Science.gov

Sample records for agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase

  1. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  2. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. Results In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. Conclusions This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group

  3. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed hydroxylations: mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Dordick, J S; Klibanov, A M; Marletta, M A

    1986-05-20

    The hydroxylation of phenol to hydroquinone and catechol in the presence of dihydroxyfumaric acid and oxygen catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase was studied under conditions where the product yield was high and the side reactions were minimal. The reaction is partially uncoupled with a molar ratio of dihydroxyfumaric acid consumed to hydroxylated products of 12:1. Hydrogen peroxide does not participate in the reaction as evidenced by the lack of effect of catalase and by the direct addition of hydrogen peroxide. Conversely, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are involved as their scavengers are potent inhibitors. Experiments were all consistent with the involvement of compound III (oxygenated ferrous complex) of peroxidase in the reaction. Compound III is stable in the presence of phenol alone but decomposes rapidly in the presence of both phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid with the concomitant formation of product. Therefore, phenol and dihydroxyfumaric acid must be present with compound III in order for the hydroxylation reaction to occur. A mechanism consistent with the experimental results is proposed. PMID:3718931

  4. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed nitric oxide formation from hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinming; Sommers, Erin M; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; King, S Bruce

    2002-04-01

    Hydroxyurea represents an approved treatment for sickle cell anemia and a number of cancers. Chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies show horseradish peroxidase catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Gas chromatographic headspace analysis and infrared spectroscopy also reveal the production of nitrous oxide in this reaction, which provides evidence for nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These reactions also generate carbon dioxide, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate. None of these products form within 1 h in the absence of hydrogen peroxide or horseradish peroxidase. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and trapping studies show the intermediacy of a nitroxide radical and a C-nitroso species during this reaction. Absorption spectroscopy indicates that both compounds I and II of horseradish peroxidase act as one-electron oxidants of hydroxyurea. Nitroxyl, generated from Angeli's salt, reacts with ferric horseradish peroxidase to produce a ferrous horseradish peroxidase-nitric oxide complex. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments with a nitric oxide specific trap reveal that horseradish peroxidase is capable of oxidizing nitroxyl to nitric oxide. A mechanistic model that includes the observed nitroxide radical and C-nitroso compound intermediates has been forwarded to explain the observed product distribution. These studies suggest that direct nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea and peroxidases may contribute to the overall pharmacological properties of this drug. PMID:11916434

  5. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Jovanović, Jelena R; Stefanović, Andrea B; Djokić, Veljko R; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2016-03-01

    Kaolin showed as a very perspective carrier for the enzyme immobilization and it was used for the adsorption of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The effects of the enzyme concentration and pH on the immobilization efficiency were studied in the reaction with pyrogallol and anthraquinone dye C.I. Acid Violet 109 (AV 109). In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analysis by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller were performed for kaolin, thermally activated kaolin and the immobilized enzyme. It has been shown that 0.1 IU of HRP-kaolin decolorized 87 % of dye solution, under the optimal conditions (pH 5.0, temperature 24 °C, dye concentration 40 mg/L and 0.2 mM of H2O2) within 40 min. The immobilized HRP decolorization follows the Ping Pong Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by the dye. The biocatalyst retained 35 ± 0.9 % of the initial activity after seven cycles of reuse in the decolorization reaction of AV 109 under optimal conditions in a batch reactor. The obtained kinetic parameters and reusability study confirmed improvement in performances of k-HRP compared to free, indicating that k-HRP has a great potential for environmental purposes. PMID:26747440

  6. Horseradish peroxidase: a modern view of a classic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Nigel C

    2004-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase is an important heme-containing enzyme that has been studied for more than a century. In recent years new information has become available on the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme and its catalytic intermediates, mechanisms of catalysis and the function of specific amino acid residues. Site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution techniques are now used routinely to investigate the structure and function of horseradish peroxidase and offer the opportunity to develop engineered enzymes for practical applications in natural product and fine chemicals synthesis, medical diagnostics and bioremediation. A combination of horseradish peroxidase and indole-3-acetic acid or its derivatives is currently being evaluated as an agent for use in targeted cancer therapies. Physiological roles traditionally associated with the enzyme that include indole-3-acetic acid metabolism, cross-linking of biological polymers and lignification are becoming better understood at the molecular level, but the involvement of specific horseradish peroxidase isoenzymes in these processes is not yet clearly defined. Progress in this area should result from the identification of the entire peroxidase gene family of Arabidopsis thaliana, which has now been completed. PMID:14751298

  7. The Reaction of Coumarins with Horseradish Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Richard W.; Sirois, J.-Claude; Morita, Hirokazu

    1975-01-01

    The peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of indole-3-acetate is inhibited by naturally occurring coumarins such as scopoletin. This inhibition is due to the preferential reactivity of the coumarins with the peroxidase compounds I, II, and III. In view of the possible growth regulatory role of coumarins in plants, the mechanism of oxidation of scopoletin by horse-radish peroxidase has been investigated. Peroxidase catalyzed coumarin oxidation requires either an electron donor and molecular oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. If peroxide is present, the reaction is mediated by peroxidase compound II which reacts rapidly and stoichiometrically with scopoletin. Different oxidation products are formed, depending on whether IAA or hydrogen peroxide promotes the reaction. A scopoletin-free radical intermediate has been isolated from the peroxide reaction mixture but was not detected in the peroxide-free system. When indole-3-acetate is the electron donor, reduced peroxidase combines with molecular oxygen to give peroxidase compound III. Added scopoletin is cooxidized with indole-3-acetate. Compared to the scopoletin peroxidation, this reaction is slower and yields fewer coumarin oxidation products. The differences observed between the two scopoletin oxidation pathways reflect: (a) the competition between indole-3-acetate and scopoletin for peroxidase compounds; (b) the lower reactivity of scopoletin with peroxidase compound III compared with peroxidase compound II. The peroxide-promoted reaction is eliminated by catalase, while the indole-3-acetate initiated oxidation is not affected by excess quantities of either catalase or superoxidase dismutase. PMID:16659024

  8. Detoxification of pesticides aqueous solution using horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    El-Said, Saad Mohamed

    2013-03-15

    There are pesticide residues in agriculture wastewater and that compounds must be removed before discharge of wastewater in native waters. Thus the aim of this study was to remove toxic pesticide in waste water by the addition of horseradish peroxidase enzyme. The process of pesticide (methyl-parathion (O,O-Diethyl- O-4-nitro-phenylthiophosphate), atrazine (1-chloro-3-ethylamino-5-isopropylamino-2,4,6-triazine) and triazophos (O,O-diethyl O-1-phenyl-1H-1,2,4- triazol-3-yl phosphorothioate) removal from synthetic wastewater using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide has been analyzed. The technical feasibility of the process was studied using 0.001-3.0 mM synthetic pesticides solutions. Experiments were carried out at different time, HRP and H2O2 dose and pH to determine the optimum removing conditions. The removal of the three pesticides increases with an increase in HRP and hydrogen peroxide dose. The optimum HRP dose is 2.0 U L(-1) and 10 mM for H2O2. The contact needed to reach equilibrium was found to be 360 min. Maximum removal was achieved up to 74% at pH 8. Also, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of the effluent reduced at the end of 6 h from 2111-221 mg L(-1) (at pH 8). Tests based upon horseradish peroxidase, at optimized parameters, show the reduction of toxicity to non-toxic levels. PMID:24498792

  9. Removal of chlorophenols from wastewater by immobilized horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Kenji; Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu

    1996-07-05

    Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on magnetite and removal of chlorophenols using immobilized enzyme were investigated. Immobilization by physical adsorption on magnetite was much more effective than that by the crosslinking method, and the enzyme was found to be immobilized at 100% of retained activity. In addition, it was discovered that horseradish peroxidase was selectively adsorbed on magnetite, and the immobilization resulted in a 20-fold purification rate for crude enzyme. When immobilized peroxidase was used to treat a solution containing various chlorophenols, p-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, each chlorophenol was almost 100% removed, and also the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) reached more than 90%, respectively. However, in the case of soluble peroxidase, complete removal of each chlorophenol could not be attained, and in particular, the removal of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol was the lowest, with a removal rate of only 36%.

  10. FTIR study of horseradish peroxidase in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Xia, C; Niu, J; Li, S

    2001-04-20

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) method was used to study the secondary structures of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in aqueous solution and in reverse micelles for the first time. Results indicated that the structure of HRP in sodium bis(2-ethylhexy)sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles was close to that in aqueous solution. In cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylfate (SDS) reverse micelles the position of some bands changed. Results indicated that the secondary structure had a close relationship with the surfactant species of the reverse micelles. Among the three types of reverse micelles, the system of AOT reverse micelles was probably the most beneficial reaction media to HRP. PMID:11302746

  11. Preparation of horseradish peroxidase hydrazide and its use in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) hydrazide that is HRP linked to adipic acid dihydrazide (HRP-ADH) and its use in enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is described. In this new strategy, horseradish peroxidase was conjugated to adipic acid dihydrazide using a carbodiimide coupling method. The resulting HRP-ADH was then coupled to cortisol-21-hemisuccinate (Cortisol-21-HS) to prepare enzyme conjugate. The prepared cortisol-21-HS coupled ADH-HRP (Cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP) enzyme conjugate was used for the development of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for direct estimation of cortisol. To the cortisol antibody coated microtiter wells, standard or serum samples (50 microL), along with cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP enzyme conjugate (100 microL) were incubated for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Bound enzyme activity was measured by using tetramethyl benzidine/hydrogen peroxide (TMB/H2O2) as substrate. The sensitivity of the assay was 0.05 microg/dL and the analytical recovery ranged from 92.9 to 101.7%. PMID:12953974

  12. Relative Binding Affinities of Monolignols to Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-08-11

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic -OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic -OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate. PMID:27447548

  13. Effects of microwaves (900 MHz) on peroxidase systems: A comparison between lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barteri, Mario; De Carolis, Roberta; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Tomassetti, Goliardo; Montemiglio, Linda Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field at 900 MHz on the catalytic activity of the enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Experimental evidence that irradiation causes conformational changes of the active sites and influences the formation and stability of the intermediate free radicals is documented by measurements of enzyme kinetics, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and cyclic voltammetry. PMID:25577980

  14. Adsorption and inactivation behavior of horseradish peroxidase on various substrates.

    PubMed

    Di Risio, Sabina; Yan, Ning

    2010-09-01

    To produce bioactive papers, i.e. papers incorporating biomolecules that are useful for analyte detection, adequate immobilization strategies should be devised. In this article, the physical immobilization behavior and activity of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on various papermaking substrates were studied. The papermaking substrates included amorphous and crystalline cellulose, calcium carbonate, styrene butadiene latex, polystyrene, and both negatively charged rayon and rayon with a positively charged layer. It was found that HRP adsorption improves as the hydrophobicity of the substrate increases; however, excessive hydrophobicity produces enzyme deactivation. HRP-calcium carbonate binding was weak and the enzyme loading was scant. These results provided a possible explanation for the poor analytical signals observed in pigment-coated papers when used as bioactive paper supports. Electrostatic effects played a minor role in HRP adsorption behavior. PMID:20570116

  15. Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation: Heme Destruction and Influence of Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation. PMID:24185130

  16. Production and purification of the multifunctional enzyme horseradish peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The oxidoreductase horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used in numerous industrial and medical applications. In this review, we briefly describe this well-studied enzyme and focus on its promising use in targeted cancer treatment. In combination with a plant hormone, HRP can be used in specific enzyme–prodrug therapies. Despite this outstanding application, HRP has not found its way as a biopharmaceutical into targeted cancer therapy yet. The reasons therefore lie in the present low-yield production and cumbersome purification of this enzyme from its natural source. However, surface glycosylation renders the recombinant production of HRP difficult. Here, we compare different production hosts for HRP and summarize currently used production and purification strategies for this enzyme. We further present our own strategy of glycoengineering this powerful enzyme to allow recombinant high-yield production in Pichia pastoris and subsequent simple downstream processing. PMID:24683473

  17. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. PMID:24534439

  18. New pteridine substrates for dihydropteridine reductase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Armarego, W L; Ohnishi, A; Taguchi, H

    1986-01-01

    The oxidation of 4,5-diaminopyrimidin-6(1H)-one, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropteridin-4(3H)-one, its 6-methyl and cis-6,7-dimethyl derivatives, and 6-methyl- and cis-6-7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterins, by horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 is enzymic and follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and its Km and kcat. values were determined. This oxidation of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterins produces quinonoid dihydropterins of established structure, and they are known to be specific substrates for dihydropteridine reductase. By analogy the peroxidase/H2O2 oxidation of the 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropteridin-4(3H)-ones should produce similar quinonoid dihydro species. The quinonoid species derived from 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropteridin-4(3H)-one and its 6-methyl and cis-6,7-dimethyl derivatives are shown to be viable substrates for human brain dihydropteridine reductase, and apparent Km and Vmax. values are reported. PMID:3718470

  19. Horseradish peroxidase and chitosan: activation, immobilization and comparative results.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2013-09-01

    Recently, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on activated wool and we envisioned that the use of chitosan would be interesting instead of wool owing to its simple chemical structure, abundant nature and biodegradability. In this work, HRP was immobilized on chitosan crosslinked with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize immobilized HRP. The number of ten reuses of immobilized HRP has been detected. The pH was shifted from 5.5 for soluble HRP to 5.0 for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP had an optimum temperature of 30 °C, which was shifted to 35 °C for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP were thermal stable up to 35 and 45 °C, respectively. The apparent kinetic constant values (K(m)) of soluble HRP and chitosan-HRP were 35 mM and 40 mM for guaiacol and 2.73 mM and 5.7 mM for H2O2, respectively. Immobilization of HRP partially protected them from metal ions compared to soluble enzyme. The chitosan-HRP was remarkably more stable against urea, Triton X-100 and organic solvents. Chitosan-HRP exhibited large number of reuses and more resistance to harmful compounds compared with wool-HRP. On the basis of results obtained in the present study, chitosan-HRP could be employed in bioremediation application. PMID:23769933

  20. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on modified chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Ayad, D M; Wei, Y; Sarhan, A A

    2010-04-01

    A method has been developed to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on modified chitosan beads by means of graft copolymerization of polyethylacrylate in presence of potassium persulphate and Mohr's salt redox initiator. The activity of free and immobilized HRP was studied. FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize HRP immobilization. The efficiency of the immobilization was investigated by examining the relative enzymatic activity of free enzyme before and after the HRP immobilization. The obtained values were found to reach 98.4%. The results show that the optimum temperature of immobilized HRP was 45 degrees C, which was identical to that of free enzyme, and the immobilized HRP exhibited a higher relative activity than that of free HRP over 45 degrees C. The optimal pH for immobilized HRP was 10, which was higher than that of the free HRP (pH 9.0), and the immobilization resulted in stabilization of enzyme over a broader pH range. The apparent kinetic constant value (K(m)) of immobilized HRP was 3.784 mmol ml(-1), which was higher than that of free HRP. On the other hand, the activity of immobilized HRP decreased slowly against time when compared to that of the free HRP, and could retain 65.8% residual activity after 6 consecutive cycles. PMID:20060854

  1. Formation and properties of dimeric recombinant horseradish peroxidase in a system of reversed micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Gazaryan, I G; Klyachko, N L; Dulkis, Y K; Ouporov, I V; Levashov, A V

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type recombinant horseradish peroxidase purified and refolded from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies has been studied in the system of bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulphosuccinate sodium salt (Aerosol OT)-reversed micelles in octane. In contrast with native horseradish peroxidase the wild-type recombinant enzyme forms dimeric structures as judged by sedimentation analysis. Peroxidase substrates affect the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric enzyme forms. The dependence of the catalytic activity of recombinant peroxidase on the degree of hydration of the surfactant exhibits two maxima with pyrogallol, o-phenylene- diamine, guaiacol and o-dianisidine, with different ratios of activities for the first and second maxima. The differences in activities of monomeric and dimeric forms of the recombinant horseradish peroxidase provide evidence for active-site screening in dimeric forms. This has been used to model a dimeric structure of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with the screened entrance to the active site. In the model structure obtained, three of eight glycosylation sites were screened. This might explain the absence of dimeric structures in native enzyme peroxidase. The system of reversed micelles provides, for the first time, evidence for the formation of dimeric structures by recombinant plant peroxidase with an altered substrate specificity compared with the native enzyme. Thus one can assume that haem-containing peroxidases in general are able to form dimeric structures. PMID:9371726

  2. The horseradish peroxidase technique for cell lineage studies.

    PubMed

    Peralta, M; Denaro, F J

    2003-12-01

    The identification of cell lineage for a given cell type of a particular tissue is an important step in understanding how this process contributes to histogenesis. The importance in understanding cell lineage has relevance for both theoretical and practical reasons. For example, delineating and identifying histogenic principals is required to advance stem cell research and tissue regeneration. To document cell lineage in a given experimental preparation, a number of techniques have been developed. This typically requires the injection of a tracer compound into a founder cell. As this cell produces progeny, the tracer is passed on to the daughter cells. By detecting the tracer in the progeny or daughter cells the investigator can determine which cells originated from the cell that was originally injected with the tracer. By using such an approach it is possible to trace the developmental path from the first cells of the embryo to the specialized cells making the tissue of the adult. A number of tracer compounds have been used with good results in lineage tracing. One of these tracer compounds is horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Several variations of the technique are available depending on what species are studied or what histological requirements are made by the study. A basic technique that can be adapted to individual needs is presented. Included in this protocol on lineage tracing are the procedures for injection, fixation, and the microscope evaluation of labelled cells in the Helobdella triseralis embryo. A brief discussion of the technique will note its advantages and disadvantages. Examples of labelled cell preparations are given to illustrate the technique. PMID:14984012

  3. Glyco-variant library of the versatile enzyme horseradish peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Simona; Pletzenauer, Robert; Maresch, Daniel; Metzger, Karl; Altmann, Friedrich; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    When the glycosylated plant enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is conjugated to specific antibodies, it presents a powerful tool for medical applications. The isolation and purification of this enzyme from plant is difficult and only gives low yields. However, HRP recombinantly produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris experiences hyperglycosylation, which impedes the use of this enzyme in medicine. Enzymatic and chemical deglycosylation are cost intensive and cumbersome and hitherto existing P. pastoris strain engineering approaches with the goal to avoid hyperglycosylation only resulted in physiologically impaired yeast strains not useful for protein production processes. Thus, the last resort to obtain less glycosylated recombinant HRP from P. pastoris is to engineer the enzyme itself. In the present study, we mutated all the eight N-glycosylation sites of HRP C1A. After determination of the most suitable mutation at each N-glycosylation site, we physiologically characterized the respective P. pastoris strains in the bioreactor and purified the produced HRP C1A glyco-variants. The biochemical characterization of the enzyme variants revealed great differences in catalytic activity and stability and allowed the combination of the most promising mutations to potentially give an unglycosylated, active HRP C1A variant useful for medical applications. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis proved to be a valuable strategy not only to reduce the overall glycan content of the recombinant enzyme but also to improve catalytic activity and stability. In the present study, we performed an integrated bioprocess covering strain generation, bioreactor cultivations, downstream processing and product characterization and present the biochemical data of the HRP glyco-library. PMID:24859724

  4. Recombinant horseradish peroxidase variants for targeted cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bonifert, Günther; Folkes, Lisa; Gmeiner, Christoph; Dachs, Gabi; Spadiut, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death. Common chemo- and radiation-therapies damage healthy tissue and cause painful side effects. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been shown to activate the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to a powerful anticancer agent in in vitro studies, but gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) studies showed ambivalent results. Thus, HRP/IAA in antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) was investigated as an alternative. However, this approach has not been intensively studied, since the enzyme preparation from plant describes an undefined mixture of isoenzymes with a heterogenic glycosylation pattern incompatible with the human system. Here, we describe the recombinant production of the two HRP isoenzymes C1A and A2A in a Pichia pastoris benchmark strain and a glyco-engineered strain with a knockout of the α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) responsible for hypermannosylation. We biochemically characterized the enzyme variants, tested them with IAA and applied them on cancer cells. In the absence of H2 O2 , HRP C1A turned out to be highly active with IAA, independent of its surface glycosylation. Subsequent in vitro cytotoxicity studies with human T24 bladder carcinoma and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells underlined the applicability of recombinant HRP C1A with reduced surface glycoslyation for targeted cancer treatment. Summarizing, this is the first study describing the successful use of recombinantly produced HRP for targeted cancer treatment. Our findings might pave the way for an increased use of the powerful isoenzyme HRP C1A in cancer research in the future. PMID:26990592

  5. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase is less compressible at higher pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Smeller, László; Fidy, Judit

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy at 10 K was used to study the effect of high pressure through the prosthetic group in horseradish peroxidase (HRP), which was Mg-mesoporphyrin (MgMP) replacing the heme of the enzyme. The same measurement was performed on MgMP in a solid-state amorphous organic matrix, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Series of FLN spectra were registered to determine the (0, 0) band shape through the inhomogeneous distribution function (IDF). In the range of 0-2 GPa a red-shift of the IDF was determined, and yielded the isothermal compressibility of MgMP-HRP as 0.066 GPa(-1), which is significantly smaller than that found earlier as 0.106 GPa(-1) by fine-tuning the pressure in the range up to 1.1 MPa. The vibrational frequencies also shifted with pressure increase, as expected. The compressibility in the DMSO matrix was smaller, 0.042 GPa(-1), both when the pressure was applied at room temperature before cooling to 10 K, or at 10 K. At 200 K or above, the bimodal (0, 0) band shape in DMSO showed a population conversion under pressure that was not observed at or below 150 K. A significant atomic rearrangement was estimated from the volume change, 3.3 +/- 0.7 cm(3)/mol upon conversion. The compressibility in proteins and in amorphous solids seems not to significantly depend on the temperature and in the protein it decreases toward higher pressures. PMID:11751329

