilic mineral matter. As a result, the UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated only hydrophobic coal particles while the polyelectrolyte (PAM) flocculated all the tested coal samples and minerals, showing no selectivity in the fine coal beneficiation. The oil agglomeration was tested using kerosene emulsified with various surfactants (e.g. cationic, anionic and non-ionic). Surfactants enhance not only oil emulsification, hence reducing oil consumption (down to 0.25--0.5%), but also entirely change the electrokinetic properties of the droplets and affect the interaction energy between oil droplets and coal particles. Consequently, the results found in the course of the experimental work strongly indicate that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. Oil agglomeration of the Ford-4 ultrafine coal showed that even at extremely low oil consumption (0.25 to 0.5%), a clean coal product with an ash content around 5% at over

  15. Integrated site investigation procedure for environment protection toward sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, R. C.; Roslan, R.; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.

    2013-06-01

    The spatial configuration of cities and their relationship to the urban environment has recently been the subject of empirical, theoretical and policy research. An awareness of environmental issues can assist policy makers, planners, developers and others to recognize the constraints imposed upon development due the physical environment especially in areas, which are susceptible to erosion, flooding and landslide. This paper highlights the key requirements for considering an assessment to protect our urban environment by incorporating three main factor i.e. policy practice, planning process and engineering investigation. Base on this three main factor the framework of the assessment is carried out. The assessment can be divided into three different categories, namely as investigation for planning, investigation for urban development and specialized investigation and mitigation. The minimum requirements for the planning and urban development investigation are listed. These guidelines suggest the level at which the various types of investigation should be carried out as well as the range of application, the scope and methodology to be used for different investigation. It is hoped that this procedure will provide guidance in the establishment and protection of urban ecosystem toward sustainable development.

  16. Development of an Expert System for Representing Procedural Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgeff, Michael P.; Lansky, Amy L.

    1985-01-01

    A high level of automation is of paramount importance in most space operations. It is critical for unmanned missions and greatly increases the effectiveness of manned missions. However, although many functions can be automated by using advanced engineering techniques, others require complex reasoning, sensing, and manipulatory capabilities that go beyond this technology. Automation of fault diagnosis and malfunction handling is a case in point. The military have long been interested in this problem, and have developed automatic test equipment to aid in the maintenance of complex military hardware. These systems are all based on conventional software and engineering techniques. However, the effectiveness of such test equipment is severely limited. The equipment is inflexible and unresponsive to the skill level of the technicians using it. The diagnostic procedures cannot be matched to the exigencies of the current situation nor can they cope with reconfiguration or modification of the items under test. The diagnosis cannot be guided by useful advice from technicians and, when a fault cannot be isolated, no explanation is given as to the cause of failure. Because these systems perform a prescribed sequence of tests, they cannot utilize knowledge of a particular situation to focus attention on more likely trouble spots. Consequently, real-time performance is highly unsatisfactory. Furthermore, the cost of developing test software is substantial and time to maturation is excessive. Significant advances in artificial intelligence (AI) have recently led to the development of powerful and flexible reasoning systems, known as expert or knowledge-based systems. We have devised a powerful and theoretically sound scheme for representing and reasoning about procedural knowledge.

  17. Development of a Composite Tailoring Procedure for Airplane Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2000-01-01

    The quest for finding optimum solutions to engineering problems has existed for a long time. In modern times, the development of optimization as a branch of applied mathematics is regarded to have originated in the works of Newton, Bernoulli and Euler. Venkayya has presented a historical perspective on optimization in [1]. The term 'optimization' is defined by Ashley [2] as a procedure "...which attempts to choose the variables in a design process so as formally to achieve the best value of some performance index while not violating any of the associated conditions or constraints". Ashley presented an extensive review of practical applications of optimization in the aeronautical field till about 1980 [2]. It was noted that there existed an enormous amount of published literature in the field of optimization, but its practical applications in industry were very limited. Over the past 15 years, though, optimization has been widely applied to address practical problems in aerospace design [3-5]. The design of high performance aerospace systems is a complex task. It involves the integration of several disciplines such as aerodynamics, structural analysis, dynamics, and aeroelasticity. The problem involves multiple objectives and constraints pertaining to the design criteria associated with each of these disciplines. Many important trade-offs exist between the parameters involved which are used to define the different disciplines. Therefore, the development of multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) techniques, in which different disciplines and design parameters are coupled into a closed loop numerical procedure, seems appropriate to address such a complex problem. The importance of MDO in successful design of aerospace systems has been long recognized. Recent developments in this field have been surveyed by Sobieszczanski-Sobieski and Haftka [6].

  18. Centrifugal air-assisted melt agglomeration for fast-release "granulet" design.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin Wui; Musa, Nafisah

    2012-07-01

    Conventional melt pelletization and granulation processes produce round and dense, and irregularly shaped but porous agglomerates respectively. This study aimed to design centrifugal air-assisted melt agglomeration technology for manufacture of spherical and yet porous "granulets" for ease of downstream manufacturing and enhancing drug release. A bladeless agglomerator, which utilized shear-free air stream to mass the powder mixture of lactose filler, polyethylene glycol binder and poorly water-soluble tolbutamide drug into "granulets", was developed. The inclination angle and number of vane, air-impermeable surface area of air guide, processing temperature, binder content and molecular weight were investigated with reference to "granulet" size, shape, texture and drug release properties. Unlike fluid-bed melt agglomeration with vertical processing air flow, the air stream in the present technology moved centrifugally to roll the processing mass into spherical but porous "granulets" with a drug release propensity higher than physical powder mixture, unprocessed drug and dense pellets prepared using high shear mixer. The fast-release attribute of "granulets" was ascribed to porous matrix formed with a high level of polyethylene glycol as solubilizer. The agglomeration and drug release outcomes of centrifugal air-assisted technology are unmet by the existing high shear and fluid-bed melt agglomeration techniques. PMID:22531845

  19. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  20. Development of AMS procedure for measurement of 93Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenting; Collon, Philippe; Kashiv, Yoav; Bowers, Matthew; Robertson, Daniel; Schmitt, Christopher

    2011-10-01

    The procedure for measuring 93Zr (t1/2 = 1.5 Ma) by AMS is currently being developed at the Nuclear Science Lab at the University of Notre Dame and we report on first experiments performed in this direction. AMS detection of 93Zr can potentially be applied to address astrophysical and environmental issues: (1) the measurement of the 92Zr(n,γ)93Zr reaction cross-section at nucleosynthesis s-process relevant temperatures, (2) the search for potential live 93Zr from a supernova in deep sea sediments, (3) hydrological and radioactive waste tracing. The measurement of 93Zr requires adequate separation from its stable isobar 93Nb. We are currently working on optimizing this separation by using the GasFilled Magnet technique with additional multiple dE measurements in a focal plane ionization chamber.

  1. Development of test procedures for hybrid/electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. F.

    1992-07-01

    This report is concerned with the development of procedures for testing of hybrid/electric vehicles to determine their energy consumption and emissions characteristics. Special emphasis is given to hybrid vehicles, which can be operated above some minimum battery state-of-charge in an all-electric mode for all types of driving (city and highway). When the all-electric range of these vehicles is exceeded, the vehicles are operated in the hybrid mode, in which an engine/generator is turned on to generate electricity on-board the vehicle. Key issues in testing hybrid vehicles are identified and discussed. These issues include the test cycles to be used, the instrumentation required, the effect of battery state-of-charge and control strategy in the hybrid mode on the need for repeated test cycles, and the data to be collected and how that data from repeated cycles is interpreted to determine the vehicle energy consumption and emissions characteristics.

  2. Development of test procedures for hybrid/electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. F.

    1992-07-01

    The development of procedures for testing of hybrid/electric vehicles to determine their energy consumption and emissions characteristics is addressed. Special emphasis is given to hybrid vehicles, which can be operated above some minimum battery state-of-charge in an all-electric mode for all types of driving (city and highway). When the all-electric range of these vehicles is exceeded, the vehicles are operated in the hybrid mode, in which an engine/generator is turned on to generate electricity on-board the vehicle. Key issues in testing hybrid vehicles are identified and discussed. These issues include the test cycles to be used, the instrumentation required, the effect of battery state-of-charge and control strategy in the hybrid mode on the need for repeated test cycles, and the data to be collected and how that data from repeated cycles is interpreted to determine the vehicle energy consumption and emissions characteristics.

  3. Development of a simplified procedure for cyclic structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Development was extended of a simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYMP) for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects can be calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress, or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials, and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite-element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  4. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Nigel; OQuinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI's patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  5. Analysis of Urban Agglomeration and Its Meaning for Rural People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegelman, Robert G.

    Agglomeration--the clustering of people, businesses, or structures within an area--is investigated for two purposes: (1) defining the nature of agglomeration and erecting a suitable agglomeration theory, and (2) suggesting further research. These two objectives are seen as being vital to help improve the economic well-being of rural people by…

  6. Method for providing improved solid fuels from agglomerated subbituminous coal

    DOEpatents

    Janiak, Jerzy S.; Turak, Ali A.; Pawlak, Wanda; Ignasiak, Boleslaw L.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for separating agglomerated subbituminous coal and the heavy bridging liquid used to form the agglomerates. The separation is performed by contacting the agglomerates with inert gas or steam at a temperature in the range of 250.degree. to 350.degree. C. at substantially atmospheric pressure.

  7. Effect of temperature on wet agglomeration of crystals

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam; Yari, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): This study dealt with the wet agglomeration process in which a small quantity of binder liquid was added into a suspension of crystals, directly in the stirring vessel where the crystallization took place. The purpose of this investigation was evaluation of the effect of temperature on the agglomeration process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of the formation of the agglomerates. Materials and Methods: Carbamazepine was used as a model drug and water/ethanol and isopropyl acetate were used as crystallization system and binder liquid, respectively. The agglomeration of crystals was carried out at various temperatures and the agglomerates were characterized in terms of size, morphology, density and mechanical strength. Results: Evaluation of the agglomerates along the course of agglomeration shows that the properties of the particles change gradually but substantially. Higher temperature of the system during agglomeration process favors the formation of more regular agglomerates with mechanically stronger and denser structure; this can be explained by the promotion effect of temperature on the agglomeration process. Conclusion: With optimized wet agglomeration temperature, spherical, dense, and strong agglomerates can be obtained. PMID:24967063

  8. Development of a simplified procedure for thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porowski, J. S.; Badlani, M.; Kasrale, B.; Odonnell, W. J.; Peterson, D.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical design procedure for predicting thrust chamber life considering cyclically induced thinning and bulging of the hot gas wall is developed. The hot gas wall, composed of ligaments connecting adjacent cooling channel ribs and separating the coolant flow from the combustion gas, is subjected to pressure loading and severe thermal cycling. Thermal transients during start up and shut down cause plastic straining through the ligaments. The primary bending stress superimposed on the alternate in-plane cyclic straining causes incremental bulging of the ligaments during each firing cycle. This basic mechanism of plastic ratcheting is analyzed and a method developed for determining ligament deformation and strain. The method uses a yield surface for combined bending and membrane loading to determine the incremental permanent deflection and pregressive thinning near the center of the ligaments which cause the geometry of the ligaments to change as the incremental strains accumulate. Fatigue and tensile instability are affected by these local geometry changes. Both are analyzed and a failure criterion developed.

  9. Involving service users in trials: developing a standard operating procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many funding bodies require researchers to actively involve service users in research to improve relevance, accountability and quality. Current guidance to researchers mainly discusses general principles. Formal guidance about how to involve service users operationally in the conduct of trials is lacking. We aimed to develop a standard operating procedure (SOP) to support researchers to involve service users in trials and rigorous studies. Methods Researchers with experience of involving service users and service users who were contributing to trials collaborated with the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health, a registered clinical trials unit, to develop the SOP. Drafts were prepared in a Task and Finish Group, reviewed by all co-authors and amendments made. Results We articulated core principles, which defined equality of service users with all other research team members and collaborative processes underpinning the SOP, plus guidance on how to achieve these. We developed a framework for involving service users in research that defined minimum levels of collaboration plus additional consultation and decision-making opportunities. We recommended service users be involved throughout the life of a trial, including planning and development, data collection, analysis and dissemination, and listed tasks for collaboration. We listed people responsible for involving service users in studies and promoting an inclusive culture. We advocate actively involving service users as early as possible in the research process, with a minimum of two on all formal trial groups and committees. We propose that researchers protect at least 1% of their total research budget as a minimum resource to involve service users and allow enough time to facilitate active involvement. Conclusions This SOP provides guidance to researchers to involve service users successfully in developing and conducting clinical trials and creating a culture of actively involving service

  10. Modeling Agglomeration of Dust Particles in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Land, Victor; Ma Qianyu; Perry, Jonathan D.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2011-11-29

    The charge on an aggregate immersed in a plasma environment distributes itself over the aggregate's surface; this can be approximated theoretically by assuming a multipole distribution. The dipole-dipole (or higher order) charge interactions between fractal aggregates lead to rotations of the grains as they interact. Other properties of the dust grains also influence the agglomeration process, such as the monomer shape (spherical or ellipsoidal) or the presence of magnetic material. Finally, the plasma and grain properties also determine the morphology of the resultant aggregates. Porous and fluffy aggregates are more strongly coupled to the gas, leading to reduced collisional velocities, and greater collisional cross sections. These factors in turn can determine the growth rate of the aggregates and evolution of the dust cloud. This paper gives an overview of the numerical and experimental methods used to study dust agglomeration at CASPER and highlights some recent results.

  11. Compression behavior of porous dust agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Speith, R.; Kley, W.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The early planetesimal growth proceeds through a sequence of sticking collisions of dust agglomerates. Very uncertain is still the relative velocity regime in which growth rather than destruction can take place. The outcome of a collision depends on the bulk properties of the porous dust agglomerates. Aims: Continuum models of dust agglomerates require a set of material parameters that are often difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. Here, we aim at determining those parameters from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our goal is to improve on the existing model that describe the interaction of individual monomers. Methods: We use a molecular dynamics approach featuring a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. The model includes normal forces, rolling, twisting and sliding between the dust grains. We present a new treatment of wall-particle interaction that allows us to perform customized simulations that directly correspond to laboratory experiments. Results: We find that the existing interaction model by Dominik & Tielens leads to a too soft compressive strength behavior for uni- and omni-directional compression. Upon making the rolling and sliding coefficients stiffer we find excellent agreement in both cases. Additionally, we find that the compressive strength curve depends on the velocity with which the sample is compressed. Conclusions: The modified interaction strengths between two individual dust grains will lead to a different behavior of the whole dust agglomerate. This will influences the sticking probabilities and hence the growth of planetesimals. The new parameter set might possibly lead to an enhanced sticking as more energy can be stored in the system before breakup.

  12. Agglomeration and Sedimentation of MWCNTS in Chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yu. S.; Kolesnikova, A. A.; Grekhov, A. M.

    The kinetics of agglomeration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in chloroform has been studied by the methods of optical spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. With the use of the models of the diffusion of cylindrical particles, the sizes of particles obtained by this method can be recalculated to the DLS data and the concentration at which the dispersion of individual МWCNTs occurs can be determined.

  13. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1995-01-01

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 mm) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. It is generally recognized that surface-based separation processes such as froth flotation or selective agglomeration offer considerable potential for such applications but there remain many problems in obtaining the required selectivity with acceptable recovery of combustible matter. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive. We are investigating the use of a hybrid process - micro-agglomerate flotation - which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30-50 mm in size) rather than individual coal particles (1-10 mm) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale.

  14. On the development of a new fracture toughness procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, M.; Provan, J. W.

    1989-05-01

    The present ASTM test procedure for plane strain fracture toughness is time consuming, expensive, includes specimen thickness requirements, and provides no assurance of a valid K(sub IC). An attempt to circumvent the thickness limitations and to develop a simple, inexpensive method to determine plane strain fracture toughness is reported. A novel disc-shaped specimen geometry was investigated for the determination of the plane strain fracture toughness of metallic materials. The specimen has an axisymmetric notch on its upper face, is clamped on its periphery and is uniformly and perpendicularly loaded around the notch. The frozen stress photoelasticity method was applied to Araldite specimens with fatigue precracked notches to determine the stress intensity factors and the fracture mode. One configuration was retained and using the crack profile from the test, a finite element study was performed to determine the compliance of the specimen geometry. Finally, the fracture toughness of aluminium Al7075-T651 was determined by applying the critical load obtained from rupture tests.

  15. Development of an efficient Procedure for Resist Wall Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Shouhei; Kumasaki, Saori; Higuchi, Sayoko; Kirihata, Kuniaki; Inoue, Yasue; Fujie, Miho; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    The Resist Wall space experiment aims to examine the role of the cortical microtubule-plasma membrane-cell wall continuum in plant resistance to the gravitational force, thereby clarifying the mechanism of gravity resistance. For this purpose, we will cultivate Arabidopsis mutants defective in organization of cortical microtubules (tua6 ) or synthesis of membrane sterols (hmg1 ) as well as the wild type under microgravity and 1 g conditions in the European Modular Cultivation System on the International Space Station up to reproductive stage, and compare phenotypes on growth and development. We will also analyze cell wall properties and gene expression levels using collected materials. However, the amounts of materials collected will be severely limited, and we should develop an efficient procedure for this space experiment. In the present study, we examined the possibility of analyzing various parameters successively using the identical material. On orbit, plant materials will be fixed with RNAlater solution, kept at 4° C for several days and then frozen in a freezer at -20° C. We first examined whether the cell wall extensibility of inflorescence stems can be measured after RNAlater fixation. The gradient of the cell wall extensibility along inflorescence stems was detected in RNAlater-fixed materials as in methanol-killed ones. The sufficient amounts of RNA to analyze the gene expression were also obtained from the materials after measurement of the cell wall extensibility. Furthermore, the levels and composition of cell wall polysaccharides could be measured using the materials after extraction of RNA. These results show that we can analyze the physical and chemical properties of the cell wall as well as gene expression using the identical material obtained in the space experiments.

  16. Preparation of sustained release matrix pellets by melt agglomeration in the fluidized bed: influence of formulation variables and modelling of agglomerate growth.

    PubMed

    Pauli-Bruns, Anette; Knop, Klaus; Lippold, Bernhard C

    2010-03-01

    The one-step preparation of sustained release matrix pellets, using a melting procedure in a fluidized bed apparatus, was tested in a 2(3) full factorial design of experiments, using microcrystalline wax as lipophilic binder, theophylline as model drug and talc as additional matrix forming agent. The three influence parameters were (A) size of binder particles, (B) fraction of theophylline in solid particles and (C) fraction of microcrystalline wax in formulation. The response variables were agglomerate size and size distribution, dissolution time, agglomerate crush resistance, sphericity, yield and porosity. Nearly spherical pellets comprising a smooth, closed surface could be obtained with the used method, exhibiting the hollow core typical for the immersion and layering mechanism. The reproducibility was very good concerning all responses. The size of agglomerates is proportional to the size of the binder particles, which serve as cores for pellet formation in the molten state in the fluidized bed. Additionally, the agglomerate size is influenced by the volume of the solid particles in relation to the binder particles, with more solid particles leading to larger agglomerates and vice versa. Dissolution times vary in a very wide range, resulting from the interplay between amount of drug in relation to the meltable matrix substance microcrystalline wax and the non-meltable matrix substance talc. The change of binder particle size does not lead to a structural change of the matrix; both dissolution times and porosity are not significantly altered. Agglomerate crush resistance is low due to the hollow core of the pellets. However, it is significantly increased if the volume fraction of microcrystalline wax in the matrix is high, which means that the matrix is mechanically better stabilized. A theoretical model has been established to quantitatively explain agglomerate growth and very good accordance of the full particle size distributions between predicted and

  17. CEL Working procedures for WRAP 2A formulation development test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchsherer, M.J.

    1994-08-02

    The WRAP 2A facility will encapsulate retrieved, stored, and newly generated contact-handled mixed low level waste (MLLW) into 55-500 gal cementitous forms. Standardized test procedures will be required to facilitate this process. Cementitous specimens will be prepared from simulated drum wastes and will be tested in the Chemical Engineering Laboratory using the laboratory operating/working procedures encorporated into this document.

  18. Chemical and physicochemial properties of submicron aerosol agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.; Ehrman, S.; Friedlander, S.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The formation of nanometer-sized aerosol particles in a premixed methane flame from both solid-phase aerosol precursors and gas-phase precursors was investigated. Techniques were developed to determine the distribution of the individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). To determine the distribution of chemical species both from particle to particle and within the particles on a nanometer scale, we used the analytical electron microscopy techniques of energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed distribution of individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size was linked to the material properties of the solid-phase precursors. For aerosol formed from gas-phase precursors by gas-to-particle conversion, the distribution of species on a manometer scale was found to correspond to the equilibrium phase distribution expected from equilibrium for the system at the flame temperatures.

  19. Combination Chemotherapeutic Dry Powder Aerosols via Controlled Nanoparticle Agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop an aerosol system for efficient local lung delivery of chemotherapeutics where nanotechnology holds tremendous potential for developing more valuable cancer therapies. Concurrently, aerosolized chemotherapy is generating interest as a means to treat certain types of lung cancer more effectively with less systemic exposure to the compound. Methods Nanoparticles of the potent anticancer drug, paclitaxel, were controllably assembled to form low density microparticles directly after preparation of the nanoparticle suspension. The amino acid, L-leucine, was used as a colloid destabilizer to drive the assembly of paclitaxel nanoparticles. A combination chemotherapy aerosol was formed by assembling the paclitaxel nanoparticles in the presence of cisplatin in solution. Results Freeze-dried powders of the combination chemotherapy possessed desirable aerodynamic properties for inhalation. In addition, the dissolution rates of dried nanoparticle agglomerate formulations (~60% to 66% after 8 h) were significantly faster than that of micronized paclitaxel powder as received (~18% after 8 h). Interestingly, the presence of the water soluble cisplatin accelerated the dissolution of paclitaxel. Conclusions Nanoparticle agglomerates of paclitaxel alone or in combination with cisplatin may serve as effective chemotherapeutic dry powder aerosols to enable regional treatment of certain lung cancers. PMID:19415471

  20. Modeling the yield strength of polymer nanocomposites based upon nanoparticle agglomeration and polymer-filler interphase.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some models for yield strength of polymer nanocomposites are developed to determine the properties of interphase and agglomerated nanoparticles. In this regard, "Bagg" parameter is defined assuming the agglomerates size (Dagg) and interphase properties. Additionally, the influences of "Bagg" and "Dagg" on the thickness and strength of interphase are evaluated by the developed equations. The agglomeration of nanoparticles causes contradictory effects on interphase properties in samples with different levels of interfacial bonding. Also, "Bagg" more depends to interphase properties compared to "Dagg". It is found that upon increasing in "Bagg" and "Dagg", the strength of interphase improves and reaches the most level at the highest values of "Bagg" and "Dagg". Therefore, controlling the levels of "Bagg" and "Dagg" is crucial to obtain a strong interphase. PMID:26802275

  1. Developing operating procedures for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, A.A.; Miner, G.L.; Grahn, K.F.; Pollard, C.G.

    1993-10-01

    This document is intended to assist persons who are developing operating and emergency procedures for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It provides 25 procedures that are considered to be relatively independent of the characteristics of a disposal facility site, the facility design, and operations at the facility. These generic procedures should form a good starting point for final procedures on their subjects for the disposal facility. In addition, this document provides 55 annotated outlines of other procedures that are common to disposal facilities. The annotated outlines are meant as checklists to assist the developer of new procedures.

  2. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1997-01-15

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {micro}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In this investigation a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation was studied. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles and to use froth flotation to separate these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units will be relatively large agglomerates (30--50 {micro}m in size) rather than fine coal particles (1--10 {micro}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is demonstrated in this study that the process is very sensitive to fluctuations in operating parameters. It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases as well as the agitation conditions in order to promote selectivity. Both kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors play a critical role in determining overall system response.

  3. Cation effects during aggregation and agglomeration of gibbsite particles under synthetic Bayer crystallisation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestidge, Clive A.; Ametov, Igor

    2000-02-01

    Rheological methods have been used to study the influence of the liquor cation (sodium versus potassium) on the time-dependent gibbsite particle interactions that occur during Bayer process crystallisation. The temperature, supersaturation and seeding levels investigated simulate those experienced in industrial crystallisers. Gibbsite agglomeration was shown to occur by reversible aggregation followed by irreversible cementation. These two sub-steps were individually characterised by careful choice of seed surface area and liquor supersaturation during batch crystallisation. At seed loading levels less than 10% w/w aggregates are rapidly cemented into agglomerates, this is more pronounced in sodium- than potassium-based liquors. These suspensions were Newtonian and the extent of agglomeration correlated with their viscosity. At seed loading levels greater than 20% w/w particle aggregation resulted in extensively time-dependent and non-Newtonian rheology. However, the aggregates did not undergo cementation into agglomerates and no irreversible size enlargement was evident. Yield stress development with time was used to probe the kinetics of aggregation and quantify the particle interaction behaviour. The rate and extent of the particle network formation is more pronounced in sodium rather than potassium-based liquors, supersaturation dependent, alkali concentration dependent, but only weakly temperature dependent. These findings are discussed with respect to the chemical and physical mechanisms of agglomeration in Bayer crystallisation and the role of cation.

  4. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steini Moura, Cassio; Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio; Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A.

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  5. Multifrequency scanning probe microscopy study of nanodiamond agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Vasudeva; Lippold, Stephen; Li, Qian; Strelcov, Evgheny; Okatan, Baris; Legum, Benjamin; Kalinin, Sergei; Clarion University Team; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Team

    Due to their rich surface chemistry and excellent mechanical properties and non-toxic nature, nanodiamond particles have found applications such as biomedicine, tribology and lubrication, targeted drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and surgical implants. Although single nanodiamond particles have diameters about 4-5nm, they tend to form agglomerates. While these agglomerates can be useful for some purposes, many applications of nanodiamonds require single particle, disaggregated nanodiamonds. This work is oriented towards studying forces and interactions that contribute to agglomeration in nanodiamonds. In this work, using multifrequency scanning probe microscopy techniques, we show that agglomerate sizes can vary between 50-100nm in raw nanodiamonds. Extremeties of particles and Interfaces between agglomerates show dissipative forces with scanning probe microscope tip, indicating agglomerates could act as points of increased adhesion, thus reducing lubricating efficiency when nanodiamonds are used as lubricant additives. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  6. Apparatus and method for compacting, degassing and carbonizing carbonaceous agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, F.W.

    1980-08-19

    An apparatus for compacting, degassing and carbonizing carbonaceous agglomerates is described. The apparatus comprises a rotary kiln having an agglomerate inlet means for introducing green agglomerates into the kiln near the inlet of the kiln and a heating medium inlet for introducing a heating medium comprising a finely divided solid into the kiln at a preselected location intermediate the inlet end of the kiln and the outlet end of the kiln to produce a mixture at a temperature above the carbonizing temperature of the agglomerates and a sieve positioned to receive the products from the rotary kiln and separate the heating medium and the compacted, degassed, carbonized agglomerate product. A method for producing compacted, degassed, carbonized carbonaceous agglomerates by the use of the apparatus is also disclosed.

  7. General concepts of hydrargillite Al(OH) 3, agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veesler, S.; Roure, S.; Boistelle, R.

    1994-02-01

    Agglomeration is an important stage of the Bayer process aiming at increasing the initial size of Al(OH) 3 particles. In the present work, we investigate the effects of supersaturation, seed charge and stirring rate on the agglomeration of hydrargillite crystallites, the size of which ranges from about 2 to 10 μm. The experiments are carried out in a batch crystallizer at constant temperature and caustic concentration. It is shown that the agglomeration rate increases with increasing seed charge, but rapidly reaches a plateau before decreasing when the seed charge is too high. On the other hand, agglomeration continuously decreases with increasing stirring rate, while it is favoured by increasing supersaturation. In the latter case, growth of the crystallites contributes to coarsening the agglomerates. We propose the general outlines of an agglomeration model taking collision and disagglomeration probabilities into account.

  8. Procedure developed for reporting fast-neutron exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossin, A. D.

    1968-01-01

    Procedure for reporting fast-neutron exposure involves determination of the spectrum shape and absolute magnitude, selection of an energy weighting for the neutrons, and definition of a unit for reporting exposure. Using this method, comparisons of irradiation data from different reactors will be free from errors resulting from differences between the spectra.

  9. DETERMINATION OF STOKES SHAPE FACTOR FOR SINGLE PARTICLES AND AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Schaible, Micah J.; Vienna, John D.

    2011-09-01

    The large octahedral crystals of spinel can precipitate from glass during the high-level waste vitrification process and potentially block the glass discharge riser of electrically heated ceramic melters. To help predict the settling behavior of spinel in the riser, the settling of single particles and agglomerates was studied in stagnant and transparent viscosity oils at room temperature with developed optical particle-dynamics-analyzer. Determined dimensions and terminal settling velocities of particles were used for calculation of their Stokes shape factors. Calculated shape factor for the glass beads was almost identical with the theoretical shape factor of 2/9 for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for single spinel crystal was about 7.6 % higher compare to the theoretically predicted value for octahedron. Stokes shape factor of irregularly shaped multi-particle agglomerates was lower than that of the glass beads and individual spinel crystals because of the higher surface drag caused by the larger surface area to volume ratio.

  10. Directional Agglomeration Multigrid Techniques for High-Reynolds Number Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    A preconditioned directional-implicit agglomeration algorithm is developed for solving two- and three-dimensional viscous flows on highly anisotropic unstructured meshes of mixed-element types. The multigrid smoother consists of a pre-conditioned point- or line-implicit solver which operates on lines constructed in the unstructured mesh using a weighted graph algorithm. Directional coarsening or agglomeration is achieved using a similar weighted graph algorithm. A tight coupling of the line construction and directional agglomeration algorithms enables the use of aggressive coarsening ratios in the multigrid algorithm, which in turn reduces the cost of a multigrid cycle. Convergence rates which are independent of the degree of grid stretching are demonstrated in both two and three dimensions. Further improvement of the three-dimensional convergence rates through a GMRES technique is also demonstrated.

  11. Directional Agglomeration Multigrid Techniques for High Reynolds Number Viscous Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A preconditioned directional-implicit agglomeration algorithm is developed for solving two- and three-dimensional viscous flows on highly anisotropic unstructured meshes of mixed-element types. The multigrid smoother consists of a pre-conditioned point- or line-implicit solver which operates on lines constructed in the unstructured mesh using a weighted graph algorithm. Directional coarsening or agglomeration is achieved using a similar weighted graph algorithm. A tight coupling of the line construction and directional agglomeration algorithms enables the use of aggressive coarsening ratios in the multigrid algorithm, which in turn reduces the cost of a multigrid cycle. Convergence rates which are independent of the degree of grid stretching are demonstrated in both two and three dimensions. Further improvement of the three-dimensional convergence rates through a GMRES technique is also demonstrated.

  12. Method for producing ceramic particles and agglomerates

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Gleiman, Seth S.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2001-01-01

    A method for generating spherical and irregularly shaped dense particles of ceramic oxides having a controlled particle size and particle size distribution. An aerosol containing precursor particles of oxide ceramics is directed into a plasma. As the particles flow through the hot zone of the plasma, they melt, collide, and join to form larger particles. If these larger particles remain in the hot zone, they continue melting and acquire a spherical shape that is retained after they exit the hot zone, cool down, and solidify. If they exit the hot zone before melting completely, their irregular shape persists and agglomerates are produced. The size and size distribution of the dense product particles can be controlled by adjusting several parameters, the most important in the case of powder precursors appears to be the density of powder in the aerosol stream that enters the plasma hot zone. This suggests that particle collision rate is responsible for determining ultimate size of the resulting sphere or agglomerate. Other parameters, particularly the gas flow rates and the microwave power, are also adjusted to control the particle size distribution.

  13. Method for recovering light hydrocarbons from coal agglomerates

    DOEpatents

    Huettenhain, Horst; Benz, August D.; Getsoian, John

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing light hydrocarbons, such as heptane, from coal agglomerates includes an enclosed chamber having a substantially horizontal perforate surface therein. The coal agglomerates are introduced into a water bath within the chamber. The agglomerates are advanced over the surface while steam is substantially continuously introduced through the surface into the water bath. Steam heats the water and causes volatilization of the light hydrocarbons, which may be collected from the overhead of the chamber. The resulting agglomerates may be collected at the opposite end from the surface and subjected to final draining processes prior to transportation or use.