  6. Electrochemical aptasensor based on the dual-amplification of G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme and blocking reagent-horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yali; Gou, Xuxu; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Zhuo, Ying; Mao, Li; Gan, Xianxue

    2011-06-15

    A simple electrochemical aptasensor for sensitive detection of thrombin was fabricated with G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme (hemin/G-quadruplex system) and blocking reagent-horseradish peroxidase as dual signal-amplification scheme. Gold nanoparticles (nano-Au) were firstly electrodeposited onto single wall nanotube (SWNT)-graphene modified electrode surface for the immobilization of electrochemical probe of nickel hexacyanoferrates nanoparticles (NiHCFNPs). Subsequently, another nano-Au layer was electrodeposited for further immobilization of thrombin aptamer (TBA), which later formed hemin/G-quadruplex system with hemin. Horseradish peroxidases (HRP) then served as blocking reagent to block possible remaining active sites and avoided the non-specific adsorption. In the presence of thrombin, the TBA binded to thrombin and the hemin released from the hemin/G-quadruplex electrocatalytic structure, increasing steric hindrance of the aptasensor and decomposing hemin/G-quadruplex electrocatalytic structure, which finally decreased the electrocatalytic efficiency of aptasensor toward H(2)O(2) in the presence of NiHCFNPs with a decreased electrochemical signal. On the basis of the synergistic amplifying action, a detection limit as low as 2 pM for thrombin was obtained. PMID:21536422

  7. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol in the presence of redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Won, Keehoon; Kim, Yong Hwan; An, Eun Suk; Lee, Yeon Soo; Song, Bong Keun

    2004-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol in aqueous organic solvent was investigated in the presence of a redox mediator. Cardanol is a phenol derivative from a renewable resource mainly having a C15 unsaturated hydrocarbon chain with mostly 1-3 double bonds at a meta position. Unlike soybean peroxidase (SBP), it has been shown that horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not able to perform oxidative polymerization of phenol derivatives having a bulky meta substituent such as cardanol. For the first time, redox mediators have been applied to enable horseradish peroxidase to polymerize cardanol. Veratryl alcohol, N-ethyl phenothiazine, and phenothiazine-10-propionic acid were tested as a mediator. It is surprising that the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol took place in the presence of N-ethyl phenothiazine or phenothiazine-10-propionic acid. However, veratryl alcohol showed no effect. FT-IR and GPC analysis of the product revealed that the structure and properties of polycardanol formed by HRP with a mediator were similar to those by SBP. This is the first work to apply a redox mediator to enzyme-catalyzed oxidative polymerization. Our new finding that oxidative polymerization of a poor substrate, which the enzyme is not active with, can take place in the presence of an appropriate mediator will present more opportunities for the application of enzyme-catalyzed polymerization. PMID:14715000

  8. Evaluation of seven cosubstrates in the quantification of horseradish peroxidase enzyme by square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2012-01-15

    The electrochemical detection for horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems was optimized. o-Phenilendiamine, phenol, hydroquinone, pyrocatechol, p-chlorophenol, p-aminophenol and 3,3'-5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine were evaluated as cosubstrates of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Therefore, the reaction time, the addition sequence of the substrates, the cosubstrate:H(2)O(2) ratio and the electrochemical techniques were elected by one-factor optimization assays while the buffer pH, the enzymatic activity and cosubstrate and H(2)O(2) concentrations for each system were selected simultaneously by response surface methodology. Then, the calibration curves for seven horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems were built and the analytic parameters were analyzed. o-Phenilendiamine was selected as the best cosubstrate for the HRP enzyme. For this system the reaction time of 60s, the phosphate buffer pH 6.0, and the concentrations of 2.5×10(-4)molL(-1) o-phenilendiamine and of 1.25×10(-4)molL(-1) H(2)O(2) were chosen as the optimal conditions. In these conditions, the calibration curve of horseradish peroxidase by square wave voltammetry showed a linearity range from 9.5×10(-11) to 1.9×10(-8)molL(-1) and the limit of detection of 3.8×10(-11)molL(-1) with RSD% of 0.03% (n=3). PMID:22265528

  9. Primary product of the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Kazunga, C.; Aitken, M.D.; Gold, A.

    1999-05-01

    Peroxidases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of various phenolic substrates by hydrogen peroxide. They are common enzymes in soil and are also available commercially, so that they have been proposed as agents of phenolic pollutant transformation both in the environment and in engineered systems. Previous research on the peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) has suggested that tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (chloranil) is the principal product and that a considerable fraction of the PCP added to reaction mixtures appears to be resistant to oxidation. In experiments employing alternative methods of product separation and analysis, the authors found that both of these observations are artifacts of extraction and analytical methods used in previous studies. The major product of the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of pentachlorophenol from pH 4--7 was 2,3,4,5,6-pentachloro-4-pentachlorophenoxy-2,5-cyclohexadienone (PPCHD), which is formed by the coupling of two pentachlorophenoxyl radicals.

  10. Toxicity of textile dyes and their degradation by the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP).

    PubMed

    Ulson de Souza, Selene Maria Arruda Guelli; Forgiarini, Eliane; Ulson de Souza, Antônio Augusto

    2007-08-25

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolorize textile effluents. This study evaluates the potential of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the decolorization of textile dyes and effluents. Some factors such as pH and the amount of H(2)O(2) and the enzyme were evaluated in order to determine the optimum conditions for the enzyme performance. For the dyes tested, the results indicated that the decolorization of the dye Remazol Turquoise Blue G 133% was approximately 59%, and 94% for the Lanaset Blue 2R; for the textile effluent, the decolorization was 52%. The tests for toxicity towards Daphnia magna showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. However, the toxicity of the textile effluent showed no change towards Artemia salina after the enzyme treatment. This study verifies the viability of the use of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase in the biodegradation of textile dyes. PMID:17628340

  11. 3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine Oxidation on Paper Devices for Horseradish Peroxidase-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Busa, Lori Shayne Alamo; Komatsu, Takeshi; Mohammadi, Saeed; Maeki, Masatoshi; Ishida, Akihiko; Tani, Hirofumi; Tokeshi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    We report on the colorimetric oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by hydrogen peroxide using horseradish peroxidase on photolithography-fabricated (P-PAD) and wax-printed (W-PAD) paper-based analytical devices. Fabricating PADs via photolithography exposes the hydrophilic areas to polymers (photoresists) and solvents, not only reducing the hydrophilicity, but also affecting the TMB-H2O2 assay system with an unavoidable incomplete elimination of photoresist during fabrication. Detection signals are then observed in the presence of photoresist residues on the P-PAD, even at a blank HRP concentration. PMID:27506705

  12. A simple device for injection of small calibrated amounts of horseradish peroxidase into the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Bullier, J; Henry, G H; Baker, W J

    1980-02-01

    A simple device for injecting horseradish peroxidase into the cerebral cortex is described. It consists of a syringe connected by tubing to a hydraulic adaptor which provides a sealed connection to a disposable glass micropipette. Replaceable micropipettes may be prepared by drawing capillary glass under heat to a fine diameter tip that provides easy penetration into the cortex without dimpling the surface grey matter or damaging the underlying white matter. The hydraulic seal achieved by the adaptor allows volumes of the order of 0.05 microliter to be readily injected into nervous tissue. PMID:7035757

  13. Well-Defined Macromolecules Using Horseradish Peroxidase as a RAFT Initiase.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Alex P; Bailey-Van Kuren, Dylan; Lucius, Melissa E; Makaroff, Katherine; Williams, Cameron; Page, Richard C; Berberich, Jason A; Konkolewicz, Dominik

    2016-02-01

    Enzymatic catalysis and control over macromolecular architectures from reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) are combined to give a new method of making polymers. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used to catalytically generate radicals using hydrogen peroxide and acetylacetone as a mediator. RAFT is used to control the polymer structure. HRP catalyzed RAFT polymerization gives acrylate and acrylamide polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. The polymerization is rapid, typically exceeding 90% monomer conversion in 30 min. Complex macromolecular architectures including a block copolymer and a protein-polymer conjugate are synthesized using HRP to catalytically initiate RAFT polymerization. PMID:26748786

  14. Conformational relaxation of a low-temperature protein as probed by photochemical hole burning. Horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Zollfrank, J; Friedrich, J; Vanderkooi, J M; Fidy, J

    1991-01-01

    For the first time, conformational relaxation processes have been measured in a small protein, mesoporphyrin-horseradish peroxidase via their influence on spectral diffusion broadening of holes burnt in the fluorescence excitation spectrum of free base mesoporphyrin. Holes were burnt in three 0----0 bands of different tautomeric forms of the chromophore at 1.5 and 4 K, and the spectral diffusion broadening was measured in temperature cycling experiments between 4 and 30 K. The inhomogeneous linewidth for the tautomeric 0----0 bands was estimated to be 60-70 cm-1; the hole width was found narrow, being in the order of 350 MHz (10(-2) cm-1) at 1.5 K what allowed for an extremely sensitive detection of the conformational changes. Though proteins have many features in common with glasses, the spectral diffusion broadening of photochemical holes under temperature cycling conditions in mesoporphyrin horseradish peroxidase has a very different pattern as a function of temperature. Up to 12 K, the linewidth did not significantly change, then around 14 K; a steplike broadening was observed for all three tautomers, although to a different extent. The total magnitude of line broadening up to 30 K was large and also different for the tautomers. We argue that the difference between the behavior of this protein and that of glassy matrices originate from finite size effects; the protein may be characterized by a small number of TLS, and their distribution may bear discrete features. PMID:2009354

  15. Kinetic model for removal of phenol by horseradish peroxidase with PEG

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Taylor, K.E.; Biswas, N.; Bewtra, J.K.

    1999-05-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to simulate horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of phenol in the presence of polyethylene glycol based on the following kinetics. The phenol conversion expression is a second-order Michaelis-Menten equation with respect to the concentrations of phenol and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme inactivation is attributed to the polymer and hydrogen peroxide simultaneously. The inactivation by polymer is an apparently second-order reaction, first-order in each of enzyme and phenol, whereas the inactivation by peroxide is also an apparently second-order reaction, first-order in each of enzyme and hydrogen peroxide. The rates of consumption of hydrogen peroxide and polyethylene glycol are directly proportional to the rate of conversion of phenol. Experimental data show that the model output can predict the phenol removal and activity depletion realistically under a variety of reaction conditions. The model has been verified by predicting some independent experimental results on reaction stoichiometry, horseradish peroxidase dose effect, and semibatch operation with respect to hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Inactivation of aminated horseradish peroxidase by interaction with S-Sepharose.

    PubMed

    Allen, M P; Choo, S H; Li, T M; Parrish, R F

    1991-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase which had been aminated by periodate oxidation and reductive amination was purified by cation-exchange chromatography on S-Sepharose. Instead of the expected single peak of aminated enzyme, two distinct peaks of protein were eluted from the column. Evaluation of the protein in each of the two distributions showed that peak number 1 had spectral properties and specific activity similar to those of native enzyme. Distribution number 2 had a threefold reduction in the extinction in the Soret region at 404 nm and was completely devoid of enzymatic activity. This inactivation was caused by a specific interaction between the aminated peroxidase and the S-Sepharose matrix, resulting in a displacement of the heme prosthetic group out of its native orientation. The inactivation of the aminated peroxidase was found to be dependent on time, pH, and the support matrix itself. These results indicate that the S-Sepharose and Mono-S resins are not interchangeable, despite the chemical similarities of the two resins. PMID:2035845

  17. Effect of architecture on the activity of glucose oxidase/horseradish peroxidase/carbon nanoparticle conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ciaurriz, Paula; Bravo, Ernesto; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) together with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). Because GOx activity relies on HRP, we probe how the arrangement of the enzymes on the CNPs affects enzymatic behavior. Colorimetric assays to probe activity found that the coupling strategy affects activity of the bienzyme-nanoparticle complex. GOx is more prone than HRP to denaturation on the CNP surface, where its activity is compromised, while HRP activity is enhanced when interfaced to the CNP. Thus, arrangements where HRP is directly on the surface of the CNP and GOx is not are more favorable for overall activity. Coverage also influenced activity of the bienzyme complex, but performing the conjugation in the presence of glucose did not improve GOx activity. These results show that the architecture of the assembly is an important factor in optimization of nanoparticle-protein interfaces. PMID:24231087

  18. Carbon Based Electrodes Modified with Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilized in Conducting Polymers for Acetaminophen Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tertis, Mihaela; Florea, Anca; Sandulescu, Robert; Cristea, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The development and optimization of new biosensors with horseradish peroxidase immobilized in carbon nanotubes-polyethyleneimine or polypyrrole nanocomposite film at the surface of two types of transducer is described. The amperometric detection of acetaminophen was carried out at −0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl using carbon based-screen printed electrodes (SPEs) and glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) as transducers. The electroanalytical parameters of the biosensors are highly dependent on their configuration and on the dimensions of the carbon nanotubes. The best limit of detection obtained for acetaminophen was 1.36 ± 0.013 μM and the linear range 9.99–79.01 μM for the HRP-SWCNT/PEI in GCE configuration. The biosensors were successfully applied for the detection of acetaminophen in several drug formulations. PMID:23580052

  19. Compound I in horseradish peroxidase enzyme: Magnetic state assessment by quadratric configuration interaction calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazza, Costantino; Sanna, Nico; Tatoli, Simone; Aschi, Massimiliano; Palma, Amedeo

    Quadratic configuration interaction procedure with single and double electronic excitations (QCISD) has been used, for the first time, to calculate the electronic structure of the Compound I (CpdI), which represents a key intermediate in the catalytic cycle of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. The QCISD method is applied to lowest quasi-isoenergetic doublet and quartet spin multiplicity and results compared with density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) data. This investigation shows that, at present, QCISD is more accurate than DFT-based approach in discriminating between the two lowest magnetic states of CpdI complex in HRP enzyme. Such a result opens the possibility of theoretically addressing the reaction mechanism leading to CpdI complex in HRP using a correlated wavefunction based approach.

  20. Catalytic and Inhibitory Kinetic Behavior of Horseradish Peroxidase on the Electrode Surface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jitao; Huang, Wei; Wang, Titi

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic biosensors are often used to detect trace levels of some specific substance. An alternative methodology is applied for enzymatic assays, in which the electrocatalytic kinetic behavior of enzymes is monitored by measuring the faradaic current for a variety of substrate and inhibitor concentrations. Here we examine a steady-state and pre-steady-state reduction of H2O2 on the horseradish peroxidase electrode. The results indicate the substrate-concentration dependence of the steady-state current strictly obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics rules; in other cases there is ambiguity, whereby he inhibitor-concentration dependence of the steady-state current has a discontinuity under moderate concentration conditions. For pre-steady-state phases, both catalysis and inhibition show an abrupt change of the output current. These anomalous phenomena are universal and there might be an underlying biochemical or electrochemical rationale. PMID:23202175

  1. Enzymatic growth of quantum dots: applications to probe glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase and sense glucose.

    PubMed

    Saa, Laura; Pavlov, Valeri

    2012-11-19

    Three innovative assays are developed for the detection of enzymatic activities of glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by the generation of CdS quantum dots (QDs) in situ using non-conventional enzymatic reactions. In the first assay, GOx catalyzes the oxidation of 1-thio-β-D-glucose to give 1-thio-β-D-gluconic acid. The latter is spontaneously hydrolyzed to β-D-gluconic acid and H2 S, which in the presence of cadmium nitrate yields fluorescent CdS nanoparticles. In the second assay HRP catalyzes the oxidation of sodium thiosulfate with hydrogen peroxide generating H2 S and consequently CdS QDs. The combination of GOx with HRP, allowed quantification of glucose in plasma by following growth of fluorescent QDs. PMID:22887879

  2. Electrochemical properties of seamless three-dimensional carbon nanotubes-grown graphene modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kikuo; Terse-Thakoor, Trupti; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2016-10-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized through sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the surface of a seamless three-dimensional hybrid of carbon nanotubes grown at the graphene surface (HRP-SDS/CNTs/G) and its electrochemical properties were investigated. Compared with graphene alone electrode modified with HRP via SDS (HRP-SDS/G electrode), the surface coverage of electroactive HRP at the CNTs/G electrode surface was approximately 2-fold greater because of CNTs grown at the graphene surface. Based on the increase in the surface coverage of electroactive HRP, the sensitivity to H2O2 at the HRP-SDS/CNTs/G electrode was higher than that at the HRP-SDS/G electrode. The kinetics of the direct electron transfer from the CNTs/G electrode to compound I and II of modified HRP was also analyzed. PMID:27224430

  3. Horseradish peroxidase-encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles for enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Chen, Chao; Yu, Haijun; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Among various enzyme-based therapies, enzyme-prodrug therapy (EPT) promises minimized side effects in that it activates non-toxic prodrugs locally where the enzymes are placed. The success of such an approach requires high enzyme stability against both structural denaturation and potential immunogenicity. This work examines the efficiency of nanoparticles for enzyme protection in EPT applications. Specifically, horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles (HRP-CSNP) were constructed and examined with respect to stability enhancement. HRP-CSNP retained enzyme activity and had improved stability at 37 °C in the presence of a denaturant, urea. The nanoparticles effectively bound to the surface of human breast cancer cell Bcap37 and led to over 80 % cell death when applied with a prodrug indole-3-acetic acid. PMID:25257586

  4. Mechanistic analysis of ultrasound assisted enzymatic desulfurization of liquid fuels using horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Bhasarkar, Jaykumar; Borah, Arup Jyoti; Goswami, Pranab; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-11-01

    This study has attempted to gain physical insight into ultrasound-assisted enzymatic desulfurization using system comprising horseradish peroxidase enzyme and dibenzothiophene (DBT). Desulfurization pathway (comprising DBT-sulfoxide and DBT-sulfone as intermediates and 4-methoxy benzoic acid as final product) has been established with GC-MS analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra of ultrasound-treated enzyme reveal conformational changes in secondary structure (reduction in α-helix and β-conformations and increase in random coil content) leading to enhancement in activity. Concurrent analysis of desulfurization profiles, Arrhenius and thermodynamic parameters, and simulations of cavitation bubble dynamics reveal that strong micro-convection generated by sonication enhances enzyme activity and desulfurization kinetics. Parallel oxidation of DBT by radicals generated from transient cavitation gives further boost to desulfurization kinetics. However, random motion of enzyme molecules induced by shock waves reduces frequency factor and limits the ultrasonic enhancement of enzymatic desulfurization. PMID:26231128

  5. Horseradish peroxidase-driven fluorescent labeling of nanotubes with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Vladimir V; Baskin, David S

    2006-03-01

    We describe the first enzyme-driven technique for fluorescent labeling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The labeling was performed via enzymatic biotinylation of nanotubes in the tyramide-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reaction. Both direct and indirect fuorescent labeling of SWNTs was achieved using either biotinyl tyramide or fluorescently tagged tyramides. Biotinylated SWNTs later reacted with streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores. Linking semiconductor nanocrystals, quantum dots (Q-dots), to the surface of nanotubes resulted in their fluorescent visualization, whereas conventional fluorophores bound to SWNTs directly or through biotin-streptavidin linkage, were completely quenched. Enzymatic biotinylation permits fluorescent visualization of carbon nanotubes, which could be useful for a number of biomedical applications. In addition, other organic molecules such as proteins, antibodies, or DNA can be conjugated to biotinylated SWNTs using this approach. PMID:16568818

  6. Horseradish-peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of amphiphilic tyrosine derivatives in micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Rupmoni; Alva, Shridhara; Marx, Kenneth A.; Akkara, Joseph A.; Kaplan, David L.; Tripathy, Sukant K.

    1998-04-01

    There has been much interest in enzyme catalyzed organic synthesis because it allows the design and synthesis of new materials via chemically mild reaction schemes. This study reports on the horseradish peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of the amphiphilic, C10 alkyl monomer derivative of d and l isomers of tyrosine in micellar solutions. The methodology has been developed to improve the solubility and hence processability of these phenolic polymers. The technique involves the formation of emulsions or micelles of the amphiphilic tyrosines in aqueous medium through manipulation of the solution pH and subsequent enzymatic polymerization. The solution pH, concentrations of the tyrosine derivatives, hydrogen peroxide and the enzyme have been optimized for maximum conversion. The physico- chemical properties of the resulting polymers have been studied by various spectroscopic techniques. Limited stereo- specificity of the reaction has been demonstrated by kinetic methods. Thin films of these polymeric materials have been fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett film technique.

  7. Deuterium NMR study of structural and dynamic properties of horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    La Mar, G.N.; Thanabal, V.; Johnson, R.D.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.