  14. Agglomeration in a fluidized bed using multiple jet streams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Abbasian, J. ); Kothari, M.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the overall temperature distribution, temperature in the vicinity of the jets, and the rate of agglomeration in a fluidized bed containing multiple jet streams. Agglomeration of ash during coal gasification increases carbon utilization efficiency considerably. The agglomeration requires a fluidized-bed reactor with a specially designed distributor equipped with a jet to yield a hot zone confined within the bed. The rate of agglomeration depends upon the size and the intensity of the zone. This rate, and hence the unit capacity, could be increased by adding multiple jets to the distributor. The purpose of this study was to verify this phenomenon. The temperature distribution inside the agglomerating fluidized-bed reactor with a single jet was studied by Hariri et al. Various parameters were involved in agglomeration phenomena -- bed material, fluidization velocity, bed temperature, jet velocity, jet temperature, bed geometry, and distributor geometry. Controlled agglomerates were produced in the fluidized bed when a sloped gas distributor consisting of a central jet and a porous plate was used. Gas at temperatures above the melting temperature of a bed material was introduced into the jet and gas at temperatures below the softening temperature was introduced into the distributor. The rate of agglomerate formation was significantly influenced by an increase in either jet air or auxiliary (grid) air temperature. The extent of agglomeration also depended strongly upon the volume of the hot zone confined within the isotherms with temperatures higher than the melting point of the bed material.

  15. Agglomeration in a fluidized bed using multiple jet streams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Abbasian, J.; Kothari, M.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H.

    1992-12-31

    Tests were conducted to determine the overall temperature distribution, temperature in the vicinity of the jets, and the rate of agglomeration in a fluidized bed containing multiple jet streams. Agglomeration of ash during coal gasification increases carbon utilization efficiency considerably. The agglomeration requires a fluidized-bed reactor with a specially designed distributor equipped with a jet to yield a hot zone confined within the bed. The rate of agglomeration depends upon the size and the intensity of the zone. This rate, and hence the unit capacity, could be increased by adding multiple jets to the distributor. The purpose of this study was to verify this phenomenon. The temperature distribution inside the agglomerating fluidized-bed reactor with a single jet was studied by Hariri et al. Various parameters were involved in agglomeration phenomena -- bed material, fluidization velocity, bed temperature, jet velocity, jet temperature, bed geometry, and distributor geometry. Controlled agglomerates were produced in the fluidized bed when a sloped gas distributor consisting of a central jet and a porous plate was used. Gas at temperatures above the melting temperature of a bed material was introduced into the jet and gas at temperatures below the softening temperature was introduced into the distributor. The rate of agglomerate formation was significantly influenced by an increase in either jet air or auxiliary (grid) air temperature. The extent of agglomeration also depended strongly upon the volume of the hot zone confined within the isotherms with temperatures higher than the melting point of the bed material.

  16. Development of electrical test procedures for qualification of spacecraft against EID. Volume 2: Review and specification of test procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkenfeld, J. M.; Harlacher, B. L.; Mathews, D.

    1982-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program to develop system electrical test procedures for the qualification of spacecraft against damage produced by space-electron-induced discharges (EID) occurring on spacecraft dielectric outer surfaces is described. A review and critical evaluation of possible approaches to qualify spacecraft against space electron-induced discharges (EID) is presented. A variety of possible schemes to simulate EID electromagnetic effects produced in spacecraft was studied. These techniques form the principal element of a provisional, recommended set of test procedures for the EID qualification spacecraft. Significant gaps in our knowledge about EID which impact the final specification of an electrical test to qualify spacecraft against EID are also identified.

  17. Novel endovascular procedures and new developments in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W K

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair has evolved to become a viable mainstream treatment for aortic pathology in both acute and elective settings. As technology advanced, traditional anatomical barriers were progressively tackled using new devices and novel procedures, and there are now multiple options available to the vascular surgeon. In the abdominal aorta, advances in endovascular aneurysm repair have been in the treatment of hostile aortic necks using new sealing concepts and ancillary procedures, and in branch preservation using fenestrations and snorkels. Access challenges have been met with a percutaneous approach and low-profile devices, and standard protocols have improved mortality for ruptured aneurysms. In the thoracic aorta, more invasive hybrid procedures have given way gradually to branched endografts. Particular challenges to the anaesthetist include blood pressure control and the prevention of stroke and paraplegia. Current focus in the thoracic aorta is in treating aortic arch pathology and in optimal management of acute and chronic dissections. This review describes the latest trends in the endovascular treatment of aortic diseases and examines the current evidence for different modalities of management. PMID:27566806

  18. Developing a Procedures Manual for Using the Innovacq 100 System Effectively and Efficiently.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubberley, Carol

    The installation of an automated acquisitions system, the Innovacq 100, demanded a review and revision of procedures in the Acquisitions Department of the University of Central Florida Library. This practicum report describes the process involved in developing the new procedures. Prior to installation, the old departmental procedures manual and…

  19. Development of use of an Operational Procedure Information System (OPIS) for future space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illmer, N.; Mies, L.; Schoen, A.; Jain, A.

    1994-01-01

    A MS-Windows based electronic procedure system, called OPIS (Operational Procedure Information System), was developed. The system consists of two parts, the editor, for 'writing' the procedure and the notepad application, for the usage of the procedures by the crew during training and flight. The system is based on standardized, structured procedure format and language. It allows the embedding of sketches, photos, animated graphics and video sequences and the access to off-nominal procedures by linkage to an appropriate database. The system facilitates the work with procedures of different degrees of detail, depending on the training status of the crew. The development of a 'language module' for the automatic translation of the procedures, for example into Russian, is planned.

  20. A guide to developing a laser standard operating procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K.

    1996-10-01

    The American National Standard Institute standard Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers calls for the preparation of a standard operating procedure (SOP) with the use of class 3b and class 4 lasers. However, the ANSI Z 136.1 standard does not recommend or suggest a format for the SOP. The goal of this article is to outline, explain and suggest an SOP format that could be applied by a laser safety officer to a varied number of situations and laser uses.

  1. Advanced crew procedures development techniques: Procedures and performance program training plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A plan developed to support the training of PPP users in the operations associated with PPP usage is described. This document contains an overview of the contents of each training session and a detailed outline to be used as the guideline for each session.

  2. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1995-07-01

    The development, of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 mm) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. This project is concerned with a hydrid process, micro-agglomerate flotation, which is a combination of oil agglomeration and froth flotation.

  3. Soot agglomeration in isolated, free droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, M. Y.; Dryer, F. L.; Green, G. J.; Sangiovanni, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Under the conditions of an isolated, free droplet experiment, hollow, carbonaceous structures, called soot spheres, were observed to form during the atmospheric pressure, low Reynolds number combustion of 1-methylnaphthalene. These structures which are agglomerates composed of smaller spheroidal units result from both thermophoretic effects induced by the envelope flame surrounding each drop and aerodynamic effects caused by changes in the relative gas/drop velocities. A chemically reacting flow model was used to analyze the process of sootshell formation during microgravity droplet combustion. The time-dependent temperature and gas property field surrounding the droplet was determined, and the soot cloud location for microgravity combustion of n-heptane droplets was predicted. Experiments showed that the sooting propensity of n-alkane fuel droplets can be varied through diluent substitution, oxygen-index variations, and ambient pressure reductions.

  4. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.; Chandran, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, added particulates may include a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  5. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.

    1993-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  6. Development of Policies, Institutions and Procedures for Water Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouche, L.; Pfiefer, J.; Hanson, A.; Skaggs, R.

    2009-12-01

    In the arid, water scarce region of New Mexico and West Texas there is growing interest in the potential for water reuse to extend existing supplies and mitigate drought shortage impacts. There are no new sources of water in New Mexico, except reclaimed water. Communities and individuals are uncertain about and have many unanswered questions about polices, institutions involved (agencies), legal and regulatory requirements, and procedures governing water reuse. Issues to be addressed by this project include: the legal ability to reuse water, ownership of water rights, downstream or third party impacts, regulatory and procedural requirements, water quality concerns, state and local agency involvement, and cost effectiveness of water reuse compared to alternative sources. Presently, there is very little implementation or directives in New Mexico policy that addresses reuse, reclamation, or recycled water. The only regulations pertaining to reuse is New Mexico Environmental Department currently allows the use of reclaimed domestic wastewater for irrigation of golf courses and green spaces, which is listed in the Policy for the Above Ground Use of Reclaimed Domestic Wastewater (NMED, 2003). This document identifies the various reclaimed quality classifications that are required for specific applications and the permits required for application. This document does not identify or address policy applications on the distribution, ownership, or trading of reclaimed water. Even though reclaimed water reuse projects are currently being implemented in many cities in the U.S., mainly for commercial and municipal irrigation (golf courses and green space), its potential has not yet been exploited. A policy analysis matrix (PAM) is being designed to identify and examine the policy framework and consequences of non-policy implementation for decision makers and interest groups and assist them in understanding the consequences of policy actions and project outcomes if no laws or

  7. Biological effects of agglomerated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Song, Zheng-Mei; Wang, Lin; Chen, Ni; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2016-06-01

    The physicochemical properties of nanomaterials play crucial roles in determining their biological effects. Agglomeration of nanomaterials in various systems is a common phenomenon, however, how agglomeration affects the biological consequence of nanomaterials has not been well investigated because of its complexity. Herein, we prepared variable sized agglomerates of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (O-MWCNTs) by using Ca(2+) and studied their cellular uptake and cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. We found the altered property of O-MWCNTs agglomerates could be controlled and adjusted by the amount of Ca(2+). Agglomeration remarkably facilitated the cellular uptake of O-MWCNTs at the initial contact stage, due to the easy contact of agglomerates with cells. But agglomeration did not induce evident cytotoxicity when the concentration of O-MWCNTs was less than 150μg/mL. That was assayed by cell proliferation, membrane integrity, apoptosis and ROS generation. This study suggests us that the biological behaviors of nanomaterials could be altered by their states of agglomeration. PMID:26930035

  8. Development of explosive welding procedures to fabricate channeled nozzle structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattee, H. E.; Linse, V. D.

    1976-01-01

    Research was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating a large contoured structure with complex internal channeling by explosive welding procedures. Structures or nozzles of this nature for wind tunnel applications were designed. Such nozzles vary widely in their complexity. However, in their simplest form, they consist of a grooved base section to which a cover sheet is attached to form a series of internal cooling passages. The cover sheet attachment can be accomplished in various ways: fusion welding, brazing, and diffusion welding. The cover sheet has also been electroformed in place. Of these fabrication methods, brazing has proved most successful in producing nozzles with complex contoured surfaces and a multiplicity of internal channels.

  9. Measuring agglomerate size distribution and dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance absorbance on gold nanoparticle agglomerate size using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Zook, Justin M; Rastogi, Vinayak; Maccuspie, Robert I; Keene, Athena M; Fagan, Jeffrey

    2011-10-25

    Agglomeration of nanoparticles during measurements in relevant biological and environmental media is a frequent problem in nanomaterial property characterization. The primary problem is typically that any changes to the size distribution can dramatically affect the potential nanotoxicity or other size-determined properties, such as the absorbance signal in a biosensor measurement. Herein we demonstrate analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) as a powerful method for measuring two critical characteristics of nanoparticle (NP) agglomerates in situ in biological media: the NP agglomerate size distribution, and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorbance spectrum of precise sizes of gold NP agglomerates. To characterize the size distribution, we present a theoretical framework for calculating the hydrodynamic diameter distribution of NP agglomerates from their sedimentation coefficient distribution. We measure sedimentation rates for monomers, dimers, and trimers, as well as for larger agglomerates with up to 600 NPs. The AUC size distributions were found generally to be broader than the size distributions estimated from dynamic light scattering and diffusion-limited colloidal aggregation theory, an alternative bulk measurement method that relies on several assumptions. In addition, the measured sedimentation coefficients can be used in nanotoxicity studies to predict how quickly the agglomerates sediment out of solution under normal gravitational forces, such as in the environment. We also calculate the absorbance spectra for monomer, dimer, trimer, and larger gold NP agglomerates up to 600 NPs, to enable a better understanding of LSPR biosensors. Finally, we validate a new method that uses these spectra to deconvolute the net absorbance spectrum of an unknown bulk sample and approximate the proportions of monomers, dimers, and trimers in a polydisperse sample of small agglomerates, so that every sample does not need to be measured by AUC. These results

  10. Effect of drug content and agglomerate size on tabletability and drug release characteristics of bromhexine hydrochloridetalc agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Namdeo; Pawar, Atmaram; Paradkar, Anant

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the investigation was to study the effect of bromhexine hydrochloride (BXH) content and agglomerate size on mechanical, compressional and drug release properties of agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA). Studies on optimized batches of agglomerates (BXT1 and BXT2) prepared by CCA have showed adequate sphericity and strength required for efficient tabletting. Trend of strength reduction with a decrease in the size of agglomerates was noted for both batches, irrespective of drug loading. However, an increase in mean yield pressure (14.189 to 19.481) with an increase in size was observed for BXT2 having BXH-talc (1:15.7). Surprisingly, improvement in tensile strength was demonstrated by compacts prepared from BXT2, due to high BXH load, whereas BXT1, having a low amount of BXH (BXH-talc, 1:24), showed low tensile strength. Consequently, increased tensile strength was reflected in extended drug release from BXT2 compacts (Higuchi model, R(2) = 0.9506 to 0.9981). Thus, it can be concluded that interparticulate bridges formed by BXH and agglomerate size affect their mechanical, compressional and drug release properties. PMID:20228039

  11. Suggestions and Procedures for Developing Teaching-Learning Stations. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendren, Travis E.; Bryant, C. Douglas

    This booklet is a collection of outlines for various teaching-learning stations which were developed by 21 teachers during a three-week institute held in 1972 at Barnardsville, North Carolina. The purposes for such stations, which can be developed inexpensively by students and teachers on school property, are: (1) to create outdoor and…

  12. Developing Policies and Procedures: Getting an Internship Program Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Roseanna G.

    Issues concerning the development of a pedagogically sound internship program, including objectives, student qualifications, requirements, evaluation, and the responsibilities of the director, are examined in this paper that explores the internship program development of the Speech Communication Department of St. Cloud State University at St.…

  13. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1995-04-01

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 mm) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive. We are investigating the use of a hybrid process - Micro-agglomerate flotation which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30-50 mm in size) rather than individual coal particles (1-10 mm) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  14. The Development of Procedural Knowledge in Adults Engaged in a Tractor-Trailer Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Nelson

    1994-01-01

    Studied development of procedural knowledge in 14 adults, aged 18 to 35 years, engaged in a novel task using a toy tractor-trailer rig. Results revealed three phases of development in subjects' knowledge of steering procedures and the rig's movement patterns, and their use of feedback information. Subjects also manifested different levels of…

  15. Video Portfolios: The Development and Usefulness of a Teacher Assessment Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Mirjam E. J.; Roelofs, Erik C.; Beijaard, Douwe; Sanders, Piet F.; Tigelaar, Dineke E. H.; Verloop, Nico

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the development and usefulness of an assessment procedure for teachers' coaching competence. We examined the usefulness of the developed procedure with respect to making reliable judgments. Video portfolios were constructed by researchers, which consisted of deliberately planned video recordings of teachers' coaching…

  16. 7 CFR 1948.84 - Application procedure for site development and acquisition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application procedure for site development and... Section 601 Energy Impacted Area Development Assistance Program § 1948.84 Application procedure for site... 103-354 Offices receiving applications shall also provide written comments reflecting site...

  17. 7 CFR 1948.84 - Application procedure for site development and acquisition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Application procedure for site development and... Section 601 Energy Impacted Area Development Assistance Program § 1948.84 Application procedure for site... 103-354 Offices receiving applications shall also provide written comments reflecting site...

  18. Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture. Technical progress report, October 1992--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. Much research and development has been sponsored on methods for particulate emissions control and the direct injection of calcium-based sorbents to reduce SO{sub 2} emission levels. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Invention Disclosure filed) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. This application can be adapted as either a ``hot flue gas cleanup`` subsystem for the current concepts for combustor islands or as an alternative primary pulse combustor island in which slagging, sulfur capture, particulate agglomeration and control, and alkali gettering as well as NO{sub x} control processes become an integral part of the pulse combustion process.

  19. APPLICATION OF SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE CONCEPTS AND PROCEDURES TO ENVIORNMENTAL RESEARCH INVOLVING SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As EPA’s environmental research expands into new areas that involve the development of software, quality assurance concepts and procedures that were originally developed for environmental data collection may not be appropriate. Fortunately, software quality assurance is a ...

  20. Operational source receptor calculations for large agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauss, Michael; Shamsudheen, Semeena V.; Valdebenito, Alvaro; Pommier, Matthieu; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For Air quality policy an important question is how much of the air pollution within an urbanized region can be attributed to local sources and how much of it is imported through long-range transport. This is critical information for a correct assessment of the effectiveness of potential emission measures. The ratio between indigenous and long-range transported air pollution for a given region depends on its geographic location, the size of its area, the strength and spatial distribution of emission sources, the time of the year, but also - very strongly - on the current meteorological conditions, which change from day to day and thus make it important to provide such calculations in near-real-time to support short-term legislation. Similarly, long-term analysis over longer periods (e.g. one year), or of specific air quality episodes in the past, can help to scientifically underpin multi-regional agreements and long-term legislation. Within the European MACC projects (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) and the transition to the operational CAMS service (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) the computationally efficient EMEP MSC-W air quality model has been applied with detailed emission data, comprehensive calculations of chemistry and microphysics, driven by high quality meteorological forecast data (up to 96-hour forecasts), to provide source-receptor calculations on a regular basis in forecast mode. In its current state, the product allows the user to choose among different regions and regulatory pollutants (e.g. ozone and PM) to assess the effectiveness of fictive emission reductions in air pollutant emissions that are implemented immediately, either within the agglomeration or outside. The effects are visualized as bar charts, showing resulting changes in air pollution levels within the agglomeration as a function of time (hourly resolution, 0 to 4 days into the future). The bar charts not only allow assessing the effects of emission

  1. Development of an Evaluative Procedure for Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Pancorbo, Salvador

    1980-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical competencies of graduate pharmacy students upon the completion of a medicine rotation, an oral examination has been developed that requires students to present data and defend decisions. Objectives, responsibilities, and competencies required by the rotation and nine sample exam questions are appended. (JMD)

  2. Interservice Procedures for Instructional Systems Development: Executive Summary and Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.

    The document is the last of a five-part series focusing in minute detail on the processes involved in the formulation of an instructional systems development (ISD) program for military interservice training that will adequately train individuals to do a particular job and which can also be applied to any interservice curriculum development…

  3. Some Procedures for Evaluating Language Development in Young Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Mack L.

    The study was designed to construct and evaluate a language inventory that would measure language ability of severely retarded children, aged 6 1/2 to 10 years. Five of R. M. Gagne's eight types of learning were chosen for identifying language ability, and eight subtests were developed to accompany these learning types. The subtests were stimulus…

  4. Developing Individualized Behavior Change Goals with Clients: A Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Richard G.; Uhlemann, Max R.

    This document reviews 10 specific and sequential steps which have emerged as being particularly effective in assisting clients in developing individualized behavior change goals in psychotherapy. The therapist and client typically work through these steps together near the beginning of treatment, but only after the client has had the opportunity…

  5. Development of improved analytical procedures for boron purification: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.D.; Fossey, J.L.; Hinds, S.C.; Lantz, L.L.; Smith, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    Three new analytical methods for boron powder certification were developed and evaluated during this project. First, the boric acid content of the powder was determined by an acid-base titration method. Second, the moisture content of boron samples was measured with a moisture evolution analyzer. Third, boron powder samples were acid digested in a microwave oven. 11 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  6. Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shield Engineering Development Practice and Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwitter, James G.; Adams, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    A document describes a series of models created for the determination of the probability of survival of critical spacecraft components from particle strike damage caused by hypervelocity impact of meteoroids and/or orbital debris. These models were integrated with both shield design and hypervelocity impact testing to develop adequate protection of said components to meet mission survivability requirements.

  7. Developing a Procedure for Accountability of Student Absenteeism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernan, James L.

    Educators must take into account the changing social, cultural, and economic trends contributing to high absenteeism and dropout rates. No curriculum can succeed if students are not in attendance to learn, develop, and advance in society. This paper evaluates the researcher's computerized system to track student attendance and prevent unexcused…

  8. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.Y.; Chen, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are most commonly utilized to remove sulfur dioxide from stack gases of coal- or oil-fired plants. In the simple slurry technology, SO{sub 2} is absorbed by a slurry of lime/limestone to form calcium sulfite crystals of acicular habit and its strong agglomeration, requiring large clarifiers and filters to dewater the sludge to make an acceptable landfill. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals from solution were studied by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with NaHSO{sub 3} in a pH-stat semibatch crystallizer. Single platelet crystals and agglomerates of platelet crystals were produced in the pH range from 5.80 to 6.80. The crystallization mechanism changed from primary nucleation to crystal growth in the progressive precipitation. Using the titration curves, the growth rate was calculated from the titration rate at the final stage of operation. The crystal growth rates of calcium sulfate hemihydrate crystals were found to obey the parabolic rate law in the low supersaturation range. Another point to be noted is that the precipitates of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in agitated suspensions have a tendency to form agglomerates. It was found that the degree of agglomeration is a weak function of relative supersaturation and magma density, while the pH value is a key factor that affects the degree of agglomeration. Addition of EDTA also has an effect on the agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrates.

  9. Analysis of atmospheric fluidized bed combustion agglomerates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, D. III; Brekke, D.W.; Karner, F.R.

    1984-04-01

    Chemical and textural studies of AFBC agglomerates have revealed detailed information regarding the mechanisms of agglomeration. The formation of agglomerates in a silica sand bed can be described by a four step process: initial ash coatings of quartz grains; thickening of ash coatings and the formation of nodules; cementation of nodules to each other by a sulfated aluminosilicate matrix; and partial or complete melting of eutectic compositions to produce a sticky glass phase between grains and along fractures. Once agglomeration has begun, large scale solidification and restricted flow within the bed will lead to hot spots, wholesale melting and further agglomeration which ultimately forces a shutdown. Standard operating temperatures during normal AFBC runs come quite close to, or may actually exceed, the minimum temperatures for eutectic melting of the silicate phases in the coal and standard bed materials. The partially melted material may be expected to lead to the formation of dense, sticky areas within the bed, and the formation of hot spots which further exacerbate the problem. Ultimately, large scale bed agglomeration will result. Attempts to eliminate agglomeration by removal of sodium via an ion exchange process have yielded encouraging results. A second approach, used to raise melting temperatures within the bed, has been to use bed materials that may react with low-temperature minerals to produce high-temperature refractory phases such as mullite or other alkali and alkali-earth alumino-silicates.

  10. Development of analytical procedures for coprocessing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.P.; Green, J.B.; Vogh, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    One phase of improving understanding of the fundamental chemistry of coprocessing involves development of the ability to distinguish between products originating from coal versus those originating from petroleum resid. A primary objective of this project was to develop analytical techniques to determine the source (coal versus resid) of the various compound types found in coprocessing products. A corollary objective was to develop an expanded knowledge of the detailed composition of coprocessing products. Two approaches were evaluated for distinguishing between products originating from coal and those originating from petroleum resid. One was based on the use of carbon isotope ratios and the other was based on variations in compound classes in response to changes in the ratio of coal to resid in the coprocessing feed. Other researchers using carbon isotope ratios to determine the origin of products have typically examined distillation fractions. This project involved determination of the origin of chemical classes (e.g., saturates, neutral aromatics, phenols, indoles, etc.) rather than distillate classes. Maya resid and Illinois No. 6 coal (with coal feed varying from 2 to 40 percent) were coprocessed in a batch autoclave to obtain products for detailed analysis.

  11. Development of a Sampling Collection Device with Diagnostic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jhih-Yan; Feng, Mow-Jung; Wu, Chia-Chi; Wang, Jane; Chang, Ting-Chang; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-08-01

    Cervicovaginal fluid plays an important role in the detection of many female genital diseases, but the lack of suitable collection devices in the market severely challenges test success rate. Appropriate clinical sampling devices for cervicovaginal fluid collection would help physicians detect diseases and disease states more rapidly, efficiently, and accurately. The objective of this study was to develop a readily usable sampling collection device that would eliminate macromolecular interference and accurately provide specimens for further studies. This study was designed to develop an effective device to collect cervicovaginal fluid from women with symptoms of endometrial lesions, women appearing in the clinic for a routine Papanicolaou smear, and/or women seeking a routine gynecologic checkup. Paper-based assay, ELISA, and qNano were used to provide accurate diagnoses. A total of 103 patients successfully used the developed device to collect cervicovaginal fluid. Some of the collected specimens were used to detect glycogen, lactate, and pH for determining pathogen infection. Other specimen samples were tested for the presence of female genital cancer by comparing interleukin 6 concentration and microvesicle concentration. We proposed a noninvasive screening test for the diagnosis of female genital diseases using a dual-material collection device. The outer, nonwoven fabric portion of this device was designed to filter macromolecules, and the inner cotton portion was designed to absorb cervicovaginal fluid. PMID:27338148

  12. Image 100 procedures manual development: Applications system library definition and Image 100 software definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guseman, L. F., Jr.; Decell, H. P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An outline for an Image 100 procedures manual for Earth Resources Program image analysis was developed which sets forth guidelines that provide a basis for the preparation and updating of an Image 100 Procedures Manual. The scope of the outline was limited to definition of general features of a procedures manual together with special features of an interactive system. Computer programs were identified which should be implemented as part of an applications oriented library for the system.

  13. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    PubMed Central

    Rothenbacher, Sonja; Messerer, Armin; Kasper, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging") was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot. PMID:18533015

  14. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  15. Agglomeration of proteins in acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Delissen, Friedmar; Leiterer, Jork; Bienert, Ralf; Emmerling, Franziska; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2008-09-01

    An ultrasonic trap (acoustic levitator) was used as an analytical tool to allow container-free handling of proteins in small sample volumes. This trap was combined for the first time with synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for structure analysis of biological macromolecules in a solution. The microfocus beamline at BESSY was used as a source of intense X-ray radiation. Apoferritin (APO) was used as a model protein, and its aggregation behavior in a levitator was followed from a diluted solution to the solid state. Different stages of APO agglomeration were observed without solid container walls, which may influence aggregation behavior and produce a parasitic scattering background. Starting with a volume of 5 microL we analyzed the concentration dependence of APO structure factors in the range from 5 to 1,200 mg/mL (solid protein). The solution was stirred automatically due to convection inside the droplet caused by the ultrasonic field. SAXS data recording of APO was performed in time intervals of 60 s during an aggregation experiment of 30 to 60 min. PMID:18607573

  16. Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers in Nuclear Power Plants: Development of a Model of Procedure Usage and Identification of Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been looking at replacing the current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedure systems. The concept of computer-based procedures is not new by any means; however most research has focused on procedures used in the main control room. Procedures reviewed in these efforts are mainly emergency operating procedures and normal operating procedures. Based on lessons learned for these previous efforts we are now exploring a more unknown application for computer based procedures - field procedures, i.e. procedures used by nuclear equipment operators and maintenance technicians. The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. commercial nuclear industry are collaborating in an applied research effort with the objective of developing requirements and specifications for a computer-based procedure system to be used by field workers. The goal is to identify the types of human errors that can be mitigated by using computer-based procedures and how to best design the computer-based procedures to do so. This paper describes the development of a Model of Procedure Use and the qualitative study on which the model is based. The study was conducted in collaboration with four nuclear utilities and five research institutes. During the qualitative study and the model development requirements and for computer-based procedures were identified.

  17. National Education Practices File Development Project. Procedures Documentation. Product 2.1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibliographic Retrieval Services, Inc., Scotia, NY.

    This paper documents procedures for maintaining and updating the National Education Practices File, a program designed to identify needs in education and to develop a resource system for educators. Each feature is discussed with emphasis on major issues. Documentation of procedures and discussion of issues are based on experiences of the file…

  18. The Development of a Procedure for the Design of Competency Based Modular Instructional Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schurter, William J.

    A project was designed to develop a curriculum model based on salient, sequenced occupational tasks. After an extensive literature review and staff discussions, a modified Q-Sort procedure was formulated to select and sequence tasks. The procedure made it possible to readily utilize a catalogue of tasks compiled by the Vocational-Technical…

  19. Site And Neighborhood Design (SAND): Development of simplified automated building thermal load procedures, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diderrich, G. T.; Hrabak, R. A.

    1980-07-01

    Preliminary efforts toward the development of simplified procedures for estimating the thermal-loads of buildings are presented. The acquisition implementation, and documentation of the thermal load procedures and associated data files actually used by the five SAND participants are described.

  20. Development and application of an optimization procedure for flutter suppression using the aerodynamic energy concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Abel, I.

    1978-01-01

    An optimization procedure is developed based on the responses of a system to continuous gust inputs. The procedure uses control law transfer functions which have been partially determined by using the relaxed aerodynamic energy approach. The optimization procedure yields a flutter suppression system which minimizes control surface activity in a gust environment. The procedure is applied to wing flutter of a drone aircraft to demonstrate a 44 percent increase in the basic wing flutter dynamic pressure. It is shown that a trailing edge control system suppresses the flutter instability over a wide range of subsonic mach numbers and flight altitudes. Results of this study confirm the effectiveness of the relaxed energy approach.

  1. In-Situ Agglomeration and De-agglomeration by Milling of Nano-Engineered Lubricant Particulate Composites for Cold Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.

    2014-10-01

    Nano-engineered self-lubricating particles comprised of hexagonal-boron-nitride powder (hBN) encapsulated in nickel have been developed for cold spray coating of aluminum components. The nickel encapsulant consists of several nano-sized layers, which are deposited on the hBN particles by electroless plating. In the cold spray deposition, the nickel becomes the matrix in which hBN acts as the lubricant. The coating demonstrated a very promising performance by reducing the coefficient of friction by almost 50% and increasing the wear resistance more than tenfold. The coatings also exhibited higher bond strength, which was directly related to the hardenability of the particles. During the encapsulation process, the hBN particles agglomerate and form large clusters. De-agglomeration has been studied through low- and high-energy ball milling to create more uniform and consistent particle sizes and to improve the cold spray deposition efficiency. The unmilled and milled particles were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, BET, and hardness tests. It was found that in low-energy ball milling, the clusters were compacted to a noticeable extent. However, the high-energy ball milling resulted in breakup of agglomerations and destroyed the nickel encapsulant.

  2. Dispersion of TiO₂ nanoparticle agglomerates by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Horst, Allison M; Neal, Andrea C; Mielke, Randall E; Sislian, Patrick R; Suh, Won Hyuk; Mädler, Lutz; Stucky, Galen D; Holden, Patricia A

    2010-11-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly incorporated into consumer products and are emerging as potential environmental contaminants. Upon environmental release, nanoparticles could inhibit bacterial processes, as evidenced by laboratory studies. Less is known regarding bacterial alteration of nanoparticles, including whether bacteria affect physical agglomeration states controlling nanoparticle settling and bioavailability. Here, the effects of an environmental strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on TiO₂ nanoparticle agglomerates formed in aqueous media are described. Environmental scanning electron microscopy and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy visually demonstrated bacterial dispersion of large agglomerates formed in cell culture medium and in marsh water. For experiments in cell culture medium, quantitative image analysis verified that the degrees of conversion of large agglomerates into small nanoparticle-cell combinations were similar for 12-h-growth and short-term cell contact experiments. Dispersion in cell growth medium was further characterized by size fractionation: for agglomerated TiO₂ suspensions in the absence of cells, 81% by mass was retained on a 5-μm-pore-size filter, compared to only 24% retained for biotic treatments. Filtrate cell and agglomerate sizes were characterized by dynamic light scattering, revealing that the average bacterial cell size increased from 1.4 μm to 1.9 μm because of nano-TiO₂ biosorption. High-magnification scanning electron micrographs showed that P. aeruginosa dispersed TiO₂ agglomerates by preferential biosorption of nanoparticles onto cell surfaces. These results suggest a novel role for bacteria in the environmental transport of engineered nanoparticles, i.e., growth-independent, bacterially mediated size and mass alterations of TiO₂ nanoparticle agglomerates. PMID:20851981

  3. Development of a standard operating procedure for the collection of pyrethroids in water and sediment matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through a Regional Applied Research Effort grant to the United States Geological Survey, Region 9 collaborated with ORD on this project to develop a standard operating procedure for collection of water and sediment samples for pyrethroid analysis.

  4. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

    1992-11-10

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  5. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Potas, Todd A.; DeWall, Raymond A.; Musich, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL TEST PROCEDURES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIC PRIORITY POLLUTANTS IN SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this program was the development of methods for the analysis of priority pollutants in sludge. Independent methods were developed for purgeable and extractable compounds. For purgeables, a purge and trap-GC/MS procedure was developed utilizing a stirred b...

  7. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  8. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child who has been... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... child and the child's family must be conducted every six months, or more frequently if...