    1989-04-05

    High field deuterium NMR spectra have been recorded for various horseradish peroxidase complexes reconstituted with hemins possessing specific 2H labels. The line width of the 2H NMR signals of deuteroheme reconstituted-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its cyano complex for the immobilized skeletal 2-2H and 4-2H labels yield the overall protein rotational correlation time (22 ms at 55 degrees C), which is consistent with expectations based on molecular weight. Meso-2H4 labels yield broad (1.3 kHz) signals just upfield from the diamagnetic protein envelope for HRP, and in the central portion of the protein envelope for the CN- ligated resting state HRP. Meso-2H4-labeled mesohemin-reconstituted HRP exhibits a similar signal but shifted further upfield by approximately 10 ppm. The net upfield meso-H hyperfine shifts confirm a five-coordinate structure for resting state HRP. 2Ha resonances for essentially rotationally immobile vinyl groups were detected in both resting state HRP and CN- ligated resting state HRP. Heme methyl-2H-labeling yields relatively narrow lines (approximately 80 Hz) indicative of effective averaging of the quadrupolar relaxation by rapid methyl rotation. Thus the 2H line width of rapidly rotating methyls in hemoproteins can be used effectively to determine the overall protein tumbling rate. Preliminary 2H experiments in meso-2H4-labeled compound I do not support large pi spin density at these positions on the porphyrin cation radical, and argue for a a1u rather than a a2u orbital ground state.

  8. Decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes from textile effluent using horseradish peroxidase: optimization and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Stefanović, Andrea B; Žuža, Milena G; Čičkarić, Dragana Z; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2015-01-01

    Two anthraquinonic dyes, C.I. Acid Blue 225 and C.I. Acid Violet 109, were used as models to explore the feasibility of using the horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) in the practical decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes in wastewater. The influence of process parameters such as enzyme concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, dye concentration, and pH was examined. The pH and temperature activity profiles were similar for decolorization of both dyes. Under the optimal conditions, 94.7% of C.I. Acid Violet 109 from aqueous solution was decolorized (treatment time 15 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.4 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 4, and temperature 24°C) and 89.36% of C.I. Acid Blue 225 (32 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.04 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 5, and temperature 24°C). The mechanism of both reactions has been proven to follow the two substrate ping-pong mechanism with substrate inhibition, revealing the formation of a nonproductive or dead-end complex between dye and HRP or between H2O2 and the oxidized form of the enzyme. Both chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon values showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. This study verifies the viability of use of horseradish peroxidase for the wastewaters treatment of similar anthraquinonic dyes. PMID:25685837

  9. Decolorization of Anthraquinonic Dyes from Textile Effluent Using Horseradish Peroxidase: Optimization and Kinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž.; Prlainović, Nevena Ž.; Stefanović, Andrea B.; Žuža, Milena G.; Čičkarić, Dragana Z.; Mijin, Dušan Ž.; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D.

    2015-01-01

    Two anthraquinonic dyes, C.I. Acid Blue 225 and C.I. Acid Violet 109, were used as models to explore the feasibility of using the horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) in the practical decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes in wastewater. The influence of process parameters such as enzyme concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, dye concentration, and pH was examined. The pH and temperature activity profiles were similar for decolorization of both dyes. Under the optimal conditions, 94.7% of C.I. Acid Violet 109 from aqueous solution was decolorized (treatment time 15 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.4 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 4, and temperature 24°C) and 89.36% of C.I. Acid Blue 225 (32 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.04 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 5, and temperature 24°C). The mechanism of both reactions has been proven to follow the two substrate ping-pong mechanism with substrate inhibition, revealing the formation of a nonproductive or dead-end complex between dye and HRP or between H2O2 and the oxidized form of the enzyme. Both chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon values showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. This study verifies the viability of use of horseradish peroxidase for the wastewaters treatment of similar anthraquinonic dyes. PMID:25685837

  10. Size-dependent tuning of horseradish peroxidase bioreactivity by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haohao; Liu, Yi; Li, Meng; Chong, Yu; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the α-helicity of the enzyme to extents inversely related to their size. Au-5 nm inhibited both HRP peroxidase activity toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and HRP compound I/II reactivity toward 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Au-5 nm enhanced the HRP peroxidase activity toward ascorbic acid and the HRP compound I/II reactivity toward redox-active residues in the HRP protein moiety. Further, Au-5 nm also decreased the catalase- and oxidase-like activities of HRP. Au-10 nm showed similar, but weaker effects, while Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm had no effect. Results suggest that AuNPs can size-dependently enhance or inhibit HRP bioreactivity toward substrates with different redox potentials via a mechanism involving extension of the HRP substrate access channel and decline in the redox potentials of HRP catalytic intermediates.Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the

  11. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation. PMID:26274391

  12. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on β-cyclodextrin-capped silver nanoparticles: Its future aspects in biosensor application.

    PubMed

    Karim, Zoheb; Khan, Mohd Jahir; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Adnan, Rohana

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to work out a simple and high-yield procedure for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on silver nanoparticle. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize silver nanoparticles. Horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on β-cyclodextrin-capped silver nanoparticles via glutaraldehyde cross-linking. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) was also performed to confirm the genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles. To decrease toxicity, silver nanoparticles were capped with β-cyclodextrin. A comparative stability study of soluble and immobilized enzyme preparations was investigated against pH, temperature, and chaotropic agent, urea. The results showed that the cross-linked peroxidase was significantly more stable as compared to the soluble counterpart. The immobilized enzyme exhibited stable enzyme activities after repeated uses. PMID:25830286

  13. Silica nanoparticles coencapsulating gadolinium oxide and horseradish peroxidase for imaging and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nikesh; Shrivastava, Anju; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles coencapsulating gadolinium oxide and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) have been synthesized in the aqueous core of sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)–hexane–water reverse micelle. The average diameter of these silica particles is around 25 nm and the particles are spherical and highly monodispersed as depicted using transmission electron microscopy. The entrapment efficiency of HRP was found to be as high as 95%. Practically, the entrapped enzyme shows zero leachability up to 90 days. The enzyme entrapped in these silica nanoparticles follows Michaelis–Menten kinetics. Peroxidase entrapped in silica nanoparticles shows higher stability towards temperature and pH change as compared to free enzymes. The gadolinium oxide-doped silica nanoparticles are paramagnetic as observed from the nuclear magnetic resonance line-broadening effect on the proton spectrum of the surrounding water molecule. The entrapped enzyme, HRP, has been used to convert a benign prodrug, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), to a toxic oxidized product and its toxic effect has been tested on cancerous cell lines through thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue (MTT) assay. In vitro studies on different cancerous cell lines show that the enzyme has been entrapped and retains its activity inside the silica nanoparticles. IAA alone has no cytotoxic effect and it becomes active only after oxidative decarboxylation by HRP. PMID:23233799

  14. Silica nanoparticles coencapsulating gadolinium oxide and horseradish peroxidase for imaging and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nikesh; Shrivastava, Anju; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles coencapsulating gadolinium oxide and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) have been synthesized in the aqueous core of sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)-hexane-water reverse micelle. The average diameter of these silica particles is around 25 nm and the particles are spherical and highly monodispersed as depicted using transmission electron microscopy. The entrapment efficiency of HRP was found to be as high as 95%. Practically, the entrapped enzyme shows zero leachability up to 90 days. The enzyme entrapped in these silica nanoparticles follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Peroxidase entrapped in silica nanoparticles shows higher stability towards temperature and pH change as compared to free enzymes. The gadolinium oxide-doped silica nanoparticles are paramagnetic as observed from the nuclear magnetic resonance line-broadening effect on the proton spectrum of the surrounding water molecule. The entrapped enzyme, HRP, has been used to convert a benign prodrug, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), to a toxic oxidized product and its toxic effect has been tested on cancerous cell lines through thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue (MTT) assay. In vitro studies on different cancerous cell lines show that the enzyme has been entrapped and retains its activity inside the silica nanoparticles. IAA alone has no cytotoxic effect and it becomes active only after oxidative decarboxylation by HRP. PMID:23233799

  15. Enzymatic etching of gold nanorods by horseradish peroxidase and application to blood glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saa, Laura; Coronado-Puchau, Marc; Pavlov, Valeri; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have become some of the most used nanostructures for biosensing and imaging applications due to their plasmon-related optical response, which is highly sensitive toward minute changes in the AuNR aspect ratio. In this context, H2O2 has been used to trigger the chemical etching of AuNRs, thereby inducing a decrease of their aspect ratio. However, special conditions and relatively high concentrations of H2O2 are usually required, preventing the applicability of the system for biodetection purposes. To overcome this limitation we have introduced a biocatalytic species, the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) that is able to induce a gradual oxidation of AuNRs in the presence of trace concentrations of H2O2. Interestingly, the presence of halide ions has also been found to be essential for this process. As a consequence, other enzymatic reactions, such as those catalyzed by glucose oxidase, can be easily coupled to HRP activity, allowing the detection of different amounts of glucose. On the basis of these findings, we developed a highly sensitive and simple colorimetric assay that can be read out by the naked eye and allows the detection of physiological glucose concentrations in human serum.Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have become some of the most used nanostructures for biosensing and imaging applications due to their plasmon-related optical response, which is highly sensitive toward minute changes in the AuNR aspect ratio. In this context, H2O2 has been used to trigger the chemical etching of AuNRs, thereby inducing a decrease of their aspect ratio. However, special conditions and relatively high concentrations of H2O2 are usually required, preventing the applicability of the system for biodetection purposes. To overcome this limitation we have introduced a biocatalytic species, the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) that is able to induce a gradual oxidation of AuNRs in the presence of trace concentrations of H2O2. Interestingly, the presence of

  16. Oxidative metabolism of the anti-cancer agent mitoxantrone by horseradish, lacto-and lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Brück, Thomas B; Brück, Dieter W

    2011-02-01

    Mitoxantrone (MH(2)X), an anthraquinone-type anti-cancer agent used clinically in the treatment of human malignancies, is oxidatively activated by the peroxidase/H(2)O(2) enzyme system. In contrast to the enzymatic mechanisms of drug oxidation, the chemical transformations of MH(2)X are not well described. In this study, MH(2)X metabolites, produced by the horseradish, lacto- or lignin peroxidase (respectively HRP, LPO and LIP)/H(2)O(2) system, were investigated by steady-state spectrokinetic and HPLC-MS methods. At an equimolar mitoxantrone/H(2)O(2) ratio, the efficacy of the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of mitoxantrone decreased in the following order: LPO > HRP > LIP, which accorded with the decreasing size of the substrate access channel in the enzyme panel examined. In all cases, the central drug oxidation product was the redox-active cyclic metabolite, hexahydronaphtho-[2,3-f]-quinoxaline-7,12-dione (MH(2)), previously identified in the urine of mitoxantrone-treated patients. As the reaction progressed, data gathered in this study suggests that further oxidation of the MH(2) side-chains occurred, yielding the mono- and dicarboxylic acid derivatives respectively. Based on the available data a further MH(2) derivative is proposed, in which the amino-alkyl side-chain(s) are cyclised. With increasing H(2)O(2) concentrations, these novel MH(2) derivatives were oxidised to additional metabolites, whose spectral properties and MS data indicated a stepwise destruction of the MH(2) chromophore due to an oxidative cleavage of the 9,10-anthracenedione moiety. The novel metabolites extend the known sequence of peroxidase-induced mitoxantrone metabolism, and may contribute to the cytotoxic effects of the drug in vivo. Based on the structural features of the proposed MH(2) oxidation products we elaborate on various biochemical mechanisms, which extend the understanding of mitoxantrone's pharmaceutical action and its clinical effectiveness with a particular focus on

  17. Catalytic properties of horseradish peroxidase reconstituted with the 8-(hydroxymethyl)- and 8-formylheme derivatives.

    PubMed

    Harris, R Z; Liddell, P A; Smith, K M; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1993-04-13

    Recent studies suggest that 8-(thiomethyl)- and 8-formylheme modifications may be present in, respectively, lactoperoxidase and myeloperoxidase. To examine whether these heme modifications contribute to the unusual catalytic properties of the mammalian peroxidases, we have reconstituted apo-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with 8-(hydroxymethyl)heme (8HM-HRP) and 8-formylheme (8F-HRP) and have characterized the reconstituted enzymes. Native HRP and 8HM-HRP have identical spectra in the ferric, compound I, and compound II states. In contrast, the Soret band of 8F-HRP is at 417 rather than 402 nm and that of its compound II species is at 436 rather than 416 nm. Compound I was observed as a transient species with 8F-HRP. The rate of formation of compound I was the same for native and 8HM-HRP, but the pseudo-first-order constant for decay of compound I was 0.021 s-1 for 8HM-HRP and 0.010 s-1 for native HRP. The rates of oxidation of guaiacol, iodide, and thioanisole are the same for native HRP and 8HM-HRP but are significantly slower for 8F-HRP. The stereospecificity of thioanisole oxidation is the same for native and 8HM-HRP, but differs for 8F-HRP. For guaiacol, which was studied in detail, Km = 2.3 mM and kcat = 33 s-1 for 8F-HRP versus Km = 1.8 mM and kcat = 104 s-1 for native HRP. 8HM-HRP oxidizes ethylhydrazine and azide to the ethyl and azidyl radicals, respectively, and is simultaneously inactivated. 8F-HRP is also slowly inactivated by ethylhydrazine and azide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8385486

  18. Expressed Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Horseradish Peroxidase Identifies Co-Clustering Molecules in Individual Lipid Raft Domains

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa-Yamaguchi, Arisa; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts that are enriched in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins serve as a platform for important biological events. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these events, identification of co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains is required. Here we describe an approach to this issue using the recently developed method termed enzyme-mediated activation of radical source (EMARS), by which molecules in the vicinity within 300 nm from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) set on the probed molecule are labeled. GPI-anchored HRP fusion proteins (HRP-GPIs), in which the GPI attachment signals derived from human decay accelerating factor and Thy-1 were separately connected to the C-terminus of HRP, were expressed in HeLa S3 cells, and the EMARS reaction was catalyzed by these expressed HRP-GPIs under a living condition. As a result, these different HRP-GPIs had differences in glycosylation and localization and formed distinct clusters. This novel approach distinguished molecular clusters associated with individual GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that it can identify co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains. PMID:24671047

  19. Probing horseradish peroxidase catalyzed degradation of azo dye from tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Sadhanandam; Anumary, Ayyappan; Ashokkumar, Meiyazhagan; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy

    2013-01-01

    Biocatalysis based effluent treatment has outclassed the presently favored physico-chemical treatments due to nil sludge production and monetary savings. Azo dyes are commonly employed in the leather industry and pose a great threat to the environment. Here, we show the degradation of C. I. Acid blue 113 using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) assisted with H2O2 as a co-substrate. It was observed that 0.08 U HRP can degrade 3 mL of 30 mg/L dye up to 80% within 45 min with the assistance of 14 μL of H2O2 at pH 6.6 and 30°C. The feasibility of using the immobilized HRP for dye degradation was also examined and the results show up to 76% dye degradation under similar conditions to that of free HRP with the exception of longer contact time of 240 min. Recycling studies reveal that the immobilized HRP can be recycled up to 3 times for dye degradation. Kinetics drawn for the free HRP catalyzed reaction marked a lower K m and higher V max values, which denotes a proper and faster affinity of the enzyme towards the dye, when compared to the immobilized HRP. The applicability of HRP for treating the actual tannery dye-house wastewater was also demonstrated. PMID:23961406

  20. Investigation on binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase by absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li; Zhu, Shuhua; Ma, Hongmei; Zhou, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated by absorption spectrometry in 0.2 M anaerobic phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Based on this binding equilibrium, a model equation for evaluating the binding constant of nitric oxide to HRP is developed and the binding constant is calculated to be (1.55 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1, indicating that HRP can form a stable complex with nitric oxide. The type of inhibition by nitric oxide is validated on the basis of studying initial reaction rates of HRP-catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. The inhibition mechanism is found to follow an apparent non-competitive inhibition by Lineweaver-Burk method. Based on this kinetic mechanism, the binding constant is also calculated to be (5.22 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1. The values of the binding constant determined by the two methods are almost identical. The non-competitive inhibition model is also applicable to studying the effect of nitric oxide on other metalloenzymes, which catalyze the two-substrate reaction with the "ping-pong" mechanism.

  1. Monitoring Synaptic Vesicle Protein Sorting with Enhanced Horseradish Peroxidase in the Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Schikorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Protein sorting is the fundamental cellular process that creates and maintains cell organelles and subcellular structures. The synaptic vesicle (SV) is a unique cell organelle that contains a plethora of specific SV proteins and its protein composition is crucial for its function. Thus understanding the mechanisms that sort proteins to SVs and other cell organelles is central to neuroscience and cell biology.While in the past protein sorting was studied in the fluorescence and confocal microscope, we here present a protocol that reveals SV protein trafficking and sorting in the electron microscope (EM). The protocol exploits tagging SV proteins with a new genetically encoded label for EM: enhanced horseradish peroxidase (eHRP). eHRP gained its high sensitivity through direct evolution of its catalytic activity and is detectable in the EM and LM after expression in neurons and other mammalian cells. The protocol describes the use of eHRP, labeling of SVs in cultured hippocampal neurons, and analysis via serial section reconstruction. PMID:27515091

  2. Catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase: relationship to enzyme inactivation by H2O2.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ruiz, J; Arnao, M B; Hiner, A N; García-Cánovas, F; Acosta, M

    2001-01-01

    H2O2 is the usual oxidizing substrate of horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C). In the absence in the reaction medium of a one-electron donor substrate, H2O2 is able to act as both oxidizing and reducing substrate. However, under these conditions the enzyme also undergoes a progressive loss of activity. There are several pathways that maintain the activity of the enzyme by recovering the ferric form, one of which is the decomposition of H2O2 to molecular oxygen in a similar way to the action of catalase. This production of oxygen has been kinetically characterized with a Clark-type electrode coupled to an oxygraph. HRP-C exhibits a weak catalase-like activity, the initial reaction rate of which is hyperbolically dependent on the H2O2 concentration, with values for K(2) (affinity of the first intermediate, compound I, for H2O2) and k(3) (apparent rate constant controlling catalase activity) of 4.0 +/- 0.6 mM and 1.78 +/- 0.12 s(-1) respectively. Oxygen production by HRP-C is favoured at pH values greater than approx. 6.5; under similar conditions HRP-C is also much less sensitive to inactivation during incubations with H2O2. We therefore suggest that this pathway is a major protective mechanism of HRP-C against such inactivation. PMID:11171085

  3. Afferent neurons of the hypoglossal nerve of the rat as demonstrated by horseradish peroxidase tracing.

    PubMed

    Neuhuber, W; Mysicka, A

    1980-01-01

    Cell bodies of sensory neurons of the rat's hypoglossal nerve were demonstrated by the somatopetal horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transport technique. Labelled perikarya were found within the second and third cervical spinal ganglia and in the vagal sensory ganglia. After application of HRP to the cut peripheral trunk of the hypoglossal nerve about 200 labelled cell bodies were counted in each animal. The vast majority of the axons from cervical spinal ganglion cells reach the hypoglossal nerve via the descending ramus (N. descendens hypoglossi). However, there may exist an additional pathway, probably via the cervical sympathetic trunk. Application of HPR to the medial and lateral end branches led to a labelling of much fewer spinal ganglion cells while the number of labelled vegal sensory neurons remained unchanged. Thus, it is suggested that the majority of the cervical afferents of the hypoglossal nerve originates within the extrinsic tongue musculature and the geniohyoid muscle, whereas the vagal afferents may perhaps derive exclusively from the intrinsic muslces. Histograms of the mean diameters of labelled cell bodies show a predominance of very small perikarya. This contrasts with the diameter distribution of sensory perikarya labelled after HRP application to nerves supplying other skeletal muscles. It is therefore assumed that the afferent component of the hypoglossal nerve is composed mainly of small-calibre axons. PMID:7356184

  4. Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase on EupergitC for the enzymatic elimination of phenol.

    PubMed

    Pramparo, L; Stüber, F; Font, J; Fortuny, A; Fabregat, A; Bengoa, C

    2010-05-15

    In this study, three different approaches for the covalent immobilisation of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto epoxy-activated acrylic polymers (EupergitC) were explored for the first time, direct HRP binding to the polymers via their oxirane groups, HRP binding to the polymers via a spacer made from adipic dihydrazide, and HRP binding to hydrazido polymer surfaces through the enzyme carbohydrate moiety previously modified by periodate oxidation. The periodate-mediated covalent immobilisation of the HRP on hydrazido EupergitC was found to be the most effective method for the preparation of biocatalysts. In this case, a maximum value of the immobilised enzyme activity of 127 U/g(support) was found using an enzyme loading on the support of 35.2mg/g(support). The free and the immobilised HRP were used to study the elimination of phenol in two batch reactors. As expected, the activity of the immobilised enzyme was lower than the activity of the free enzyme. Around 85% of enzyme activity is lost during the immobilisation. However, the reaction using immobilised enzyme showed that it was possible to reach high degrees of phenol removal (around 50%) using about one hundredth of the enzyme used in the soluble form. PMID:20092944

  5. Improved covalent immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on macroporous glycidyl methacrylate-based copolymers.

    PubMed

    Prodanović, Olivera; Prokopijević, Miloš; Spasojević, Dragica; Stojanović, Zeljko; Radotić, Ksenija; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D; Prodanović, Radivoje

    2012-11-01

    A macroporous copolymer of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, poly(GMA-co-EGDMA), with various surface characteristics and mean pore size diameters ranging from 44 to 200 nm was synthesized, modified with 1,2-diaminoethane, and tested as a carrier for immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by two covalent methods, glutaraldehyde and periodate. The highest specific activity of around 35 U g(-1) dry weight of carrier was achieved on poly(GMA-co-EGDMA) copolymers with mean pore diameters of 200 and 120 nm by the periodate method. A study of deactivation kinetics at 65 °C and in 80 % dioxane revealed that periodate immobilization also produced an appreciable stabilization of the biocatalyst, while stabilization factor depended strongly on the surface characteristics of the copolymers. HRP immobilized on copolymer with a mean pore diameter of 120 nm by periodate method showing not only the highest specific activity but also good stability was further characterized. It appeared that the immobilization resulted in the stabilization of enzyme over a broader pH range while the Michaelis constant value (K (m)) of the immobilized HRP was 10.8 mM, approximately 5.6 times higher than that of the free enzyme. After 6 cycles of repeated use in a batch reactor for pyrogallol oxidation, the immobilized HRP retained 45 % of its original activity. PMID:22941271

  6. Amperometric inhibitive biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase-nanoporous gold for sulfide determination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huihui; Liu, Zhuang; Wu, Chao; Xu, Ping; Wang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    As a well-known toxic pollutant, sulfide is harmful to human health. In this study, a simple and sensitive amperometric inhibitive biosensor was developed for the determination of sulfide in the environment. By immobilizing nanoporous gold (NPG) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and encapsulating horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto NPG, a HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode for sulfide detection was successfully constructed based on the inhibition of sulfide on HRP activity with o-Phenylenediamine (OPD) as a substrate. The resulted HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode achieved a wide linear range of 0.1-40 μM in sulfide detection with a high sensitivity of 1720 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and a low detection limit of 0.027 μM. Additionally, the inhibition of sulfide on HRP is competitive inhibition with OPD as a substrate by Michaelis-Menten analysis. Notably, the recovery of HRP activity was quickly achieved by washing the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique in deaerated PBS (50 mM, pH 7.0) for only 60 s. Furthermore, the real sample analysis of sulfide by the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode was achieved. Based on above results, the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode could be a better choice for the real determination of sulfide compared to inhibitive biosensors previously reported. PMID:27515253

  7. Amperometric inhibitive biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase-nanoporous gold for sulfide determination

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huihui; Liu, Zhuang; Wu, Chao; Xu, Ping; Wang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    As a well-known toxic pollutant, sulfide is harmful to human health. In this study, a simple and sensitive amperometric inhibitive biosensor was developed for the determination of sulfide in the environment. By immobilizing nanoporous gold (NPG) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and encapsulating horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto NPG, a HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode for sulfide detection was successfully constructed based on the inhibition of sulfide on HRP activity with o-Phenylenediamine (OPD) as a substrate. The resulted HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode achieved a wide linear range of 0.1–40 μM in sulfide detection with a high sensitivity of 1720 μA mM−1 cm−2 and a low detection limit of 0.027 μM. Additionally, the inhibition of sulfide on HRP is competitive inhibition with OPD as a substrate by Michaelis-Menten analysis. Notably, the recovery of HRP activity was quickly achieved by washing the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique in deaerated PBS (50 mM, pH 7.0) for only 60 s. Furthermore, the real sample analysis of sulfide by the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode was achieved. Based on above results, the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode could be a better choice for the real determination of sulfide compared to inhibitive biosensors previously reported. PMID:27515253

  8. Biocatalysis in water-in-ionic liquid microemulsions: a case study with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, M; Kamiya, N; Goto, M

    2009-01-20

    In this article we report the first results on the enzymatic activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) microencapsulated in water-in-ionic liquid (w/IL) microemulsions using pyrogallol as the substrate. Toward this goal, the system used in this study was composed of anionic surfactant AOT (sodium bis(2-ethyl-1-hexyl)sulfosuccinate)/hydrophobic IL [C(8)mim][Tf(2)N] (1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide)/water/1-hexanol. In this system, the catalytic activity of HRP was measured as a function of substrate concentrations, W(0) (molar ratio of water to surfactant), pH, and 1-hexanol content. The curve of the activity-W(0) profile was found to be hyperbolic for the new microemulsion. The apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters (k(cat) and K(m)) were estimated and compared to those obtained from a conventional microemulsion. Apparently, it was found that HRP-catalyzed oxidation of pyrogallol by hydrogen peroxide in IL microemulsuions is much more effective than in a conventional AOT/water/isooctane microemulsion. The stability of HRP solubilized in the newly developed w/IL microemulsions was examined, and it was found that HRP retained almost 70% of its initial activity after incubation at 28 degrees C for 30 h. PMID:19113810

  9. Chemically glycosylation improves the stability of an amperometric horseradish peroxidase biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cancel, Griselle; Suazo-Dávila, Damaris; Medina-Guzmán, Johnsue; Rosado-González, María; Díaz-Vázquez, Liz M.; Griebenow, Kai

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a biosensor by electrodeposition of gold nano-particles (AuNPs) on glassy carbon (GC) and subsequent formation of a 4-mercaptobenzoic acid self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was then covalently immobilized onto the SAM. Two forms of HRP were employed: non-modified and chemically glycosylated with lactose. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that chemical glycosylation did neither change the tertiary structure of HRP nor the heme environment. The highest sensitivity of the biosensor to hydroquinone was obtained for the biosensor with HRP-lactose 1 (414 nA μM−1 ) compared to 378 nA μM−1 for the one employing non-modified HRP. The chemically glycosylated form of the enzyme catalyzed the reduction of hydroquinone more rapidly than the native form of the enzyme. The sensor employing lactose-modified HRP also had a lower limit of detection (74 μM) than the HRP biosensor (83 μM). However, most importantly, chemically glycosylation improved the long-term stability of the biosensor, which retained 60% of its activity over a four-month storage period compared to only 10% for HRP. These results highlight improvements by an innovative stabilization method when compared to previously reported enzyme-based biosensors. PMID:25479876

  10. Enzymatic removal of paracetamol from aqueous phase: horseradish peroxidase immobilized on nanofibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ran; Si, Yifang; Li, Fengting; Zhang, Bingru

    2015-03-01

    Paracetamol is a widely used as an analgesic and an antipyretic that can easily accumulate in aquatic environments. This study aimed to enhance paracetamol removal efficiency from water by combining the biocatalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the adsorption of nanofibrous membrane. Poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid)/SiO2 electrospinning nanofibrous membrane was prepared with fiber diameters of 200 to 300 nm. The membrane was made insoluble by the thermal cross-linking process. HRP, which was previously activated by 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole, was covalently immobilized on the surface of nanofibers. Immobilized HRP retained 79.4 % of the activity of free HRP. The physical, chemical, and biochemical properties of the immobilized HRP and its application in paracetamol removal were comprehensively investigated. Immobilized HRP showed better storage capability and higher tolerance to the changes in pH and temperature than free HRP. Paracetamol removal rate by immobilized HRP (83.5 %) was similar to that of free HRP (84.4 %), but immobilized HRP showed excellent reusability. The results signify that enzyme immobilized on nanofibers has great application potential in water treatment. PMID:25269844

  11. Sensitive electrochemical detection of horseradish peroxidase at disposable screen-printed carbon electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Tan, Swee-Nign; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-09-10

    A rapid, simple and sensitive electrochemical assay of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) performed on disposable screen-printed carbon electrode was developed. HRP activities were monitored by square-wave voltammetric (SWV) measuring the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of o-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide substrate solution. SWV analysis demonstrated a greater sensitivity and shorter analysis time than the widely used amperometric and differential-pulsed voltammetric methods. The voltammetric characteristics of substrate and enzymatic product as well as the parameters of SWV analysis were optimized. Under optimized conditions, a linear response for HRP from 0.003 - 0.1 U/mL and a detection limit of 0.002 U/mL (1.25×10-15 mol in 25 µL) were obtained with a good precision (RSD = 8%; n = 6). This rapid and sensitive HRP assay with microliters-assay volume could be readily integrated to portable devices and point-of-care (POC) diagnosis applications.

  12. Mechanisms for Covalent Immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase on Ion-Beam-Treated Polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Kondyurin, Alexey V.; Naseri, Pourandokht; Tilley, Jennifer M. R.; Nosworthy, Neil J.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; McKenzie, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The surface of polyethylene was modified by plasma immersion ion implantation. Structure changes including carbonization and oxidation were observed. High surface energy of the modified polyethylene was attributed to the presence of free radicals on the surface. The surface energy decay with storage time after treatment was explained by a decay of the free radical concentration while the concentration of oxygen-containing groups increased with storage time. Horseradish peroxidase was covalently attached onto the modified surface by the reaction with free radicals. Appropriate blocking agents can block this reaction. All aminoacid residues can take part in the covalent attachment process, providing a universal mechanism of attachment for all proteins. The native conformation of attached protein is retained due to hydrophilic interactions in the interface region. The enzymatic activity of covalently attached protein remained high. The long-term activity of the modified layer to attach protein is explained by stabilisation of unpaired electrons in sp2 carbon structures. A high concentration of free radicals can give multiple covalent bonds to the protein molecule and destroy the native conformation and with it the catalytic activity. The universal mechanism of protein attachment to free radicals could be extended to various methods of radiation damage of polymers. PMID:24278665

  13. Effect of ozone and histamine on airway permeability to horseradish peroxidase in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.D.; Gordon, T.; Warnick, M.; Amdur, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    Airway permeability was studied in groups of male guinea pigs at 2, 8, and 24 h after a 1-h exposure to 1 ppm ozone or at 2 h after a 1-h exposure to filtered air (control). Intratracheal administration of 2 mg horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was followed by blood sampling at 5-min intervals up to 30 min. The rate of appearance of HRP in plasma was significantly higher at 2 and 8 h after ozone exposure than that found in animals examined 2 h after air exposure or 24 h after ozone exposure. A dose of 0.12 mg/kg of subcutaneous histamine given after the 15 min blood sample significantly increased the already elevated permeability seen at 2 h post ozone, but had no effect on animals exposed to filtered air 2 h earlier or to ozone 24 h earlier. No difference was seen in the amount of subcutaneous radiolabeled histamine in the lungs of animals exposed 2 h earlier either to air or to ozone. These data indicate that a short-term exposure to ozone produced a reversible increase in respiratory epithelial permeability to HRP in guinea pigs. The potentiation of this increased permeability by histamine may be another manifestation of ozone-induced hyperreactivity.

  14. A genetically engineered fusion protein with horseradish peroxidase as a marker enzyme for use in competitive immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, V; Andreeva, I; Börchers, T; Spener, F; Egorov, A

    2001-03-15

    Horseradish peroxidase is one of the most widely used marker enzymes in immunoassays. Several disadvantages are encountered upon chemical conjugation of peroxidase with antibodies or antigens, as are low reproducibility and undefined stoichiometry. We here describe for the first time the production of a recombinant fusion of a protein analyte with horseradish peroxidase in Escherichia coli, employing refolding of inclusion bodies and reconstitution with heme. The genetic fusion approach enables preparation of conjugates with 1:1 stoichiometry and defined structure. As a protein analyte, the human heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) was chosen, which is a new and sensitive marker for acute myocardial infarction. The recombinant conjugate was fully active [650 U/mg with 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethyl-thiazoline-6-sulfonate) as substrate] and obtained in a yield of 12 mg/L of E. coli culture, which is better than that for recombinant peroxidase alone. The competitive immunoassay that was developed with the recombinant conjugate requires fewer incubation steps than the traditional sandwich ELISA format. It permitted the detection of H-FABP directly in plasma in the range of 10-1500 ng/mL which is the relevant range for clinical decision-making. PMID:11305642

  15. Investigations of Ferric Heme Cyanide Photodissociation in Myoglobin and Horseradish Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weiqiao; Sun, Yuhan; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Champion, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The photodissociation of cyanide from ferric myoglobin (MbCN) and horseradish peroxidase (HRPCN) has been definitively observed. This has implications for the interpretation of ultrafast IR (Helbing et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 87, 1881–1891) and optical (Gruia et al. Biophys. J. 2008, 94, 2252–2268) studies that had previously suggested the Fe-CN bond was photostable in MbCN. The photolysis of ferric MbCN takes place with a quantum yield of ~75% and the resonance Raman spectrum of the photoproduct observed in steady-state experiments as a function of laser power and sample spinning rate is identical to that of ferric Mb (metMb). The data are quantitatively analyzed using a simple model where cyanide is photodissociated and, although geminate rebinding with a rate kBA ≈ (3.6 ps)−1 is the dominant process, some CN− exits from the distal heme pocket and is replaced by water. Using independently determined values for the CN− association rate, we find that the CN− escape rate from the ferric myoglobin pocket to the solution at 293 K is kout ≈ 1–2 × 107 s−1. This value is very similar to, but slightly larger than, the histidine gated escape rate of CO from Mb (1.1×107 s−1) under the same conditions. The analysis leads to an escape probability kout/(kout+kBA) ~ 10−4, which is unobservable in most time domain kinetic measurements. However, the photolysis is surprisingly easy to detect in Mb using cw resonance Raman measurements. This is due to the anomalously slow CN− bimolecular association rate (170 M−1s−1), which arises from the need for water to exchange at the ferric heme binding site of Mb. In contrast, ferric HRP does not have a heme bound water molecule and its CN− bimolecular association rate is larger by ~103 making the CN− photolysis more difficult to observe. PMID:23472676

  16. Horseradish peroxidase localization of sympathetic postganglionic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons innervating the monkey heart.

    PubMed

    Chuang, King-Shun; Liu, Wan-Cherng; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Liu, Jiang-Chuan

    2004-06-30

    The localization of the sympathetic postganglionic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons innervating the monkey heart were investigated through retrograde axonal transport with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP (4 mg or 30 mg) was injected into the subepicardial and myocardial layers in four different cardiac regions. The animals were euthanized 84-96 hours later and fixed by paraformaldehyde perfusion via the left ventricle. The brain stem and the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia from the superior cervical, middle cervical, and stellate ganglia down to the T9 ganglia were removed and processed for HRP identification. Following injection of HRP into the apex of the heart, the sinoatrial nodal region, or the right ventricle, HRP-labeled sympathetic neurons were found exclusively in the right superior cervical ganglion (64.8%) or in the left superior cervical ganglion (35%). Fewer labeled cells were found in the right stellate ganglia. After HRP injection into the left ventricle, labeled sympathetic cells were found chiefly in the left superior cervical ganglion (51%) or in the right superior cervical ganglion (38.6%); a few labeled cells were seen in the stellate ganglion bilaterally and in the left middle cervical ganglion. Also, in response to administration of HRP into the anterior part of the apex, anterior middle part of the right ventricle, posterior upper part of the left ventricle, or sinoatrial nodal region, HRP-labeled parasympathetic neurons were found in the nucleus ambiguus on both the right (74.8%) and left (25.2%) sides. No HRP-labeled cells were found in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus on either side. PMID:15481792

  17. Effects of molecular confinement and crowding on horseradish peroxidase kinetics using a nanofluidic gradient mixer.

    PubMed

    Wichert, William R A; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W

    2016-03-01

    The effects of molecular confinement and crowding on enzyme kinetics were studied at length scales and under conditions similar to those found in biological cells. These experiments were carried out using a nanofluidic network of channels constituting a nanofluidic gradient mixer, providing the basis for measuring multiple experimental conditions simultaneously. The 100 nm × 40 μm nanochannels were wet etched directly into borosilicate glass, then annealed and characterized with fluorescein emission prior to kinetic measurements. The nanofluidic gradient mixer was then used to measure the kinetics of the conversion of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed conversion of non-fluorescent Amplex Red (AR) to the fluorescent product resorufin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The design of the gradient mixer allows reaction kinetics to be studied under multiple (five) unique solution compositions in a single experiment. To characterize the efficiency of the device the effects of confinement on HRP-catalyzed AR conversion kinetics were studied by varying the starting ratio of AR : H2O2. Equimolar concentrations of Amplex Red and H2O2 yielded the highest reaction rates followed by 2 : 1, 1 : 2, 5 : 1, and finally 1 : 5 [AR] : [H2O2]. Under all conditions, initial reaction velocities were decreased by excess H2O2. Crowding effects on kinetics were studied by increasing solution viscosity in the nanochannels in the range 1.0-1.6 cP with sucrose. Increasing the solution viscosities in these confined geometries decreases the initial reaction velocity at the highest concentration from 3.79 μM min(-1) at 1.00 cP to 0.192 μM min(-1) at 1.59 cP. Variations in reaction velocity are interpreted in the context of models for HRP catalysis and for molecular crowding. PMID:26792298

  18. Catalytic activity and thermal stability of horseradish peroxidase encapsulated in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Kim, Youngchan; Bassim, Nabil; Raman, Nisha; Collins, Greg E

    2016-03-21

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was encapsulated in self-assembled lithocholic acid (LCA) based organic nanotubes and its catalytic activity before and after thermal treatment was measured for comparison with free HRP. The apparent kcat (kcat/Km) for nanotube encapsulated HRP remained almost the same before and after thermal treatment, reporting an average value of 3.7 ± 0.4 μM(-1) s(-1). The apparent kcat value for free HRP decreased from 14.8 ± 1.3 μM(-1) s(-1) for samples stored at 4 °C to 2.4 ± 0.1 μM(-1) s(-1) after thermal treatment for 8 h at 55 °C. The Michaelis-Menten constants, Km, determined for encapsulated HRP and free HRP were relatively unperturbed by storage conditions at 4 °C or thermally treated at 55 °C for varying time periods from 2-8 h, with encapsulated HRP having a slightly higher Km than free HRP (13.4 ± 0.9 μM versus 11.7 ± 0.4 μM). The amount of HRP encapsulated in LCA nanotubes increased dramatically when the mixture of HRP and LCA nanotubes was brought to an elevated temperature. Within 4 h of thermal treatment at 55 °C, the amount of HRP encapsulated by the LCA nanotubes was more than 4 times the amount of HRP encapsulated when equilibrated at 4 °C for 7 days. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the higher degree of exposure of hydrophobic residues in HRP at elevated temperatures enhances the hydrophobic interaction between HRP and the nanotube wall, resulting in the increased amount of HRP surface adsorption and, hence, the overall amount of encapsulation inside the nanotubes. PMID:26953357

  19. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on amidoximated acrylic polymer activated by cyanuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed S; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2016-10-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on amidoximated acrylic fabric after being activated with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize fabrics. The maximum immobilization efficiency of HRP (70%) was detected at 4% cyanuric chloride and pH 7.0. The immobilized enzyme retained 45% of its initial activity after ten reuses. The immobilization of enzyme on the carrier is saturated after 6h of incubation time. The pH was shifted from 7.0 for soluble HRP to 7.5-8.0 for the immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP had the same optimum activity at 40°C. The immobilized HRP is more thermal stable than soluble HRP. Substrate analogues were oxidized by immobilized HRP with higher efficiencies than those of soluble HRP. Km values of the soluble HRP and the immobilized HRP were 31 and 37mM for guiacol and 5.0 and 7.8mM for H2O2, respectively. The immobilized HRP had higher efficiency for removal of phenol than that of soluble HRP. The immobilized HRP had higher resistance toward heavy metal ions compared to the soluble enzyme. The immobilized HRP was more stable against high concentration of urea, Triton X-100 and isopropanol. The immobilized HRP exhibited high resistance to proteolysis by trypsin than soluble enzyme. In conclusion, the immobilized HRP could be used as a potential efficient catalyst for the removal of aromatic pollutants from wastewater. PMID:27264646

  20. Tyrosine Coupling Creates a Hyperbranched Multivalent Protein Polymer Using Horseradish Peroxidase via Bipolar Conjugation Points.