  9. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  10. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child who has been... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... child and the child's family must be conducted every six months, or more frequently if...

  11. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  12. From analogue to apps--developing an app to prepare children for medical imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gigi; Greene, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    The Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Melbourne has launched a world-first app for children that will help reduce anxiety and the need for anesthesia during medical imaging procedures. The free, game-based app, "Okee in Medical Imaging", helps children aged from four to eight years to prepare for all medical imaging procedures--X-ray, CT, MRI, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, and fluoroscopy. The app is designed to reduce anticipatory fear of imaging procedures, while helping to ensure that children attend imaging appointments equipped with the skills required for efficient and effective scans to be performed. This paper describes how the app was developed. PMID:26828544

  13. Development experience with a simple expert system demonstrator for pilot emergency procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, M.; Mackall, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Expert system techniques, a major application area of artificial intelligence (AI), are examined in the development of pilot associate to handle aircraft emergency procedures. The term pilot associate is used to describe research involving expert systems that can assist the pilot in the cockpit. The development of expert systems for the electrical system and flight control system emergency procedures are discussed. A simple, high-level expert system provides the means to choose which knowledge domain is needed. The expert systems were developed on a low-cost, FORTH-based package, using a personal computer.

  14. Model for coal ash agglomeration based on two-particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, J.L.; O'Brien, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The agglomeration of coal and coal ash in fluidized-bed gasifiers (FBG's) is of great interest in coal conversion. However, only limited work has been done to develop analytical models in order to understand ash agglomeration in FBG's. This paper focuses on two-particle collision dynamics, which is then used to develop a criterion for the agglutination of the two particles. The main assumption of this mechanism is that the binding force can be modeled as ''piecewise'' conservative. This makes it possible to compute the maximum energy that can be dissipated by the system. Comparison of this quantity with the initial kinetic energy provides the agglutination criteria. A specific version of this model is obtained by making specific choices for the contact force and the binding force. An analytic formula for the critical velocity, the relative collision velocity below which agglutination takes place, is obtained for head-on collisions; a numerical technique is developed for collisions which are not head-on. A process change which increases the critical velocity increases the likelihood of agglutination of particles with random relative velocities. To examine the critical velocity as a function of temperature, the model requires correlations for the shear modulus and surface adhesiveness coefficient of the particles. Although these correlations are derived from limited experimental information, they lead to reasonable results and agreement with existing experimental data on agglomeration and defluidization. By considering the agglutination of particles of average size and temperature, a measure of the agglomeration tendency of a FBG can be obtained. Finally, the sensitivity of the model to system parameters is also investigated and an assessment of needed additional work is made. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  15. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  16. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-28

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as 'self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here. PMID:26508277

  17. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and highly stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Actual cycle results are verified using quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  18. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as `self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING TRAINING OBJECTIVES FOR JUNIOR OFFICER JOBS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AMMERMAN, HARRY L.

    A SYSTEMATIC METHOD WAS DEVELOPED TO BE USED BY SERVICE SCHOOL PERSONNEL IN PREPARING JOB-ORIENTED TRAINING OBJECTIVES FOR JUNIOR OFFICERS, PRIMARILY IN THE FORM OF BEHAVIORAL STATEMENTS OF PERFORMANCE EXPECTED AFTER TRAINING. THE PROCEDURES DEVELOPED WERE (1) LISTING ALL TASKS FOR A JOB, (2) SELECTING TASKS FOR SOME FORMAL TRAINING, (3)…

  20. Capillary condensation onto titania (TiO2) nanoparticle agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonmin; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-02-27

    A capillary condensation process was developed for the purpose of forming interconnections between nanoparticles at low temperatures. The process was performed in a temperature-controlled flow chamber on nanoparticle agglomerates deposited at submonolayer coverage on a transmission electron microscope grid. The partial pressure of the condensing species, tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the temperature of the chamber were adjusted in order to obtain the various saturation conditions for capillary condensation. The modified samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET surface area method, and scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy-loss spectrometry. Experimental results show that bridge-shaped layers were dominantly formed in the neck region between particles and were composed of amorphous silica. The analysis of TEM micrographs verified that the coverage of the layers is strongly dependent on the saturation ratio. Image analysis of TEM micrographs shows that this dependency is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the classical Kelvin equation for the specific geometries in our system. PMID:17243733

  1. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  2. Development of interim test methods and procedures for determining the performance of small photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, P.; Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.; Algra, K.; DeBlasio, R.

    1998-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing tests and procedures that will determine if the configuration of a small photovoltaic (PV) system is suitable for its intended use, and if the system will perform as specified. An overview of these procedures is presented in this paper. Development of standard test procedures will allow designers, manufacturers, system integrators, users, and independent laboratories to assess the performance of PV systems under outdoor prevailing conditions. An NREL Technical Report detailing the procedures is under way, and the IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21 (SCC21) has established a project on this subject. The work will be submitted to the IEEE SCC21 and International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Committee 82 (IEC TC82) for consideration as a consensus standard. Certification bodies such as PowerMark and PV Global Approval Program (PVGAP) may adopt the IEC and IEEE documents when testing systems. Developing standardized test methods and procedures at NREL to evaluate the outdoor performance of PV systems will encourage product quality and promote PV standards development. Standardized tests will assure people that PV systems will perform as specified for their intended applications. As confidence in PV systems increases, the successful commercialization of PV will grow internationally.

  3. Development of an efficient procedure for calculating the aerodynamic effects of planform variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. E.; Geller, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical procedures to compute gradients in aerodynamic loading due to planform shape changes using panel method codes were studied. Two procedures were investigated: one computed the aerodynamic perturbation directly; the other computed the aerodynamic loading on the perturbed planform and on the base planform and then differenced these values to obtain the perturbation in loading. It is indicated that computing the perturbed values directly can not be done satisfactorily without proper aerodynamic representation of the pressure singularity at the leading edge of a thin wing. For the alternative procedure, a technique was developed which saves most of the time-consuming computations from a panel method calculation for the base planform. Using this procedure the perturbed loading can be calculated in about one-tenth the time of that for the base solution.

  4. Documentation for a Structural Optimization Procedure Developed Using the Engineering Analysis Language (EAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Carl J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a structural optimization procedure developed for use with the Engineering Analysis Language (EAL) finite element analysis system. The procedure is written primarily in the EAL command language. Three external processors which are written in FORTRAN generate equivalent stiffnesses and evaluate stress and local buckling constraints for the sections. Several built-up structural sections were coded into the design procedures. These structural sections were selected for use in aircraft design, but are suitable for other applications. Sensitivity calculations use the semi-analytic method, and an extensive effort has been made to increase the execution speed and reduce the storage requirements. There is also an approximate sensitivity update method included which can significantly reduce computational time. The optimization is performed by an implementation of the MINOS V5.4 linear programming routine in a sequential liner programming procedure.

  5. Development of a turbomachinery design optimization procedure using a multiple-parameter nonlinear perturbation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to complete the preliminary development of a combined perturbation/optimization procedure and associated computational code for designing optimized blade-to-blade profiles of turbomachinery blades. The overall purpose of the procedures developed is to provide demonstration of a rapid nonlinear perturbation method for minimizing the computational requirements associated with parametric design studies of turbomachinery flows. The method combines the multiple parameter nonlinear perturbation method, successfully developed in previous phases of this study, with the NASA TSONIC blade-to-blade turbomachinery flow solver, and the COPES-CONMIN optimization procedure into a user's code for designing optimized blade-to-blade surface profiles of turbomachinery blades. Results of several design applications and a documented version of the code together with a user's manual are provided.

  6. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous measurements of the heat of immersion of coal were conducting using several different particle size fractions of No. 2 Gas Seam coal from Raleigh County, West Virginia. The heat of immersion was determined in water, methanol, heptane, hexadecane and neohexane (2,2-dimethybutane). A comparison of the results with those determined previously for Illinois No. 6 coal is discussed. A number of potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of coal were screened by testing the response of sulfidized mineral pyrite to agglomeration with heptane in the presence of the potential depressant. The following were tested; sodium dithionite, sodium thiosulfate, ferrous sulfate, ferric sulfate, titanous chloride, hydrogen peroxide, Oxone (a form of potassium monopersulfate), pyrogallol, quebracho (colloidal dispersant derived from tree bark), milk whey, and several organic thiols. Ferric chloride was applied to mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and sulfidized mineral pyrite before subjecting the mixtures to agglomeration with heptane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Ultrasonic de-agglomeration of barium titanate powder.

    PubMed

    Marković, S; Mitrić, M; Starcević, G; Uskoković, D

    2008-01-01

    BaTiO3 (BT) powder, with average particle size of 1.4 microm, was synthesized by solid-state reaction. A high-intensity ultrasound irradiation (ultrasonication) was used to de-agglomerate micro-sized powder to nano-sized one. The crystal structure, crystallite size, morphology, particle size, particle size distribution, and specific surface area of the BT powder de-agglomerated for different ultrasonication times (0, 10, 60, and 180 min) were determined. It was found that the particles size of the BT powder was influenced by ultrasonic treatment, while its tetragonal structure was maintained. Therefore, ultrasonic irradiation can be proposed as an environmental-friendly, economical, and effective tool for the de-agglomeration of barium titanate powders. PMID:17845864

  8. Effect of calcium ions on agglomeration of bayer aluminium trihydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, N.

    1988-10-01

    Small amounts of calcium ions in caustic aluminate solution can lead to enhanced agglomeration of aluminium trihydroxide [Al(OH) 3] particles in the crystallization step of the Bayer process. The present study shows that the magnitude of the effect is strongly dependent on the nature and polycrystallinity of the Al(OH) 3 seed crystals. The more irregular and polycrystalline the seed crystals, the smaller is the optimum amount of added calcium for maximum coarsening ( ≈ 50 mg/l, expressed as CaO). While the same degree of agglomeration can be achieved using well-rounded, smooth-surfaced seed crystals of the same overall size, more calcium is required (75-100 mg/l, expressed as CaO) and the agglomerated particles formed are weaker and less resistant to size reduction on handling.

  9. Development of a procedure to estimate runoff and sediment transport in ephemeral streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    A distributed hydrologic model for application on small, semiarid watersheds is developed. The distributed model incorporates simplified routing schemes to include the influence of transmission losses on runoff. A sediment transport model, by sediment size fractions, is developed to compute transport capacity and sediment yield in noncohesive, alluvial channels. Based on available information published in soils and topographic maps and on channel and bed sediment characteristics, the procedure is used to estimate runoff rates and amounts together with sediment yields from semiarid watersheds. Example applications include flood frequency analysis and sediment yield. The procedure requires a minimum of observed data for calibration and is designed for practical applications.

  10. A pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the purpose of estimating the fraction of aluminum powder that will form agglomerates at the surface of deflagrating composite propellants. The basic idea is that the fraction agglomerated depends upon the amount of aluminum that melts within effective binder pocket volumes framed by oxidizer particles. The effective pocket depends upon the ability of ammonium perchlorate modals to encapsulate the aluminum and provide a local temperature sufficient to ignite the aluminum. Model results are discussed in the light of data showing effects of propellant formulation variables and pressure.

  11. Agglomeration behavior of solid nickel on polycrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K Scott; Mast, Eric S; Sprenkle, Vince

    2007-11-01

    This letter describes the phenomenon that takes place between nickel/barium titanate couples when heated under conditions employed in multilayer ceramic capacitor manufacturing practice: a 4hr, 1300°C isothermal anneal in 1% H2 – 99% N2. Dense, sputtered nickel films were observed to dewet the titanate and agglomerate into discrete or interconnected islands via a solid-state process. Up to a critical film thickness value of ~1.4 μm, the degree of agglomeration was found to display an exponential dependence on the thickness of the original nickel film.

  12. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  13. Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    1998-09-29

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  14. Percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene-based nanocomposites with filler agglomeration and interfacial tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Shan, Jerry W.; Weng, George J.

    2015-08-01

    The dispersion state or degree of agglomeration of graphene is known to have a significant influence on the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene-based polymer nanocomposites. In addition, an imperfectly conducting interface and tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity can also affect the overall conductivity. In this paper, a continuum theory is developed that considers all these factors. We first present a two-scale composite model consisting of graphene-rich regions serving as the agglomerates and a graphene-poor region as the matrix. We then introduce the effective-medium theory to determine the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of the agglomerate and the composite. To account for the effect of imperfect interfaces, a thin layer of interphase with low conductivity is introduced to build a thinly coated graphene, while to account for the contribution of electron hopping from one graphene to another, Cauchy's statistical function which can reflect the increased tunneling activity near the percolation threshold is introduced. It is shown that the percolation threshold of the nanocomposite is controlled by two dispersion parameters, a and b, and the aspect ratio of agglomerates, αR . It is also shown that the overall conductivity of the nanocomposite mainly depends on the intrinsic conductivity of graphene and polymer matrix, the intrinsic interfacial resistivity, and the tunneling-assisted hopping process. We highlight the conceived theory by demonstrating that a set of recently measured data on the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene/polystyrene nanocomposites can be well captured by it.

  15. Recent Developments in the Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz Procedure for Multireader ROC Study Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, Stephen L.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Metz, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz (DBM) method has been one of the most popular methods for analyzing multireader receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies since it was proposed in 1992. Despite its popularity, the original procedure has several drawbacks: it is limited to jackknife accuracy estimates, it is substantially conservative, and it is not based on a satisfactory conceptual or theoretical model. Recently, solutions to these problems have been presented in three papers. Our purpose is to summarize and provide an overview of these recent developments. Materials and Methods We present and discuss the recently proposed solutions for the various drawbacks of the original DBM method. Results We compare the solutions in a simulation study and find that they result in improved performance for the DBM procedure. We also compare the solutions using two real data studies and find that the modified DBM procedure that incorporates these solutions yields more significant results and clearer interpretations of the variance component parameters than the original DBM procedure. Conclusions We recommend using the modified DBM procedure that incorporates the recent developments. PMID:18423323

  16. Clustering algorithm evaluation and the development of a replacement for procedure 1. [for crop inventories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennington, R. K.; Johnson, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient procedure which clusters data using a completely unsupervised clustering algorithm and then uses labeled pixels to label the resulting clusters or perform a stratified estimate using the clusters as strata is developed. Three clustering algorithms, CLASSY, AMOEBA, and ISOCLS, are compared for efficiency. Three stratified estimation schemes and three labeling schemes are also considered and compared.

  17. Development and Implementation of Procedures to Maximize Instructional Time in an Itinerant Special Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Robert A.

    The doctoral thesis, three-fourths of which consists of appendixes, describes the development and implementation of procedures to maximize the individualized instruction time of speech, hearing, and visually handicapped students in a public school itinerant special education setting in Pennsylvania. A brief review of the Education for All…

  18. Development of Procedures for Generating Alternative Allied Health Manpower Requirements and Supply Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This report presents results of a project to assess the adequacy of existing data sources on the supply of 21 allied health occupations in order to develop improved data collection strategies and improved procedures for estimation of manpower needs. Following an introduction, chapter 2 provides a discussion of the general phases of the project and…

  19. Language Learning of Children with Typical Development Using a Deductive Metalinguistic Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finestack, Lizbeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the current study, the author aimed to determine whether 4- to 6-year-old typically developing children possess requisite problem-solving and language abilities to produce, generalize, and retain a novel verb inflection when taught using an explicit, deductive teaching procedure. Method: Study participants included a cross-sectional…

  20. A National Survey of Faculty Development Evaluation Outcome Measures and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their evaluation procedures and outcome measures for faculty development for online teaching conducted during 2011-2012. The survey results found that over 90% of institutions used measures of the faculty person's…

  1. Development of luminescence procedures to evaluate permeation of multi-ring polyaromatic compounds through protective materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; White, D.A.

    1987-04-01

    This study describes two practical and simple luminescence techniques developed to evaluate the efficacy of protective clothing materials against permeation of multi-ring polyaromatic compounds contained in heavy oil and petroleum products. The procedures use a rapid and simple technique based on room temperature phosphorimetry and fluorescence detection in which a portable fiberoptics luminoscope was used.

  2. Development of Criteria and Procedures for Management of Classified Document Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rea, Jack C.

    The report describes work done in development of criteria and procedures for management of collections of classified documents. Material is presented on philosophy of operation, concept of user service, accession and retention. Much of the discussion is based upon the concept of conversion to a microfiche-oriented library; however, hard copy…

  3. Development of a numerical procedure to treat wires attached to arbitrarily shaped conducting bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilton, D. R.; Long, S. A.

    1986-04-01

    A numerical analysis procedure was developed which modeled wire radiating structures, conducting surfaces, and the junctions between them. In addition, an experimental investigation was undertaken to determine the admittance of a monopole antenna attached to a conducting box-a configuration which models several actual radiating systems. Experimental measurements and numerically predicted data were compared with good correlation noted.

  4. Methodological Issues in Developing a Multi-Dimensional Coding Procedure for Small-Group Chat Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Stahl, Gerry

    2007-01-01

    In CSCL research, collaboration through chat has primarily been studied in dyadic settings. This article discusses three issues that emerged during the development of a multi-dimensional coding procedure for small-group chat communication: (a) the unit of analysis and unit fragmentation, (b) the reconstruction of the response structure and (c)…

  5. Development of the Contents of a College Health Services Policy and Procedure Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockoff, Sheila G.

    This study sought to clarify the appropriate content of a policy and procedures manual for college health services at Rancho Santiago College (RSC) and to involve the health services staff in developing such a manual. RSC is a large urban Southern California comprehensive community college. The study proceeded with a literature review, a modified…

  6. Frequency comparative study of coal-fired fly ash acoustic agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianzhong; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Guangxue; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2011-01-01

    Particulate pollution is main kind of atmospheric pollution. The fine particles are seriously harmful to human health and environment. Acoustic agglomeration is considered as a promising pretreatment technology for fine particle agglomeration. The mechanisms of acoustic agglomeration are very complex and the agglomeration efficiency is affected by many factors. The most important and controversial factor is frequency. Comparative studies between high-frequency and low-frequency sound source to agglomerate coal-fired fly ash were carried out to investigate the influence of frequency on agglomeration efficiency. Acoustic agglomeration theoretical analysis, experimental particle size distributions (PSDs) and orthogonal design were examined. The results showed that the 20 kHz high-frequency sound source was not suitable to agglomerate coal-fired fly ash. Only within the size ranging from 0.2 to 0.25 microm the particles agglomerated to adhere together, and the agglomerated particles were smaller than 2.5 microm. The application of low-frequency (1000-1800 Hz) sound source was proved as an advisable pretreatment with the highest agglomeration efficiency of 75.3%, and all the number concentrations within the measuring range decreased. Orthogonal design L16 (4)3 was introduced to determine the optimum frequency and optimize acoustic agglomeration condition. According to the results of orthogonal analysis, frequency was the dominant factor of coal-fired fly ash acoustic agglomeration and the optimum frequency was 1400 Hz. PMID:22432309

  7. Weather analysis and interpretation procedures developed for the US/Canada wheat and barley exploratory experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, M. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Procedures and techniques for providing analyses of meteorological conditions at segments during the growing season were developed for the U.S./Canada Wheat and Barley Exploratory Experiment. The main product and analysis tool is the segment-level climagraph which depicts temporally meteorological variables for the current year compared with climatological normals. The variable values for the segment are estimates derived through objective analysis of values obtained at first-order station in the region. The procedures and products documented represent a baseline for future Foreign Commodity Production Forecasting experiments.

  8. Universities' Entrepreneurial Performance: The Role of Agglomeration Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ping Penny

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the extensive research on universities' entrepreneurship, whether research strength fosters or dampens their entrepreneurial performance remains controversial. Much research claims an influential role of research universities in regional economy, however, little has been said about what a part that the agglomeration economies may play…

  9. Developing a preservation policy and procedure statement for a health sciences library.

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, B A

    1989-01-01

    The preconditions for creating a preservation policy document in a health sciences library are an existing preservation policy for the institution of which it is a part and administrative support for preservation. The assumption underlying preservation activity, from the formulation of general guidelines to the detail of operating procedure, is that collection development and preservation are complementary functions. Documentation of operational procedures in some detail should be a part of the statement. Since preservation activity cuts across functional library structures, all management staff should be involved in the planning process and be made aware of their responsibilities. The creation of a preservation policy statement will highlight unaddressed issues, procedural inadequacies, and differences in staff perceptions of priorities, but a written statement provides a framework for setting priorities and making decisions. PMID:2758183

  10. Design, development and characterization of a modular end effector for MIS procedures.

    PubMed

    Izzo, A; Tortora, G; Dario, P; Menciassi, A

    2015-08-01

    The Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) paradigm is well established in modern surgical procedures. Although MIS is successful from the patient's viewpoint, the use of rigid instruments inserted through small skin incisions leads to dexterity constraints and loss of degree of motion. Robotics has been introduced as support for augmenting dexterity during interventions, restoring hand-eye coordination and providing tools with enhanced degrees of motion. However, surgical robots have high costs and large footprint, pushing the research towards the development of modular robots to be used in Naturally Orifice Trans-luminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) procedures. The main need of having simple and cheap tools able to be interchanged during the surgical procedure became crucial. In this paper an innovative modular end-effector based on a compliant soft actuation system able to provide up to 5.78 N gripping forces is presented. PMID:26737874

  11. The policy & procedure manual: development of a computer-assisted process for review.

    PubMed

    Crawford, N; Norris, J R; Ferguson-Paré, M L

    1993-01-01

    This article documents the successful development of a computer-assisted process for systematic review of nursing policies and procedures at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. Through broad staff input, policies and procedures are research-based yet grounded in the reality of the facility's nursing practice. Client-related standards are written as measurable, realistic statements of desired client outcomes, and as such are standards for client care. Policies and procedures have been rated according to the Canadian Council on Health Facilities Accreditation criteria (client centered, high risk, high volume, problem prone, interservice, outcome-related), so that important policies are easily identified to provide focus for quality assurance activities. The review process is structured so that over the course of a year, all policies are circulated for review by all levels of nursing staff. PMID:8347653

  12. Experimental study on static and impact strength of sintered agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Nagisa; Nakamura, Akiko M.

    2011-01-01

    Porous internal structure is common among small bodies in the planetary systems and possible range of porosity, strength, and scale of in-homogeneity is wide. Icy agglomerates, such as icy dust aggregates in the proto-planetary disks or icy re-accumulated bodies of fragments from impact disruption beyond snow-line would have stronger bulk strength once the component particles physically connect each other due to sintering. In this study, in order to get better understanding of impact disruption process of such bodies, we first investigated the critical tensile (normal) and bending (tangential) forces to break a single neck, the connected part of the sintered particles, using sintered dimer of macro glass particles of ˜5 mm in diameter. We found that the critical tensile force is proportional to the cross-section of the neck when the neck grows sufficiently larger than the surface roughness of the original particles. We also found that smaller force is required to break a neck when the force is applied tangentially to the neck than normally applied. Then we measured the bulk tensile strength of sintered glass agglomerates consisting of 90 particles and showed that the average tensile stress to break a neck of agglomerates in static loading is consistent with the measured value for dimers. Impact experiments with velocity from 40 to 280 m/s were performed for the sintered agglomerates with ˜40% porosity, of two different bulk tensile strengths. The size ratio of the beads to the target was 0.19. The energy density required to catastrophically break the agglomerate was shown to be much less than those required for previously investigated sintered glass beads targets with ˜40% porosity, of which the size of component bead is 10 -2 times smaller and the size ratio of the bead to target is also ˜10 -2 times smaller than the agglomerates in this study. This is probably due to much smaller number of necks for the stress wave to travel through the agglomerates and

  13. Safety testing and operational procedures for self-developed radiofrequency coils.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jens; Henning, Anke; Giapitzakis, Ioannis A; Scheffler, Klaus; Shajan, G; Pohmann, Rolf; Avdievich, Nikolai I

    2016-09-01

    The development of novel radiofrequency (RF) coils for human ultrahigh-field (≥7 T), non-proton and body applications is an active field of research in many MR groups. Any RF coil must meet the strict requirements for safe application on humans with respect to mechanical and electrical safety, as well as the specific absorption rate (SAR) limits. For this purpose, regulations such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard for medical electrical equipment, vendor-suggested test specifications for third party coils and custom-developed test procedures exist. However, for higher frequencies and shorter wavelengths in ultrahigh-field MR, the RF fields may become extremely inhomogeneous in biological tissue and the risk of localized areas with elevated power deposition increases, which is usually not considered by existing safety testing and operational procedures. In addition, important aspects, such as risk analysis and comprehensive electrical performance and safety tests, are often neglected. In this article, we describe the guidelines used in our institution for electrical and mechanical safety tests, SAR simulation and verification, risk analysis and operational procedures, including coil documentation, user training and regular quality assurance testing, which help to recognize and eliminate safety issues during coil design and operation. Although the procedure is generally applicable to all field strengths, specific requirements with regard to SAR-related safety and electrical performance at ultrahigh-field are considered. The protocol describes an internal procedure and does not reflect consensus among a large number of research groups, but rather aims to stimulate further discussion related to minimum coil safety standards. Furthermore, it may help other research groups to establish their own procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25851551

  14. Overview of the Standing Operating Procedures (SOP) for the Development of Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Robert; Bast, Cheryl B; Wood, Carol S; Adeshina, Femi; Ross, Robert Hord

    2009-01-01

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are concentrations in air and drinking water for priority toxic chemicals. This article summarizes the Standing Operating Procedures (SOPs) currently in place for the data-driven development of chemical-specific PALs. To provide consistency and transparency, and to avoid faults of arbitrariness, SOPs were developed for guidance in deriving PAL values. The SOPs for PAL development focus on: 1) data acquisition and analysis, 2) identification of a chemical-specific critical effect, 3) selection of a quantitative point-of-departure (POD), 4) uncertainty analysis and adjustments, 5) exposure duration adjustment and extrapolation, 6) identification of special concerns and issues, and 7) verification, documentation and dissemination of PALs. To avoid uncompromising rigidity in deriving PAL values and to allow for incorporation of new or refined methodologies, the overall procedure is fluid and subject to modification. The purpose of this publication is to provide a summary of these SOPs.

  15. [Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture]. [Quarterly technical progress report, September 27, 1993--January 2, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. This application can be adapted as either a ``hot flue gas cleanup`` subsystem for the current concepts for combustor islands or as an alternative primary pulse combustor island in which slagging, sulfur capture, particulate agglomeration and control, and alkali gettering as well as NO{sub x} control processes become an integral part of the pulse combustion process. The goal of the program is to support the DOE mission in developing coal-fired combustion gas turbines. In particular, the MTCI proprietary process for bimodal ash agglomeration and simultaneous sulfur capture will be evaluated and developed. The technology embodiment of the invention provides for the use of standard grind, moderately beneficiated coal and WEM for firing the gas turbine with efficient sulfur capture and particulate emission control upstream of the turbine. The process also accommodates injection of alkali gettering material if necessary. This is aimed at utilization of relatively inexpensive coal fuels, thus realizing the primary benefit being sought by direct firing of coal in such gas turbine systems.

  16. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho; Lee, Yoonho

    2015-09-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  17. Language learning of children with typical development using a deductive metalinguistic procedure.

    PubMed

    Finestack, Lizbeth H

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE In the current study, the author aimed to determine whether 4- to 6-year-old typically developing children possess requisite problem-solving and language abilities to produce, generalize, and retain a novel verb inflection when taught using an explicit, deductive teaching procedure. METHOD Study participants included a cross-sectional sample of 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old children with typical cognitive and language development. The 66 participants were randomly assigned to either a deductive or inductive teaching condition in which they were taught a novel gender morphological inflection across 4 sessions. Learning was assessed on the basis of performance on learning, generalization, and maintenance probes. RESULTS Across all age groups, children were more likely to successfully use the novel gender form when taught using the deductive procedure than if taught using the inductive procedure (Φ range: .33-.73). Analyses within each age group revealed a robust effect for the 5-year-old children, with less consistent effects across the other age groups. CONCLUSIONS Study results suggest that 4- to 6-year-old children with typical language and cognitive abilities are able to make use of a deductive language teaching procedure when learning a novel gender inflection. Evidence also suggests that this effect is driven by expressive and receptive language ability. PMID:24129009

  18. Language Learning of Children With Typical Development Using a Deductive Metalinguistic Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Finestack, Lizbeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In the current study, the author aimed to determine whether 4- to 6-year-old typically developing children possess requisite problem-solving and language abilities to produce, generalize, and retain a novel verb inflection when taught using an explicit, deductive teaching procedure. Method Study participants included a cross-sectional sample of 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old children with typical cognitive and language development. The 66 participants were randomly assigned to either a deductive or inductive teaching condition in which they were taught a novel gender morphological inflection across 4 sessions. Learning was assessed on the basis of performance on learning, generalization, and maintenance probes. Results Across all age groups, children were more likely to successfully use the novel gender form when taught using the deductive procedure than if taught using the inductive procedure (Φ range: .33–.73). Analyses within each age group revealed a robust effect for the 5-year-old children, with less consistent effects across the other age groups. Conclusions Study results suggest that 4- to 6-year-old children with typical language and cognitive abilities are able to make use of a deductive language teaching procedure when learning a novel gender inflection. Evidence also suggests that this effect is driven by expressive and receptive language ability. PMID:24129009

  19. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  20. Development of Visual Field Screening Procedures: A Case Study of the Octopus Perimeter

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Andrew,; Myers, Jonathan S.; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We develop a methodology for designing perimetric screening procedures, using Octopus perimeters as a case study. Methods The process has three stages: analytically determining specificity and number of presentations required for different multisampling suprathreshold schemes at a single location of the visual field, ranking visual field locations by their positive predictive value (PPV) for glaucoma, and determining a pass/fail criteria for the test. For the case study the Octopus G-program visual field test pattern is used, and a dataset of 385 glaucoma and 86 normal patients. Results Using a 1-of-3 sampling strategy at a level equal to the 95 percentile of normal observers gave the most robust specificity under the influences of false-negative responses using an average of 1.5 presentations per location. The PPV analysis gave 19 locations that completely classified our glaucomatous data. A further 9 points were added to screen for nonglaucomatous loss. The final stage found that insisting that 3 locations are missed for the screening to fail gave a simulated specificity and sensitivity of approximately 95% for unreliable responders. Conclusions Our method gives a principled approach to choosing between the many parameters of a visual field screening procedure. We have developed a procedure for the Octopus that should terminate in less than 1 minute for normal observers with high specificity and sensitivity to glaucoma. Translational Relevance Visual field screening is used in community settings and eye care practice. This study provides a principled approach to the development of such screening procedures and details a new procedure. PMID:27190698

  1. Proceedings of the 19 biennial conference of the institute for briquetting and agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the briquetting and agglomeration of materials. Topics considered at the conference included the pelletizing of carbon black, the agglomeration of hard coal, the selection of a coal agglomerate for gasification, the briquetting of soft lignite, fiber addition for increased pellet strength, properties of granules, compaction, the Iowa agglomeration process, land disposal restrictions, the disposal of hazardous materials and industrial wastes, and the compaction of sludges from municipal waste treatment plants.

  2. POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from October 1, 1997 to December 31, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental test procedures and the results related to the processing of coal fines originating from process streams generated at the Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant, owned and operated by the Drummond Company Inc. of Alabama, are described. Two samples of coal fines, namely Cyclone Overflow and Pond Fines were investigated. The batch test results showed that by applying the Aglofloat technology a significant ash removal might be achieved at a very high combustible matter recovery: · for the Cyclone Overflow sample the ash reduction was in the range 50 to 55% at combustible matter recovery about 98% · for the Pond Fines sample the ash reduction was up to 48% at combustible matter recovery up to 85%. Additional tests were carried out with the Alberta origin Luscar Mine coal, which will be used for the parametric studies of agglomeration equipment at the 250 kg/h pilot plant. The Luscar coal is very similar to the Mary Lee Coal Group (processed at Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant) in terms of rank and chemical composition.

  3. An Overview of Models of Speaking Performance and Its Implications for the Development of Procedural Framework for Diagnostic Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Zhongbao

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at developing a procedural framework for the development and validation of diagnostic speaking tests. The researcher reviews the current available models of speaking performance, analyzes the distinctive features and then points out the implications for the development of a procedural framework for diagnostic speaking tests. On…

  4. Development of an Open Source Educational Resource: "Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Care".

    PubMed

    Doyle, Glynda; McCutcheon, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    An Open Education Resource (OER) has been developed by two nurse educators to address inconsistencies in how clinical health care skills are taught and practiced in the clinical setting, and to ensure best practice and quality care based on the latest evidence. A checklist approach aims to provide clear steps and rationale for procedures, standardized processes for clinical skills and to assist nursing schools and clinical practice partners in teaching clinical skills, and keeping procedural practice current. The format is logical, organized and focused on patient safety, and will provide information retrieval opportunities at the point of care to support decisions and plan patient care. This poster discusses the development of this resource, the framework used, and the process from conception to distribution. PMID:27332441

  5. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1993-10-01

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 1 {mu}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. It is generally recognized that surface-based separation processes such as froth flotation or selective agglomeration offer considerable potential for such applications but there remain many problems in obtaining the required selectivity with acceptable recovery of combustible matter. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive.