    PubMed

    Minamihata, Kosuke; Yamaguchi, Sou; Nakajima, Kei; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2016-05-18

    Protein polymers of covalently cross-linked protein monomers are highly attractive biomaterials because each monomer unit possesses distinct protein functions. Protein polymers often show enhancement effects on the function by integrating a large number of molecules into one macromolecule. The cross-linking site of component proteins should be precisely controlled to avoid diminishing the protein function. However, preparing protein polymers that are cross-linked site-specifically with a high cross-linking degree is a challenge. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of a site-specifically cross-linked protein polymer that has a hyperbranched polymer-like structure with a high cross-linking degree. A horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reaction was used to achieve the protein polymerization through a peptide tag containing a tyrosine residue (Y-tag). Y-tag sequences were introduced to both N- and C-termini of a model protein, protein G. The dual Y-tagged protein G (Y-pG-Y) was treated with HRP to form a Y-pG-Y polymer possessing average and maximum cross-linking degree of approximately 70-mer and 150-mer, respectively. The Y-pG-Y polymer shows the highest cross-linking degree among the protein polymers reported, which are completely soluble in water and cross-linked via covalent bonding. The Y-pG-Y was cross-linked site-specifically at the Tyr residue in the Y-tag, retaining its function, and the Y-pG-Y polymer showed extremely strong avidity against immunoglobulin G. The reactivities of N- and C-terminal Y-tags were evaluated, and we revealed that the difference in the radical formation rate by HRP was the key for yielding highly cross-linked protein polymers. PMID:27093089

  1. Differential activity and structure of highly similar peroxidases. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and enzymatic analyses of lignifying Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase A2 and horseradish peroxidase A2.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K L; Indiani, C; Henriksen, A; Feis, A; Becucci, M; Gajhede, M; Smulevich, G; Welinder, K G

    2001-09-18

    Anionic Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase ATP A2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as a model for the 95% identical commercially available horseradish peroxidase HRP A2. The crystal structure of ATP A2 at 1.45 A resolution at 100 K showed a water molecule only 2.1 A from heme iron [Ostergaard, L., et al. (2000) Plant Mol. Biol. 44, 231-243], whereas spectroscopic studies of HRP A2 in solution at room temperature [Feis, A., et al. (1998) J. Raman Spectrosc. 29, 933-938] showed five-coordinated heme iron, which is common in peroxidases. Presented here, the X-ray crystallographic, single-crystal, and solution resonance Raman studies at room temperature confirmed that the sixth coordination position of heme iron of ATP A2 is essentially vacant. Furthermore, electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the heme environments of recombinant ATP A2 and glycosylated plant HRP A2 are indistinguishable at neutral and alkaline pH, from room temperature to 12 K, and are highly flexible compared with other plant peroxidases. Ostergaard et al. (2000) also demonstrated that ATP A2 expression and lignin formation coincide in Arabidopsis tissues, and docking of lignin precursors into the substrate binding site of ATP A2 predicted that coniferyl and p-coumaryl alcohols were good substrates. In contrast, the additional methoxy group of the sinapyl moiety gave rise to steric hindrance, not only in A2 type peroxidases but also in all peroxidases. We confirm these predictions for ATP A2, HRP A2, and HRP C. The specific activity of ATP A2 was lower than that of HRP A2 (pH 4-8), although a steady-state study at pH 5 demonstrated very little difference in their rate constants for reaction with H2O2 (k1 = 1.0 microM(-1) x s(-1). The oxidation of coniferyl alcohol, ferulic, p-coumaric, and sinapic acids by HRP A2, and ATP A2, however, gave modest but significantly different k3 rate constants of 8.7 +/- 0.3, 4.0 +/- 0.2, 0.70 +/- 0.03, and 0.04 +/- 0.2 microM(-1) x

  2. Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a potential candidate to eliminate intracellular reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Xiuhong; Teng, Xiyao; Yan, Manqing; Bi, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs-HRP) have been synthesized by a NHS/EDC coupling between the amino groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the carboxyl groups on the MMSNs surface. It is found that the immobilized HRP on MMSNs still retain high activity and the MMSNs-HRP can eliminate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells induced by the addition of H2O2 aqueous solution. Further, the fluorescent MMSN-HRP-CD nanoparticles have been prepared by attaching biocompatible, fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) to MMSNs-HRP. We have also investigated the effect of an applied magnetic field on cellular uptake of MMSNs-HRP-CDs and found that the internalization of MMSNs-HRP-CDs by CHO cells could be enhanced within 2 hours under the magnetic field. This work provides us with a novel and efficient method to eliminate ROS in living cells by using HRP-immobilized nanoparticles.Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs-HRP) have been synthesized by a NHS/EDC coupling between the amino groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the carboxyl groups on the MMSNs surface. It is found that the immobilized HRP on MMSNs still retain high activity and the MMSNs-HRP can eliminate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells induced by the addition of H2O2 aqueous solution. Further, the fluorescent MMSN-HRP-CD nanoparticles have been prepared by attaching biocompatible, fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) to MMSNs-HRP. We have also investigated the effect of an applied magnetic field on cellular uptake of MMSNs-HRP-CDs and found that the internalization of MMSNs-HRP-CDs by CHO cells could be enhanced within 2 hours under the magnetic field. This work provides us with a novel and efficient method to eliminate ROS in living cells by using HRP-immobilized nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM image of CDs, BET XRD

  3. A fluorescence approach to the unfolding thermodynamics of horseradish peroxidase based on heme degradation by hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhigang; Ma, Shanshan; Li, Lamei; Huang, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is a classical heme-containing protein which has been applied in many fields. The prosthetic group heme in HRP, especially in unfolded state, can react with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to produce a fluorescent product with the maximum emission wavelength at 450 nm. Utilizing this emission band as a fluorescence probe, the unfolding process of HRP in urea can be assessed quantitatively, and the calculated thermodynamic parameters are consistent with those determined by circular dichroism (CD) at 222 nm and steady-state tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence methods.

  4. Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase. 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Modi, S; Behere, D V; Mitra, S

    1989-11-25

    Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was investigated by relaxation rate measurements (at 50.68 MHz) of the 15N resonance of thiocyanate nitrogen and by following the hyperfine shifted ring methyl proton resonances (at 500 MHz) of the heme group of SCN-.HRP solutions. At pH 4.0, the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for thiocyanate binding to HRP was deduced to be 158 mM from the relaxation rate measurements. Chemical shift changes of 1- and 8-ring methyl proton resonances in the presence of various amounts of thiocyanate at pH 4.0 yielded KD values of 166 and 136 mM, respectively. From the pH dependence of KD and the 15N resonance line width, it was observed that thiocyanate binds to HRP only under acidic conditions (pH less than 6). The binding was found to be facilitated by protonation of an acid group on the enzyme with pKa 4.0. The pH dependence of the 15N line width as well as the apparent dissociation constant were quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a reaction scheme in which thiocyanate in deprotonated ionic form binds to the enzyme in protonated acidic form. The KD for thiocyanate binding to HRP was also evaluated in the presence of an excess of exogenous substrates such as resorcinol, cyanide, and iodide ions. It was found that the presence of cyanide (which binds to heme iron at the sixth coordination position) and resorcinol did not have any effect on the binding of thiocyanate, indicating that the binding site of the thiocyanate ion is located away from the ferric center as well as from the aromatic donor binding site. The KD in the presence of iodide, however, showed that iodide competes with thiocyanate for binding at the same site. The distance of the bound thiocyanate ion from the ferric center was deduced from the 15N relaxation time measurements and was found to be a 6.8 A. From the distance as well as the change in the chemical shifts and line width of 1- and 8-methyl proton resonances, it is suggested that the

  5. Nature of the inhibition of horseradish peroxidase and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase by cyanyl radical.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y R; Deterding, L J; Tomer, K B; Mason, R P

    2000-04-18

    Previous studies established that the cyanyl radical ((*)CN), detected as 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO)/(*)CN by the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique, can be generated by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) in the absence of H(2)O(2). To investigate the mechanism of inhibition by cyanyl radical, we isolated and characterized the iron protoporphyrin IX and heme a from the reactions of CN(-) with HRP and CcO, respectively. The purified heme from the reaction mixture of HRP/H(2)O(2)/KCN was unambiguously identified as cyanoheme by the observation of the protonated molecule, (M + H)(+), of m/z = 642.9 in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrum. The proton NMR spectrum of the bipyridyl ferrous cyanoheme complex revealed that one of the four meso protons was missing and had been replaced with a cyanyl group, indicating that the single, heme-derived product was meso-cyanoheme. The holoenzyme of HRP from the reconstitution of meso-cyanoheme with the apoenzyme of HRP (apoHRP) showed no detectable catalytic activity. The Soret peak of cyanoheme-reconstituted apoHRP was shifted to 411 nm from the 403 nm peak of native HRP. In contrast, the heme a isolated from partially or fully inhibited CcO did not show any change in the structure of the protoporphyrin IX as indicated by its MALDI mass spectrum, which showed an (M + H)(+) of m/z = 853.6, and by its pyridine hemochromogen spectrum. However, a protein-centered radical on the CcO can be detected in the reaction of CcO with cyanide and was identified as the thiyl radical(s) based on inhibition of its formation by N-ethylmaleimide pretreatment, suggesting that the protein matrix rather than protoporphyrin IX was attacked by the cyanyl radical. In addition to the difference in heme structures between HRP and CcO, the available crystallographic data also suggested that the distinct

  6. Which one of the two common reporter systems is more suitable for chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay: alkaline phosphatase or horseradish peroxidase?

    PubMed

    Yu, Songcheng; Yu, Fei; Liu, Lie; Zhang, Hongquan; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Qu, Lingbo; Wu, Yongjun

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase and horseradish peroxidase are the most commonly used reporter systems in chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA). Which one, therefore, would be better when establishing a CLEIA method for a new target substance? There was no standard answer. In this study, both reporters were compared systematically including luminescence kinetics, conjugation methods, optimal condition and detection performance, using two common drugs, SD-methoxy-pyrimidine and enrofloxacin, as determination objects. The results revealed that there was much difference between the luminescence kinetics of the two systems. However, there was little difference between these systems when detecting the same substance, including in optimal conditions and determination of performance. Both reporters were suitable for establishing chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassays. Therefore, the choice of alkaline phosphatase or horseradish peroxidase as the reporter system in chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassays depends on availability. Conversely, these two report systems could be applied in simultaneous analysis of multicomponents due to their different optical behaviors and similar performances. But attention should be paid to conjugation method and coating buffer, which affected the luminescent intensity of different determination targets. PMID:26552992

  7. An Amperometric Biosensor Utilizing a Ferrocene-Mediated Horseradish Peroxidase Reaction for the Determination of Capsaicin (Chili Hotness)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Rosmawani; Ahmad, Musa; Heng, Lee Yook

    2013-01-01

    Chili hotness is very much dependent on the concentration of capsaicin present in the chili fruit. A new biosensor based on a horseradish peroxidase enzyme-capsaicin reaction mediated by ferrocene has been successfully developed for the amperometric determination of chili hotness. The amperometric biosensor is fabricated based on a single-step immobilization of both ferrocene and horseradish peroxidase in a photocurable hydrogel membrane, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). With mediation by ferrocene, the biosensor could measure capsaicin concentrations at a potential 0.22 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), which prevented potential interference from other electroactive species in the sample. Thus a good selectivity towards capsaicin was demonstrated. The linear response range of the biosensor towards capsaicin was from 2.5–99.0 μM with detection limit of 1.94 μM. A good relative standard deviation (RSD) for reproducibility of 6.4%–9.9% was obtained. The capsaicin biosensor demonstrated long-term stability for up to seven months. The performance of the biosensor has been validated using a standard method for the analysis of capsaicin based on HPLC. PMID:23921830

  8. Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a potential candidate to eliminate intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Xiuhong; Teng, Xiyao; Yan, Manqing; Bi, Hong

    2015-02-21

    Horseradish peroxidase-immobilized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs-HRP) have been synthesized by a NHS/EDC coupling between the amino groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the carboxyl groups on the MMSNs surface. It is found that the immobilized HRP on MMSNs still retain high activity and the MMSNs-HRP can eliminate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells induced by the addition of H2O2 aqueous solution. Further, the fluorescent MMSN-HRP-CD nanoparticles have been prepared by attaching biocompatible, fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) to MMSNs-HRP. We have also investigated the effect of an applied magnetic field on cellular uptake of MMSNs-HRP-CDs and found that the internalization of MMSNs-HRP-CDs by CHO cells could be enhanced within 2 hours under the magnetic field. This work provides us with a novel and efficient method to eliminate ROS in living cells by using HRP-immobilized nanoparticles. PMID:25587910

  9. Application of horse-radish peroxidase linked chemiluminescence to determine the production mechanism of Shiga-like toxins by E. coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sandwiched immunoassay consisting of toxin capture by immunomagnetic beads (IMB) and toxin detection by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) linked chemiluminescence was used to follow the production of Shiga-like toxins (SLT) by E. coli O157:H7. The intensity of luminescence generated by the oxidation o...

  10. A split horseradish peroxidase for the detection of intercellular protein-protein interactions and sensitive visualization of synapses.

    PubMed

    Martell, Jeffrey D; Yamagata, Masahito; Deerinck, Thomas J; Phan, Sébastien; Kwa, Carolyn G; Ellisman, Mark H; Sanes, Joshua R; Ting, Alice Y

    2016-07-01

    Intercellular protein-protein interactions (PPIs) enable communication between cells in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, immune responses, infection, and synaptic transmission, but they are challenging to visualize because existing techniques have insufficient sensitivity and/or specificity. Here we report a split horseradish peroxidase (sHRP) as a sensitive and specific tool for the detection of intercellular PPIs. The two sHRP fragments, engineered through screening of 17 cut sites in HRP followed by directed evolution, reconstitute into an active form when driven together by an intercellular PPI, producing bright fluorescence or contrast for electron microscopy. Fusing the sHRP fragments to the proteins neurexin (NRX) and neuroligin (NLG), which bind each other across the synaptic cleft, enabled sensitive visualization of synapses between specific sets of neurons, including two classes of synapses in the mouse visual system. sHRP should be widely applicable to studying mechanisms of communication between a variety of cell types. PMID:27240195

  11. Measuring hydrogen peroxide due to water radiolysis using a modified horseradish peroxidase based biosensor as an alternative dosimetry method.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Hassan; Baghbanan, Amin Azam

    2015-08-01

    H2O2 generated during water radiolysis was measured electrochemically as an alternative dosimetry method. A biosensor was fabricated by immobilising modified horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) followed by evaluation of its analytical parameters. Anthraquinone 2-carboxylic acid was used to modify HRP. To assess sensor performance, phosphate buffer solutions were irradiated with 0.510 Gy of gamma ray emitted from (60)Co. The results showed that this sensor can detect low quantities of hydrogen peroxide in water radiolysis. Sensitivity, detection limit and linear range of the biosensor were 260 nA/Gy, 0.392 Gy and 0.5-5 Gy, respectively. Long term stability studies showed that sensor responses were stable for at least a month. The cathodic peak current, as biosensor response, subsequently decreased to 20% of its initial value. PMID:25880374

  12. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase in phospholipid-templated titania and its applications in phenolic compounds and dye removal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjun; Tang, Wei; Gao, Jing; Zhou, Liya; He, Ying

    2014-02-01

    In this study, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was encapsulated in phospholipid-templated titania particles through the biomimetic titanification process and used for the treatment of wastewater polluted with phenolic compounds and dye. The encapsulated HRP exhibited improved thermal stability, a wide range of pH stability and high tolerance against inactivating agents. It was observed an increase in Km value for the encapsulated HRP (8.21 mM) when compared with its free counterpart. For practical applications in the removal of phenolic compounds and dye by the encapsulated HRP, the removal efficiency for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, Direct Black-38 were 92.99%, 87.97%, and 79.72%, respectively, in the first treatment cycle. Additionally, the encapsulated HRP showed better removal efficiency than free HRP and a moderately good capability of reutilization. PMID:24411438

  13. Evaluation of density functional theory methods for the electronic interactions between indole and substituted benzene: Applications to horseradish peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sickle, Karina; Culberson, Lori Marie; Holzmacher, Jeremy Levin; Cafiero, Mauricio

    In an effort to evaluate and design fast, accurate density functional theory (DFT) methods for calculating electrostatic and dispersion interactions between proteins and ligands, we have set up a model system examining interactions between mono-substituted benzene and indole in seven different stable conformations. We first optimized the geometries of the monomers at the B3LYP/6-31G level, and then scanned the potential curves with MP2, HF, B3LYP, SVWN, and HCTH407 [all at the 6-311++G(d,p) level] to find the optimum separation. We used the approximate counterpoise method to calculate the basis set superposition error-corrected interaction energies at the optimum geometries. We then applied these methods to the interactions between aromatic active site residues of horseradish peroxidase C with indole-3-propionic acid at two different binding sites.

  14. Comparison of cattle and sheep colonic permeabilities to horseradish peroxidase and hamster scrapie prion protein in vitro

    PubMed Central

    McKie, A; Zammit, P; Naftalin, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Paracellular permeability to solutes across the descending colon is much higher in cattle than sheep. This is a possible route for transmission of infective materials, such as scrapie prion.
AIMS—To compare the permeabilities of labelled scrapie prion protein and other macromolecules in bovine and ovine descending colons in vitro.
METHODS—Using fresh slaughterhouse material, transepithelial fluxes of macromolecules across colonic mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers were measured by monitoring transport of either enzyme activity or radioactivity.
RESULTS—The comparative bovine to ovine permeability ratio of the probes increased with molecular weight: from 3.1 (0.13) for PEG400 to 10.67 (0.20) (p<0.001) for PEG4000; and from 1.64 (0.17) for microperoxidase to 7.03 (0.20) (p<0.001) for horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The permeability of 125I-labelled inactivated Syrian hamster scrapie prion protein (ShaPrPsc) was 7.02 (0.33)-fold higher in bovine than ovine colon (p<0.0025). In each species, the probe permeabilities decreased according to the formula: P = Po.exp(−K.ra). The "ideal" permeabilities, Po are similar, however, K(ovine) = 2.46 (0.20) cm/h/nm exceeds K(bovine) = 0.85 (0.15) cm/h/nm (p<0.001) indicating that bovine colon has a higher proportion of wide pores than ovine. Image analysis confirmed that HRP permeated through the bovine mucosal layer via a pericryptal paracellular route much more rapidly than in sheep.
CONCLUSIONS—These data may imply that scrapie prion is transmitted in vivo more easily across the low resistance bovine colonic barrier than in other species.


Keywords: cattle; sheep; colon; paracellular permeability; horseradish peroxidase; hamster scrapie prion protein PMID:10562587

  15. The Endogenous Calcium Ions of Horseradish Peroxidase C Are Required to Maintain the Functional Nonplanarity of the Heme

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, Monique; Huang, Qing; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Fidy, Judit

    2003-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase C (HRPC) binds 2 mol calcium per mol of enzyme with binding sites located distal and proximal to the heme group. The effect of calcium depletion on the conformation of the heme was investigated by combining polarized resonance Raman dispersion spectroscopy with normal coordinate structural decomposition analysis of the hemes extracted from models of Ca2+-bound and Ca2+-depleted HRPC generated and equilibrated using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that calcium removal causes reorientation of heme pocket residues. We propose that these rearrangements significantly affect both the in-plane and out-of-plane deformations of the heme. Analysis of the experimental depolarization ratios are clearly consistent with increased B1g- and B2g-type distortions in the Ca2+-depleted species while the normal coordinate structural decomposition results are indicative of increased planarity for the heme of Ca2+-depleted HRPC and of significant changes in the relative contributions of three of the six lowest frequency deformations. Most noteworthy is the decrease of the strong saddling deformation that is typical of all peroxidases, and an increase in ruffling. Our results confirm previous work proposing that calcium is required to maintain the structural integrity of the heme in that we show that the preferred geometry for catalysis is lost upon calcium depletion. PMID:12668462

  16. An efficient proton-coupled electron-transfer process during oxidation of ferulic acid by horseradish peroxidase: coming full cycle.