  6. Development of three vitrification-based cryopreservation procedures for shoot tips of China's potato.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Wang, R R; Li, J W; Ma, Y L; Sheng, W M; Li, M F; Wang, Q C

    2013-01-01

    China is now the largest potato producing country worldwide. The establishment of efficient conservation techniques for potato germplasm is a prerequisite for breeding of elite cultivars. Potato viral diseases have been a great threat for sustainable potato production in China. Use of virus-free seed tubers is an effective and practical means to control viral diseases. In the present study, three vitrification-based cryopreservation techniques, i.e. droplet-vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification and vitrification were successfully developed for the first time for China's potato. Cultivar 'Zihuabai' was used to optimize key parameters involved in the three vitrification-based procedures. With the optimized parameters, shoot regrowth percentages of 71%, 76% and 43% were obtained for droplet-vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification and vitrification, respectively. The three protocols developed were further tested with eight China's major cultivars, with average shoot regrowth of 61%, 38% and 28% for droplet-vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification and vitrification, respectively. Successful development of the three cryopreservation procedures using a single cultivar will facilitate a number of comparative studies such as cryo-injury, regrowth pattern, genetic stability and efficiency of virus elimination. Testing these three cryogenic procedures for potato major cultivars representing a wide range of genetic background, will help the establishment of potato cryobanking in China and the production of virus-free plants. PMID:23995404

  7. Development of SRC-I product analysis. Volume 3. Documentation of procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Schweighardt, F.K.; Kingsley, I.S.; Cooper, F.E.; Kamzelski, A.Z.; Parees, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    This section documents the BASIC computer program written to simulate Wilsonville's GC-simulated distillation (GCSD) results at APCI-CRSD Trexlertown. The GC conditions used at APCI for the Wilsonville GCSD analysis of coal-derived liquid samples were described in the SRC-I Quarterly Technical Report, April-June 1981. The approach used to simulate the Wilsonville GCSD results is also from an SRC-I Quarterly Technical Report and is reproduced in Appendix VII-A. The BASIC computer program is described in the attached Appendix VII-B. Analysis of gases produced during coal liquefaction generates key information needed to determine product yields for material balance and process control. Gas samples from the coal process development unit (CPDU) and tubing bombs are the primary samples analyzed. A Carle gas chromatographic system was used to analyze coal liquefaction gas samples. A BASIC computer program was written to calculate the gas chromatographic peak area results into mole percent results. ICRC has employed several analytical workup procedures to determine the amount of distillate, oils, asphaltenes, preasphaltenes, and residue in SRC-I process streams. The ASE procedure was developed using Conoco's liquid column fractionation (LC/F) method as a model. In developing the ASE procedure, ICRC was able to eliminate distillation, and therefore quantify the oils fraction in one extraction step. ASE results were shown to be reproducible within +- 2 wt %, and to yield acceptable material balances. Finally, the ASE method proved to be the least affected by sample composition.

  8. Research approach and first results on agglomerate compaction in protoplanetary dust simulation in the Cloud Manipulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Blum, Jurgen; Ingo Von Borstel, Olaf; Schraepler, Rainer; Balapanov, Daniyar; Cecere, Anselmo

    2016-07-01

    Nanometre and micrometre-sized solid particles are ubiquitous in space and on Earth - from galaxies, interstellar space, protoplanetary and debris disks to planetary rings and atmospheres, planetary surfaces, comets, interplanetary space, Earth's atmosphere. Apparently, the most intriguing problem in the picture of the formation of planets is the transition from individual microscopic dust grains to kilometre-sized planetesimals. Revealing the mechanisms of this transition is one of the main tasks of the European Space Agency's project Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS). It was found that Brownian motion driven agglomeration could not provide the transition within reasonable time scale. As a result, at this stage top scientific goals shifted towards forced agglomeration and concentration of particles, targeting revealing the onset of compaction, experimental study of the evolution of fractal dimensions, size and mass distribution, occurrence of bouncing. The main tasks comprise 1) development of the rapid agglomeration model 2) development of the experimental facilities creating big fractal-type agglomerates from 10 to 1000 μm from a cloud of micrometre-size grains; 3) experimental realization of the rapid agglomeration in microgravity and ground conditions; and 4) in situ investigation of the morphology, mobility, mechanical and optical properties of the free-floating agglomerates, including investigation of thermophoresis, photophoresis of the agglomerates and of the two-phase flow phenomena. To solve the experimental part of the tasks we developed a Cloud Manipulation System, realized as a breadboard (CMS BB) for long duration microgravity platforms and a simplified laboratory version (CMS LV) mostly oriented on short duration microgravity and ground tests. The new system is based on the use of thermophoresis, most favourable for cloud manipulation without creating additional particle-particle forces in the cloud with a possibility

  9. On Some Versions of the Element Agglomeration AMGe Method

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuk, I; Vassilevski, P

    2007-08-09

    The present paper deals with element-based AMG methods that target linear systems of equations coming from finite element discretizations of elliptic PDEs. The individual element information (element matrices and element topology) is the main input to construct the AMG hierarchy. We study a number of variants of the spectral agglomerate element based AMG method. The core of the algorithms relies on element agglomeration utilizing the element topology (built recursively from fine to coarse levels). The actual selection of the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is based on solving large number of local eigenvalue problems. Additionally, we investigate strategies for adaptive AMG as well as multigrid cycles that are more expensive than the V-cycle utilizing simple interpolation matrices and nested conjugate gradient (CG) based recursive calls between the levels. The presented algorithms are illustrated with an extensive set of experiments based on a matlab implementation of the methods.

  10. Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand

    2009-01-15

    Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Functionally graded porous scaffolds made of Ti-based agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Keivan A; Hilditch, Tim; Dargusch, Matthew S; Nouri, Alireza

    2016-10-01

    Mono- and double-layer porous scaffolds were successfully fabricated using ball-milled agglomerates of Ti and Ti-10Nb-3Mo alloy. For selectively controlling the level of porosity and pore size, the agglomerates were sieved into two different size fractions of 100-300μm and 300-500μm. Compressive mechanical properties were measured on a series of cylindrical sintered compacts with different ratios of solid core diameter to porous layer width. The graded porous scaffolds exhibited stress-strain curves typical for metallic foams with a defined plateau region after yielding. The compressive strengths and elastic moduli ranged from 300 to 700MPa and 14 to 55GPa, respectively, depending on the core diameter and the material used. The obtained properties make these materials suitable for load-bearing implant applications. PMID:27389321

  12. Liquid bridge agglomeration: A fundamental approach to toner deinking

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, B.A.; Berg, J.C. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-05-01

    An alternative agglomeration technique for deinking toner-printed furnishes has been investigated. This technique requires only the addition of an immiscible hydrocarbon oil dispersed in water at dosages of approximately 1% by weight on fiber. The addition is made during repulping: the process appears to be effective at all temperatures of interest (23 C and 70 C are tested) and requires no surfactants or additional chemicals. The result of the oil addition is the agglomeration of the toner particles into spheres of 1 mm to 1 cm in size. These spheres contain the added oil which acts as a binder, holding the toner particles together by liquid bridges. The process is ineffective when the furnish contains highly sized fibers or starched paper, and future work seeks to address these crucial problems.

  13. Parallel Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library

    2015-02-19

    ParFELAG is a parallel distributed memory C++ library for numerical upscaling of finite element discretizations. It provides optimal complesity algorithms ro build multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for solving a wide class of partial differential equations (elliptic, hyperbolic, saddle point problems) on general unstructured mesh (under the assumption that the topology of the agglomerated entities is correct). Additionally, a novel multilevel solver for saddle point problems with divergence constraint is implemented.

  14. Endoscopic surgery and telemedicine in microgravity: developing contingency procedures for exploratory class spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Johnston, S.; Campbell, M.; Miles, B.; Billica, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The risk of a urinary calculus during an extended duration mission into the reduced gravity environment of space is significant. For medical operations to develop a comprehensive strategy for the spaceflight stone risk, both preventive countermeasures and contingency management (CM) plans must be included. METHODS: A feasibility study was conducted to demonstrate the potential CM technique of endoscopic ureteral stenting with ultrasound guidance for the possible in-flight urinary calculus contingency. The procedure employed the International Space Station/Human Research Facility ultrasound unit for guide wire and stent localization, a flexible cystoscope for visual guidance, and banded, biocompatible soft ureteral stents to successfully stent porcine ureters bilaterally in zero gravity (0g). RESULTS: The study demonstrated that downlinked endoscopic surgical and ultrasound images obtained in 0g are comparable in quality to 1g images, and therefore are useful for diagnostic clinical utility via telemedicine transmission. CONCLUSIONS: In order to be successful, surgical procedures in 0g require excellent positional stability of the operating surgeon, assistant, and patient, relative to one another. The technological development of medical procedures for long-duration spaceflight contingencies may lead to improved terrestrial patient care methodology and subsequently reduced morbidity.

  15. Development and evaluation of a prototype in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, J. B., Jr.; Morris, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    An in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer capable of providing simulated indications of instrument flight in a typical general aviation aircraft independent of ground based navigation aids was developed. The IFR navaid related instruments and circuits from an ATC 610J table top simulator were installed in a Cessna 172 aircraft and connected to its electrical power and pitot static systems. The benefits expected from this hybridization concept include increased safety by reducing the number of general aviation aircraft conducting IFR training flights in congested terminal areas, and reduced fuel use and instruction costs by lessening the need to fly to and from navaid equipped airports and by increased efficiency of the required in-flight training. Technical feasibility was demonstrated and the operational feasibility of the concept was evaluated. Results indicated that the in-flight simulator is an effective training device for teaching IFR procedural skills.

  16. Procedure development study: Low strain rate and creep experiments; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S.; Price, R.H.

    1991-10-01

    Licensing of the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission would require, among other things, demonstrations of the long term usability of the underground facilities. Such a demonstration involves analysis of the mechanical response of the rock to the presence of underground openings and heat-producing waste, which in turn requires data on the mechanical properties of the rock. This document describes the experimental results from a scoping study which led to the development of procedures for performing quality-affecting rock-mechanics experiments on intact rock. The future experiments performed with these procedures will produce information on the time-dependent deformation of welded tuff and represent one aspect of the overall effort to characterize the rheology of the rock mass. 3 refs., 42 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Nifedipine Nanoparticle Agglomeration as a Dry Powder Aerosol Formulation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Plumley, Carl; Gorman, Eric M.; Munson, Eric J.; Berkland, Cory

    2009-01-01

    Efficient administration of drugs represents a leading challenge in pulmonary medicine. Dry powder aerosols are of great interest compared to traditional aerosolized liquid formulations in that they may offer improved stability, ease of administration, and simple device design. Particles 1–5 µm in size typically facilitate lung deposition. Nanoparticles may be exhaled as a result of their small size; however, they are desired to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs. Nanoparticles of the hypertension drug nifedipine were co-precipitated with stearic acid to form a colloid exhibiting negative surface charge. Nifedipine nanoparticle colloids were destabilized by using sodium chloride to disrupt the electrostatic repulsion between particles as a means to achieve the agglomerated nanoparticles of a controlled size. The aerodynamic performance of agglomerated nanoparticles was determined by cascade impaction. The powders were found to be well suited for pulmonary delivery. In addition, nanoparticle agglomerates revealed enhanced dissolution of the drug species suggesting the value of this formulation approach for poorly water soluble pulmonary medicines. Ultimately, nifedipine powders are envisioned as an approach to treat pulmonary hypertension. PMID:19015016

  18. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  19. Development of a simplified asphalt mix stability procedure for use in Superpave volumetric mix design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihab Hussein Fahmy

    Over the last five decades, two common test methods (Marshall and Hveem) have evolved for the design of asphaltic mixes. These design methods have been historically found to be generally reliable and reasonable for most application in design. However, premature distress in many flexible pavements suggests that these empirical methods of design do not guarantee a stable mix. Recently, many studies have been carried out in order to develop a rational mix design procedure that accounts for both the mix volumetric properties as well as fundamental engineering properties. Among those is the Superpave design procedure, which was originally divided into three, hierarchical levels termed the volumetric mix design (level I), the abbreviated mix design (level II), and the full mix design (level III). In the volumetric design, the entire mix design process is based upon the volumetric properties and does not include a test method to evaluate the stability/strength of the mix. Although both the abbreviated level and the full level of design included test methods that considered the engineering properties in a complete and a comprehensive manner; they required the purchase of very expensive equipment and a large number of samples to be tested. The objective of this research was to develop a new rational "fundamental" mix strength (stability) test for the design of dense graded mixes to overcome the limitations of the Hveem and Marshall empirical methods and to fill the gaps and major deficiencies in the current Superpave volumetric mix design. The new procedure is based upon the Superpave volumetric design (level I) but is augmented by the simple, but fundamental mix strength (stability) test. Such a test is now currently absent in the existing Superpave approach. The new procedure introduces the flow time as a fundamental engineering design criterion in the mix design. This parameter is defined as the time (in seconds) at which plastic flow in a mix occurs under creep loading

  20. Development of an analytic procedure to calculate damage accumulation in composites during low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, E. A.; Goering, J.

    1983-01-01

    A computerized procedure was developed to model the response of a laminated composite plate subjected to low velocity impact. The methodology incorporated transient dynamics finite element analysis coupled with composite layer and interlaminar stress predictions. Damage was predicted using a stress based failure criteria and incorporated into the solution as stiffness modifications. The force-displacement relation between the impactor and plate was modelled with a nonlinear contact spring similar to Hertzian contact. Analyses performed predicted ply damage early in the impact event when the displacement fields were characteristic of high frequency flexurable response.

  1. Development of a drift-correction procedure for a photoelectric spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique has been developed to automatically correct for drifts in the radiometric sensitivity of the detector channels in a direct-reading emission spectrometer. The method utilizes a 1000 W tungsten-halogen reference lamp to illuminate the detectors through the same optical path as that traversed during the analysis of the sample. Detector channel responses to the light are compared to those for the same light intensity at the time of analytical calibration. This corrects for the drift. It is noted that with the exception of positioning the lamp, the procedure is fully automatic.

  2. Development of a full-scale transmission testing procedure to evaluate advanced lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.; Shimski, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on the OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission in the NASA Lewis 500-hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. The testing was part of a joint Navy/NASA/Army lubrication program. The objective of the program was to develop a separate lubricant for gearboxes and demonstrate an improved performance in life and load-carrying capacity. The goal of the experiments was to develop a testing procedure to fail certain transmission components using a MIL-L-23699 base reference oil, then run identical tests with improved lubricants and demonstrate performance. The tests were directed at failing components that the Navy has had problems with due to marginal lubrication. These failures included mast shaft bearing micropitting, sun gear and planet bearing fatigue, and spiral bevel gear scoring. A variety of tests were performed and over 900 hours of total run time accumulated for these tests. Some success was achieved in developing a testing procedure to produce sun gear and planet bearing fatigue failures. Only marginal success was achieved in producing mast shaft bearing micropitting and spiral bevel gear scoring.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of agglomerated crystals by crystallo-co-agglomeration: an integrated approach of principal component analysis and Box-Behnken experimental design.

    PubMed

    Garala, Kevin C; Patel, Jaydeep M; Dhingani, Anjali P; Dharamsi, Abhay T

    2013-08-16

    Poor mechanical properties of crystalline drug particles require wet granulation technique for tablet production which is uneconomical, laborious, and tedious. The present investigation was aimed to improve flow and mechanical properties of racecadotril (RCD), a poorly water soluble antidiarrheal agent, by a crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA) technique. The influence of various excipients and processing conditions on formation of directly compressible agglomerates of RCD was evaluated. Principal component analysis and Box-Behnken experimental design was implemented to optimize the agglomerates with good micromeritics and mechanical properties. The overall yield of the process was 88-98% with size of agglomerates between 351 and 1214 μm. Further, higher rotational speed reduced the size of agglomerates and disturbed sphericity. The optimized batch of agglomerates exhibited excellent flowability and crushing strength. The optimized batch of RCD agglomerates was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry and gas chromatography which illustrated absence of drug-excipient interaction with minimal entrapment of residual solvent. Hence, it may be concluded that both excipients and processing conditions played a vital role to prepare spherical crystal agglomerates of RCD by CCA and it can be adopted as an excellent alternative to wet granulation. PMID:23684660

  4. A micromanipulation particle tester for agglomeration contact mechanism studies in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, C. I.; Althaus, T.; Niederreiter, G.; Hounslow, M. J.; Palzer, S.; Salman, A. D.

    2012-10-01

    Pressure agglomeration of powders is widely applied in various industries and an increasing interest lies in the identification and description of contact mechanisms between particles, which are responsible for the compaction product properties. In this paper, the design and development of a novel micromanipulation particle tester (MPT) is presented. This device makes it possible to measure the deformation kinetics and resulting adhesion of two individual particles in contact under load, which are strongly influenced by the applied process conditions. The MPT set-up is, therefore, designed to offer a unique control over the process conditions most relevant to the compaction of powders: external stress, dwell or holding time at constant deformation, compression velocity as well as relative humidity and temperature determining the physical state and mechanical characteristics of hygrosensitive amorphous particles. The latter are often part of powder formulations, e.g. in the food industry, and have been used for force and contact-zone development studies with the MPT. The experimental results on the microscale level will deliver valuable quantitative information for an improved tailoring of pressure agglomeration process conditions of bulk solids.

  5. Developing standard performance testing procedures for MC&A components at a site

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements, documentation and the human factor, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following elements and subsystems or components for a material control and accountability system: (1) MC&A Elements: Information subsystem, Measurement subsystem, NM access subsystem, including a tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated information-gathering subsystem; and (2) Detecting NM Loses Elements: Inventory differences, Shipper/receiver differences, Confirmatory measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or seal violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems (from the list above). Additionally this work includes a review of the status of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system components and potential criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a pilot Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the MBAs of SSC RF IPPE.

  6. Developing policies and procedures for a picture archiving and communication system.

    PubMed

    Gaytos, B

    2001-06-01

    Policies and procedures (P&P) constitute the mechanism for planning, standardizing, and documenting the provision of clinical services. Upon approval by hospital management, the P&P is an official statement of hospital rules and regulations. Each P&P establishes organizational responsibility for providing services. P&P are a mechanism for communicating standard operating procedures to hospital and medical staff. P&P serve as a reference document for unusual events, as well as routine procedures. P&P are often reviewed by inspection teams from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospital Organizations (JCAHO) to determine whether the hospital has documented systematic practices. A picture archival and communications system (PACS) provides a new vehicle for providing radiology services. P&P that were designed for conventional film-based imaging are often not appropriate for electronic imaging. Because PACS is new and not yet widespread, good examples of PACS P&P are not yet available. JCAHO has no official requirements for PACS: PACS is viewed only as a means for the hospital to accomplish its work. Successful P&P development is a team effort, drafted by personnel responsible for executing the procedure, assisted by staff proficient in PACS technology, and tested in the field. The P&P should be reviewed and approved by management personnel knowledgeable about hospital and imaging operations. P&P should be written in clear and concise language. Successful P&P development is an ongoing effort. P&P must be periodically reviewed and updated to reflect changes in PACS technology and changes in clinical operations. New P&P must be developed when a deficit is noted. PACS security is a good example of a topic worthy of P&P development, especially in the face of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) legislation of 1996. What are the provisions for access control? Does the system include a feature for automatic shut-off of the software? Are there

  7. Locating Supervision--A Reflective Framework for Negotiating Tensions within Conceptual and Procedural Foci for Teacher Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow-Gerono, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript presents a theoretical construct for analyzing procedural and conceptual tensions within instructional leadership for teacher development. The dynamic, multi-dimensional framework demonstrates possibilities for locating supervision as having procedural and conceptual bases. By employing the questions identified, educators may place…

  8. 29 CFR 37.77 - Who is responsible for developing and publishing complaint processing procedures for service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Who is responsible for developing and publishing complaint processing procedures for service providers? 37.77 Section 37.77 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) Compliance Procedures...

  9. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  10. Effect of Electromagnetic Vibration on the Agglomeration Behavior of Primary Silicon in Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yecong; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei; He, Yanjie

    2012-05-01

    An experimental apparatus that enables the simultaneous application of an alternating electric field and a stationary magnetic field was developed. Electromagnetic vibration was induced in a hypereutectic Al-Si alloy melt during solidification at a constant cooling rate. The results showed that the silicon particles collide with each other and agglomerate into clusters with the application of an electromagnetic vibration. With the increase of the electromagnetic force F, the sizes of the silicon clusters decrease and the clusters become more compact.

  11. Intra-metropolitan migration in the Warsaw agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Rykiel, Z

    1984-01-01

    "Two questions of intra-metropolitan migration are analyzed in the paper, intra-metropolitan hierarchy and intra-metropolitan spatial barriers. The former embraces four detailed questions: ranking of centers; spatial pattern of hierarchical subordination; degree of unequivocalness of the subordinations, or degree of dominance; and degree of hierarchicality of interrelationships. Two specialties of the Warsaw [Poland] agglomeration are discussed, the influence of the present crisis, and the administrative restrictions to migration to the city, or the spatial barriers. Social connotations of the latter are also presented." PMID:12312885

  12. Development of a Quality Assurance Procedure for Dose Volume Histogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, David A.

    The role of the dose-volume histogram (DVH) is rapidly expanding in radiation oncology treatment planning. DVHs are already relied upon to differentiate between two similar plans and evaluate organ-at-risk dosage. Their role will become even more important as progress continues towards implementing biologically based treatment planning systems. Therefore it is imperative that the accuracy of DVHs is evaluated and reappraised after any major software or hardware upgrades, affecting a treatment planning system (TPS). The purpose of this work is to create and implement a comprehensive quality assurance procedure evaluating dose volume histograms to insure their accuracy while satisfying American College of Radiology guidelines. Virtual phantoms of known volumes were created in Pinnacle TPS and exposed to different beam arrangements. Variables including grid size and slice thickness were varied and their effects were analyzed. The resulting DVHs were evaluated by comparison to the commissioned percent depth dose values using a custom Excel spreadsheet. After determining the uncertainty of the DVH based on these variables, multiple second check calculations were performed using MIM Maestro and Matlab software packages. The uncertainties of the DVHs were shown to be less than +/- 3%. The average uncertainty was shown to be less than +/- 1%. The second check procedures resulted in mean percent differences less than 1% which confirms the accuracy of DVH calculation in Pinnacle and the effectiveness of the quality assurance template. The importance of knowing the limits of accuracy of the DVHs, which are routinely used to assess the quality of clinical treatment plans, cannot be overestimated. The developed comprehensive QA procedure evaluating the accuracy of the DVH statistical analysis will become a part of our clinical arsenal for periodic tests of the treatment planning system. It will also be performed at the time of commissioning and after any major software

  13. Desulfurization and deashing of Hazro coal by selective oil agglomeration in various water mediums

    SciTech Connect

    Halime Abakay Temel; Fatma Deniz Ayhan

    2006-10-15

    The aim of this study was to study the effects of various water mediums on desulfurization and deashing of Hazro coal by the agglomeration method. For this purpose, three groups of agglomeration experiments were made. The effects of some parameters that markedly influence the effectiveness of selective oil agglomeration, such as solid concentration, bridging liquid concentration, and pH, on the agglomeration were investigated in the first group of experiments. The effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3}) on the agglomeration were investigated in the second group of experiments. The effects of lake water and sea water on the agglomeration were investigated in the third group of experiments. The influences of the Mediterranean Sea water and Aegean Sea water on the removal of ash and total sulfur were found to be important. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Developing Tsunami Evacuation Plans, Maps, And Procedures: Pilot Project in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcos, N. P.; Kong, L. S. L.; Arcas, D.; Aliaga, B.; Coetzee, D.; Leonard, J.

    2015-12-01

    In the End-to-End tsunami warning chain, once a forecast is provided and a warning alert issued, communities must know what to do and where to go. The 'where to' answer would be reliable and practical community-level tsunami evacuation maps. Following the Exercise Pacific Wave 2011, a questionnaire was sent to the 46 Member States of Pacific Tsunami Warning System (PTWS). The results revealed over 42 percent of Member States lacked tsunami mass coastal evacuation plans. Additionally, a significant gap in mapping was exposed as over 55 percent of Member States lacked tsunami evacuation maps, routes, signs and assembly points. Thereby, a significant portion of countries in the Pacific lack appropriate tsunami planning and mapping for their at-risk coastal communities. While a variety of tools exist to establish tsunami inundation areas, these are inconsistent while a methodology has not been developed to assist countries develop tsunami evacuation maps, plans, and procedures. The International Tsunami Information Center (ITIC) and partners is leading a Pilot Project in Honduras demonstrating that globally standardized tools and methodologies can be applied by a country, with minimal tsunami warning and mitigation resources, towards the determination of tsunami inundation areas and subsequently community-owned tsunami evacuation maps and plans for at-risk communities. The Pilot involves a 1- to 2-year long process centered on a series of linked tsunami training workshops on: evacuation planning, evacuation map development, inundation modeling and map creation, tsunami warning & emergency response Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), and conducting tsunami exercises (including evacuation). The Pilot's completion is capped with a UNESCO/IOC document so that other countries can replicate the process in their tsunami-prone communities.

  15. Consumption of milk and milk products in the population of the Upper Silesian agglomeration inhabitants

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Marek; Grochowska-Niedworok, Elżbieta; Całyniuk, Beata; Kolasa, Ilona; Grajek, Mateusz; Bielaszka, Agnieszka; Kiciak, Agata; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background Providing the appropriate amount of nutrients at every stage of life is a key element determining the proper development and functioning of the body. Objective Because of the nutritional value and resulting position of milk and milk products in the daily diet, this study was undertaken to assess the consumption of milk and milk products among the inhabitants of the Upper Silesian agglomeration. Design The survey covered 600 people, including 339 women (56.5%) and 261 men (43.5%) aged 18–78 years. To assess the consumption of milk and milk products, as a research tool an original survey with the closed-ended and open-ended questions was used. The questions concerned the characteristics of the surveyed group and various aspects of the consumption of milk and milk products. The results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using the Statistica 10.0 program with a chi-square test for quality features. Results The level of consumption of milk and milk products among the Upper Silesian agglomeration inhabitants is insufficient in relation to nutrition recommendations. However, despite many controversies surrounding milk, the respondents also claimed that it played an important role in their daily diet. Conclusions The most frequently consumed type of milk in the surveyed group is ultra heat treated (UHT) milk with average fat content. PMID:26942408

  16. Dispersion and Filtration of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Measurement of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Pui, David Y.H.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) tend to form bundles due to their geometry and van der Walls forces, which usually complicates studies of the CNT properties. Dispersion plays a significant role in CNT studies and we summarize dispersion techniques to generate airborne CNTs from suspensions or powders. We describe in detail our technique of CNT aerosolization with controlled degree of agglomeration using an electrospray system. The results of animal inhalation studies using the electrosprayed CNTs are presented. We have performed filtration experiments for CNTs through a screen filter. A numerical model has been established to simulate the CNT filtration experiments. Both the modeling and experimental results show that the CNT penetration is less than the penetration for a sphere with the same mobility diameter, which is mainly due to the larger interception length of the CNTs. There is a need for instruments capable of fast and online measurement of gas-borne nanoparticle agglomerates. We developed an instrument Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA) and the measurement results for diesel exhaust particulates are presented. The results presented here are pertinent to non-spherical aerosol particles, and illustrate the effects of particle morphology on aerosol behaviors. PMID:23355749

  17. Development and evaluation of a rapid and simple procedure for detection of Pneumocystis carinii by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, C P; Nelson, N A; Gill, V J

    1994-01-01

    We report the development of a simplified PCR-based assay for the detection of Pneumocystis carinii DNA in clinical specimens. The adoption of a rapid DNA extraction procedure and the introduction of a type of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for PCR product detection enabled this procedure to be carried out in a single working day in a clinical microbiology laboratory. The PCR assay was prospectively compared with an immunofluorescent-antibody (FA) staining method for the detection of P. carinii in induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. The results of the study showed that, for induced sputum specimens, FA staining had a sensitivity of 78% (32 of 41 specimens) and a specificity of 100% (166 of 166 specimens); PCR was 100% (41 of 41 specimens) sensitive and 98% (162 of 166 specimens) specific. For BAL specimens, FA staining was 100% sensitive (21 of 21 specimens) and 100% specific (133 of 133 specimens), and PCR had a sensitivity of 100% (21 of 21 specimens) and a specificity of 99% (132 of 133 specimens). These results strongly suggest that use of our PCR-based assay could effect clinically useful improvements in the sensitivity of induced sputum specimens for the detection of P. carinii. Images PMID:7929749

  18. Development of a procedure to determine odour emissions from animal farming for regulatory purposes in Flanders.

    PubMed

    Van Langenhove, H; De Bruyn, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the project described in this paper was to develop a procedure to determine odour emissions at existing and new intensive animal farming houses. The procedure should be scientifically valid and preferably applicable on a large scale at reasonable costs. In this project odour emissions were measured during one year at the same farm. Measurements included 20 olfactometric sampling days and 50 sniffing measurements, all spread over one year. For each olfactometric sampling day, samples were taken in duplicate for the different pig categories. The olfactometric analysis resulted in the determination of odour emission factors for growing/fattening pigs, weaned piglets, dry sows and farrowing sows. The influence of external parameters (ventilation rate, inside temperature, outside temperature, pen dirtiness, number of pigs and their weight) was examined. Good correlation between the odour emission and an external parameter could only be found for the ventilation rate (r = 0.98) and outside temperature (r = 0.87). The sniffing measurements resulted in maximal odour perception distances and odour emissions calculated with short and long term dispersion models. No significant influence of the outside temperature (season) could be found here. The results of the olfactometric and sniffing measurements will be presented, including a combination of both techniques to determine the odour emission of an agricultural construction. PMID:11762463

  19. Development of low-cost welding procedures for thick sections of HY-150 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, P. M.; Snow, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost welding procedures were developed for welding 6-inch thick HY-150 steel to be used in the manufacture of large diameter motor case Y rings and nozzle attachment flanges. An extensive investigation was made of the mechanical and metallurgical properties and fracture toughness of HY-150 base plate and welds made with manual shielded metal arc process and semi-automatic gas metal arc process in the flat position. Transverse tensiles, all-weld metal tensiles, Charpy V-notch specimens and edge notched bend specimens were tested in the course of the program. In addition metallographic studies and hardness tests were performed on the weld, weld HAZ and base metal. The results of the work performed indicate that both the shielded metal arc and gas metal arc processes are capable of producing consistently sound welds as determined by radiographic and ultrasonic inspection. In addition, the weld metal, deposited by each process was found to exhibit a good combination of strength and toughness such that the selection of a rolled and welded procedure for fabricating rocket motor case components would appear to be technically feasible.

  20. Time/Loss Analysis in the development and evaluation of emergency response procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.A.

    1994-08-01

    Time/Loss Analysis (T/LA) provides a standard for conducting technically consistent and objective evaluations of emergency response planning and procedures. T/LA is also a sound tool for evaluating the performance of safeguards and procedures.

  1. Generalized flooded agglomerate model for the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarajugadda, Sai; Mazumder, Sandip

    2012-06-01

    The flooded agglomerate model has found prolific usage in modeling the oxygen reduction reaction within the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The assumption made in this model is that the ionomer-coated carbon-platinum agglomerate is spherical in shape and that the spheres are non-overlapping. This assumption is convenient because the governing equations lend themselves to closed-form analytical solution when a spherical shape is assumed. In reality, micrographs of the catalyst layer show that the agglomerates are best represented by sets of overlapping spheres of unequal radii. In this article, the flooded agglomerate is generalized by considering overlapping spheres of unequal radii. As a first cut, only two overlapping spheres are considered. The governing reaction-diffusion equations are solved numerically using the unstructured finite-volume method. The volumetric current density is extracted for various parametric variations, and tabulated. This sub-grid-scale generalized flooded agglomerate model is first validated and finally coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for predicting the performance of the PEMFC. Results show that when the agglomerates are small (<200 nm equivalent radius), the effect of agglomerate shape on the overall PEMFC performance is insignificant. For large agglomerates, on the other hand, the effect of agglomerate shape was found to be critical, especially for high current densities for which the mass transport resistance within the agglomerate is strongly dependent on the shape of the agglomerate, and was found to correlate well with the surface-to-volume ratio of the agglomerate.

  2. Haeckel or Hennig? The Gordian Knot of Characters, Development, and Procedures in Phylogeny.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Claude

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the conditions for validating customary phylogenetic procedures. Concludes that the requisites of homogeneity and completeness for proved short lineages seem satisfied by the Hennigian but not the Haeckelian procedure. The epistemological antinomy of the two procedures is emphasized for the first time. (Author/RH)

  3. A non-immersed induction conductivity system for controlling supersaturation in corrosive media: the case of gibbsite crystals agglomeration in Bayer liquors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyssiecq, I.; Veesler, S.; Boistelle, R.

    1996-11-01

    Agglomeration of gibbsite Al(OH) 3 crystallites is an important stage of the Bayer process, aiming at increasing the initial size of the particles. In the present work, a semi-continuous crystallizer working at constant and imposed supersaturation, and equipped with an automatic withdrawal system was developed to study the agglomeration of gibbsite crystals in supersaturated Bayer liquors. The liquor conductivity was measured using an induction conductivity system placed around the crystallizer, the conductivity regulation being used to work at constant supersaturation. Using this system allowed one to work with both a small crystallizer and a highly corrosive and abrasive suspension of gibbsite in a five molar caustic soda solution at 70°C. Analyses of the withdrawals were carried out with an Elzone particle counter, in order to draw {N(t)}/{N(0) = f(t)} plots, representing the decrease of crystal number with time, due to agglomeration.

  4. Development of multidisciplinary design optimization procedures for smart composite wings and turbomachinery blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Ratneshwar

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) procedures have been developed for smart composite wings and turbomachinery blades. The analysis and optimization methods used are computationally efficient and sufficiently rigorous. Therefore, the developed MDO procedures are well suited for actual design applications. The optimization procedure for the conceptual design of composite aircraft wings with surface bonded piezoelectric actuators involves the coupling of structural mechanics, aeroelasticity, aerodynamics and controls. The load carrying member of the wing is represented as a single-celled composite box beam. Each wall of the box beam is analyzed as a composite laminate using a refined higher-order displacement field to account for the variations in transverse shear stresses through the thickness. Therefore, the model is applicable for the analysis of composite wings of arbitrary thickness. Detailed structural modeling issues associated with piezoelectric actuation of composite structures are considered. The governing equations of motion are solved using the finite element method to analyze practical wing geometries. Three-dimensional aerodynamic computations are performed using a panel code based on the constant-pressure lifting surface method to obtain steady and unsteady forces. The Laplace domain method of aeroelastic analysis produces root-loci of the system which gives an insight into the physical phenomena leading to flutter/divergence and can be efficiently integrated within an optimization procedure. The significance of the refined higher-order displacement field on the aeroelastic stability of composite wings has been established. The effect of composite ply orientations on flutter and divergence speeds has been studied. The Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser (K-S) function approach is used to efficiently integrate the objective functions and constraints into a single envelope function. The resulting unconstrained optimization problem is solved using the

  5. Agglomeration of soot particles in diffusion flames under microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Fujita, O.; Ito, K.

    1994-11-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the behavior of soot particles in diffusion flames under microgravity conditions using a 490-m drop shaft (10-s microgravity duration) in Hokkaido, Japan. Flames from the combustion of paper sheets and butane jet diffusion flames are observed under microgravity. The oxygen concentration of the surroundings, the butane flow rate,and the burner diameter are varied as experimental parameters. The generated soot particles are sampled under microgravity and observed using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. The flames with a residual convection or forced convection are also observed to examine the influence of flow field on soot particle generation under microgravity. From these results, it is found that a number of large luminous spots appear in diffusion flames under microgravity. From the observation of TEM images, the luminous spots are the result of agglomerated soot particles and the growth of their diameters to a discernible level. The diameter of the agglomerated particles measure about 0.1 mm, 200 to 500 times as large as those generated under normal gravity. It is suggested that these large soot particles are generated in the limited areas where the conditions for the formation of these particles, such as gas velocity (residence time) and oxygen concentration, are satisfied.

  6. Mechanism of nanoparticle agglomeration during the combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Igor S.; Agranovski, Igor E.; Choi, Mansoo

    2005-08-01

    The mechanism of agglomeration of nanoparticles generated during combustion synthesis is discussed. This is based on the analysis of the transmission electron microscope images of probes collected at different heights. Although direct temperature measurements were not available, the qualitative temperature dependence of the particle formation streamlines is taken into account. It is demonstrated that agglomeration of the MgO nanoparticles, which are formed during a Mg particle combustion, occurs as the result of bonding the mature nanoparticles by the supercritical clusters existing in the system. Accumulation of these supercritical clusters in the flame has been revealed and their nature has been explained in our recent paper [I.S. Altman, I.E. Agranovski, and M. Choi, Phys. Rev E 70, 062603 (2004)]. Also, some inspection of the previously published experimental data on the nanoparticle generation shows that the similar supercritical clusters may exist in another flame reactor generating titania nanopaprticles. If this is the case, the cluster-based process of nanoparticle bonding we suggest can be considered to be general.

  7. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions.

    PubMed

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells. PMID:27541815

  8. Development and Analysis of Psychomotor Skills Metrics for Procedural Skills Decay.

    PubMed

    Parthiban, Chembian; Ray, Rebecca; Rutherford, Drew; Zinn, Mike; Pugh, Carla

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we develop and analyze the metrics associated with a force production task involving a stationary target with the help of advanced VR and Force Dimension Omega 6 haptic device. We study the effects of force magnitude and direction on the various metrics namely path length, movement smoothness, velocity and acceleration patterns, reaction time and overall error in achieving the target. Data was collected from 47 participants who were residents. Results show a positive correlation between the maximum force applied and the deflection error, velocity while reducing the path length and increasing smoothness with a force of higher magnitude showing the stabilizing characteristics of higher magnitude forces. This approach paves a way to assess and model procedural skills decay. PMID:27046593

  9. Hydrophobic Agglomeration of Mineral Fines in Aqueous Suspensions and its Application in Flotation: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingqiao; Song, Shaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Hydrophobic agglomeration is originated from the hydrophobic attraction between particles, which is essentially different from electrolyte coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is applied to mineral processing in floc-flotation process to improve the recovery of mineral fines. In this paper, the applications of this phenomenon in mineral fines were summarized, including the origin of hydrophobic agglomeration, the main factors affect hydrophobic agglomeration (particle hydrophobicity, shear rate and duration, nonpolar oil and tank geometry), as well as hydrophobic agglomeration based separation processes (carrier flotation and floc-flotation).

  10. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  11. Development of static system procedures to study aquatic biofilms and their responses to disinfection and invading species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithers, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The microbial ecology facility in the Analytical and Physical Chemistry Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is tasked with anticipation of potential microbial problems (and opportunities to exploit microorganisms) which may occur in partially closed systems such as space station/vehicles habitats and in water reclamation systems therein, with particular emphasis on the degradation of materials. Within this context, procedures for microbial biofilm research are being developed. Reported here is the development of static system procedures to study aquatic biofilms and their responses to disinfection and invading species. Preliminary investigations have been completed. As procedures are refined, it will be possible to focus more closely on the elucidation of biofilm phenomena.

  12. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn P; Bushlya, Anatoly V; Efimenko, Vladimir F; Ilyanstev, Anatoly; Regoushevsky, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  13. Development of ecotoxicology procedures for use in assessing health of coral reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.S.; Marubini, F.

    1995-12-31

    There is widespread concern over the apparent worldwide decline in the health of coral reefs. However, assessment methods, other than long-term monitoring, have not yet been attempted. To remedy this the authors are developing ecotoxicology procedures to assess the effects of water quality factors on the corals themselves. Because of the problems of working with large, attached organisms, the authors have concentrated on developing small clonal preparations from corals with both a branching and a massive growth-form. For branching corals, tips (`nubbins`) are removed, and the cut surface ground smooth before cementing to 30mm x 30mm acrylic squares. Cores, or `explants`, 25mm in diameter are removed from massive corals and cemented into injection-moulded plastic cups, to protect the cut surfaces of the skeleton. Trays of up to 18 nubbins and explants may then be transferred to the reef, where they are affixed to previously installed concrete breeze blocks. They may then be retrieved as required to assess the effects of water quality upon them. For laboratory ecotoxicology experiments, the authors have devised a system of artificial lighting, using halide lamps, to grow coral nubbins and explants under controlled conditions. To test the effects of pollutants, the authors use measurements of respiration, photosynthesis and skeletal growth rate. Growth is measured by a very simple buoyant weighing procedure, which requires only an analytical laboratory balance, and an easily-constructed plastic box-shaped chamber. The method is sufficiently sensitive to measure growth over a 24 hour period in some fast-growing corals. The authors will describe the results of initial experiments, carried out at the Bellairs Research Institute, Barbados, on the effects of different levels of phosphate and nitrate in the seawater. For the first time, they are able to demonstrate the concentration-related decrease in growth rate associated with nitrate eutrophication.

  14. Strategic environmental assessment and national development plans in Turkey: Towards legal framework and operational procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Say, Nuriye Peker . E-mail: nursay@cu.edu.tr; Yuecel, Muzaffer

    2006-04-15

    National development plans were started to be prepared in Turkey in 1963. These plans are mandatory for public investments and guiding principles for private investments. They have a quality which guides and sets objectives for other plans in the country. Therefore, they can be evaluated as the main reason of successes and failures of sectoral investments or the problems that they cause directly or indirectly. Turkey is undergoing rapid industrialization, urbanization and population growth, thus environmental problems are on the increase. Although Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been applied to individual investments in Turkey since 1993, natural environment has continued to be affected because of human activities. Today, parallel to the developments in the world, it has been discussed that it is necessary to strengthen project-level Environmental Assessment (EA) and to practice Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The interest in SEA, that is, EA at the level of proposed policies, plans and programs has grown significantly since 2000 in the country. Discussions and preparations have started about regulation which provides the legal and institutional framework for SEA in The Ministry of Environment and Forestry. However, since the scientific approach into the subject is very new in Turkey, it will take time to answer the questions about how and in what fields to practice. This research project aims at analyzing the possible practice opportunities of SEA in Turkey and the practicability of SEA into the National Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP) which is assumed at the highest level of planning hierarchy in the country. The research is conducted on two sections. In the first section, procedural approaches to SEA on national development plans are investigated and a framework for these approaches is adapted at the institutional level. In the second section, SEA form for energy sector in the development plans is developed. In this article, the findings

  15. Developing an automated database for monitoring ultrasound- and computed tomography-guided procedure complications and diagnostic yield.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Jones, Lisa P; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W; Kolansky, Ana S; Hilton, Susan; Zafar, Hanna M

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring complications and diagnostic yield for image-guided procedures is an important component of maintaining high quality patient care promoted by professional societies in radiology and accreditation organizations such as the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Joint Commission. These outcome metrics can be used as part of a comprehensive quality assurance/quality improvement program to reduce variation in clinical practice, provide opportunities to engage in practice quality improvement, and contribute to developing national benchmarks and standards. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and successful implementation of an automated web-based software application to monitor procedural outcomes for US- and CT-guided procedures in an academic radiology department. The open source tools PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) and MySQL were used to extract relevant procedural information from the Radiology Information System (RIS), auto-populate the procedure log database, and develop a user interface that generates real-time reports of complication rates and diagnostic yield by site and by operator. Utilizing structured radiology report templates resulted in significantly improved accuracy of information auto-populated from radiology reports, as well as greater compliance with manual data entry. An automated web-based procedure log database is an effective tool to reliably track complication rates and diagnostic yield for US- and CT-guided procedures performed in a radiology department. PMID:24146357

  16. 24 CFR 972.106 - Procedure for required conversion of public housing developments to tenant-based assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure for required conversion... FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE Required Conversion of Public Housing Developments Required...

  17. The lignipel process mass production of a low moisture content lignite agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, E.W.; Garvin, J.P.

    1983-11-01

    The goal is to convert lignite to a less degradable and easily transportable product with a greatly reduced water content. Ideally, a process was sought that would result in an agglomerate with less than 20 percent moisture content remaining, without spontaneous combustion problems, significantly reduced dust losses, and improved heating value. The research and development project was significantly contracted to an engineering company and not to a research institution. The rationale was that the development of the improved coal should be as soon as possible translated into an actual industrial process. The approach while unorthodox produced results. Four years after conceiving the project, the engineering team demonstrated the new process with a continuous production of lignite pellets in a small industrial facility. A conceptional design and cost estimate for a 4,000 ton/day pelletizing facility was completed shortly thereafter.

  18. Study on GIS Visualization in Evaluation of the Human Living Environment in Shenyang-Dalian Urban Agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Kang; Zhou, Jieting; Li, Xuxiang; Ge, Shengbin

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of human living environmental quality of Shenyang-Dalian urban agglomerations has important theoretical and practical significance in rapid development region. A lot of investigations have been carried for Shenyang-Dalian urban agglomerations, including 38 counties. Based on the carrying capacity of resources, natural and socioeconomic environmental factors and regional changes of human living environmental evaluation are analyzed with the application of geographic information systems (GIS) software. By using principal component analysis (PCA) model and natural breaks classification (NBC) method, the evaluation results are divided into five categories. The results show that the human living environmental evaluation (HLEE) indexes of Dalian, Shenyang, and Liaoyang are higher than other counties. Among these counties, the human living environmental evaluation (HLEE) indexes of coastal counties are significantly higher than inland counties. The range of the human living environmental evaluation index in most of the study area is at III, IV, and V levels, accounting for 80.01%. Based on these results, it could illustrate the human living environment is in relatively suitable condition in Shenyang-Dalian urban agglomeration. PMID:27200212

  19. Study on GIS Visualization in Evaluation of the Human Living Environment in Shenyang-Dalian Urban Agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Hou, Kang; Zhou, Jieting; Li, Xuxiang; Ge, Shengbin

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of human living environmental quality of Shenyang-Dalian urban agglomerations has important theoretical and practical significance in rapid development region. A lot of investigations have been carried for Shenyang-Dalian urban agglomerations, including 38 counties. Based on the carrying capacity of resources, natural and socioeconomic environmental factors and regional changes of human living environmental evaluation are analyzed with the application of geographic information systems (GIS) software. By using principal component analysis (PCA) model and natural breaks classification (NBC) method, the evaluation results are divided into five categories. The results show that the human living environmental evaluation (HLEE) indexes of Dalian, Shenyang, and Liaoyang are higher than other counties. Among these counties, the human living environmental evaluation (HLEE) indexes of coastal counties are significantly higher than inland counties. The range of the human living environmental evaluation index in most of the study area is at III, IV, and V levels, accounting for 80.01%. Based on these results, it could illustrate the human living environment is in relatively suitable condition in Shenyang-Dalian urban agglomeration. PMID:27200212

  20. Agglomeration processes sustained by dust density waves in Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} plasma: From C{sub 2}H{sub 2} injection to the formation of an organized structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dap, Simon; Hugon, Robert; Poucques, Ludovic de; Briancon, Jean-Luc; Bougdira, Jamal; Lacroix, David

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, an experimental investigation of dust particle agglomeration in a capacitively coupled RF discharge is reported. Carbonaceous particles are produced in an argon plasma using acetylene. As soon as the particle density becomes sufficient, dust density waves (DDWs) are spontaneously excited within the cathode sheath. Recently, it was proven that DDWs can significantly enhance the agglomeration rate between particles by transferring them a significant kinetic energy. Thus, it helps them to overcome Coulomb repulsion. The influence of this mechanism is studied from acetylene injection to the formation of very large agglomerates forming an organized structure after a few dozens of seconds. For this purpose, three diagnostic tools are used: extinction measurements to probe nanometer-sized particles, fast imaging for large agglomerates and a dust extraction technique developed for ex-situ analysis.

  1. Procedures for use of freshwater fishes in the development of reproducible toxicological information.

    PubMed

    Marking, L L

    1984-05-01

    Toxicity testing with fish began early in this century, but standardized methods have been developed only within the last three decades. Standardized test procedures promote reproducibility of results; healthy fish properly handled and acclimated to test conditions are a given prerequisite. The principles of acute toxicity testing are important in the design of chronic tests for suspected carcinogens because certain factors influence the activity of chemicals or contaminants. The pH of test water is a critical factor in governing the uptake of chemicals by fish. Buffering is required so that uniform pH in waters of different hardnesses and different pHs in water of a given hardness are maintained. The importance of water quality control is graphically demonstrated by the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol; the toxicant is over 50 times more toxic in water at pH 6.5 than at pH 9.5. Results of laboratory tests on toxicity or carcinogenicity of single compounds in a clean environment represent an oversimplification of the real world because organisms are actually exposed to multiple chemicals or stresses. Because the environment is a complex interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that are extremely variable and dynamic, simulation of these systems in the laboratory is, at best, artificial; therefore, results developed must be considered to be predictive. PMID:6749253

  2. Development of a systematic procedure for analyzing bus service cutback programs

    SciTech Connect

    Tadi, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    In this era of shrinking public resources and mounting operating costs, it is becoming increasingly important to operate public transit as efficiently as possible. The primary purpose of this thesis is to develop a systematic procedure (planning tool) that will enable transit operators to quickly and efficiently evaluate transit routes in order to minimize the total operating deficit while responding to service cutbacks or modifications. As a part of this research, a computer model called Transit Route Evaluation Model (TREM) is developed that can evaluate each transit route both at the system level and at the route level based upon a set of pre-specified criteria such as revenue/operating cost ratio, transit demand, population density, subsidy, and income. The unproductive routes, thus identified, are reviewed to analyze if service cutbacks or service modifications can be considered along those routes so that total operating deficit can be minimized. The alternative which yields the minimum operating deficit is considered as the optimal alternative. A case study example (Flint, Michigan) consisting of 12 routes is used to demonstrate the applicability of the research methodology. A sensitivity analysis is also conducted by changing the various input parameters in order to judge the viability of the methodology.

  3. Mathematical études: embedding opportunities for developing procedural fluency within rich mathematical contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Colin

    2013-07-01

    In a high-stakes assessment culture, it is clearly important that learners of mathematics develop the necessary fluency and confidence to perform well on the specific, narrowly defined techniques that will be tested. However, an overemphasis on the training of piecemeal mathematical skills at the expense of more independent engagement with richer, multifaceted tasks risks devaluing the subject and failing to give learners an authentic and enjoyable experience of being a mathematician. Thus, there is a pressing need for mathematical tasks which embed the practice of essential techniques within a richer, exploratory and investigative context. Such tasks can be justified to school management or to more traditional mathematics teachers as vital practice of important skills; at the same time, they give scope to progressive teachers who wish to work in more exploratory ways. This paper draws on the notion of a musical étude to develop a powerful and versatile approach in which these apparently contradictory aspects of teaching mathematics can be harmoniously combined. I illustrate the tactic in three central areas of the high-school mathematics curriculum: plotting Cartesian coordinates, solving linear equations and performing enlargements. In each case, extensive practice of important procedures takes place alongside more thoughtful and mathematically creative activity.

  4. Crush performance of redwood for developing design procedures for impact limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.M.; Hermanson, J.C.; McMurtry, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    Containers for the transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials incorporate redwood in impact limiters. Redwood is an excellent energy absorber, but only the most simplistic information exists on its crush properties. Tbe stress-strain interrelationship for any wood species subject to three-dimensional stresses is largely unknown for any all stress condition and wood behavior at both high strains and high strain-rates is known only in general terms. Both stress-strain and crush failure theories have been developed based only on uniaxial load tests. The anisotropy of wood adds an additional complexity to measuring wood response and developing suitable theories to describe it. A long history of wood utilization in the building industry has led to design procedures and property information related to simple uniaxial loadings that do not inflict damage to the wood. This lack of knowledge may be surprising for a material that has a long history of engineered use, but the result is difficulty in utilizing wood in more sophisticated designs such as impact limiters. This study provides a step toward filling the information gap on wood material response for high performance applications such as impact limiters.

  5. Procedure Developed for Ballistic Impact Testing of Composite Fan Containment Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Melis, Matthew E.

    1998-01-01

    The fan-containment system in a jet engine is designed to prevent a fan blade from penetrating the engine case in the event that the blade or a portion of the blade separates from the rotor during operation. Usually, these systems consist of a thick metal case that is strong enough to survive such an impact. Other systems consist of a dry aramid fabric wrapped around a relatively thin metal case. In large turbofan engines, metal-containment systems can weigh well over 300 kg, and there is a strong impetus to reduce their weight. As a result, the NASA Lewis Research Center is involved in an effort to develop polymer matrix composite (PMC) fan-containment systems to reduce the weight and cost while maintaining the high levels of safety associated with current systems. Under a Space Act Agreement with AlliedSignal Aircraft Engines, a new ballistic impact test procedure has been developed to quantitatively evaluate the performance of polymer matrix composite systems.

  6. Development of in situ test procedures for TMI-2 axial power shaping rod-drive mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J A

    1982-11-01

    General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation (GPUNC), Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), and EG and G Idaho participated jointly in tests at Diamond Power Specialty Corporation, Lancaster, Ohio, to develop an in-situ dynamic test procedure for application to the TMI-2 Axial Power Shaping Rods (APSRs). An APSR drive mechanism was set up with operating controls and instrumentation. Testing took place on an air stand installation and on an autoclave which simulated conditions of a stator in a water-filled reactor. Dynamic tests established mechanism electrical transient and acoustic signature characteristics associated with mechanism response to energizing and running various modes. Static tests determined characteristics unrelated to actual motion. Analysis of data from the controlled experiments resulted in development of a set of baseline characteristics to be used as a reference for evaluating the condition and response of installed APSRs. A test was devised for use at TMI-2 to verify APSR operability, to drive the APSRs to their lower limits, and to acquire data for potential clues to condition of the reactor core.

  7. Assessment of silver nanoparticle toxicity for common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fish embryos using a novel method controlling the agglomeration in the aquatic media.

    PubMed

    Oprsal, Jakub; Blaha, Ludek; Pouzar, Miloslav; Knotek, Petr; Vlcek, Milan; Hrda, Katerina

    2015-12-01

    Formation of agglomerates and their rapid sedimentation during aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is a major issue with a crucial influence on the risk assessment of nanomaterials. The present work is aimed at developing and testing a new approach based on the periodic replacement of liquid media during an ecotoxicological experiment which enabled the efficient monitoring of exposure conditions. A verified mathematical model predicted the frequencies of media exchanges which checked for formation of agglomerates from silver nanoparticles AgNP with 50 nm average size of the original colloid. In the model experiments, embryos of common carp Cyprinus carpio were exposed repeatedly for 6 h to AgNPs (5-50 μm Ag L(-1)) either under semistatic conditions (exchange of media after 6 h) or in variants with frequent media exchanges (varying from 20 to 300 min depending on the AgNP colloid concentration and the desired maximum agglomerate size of 200 or 400 nm). In contrast to other studies, where dissolved free metals are usually responsible for toxic effects, our 144-h experiments demonstrated the importance of AgNP agglomerates in the adverse effects of nanosilver. Direct adsorption of agglomerates on fish embryos locally increased Ag concentrations which resulted in pronounced toxicity particularly in variants with larger 400 nm agglomerates. The present study demonstrates the suitability of the novel methodology in controlling the conditions during aquatic nanomaterial toxicity testing. It further provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the effects of AgNP, which rank on a global scale among the most widely used nanomaterials. PMID:26233755

  8. Quantitative evaluation of geodiversity: development of methodological procedures with application to territorial management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, J.; Brilha, J.; Pereira, D.; Nolasco, M.

    2012-04-01

    Although geodiversity is considered the setting for biodiversity, there is still a huge gap in the social recognition of these two concepts. The concept of geodiversity, less developed, is now making its own way as a robust and fundamental idea concerning the abiotic component of nature. From a conservationist point of view, the lack of a broader knowledge concerning the type and spatial variation of geodiversity, as well as its relationship with biodiversity, makes the protection and management of natural or semi-natural areas incomplete. There is a growing need to understand the patterns of geodiversity in different landscapes and to translate this knowledge for territorial management in a practical and effective point of view. This kind of management can also represent an important tool for the development of sustainable tourism, particularly geotourism, which can bring benefits not only for the environment, but also for social and economic purposes. The quantification of geodiversity is an important step in all this process but still few researchers are investing in the development of a proper methodology. The assessment methodologies that were published so far are mainly focused on the evaluation of geomorphological elements, sometimes complemented with information about lithology, soils, hidrology, morphometric variables, climatic surfaces and geosites. This results in very dissimilar areas at very different spatial scales, showing the complexity of the task and the need of further research. This current work aims the development of an effective methodology for the assessment of the maximum elements of geodiversity possible (rocks, minerals, fossils, landforms, soils), based on GIS routines. The main determinant factor for the quantitative assessment is scale, but other factors are also very important, such as the existence of suitable spatial data with sufficient degree of detail. It is expected to attain the proper procedures in order to assess geodiversity

  9. Development of Biocompatibility Procedures for Assessment of Plant Growth in Ground Test Hardware for the EMCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. N.; Steele, M. K.; Sun, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) is an European Space Agency-developed facility designed to support plant research in microgravity on the IS NASA is responsible for providing US specific hardware to use within the EMCS. In preparation for flight, research will be developed and tested at Ames Research Center in the EMCS ground test hardware, the Experiment Reference Module (ERM) In order to determine the acceptability of the ERM for such purposes, biocompatibility tests will be performed to determine that the hardware functions as intended and successfully supports the' growth of plants. In this report, we describe the development of procedures and the collection of baseline data against which to compare ERM function, e.g. biocompatibility testing. A simple and robust system was developed to grow whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants within the confined volumes characteristic of spaceflight hardware. Our system for growing plants eliminated the necessity of a water/nutrient delivery system and allowed for quantifiable assessment of individual plants, as well as entire population dynamics. To insure uniform germination, seeds were started in small straw segments and transplanted into modified scintillation vials. Seedlings were selected prior to transplantation to decrease genetic variability. Plants were grown for a total of 24 days in standard laboratory plant growth chambers under controlled conditions. Sequential digital still images were taken on a daily basis. Analysis of these images allowed for the quantification of even minute environmental effect, on growth dynamics whole plants. The data collected provide reliable growth curves against which to compare plants grown in the ERM.

  10. Identification of micro parameters for discrete element simulation of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Dosta, Maksym; Heinrich, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of solid particles like agglomerates, granules or crystals strongly depends on their micro structure, e.g. structural defects and porosity. In order to model the mechanical behaviour of these inhomogeneous media the discrete element method has been proven to be an appropriate tool. The model parameters used are typically micro parameters like bond stiffness, particle-particle contact stiffness, strength of the bonds. Due to the lack of general methods for a direct micro parameter determination, normally laborious parameter adaptation has to be done in order to fit experiment and simulation. In this contribution a systematic and automatic way for parameter adaptation using real experiments is proposed. Due to the fact, that discrete element models are typically systems of differential equations of very high order, gradient based methods are not suitable. Hence, the focus will be on derivative free methods.

  11. Agglomerating combustor-gasifier method and apparatus for coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Joseph L. P.; Archer, David H.

    1976-09-21

    A method and apparatus for gasifying coal wherein the gasification takes place in a spout fluid bed at a pressure of about 10 to 30 atmospheres and a temperature of about 1800.degree. to 2200.degree.F and wherein the configuration of the apparatus and the manner of introduction of gases for combustion and fluidization is such that agglomerated ash can be withdrawn from the bottom of the apparatus and gas containing very low dust loading is produced. The gasification reaction is self-sustaining through the burning of a stoichiometric amount of coal with air in the lower part of the apparatus to form the spout within the fluid bed. The method and apparatus are particularly suitable for gasifying coarse coal particles.

  12. Remediation of Sucarnoochee soil by agglomeration with fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, P.S.; Arnold, D.W.; Rahnama, M.B. )

    1994-01-01

    Fine-sized Blue Creek coal was used to remove high molecular weight hydrocarbons from Sucarnoochee soil, a fine-sized high-organic soil. Fine coal in slurry form was blended with Sucarnoochee soil contaminated with 15.0% by wt of crude oil, and agglomerates were removed in a standard flotation cell. Crude oil in the remediated soil was reduced from the original 15.0% to less than a tenth of a wt% by a two-step process. Oil removal of approx. 99.3% was obtained. An added benefit was that the low-grade coal used in the process was simultaneously upgraded. The final level of cleaning was not affected by initial oil concentration. The process compared favorably with a hot water wash technique used to recovery oils from contaminated soil.

  13. Cold bond agglomeration of waste oxides for recycling

    SciTech Connect

    D`Alessio, G.; Lu, W.K.

    1996-12-31

    Recycling of waste oxides has been an on-going challenge for integrated steel plants. The majority of these waste oxides are collected from the cleaning systems of ironmaking and steelmaking processes, and are usually in the form of fine particulates and slurries. In most cases, these waste materials are contaminated by oils and heavy metals and often require treatment at a considerable expense prior to landfill disposal. This contamination also limits the re-use or recycling potential of these oxides as secondary resources of reliable quality. However, recycling of some selected wastes in blast furnaces or steelmaking vessels is possible, but first requires agglomeration of the fine particulate by such methods as cold bond briquetting. Cold bond briquetting technology provides both mechanical compacting and bonding (with appropriate binders) of the particulates. This method of recycling has the potential to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The nature of the present study is cold bond briquetting of iron ore pellet fines with a molasses-cement-H{sub 2}O binder for recycling in a blast furnace. The inclusion of molasses is for its contribution to the green strength of briquettes. During the curing stage, significant gains in strength may be credited to molasses in the presence of cement. The interactions of cement (and its substitutes), water and molasses and their effects on the properties of the agglomerates during and after various curing conditions were investigated. Tensile strengths of briquettes made in the laboratory and subjected to experimental conditions which simulated the top part of a blast furnace shaft were also examined.

  14. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined ‘geometric surface area’ of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60–350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility–mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility–mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility–mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3–10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3. PMID:26692585

  15. Simulation of acoustic agglomeration processes of poly-disperse solid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Changdong Sheng; Xianglin Shen

    2007-01-15

    This article presents the simulation of acoustic agglomeration of poly-disperse solid particles with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The modelled processes include the agglomeration due to the orthokinetic and hydrodynamic mechanisms, Brownian coagulation and wall deposition. The aggregates formed during the agglomeration process were characterised as mass fractal aggregates with an equivalent radius to estimate the average radius of the primary particles in individual aggregates. Acoustic agglomeration of fly ash with a lognormal size distribution and TiO{sub 2} particles with a bimodal size distribution was simulated and validated against the experimental data in the literature. It was found that the acoustic agglomeration process of solid particles could be represented with a modified version of Song's orthokinetic model and Koenig's hydrodynamic equation that account for the fractal-like morphology of the aggregates. The fractal dimensions of around 1.8 and 2.2 were obtained for the fly ash and TiO{sub 2} particles, respectively, consistent with the values reported for the aggregates in the literature. The poly-disperse nature of the primary particles is essential to the simulation; assuming mono-disperse primary particles leads to a significant underestimation of the agglomeration rate and the particle size growth particularly during the early stages of the acoustic agglomeration process. Particle deposition on the chamber walls also has some effect on acoustic agglomeration.

  16. Agglomeration characteristics of river sand and wheat stalk ash mixture at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Linlin; Li, Shiyuan; Lu, Qinggang

    2013-02-01

    The agglomeration characteristics of river sand and wheat stalk ash mixture at various temperatures are investigated using a muffle furnace. The surface structural changes, as well as the elemental makeup of the surface and cross-section of the agglomerates, are analyzed by polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Multi-phase equilibrium calculation is performed with FactSage in identifying the melting behavior of the river sand-wheat stalk ash mixture at high temperatures. No indication of agglomeration is detected below 850°C. At a temperature of 900-1000°C, however, obvious agglomeration is observed and the agglomerates solidify further as temperature increases. The presence of potassium and calcium enrichment causes the formation of a sticky sand surface that induces agglomeration. The main component of the agglomerate surface is K2O-CaO-SiO2, which melts at low temperatures. The formation of molten silicates causes particle cohesion. The main ingredient of the binding phase in the cross-section is K2O-SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO; the agglomeration is not the result of the melting behavior of wheat stalk ash itself but the comprehensive results of chemical reaction and the melting behavior at high temperatures. The multi-phase equilibrium calculations agree well with the experimental results.