    PubMed

    Derat, Etienne; Shaik, Sason

    2006-10-25

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations were utilized to study the process of oxidation of a native substrate (ferulic acid) by the active species of horseradish peroxidase (Dunford, H. B. Heme Peroxidases; Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999), Compound I and Compound II, and the manner by which the enzyme returns to its resting state. The results match experimental findings and reveal additional novel features. The calculations demonstrate that both oxidation processes are initiated by a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step, in which the active species of the enzyme participate only as electron-transfer partners, while the entire proton-transfer event is being relayed from the substrate to and from the His42 residue by a water molecule (W402). The reason for the observed (Henriksen, A; Smith, A. T.; Gajhede, M. J. Biol. Chem. 1999, 274, 35005-35011) similar reactivities of Compound I and Compound II toward ferulic acid is that the reactive isomer of Compound II is the, hitherto unobserved, Por(*)(+)Fe(III)OH isomer that resembles Compound I. The PCET mechanism reveals that His42 and W402 are crucial moieties and they determine the function of the HRP enzyme and account for its ability to perform substrate oxidation (Poulos, T. L. Peroxidases and Cytochrome P450. In The Porphyrin Handbook; Kadish, K. M., Smith, K. M., Guilard, R., Eds.; Academic Press: New York, 2000; Vol. 4, pp 189). In view of the results, the possibility of manipulating substrate oxidation by magnetic fields is an intriguing possibility. PMID:17044722

  17. Ultra-High-Throughput Screening of an In Vitro-Synthesized Horseradish Peroxidase Displayed on Microbeads Using Cell Sorter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Mizoguchi, Takuro; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The C1a isoenzyme of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is an industrially important heme-containing enzyme that utilizes hydrogen peroxide to oxidize a wide variety of inorganic and organic compounds for practical applications, including synthesis of fine chemicals, medical diagnostics, and bioremediation. To develop a ultra-high-throughput screening system for HRP, we successfully produced active HRP in an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system, by adding disulfide bond isomerase DsbC and optimizing the concentrations of hemin and calcium ions and the temperature. The biosynthesized HRP was fused with a single-chain Cro (scCro) DNA-binding tag at its N-terminal and C-terminal sites. The addition of the scCro-tag at both ends increased the solubility of the protein. Next, HRP and its fusion proteins were successfully synthesized in a water droplet emulsion by using hexadecane as the oil phase and SunSoft No. 818SK as the surfactant. HRP fusion proteins were displayed on microbeads attached with double-stranded DNA (containing the scCro binding sequence) via scCro-DNA interactions. The activities of the immobilized HRP fusion proteins were detected with a tyramide-based fluorogenic assay using flow cytometry. Moreover, a model microbead library containing wild type hrp (WT) and inactive mutant (MUT) genes was screened using fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, thus efficiently enriching the WT gene from the 1:100 (WT:MUT) library. The technique described here could serve as a novel platform for the ultra-high-throughput discovery of more useful HRP mutants and other heme-containing peroxidases. PMID:25993095

  18. Oxidation of 4-bromophenol by the recombinant fused protein cellulose-binding domain-horseradish peroxidase immobilized on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilan; Ward, Gary; Hadar, Yitzhak; Shoseyov, Oded; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2003-04-20

    A fused protein consisting of cellulose-binding domain (CBD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. Refolded recombinant CBD-HRP (95% recovery yield) was bound to microcrystalline cellulose and applied for the oxidation of a model toxic phenol, 4-bromophenol (BP). Oxidation of BP by CBD-HRP resulted in the formation of dimers to pentamers as evidenced by mass spectrometry analysis. When immobilized, the vast majority of the oxidation products adsorbed to the cellulose matrix. CBD-HRP (0.75 pyrogallol units) bound to 0.1 g cellulose was packed in a column, connected to an HPLC pump and monitoring system, and column performance and capacity were studied under various operating conditions. When performance was studied as a function of BP loading rate at a constant H(2)O(2) loading rate of 1500 nmol/min, V(app) (max) and K(m) (app) were calculated to be 5.29 +/- 0.46 micromol mL min and 644.9 +/- 114.3 microM, respectively. Immobilized CBD-HRP exhibited enhanced stability to H(2)O(2) and oxidized considerably more BP than free CBD-HRP. Inclusion of gelatin, which suppresses product-dependent inactivation, further increased the amount of BP oxidation. These findings may have potential impact in terms of enzyme supply in high-rate treatment of wastewater contaminated with toxic phenols, since the susceptibility of peroxidases to both H(2)O(2) - and product-dependent inactivation demands continuous supply of fresh enzyme. PMID:12584764

  19. Enhanced chemiluminescence of CdTe quantum dots-H2O2 by horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junli; Li, Baoxin

    In this study, it was found that horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme could effectively enhance the CL emission of CdTe quantum dots (QDs)-H2O2 system, whereas HRP could not enhance the CL intensity. The CL enhancement mechanism was investigated, and the CL enhancement was supposed to originate from the catalysis of HRP-mimicking DNAzyme on the CL reaction between CdTe QDs and H2O2. Meantime, compared with CdTe QDs-H2O2 CL system, H2O2 concentration was markedly decreased in QDs-H2O2-HRP-mimicking DNAzyme CL system, improving the stability of QDs-H2O2 CL system. The QDs-based CL system was used to detect sensitively CdTe QDs and HRP-mimicking DNAzyme (as biologic labels). This work gives a path for enhancing CL efficiency of QDs system, and will be helpful to promote the step of QDs application in various fields such as bioassay and trace detection of analyte.

  20. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-loaded silica-poly(acrylic acid) brushes for protein biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Yiqun; Kong, Rongmei; Xia, Lian; Qu, Fengli

    2016-01-15

    We report an ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor designed for the detection of protein biomarkers using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-loaded silica-poly(acrylic acid) brushes (SiO2-SPAABs) as labels. HRP could be efficiently and stably accommodated in the three-dimensional architecture of the SiO2-SPAABs and the SiO2-SPAABs-HRP exhibited high catalytic performance towards o-phenylenediamine (OPD) oxidation in the presence of H2O2, which resulted in significant differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) response change and color change. Using human IgG (HIgG) as a model analyte, a sandwich-type immunosensor was constructed. In particular, graphene oxide (GO) and SiO2-SPAABs-HRP were used to immobilize capture antibody (Ab1) and bind a layer of detection antibody (Ab2), respectively. The current biosensor exhibited a good linear response of HIgG from 100pg/mL to 100μg/mL with a detection limit of 50pg/mL (S/N=5). The sensitivity was 6.70-fold higher than the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The immunosensor results were validated through the detection of HIgG in serum samples. PMID:26342574

  1. An amperometric biosensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotube-poly(pyrrole)-horseradish peroxidase nanobiocomposite film for determination of phenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Seyda; Keskinler, Bulent; Erhan, Elif

    2008-09-15

    An amperometric biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and carbon nanotube (CNT)/polypyrrole (PPy) nanobiocomposite film on a gold surface has been developed. The HRP was incorporated into the CNT/PPy nanocomposite matrix in one-step electropolymerization process without the aid of cross-linking agent. Amperometric response was measured as a function of concentration of phenol derivatives, at a fixed bias voltage of -50 mV. Optimization of the experimental parameters was performed with regard to pH and concentration of hydrogen peroxide. The linear range, sensitivity and detection limit of the biosensor were investigated for eighteen phenol derivatives. The sensitivity in the linear range increased in this order: 4-methoxyphenol>2-aminophenol>guaiacol=m-cresol>2-chlorophenol=4-chlorophenol=hydroquinone=pyrocatechol>2,6-dimethoxyphenol>3-chlorophenol>p-cresol>p-benzoquinone=4-acetamidophenol>catechol>phenol=pyrogallol=2,4-dimethylphenol. CNTs was shown to enhance the electron transfer as a mediator and capable to carry higher bioactivity owing to its intensified surface area. The biosensor exhibited low detection limits with a short response time (2s) for the tested phenolics compared to the reported working electrodes. It retained 70% of its initial activity after using for 700 measurements in 1 month. PMID:18761169

  2. Catalytic activity and stability of glucose oxidase/horseradish peroxidase co-confined in macroporous silica foam.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodong; Li, Ying; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Jiachao; Qian, Jing; Liu, Songqin

    2012-12-21

    Investigation of the catalytic activity and stability of enzymes in confined nano/microspace provides valuable contributions to the fundamental understanding of biological reactions taking place on a mesoscopic scale within confined spaces. In this paper, macroporous silica foam (MSF) is used as a nanoreactor to co-confine glucose oxidase (GOD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Then, the enzymatic cascade reactions, which act in tandem inside nanoreactors, for oxidation of glucose and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) were studied. The catalytic kinetic parameters of apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)(app)) and maximum rate (V(max)) were obtained from Lineweaver-Burk plot by UV-vis spectrometry. Results showed that the catalytic activity of the co-confined enzymes is reduced compared to that of free enzymes in solution at room temperature. The stabilities of co-confined enzymes in denaturing agents, such as guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and urea, were higher than those of free enzymes in solution. When employing a co-confined bienzyme system as a biosensor for the detection of glucose, a wider linear range of glucose was obtained for the co-confined bienzyme system than for free enzymes in solution. PMID:23096254

  3. Combining Protein and Strain Engineering for the Production of Glyco-Engineered Horseradish Peroxidase C1A in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Simona; Ćorajević, Lejla; Bonifert, Günther; Murth, Patrick; Maresch, Daniel; Altmann, Friedrich; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP), conjugated to antibodies and lectins, is widely used in medical diagnostics. Since recombinant production of the enzyme is difficult, HRP isolated from plant is used for these applications. Production in the yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris), the most promising recombinant production platform to date, causes hyperglycosylation of HRP, which in turn complicates conjugation to antibodies and lectins. In this study we combined protein and strain engineering to obtain an active and stable HRP variant with reduced surface glycosylation. We combined four mutations, each being beneficial for either catalytic activity or thermal stability, and expressed this enzyme variant as well as the unmutated wildtype enzyme in both a P. pastoris benchmark strain and a strain where the native α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) was knocked out. Considering productivity in the bioreactor as well as enzyme activity and thermal stability, the mutated HRP variant produced in the P. pastoris benchmark strain turned out to be interesting for medical diagnostics. This variant shows considerable catalytic activity and thermal stability and is less glycosylated, which might allow more controlled and efficient conjugation to antibodies and lectins. PMID:26404235

  4. A novel glutathione-S transferase immunosensor based on horseradish peroxidase and double-layer gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dingqiang; Lu, Fuping; Pang, Guangchang

    2016-06-01

    GSTs, a biotransformation enzyme group, can perform metabolism, drug transfer and detoxification functions. Rapid detection of the GSTs with more sensitive approaches is of great importance. In the current study, a novel double-layer gold nanoparticles-electrochemical immunosensor electrode (DGN-EIE) immobilized with Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) antibody derived from Balb/c mice was developed. To increase the fixed quantity of antibodies and electrochemical signal, an electrochemical biosensing signal amplification system was utilized with gold nanoparticles-thionine-chitosan absorbing horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In addition, transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to characterize the nanogold solution. To evaluate the quality of DGN-EIE, the amperometric I-t curve method was applied to determine the GST in PBS. The results showed that the response current had a good linear correlation with the GST concentration ranged from 0.1-10(4) pg/mL. The lowest detection limit was found at 0.03 pg/mL(S/N = 3). The linear equation was deduced as △I/% = 7.386lgC + 22.36 (R(2) = 0.998). Moreover, it was validated with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Apparently, DGN-EIE may be a very useful tool for monitoring the GST. PMID:27220630

  5. Influence of iodothyronine conjugates of bovine serum albumin and horseradish peroxidase on enzyme immunosorbent assay of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Kumari, G Lakshmi; Kumar, Sachin; Gupta, Satish; Saini, Anuradha; Sharma, Sudesh K; Kaur, Navneet

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA's) reported for thyroxine (T₄) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T₃), involved coupling of the haptens through (i) carboxylic group to carrier protein for producing antibodies and (ii) amino group to detection labels. To improve the titer and specificity of antibodies, immunogens were prepared by coupling of carboxyl group to bovine serum albumin (BSA) either directly or through adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH), after protecting amino group through acetylation of T₄ and T₃. Direct coupling resulted in the incorporation of 40-50 moles of T₄ and T₃ per BSA molecule and helped in improving immunogenic response and specificity, especially of T₄. High epitope density of immunogens evoked better antibody response, since attachement of ADH as spacer, introduced 18-27 moles of haptens into carrier protein and had less effect on antibody development, with T₃ being exception. Detection labels were prepared by coupling horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to amino group of thyroid hormones directly and after preparing their methyl esters, which provided sensitive displacement curves in combination with the antibodies developed against N-acetylated-T₄ and T₃. Unlike methyl esters, T₄-HRP and T₃-HRP showed higher sensitivity and seemed to be related to the affinity of the labels for binding the antibody. PMID:24295178

  6. Selective determination of phenols and aromatic amines based on horseradish peroxidase-nanoporous gold co-catalytic strategy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Liu, Zhuang; Sun, Huihui; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2016-05-15

    Aromatic compounds, such as phenols and aromatic amines, are environmental contaminants suspected of posing human health risks. For phenols and aromatic amines reliable detection, promoting selectivity and sensitivity for phenols and aromatic amines is crucial in biosensor design. Here, a biosensor combined the advantages of both enzymatic and nonenzymatic electrochemical sensors is constructed. Nanoporous gold (NPG) is selected as an enzyme carrier for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) biosensor fabrication due to its three-dimension structure with unique properties. It is firstly discovered that NPG can achieve selective oxidation for phenols and aromatic amines. Thus, the electrochemical reaction on the resulting HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode is attributed to the co-catalysis of HRP and NPG. For the detection of catechol (Cat), 4-aminophenol (p-AP), o-phenylenediamine (o-PD), and p-phenylenediamine (p-PD), linear responses are observed in large concentration ranges with high sensitivities and low detection limits. Further, the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode presents strong reproducibility, specificity, selectivity and anti-interference capability in detecting the mixture of phenols and aromatic amines along with a long shelf-life, and the real sea water sample analysis was achieved. These unique properties make the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode an excellent choice for phenols and aromatic amines reliable detection. PMID:26780372

  7. Localisation of motoneurons supplying the extra-ocular muscles of the rat using horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent double labelling.

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira Garcia, J L; Gomez Segade, L A; Suarez Nuñez, J M

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a qualitative and quantitative investigation into the location of the motoneurons innervating the extra-ocular muscles of the rat. Injections of horseradish peroxidase, bisbenzimide, propidium iodide and DAPI-primuline were made either in one or simultaneously in two muscles. Unlike those of the cat, rabbit and monkey, the motoneurons which make up the oculomotor nucleus of the rat are not arranged in spatially separate subgroups belonging each to its corresponding extra-ocular muscle, but instead allow a high degree of superposition among the motor pools which they compose. The motoneurons innervating the lateral rectus and inferior oblique muscles are all homolateral; those of the medial and inferior rectus muscles are mainly homolateral with a few contralateral exceptions; and those of the superior rectus, levator palpebrae and superior oblique muscles are mainly contralateral with a small minority of homolateral exceptions. As well as from the main motor pools with which they are associated, the medial rectus, inferior rectus, superior rectus, levator palpebrae, superior oblique and lateral rectus muscles all receive innervation from motoneurons lying among the fibres of the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis. All these observations are supported by quantitative data. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6195140

  8. Antibody-targeted horseradish peroxidase associated with indole-3-acetic acid induces apoptosis in vitro in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dalmazzo, Leandro F F; Santana-Lemos, Bárbara A; Jácomo, Rafael H; Garcia, Aglair B; Rego, Eduardo M; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Falcão, Roberto P

    2011-05-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), when oxidized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), is transformed into cytotoxic molecules capable of inducing cell injury. The aim of this study was to test if, by targeting hematopoietic tumors with HRP-conjugated antibodies in association with IAA treatment, there is induction of apoptosis. We used two lineages of hematologic tumors: NB4, derived from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and Granta-519 from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We also tested cells from 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and from 10 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). HRP targeting was performed with anti-CD33 or anti-CD19 antibodies (depending on the origin of the cell), followed by incubation with goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with HRP. Eight experimental groups were analyzed: control, HRP targeted, HRP targeted and incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA, and cells not HRP targeted but incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide labeling. Results showed that apoptosis was dependent on the dose of IAA utilized, the duration of exposure to the prodrug and the origin of the neoplasia. Targeting HRP with antibodies was efficient in activating IAA and inducing apoptosis. PMID:21168913

  9. Electrochemical immunosensor for α-fetoprotein detection using ferroferric oxide and horseradish peroxidase as signal amplification labels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Li, Xiaojian; Mao, Kexia; Li, Yan; Du, Bin; Zhang, Yihe; Wei, Qin

    2014-11-15

    An electrochemical immunosensor for quantitative detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP) in human serum was developed using graphene sheets (GS) and thionine (TH) as electrode materials and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) loaded with ferroferric oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as labels for signal amplification. In this study, the compound of GS and TH (GS-TH) was used as a substrate for promoting electron transfer and immobilization of primary antibody of AFP (Ab1). MSNs were used as a carrier for immobilization of secondary antibody of AFP (Ab2), Fe3O4, and HRP. The synergistic effect occurred between Fe3O4 and HRP and greatly improved the sensitivity of the immunosensor. This method could detect AFP over a wide concentration range from 0.01 to 25 ng ml(-1) with a detection limit of 4 pg ml(-1). This strategy may find wide potential application in clinical analysis or detection of other tumor markers. PMID:25168193

  10. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed formation of hydrogels from chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) derivatives both possessing phenolic hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Khanmohammadi, Mehdi; Khoshfetrat, Ali Baradar; Taya, Masahito

    2014-10-13

    Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed cross-linking was applied to prepare hydrogels from aqueous solutions containing chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) derivatives both possessing phenolic hydroxyl groups (denoted as Ph-chitosan and Ph-PVA, respectively). Comparing the hydrogels prepared from the solution of 1.0% (w/v) Ph-chitosan and 3.0% (w/v) Ph-PVA and that of 3.0% (w/v) Ph-chitosan and 1.0% (w/v) Ph-PVA, the gelation time of the former hydrogel was 47 s, while was 10s longer than that of the latter one. The breaking point for the former hydrogel under stretching (114% strain) was approximately twice larger than that for the latter one. The swelling ratio of the former hydrogel in saline was about half of the latter one. Fibroblastic cells did not adhere on the former hydrogel but adhered and spread on the latter one. The growth of Escherichia coli cells was fully suppressed on the latter hydrogel during 48 h cultivation. PMID:25037368

  11. Evaluation of textile dye degradation due to the combined action of enzyme horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A R; da Costa, R S; Yokoyama, L; Alhadeff, E M; Teixeira, L A C

    2014-12-01

    The kinetic parameters of the oxidant action of the combination of enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with hydrogen peroxide in the degradation of methylene blue dye were investigated. Twenty-one percent of color removal was obtained at pH 5.0 and temperature of 30 °C. Under these conditions, the kinetic parameters K m and V max of enzymatic reactions were determined for hydrogen peroxide in the absence of methylene blue dye (K m = 17.3 mM; V max = 1.97 mM/min) and in the presence of methylene blue dye (K m = 0.27 mM, V max = 0.29 μM/min). By means of analysis of phosphorescence, the presence of reactive oxygen species was detected in the form of singlet oxygen through the redox reaction between HRP and hydrogen peroxide. The existence of this reactive species is directly dependent on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the aqueous solution. PMID:25248990

  12. Horseradish peroxidase and aptamer dual-functionalized nanoprobe for the amplification detection of alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yongyi; Zheng, Aixian; Wu, Jing; Cai, Zhixiong; Huang, Aimin; Liu, Xiaolong

    2015-10-29

    Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) is over-expressed in many cancer types and can serve as a novel diagnostic biomarker. Development of convenient and sensitive detection methods of AMACR is of particular importance for cancer diagnosis. Aptamers are a type of recognition elements, which possess many advantages over antibody, making them suitable for applications in biosensing and biotechnology. In this work, we use the efficient surface modification of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to prepare the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and aptamer dual-functionalized nanoprobe. The immobilization of HRP and thiol-terminated aptamer on the surface of AuNPs can be achieved through electrostatic interaction and the formation of Au-S bond, respectively. This nanoprobe, which is used as discriminating and catalytic probe, can be combined with enzyme immunoassay method to increase the detection sensitivity of AMACR. The detection limit can reach as low as 4.6 pg mL(-1) due to the dual signal amplification from enzymatic cycling and the high loading of enzymes on AuNPs. This sensitivity is about three orders of magnitude higher than that of AMACR aptamer based fluorescence method, which is also comparable to or one order of magnitude higher than that of ELISA. Furthermore, this method is more simple and effective, which not only avoids the conjugation between recognition element and the catalytic enzyme, but also achieves greater signal amplification. This assay could be used as a sensitive and selective platform for the detection of target protein. PMID:26547498

  13. Enhanced chemiluminescence of CdTe quantum dots-H₂O₂ by horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Li, Baoxin

    2014-05-01

    In this study, it was found that horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme could effectively enhance the CL emission of CdTe quantum dots (QDs)-H2O2 system, whereas HRP could not enhance the CL intensity. The CL enhancement mechanism was investigated, and the CL enhancement was supposed to originate from the catalysis of HRP-mimicking DNAzyme on the CL reaction between CdTe QDs and H2O2. Meantime, compared with CdTe QDs-H2O2 CL system, H2O2 concentration was markedly decreased in QDs-H2O2-HRP-mimicking DNAzyme CL system, improving the stability of QDs-H2O2 CL system. The QDs-based CL system was used to detect sensitively CdTe QDs and HRP-mimicking DNAzyme (as biologic labels). This work gives a path for enhancing CL efficiency of QDs system, and will be helpful to promote the step of QDs application in various fields such as bioassay and trace detection of analyte. PMID:24556131

  14. Mixed Monolayers of Ferrocenylalkanethiol and Encapsulated Horseradish Peroxidase for Sensitive and Durable Electrochemical Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yong; Jiang, Dianlu; Su, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Yan, Ming; Du, Juanjuan; Lu, Yufeng; Liu, You-Nian; Zhou, Feimeng

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of a mixed monolayer of ferrocenylalkanethiol and encapsulated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at a gold electrode for amperometric detection of H2O2 at trace levels. By tuning the alkanethiol chain lengths that tether the HRP enzyme and the ferrocenylalkanethiol (FcC11SH) mediator, facile electron transfer between FcC11SH and HRP can be achieved. Unlike most HRP-based electrochemical sensors, which rely on HRP-facilitated H2O2 reduction (to H2O), the electrocatalytic current is resulted from an HRP-catalyzed oxidation reaction of H2O2 (to O2). Upon optimizing other experimental conditions (surface coverage ratio, pH, and flow rate), the electrocatalytic reaction proceeding at the electrode was used to attain a low amperometric detection level (0.64 nM) and a dynamic range spanning over three orders of magnitude. Not only does the thin hydrophilic porous HRP capsule allow facile electron transfer, it also enables H2O2 to permeate. More significantly, the enzymatic activity of the encapsulated HRP is retained for a considerably longer period (> three weeks) than naked HRP molecules attached to an electrode or those wired to a redox polymer thin film. By comparing to electrodes modified with denatured HRP that are subsequently encapsulated or embedded in a poly-L-lysine matrix, it is concluded that the encapsulation has significantly preserved the native structure of HRP and therefore its enzymatic activity. The electrode covered with FcC11SH and encapsulated HRP is shown to be capable of rapidly and reproducibly detecting H2O2 present in complex sample media. PMID:19928778

  15. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of horseradish peroxidase isoenzymes: correlation of distinctive spectra with isoenzyme specific activities.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vergara, E; Meyer, M; Goff, H M