  17. Developing Flowcharted Procedures Manuals for School District Administration within the ISO 9000 Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoch, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the School District of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, implemented a districtwide quality-management system based on the Geneva-based International Standards Organization 9001, a major component of which is the documentation of procedures. Includes sections on implementation, procedure manuals, quality management, uniformity, formatting,…

  18. Development of fraction concepts and procedures in U.S. and Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Drew H; Zhou, Xinlin; Zhang, Yiyun; Cui, Jiaxin; Fuchs, Lynn S; Jordan, Nancy C; Gersten, Russell; Siegler, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    We compared knowledge of fraction concepts and procedures among sixth and eighth graders in China and the United States. As anticipated, Chinese middle school children had higher knowledge of fraction concepts and procedures than U.S. children in the same grades, and the difference in procedural knowledge was much larger than the difference in conceptual knowledge. Of particular interest, national differences in knowledge of fraction concepts were fully mediated by differences in knowledge of fraction procedures, and differences between the knowledge of Chinese and U.S. children were most pronounced among the lowest achieving children within each country. Based on these and previous results, a theoretical model of the mutually facilitative interaction between conceptual and procedural knowledge of fractions is proposed and discussed. PMID:25268902

  19. Development of a Portable Training Tool for Simulating Visceral Angiographic Procedures for Beginners

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji; Osuga, Keigo; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Miura, Hiroshi; Terayama, Koshi; Anai, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahide; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a tool that we developed to simulate performance of visceral angiography to train beginners in the field of splanchnic angiography. Seven residents and two fellows who were rotating within the Division of Interventional Radiology at our institution between June and August 2008 participated in the evaluation of this tool. They had no experience in performing visceral angiography as an operator. Time for selection of arterial branches arising from the celiac axis on the model was measured before and after training. After such training, the participants performed actual visceral angiography as an operator with instructors beside them. Success of the trainees in selecting visceral arterial branches was evaluated in these real-life cases. In the first test using the model, seven of nine trainees (77.8%) succeeded in selecting all required arteries, while the remaining two failed to select all required arteries. After training using the model, all trainees succeeded in selecting all required arteries just before the actual angiographic study. In the actual angiography, the catheter was successfully inserted from the femoral artery and advanced to the superior mesenteric, celiac, splenic, common hepatic, gastroduodenal, and right and left hepatic arteries by all trainees with only two exceptions. In conclusion, this tool is helpful for training beginners in visceral angiographic procedures.

  20. Practical implications of procedures developed in IDEA project--comparison with traditional methods.

    PubMed

    Andrasi, A; Bouvier, C; Brandl, A; de Carlan, L; Fischer, H; Franck, D; Höllriegl, V; Li, W B; Oeh, U; Ritt, J; Roth, P; Schlagbauer, M; Schmitzer, Ch; Wahl, W; Zombori, P

    2007-01-01

    The idea of the IDEA project aimed to improve assessment of incorporated radionuclides through developments of more reliable and possibly faster in vivo and bioassay monitoring techniques and making use of such enhancements for improvements in routine monitoring. In direct in vivo monitoring technique the optimum choice of the detectors to be applied for different monitoring tasks has been investigated in terms of material, size and background in order to improve conditions namely to increase counting efficiency and reduce background. Detailed studies have been performed to investigate the manifold advantageous applications and capabilities of numerical simulation method for the calibration and optimisation of in vivo counting systems. This calibration method can be advantageously applied especially in the measurement of low-energy photon emitting radionuclides, where individual variability is a significant source of uncertainty. In bioassay measurements the use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can improve considerably both the measurement speed and the lower limit of detection currently achievable with alpha spectrometry for long-lived radionuclides. The work carried out in this project provided detailed guidelines for optimum performance of the technique of ICP-MS applied mainly for the determination of uranium and thorium nuclides in the urine including sampling procedure, operational parameters of the instruments and interpretation of the measured data. The paper demonstrates the main advantages of investigated techniques in comparison with the performances of methods commonly applied in routine monitoring practice. PMID:17314089

  1. Systems, methods and apparatus for pattern matching in procedure development and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Rash, James L. (Inventor); Rouff, Christopher A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which, in some embodiments, a formal specification is pattern-matched from scenarios, the formal specification is analyzed, and flaws in the formal specification are corrected. The systems, methods and apparatus may include pattern-matching an equivalent formal model from an informal specification. Such a model can be analyzed for contradictions, conflicts, use of resources before the resources are available, competition for resources, and so forth. From such a formal model, an implementation can be automatically generated in a variety of notations. The approach can improve the resulting implementation, which, in some embodiments, is provably equivalent to the procedures described at the outset, which in turn can improve confidence that the system reflects the requirements, and in turn reduces system development time and reduces the amount of testing required of a new system. Moreover, in some embodiments, two or more implementations can be "reversed" to appropriate formal models, the models can be combined, and the resulting combination checked for conflicts. Then, the combined, error-free model can be used to generate a new (single) implementation that combines the functionality of the original separate implementations, and may be more likely to be correct.

  2. Influence of primary-particle density in the morphology of agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Camejo, M D; Espeso, D R; Bonilla, L L

    2014-07-01

    Agglomeration processes occur in many different realms of science, such as colloid and aerosol formation or formation of bacterial colonies. We study the influence of primary-particle density in agglomerate structures using diffusion-controlled Monte Carlo simulations with realistic space scales through different regimes (diffusion-limited aggregation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation). The equivalence of Monte Carlo time steps to real time scales is given by Hirsch's hydrodynamical theory of Brownian motion. Agglomerate behavior at different time stages of the simulations suggests that three indices (the fractal exponent, the coordination number, and the eccentricity index) characterize agglomerate geometry. Using these indices, we have found that the initial density of primary particles greatly influences the final structure of the agglomerate, as observed in recent experimental works. PMID:25122302

  3. Influence of primary-particle density in the morphology of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camejo, M. D.; Espeso, D. R.; Bonilla, L. L.

    2014-07-01

    Agglomeration processes occur in many different realms of science, such as colloid and aerosol formation or formation of bacterial colonies. We study the influence of primary-particle density in agglomerate structures using diffusion-controlled Monte Carlo simulations with realistic space scales through different regimes (diffusion-limited aggregation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation). The equivalence of Monte Carlo time steps to real time scales is given by Hirsch's hydrodynamical theory of Brownian motion. Agglomerate behavior at different time stages of the simulations suggests that three indices (the fractal exponent, the coordination number, and the eccentricity index) characterize agglomerate geometry. Using these indices, we have found that the initial density of primary particles greatly influences the final structure of the agglomerate, as observed in recent experimental works.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF SOURCE TESTING, ANALYTICAL, AND MUTAGENICITY BIOASSAY PROCEDURES FOR EVALUATING EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL AND HOSPITAL WASTE COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses researched aimed at developing new testing equipment and procedures that will allow a more comprehensive assessment of the complex mixture of organics that is present in stack emissions. hese efforts are directed specifically toward development of source testi...

  5. 22 CFR 1508.610 - What procedures does the African Development Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions? 1508.610 Section 1508.610 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 1508.610 What procedures does the African Development Foundation use...

  6. 22 CFR 1508.610 - What procedures does the African Development Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions? 1508.610 Section 1508.610 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 1508.610 What procedures does the African Development Foundation use...

  7. 22 CFR 1508.610 - What procedures does the African Development Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions? 1508.610 Section 1508.610 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 1508.610 What procedures does the African Development Foundation use...

  8. 22 CFR 1508.610 - What procedures does the African Development Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions? 1508.610 Section 1508.610 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 1508.610 What procedures does the African Development Foundation use...

  9. 22 CFR 1508.610 - What procedures does the African Development Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Foundation use in suspension and debarment actions? 1508.610 Section 1508.610 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 1508.610 What procedures does the African Development Foundation use...

  10. 29 CFR 1956.23 - Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of criteria. 1956.23 Section 1956.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO STATE AND LOCAL...

  11. 29 CFR 1956.23 - Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of criteria. 1956.23 Section 1956.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO STATE AND LOCAL...

  12. 29 CFR 1956.23 - Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of criteria. 1956.23 Section 1956.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO STATE AND LOCAL...

  13. 29 CFR 1956.23 - Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of criteria. 1956.23 Section 1956.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO STATE AND LOCAL...

  14. 29 CFR 1956.23 - Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for certification of completion of development and determination on application of criteria. 1956.23 Section 1956.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO STATE AND LOCAL...

  15. Development and validation of a single collector ICPMS procedure to determine boron isotopeic compositions of water and food samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Pritzkow, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Authenticity and provenance studies as well as issues in environmental- and geo-sciences are hot topics in nowadays isotope research. Elements being known for their natural isotopic variation, such as lead and strontium, are being used to assign the provenance of artefacts, food and other products. A recent study revealed the potential of boron (B) isotopes for delivering information on the provenance of crop plants. To offer alternative analytical instrumentations beside the classical TIMS procedures a single collector ICPMS procedure for B isotope analyses has been developed and validated. This procedure should enable more B isotope studies, as single collector ICPMS intruments are more widepread in the relevant laboratories compared to TIMS. The developed procedures for the determination of B isotopic compositions use a magnetic sector ICPMS and consist of one low resolution (LR) and one medium resolution (MR) procedure. The absolute standard deviation for the δ11B determination in three independently measured samples lies between 0.2 and 0.8 ‰ for the LR and between 0.3 and 1.5 ‰ for the MR. The expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor of k=2 range between 1.4 and 1.6 ‰ for the LR and between 2.9 and 3.2 ‰ for the MR. The trueness, expressed as average deviation from the reference values, is less than 1.1 ‰ for LR and 0.8 ‰ for MR. To test the practicability of the procedure the matrix tolerance has been investigated. Using a measurement solution containing 100 µg/kg boron a matrix of 2 mg/kg of alkaline and earth alkaline elements was found as a limit for stable instrumental mass discrimination. Thus a highly efficient matrix separation is required, similar to TIMS. The developed procedure is well suited for the for B isotope studies of various matrices and especially the LR procedure offers relatively small uncertainties combined with high sample throughput.

  16. Megacities and large urban agglomerations in the coastal zone: interactions between atmosphere, land, and marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland; Jickells, Tim D; Baklanov, Alexander; Carmichael, Gregory R; Church, Tom M; Gallardo, Laura; Hughes, Claire; Kanakidou, Maria; Liss, Peter S; Mee, Laurence; Raine, Robin; Ramachandran, Purvaja; Ramesh, R; Sundseth, Kyrre; Tsunogai, Urumu; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Zhu, Tong

    2013-02-01

    Megacities are not only important drivers for socio-economic development but also sources of environmental challenges. Many megacities and large urban agglomerations are located in the coastal zone where land, atmosphere, and ocean meet, posing multiple environmental challenges which we consider here. The atmospheric flow around megacities is complicated by urban heat island effects and topographic flows and sea breezes and influences air pollution and human health. The outflow of polluted air over the ocean perturbs biogeochemical processes. Contaminant inputs can damage downstream coastal zone ecosystem function and resources including fisheries, induce harmful algal blooms and feedback to the atmosphere via marine emissions. The scale of influence of megacities in the coastal zone is hundreds to thousands of kilometers in the atmosphere and tens to hundreds of kilometers in the ocean. We list research needs to further our understanding of coastal megacities with the ultimate aim to improve their environmental management. PMID:23076973

  17. Assessing mobility and redistribution patterns of sand and oil agglomerates in the surf zone.

    PubMed

    Dalyander, P Soupy; Long, Joseph W; Plant, Nathaniel G; Thompson, David M

    2014-03-15

    Heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates that formed in the surf zone following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill continued to cause beach re-oiling 3years after initial stranding. To understand this phenomena and inform operational response now and for future spills, a numerical method to assess the mobility and alongshore movement of these "surface residual balls" (SRBs) was developed and applied to the Alabama and western Florida coasts. Alongshore flow and SRB mobility and potential flux were used to identify likely patterns of transport and deposition. Results indicate that under typical calm conditions, cm-size SRBs are unlikely to move alongshore, whereas mobility and transport is likely during storms. The greater mobility of sand compared to SRBs makes burial and exhumation of SRBs likely, and inlets were identified as probable SRB traps. Analysis of field data supports these model results. PMID:24503377

  18. Assessing mobility and redistribution patterns of sand and oil agglomerates in the surf zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Long, Joesph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thompson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates that formed in the surf zone following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill continued to cause beach re-oiling 3 years after initial stranding. To understand this phenomena and inform operational response now and for future spills, a numerical method to assess the mobility and alongshore movement of these “surface residual balls” (SRBs) was developed and applied to the Alabama and western Florida coasts. Alongshore flow and SRB mobility and potential flux were used to identify likely patterns of transport and deposition. Results indicate that under typical calm conditions, cm-size SRBs are unlikely to move alongshore, whereas mobility and transport is likely during storms. The greater mobility of sand compared to SRBs makes burial and exhumation of SRBs likely, and inlets were identified as probable SRB traps. Analysis of field data supports these model results.

  19. Development of Rapid Seismic Monitoring Procedures for Incorporation into the Caribbean Tsunami Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerfano, V. A.; von Hillebrandt, C. G.; Mendoza, C.

    2007-05-01

    "Middle America", the geographic area between North and South America, including the Caribbean, has been a site of great plate tectonic activity in the most recent 35 million years. The region continues to be highly geologically active today as the Caribbean tectonic plate advances to the east, interacting with the North American and South American plates. Type examples of many of the salient features of plate tectonics-subduction zones, deep trenches, transform faults, pull-apart basins, subduction-to-strike-slip transitions, subduction-related volcanism, and volcano-free subduction zones-exist in a relatively small geographical area. The circum-Caribbean region has a documented history of destructive earthquakes and large damaging tsunamis that have affected coastal areas, including the events of Virgin Islands in 1867 and Mona Passage in 1918. These tsunamis have been triggered by large earthquakes that deformed the ocean floor. Tsunami waves originating in the prominent fault system around the Caribbean are considered to pose a near-field hazard because they can reach populated coastal areas within a few minutes after the earthquake. Because of this situation, the need to establish a system of rapid notification for tsunami alerting in the Caribbean has been recognized by emergency management agencies and the scientific community. In the wake of the December 26, 2004 devastating earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia, attention has been focused worldwide on the establishment of local and regional tsunami warning systems. The objective of the monitoring component of the Caribbean tsunami warning system under development in the Puerto Rico Seismic Network since 2000 is to detect, inform and confirm as rapidly and accurately as possible potential tsunamigenic events. In this presentation, we will describe the application of waveform analysis procedures for the rapid identification of shallow earthquake source parameters (geometry and size) in the Caribbean using

  20. Patient reported outcome measures for cardiac ablation procedures: a multicentre pilot to develop a new questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Kathleen L.; White, Judith; Carolan-Rees, Grace; Patrick, Hannah; O'Callaghan, Peter; Murray, Stephen; Cunningham, David; Wood, Kathryn A.; Lencioni, Mauro; Griffith, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the feasibility of administering Patient Reported Outcomes Measures (PROMs) in patients treated with ablation for cardiac arrhythmias, and to conduct the first stage of development and testing of a new PROM tool. Methods and results A new tool was developed by a multidisciplinary team and tested alongside an adaptation of the patient perception of arrhythmia questionnaire (PPAQ) and EQ-5D-5L in a multicentre retrospective audit involving 791 consecutive cardiac arrhythmia patients treated with catheter ablation at three UK centres over 13 months. Data were recorded in the National Cardiac Rhythm Management Database, part of the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research. The response rate was 71.9% (n = 569). Patients reported significant improvements across all outcomes and impacts, with reductions in symptoms of 51.7% (heart racing), 33.9% (fatigue) 31.8% (heart flutters), 43.5% (dizziness), 38.6% (breathlessness), 44.2% (chest pressure), 33.1% (trouble concentrating), 15.9% (headache), 28.3% (neck pressure), and 23.4% (fainting) (P < 0.001). The mean number of social days affected reduced by 7.49 days/month (P < 0.001); mean work/school days affected/month reduced by 6.26 (P < 0.001); mean GP/hospital visits reduced by 1.36 days/month (P < 0.001). The procedure met patient expectations in 72% of responders. Conclusions The high response rate suggests that the use of PROMs in this patient group is feasible, with rates equalling those of the National PROMs Programme. The results showed that patients experienced significant improvements in their quality of life following ablation, while feedback allowed the tools to be improved. Further work is required to validate these tools; however, the findings suggest that PROMs could be useful in the audit of ablation techniques. PMID:24627541

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOASSAY PROCEDURES FOR DEFINING POLLUTION OF HARBOR SEDIMENTS. PART I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research investigates bioassay methods which may be useful in assessing the degree of pollution of harbor sediments. Procedures studied include 96 hr. toxicity tests employing Hexagenia limbata, Daphnia magna and Pontoporeia affinis as biological probes, monitoring cough fre...

  2. Development of an ICF-based eligibility procedure for education in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Starting in January 2011, Switzerland will implement a multidimensional, context-sensitive procedure to establish eligibility in education systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the different eligibility-related practices with a special focus on children with disabilities. The paper then outlines the philosophical and conceptual framework of the eligibility procedure based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. The different components and methodology applied to organise information in the process towards establishing eligibility are also presented. Finally, some observations are made regarding transparent and just applications of the eligibility procedure, and the implementation of this new eligibility procedure. PMID:21624193

  3. Development of the quasi-procedural method for use in aircraft configuration optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, P.; Kroo, I.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the quasi-procedural analysis system in optimization tasks is investigated. In particular, the quasi-procedural method is applied to the complete mission optimization of a medium-sized transport aircraft using a vortex-lattice aerodynamic model and finite element structural analysis of the wing and the tail. Some modifications and improvements to the system, required in order to complete this task, are described. The performance of the system is compared with that of the standard procedural system, and it is shown that the quasi-procedural approach reduces the analysis required to reach the optimum. The overall cost is shown to be strongly dependent on the analysis architecture and data structure.

  4. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  5. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the

  6. Development and Optimization of a Flocculation Procedure for Improved Solid-Liquid Separation of Digested Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Caroline; Lischeske, James J.; Sievers, David A.

    2015-11-03

    One viable treatment method for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels begins with saccharification (thermochemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis), followed by fermentation or catalytic upgrading to fuels such as ethanol, butanol, or other hydrocarbons. The post-hydrolysis slurry is typically 4-8 percent insoluble solids, predominantly consisting of lignin. Suspended solids are known to inhibit fermentation as well as poison catalysts and obstruct flow in catalyst beds. Thus a solid-liquid separation following enzymatic hydrolysis would be highly favorable for process economics, however the material is not easily separated by filtration or gravimetric methods. Use of a polyacrylamide flocculant to bind the suspended particles in a corn stover hydrolyzate slurry into larger flocs (1-2mm diameter) has been found to be extremely helpful in improving separation. Recent and ongoing research on novel pretreatment methods yields hydrolyzate material with diverse characteristics. Therefore, we need a thorough understanding of rapid and successful flocculation design in order to quickly achieve process design goals. In this study potential indicators of flocculation performance were investigated in order to develop a rapid analysis method for flocculation procedure in the context of a novel hydrolyzate material. Flocculation conditions were optimized on flocculant type and loading, pH, and mixing time. Filtration flux of the hydrolyzate slurry was improved 170-fold using a cationic polyacrylamide flocculant with a dosing of approximately 22 mg flocculant/g insoluble solids at an approximate pH of 3. With cake washing, sugar recovery exceeded 90 percent with asymptotic yield at 15 L wash water/kg insoluble solids.

  7. Development of source testing, analytical, and mutagenicity bioassay procedures for evaluating emissions from municipal and hospital waste combustors.

    PubMed Central

    Watts, R R; Lemieux, P M; Grote, R A; Lowans, R W; Williams, R W; Brooks, L R; Warren, S H; DeMarini, D M; Bell, D A; Lewtas, J

    1992-01-01

    Incineration is currently being used for disposal of about 10% of the solid waste generated in the United States, and this percentage will likely increase as land disposal declines. Siting new incinerators, however, is often controversial because of concerns related to the possibility of adverse health effects and environmental contamination from long-term exposure to stack emissions. Specific concerns relate to the adequacies of a) stack emission testing protocols, b) existing regulations, and c) compliance monitoring and enforcement of regulations. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency laboratories are cooperatively conducting research aimed at developing new testing equipment and procedures that will allow a more comprehensive assessment of the complex mixture of organics that is present in stack emissions. These efforts are directed specifically toward developing source testing equipment and procedures, analytical procedures, and bioassay procedures. The objectives of this study were to field test two types of high-volume source dilution samplers, collect stack samples for use in developing analytical and mutagenicity bioassay procedures, and determine mutagenicity of organics associated with emission particles from two municipal waste combustors and a hospital waste combustor. Data are presented for particle concentrations and emission rates, extractable organic concentrations and emission rates, and Salmonella (Ames) mutagenic potency and emission rates. The mutagenic emission rates and emission factors are compared to other incinerators and combustion sources. PMID:1486854

  8. A 3D agglomeration multigrid solver for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid strategy is developed and implemented for the solution of three-dimensional steady viscous flows. The method enables convergence acceleration with minimal additional memory overheads, and is completely automated, in that it can deal with grids of arbitrary construction. The multigrid technique is validated by comparing the delivered convergence rates with those obtained by a previously developed overset-mesh multigrid approach, and by demonstrating grid independent convergence rates for aerodynamic problems on very large grids. Prospects for further increases in multigrid efficiency for high-Reynolds number viscous flows on highly stretched meshes are discussed.

  9. Development of the preliminary procedure for a national nuclear safety authority staff acting during the PWR NPP accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadinov, V.

    1997-12-01

    We present the development of the new preliminary procedure for a National Nuclear Safety Authority staff preparedness for action in the case of a Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant accident. The procedures are generic and equally applicable for advanced nuclear plants. The basic goal of the procedure is systematic determination of the responsibilities of the staff expert group(s) members for accident analysis and consequences prediction. Moreover, the procedure describes anticipated practices of an expert group acting during a plant accident. Different sources will define the state(s) of the plant as: the plant form for initial notification of an accident, the particular form for specific plant information, etc. By this procedure we propose three expert groups successively to work up to eight hours each, in the circumstances of an accident. We suppose the expert group to have mostly five members each. The members should have different tasks for resolution, defined by the procedure. The head of the group will coordinate group members work during an accident. Group members have to be qualified and acquainted with all adequate references. In the paper we present a newly devised agenda with presumed duties of each member of the group. Furthermore, we also composed a special form for information exchange between the utility and regulatory staff member during an accident. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Development, test and evaluation of a computerized procedure for using Landsat data to estimate spring small grains acreage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, R. R. J.; Palmer, W. F.; Smyrski, M. M.; Baker, T. C.; Nazare, C. V.

    1982-01-01

    A number of methods which can provide information concerning crop acreages on the basis of a utilization of multispectral scanner (MSS) data require for their implementation a comparatively large amount of labor. The present investigation is concerned with a project designed to improve the efficiency of analysis through increased automation. The Caesar technique was developed to realize this objective. The processability rates of the Caesar procedure versus the historical state-of-the-art proportion estimation procedures were determined in an experiment. Attention is given to the study site, the aggregation technology, the results of the aggregation test, and questions of error characterization. It is found that the Caesar procedure, which has been developed for the spring small grains region of North America, is highly efficient and provides accurate results.

  11. Nanosized rods agglomerates as a new approach for formulation of a dry powder inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Salem, HF; Abdelrahim, ME; Eid, K Abo; Sharaf, MA

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nanosized dry powder inhalers provide higher stability for poorly water-soluble drugs as compared with liquid formulations. However, the respirable particles must have a diameter of 1–5 μm in order to deposit in the lungs. Controlled agglomeration of the nanoparticles increases their geometric particle size so they can deposit easily in the lungs. In the lungs, they fall apart to reform nanoparticles, thus enhancing the dissolution rate of the drugs. Theophylline is a bronchodilator with poor solubility in water. Methods: Nanosized theophylline colloids were formed using an amphiphilic surfactant and destabilized using dilute sodium chloride solutions to form the agglomerates. Results: The theophylline nanoparticles thus obtained had an average particle size of 290 nm and a zeta potential of −39.5 mV, whereas the agglomerates were 2.47 μm in size with a zeta potential of −28.9 mV. The release profile was found to follow first-order kinetics (r2 > 0.96). The aerodynamic characteristics of the agglomerated nanoparticles were determined using a cascade impactor. The behavior of the agglomerate was significantly better than unprocessed raw theophylline powder. In addition, the nanoparticles and agglomerates resulted in a significant improvement in the dissolution of theophylline. Conclusion: The results obtained lend support to the hypothesis that controlled agglomeration strategies provide an efficient approach for the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs into the lungs. PMID:21383856

  12. Nanoparticle agglomeration in an evaporating levitated droplet for different acoustic amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijerino, Erick; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Radiatively heated levitated functional droplets with nanosilica suspensions exhibit three distinct stages namely pure evaporation, agglomeration, and finally structure formation. The temporal history of the droplet surface temperature shows two inflection points. One inflection point corresponds to a local maximum and demarcates the end of transient heating of the droplet and domination of vaporization. The second inflection point is a local minimum and indicates slowing down of the evaporation rate due to surface accumulation of nanoparticles. Morphology and final precipitation structures of levitated droplets are due to competing mechanisms of particle agglomeration, evaporation, and shape deformation. In this work, we provide a detailed analysis for each process and propose two important timescales for evaporation and agglomeration that determine the final diameter of the structure formed. It is seen that both agglomeration and evaporation timescales are similar functions of acoustic amplitude (sound pressure level), droplet size, viscosity, and density. However, we show that while the agglomeration timescale decreases with initial particle concentration, the evaporation timescale shows the opposite trend. The final normalized diameter can be shown to be dependent solely on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation timescales for all concentrations and acoustic amplitudes. The structures also exhibit various aspect ratios (bowls, rings, spheroids) which depend on the ratio of the deformation timescale (tdef) and the agglomeration timescale (tg). For tdef

  13. Agglomeration and defluidization in FBC of biomass fuels -- Mechanisms and measures for prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Nordin, A.; Oehman, M.; Skrifvars, B.J.; Hupa, M.

    1996-12-31

    The use of biomass fuels in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) and gasification (FBG) is becoming more important because of the environmental benefits associated with these fuel and processes. However, severe bed agglomeration and defluidization have been reported due to the special ash forming constituents of some biomass fuels. Previous results have indicated that this could possibly be prevented by intelligent fuel mixing. In the present work the mechanisms of bed agglomeration using two different biomass fuels as well as the mechanism of the prevention of agglomeration by co-combustion with coal (50/50 %{sub w}) were studied. Several repeated combustion tests with the two biomass fuels, alone (Lucerne and olive flesh), all resulted in agglomeration and defluidization of the bed within less than 30 minutes. By controlled defluidization experiments the initial cohesion temperatures for the two fuels were determined to be as low as 670 C and 940 C, respectively. However, by fuel mixing the initial agglomeration temperature increased to 950 C and more than 1050 C, respectively. When co-combusted with coal during ten hour extended runs, no agglomeration was observed for either of the two fuel mixtures. The agglomeration temperatures were compared with results from a laboratory method, based on compression strength measurements of ash pellets, and results from chemical equilibrium calculations. Samples of bed materials, collected throughout the experimental runs, as well as the produced agglomerated beds, were analyzed using SEM EDS and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that loss of fluidization resulted from formation of molten phases coating the bed materials; a salt melt in the case of Lucerne and a silicate melt in the case of the olive fuel. By fuel mixing, the in-bed ash composition is altered, conferring higher melting temperatures, and thereby agglomeration and defluidization can be prevented.

  14. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM): useful for developing procedures for immobilization of proteins on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sha, Xue; Sun, Chengjun; Xu, Xiaohe; Alexander, Laura; Loll, Patrick J; Penn, Lynn S

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the combined use of liquid and air measurements with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for quantitative analysis of multistep reaction procedures leading to immobilized proteins on solid surfaces. Reactions are conducted on the surfaces of QCM sensor crystals and are quantified by measurements of resonant frequency of the crystals before and after each reaction step. When reactions are conducted in the flow cell of the QCM in the presence of solvent, measurement of resonant frequency can be made in situ (liquid measurement). When reactions cannot be conducted in the flow cell because of temperatures or solvents not tolerated by the cell, frequency can be measured after evaporation of solvent (air measurement). Each reaction step can be analyzed by either liquid or air measurement so that the whole multistep procedure is addressed, no matter how diverse the chemical nature of the steps. We conducted identical multistep procedures on two different starting surfaces, gold and silica, and found comparable results. PMID:23121645

  15. Using Data Comparison and Interpretation to Develop Procedural Understandings in the Primary Classroom: Case Study Evidence from Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Paul; Siraj-Blatchford, John

    2006-01-01

    The development of a science education that includes a focus upon the nature of science suggests the need for "pedagogic tools" that can be used to engage children with the procedural understandings that are central to the scientific approach to enquiry. This paper reports on a collaborative action research project that focused on the use of…

  16. What Counts as Knowing? The Development of Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Counting from Kindergarten through Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Smith-Chant, Brenda L.; Fast, Lisa; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Sargla, Erin; Arnup, Jesse S.; Penner-Wilger, Marcie; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Kamawar, Deepthi

    2006-01-01

    The development of conceptual and procedural knowledge about counting was explored for children in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2 (N = 255). Conceptual knowledge was assessed by asking children to make judgments about three types of counts modeled by an animated frog: standard (correct) left-to-right counts, incorrect counts, and unusual…

  17. Some Extension Resource Development Principles and Procedures for Use in Tennessee Counties. A Research Summary of a Graduate Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanumanthappa, H. S.; And Others

    A study was conducted to identify some generally accepted principles and procedures found to be effective and useful in county and area resource development planning. Review of available published and unpublished literature and involvement of a six-member panel of judges permitted identification of nine principles concerning resource development…

  18. Procedures Used in Designing a Training Program in Educational Evaluation and Development. Technical Paper No. 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Boulder. Colorado Center for Training in Educational Evaluation and Development.

    The purpose of this technical paper is to outline the procedures used in designing the training programing in educational evaluation and development involving an elaborate collection of data from many sources and a drafting of a tentative plan which was then screened, reviewed, and critiqued by each of the consortium units. The data sources were…

  19. Diffusion-Limited Agglomeration and Defect Generation during Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, R.; Han, Y.; Karra, P.; Sherman, P.; Chandra, A.

    2008-06-06

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of copper involves removal of surface asperities with abrasive particles and polishing processes. This leads to copper-containing nanoparticles extruded into the solution. We model the diffusion-limited agglomeration (DLA) of such nanoparticles which can rapidly grow to large sizes. These large particles are detrimental because they can participate in polishing, causing scratches and surface defects during CMP. The agglomeration is much slower in the reaction-limited agglomeration process. Under realistic conditions the defect generation probability can increase significantly over time scales of {approx}10 to 20 min from DLA, unless prevented by slurry rejuvenation or process modification measures.

  20. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Huber, Dale L.

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  1. Constraints on chondrule agglomeration from fine-grained chondrule rims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, K.; Bischoff, A.

    1994-01-01

    Fine-grained rims around chondrules, Ca,Al-rich inclusions, and other coarse-grained components occur in most types of unequilibrated chondrites, most prominently in carbonaceous chondrites of the CM group. Based on mineralogical and petrographic investigations, it was suggested that rim structures in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites could have formed in the solar nebula by accretion of dust on the surfaces of the chondrules. Dust mantles in CM chondrites seem to have formed by accretion of dust on the surfaces of chondrules and other components during their passage through dust-rich regions in the solar nebula. Concentric mantles with compositionally different layers prove the existence of various distinct dust reservoirs in the vicinity of the accreting parent body. Despite mineralogical and chemical differences, fine-grained rims from other chondrite groups principally show striking similarities to dust mantle textures in CM chondrite. This implies that the formation of dust mantles was a cosmically significant event like the chondrule formation itself. Dust mantles seem to have formed chronologically between chondrule-producing transient heating events and the agglomeration of chondritic parent bodies. For this reason the investigation of dust mantle structures may help to answer the question of how a dusty solar nebula was transformed into a planetary system.

  2. Nearshore dynamics of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.; McLaughlin, Molly R.

    2015-01-01

    Weathered oil can mix with sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) that can cause beach re-oiling for years after a spill. Few studies have focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. In this study, artificial SOAs (aSOAs) were created and deployed in the nearshore, and shear stress-based mobility formulations were assessed to predict SOA response. Prediction sensitivity to uncertainty in hydrodynamic conditions and shear stress parameterizations were explored. Critical stress estimates accounting for large particle exposure in a mixed bed gave the best predictions of mobility under shoaling and breaking waves. In the surf zone, the 10-cm aSOA was immobile and began to bury in the seafloor while smaller size classes dispersed alongshore. aSOAs up to 5 cm in diameter were frequently mobilized in the swash zone. The uncertainty in predicting aSOA dynamics reflects a broader uncertainty in applying mobility and transport formulations to cm-sized particles.

  3. Reducing adhesion and agglomeration within a cloud of combustible particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.