    1985-11-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra are reported for the paramagnetic ferric native and cyano complexes of the five major horseradish root peroxidase (HRP) isoenzymes (A1, A2, A3, B, and C). Axial imidazole resonances are observed in the native and cyano-complex spectra of all the isoenzymes, thus indicating the presence of a common axial histidine ligand. Proton NMR spectra outside the usual diamagnetic region are identical for sets of A1 and A2 isoenzymes and for the B and C isoenzyme set. Variation in heme residue chemical shift positions may be controlled in part by porphyrin vinyl side chain-protein interactions. Diverse upfield spectra among the isoenzymes reflect amino acid substitutions and/or conformational differences near the prosthetic group, as signals in this region must result from amino acid residues in proximity to the heme center. Acid-base dependence studies reveal an "alkaline" transition that converts the native high-spin iron (III) porphyrin to the low-spin state. The transition occurs at pH 9.3, 9.4, 9.8, and 10.9 for respective HRP A1, A2, A3, and C isoenzymes, respectively. Significantly, this ordering also reflects specific activities for the isoenzymes in the order A1 = A2 greater than A3 greater than B = C. Identical proton NMR spectra for A1/A2 and B/C isoenzyme sets parallel equivalent specific activities for members of a particular set. Proton NMR spectra thus appear to be highly sensitive to protein modifications that affect catalytic activity. PMID:4084538

  16. Conjugation of poly-L-lysine to albumin and horseradish peroxidase: a novel method of enhancing the cellular uptake of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W C; Ryser, H J

    1978-01-01

    The carbodiimide-catalyzed conjugation of a 6700 molecular weight fragment of poly-L-lysine to radiolabeled human serum albumin or to horseradish peroxidase enhances the membrane transport of each protein into cultured mouse fibroblasts approximately 11- and 200-fold, respectively. At least 50% of the peroxidase activity remained after conjugation. Trypsinization and carbamylation of the two conjugates demonstrates that the enhancement of their cellular uptake is related to their poly-L-lysine content. Simple addition to the medium of comparable amounts of free poly-L-lysine has no effect on the transport of either native protein. Addition of poly-L-ornithine (molecular weight 200,000) at 3-30 microgram/ml, a condition known to cause enhancement of 125I-labeled human serum albumin uptake by mouse sarcoma cells, has no visible effect on the cellular uptake of native horseradish peroxidase. The intracellular localization of the enzyme-poly-L-lysine conjugate can be demonstrated cytochemically by either light or transmission electron microscopy. A concentration of conjugate that increases the uptake more than 200-fold does not cause any detectable morphological change suggestive of cell toxicity. Furthermore, because poly-L-lysine is an excellent substrate for intracellular proteolytic enzymes, it can be expected to be broken down and reutilized in the cell. Images PMID:273916

  17. Propagation of human iPS cells in alginate-based microcapsules prepared using reactions catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Tomoaki; Sakai, Shinji; Taya, Masahito

    2016-09-01

    Cell encapsulation has been investigated as a bioproduction system in the biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. We encaps-ulated human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells in duplex microcapsules prepared from an alginate derivative possessing phenolic hydroxyl moieties, in a single-step procedure based on two competing enzymatic reactions catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and catalase. The encapsulated cells maintained 91.4% viability and proliferated to fill the microcapsules following 19 days of culture. Encapsulated hiPS cells showed pluripotency comparable to that of unencapsulated cells during the cultures, as demonstrated by the expression of the SSEA-4 marker. PMID:26148179

  18. Studies on the oxidation reaction of tyrosine (Tyr) with H 2O 2 catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in alcohol-water medium by spectrofluorimetry and differential spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Liang, Huiling; Chen, Zhenzhen; He, Xiwen; Shen, Hanxi

    2006-03-01

    An oxidation reaction of tyrosine (Tyr) with H 2O 2 catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied by spectrofluorimetry and differential spectrophotometry in the alcohol(methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and isopropanol)-water mutual solubility system. Compared with the enzymatic-catalyzed reaction in the water medium, the fluorescence intensities of the product weakened, even extinguished. Because the addition of alcohols made the conformation of HRP change, the catalytic reaction shifted to the side of polymerization and the polymer (A nH 2, n ≥ 3) exhibited no fluorescence. The four alcohols cannot deactivate HRP. Moreover isopropanol activated HRP remarkably.

  19. A general method for immobilization of glycoproteins on regenerable immobilized metal-ion carriers: application to glucose oxidase from Penicillium chrysogenum and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G

    1994-08-01

    A general method for immobilization of glycoproteins on immobilized metal-ion carriers is described. The method includes oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the glycoprotein with potassium periodate, covalent modification with histidine and immobilization on bivalent metal ion-iminodiacetic acid-agarose. The method is exemplified with horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The modified and immobilized enzymes are stable for at least 2 months at 4 degrees C. The immobilized enzymes were used as enzyme electrodes for the determination of the glucose concentration. PMID:7917065

  20. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase immobilized in hybrid organic-inorganic film of chitosan/sol-gel/carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Jun; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-04-15

    A hybrid organic-inorganic nanocomposite film of chitosan/sol-gel/multi-walled carbon nanotubes was constructed for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). This film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Direct electron transfer (DET) and bioelectrocatalysis of HRP incorporated into the composite film were investigated. The results indicate that the film can provide a favorable microenvironment for HRP to perform DET on the surface of glassy carbon electrodes with a pair of quasi-reversible redox waves and to retain its bioelectrocatalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Amperometric determination of cadmium, lead, and mercury metal ions using a novel polymer immobilised horseradish peroxidase biosensor system.

    PubMed

    Silwana, Bongiwe; Van Der Horst, Charlton; Iwuoha, Emmanuel; Somerset, Vernon

    2014-01-01

    This work was undertaken to develop a novel Pt/PANI-co-PDTDA/HRP biosensor system for environmental applications to investigate the inhibition studies by specific heavy metals, to provide data suitable for kinetic studies and further application of the biosensor to environmental samples. The newly constructed biosensor was compared to the data of the well-researched Pt/PANI/HRP biosensor. Optimised experimental conditions, such as the working pH for the biosensor was evaluated. The functionality of the amperometric enzyme sensor system was demonstrated by measuring the oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide followed by the development of an assay for determination of metal concentration in the presence of selected metal ions of Cd(2+), Pb(2+) and Hg(2+). The detection limits were found to be 8 × 10(-4) μg L(-1) for cadmium, 9.38 × 10(-4) μg L(-1) for lead and 7.89 × 10(-4) μg L(-1) for mercury. The World Health Organisation recommended that the maximum safety level of these metals should not exceed 0.005 mg L(-1) of Cd(2+), 0.01 mg L(-1) of Pb(2+) and 0.001 mg L(-1) of Hg(2+.), respectively. The analytical and detection data for the metals investigated were observed to be lower than concentrations recommended by several bodies including World Health Organisation and Environmental Protection Agencies. Therefore the biosensors developed in this study can be used to screen the presence of these metals in water samples because of its low detection limit. The modes of inhibition of horseradish peroxidase by Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) as analysed using the double reciprocal plots of the Michaelis-Menten equation was found to be reversible and uncompetitive inhibition. Based on the Km(app) and Imax values for both biosensors the results have shown smaller values. These results also proved that the enzyme modified electrode is valuable and can be deployed for the determination or screening of heavy metals. PMID:25137538

  2. [Catalytic activity and the stability of horseradish peroxidase increase as a result of its incorporation into a polyelectrolyte complex with chitosan].

    PubMed

    Veselova, I A; Koreĭko, A V; Shekhovtsova, T N

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of horseradish peroxidase into polyelectrolyte complexes with chitosans of different molecular weights (MW 5-150 kDa) yielded highly active and stable enzyme preparations. As a result of the selection of optimal conditions for the formation of peroxidase-chitosan complexes, it was found that 0.1% chitosan with a MW of 10 kDa had the strongest activatory effect on peroxidase (activation degree, > 70%) in the reaction of o-dianisidine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. The complex formed by 0.001% chitosan with a molecular weight of 150 kDa was most stable: when immobilized on foamed polyurethane, it retained at least 50% of the initial activity for 550 days. The highest catalytic activity was exhibited in a 0.05 M phthalate buffer (pH 5.9-6.2) by the complex containing 0.006-0.009% chitosan in the indicator reaction. The activatory effect of the polysaccharide on the enzyme was determined by its influence on the binding and conversion of the reducting substrate peroxidase. PMID:19382699

  3. Combined experimental and theoretical study on the reactivity of compounds I and II in horseradish peroxidase biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Li; Franke, Alicja; Brindell, Małgorzata; Oszajca, Maria; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2014-10-27

    For the exploration of the intrinsic reactivity of two key active species in the catalytic cycle of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Compound I (HRP-I) and Compound II (HRP-II), we generated in situ [Fe(IV) O(TMP(+.) )(2-MeIm)](+) and [Fe(IV) O(TMP)(2-MeIm)](0) (TMP=5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin; 2-MeIm=2-methylimidazole) as biomimetics for HRP-I and HRP-II, respectively. Their catalytic activities in epoxidation, hydrogen abstraction, and heteroatom oxidation reactions were studied in acetonitrile at -15 °C by utilizing rapid-scan UV/Vis spectroscopy. Comparison of the second-order rate constants measured for the direct reactions of the HRP-I and HRP-II mimics with the selected substrates clearly confirmed the outstanding oxidizing capability of the HRP-I mimic, which is significantly higher than that of HRP-II. The experimental study was supported by computational modeling (DFT calculations) of the oxidation mechanism of the selected substrates with the involvement of quartet and doublet HRP-I mimics ((2,4) Cpd I) and the closed-shell triplet spin HRP-II model ((3) Cpd II) as oxidizing species. The significantly lower activation barriers calculated for the oxidation systems involving (2,4) Cpd I than those found for (3) Cpd II are in line with the much higher oxidizing efficiency of the HRP-I mimic proven in the experimental part of the study. In addition, the DFT calculations show that all three reaction types catalyzed by HRP-I occur on the doublet spin surface in an effectively concerted manner, whereas these reactions may proceed in a stepwise mechanism with the HRP-II mimic as oxidant. However, the high desaturation or oxygen rebound barriers during CH bond activation processes by the HRP-II mimic predict a sufficient lifetime for the substrate radical formed through hydrogen abstraction. Thus, the theoretical calculations suggest that the dissociation of the substrate radical may be a more favorable pathway than desaturation or

  4. Catalytic spectrofluorimetric determination of superoxide anion radical and superoxide dismutase activity using N, N-dimethylaniline as the substrate for horseradish peroxidase (HRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Chen, Zhen-zhen

    2002-10-01

    The coupled reaction of N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) using superoxide anion radical (O 2-) as oxidizing agent under the catalysis of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. Based on the reaction, O 2- produced by irradiating Vitamin B 2, (V B2) was spectrophotometricly determined at 554 nm. The linear range of this method was 1.8×10 -6-1.2×10 -4 mol l -1 with a detection limit of 5.3×10 -7 mol l -1. The effect of interferences on the determination of O 2- was investigated. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in human blood and mouse blood.

  5. Retention and extractability of phenol, cresol, and dichlorophenol exposed to two surface soils in the presence of horseradish peroxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangxiang; Bhandari, Alok

    2003-01-01

    The retention of phenol, o-cresol, 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), and their peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization products was evaluated on two surface soils. The extractability of the parent solutes and their polymerization products was also investigated. (14)C-Labeled radioisotopes were used to quantify the contaminant retained on soil as water-extractable, methanol-extractable, humic/fulvic (HA/FA) acid-bound, and soil/humin bound. Between 2 and 20% of the solute retained on soil after a 7-day contact period remained bound to the HA/FA and soil/humin components in unamended soils; in the presence of peroxidase this amount was as high as 40-75%. The alkali-extractable HA/FA component contained the largest fraction of radioactivity in peroxidase-amended soils. Whereas the soil organic matter content was the predominant factor controlling the extent of sorption of the parent phenols, the clay content and particle surface area appeared to contribute to the retention of the polymerization products. High molecular weight oligomers produced during peroxidase-mediated polymerization of phenols associate strongly with soil components and are likely incorporated into the soil organic matter via oxidative coupling reactions. PMID:12502405

  6. Glycopeptide analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals novel features of horseradish peroxidase glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Wuhrer, Manfred; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M

    2004-01-01

    We explored matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) tandem time-of-flight (TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry for the analysis of N-glycosylated peptides, using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a test case. Two different types of cleavage were observed in the TOF/TOF fragmentation spectra: Firstly, cleavages of peptide bonds yielded fragments with the attached N-glycans staying intact, thus revealing information on peptide sequence and glycan attachment site. Secondly, fragmentation of the glycan moiety was characterized by cleavage of glycosidic bonds as well as a (0,2)X-ring fragmentation of the innermost N-acetylglucosamine of the chitobiose core. Loss of the complete N-glycan moiety occurred by cleavage of both the N-glycosidic bond and the side-chain amide group of the N-glycosylated asparagine, yielding a characteristic peak doublet with a mass difference of 17 Da, which revealed the individual masses of the N-glycan and the peptide moiety. Analysis of a HRP tryptic digest at the sub-picomole level allowed the characterization of various N-glycosylated peptides including those with internal disulfide linkages, a glycopeptide linked via a disulfide bond to another peptide, and a 5 kDa glycopeptide carrying two N-glycans. The potential of our approach was illustrated by the detection of the following novel features of HRP glycosylation: (i) The conjugation of a xylosylated trimannosyl N-glycan without core-fucosylation to site Asn316, showing for the first time unambiguously the occupation of this site; and (ii) A disaccharide N-acetylhexosamine1deoxyhexose1 attached to N-glycosylation sites Asn285 and Asn298, which might represent a Fuc(alpha1-3)GlcNAc- moiety arising from the processing of N-glycans by a horse-radish endoglycosidase during biosynthesis of HRP. PMID:15282773

  7. Application of horse-radish peroxidase linked chemiluminescence to determine the production mechanism of Shiga-like toxins by E. coli O157:H7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-I.; Uknalis, Joseph; Gehring, Andrew; He, Yiping

    2007-09-01

    A sandwiched immunoassay consisting of toxin capture by immunomagnetic beads (IMB) and toxin detection by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) linked chemiluminescence was used to follow the production of Shiga-like toxins (SLT) by E. coli O157:H7. The intensity of luminescence generated by the oxidation of luminol-liked compounds was used to represent the concentration of toxins produced. The time-course of SLT production by E. coli O157:H7 under different conditions was investigated. In pure culture, optimal generation of SLT showed a significant delay than the steady state of cell growth. In mixed cultures of SLT producing E. coli O157:H7 and non-SLT producing E. coli K-12 strain, the production of toxins was substantially decreased. However, the growth of E. coli O157:H7 was not affected by the presence of K-12 strain. This decrease in SLT production was also observed in radiation-sterile ground beef. In regular ground beef that might contain numerous other bacteria, the growth of E. coli O157:H7 in EC media was not significantly affected but the lowered production of SLT was observed. The results showed that mechanism of inducing SLT production was complex with both the growth time and growth environment could influence SLT production. The addition of homo-serine lactone to the growth media enhanced the production of SLT. Thus, possibly cell-cell communication may have a role in SLT production by E. coli O157:H7.

  8. Alterations in blood-brain barrier function following acute hypertension: comparison of the blood-to-brain transfer of horseradish peroxidase with that of alpha-aminisobutyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, M.D.B.

    1985-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively restricts the blood-to-brain passage of many solutes owing to unique properties of cerebrovascular endothelial cell membranes. To date, experimental study of the BBB has been accomplished primarily through the use of two different methodological approaches. Morphological studies have mostly employed large molecular weight (MW) tracers to detect morphological alterations underlying increased permeability. Physiological studies, employing smaller, more physiologic tracers have successfully described, quantitatively, certain functional aspects of blood-to-brain transfer. The current work attempts to merge these two approaches and to consider barrier function/dysfunction from both a morphological and a functional perspective. Specifically, the study compares in rats, following acute hypertension, the cerebrovascular passage of /sup 14/C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The blood-to-brain passage of AIB and HRP were compared following acute hypertension, with regard to both the distributions of the tracer extravasation patterns and the magnitude of tracer extravasation. The results of this study suggest that traditional morphological barrier studies alone do not reveal all aspects of altered barrier status and that multiple mechanisms underlying increased BBB permeability may operate simultaneously during BBB dysfunction.

  9. Distribution of cardiac sympathetic afferent fibers in the guinea pig heart labeled by anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Quigg, M; Elfvin, L G; Aldskogius, H

    1988-12-01

    Anterogradely transported wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was used to selectively label the distribution within the guinea pig heart of cardiac sympathetic afferent fibers whose cell bodies lie in the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of C6, C8, T1-3. The majority of fibers were seen in the posterior atrial wall, the pulmonary arterial walls, and along the major branches of the coronary arteries. Labeled fibers were also found in the parietal pericardium and associated with the atrioventricular and aortic valves. The labeling pattern was dependent upon segmental level: the most general labeling followed upper thoracic DRG injection, while labeled fibers associated with the coronary arteries were nearly absent after lower cervical DRG injection. Comparison of heart labeling among chemically sympathectomized and untreated animals demonstrated no difference in the distribution of frequency of WGA-HRP labeled fibers, indicating the specificity of this technique. The present findings indicate that the spinal sensory innervation of the heart has its major origins in the uppermost thoracic dorsal root ganglia and has a highly selective regional distribution. The implications of these findings in relation to cardiac autonomic dysfunction and pain are discussed. PMID:3148648

  10. Chemiluminescence immunoassay for the rapid and sensitive detection of antibody against porcine parvovirus by using horseradish peroxidase/detection antibody-coated gold nanoparticles as nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Rui; Hu, Yonggang

    2014-06-01

    A rapid, simple, facile, sensitive and enzyme-amplified chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) method to detect antibodies against porcine parvovirus has been developed. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the detection antibody were simultaneously co-immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles using the electrostatic method to form gold nanoparticle-based nanoprobes. This nanoprobe was employed in a sandwich-type CLIA, which enables CL signal readout from enzymatic catalysis and results in signal amplification. The presence of porcine parvovirus infection was determined in porcine parvovirus antibodies by measuring the CL intensity caused by the reaction of HRP-luminol with H2 O2 . Under optimal conditions, the obtained calibration plot for the standard positive serum was approximately linear within the dilution range of 1:80 to 1:5120. The limit of detection for the assay was 1:10,240 (S/N = 3), which is much lower than that typically achieved with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (1:160; S/N = 3). A series of repeatability measurements using 1:320-fold diluted standard positive serum gave reproducible results with a relative standard deviation of 4.9% (n = 11). The ability of the immunosensor to analyze clinical samples was tested on porcine sera. The immunosensor had an efficiency of 90%, a sensitivity of 93.3%, and a specificity of 87.5% relative to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results. PMID:23832716

  11. Horseradish peroxidase and antibody labeled gold nanoparticle probe for amplified immunoassay of ciguatoxin in fish samples based on capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chaoying; Luan, Wenxiu

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a new amplified immunoassay with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody (Ab) labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) probe hyphenated to capillary electrophoresis (CE) with electrochemical (EC) detection for ultrasensitive determination of ciguatoxin CTX1B. AuNPs were conjugated with HRP and Ab, and then incubated with limited amount of CTX1B to produce immunocomplex. The immunoreactive sample was injected into capillary for CE separation and EC detection. Enhanced sensitivity was obtained by adopting the AuNPs as carriers of HRP and Ab at high HRP/Ab molar ratio. The calibration curve of CTX1B was in the range of 0.06-90 ng/mL. The detection limit was 0.045 ng/mL, which is 38-fold lower than that of HPLC-MS method for CTX1B analysis. The proposed method was successfully applied for the quantification of CTX1B in contamined fish samples by simultaneously labeling Ab and HRP on AuNPs. The amplified IA with HRP and Ab labeled AuNPs probe hyphenated to CE and EC detection provides a sensitive analytical approach for the determination of trace ciguatoxin in complex samples. PMID:25637767

  12. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on NH2-modified magnetic Fe3O4/SiO2 particles and its application in removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Tang, Heqing

    2014-01-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation method with the assistance of ultrasound irradiation, and then coated with silica generated by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane. The silica-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles were further modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, resulting in anchoring of primary amine groups on the surface of the particles. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was then immobilized on the magnetic core-shell particles by using glutaraldehyde as a crosslinking agent. Immobilization conditions were optimized to obtain the highest relative activity of the immobilized enzyme. It was found the durability of the immobilized enzyme to heating and pH variation were improved in comparison with free HRP. The apparent Michaelis constants of the immobilized HRP and free HRP with substrate were compared, showing that the enzyme activity of the immobilized HRP was close to that of free HRP. The HRP immobilized particles, as an enzyme catalyst, were used to activate H2O2 for degrading 2,4-dichlorophenol. The rapid degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol indicated that the immobilized enzyme has potential applications for removing organic pollutants. PMID:25268726

  13. Thermo- and sulfate-controllable bioelectrocatalysis of glucose based on horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase embedded in poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide) hydrogel films.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huiqin; Lin, Ling; Wang, Peng; Liu, Hongyun