    1988-01-01

    The study of combustible particle clouds inside flame tubes is of fundamental scientific interest as well as a practical concern. Only the suspended concentration is important to the combustion process, so that assurances must be provided that a minimum of particles adheres to the tube wall. This paper demonstrates experimentally the ability to minimize adhesion and agglomeration of acoustically-mixed lycopodium particles within a 5-cm diameter lexan flame tube. The area density of particles (ADP) adhering to the wall of bare lexan tubes was measured at greater than 100 particles/sq mm. The nature of adhesion was found to be clearly electrostatic, with the ADP level aggravated by increased mixing time, vigor, and the concentration of particles. Increases in the conductivity of the air and the tube wall did not affect ADP levels substantially. However, the observed adhesion was reduced to less than 10 p/sq mm when the air was ionized by use of an alpha emitter mounted on the inner walls of the flame tube.

  4. Agglomeration Multigrid for an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal; Pandya, Mohagna J.

    2004-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid scheme has been implemented into the sequential version of the NASA code USM3Dns, tetrahedral cell-centered finite volume Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver. Efficiency and robustness of the multigrid-enhanced flow solver have been assessed for three configurations assuming an inviscid flow and one configuration assuming a viscous fully turbulent flow. The inviscid studies include a transonic flow over the ONERA M6 wing and a generic business jet with flow-through nacelles and a low subsonic flow over a high-lift trapezoidal wing. The viscous case includes a fully turbulent flow over the RAE 2822 rectangular wing. The multigrid solutions converged with 12%-33% of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) time required by the solutions obtained without multigrid. For all of the inviscid cases, multigrid in conjunction with an explicit time-stepping scheme performed the best with regard to the run time memory and CPU time requirements. However, for the viscous case multigrid had to be used with an implicit backward Euler time-stepping scheme that increased the run time memory requirement by 22% as compared to the run made without multigrid.

  5. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. V. Multiple Impacts of Dusty Agglomerates at Velocities Above the Fragmentation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Güttler, Carsten; Blum, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, a number of new experiments have advanced our knowledge on the early growth phases of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Some of these experiments have shown that collisions between porous and compacted agglomerates at velocities above the fragmentation threshold velocity can lead to growth of the compact body, when the porous collision partner fragments upon impact and transfers mass to the compact agglomerate. To obtain a deeper understanding of this potentially important growth process, we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small, highly porous dust-aggregate projectiles onto sintered dust targets. The projectile and target consisted of 1.5 μm monodisperse, spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 ± 0.01 and 0.45 ± 0.05, respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid magnet and combined with a projectile magazine with which 25 impacts onto the same spot on the target could be performed in vacuum. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency and the volume filling factor for different impact velocities between 1.5 and 6.0 m s^{-1}. The experiments at the lowest impact speeds were performed in the Bremen drop tower under microgravity conditions to allow partial mass transfer also for the lowest adhesion case. Within this velocity range, we found a linear increase of the accretion efficiency with increasing velocity. In the laboratory experiments, the accretion efficiency increases from 0.12 to 0.21 in units of the projectile mass. The recorded images of the impacts showed that the mass transfer from the projectile to the target leads to the growth of a conical structure on the target after less than 100 impacts. From the images, we also measured the volume filling factors of the grown structures, which ranged from 0.15 (uncompacted) to 0.40 (significantly compacted) with increasing impact speed. The velocity dependency of the mass-transfer efficiency and the packing

  6. Development of a School Bus Fuel System Integrity Compliance Procedure. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, G. W.; Johnson, N. B.

    This report presents a program that derived a compliance test procedure for school buses with a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds or greater. The objective of this program was to evaluate Fuel System Integrity (FMVSS 301) in relation to school buses, conduct a limited state-of-the-art survey and run full-scale dynamic tests to produce an…

  7. Complex Problem Exercises in Developing Engineering Students' Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Electromagnetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppavirta, J.; Kettunen, H.; Sihvola, A.

    2011-01-01

    Complex multistep problem exercises are one way to enhance engineering students' learning of electromagnetics (EM). This study investigates whether exposure to complex problem exercises during an introductory EM course improves students' conceptual and procedural knowledge. The performance in complex problem exercises is compared to prior success…

  8. Don't Be a Slave to Seniority When Developing RIF Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ralph M., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A reduction in force (RIF) policy not exclusively based on seniority includes appeal procedures and provisions for teachers nearing retirement. A point system determines RIF order: supervisors assess teachers' planning and organization, instructional techniques, classroom and school environment, and professional attitude. Education, teaching…

  9. Development of an Ethanol Yield Procedure for Dry-grind Corn Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of U.S. ethanol is produced at a rate of more than 9.3 billion gallons per year; an additional 4.4 billion gallon capacity is under construction. Kernel composition and wet milling properties are not correlated with ethanol yield. A procedure to predict hybrid potential would benefit co...

  10. Procedures for Developing Policy for Nursery Schools and Day Care Centers: Educational Policy Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Roberta L.

    This investigation of educational policy for child care facilities identifies 18 areas of school operation that would benefit from written policy statements and suggests 6 procedures to use in formulating policy. Interviews with 6 child care center directors, a review of the literature, and a review of federal and state standards for child care,…

  11. Developing Conceptions of Fair Contest Procedures and the Understanding of Skill and Luck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorkildsen, Theresa A.; White-McNulty, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Contrary to assumptions about aversive effects of competition on achievement motivation, in this study young people saw academic contests as fair. When participants completed structural interviews on fair ways to organize science contests and on differentiation of skill and luck, age-related trends in their conceptions of procedural justice were…

  12. Treatment of control data in lunar phototriangulation. [application of statistical procedures and development of mathematical and computer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    In lunar phototriangulation, there is a complete lack of accurate ground control points. The accuracy analysis of the results of lunar phototriangulation must, therefore, be completely dependent on statistical procedure. It was the objective of this investigation to examine the validity of the commonly used statistical procedures, and to develop both mathematical techniques and computer softwares for evaluating (1) the accuracy of lunar phototriangulation; (2) the contribution of the different types of photo support data on the accuracy of lunar phototriangulation; (3) accuracy of absolute orientation as a function of the accuracy and distribution of both the ground and model points; and (4) the relative slope accuracy between any triangulated pass points.

  13. Analytical procedures for flutter model development and checkout in preparation for wind tunnel testing of the DAST ARW-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1982-01-01

    A study to develop analytical procedures to be used in the checkout and calibration of a flutter wind tunnel model of the DAST ARW-1 wing equipped with a flutter suppression device is reported. The methods used to obtain a realistic simulation of the structural inertial and aerodynamic properties of the wing, the hydro-electro-servo actuator used for flutter suppression, a prediction of the open loop flutter speed at a fixed Mach number (.897), a procedure for checkout and calibration using the method frequency response of a wing mounted accelerometer, and an analytical representation of a reduced state approximation of the overall system are described.

  14. Development of SCR Aircraft takeoff and landing procedures for community noise abatement and their impact on flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted simulator studies to determine takeoff and landing procedures for a supersonic cruise transport concept that result in predicted community noise levels which meet current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards are discussed. The results indicate that with the use of advanced procedures, the subject simulated aircraft meets the FAA traded noise levels during takeoff and landing utilizing average flight crew skills. The advanced takeoff procedures developed involved violating three of the current Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) noise test conditions. These were: (1) thrust cutbacks at altitudes below 214 meters (700 ft); (2) thrust cutback level below those presently allowed; and (3) configuration change, other than raising the landing gear. It was not necessary to violate any FAR noise test conditions during landing approach. It was determined that the advanced procedures developed do not compromise flight safety. Automation of some of the aircraft functions reduced pilot workload, and the development of a simple head-up display to assist in the takeoff flight mode proved to be adequate.

  15. Generalization and formalization of the USEPA procedure for design of treated wastewater aquifer recharge basins: I. Theoretical development.

    PubMed

    Kallali, Hamadi; Yoshida, Mitsuo; Tarhouni, Jamila; Jedidi, Naceur

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is vulnerable to overdraft and depletion, especially in relatively dry regions where natural recharge rates are very low and groundwater is the main source of water. Artificial recharge of groundwater with treated wastewater has been widely adopted as a technique to replenish the overdraft aquifers. Indeed, in the USA, the technique has been practised for a long time. In 1981, a design procedure manual was developed for practitioners by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). It was updated in 1984 and lastly in 2006. However, the design procedure has not been fully generalized for the different situations and has not been fully formalized in order to allow its automated implementation on calculation software (i.e. spreadsheet). Therefore, in this paper we formalized and generalized the USEPA design procedure to achieve an automated iterative method of calculation which can be easily implemented in a spreadsheet. PMID:23128630

  16. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VII. THE LOW-VELOCITY COLLISION BEHAVIOR OF LARGE DUST AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen; Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-10-10

    We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s{sup -1} to 0.5 m s{sup -1}, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

  17. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, September 30, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which led to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. Survey of industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors is being conducted to determine the occurrence of bed agglomeration and the circumstances under which agglomeration took place. This task should be finished by the end of February. Samples of bed material, agglomerate material, and boiler deposits are being requested from boiler operators as part of the survey. Once received, these sample will be analyzed to determine chemical and mineralogic composition. The bulk chemical determination will be performed using x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission (ICP). Mineralogy will be detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical and mineral reactions will be determined by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and electron microprobe.

  18. Role of Solvents in Improvement of Dissolution Rate of Drugs: Crystal Habit and Crystal Agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization is often used for manufacturing drug substances. Advances of crystallization have achieved control over drug identity and purity, but control over the physical form remains poor. This review discusses the influence of solvents used in crystallization process on crystal habit and agglomeration of crystals with potential implication for dissolution. According to literature it has been known that habit modification of crystals by use of proper solvents may enhance the dissolution properties by changing the size, number and the nature of crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium. Also, the faster dissolution rate of drug from the agglomerates of crystals compared with the single crystals may be related to porous structure of the agglomerates and consequently their better wettability. It is concluded from this review that in-depth understanding of role of the solvents in crystallization process can be applied to engineering of crystal habit or crystal agglomeration, and predictably dissolution improvement in poorly soluble drugs. PMID:25789214

  19. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup. PMID:24152872

  20. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-06-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  1. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine are considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analysis. The inviscid, quasi three dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous three dimensional internal flow cade for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three dimensional heat conduction code for the calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results are given.

  2. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  3. Development of a procedure for substantiating replacement terms for the condenser tubes of steam turbine installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Ryabchikov, A. Yu.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Loginov, M. I.

    2013-08-01

    Results obtained from elaboration of a procedure for estimating replacement terms for the condenser tube systems of steam turbine installations are presented. Censored data processing methods are used in performing statistical assessment of replacement terms. The service life of condenser tubes blanked off in the course of turbine operation is assumed to be known (complete operation time), and that for tubes blanked off during the turbine repair process is assumed to be undetermined (censored operation time). The criterion for estimating the replacement term for a condenser tube system is defined as the ratio between the number of tubes blanked off during a repair and in the course of turbine operation. The procedure is validated by the results from a study on analyzing the damageability of tubes made of different materials for the condensers of 11 turbines with capacities ranging from 25 to 500 MW.

  4. Development of a drift-correction procedure for a direct-reading spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure which provides automatic correction for drifts in the radiometric sensitivity of each detector channel in a direct-reading emission spectrometer is described. Such drifts are customarily controlled by the regular analyses of standards, which provide corrections for changes in the excitational, optical, and electronic components of the instrument. This standardization procedure, however, corrects for the optical and electronic drifts. It is a step that must be taken if the time, effort, and cost of processing standards is to be minimized. This method of radiometric drift correction uses a 1,000-W tungsten-halogen reference lamp to illuminate each detector through the same optical path as that traversed during sample analysis. The responses of the detector channels to this reference light are regularly compared with channel response to the same light intensity at the time of analytical calibration in order to determine and correct for drift. Except for placing the lamp in position, the procedure is fully automated and compensates for changes in spectral intensity due to variations in lamp current. A discussion of the implementation of this drift-correction system is included.

  5. Reduced bed agglomeration by co-combustion biomass with peat fuels in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Karin Lundholm; Anders Nordin; Marcus Oehman; Dan Bostroem

    2005-12-01

    Fluidized bed combustion is an energy conversion technology that is very suitable for biomass combustion because of its fuel flexibility and low process temperatures. However, agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems. To prevent or at least reduce this, peat has been suggested as an additive to the main fuels. Nevertheless, the characteristics of peat fuels vary and there is limited information of the effect of different peat fuels and of the mechanisms behind the agglomeration prevention. The objectives of the present work were therefore to: (I) quantify the potential positive effect by co-combustion peat with forest fuels in terms of initial agglomeration temperatures; (ii) determine the amount of peat fuel that is needed to significantly reduce the agglomeration tendencies; and, if possible, (iii) elucidate the governing mechanisms. The results showed that all peat fuels prevented agglomeration in the studied interval of 760-1020{sup o}C and even as little as 5% peat fuel was found to have significant effects. The results also indicated that the mechanism of the agglomeration prevention varies between different peat fuels. Possible mechanisms are the minerals in the peat fuel retain alkali, which then is either elutriated up from the bed or captured in the bed; calcium and other refractory elements increase the melting temperature and thereby counteract the melting of alkali; and sulfur reacts with alkali metals and the alkali sulfates is either elutriated up from the bed or prevents agglomeration by increased melting temperature and lowered viscosity. Results from elemental analysis of the coating on bed particles showed that all mixtures with peat fuel resulted in a decreased or unchanged fraction of potassium and an increased fraction of aluminum in the coatings. The results also indicated a complex relationship between the fuel inorganic contents and the agglomeration process. 21 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Quantitative characterization of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling blender by using the Stokes number approach.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Nguyen, Tien Thanh; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2013-03-01

    Removal of microcrystalline cellulose agglomerates in a dry-mixing system (lactose, 100 M) predominantly occurs via abrasion. The agglomerate abrasion rate potential is estimated by the Stokes abrasion (StAbr) number of the system. The StAbr number equals the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. Basically, the StAbr number concept describes the blending condition of the dry-mixing system. The concept has been applied to investigate the relevance of process parameters on agglomerate abrasion in tumbling blenders. Here, process parameters such as blender rotational speed and relative fill volumes were investigated. In this study, the StAbr approach revealed a transition point between abrasion rate behaviors. Below this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerate abrasion is dominated by the kinetic energy density of the powder blend. Above this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerates show (undesirable) slow abrasion rates. In this situation, the blending condition is mainly determined by the high fill volume of the filler. PMID:23250711

  7. Factors affecting the oil agglomeration of Sivas-Divrigi Ulucayir lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, I.; Gorgun Ersan, M.

    2007-07-01

    In the coal industry, the coal particles need to be decreased to a very fine size because of the need of removing inorganic materials from coal. Oil agglomeration is a kind of coal cleaning technique that is used for separation of organic and inorganic parts of fine sized coal. In this study, the oil agglomeration of Sivas-Divrigi (S-D) Ulucayir lignite was carried out by using kerosene, diesel oil, fuel oil, poppy oil, and sunflower oil. The amount of bridging oil was varied from 5% to 25% of the amount of lignite. The effect of oil amount, oil type, solid content, agitation rate and time, pH on agglomeration performance was investigated. Maximum recovery value of 98.18% was observed by using poppy oil. In order to investigate the effect of pH on agglomeration NaOH and HCl is added to the slurry in various amounts. It is decided that the best agglomeration condition is obtained at low pH values. The effect of nonionic surface active agent (Igepal-CA 630) on agglomeration is investigated by adding to the slurry and it is observed that the grade is increased with the amount of surface active agent.

  8. Two-level hierarchical structure in nano-powder agglomerates in gas media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martin, Lilian; Bouwman, Wim G.; van Ommen, J. Ruud

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles in high concentration in a gas form agglomerates due to the interparticle van der Waals forces. The size and the internal structure of these nanoparticles agglomerates strongly influence their dynamics and their interaction with other objects. This information is crucial, for example, when studying inhalation of nanoparticles. It is common to model the structure of these agglomerates using a fractal approach and to compare their dimension with the dimension obtained from aggregation models, such diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). In this work we have analyzed the structure of nanoparticles agglomerates in situ by means of Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS), while they were fluidized in a gas stream. The advantage of SESANS over conventional SANS is that SESANS can measure scales up to 20 microns, while SANS does not exceed a few hundred of nanometers. We have observed that when agglomerates interact, their structure cannot be characterized by using only one scaling parameter, the fractal dimension. We have found that there are at least two structure levels in the agglomerates and hence, we need at least two parameters to describe the autocorrelation function in each level.

  9. Effects of operating conditions on agglomeration and habit of paracetamol crystals in anti-solvent crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Q.; Tan, R. B. H.; Chow, P. S.

    2005-06-01

    Effects of agitation speed and feeding rate on agglomeration and habit of paracetamol crystals in anti-solvent crystallization from water-acetone mixture are reported. Water is used as anti-solvent and is added in a semi-batch manner to a baffled 1-l crystallizer equipped with a marine-type impeller. A simple new method to characterize agglomeration degree has been proposed. Results show that agglomeration degree of crystals depends on particle size and elevated agitation reduces agglomeration degree of big particles. Particle mean size exhibits a maximum with increasing agitation intensity in the range of 200-600 rpm, which is explained from the perspective of anti-solvent dispersion and crystal agglomeration/disruption. Agglomeration degree of products deteriorates with increasing feeding rate ranging from 1 to 20 g/min due to enhanced nucleation. Crystal habit changes when feeding rate is altered, mainly in the faces of [0 0 1] and [1 1 0]. Focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was used to monitor indirectly the particle size distribution in situ. The data demonstrated that FBRM may potentially be used as a tool to control crystallization process.

  10. Development of an analytical procedure for quantifying the underivatized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Combes, Audrey; El Abdellaoui, Saïda; Vial, Jérome; Lagrange, Emmeline; Pichon, Valérie

    2014-07-01

    The cyanotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has received renewed attention as an environmental risk factor for sporadic cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (Nunn et al., Brain Res 410:375-379, 1987). The aim of the present study was to develop and to validate an analytical procedure that allows the quantification of native BMAA and of its natural isomer, 2,4 diaminobutyric acid (DAB), in brain tissues. An analytical procedure was previously reported by our group for the determination of underivatized BMAA in environmental samples. It included a step of sample clean-up by solid phase extraction (SPE) with a mixed-mode sorbent and the analyses were performed by LC/MS-MS using hydrophilic interaction chromatography and multiple reactions monitoring scan mode. As brain tissues have a higher lipid content, the crucial step of sample clean-up had been optimized by evaluating the efficiency of the addition of a liquid/liquid extraction step prior to the SPE procedure or alternatively, of washing steps to the SPE extraction procedure. The efficiency was checked by visualizing the complexity of the resulting chromatograms in LC/MS and their performance by using spiked brain samples. The optimized analytical procedure, including a washing step with cyclohexane to the SPE with a recovery yield close to 100%, was validated using the total error approach and allowed the quantification of BMAA in a concentration level ranging from 20 to 1,500 ng/g in brain samples. Finally, the feasibility of implementation of this procedure was verified in human brain samples from two patients who died of ALS. PMID:24858470

  11. Development of a nested PCR detection procedure for Nectria fuckeliana direct from Norway spruce bark extracts.

    PubMed

    Langrell, Stephen R H

    2005-01-01

    A pair of primers specific for Nectria fuckeliana, a bark infecting pathogen predominantly of Norway spruce (Picea abies), were designed from comparisons of nucleotide sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nine isolates from Norway, Lithuania, Switzerland, Austria, Slovakia, Scotland (Larix sp.) and New Zealand (Pinus radiata), and other closely related nectriaceous species, including Neo. Neomacrospora, and 'N'. mammoidea, to which it exhibits taxonomic similarities. Complete ITS sequence homology was observed between each of the nine N. fuckeliana isolates, regardless of geographic provenance, including a previously published Danish strain. Primers Cct1 and Cct2 consistently amplified a single product of 360 bp from DNA prepared from 20 isolates covering the principle range of the disease from Central and Northern Europe, but not from other Neonectria, 'Nectria' or a range of species commonly encountered in forest ecosystems, as well as P. abies or P. radiata DNA. A quick, simple and efficient mechanical lysis procedure for the extraction of high quality total DNA from bark, coupled with post-extraction polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) chromatography purification, is described to facilitate successful PCR detection of N. fuckeliana direct from bark extracts. Detection of N. fuckeliana from bark preparations was only possible following nested PCR of PVPP purified extracts using universal primers ITS5 and 4 in first round amplification. The identity of products from bark tissues was confirmed by Southern hybridisation and sequencing. Using the above procedure, positive diagnosis of N. fuckeliana was achievable within 5 h and has the potential for full exploitation as both a forest management and ecological research tool. As the DNA extraction procedure described here has been successful in application against other tree species, it has potential for incorporation into other molecular diagnostic systems for other

  12. Development of a new illumination procedure for photodynamic therapy of the abdominal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Laurie; Claude Lesage, Jean; Betrouni, Nacim; Mordon, Serge

    2012-03-01

    A homogeneous illumination of intra-abdominal organs is essential for successful photodynamic therapy of the abdominal cavity. Considering the current lack of outstanding light-delivery systems, a new illumination procedure was assessed. A rat model of peritoneal carcinomatosis was used. Four hours after intraperitoneal injection of hexaminolevulinate, a square illuminating panel connected to a 635-nm laser source was inserted vertically into the abdominal cavity. The abdominal incision was sutured and a pneumoperitoneum created prior to illumination. Light dosimetry was based on the calculation of the peritoneal surface by MRI. The rats were treated with a light dose of 20, 10, 5 or 2.5 J/cm2 administered continuously with an irradiance of 7 mW/cm2. The homogeneity of the cavity illumination was assessed by quantification of the photobleaching of the tumor lesions according to their localization and by scoring of that of the liver and of the bowel immediately after treatment. Photobleaching quantification for tumor lesions relied on the calculation of the fluorescence intensity ratio (after/before treatment) after recording of the lesions during blue-light laparoscopy and determination of their fluorescence intensity with Sigmascan Pro software. The procedure led to a homogeneous treatment of the abdominal cavity. No statistical difference was observed for the photobleaching values according to the localization of the lesions on the peritoneum (p=0.59) and photobleaching of the liver and of the intestine was homogeneous. We conclude that this procedure can successfully treat the major sites involved in peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  13. Informatics in Radiology: developing a touchless user interface for intraoperative image control during interventional radiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Justin H; Chao, Cherng; Zawaideh, Mazen; Roberts, Anne C; Kinney, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Review of prior and real-time patient images is critical during an interventional radiology procedure; however, it often poses the challenge of efficiently reviewing images while maintaining a sterile field. Although interventional radiologists can "scrub out" of the procedure, use sterile console covers, or verbally relay directions to an assistant, the ability of the interventionalist to directly control the images without having to touch the console could offer potential gains in terms of sterility, procedure efficiency, and radiation reduction. The authors investigated a potential solution with a low-cost, touch-free motion-tracking device that was originally designed as a video game controller. The device tracks a person's skeletal frame and its motions, a capacity that was adapted to allow manipulation of medical images by means of hand gestures. A custom software program called the Touchless Radiology Imaging Control System translates motion information obtained with the motion-tracking device into commands to review images on a workstation. To evaluate this system, 29 radiologists at the authors' institution were asked to perform a set of standardized tasks during a routine abdominal computed tomographic study. Participants evaluated the device for its efficacy as well as its possible advantages and disadvantages. The majority (69%) of those surveyed believed that the device could be useful in an interventional radiology practice and did not foresee problems with maintaining a sterile field. This proof-of-concept prototype and study demonstrate the potential utility of the motion-tracking device for enhancing imaging-guided treatment in the interventional radiology suite while maintaining a sterile field. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.332125101/-/DC1. PMID:23264282

  14. Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

  15. Developing the Pediatric Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit: A Clinical Report by the Endoscopy and Procedures Committee.

    PubMed

    Pall, Harpreet; Lerner, Diana; Khlevner, Julie; Reynolds, Carrie; Kurowski, Jacob; Troendle, David; Utterson, Elizabeth; Evans, Pamela M; Brill, Herbert; Wilsey, Michael; Fishman, Douglas S

    2016-08-01

    There is significant variability in the design and management of pediatric endoscopy units. Although there is information on adult endoscopy units, little guidance is available to the pediatric endoscopy practitioner. The purpose of this clinical report, prepared by the NASPGHAN Endoscopy and Procedures Committee, is to review the important considerations for setting up an endoscopy unit for children. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken in the preparation of this report regarding the design, management, needed equipment, motility setup, billing and coding, and pediatric specific topics. PMID:26974415

  16. Development of Procedures for Assessing the Impact of Vocational Education Research and Development on Vocational Education (Project IMPACT). Volume 4--A Case Study of Illinois Projects in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Colin; Ethridge, James

    As part of Project IMPACT's efforts to identify and develop procedures for complying with the impact requirements of Public Law 94-482, a case study was made of Illinois Projects in Horticulture. Fourteen horticulture projects in high schools and junior colleges were discovered through a previous study, personal interviews with two University of…

  17. Development of a multiple-parameter nonlinear perturbation procedure for transonic turbomachinery flows: Preliminary application to design/optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.; Elliott, J. P.; Spreiter, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to continue the development of perturbation procedures and associated computational codes for rapidly determining approximations to nonlinear flow solutions, with the purpose of establishing a method for minimizing computational requirements associated with parametric design studies of transonic flows in turbomachines. The results reported here concern the extension of the previously developed successful method for single parameter perturbations to simultaneous multiple-parameter perturbations, and the preliminary application of the multiple-parameter procedure in combination with an optimization method to blade design/optimization problem. In order to provide as severe a test as possible of the method, attention is focused in particular on transonic flows which are highly supercritical. Flows past both isolated blades and compressor cascades, involving simultaneous changes in both flow and geometric parameters, are considered. Comparisons with the corresponding exact nonlinear solutions display remarkable accuracy and range of validity, in direct correspondence with previous results for single-parameter perturbations.

  18. Towards developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical testing in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Miranda D.; Radley, Hannah G.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; De Luca, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various issues to consider when developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical studies in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The review describes and evaluates a wide range of techniques used to measure parameters of muscle pathology in mdx mice and identifies some basic techniques that might comprise standardised approaches for evaluation. While the central aim is to provide a basis for the development of standardised procedures to evaluate efficacy of a drug or a therapeutic strategy, a further aim is to gain insight into pathophysiological mechanisms in order to identify other therapeutic targets. The desired outcome is to enable easier and more rigorous comparison of pre-clinical data from different laboratories around the world, in order to accelerate identification of the best pre-clinical therapies in the mdx mouse that will fast-track translation into effective clinical treatments for DMD. PMID:18499465

  19. Finite-element procedure for calculating the three-dimensional inelastic bowing of fuel rods (AWBA development program)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S E

    1982-05-01

    An incremental finite element procedure is developed for calculating the in-pile lateral bowing of nuclear fuel rods. The fuel rod is modeled as a viscoelastic beam whose material properties are derived as perturbations of the results of an axisymmetric stress analysis of the fuel rod. The effects which are taken into account in calculating the rod's lateral bowing include: (a) lateral, axial, and rotational motions and forces at the rod supports, (b) transverse gradients of temperature, fast-neutron flux, and fissioning rate, and (c) cladding circumferential wall thickness variation. The procedure developed in this report could be used to form the basis for a computer program to calculate the time-dependent bowing as a function of the fuel rod's operational and environmental history.

  20. Development and Execution of Autonomous Procedures Onboard the International Space Station to Support the Next Phase of Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beisert, Susan; Rodriggs, Michael; Moreno, Francisco; Korth, David; Gibson, Stephen; Lee, Young H.; Eagles, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Now that major assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) is complete, NASA's focus has turned to using this high fidelity in-space research testbed to not only advance fundamental science research, but also demonstrate and mature technologies and develop operational concepts that will enable future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The ISS as a Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) project was established to reduce risks for manned missions to exploration destinations by utilizing ISS as a high fidelity micro-g laboratory to demonstrate technologies, operations concepts, and techniques associated with crew autonomous operations. One of these focus areas is the development and execution of ISS Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) autonomous flight crew procedures intended to increase crew autonomy that will be required for long duration human exploration missions. Due to increasing communications delays and reduced logistics resupply, autonomous procedures are expected to help reduce crew reliance on the ground flight control team, increase crew performance, and enable the crew to become more subject-matter experts on both the exploration space vehicle systems and the scientific investigation operations that will be conducted on a long duration human space exploration mission. These tests make use of previous or ongoing projects tested in ground analogs such as Research and Technology Studies (RATS) and NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO). Since the latter half of 2012, selected non-critical ISS systems crew procedures have been used to develop techniques for building ISTAR autonomous procedures, and ISS flight crews have successfully executed them without flight controller involvement. Although the main focus has been preparing for exploration, the ISS has been a beneficiary of this synergistic effort and is considering modifying additional standard ISS procedures that may increase crew efficiency, reduce operational costs, and

  1. Development and Validation of the On-Board Control Procedures Subsystem for the Herschel and Planck Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraguto, M.; Wittrock, T.; Barrenscheen, M.; Paakko, M.; Sipinen, V.; Pelttari, L.

    2009-05-01

    The On-Board Control Procedures (OBCP) subsystem of Herschel and Planck Satellites' Central Data Management Unit (CDMU) Application SW (ASW) provides means to control the spacecraft through small script-like programs written in a specific language called On-board Command Language (OCL). The implementation for Herschel and Planck satellites is an adaptation from previous experiences on instruments like Rosetta/OSIRIS, Venus Express/VMC and Dawn/FC, but it had also been adapted successfully for the GOCE satellite already. A thorough validation campaign has been conducted to qualify the H&P SW implementation for flight. The purpose of having on-board control procedures is to allow the ground operators to be able to prepare and up-link complex operations sequences (more complex than simple sequences of mission time-line telecommands) to be executed on-board during the mission operational phase. This is possible because the OBCPs run in a quite separate subsystem, so the creation of a new procedure does not require modification, uplink and re-validation of the whole on-board software. The OBCP subsystem allows these control procedures to be developed, tested on ground, and executed on the spacecraft.

  2. 24 CFR 5.353 - Housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... development of pet rules. 5.353 Section 5.353 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Housing Programs § 5.353...

  3. 24 CFR 5.380 - Public housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for development of pet rules. 5.380 Section 5.380 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Public...

  4. 24 CFR 5.353 - Housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... development of pet rules. 5.353 Section 5.353 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Housing Programs § 5.353...

  5. 24 CFR 5.380 - Public housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for development of pet rules. 5.380 Section 5.380 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Public...

  6. 24 CFR 5.380 - Public housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for development of pet rules. 5.380 Section 5.380 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Public...

  7. 24 CFR 5.380 - Public housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for development of pet rules. 5.380 Section 5.380 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Public...

  8. 24 CFR 5.380 - Public housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for development of pet rules. 5.380 Section 5.380 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Public...

  9. 24 CFR 5.353 - Housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... development of pet rules. 5.353 Section 5.353 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Housing Programs § 5.353...

  10. 24 CFR 5.353 - Housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... development of pet rules. 5.353 Section 5.353 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Housing Programs § 5.353...

  11. 24 CFR 5.353 - Housing programs: Procedure for development of pet rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... development of pet rules. 5.353 Section 5.353 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Housing Programs § 5.353...

  12. Developing a Noninvasive Procedure Using Labeled Monoclonal Antibody Anti-VEGF (Bevacizumab) for Detection of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Orlando, Margarida Maria Camoes; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The off-label use of bevacizumab labeled with 99mTc as a new radiopharmaceutical for imaging of endometriosis is a promising noninvasive, new clinical procedure. The bevacizumab in monoclonal antibodies targeted at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is superexpressed in cases of endometriosis. In this study we evaluate the imaging of endometriosis lesion in rats (induced to endometriosis) using bevacizumab-99mTc. The results showed that bevacizumab-99mTc imaged the lesion and support his use for Nuclear Medicine applied to gynecology. Also the results appointed that this radiopharmaceutical has a hepatobiliary excretion. It is important to notice that the dose used was almost 0,01% of the usual dose for the bevacizumab. PMID:26240826

  13. Towards developing an analytical procedure of defining the equatorial electrojet for correcting satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay; Hinze, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the total magnetic intensity MAGSAT data has identified and characterized the variability of ionospheric current effects as reflected in the geomagnetic field as a function of longitude, elevation, and time (daily as well as monthly variations). This analysis verifies previous observations in POGO data and provides important boundary conditions for theoretical studies of ionospheric currents. Furthermore, the observations have led to a procedure to remove these temporal perturbations from lithospheric MAGSAT magnetic anomaly data based on 'along-the-dip-latitude' averages from dawn and dusk data sets grouped according to longitudes, time (months), and elevation. Using this method, high-resolution lithospheric magnetic anomaly maps have been prepared of the earth over a plus or minus 50 deg latitude band. These maps have proven useful in the study of the structures, nature, and processes of the lithosphere.

  14. Developing a Noninvasive Procedure Using Labeled Monoclonal Antibody Anti-VEGF (Bevacizumab) for Detection of Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Orlando, Margarida Maria Camoes; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The off-label use of bevacizumab labeled with 99mTc as a new radiopharmaceutical for imaging of endometriosis is a promising noninvasive, new clinical procedure. The bevacizumab in monoclonal antibodies targeted at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is superexpressed in cases of endometriosis. In this study we evaluate the imaging of endometriosis lesion in rats (induced to endometriosis) using bevacizumab-99mTc. The results showed that bevacizumab-99mTc imaged the lesion and support his use for Nuclear Medicine applied to gynecology. Also the results appointed that this radiopharmaceutical has a hepatobiliary excretion. It is important to notice that the dose used was almost 0,01% of the usual dose for the bevacizumab. PMID:26240826

  15. Development of autoclavable polyimides. [fabrication procedures of high temperature resistant/fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A poly(Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication procedures. Low void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 477K (400F) and 0.7 MN/sq m (100 psi) for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 589K (600F), the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 561K (550F). The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term ( 1000 hours) use at 533K (500F) and shorter-term (up to 1000 hours) at 561K (550F).

  16. Coal-gold agglomeration: an alternative separation process in gold recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Akcil, A.; Wu, X.Q.; Aksay, E.K.

    2009-07-01

    Considering the increasing environmental concerns and the potential for small gold deposits to be exploited in the future, the uses of environmentally friendly processes are essential. Recent developments point to the potential for greatly increased plant performance through a separation process that combines the cyanide and flotation processes. In addition, this kind of alternative treatment processes to the traditional gold recovery processes may reduce the environmental risks of present small-scale gold mining. Gold recovery processes that applied to different types of gold bearing ore deposits show that the type of deposits plays an important role for the selection of mineral processing technologies in the production of gold and other precious metals. In the last 25 years, different alternative processes have been investigated on gold deposits located in areas where environmental issues are a great concern. In 1988, gold particles were first recovered by successful pilot trial of coal-gold agglomeration (CGA) process in Australia. The current paper reviews the importance of CGA in the production of gold ore and identifies areas for further development work.

  17. The simplification of the SCT procedures in developing countries has resulted in cost-lowering and availability to more patients.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2002-08-01

    In order to simplify and cutting down expenses of the bone marrow transplantation procedures we have made some efforts, trying to provide the best transplantation technique for the individual patient with scarce resources. In relation with the source of stem cells, we have found very attractive the use of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) instead of bone marrow cells. This procedure can produce substantially more rapid engraftment than observed with bone marrow. The rapid hematopoietic reconstitution in the recipient of PBSC lower expenses stemming from the use of antibiotics, blood bank products and days at the hospital. In Mexico, a country with a large number of cases of severe aplastic anemia we decided to use PBSC to transplant 10 patients with this disease, in order to take advantage of the large number of stem cells that this procedure can provide. We had excellent results in these patients, avoiding the high cost of the conventional transplantation and the use of ATG. In relation to autologous transplantation we have made efforts to perform autografts without the use of freezing devices, keeping the stem cells in liquid form using a conventional blood bank refrigerator for up to 96 hr. This modifications have resulted in diminishing costs and increasing the availability of the procedure to a large number of patients. Finally in Mexico we have had experience with non-myeloablative transplants, and obtained reasonably good results, with a median cost of 18,000 USD per allogeneic transplantation procedure. In some cases this is the only affordable therapeutic option. In developing countries where very few patients can afford the cost of conventional bone marrow transplants, any reasonable effort in the direction of simplification must be welcome. PMID:12430886

  18. Development of procedures to ensure quality and integrity in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) diagnostics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, G.W.; Coon, M.L.; Hinz, A.F.; Hornady, R.S.; Lang, D.D.; Lund, N.P.

    1983-11-30

    The diagnostic systems for Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) have grown from eleven initial systems to more than twenty systems. During operation, diagnostic system modifications are sometimes required to complete experimental objectives. Also, during operations new diagnostic systems are being developed and implemented. To ensure and maintain the quality and integrity of the data signals, a set of plans and systematic actions are being developed. This paper reviews the procedures set in place to maintain the integrity of existing data systems and ensure the performance objectives of new diagnostics being added.

  19. Development of a Nucleic Acid Extraction Procedure for Simultaneous Recovery of DNA and RNA from Diverse Microbes in Water

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Vincent R.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Gallen, Rachel R.; Ferdinand, Karen L.; Cromeans, Theresa; Vinjé, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Drinking and environmental water samples contain a diverse array of constituents that can interfere with molecular testing techniques, especially when large volumes of water are concentrated to the small volumes needed for effective molecular analysis. In this study, a suite of enteric viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites were seeded into concentrated source water and finished drinking water samples, in order to investigate the relative performance of nucleic acid extraction techniques for molecular testing. Real-time PCR and reverse transcription-PCR crossing threshold (CT) values were used as the metrics for evaluating relative performance. Experimental results were used to develop a guanidinium isothiocyanate-based lysis buffer (UNEX buffer) that enabled effective simultaneous extraction and recovery of DNA and RNA from the suite of study microbes. Procedures for bead beating, nucleic acid purification, and PCR facilitation were also developed and integrated in the protocol. The final lysis buffer and sample preparation procedure was found to be effective for a panel of drinking water and source water concentrates when compared to commercial nucleic acid extraction kits. The UNEX buffer-based extraction protocol enabled PCR detection of six study microbes, in 100 L finished water samples from four drinking water treatment facilities, within three CT values (i.e., within 90% difference) of the reagent-grade water control. The results from this study indicate that this newly formulated lysis buffer and sample preparation procedure can be useful for standardized molecular testing of drinking and environmental waters. PMID:26016775

  20. Space shuttle: Structural integrity and assessment study. [development of nondestructive test procedures for space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, W. M.; Lewis, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A study program was conducted to determine the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) requirements and to develop a preliminary nondestructive evaluation manual for the entire space shuttle vehicle. The rationale and guidelines for structural analysis and NDE requirements development are discussed. Recommendations for development of NDE technology for the orbiter thermal protection system and certain structural components are included. Recommendations to accomplish additional goals toward space shuttle inspection are presented.

  1. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    SciTech Connect

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Development of electrical test procedures for qualification of spacecraft against EID. Volume 1: The CAN test and other relevant data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkenfeld, J. M.; Judge, R. J. R.; Harlacher, B. L.

    1982-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program to develop system electrical test procedures for the qualification of spacecraft against damage produced by space-electron-induced discharges (EID) occurring on spacecraft dielectric outer surfaces is described. The data on the response of a simple satellite model, called CAN, to electron-induced discharges is presented. The experimental results were compared to predicted behavior and to the response of the CAN to electrical injection techniques simulating blowoff and arc discharges. Also included is a review of significant results from other ground tests and the P78-2 program to form a data base from which is specified those test procedures which optimally simulate the response of spacecraft to EID. The electrical and electron spraying test data were evaluated to provide a first-cut determination of the best methods for performance of electrical excitation qualification tests from the point of view of simulation fidelity.

  3. [Ocra Method: development of a new procedure for analysis of multiple tasks subject to infrequent rotation].

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, E; Colombini, Daniela; Occhipinti, M

    2008-01-01

    In the Ocra methods (Ocra index and Ocra Checklist), when computing the final indices (Ocra index or checklist score), in the case of more than one repetitive task a "traditional" procedure was already proposed, the results of which could be defined as "time-weighted average". This approach appears to be appropriate when considering rotations among tasks that are performed very frequently, for instance almost once every hour (or for shorter periods). However, when rotation among repetitive tasks is less frequent (i.e. once every 1 1/2 or more hours), the "time-weighted average" approach could result in an underestimation of the exposure level (as it practically flattens peaks of high exposures). For those scenarios an alternative approach based on the "most stressful task as minimum" might be more realistic. This latter approach has already been included in the NIOSH approach for multiple sequential lifting tasks and, given the recent availability in the Ocra method of more detailed duration multipliers (practically one different Du(M) for each different step of one hour of duration of the repetitive task), it is now possible to define a particular procedure to compute the complex Ocra Multitask Index (cOCRA) and the complex Checklist Score (cCHESCO) for the analysis of two or more repetitive tasks when rotations are infrequent (rotations every 1 1/2 hours or more). The result of this approach will be at least equal to the index of the most stressful task considered for its individual daily duration and at the most equal to the index of the most stressful task when it is (only theoretically) considered as lasting for the overall daily duration of all examined repetitive tasks. The procedure is based on the following formula: Complex Ocra Multitask Index = Ocra(1(Dum1) + (Delta ocra1xK) where 1,2,3,...,N = repetitive tasks ordered by ocra index values (1 = highest; N = lowest) computed considering respective real duration multipliers (Dum(i)). ocra1 = ocra index of

  4. "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures" - Development of faculty-wide standards for physical examination techniques and clinical procedures in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Nikendei, C; Ganschow, P; Groener, J B; Huwendiek, S; Köchel, A; Köhl-Hackert, N; Pjontek, R; Rodrian, J; Scheibe, F; Stadler, A-K; Steiner, T; Stiepak, J; Tabatabai, J; Utz, A; Kadmon, M

    2016-01-01

    The competent physical examination of patients and the safe and professional implementation of clinical procedures constitute essential components of medical practice in nearly all areas of medicine. The central objective of the projects "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures", which were initiated by students, was to establish uniform interdisciplinary standards for physical examination and clinical procedures, and to distribute them in coordination with all clinical disciplines at the Heidelberg University Hospital. The presented project report illuminates the background of the initiative and its methodological implementation. Moreover, it describes the multimedia documentation in the form of pocketbooks and a multimedia internet-based platform, as well as the integration into the curriculum. The project presentation aims to provide orientation and action guidelines to facilitate similar processes in other faculties. PMID:27579354

  5. Protecting and Disclosing Student Health Information: How To Develop School District Policies and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Health Association (NJ3), 2005

    2005-01-01

    Developed in collaboration with representatives from 20 national health and education organizations, this handbook provides guidance to help school district personnel navigate the many and at times conflicting legal considerations connected to managing student health information. This resource will assist all school officials in developing and…

  6. Individually Guided Motivation: Goal-Setting Procedures to Develop Student Self-Direction and Prosocial Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausmeier, Herbert J.; And Others

    This paper describes research and development activities dealing with a system of individually guided motivation at a Wisconsin elementary school. Four general objectives for the project are stated. These deal with motivation for learning subject matter knowledge and skills, developing independence, assuming increasing self direction, and…

  7. Development of a corn and soybean labeling procedure for use with profile parameter classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magness, E. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Some essential processes for the development of a green-number-based logic for identifying (labeling) crops in LANDSAT imagery are documented. The supporting data and subsequent conclusions that resulted from development of a specific labeling logic for corn and soybean crops in the United States are recorded.

  8. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY METHODS DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) is engaged in the development, demonstration, and validation of new or newly adapted methods of analysis for environmentally related samples. Recognizing that a "one size fits all" approach to qu...

  9. Beyond Satisfaction: Toward an Outcomes-Based, Procedural Model of Faculty Development Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, D. Christopher; Marsh, Lauren; Wilcox, Kimerly; Cohen, Brad

    2011-01-01

    In response to the well-documented need for rigorous evaluations of faculty development programs and increasing demands for institutional accountability, University of Minnesota's Office of Information Technology (OIT) researchers have developed an approach to program evaluation that assesses individual level changes to participants' attitudes,…

  10. Theoretical model for surface diffusion driven Ni-particle agglomeration in anode of solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Sheng; Li, Jiayu; Lin, Zijing

    2014-06-01

    The agglomeration of Ni particles in nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode is an important degradation mechanism for the solid oxide fuel cell and is widely believed to be driven by surface diffusion. This work aims to develop a quantitative model to describe the agglomeration kinetics. The model treats the anode as a system of random packing Ni and YSZ particles. Surface diffusion occurs between the connected Ni particles of different sizes characterized by two representative radii, but is influenced by the YSZ network. The Fick's law for diffusion, the Gibbs-Thomson relation for vacancy concentration and the coordination number theory for percolating Ni network are employed in the mathematical derivation. The growth kinetics is expressed as an analytical function consisting of two model parameters, one for the Ni-particle size distribution and the other for the influence of the YSZ backbone. The model is in excellent agreement with the available experiments. The influence of the YSZ backbone is further considered to obtain a model with just one fitting parameter. The one-parameter model is also in good agreement with the experiments and the fundamental physics for the Ni-particle growth is therefore believed to be well characterized.

  11. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 °C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption. PMID:26069936

  12. Development of the NASA VALT digital navigation system. [for approach and landing procedures of VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, W. J., Jr.; Skutecki, E. R.; Calzado, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The research to develop and fabricate a terminal area navigation system for use in the NASA VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program. The results of that effort are reported. The navigation system developed and fabricated was based on a general purpose airborne digital computer. A set of flight hardware units was fabricated to create the necessary analog, digital and human interface with the computer. A comprehensive package of software was created to implement the control and guidance laws required for automatic and flight director approaches that are curved in two planes. A technique was developed that enables the generation of randomly shaped lateral paths from simple input data. The lateral path concept combines straight line and elliptical-curved segments to fit a continuous curved path to the data points. A simple, fixed base simulation was put together to assist in developing and evaluating the system. The simulation was used to obtain system performance data during simulated curved-path approaches.

  13. Oscillatory Dynamics of Single Bubbles and Agglomeration in a Sound Field in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Depew, Jon; Asaki, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A dual-frequency acoustic levitator containing water was developed for studying bubble and drop dynamics in low gravity. It was flown on USML-1 where it was used in the Glovebox facility. High frequency (21 or 63 kHz) ultrasonic waves were modulated by low frequencies to excite shape oscillations on bubbles and oil drops ultrasonically trapped in the water. Bubble diameters were typically close to 1 cm or larger. When such large bubbles are acoustically trapped on the Earth, the acoustic radiation pressure needed to overcome buoyancy tends to shift the natural frequency for quadrupole (n = 2) oscillations above the prediction of Lamb's equation. In low gravity, a much weaker trapping force was used and measurements of n = 2 and 3 mode frequencies were closer to the ideal case. Other video observations in low gravity include: (i) the transient reappearance of a bulge where a small bubble has coalesced with a large one, (ii) observations of the dynamics of bubbles coated by oil indicating that shape oscillations can shift a coated bubble away from the oil-water interface of the coating giving a centering of the core, and (iii) the agglomeration of bubbles induced by the sound field.

  14. Development of an NMR microprobe procedure for high-throughput environmental metabolomics of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Edward G; Lankadurai, Brian P; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary platform used in high-throughput environmental metabolomics studies because its non-selectivity is well suited for non-targeted approaches. However, standard NMR probes may limit the use of NMR-based metabolomics for tiny organisms because of the sample volumes required for routine metabolic profiling. Because of this, keystone ecological species, such as the water flea Daphnia magna, are not commonly studied because of the analytical challenges associated with NMR-based approaches. Here, the use of a 1.7-mm NMR microprobe in analyzing tissue extracts from D. magna is tested. Three different extraction procedures (D2O-based buffer, Bligh and Dyer, and acetonitrile : methanol : water) were compared in terms of the yields and breadth of polar metabolites. The D2O buffer extraction yielded the most metabolites and resulted in the best reproducibility. Varying amounts of D. magna dry mass were extracted to optimize metabolite isolation from D. magna tissues. A ratio of 1-1.5-mg dry mass to 40 µl of extraction solvent provided excellent signal-to-noise and spectral resolution using (1)H NMR. The metabolite profile of a single daphnid was also investigated (approximately 0.2 mg). However, the signal-to-noise of the (1)H NMR was considerably lower, and while feasible for select applications would likely not be appropriate for high-throughput NMR-based metabolomics. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on D. magna extracts were also performed using the 1.7-mm NMR probe to confirm (1)H NMR metabolite assignments. This study provides an NMR-based analytical framework for future metabolomics studies that use D. magna in ecological and ecotoxicity studies. PMID:25891518

  15. Collection of Pyrethroids in Water and Sediment Matrices: Development and Validation of a Standard Operating Procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2009-01-01

    Loss of pyrethroid insecticides onto surfaces during sample collection can confound the interpretation of analytical and toxicity test results. Sample collection devices, container materials, and water matrix composition have a significant influence on the association of pyrethroids to container walls, which can be as high as 50 percent. Any sample collection method involving transfer through multiple containers or pieces of equipment increases the potential for pyrethroid loss. This loose 'surface-association' with container walls can be reversed through agitation. When sampling water matrices with pumps or autosamplers, no pyrethroids were lost as long as the water was moving continuously through the system. When collecting water matrices in containers, the material with the least amount of pyrethroid sorption is as follows: glass less than (<) plastic less than (<) Teflon. Additionally, pyrethroids were easier to re-suspend from the glass container walls. Since the amount of surface-association is proportional to the ratio of volume-to-contact-area of the sample, taking larger-volume field samples (greater than 3 liters) reduced pyrethroid losses to less than 10 percent. The amount of surface-association cannot be predicted easily because of the dependence on water matrix composition; samples with higher dissolved organic carbon or suspended-sediment concentrations were observed to have lower percent loss. Sediment samples were not affected by glass-container sorption (the only containers tested). Standardized sample-collection protocols are critical to yield accurate pyrethroid concentrations for assessment of potential effects, and have been summarized in an accompanying standard operating procedure.

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Procedure to Clinically Type Prevalent Salmonella enterica Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Nélida; Diaz-Osorio, Miguel; Moreno, Jaime; Sánchez-Jiménez, Miryan; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2010-01-01

    A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure was developed to identify the most prevalent clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. Genes from the rfb, fliC, fljB, and viaB groups that encode the O, H, and Vi antigens were used to design 15 primer pairs and TaqMan probes specific for the genes rfbJ, wzx, fliC, fljB, wcdB, the sdf-l sequence, and invA, which was used as an internal amplification control. The primers and probes were variously combined into six sets. The first round of reactions used two of these sets to detect Salmonella O:4, O:9, O:7, O:8, and O:3,10 serogroups. Once the serogroups were identified, the results of a second round of reactions that used primers and probes for the flagellar antigen l genes, 1,2; e,h; g,m; d; e,n,x; and z10, and the Vi gene were used to identify individual serovars. The procedure was standardized using 18 Salmonella reference strains and other enterobacteria. The procedure's reliability and sensitivity was evaluated using 267 randomly chosen serotyped Salmonella clinical isolates. The procedure had a sensitivity of 95.5% and was 100% specific. Thus, our technique is a quick, sensitive, reliable, and specific means of identifying S. enterica serovars and can be used in conjunction with traditional serotyping. Other primer and probe combinations could be used to increase the number of identifiable serovars. PMID:20110454

  17. A prospective study on the effectiveness of newly developed autogenous tooth bone graft material for sinus bone graft procedure

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Lee, Jae-Il; Ahn, Kyo-Jin; Yun, Pil-Young

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the effectiveness of newly developed autogenous tooth bone graft material (AutoBT)application for sinus bone graft procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS The patients with less than 5.0 mm of residual bone height in maxillary posterior area were enrolled. For the sinus bone graft procedure, Bio-Oss was grafted in control group and AutoBT powder was grafted in experimental group. Clinical and radiographic examination were done for the comparison of grafted materials in sinus cavity between groups. At 4 months after sinus bone graft procedure, biopsy specimens were analyzed by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric examination for the evaluation of healing state of bone graft site. RESULTS In CT evaluation, there was no difference in bone density, bone height and sinus membrane thickness between groups. In microCT analysis, there was no difference in total bone volume, new bone volume, bone mineral density of new bone between groups. There was significant difference trabecular thickness (0.07 µm in Bio-Oss group Vs. 0.08 µm in AutoBT group) (P=.006). In histomorphometric analysis, there was no difference in new bone formation, residual graft material, bone marrow space between groups. There was significant difference osteoid thickness (8.35 µm in Bio-Oss group Vs. 13.12 µm in AutoBT group) (P=.025). CONCLUSION AutoBT could be considered a viable alternative to the autogenous bone or other bone graft materials in sinus bone graft procedure. PMID:25551014

  18. Emergency evacuation/transportation plan update: Traffic model development and evaluation of early closure procedures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-28

    Prolonged delays in traffic experienced by Laboratory personnel during a recent early dismissal in inclement weather, coupled with reconstruction efforts along NM 502 east of the White Rock Wye for the next 1 to 2 years, has prompted Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to re-evaluate and improve the present transportation plan and its integration with contingency plans maintained in other organizations. Facilities planners and emergency operations staff need to evaluate the transportation system`s capability to inefficiently and safely evacuate LANL under different low-level emergency conditions. A variety of potential procedures governing the release of employees from the different technical areas (TAs) requires evaluation, perhaps with regard to multiple emergency-condition scenarios, with one or more optimal procedures ultimately presented for adoption by Lab Management. The work undertaken in this project will hopefully lay a foundation for an on-going, progressive transportation system analysis capability. It utilizes microscale simulation techniques to affirm, reassess and validate the Laboratory`s Early Dismissal/Closure/Delayed Opening Plan. The Laboratory is required by Federal guidelines, and compelled by prudent practice and conscientious regard for the welfare of employees and nearby residents, to maintain plans and operating procedures for evacuation if the need arises. The tools developed during this process can be used outside of contingency planning. It is anticipated that the traffic models developed will allow site planners to evaluate changes to the traffic network which could better serve the normal traffic levels. Changes in roadway configuration, control strategies (signalization and signing), response strategies to traffic accidents, and patterns of demand can be modelled using the analysis tools developed during this project. Such scenarios typically are important considerations in master planning and facilities programming.

  19. Revisiting the destination ranking procedure in development of an Intervening Opportunities Model for public transit trip distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazem, Mohsen; Trépanier, Martin; Morency, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    An Enhanced Intervening Opportunities Model (EIOM) is developed for Public Transit (PT). This is a distribution supply dependent model, with single constraints on trip production for work trips during morning peak hours (6:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.) within the Island of Montreal, Canada. Different data sets, including the 2008 Origin-Destination (OD) survey of the Greater Montreal Area, the 2006 Census of Canada, GTFS network data, along with the geographical data of the study area, are used. EIOM is a nonlinear model composed of socio-demographics, PT supply data and work location attributes. An enhanced destination ranking procedure is used to calculate the number of spatially cumulative opportunities, the basic variable of EIOM. For comparison, a Basic Intervening Opportunities Model (BIOM) is developed by using the basic destination ranking procedure. The main difference between EIOM and BIOM is in the destination ranking procedure: EIOM considers the maximization of a utility function composed of PT Level Of Service and number of opportunities at the destination, along with the OD trip duration, whereas BIOM is based on a destination ranking derived only from OD trip durations. Analysis confirmed that EIOM is more accurate than BIOM. This study presents a new tool for PT analysts, planners and policy makers to study the potential changes in PT trip patterns due to changes in socio-demographic characteristics, PT supply, and other factors. Also it opens new opportunities for the development of more accurate PT demand models with new emergent data such as smart card validations.

  20. Development and validation of a novel data analysis procedure for spherical nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Siddhartha

    This dissertation presents a novel approach for converting the raw load-displacement data measured in spherical nanoindentation into much more meaningful indentation stress-strain curves. This new method entails a novel definition of the indentation strain and a new procedure for establishing the effective zero point in the raw dataset---both with and without the use of the continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) data. The concepts presented here have been validated by simulations and experiments on isotropic metallic samples of aluminum and tungsten. It is demonstrated that these new indentation stress-strain curves accurately capture the loading and unloading elastic moduli, the indentation yield points, as well as the post-yield characteristics in the tested samples. Subsequently this approach has been applied on a wide range of material systems including metals, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), ceramics and bone. In metals, these data analysis techniques have been highly successful in explaining several of the surface preparation artifacts typically encountered during nanoindentation measurements. This approach has also been extended to anisotropic polycrystalline samples, where a judicious combination of Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and nanoindentation were used to estimate, for the first time, the changes in slip resistance in deformed grains of Fe-3%Si steel. Similar studies on dense CNT brushes, with ˜10 times higher density than CNT brushes produced by other methods, demonstrate the higher modulus (˜17-20 GPa) and orders of magnitude higher resistance to buckling in these brushes than vapor phase deposited CNT brushes or carbon walls, showing their promise for energy-absorbing coatings. Even for a complex hierarchical material system like bone, these techniques have elucidated trends in the elastic and yield behavior at the lamellar level in the femora (thigh bone) of different inbred mouse strains. Thus bone with a higher mineral-to-matrix ratio

  1. General procedure to aid the development of continuous pharmaceutical processes using multivariate statistical modeling - an industrial case study.

    PubMed

    Tomba, Emanuele; De Martin, Marialuisa; Facco, Pierantonio; Robertson, John; Zomer, Simeone; Bezzo, Fabrizio; Barolo, Massimiliano

    2013-02-28

    Streamlining the manufacturing process has been recognized as a key issue to reduce production costs and improve safety in pharmaceutical manufacturing. Although data available from earlier developmental stages are often sparse and unstructured, they can be very useful to improve the understanding about the process under development. In this paper, a general procedure is proposed for the application of latent variable statistical methods to support the development of new continuous processes in the presence of limited experimental data. The proposed procedure is tested on an industrial case study concerning the development of a continuous line for the manufacturing of paracetamol tablets. The main driving forces acting on the process are identified and ranked according to their importance in explaining the variability in the available data. This improves the understanding about the process by elucidating how different active pharmaceutical ingredient pretreatments, different formulation modes and different settings on the processing units affect the overall operation as well as the properties of the intermediate and final products. The results can be used as a starting point to perform a comprehensive and science-based quality risk assessment that help to define a robust control strategy, possibly enhanced with the integration of a design space for the continuous process at a later stage. PMID:23337630

  2. Instrument Development Procedures for Mathematics Measures. Technical Report Number 08-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Eunju; Liu, Kimy; Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Tindal, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop general outcome measures (GOM) in mathematics so that teachers could focus their instruction on needed prerequisite skills. We describe in detail, the manner in which content-related evidence was established and then present a number of statistical analyses conducted to evaluate the technical adequacy of…

  3. The Same Procedure as Every Time? School Inspections and School Development in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedering, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    The article focuses on school inspections as an instrument for school development and aims to clarify how schools cope with the results which are generated by it. It is based on the assumption that the specific situation of a school has an impact on how and in what way the results are received and dealt with in schools. In order to support this…

  4. Evaluation of the Child Development Project: Research Design, Procedures, and Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Daniel; And Others

    Findings of an evaluation of the first 5 years of a longitudinal program designed to enhance children's prosocial development are reported. The program was offered for children in three elmentary schools in a suburban, middle-class district near San Francisco. Three schools in the same district served as a comparison group. Enrollment ranged from…

  5. A Methodological Framework for Instructional Design Model Development: Critical Dimensions and Synthesized Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jihyun; Jang, Seonyoung

    2014-01-01

    Instructional design (ID) models have been developed to promote understandings of ID reality and guide ID performance. As the number and diversity of ID practices grows, implicit doubts regarding the reliability, validity, and usefulness of ID models suggest the need for methodological guidance that would help to generate ID models that are…

  6. Development of Proficiency Examinations and Procedures for Two Levels of Respiratory Therapy Personnel. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psychological Corp., New York, NY.

    Under the guidance of an advisory committee from the American Association for Respiratory Therapy (AART), The Psychological Corporation developed three forms of two criterion-referenced proficiency examinations to measure the skills, understandings, and knowledge required in entry level jobs for two levels of respiratory therapy personnel. The…

  7. Development and Validation of a Selection Procedure for an Apprentice Carpenter and Trainee Program. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Yong H.; And Others

    This report presents results of a concurrent validation study for the Chicago District Council of Carpenters Apprentice and Trainee Program. Its purpose was to develop a fair screening device for applicant selection. Advanced apprentice carpenters in three specialities--construction, cabinet making, and floor covering--were administered the Ball…

  8. Correlates of Harmful Alcohol Consumption in Six Countries: Development of an International Screening and Assessment Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow; and Others

    The aim of this study was to develop tools for screening and assessment of socio-medical effects of alcohol use which are simple and inexpensive enough to be used in any primary health care setting. A test protocol was prepared by a group of investigators from Australia, Bulgaria, Kenya, Mexico, Norway, and the United States. Based on a number of…

  9. A Taxonomy of Care for Youth: Results of an Empirical Development Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenboer, K. Els; Huyghen, Anne-Marie N.; Tuinstra, Jolanda; Knorth, Erik J.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Statements about potentially effective components of interventions in child and youth care are hard to make because of a lack of a standardized instruments for classifying the most salient care characteristics. The aim of this study is to present an empirically developed taxonomy of care for youth (Tocfy) which is feasible for use in…

  10. Instrument Development Procedures for Maze Measures. Technical Report # 08-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Kimy; Sundstrom-Hebert, Krystal; Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Tindal, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the instrument development of maze measures for grades 3-8. Each maze passage contained twelve omitted words that students filled in by choosing the best-fit word from among the provided options. In this technical report, we describe the process of creating, reviewing, and pilot testing the maze measures.…

  11. Developing and Improving Modified Achievement Level Descriptors: Rationale, Procedures, and Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quenemoen, Rachel; Albus, Debra; Rogers, Chris; Lazarus, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Some states are developing alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) to measure the academic achievement of some students with disabilities (Albus, Lazarus, Thurlow, & Cormier, 2009; Lazarus, Thurlow, Christensen, & Cormier, 2007). These assessments measure the same content as the general assessment for a given…

  12. A Learning Assessment System: Development of Assessment Instruments plus Scoring and Reporting Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Larry P.; Anderson, Paul S.

    This manual is intended to provide Illinois school districts with guidance in developing learning assessment plans and using testing materials as part of the school improvement program mandated by the 1985 educational reform legislation for Illinois. Designed primarily to be a series of "how to" booklets, the manual is divided into six major…

  13. Development of methods and procedures for high rate low energy expenditure fabrication of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Minnucci, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop high rate, energy efficient solar cell processing techniques based around ion implantation and elimination of all conventional thermal operations. Cells have been fabricated using an abbreviated series of vacuum process operations performed at room temperature.

  14. The Devil Is in the Details: Development of Policy and Procedure in the Battle River Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleddie, Doug L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Guidelines from a variety of jurisdictions for the health-promoting schools (HPS) approach include healthy school policy as a critical element. Research also supports the importance of policy; however, there seems to be a lack of information on how to develop and implement policy. The article examines the processes involved in one…

  15. Instrument Development Procedures for Rapid Reading Rate Measures. Technical Report # 08-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Kimy; Carling, Kristy; Geller, Leanne Ketterlin; Tindal, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe the development of rapid reading measures, sentences presented to students in a nearly subliminal manner, with a literal comprehension question asked following their removal. After administering alternate forms of these measures to students, we present the results from three statistical analyses to ascertain their…

  16. Compilation and Estimation of Nutrient Values in Foods: Development of Standard Procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than 100 years the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has supported the generation and compilation of food composition data. Today the Agricultural Research Service, USDA develops and maintains the National Nutrient Data Bank, a repository of food composition data which provides the founda...

  17. Fluency Training in the ESL Classroom: An Experimental Study of Fluency Development and Proceduralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Nel; Perfetti, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the role of speech repetition in oral fluency development. Twenty-four students enrolled in English-as-a-second-language classes performed three training sessions in which they recorded three speeches, of 4, 3, and 2 min, respectively. Some students spoke about the same topic three times, whereas others spoke about…

  18. Peer Interaction and Corrective Feedback for Accuracy and Fluency Development: Monitoring, Practice, and Proceduralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Masatoshi; Lyster, Roy

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study is aimed at (a) teaching learners how to provide corrective feedback (CF) during peer interaction and (b) assessing the effects of peer interaction and CF on second language (L2) development. Four university-level English classes in Japan participated (N = 167), each assigned to one of four treatment conditions. Of…

  19. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Shcherbina, M. E.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Kirichenko, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 1014 particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  20. Direct observation of nanoscale Pt electrode agglomeration at the triple phase boundary.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen-Chiang; Kim, Sanwi; Baek, Jong Dae; Li, Yong; Su, Pei-Chen; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2015-03-25

    Nanoporous platinum electrode thin films were delaminated from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates via double cantilever beam delamination to reveal the structure located at the interface between electrode and electrolyte. The thermally driven morphological evolution between the electrode top surface and the substrate contact interface of agglomerated nanoporous platinum thin films were compared. We found the temperature required for significant agglomeration to occur was approximately 100 °C higher at the electrolyte contact interface side than at the top surface side. Judging the reaction active site from the electrode top surface could be inaccurate because higher resistance of thermal agglomeration at the interface could retain the reaction active site during fuel cell operation. PMID:25756949