    2014-08-01

    Dual-responsive poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide) (PDEA) hydrogel films with entrapped horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOD) were successfully prepared on electrode surface with a simple one-step polymerization procedure under mild conditions, designated as PDEA-HRP-GOD. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) response of electroactive probe K3Fe(CN)6 at the film electrodes displayed reversible thermo- and sulfate-responsive switching behavior. For example, at 25 °C, the K3Fe(CN)6 demonstrated a well-defined CV peak pair with large peak currents for the films, showing the on state, while at 40 °C, the CV response was greatly suppressed and the system was at the off state. The influence of temperature and Na2SO4 concentration on the switching behavior of the film system was not independent or separated, but was synergetic. The responsive mechanism of the system was ascribed to the structure change of PDEA component in the films with temperature and sulfate concentration. This switching property of the PDEA-HRP-GOD films could be further used to realize dual-responsive catalytic oxidation of glucose sequentially by HRP and GOD entrapped in the films with Fe(CN)6 (3-) as the mediator through changing the surrounding temperature and Na2SO4 concentration. This system may establish a foundation for fabricating a new type of multi-switchable electrochemical biosensors based on bienzyme electrocatalysis. PMID:24888410

  14. A third-generation hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase immobilized in a tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane/multiwalled carbon nanotubes film.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijun; Jiang, Xueqin; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2008-10-15

    A new third-generation biosensor for H(2)O(2) assay was developed on the basis of the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in a nanocomposite film of tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified gold electrode. The prepared HRP/TTF-TCNQ/MWCNTs/Au electrode was used for the bioelectrocatalytic reduction of H(2)O(2), with a linear range from 0.005 to 1.05 mM and a detection limit of 0.5 microM for amperometric sensing of H(2)O(2). In addition, a novel method on the basis of electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements was proposed to determine the effective enzymatic specific activity (ESA) of the immobilized HRP for the first time, and the ESA was found to be greater at the TTF-TCNQ/MWCNTs/Au electrode than that at the MWCNTs/Au or TTF-TCNQ/Au electrode, indicating that the TTF-TCNQ/MWCNTs film is a good HRP-immobilization matrix to achieve the direct electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode. PMID:18479905

  15. A novel biosensor based on the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized in the three-dimensional flower-like Bi2WO6 microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Guo, Kai; Duan, Congyue; Chen, Xianjin; Zhu, Zhenfeng

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional flower-like Bi2WO6 microspheres (3D-Bi2WO6 MSs) have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal method. The morphology and structure of 3D-Bi2WO6 MSs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The 3D-Bi2WO6 MSs subsequently were used to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and fabricate a mediator-free biosensor for the detection of H2O2. Spectroscopic and electrochemical results reveal that 3D-Bi2WO6 MSs constitute an excellent immobilization matrix with biocompatibility for enzymes. Meanwhile, due to unique morphology of the flower-like microspheres, the direct electron transfer of HRP is facilitated and the prepared biosensors display good performances for the detection of H2O2 with a wide linear range, including two linear sections: 0.5-100μM (R(2)=0.9983) and 100-250μM (R(2)=0.9981), as well as an extremely low method detection limit of 0.18μM. PMID:27127050

  16. Investigations of an electrochemical platform based on the layered MoS2-graphene and horseradish peroxidase nanocomposite for direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiyan; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2014-06-15

    The self-assembly of layered molybdenum disulfide-graphene (MoS2-Gr) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by electrostatic attraction into a novel hybrid nanomaterial (HRP-MoS2-Gr) is reported. The properties of the MoS2-Gr were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) indicate that the native structure of the HRP is maintained after the assembly, implying good biocompatibility of MoS2-Gr nanocomposite. Furthermore, the HRP-MoS2-Gr composite is utilized as a biosensor, which displays electrocatalytic activity to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with high sensitivity (679.7 μA mM(-1)cm(-2)), wide linear range (0.2 μM-1.103 mM), low detection limit (0.049 μM), and fast amperometric response. In addition, the biosensor also exhibits strong anti-interference ability, satisfactory stability and reproducibility. These desirable electrochemical properties are attributed to the good biocompatibility and electron transport efficiency of the MoS2-Gr composite, as well as the high loading of HRP. Therefore, this biosensor is potentially suitable for H2O2 analysis in environmental, pharmaceutical, food or industrial applications. PMID:24480133

  17. Sensory nerve endings in the rat oro-facial region labeled by the anterograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase: a new method for tracing peripheral nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Marfurt, C F; Turner, D F

    1983-02-14

    The purpose of the present investigation is to introduce the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the study of the morphology and peripheral distribution of sensory nerve endings. HRP was injected into the trigeminal ganglion or trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex (TBNC) in separate adult rats. HRP injected into the trigeminal ganglion was taken up by the neuronal perikarya and transported anterogradely in massive amounts to sensory nerve endings in the cornea, vibrissal hair follicles, tooth pulps, and periodontal ligaments. HRP injected into the TBNC was taken up by trigeminal primary afferent fibers that terminated there and transported transganglionically, i.e., past or through the trigeminal ganglion, to peripheral sensory endings. The results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that: (1) anterograde HRP transport is a highly successful method of labeling with an intracellular marker trigeminal sensory endings in a variety of oro-facial tissues, and (2) trigeminal primary sensory neurons possess intra-axonal transport mechanisms by which HRP, and possibly other substances, taken up in the central nervous system may be transported to the periphery. PMID:6601506

  18. Enzymatic biosensor of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on Au-Pt nanotube/Au-graphene for the simultaneous determination of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Yin, Wenmin; Tang, Kun; Li, Dian; Shao, Kang; Zuo, Yunpeng; Ma, Jing; Liu, Jiawei; Han, Heyou

    2016-08-24

    A new electrochemical method has been proposed for the simultaneous determination of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and propyl gallate (PG) in food matrices based on enzymatic biosensors. Spiny Au-Pt nanotubes (SAP NTs) was first synthesized and demonstrated to exhibit intrinsic peroxidase and catalase-like activity. The structure of SAP NTs provides large surface area and favorable medium for electron transfer, on which HRP were immobilized and acted as enzymatic biosensor for the simultaneous detection of BHA and PG. The results revealed that BHA and PG both have well-defined oxidation waves with peak potentials of 624 and 655 mV, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, the method behaved satisfactory analytical performance towards BHA and PG with a wide linear range of 0.3-50 mg L(-1) and 0.1-100 mg L(-1), as well as a detection limit of 0.046 mg L(-1) and 0.024 mg L(-1) (3σ/slope), respectively. Besides, the proposed method exhibits good sensitivity, stability and reproducibility, providing an alternative to fabricate electrode and construct sensitive biosensors. PMID:27497001

  19. Coupled enzyme reactions performed in heterogeneous reaction media: experiments and modeling for glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase in a PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Aumiller, William M; Davis, Bradley W; Hashemian, Negar; Maranas, Costas; Armaou, Antonios; Keating, Christine D

    2014-03-01

    The intracellular environment in which biological reactions occur is crowded with macromolecules and subdivided into microenvironments that differ in both physical properties and chemical composition. The work described here combines experimental and computational model systems to help understand the consequences of this heterogeneous reaction media on the outcome of coupled enzyme reactions. Our experimental model system for solution heterogeneity is a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/sodium citrate aqueous mixture that provides coexisting PEG-rich and citrate-rich phases. Reaction kinetics for the coupled enzyme reaction between glucose oxidase (GOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were measured in the PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS). Enzyme kinetics differed between the two phases, particularly for the HRP. Both enzymes, as well as the substrates glucose and H2O2, partitioned to the citrate-rich phase; however, the Amplex Red substrate necessary to complete the sequential reaction partitioned strongly to the PEG-rich phase. Reactions in ATPS were quantitatively described by a mathematical model that incorporated measured partitioning and kinetic parameters. The model was then extended to new reaction conditions, i.e., higher enzyme concentration. Both experimental and computational results suggest mass transfer across the interface is vital to maintain the observed rate of product formation, which may be a means of metabolic regulation in vivo. Although outcomes for a specific system will depend on the particulars of the enzyme reactions and the microenvironments, this work demonstrates how coupled enzymatic reactions in complex, heterogeneous media can be understood in terms of a mathematical model. PMID:24517887

  20. Multi-input and -output logic circuits based on bioelectrocatalysis with horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase immobilized in multi-responsive copolymer films on electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Lian, Wenjing; Zhang, Jiannan; Liu, Hongyun

    2016-06-15

    Herein, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N'-dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) copolymer films were polymerized on electrode surface with a simple one-step method, and the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was embedded in the films simultaneously, which were designated as P(NiPAAm-co-DMEM)-HRP. The films exhibited a reversible structure change with the external stimuli, such as pH, CO2, temperature and SO4(2-), causing the cyclic voltammetric (CV) response of electroactive K3Fe(CN)6 at the film electrodes to display the corresponding multi-stimuli sensitive ON-OFF behavior. Based on the switchable CV property of the system and the electrochemical reduction of H2O2 catalyzed by HRP in the films and mediated by Fe(CN)6(3-) in solution, a 5-input/3-output logic gate was established. To further increase the complexity of the logic system, another enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) was added into the films, designated as P(NiPAAm-co-DMEM)-HRP-GOD. In the presence of oxygen, the oxidation of glucose in the solution was catalyzed by GOD in the films, and the produced H2O2 in situ was recognized and electrocatalytically reduced by HRP and mediated by Fe(CN)6(3-). Based on the bienzyme films, a cascaded or concatenated 4-input/3-output logic gate system was proposed. The present work combined the multi-responsive interface with bioelectrocatalysis to construct cascaded logic circuits, which might open a new avenue to develop biocomputing elements with more sophisticated functions and design novel glucose biosensors. PMID:26901460

  1. Radical Energies and the Regiochemistry of Addition to Heme Groups. Methylperoxy and Nitrite Radical Additions to the Heme of Horseradish Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Grzegorz; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    The heme of hemoproteins, as exemplified by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), can undergo additions at the meso carbons and/or vinyl groups of the electrophilic or radical species generated in the catalytic oxidation of halides, pseudohalides, carboxylic acids, aryl and alkyl hydrazines, and other substrates. The determinants of the regiospecificity of these reactions, however, are unclear. We report here modification of the heme of HRP by autocatalytically generated, low energy NO2• and CH3OO• radicals. The NO2• radical adds regioselectively to the 4- over the 2-vinyl group but does not add to the meso positions. Reaction of HRP with tert-BuOOH does not lead to heme modification, but reaction with the F152M mutant, in which the heme vinyls are more sterically accessible, results in conversion of the heme 2-vinyl into a 1-hydroxy-2-(methylperoxy)-ethyl group [-CH(OH)CH2OOCH3]. [18O]-labeling studies indicate that the hydroxyl group in this adduct derives from water and the methylperoxide oxygens from O2. Under anaerobic conditions, methyl radicals formed by fragmentation of the autocatalytically generated tert-BuO• radical add to both the δ-meso-carbon and the 2-vinyl group. The regiochemistry of these and the other known additions to the heme indicate that only high-energy radicals (e.g., CH3•) add to the meso-carbon. Less energetic radicals, including NO2• and CH3OO•, add to heme vinyl groups if they are small enough but do not add to the meso-carbons. Electrophilic species such as HOBr, HOCl, and HOSCN add to vinyl groups but do not react with the meso-carbons. This meso- versus vinyl-reactivity paradigm, which appears to be general for autocatalytic additions to heme prosthetic groups, suggests that meso-hydroxylation of the heme by heme oxygenase occurs by a controlled radical reaction rather than by electrophilic addition. PMID:17249668

  2. Amperometric carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunosensor based on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic Au film coupling direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Chen, Xiaojun; Tang, Yin; Ge, Lingna; Guo, Buhua; Yao, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    A sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) antigen based on the immobilization of primary antibody (Ab1) on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic (3DOMM) electrode, and the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) that was used as both the label of secondary antibody (Ab2) and the blocking reagent. The 3DOMM electrode was fabricated by introducing core-shell Au-SiO2@Fe3O4 nanospheres onto the surface of three dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) Au electrode via the application of an external magnet. Au nanoparticles functionalized SBA-15 (Au@SBA-15) was conjugated to the HRP labeled secondary antibody (HRP-Ab2) through the Au-SH or Au-NH3(+) interaction, and HRP was also used as the block reagent. The formation of antigen-antibody complex made the combination of Au@SBA-15 and 3DOMM exhibit remarkable synergistic effects for accelerating direct electron transfer (DET) between HRP and the electrode. Under the optimal conditions, the DET current signal increased proportionally to CA 19-9 concentration in the range of 0.05 to 15.65 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.01 U mL(-1). Moreover, the immunosensor showed high selectivity, good stability, satisfactory reproducibility and regeneration. Importantly, the developed method was used to assay clinical serum specimens, achieving a good relation with those obtained from the commercialized electrochemiluminescent method. PMID:24560371

  3. Steady-state oxidation model by horseradish peroxidase for the estimation of the non-inactivation zone in the enzymatic removal of pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y J; Chae, H J; Kim, E Y

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical model for the rate of oxidation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was investigated to account for the influence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration on the catalytic activity. To evaluate the maximum allowable H2O2 concentration, a relatively simple steady-state model was developed based on the Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism considering the effect of excess H2O2. Several sets of experimental data obtained from batch reactions using an equimolar concentration of H2O2 and PCP were used to estimate the kinetic parameters by a nonlinear regression method. The model profiles acquired using the estimated parameters were in good agreement with experimental data at different initial enzyme and substrate concentrations. The best-fitted parameters were used to predict the initial rate of the enzyme reaction. The model prediction was coincident with the experimental results of other studies, indicating that the proposed model could be used for the optimization of reaction conditions. The maximum allowable H2O2 concentration to prevent H2O2 inhibition was calculated from the proposed model equation: [H2O2](0,max) = (square root)KmH2O2Ki[PCP]0/KmPCP+[PCP]0. Using this equation, a curve depicting the non-inactivation zone for the two substrates (hydrogen peroxide and PCP) was plotted and it could be used for experimental design and optimal process operation. To minimize enzyme inactivation by H2O2, it was determined that the concentration of H2O2 should be lower than 2.78 mM, regardless of the stoichiometric ratio. PMID:16232630

  4. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of L-DOPA for mono-/bi-enzyme immobilization and amperometric biosensing of H2O2 and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mengzhen; Huang, Ting; Chao, Long; Xie, Qingji; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Meng, Wenhua

    2016-03-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed polymerization of L-DOPA (vs. dopamine) in the presence of H2O2 (and uricase (UOx)) was exploited to immobilize mono-/bi-enzymes for hydroquinone-mediated amperometric biosensing of H2O2 and uric acid (UA). The relevant polymeric biocomposites (PBCs) were prepared in phosphate buffer solution containing HRP and L-DOPA (or plus UOx) after adding H2O2. The mono-/bi-enzyme amperometric biosensors were prepared simply by casting some of the PBCs on Au-plated Au (Au(plate)/Au) electrodes, followed by coating with an outer-layer chitosan (CS) film for each. UV-vis spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for film characterization and/or process monitoring. The HRP immobilized by enzyme catalysis well preserved its bioactivity, as confirmed by UV-vis spectrophotometry. Under optimized conditions, the monoenzyme CS/HRP-poly(L-DOPA) (PD)/Au(plate)/Au electrode potentiostated at -0.1V responded linearly to H2O2 concentration from 0.001 to 1.25mM with a sensitivity of 700μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1μM, and the bienzyme CS/UOx-HRP-PD/Au(plate)/Au electrode at -0.1V responded linearly to UA concentration from 0.001 to 0.4mM with a sensitivity of 349μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and a LOD of 0.1μM. The mono-/bi-enzyme biosensors based on biosynthesized PD performed better than many reported analogues and those based on similarly biosynthesized polydopamine. PMID:26717822

  5. A dopaminergic projection to the rat mammillary nuclei demonstrated by retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalo-Ruiz, A.; Alonso, A.; Sanz, J. M.; Llinas, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence and distribution of dopaminergic neurons and terminals in the hypothalamus of the rat were studied by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry. Strongly labelled TH-immunoreactive neurons were seen in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, periventricular region, zona incerta, arcuate nucleus, and supramammillary nucleus. A few TH-positive neurons were also identified in the dorsal and ventral premammillary nucleus, as well as the lateral hypothalamic area. TH-immunoreactive fibres and terminals were unevenly distributed in the mammillary nuclei; small, weakly labelled terminals were scattered in the medial mammillary nucleus, while large, strongly labelled, varicose terminals were densely concentrated in the internal part of the lateral mammillary nucleus. A few dorsoventrally oriented TH-positive axon bundles were also identified in the lateral mammillary nucleus. A dopaminergic projection to the mammillary nuclei from the supramammillary nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area was identified by double labelling with retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and TH-immunohistochemistry. The lateral mammillary nucleus receives a weak dopaminergic projection from the medial, and stronger projections from the lateral, caudal supramammillary nucleus. The double-labelled neurons in the lateral supramammillary nucleus appear to encapsulate the caudal end of the mammillary nuclei. The medial mammillary nucleus receives a very light dopaminergic projection from the caudal lateral hypothalamic area. These results suggest that the supramammillary nucleus is the principal source of the dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei, establishing a local TH-pathway in the mammillary complex. The supramammillary cell groups are able to modulate the limbic system through its dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei as well as through its extensive dopaminergic projection to the lateral septal nucleus.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of mutations at the Phe41 position in the distal haem pocket of horseradish peroxidase C: structural and functional consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Heering, Hendrik A; Smith, Andrew T; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2002-01-01

    Three mutants of horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRPC) have been constructed in which the conserved distal aromatic residue Phe(41) has been substituted by Trp, Val or Ala and the properties of the mutant proteins have been compared with that of the wild-type. The ferric and ferrous states have been studied by resonance Raman, electronic absorption and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopies, together with their respective fluoride and CO complexes as probes for the integrity of the distal haem-pocket hydrogen-bonding network. The catalytic properties of the mutants, most notably the HRPC-mutant Phe(41)-->Trp (F41W) variant, were also affected. Structural modelling suggests that the bulky indole group of the F41W mutant blocks the distal cavity, inhibiting the binding of fluoride and CO to the haem iron, severely impairing the reaction of the enzyme with H(2)O(2) to form Compound I. Substitution with the smaller side-chain residues Val or Ala resulted in a 2-fold increase in the affinity of the mutants for the aromatic donor benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) compared with the wild-type, whereas the sterically hindered F41W mutant was not able to bind BHA at all. All the mutations studied increased the amount of a ferric six-coordinate aquo-high-spin species. On the other hand, the similarity in the Fe-Im stretching frequencies of the mutants and wild-type protein suggests that the distal haem-pocket mutations do not cause any substantive changes on the proximal side of the haem. Spectra of the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Ala-CO and the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Val-CO complexes strongly suggested a weakening of the interaction between CO and Arg(38) due to a secondary rearrangement of the haem relative to helix B. The effects observed for these HRP mutants were somewhat different from those noted recently for the analogous Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) mutants, particularly the Trp mutant. These differences can be reconciled in part as being due to the smaller size of the

  7. Enzymatic hydrolysate-induced displacement reaction with multifunctional silica beads doped with horseradish peroxidase-thionine conjugate for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lin, Youxiu; Zhou, Qian; Lin, Yuping; Tang, Dianping; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2015-08-18

    A novel (invertase) enzymatic hydrolysate-triggered displacement reaction strategy with multifunctional silica beads, doped with horseradish peroxidase-thionine (HRP-Thi) conjugate, was developed for competitive-type electrochemical immunoassay of small molecular aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). The competitive-type displacement reaction was carried out on the basis of the affinity difference between enzymatic hydrolysate (glucose) and its analogue (dextran) for concanavalin A (Con A) binding sites. Initially, thionine-HRP conjugates were doped into nanometer-sized silica beads using the reverse micelle method. Then monoclonal anti-AFB1 antibody and Con A were covalently conjugated to the silica beads. The immunosensor was prepared by means of immobilizing the multifunctional silica beads on a dextran-modified sensing interface via the dextran-Con A binding reaction. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with AFB1-bovine serum albumin conjugate (AFB1-BSA) and invertase were utilized as the trace tag. Upon target AFB1 introduction, a competitive-type immunoreaction was implemented between the analyte and the labeled AFB1-BSA on the nanogold particles for the immobilized anti-AFB1 antibody on the electrode. The invertase followed by gold nanoparticles hydrolyzed sucrose into glucose and fructose. The produced glucose displaced the multifunctional silica beads from the electrode based on the classical dextran-Con A-glucose system, thus decreasing the catalytic efficiency of the immobilized HRP on the electrode relative to that of the H2O2-thionine system. Under optimal conditions, the detectable electrochemical signal increased with the increasing target AFB1 in a dynamic working range from 3.0 pg mL(-1) to 20 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 2.7 pg mL(-1). The strong bioconjugation with two nanostructures also resulted in a good repeatability and interassay precision down to 9.3%. Finally, the methodology was further validated for analysis of naturally contaminated or spiked AFB1

  8. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed synthesis of poly(thiophene-3-boronic acid) biocomposites for mono-/bi-enzyme immobilization and amperometric biosensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Wang, Wen; Li, Zou; Qin, Xiaoli; Bu, Lijuan; Tang, Zhiyong; Fu, Yingchun; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo; Hu, Jiming

    2013-06-15

    We report here on a facile enzymatic polymerization protocol to prepare enzyme-poly(thiophene-3-boronic acid) (PTBA) polymeric biocomposites (PBCs) for high-performance mono-/bi-enzyme amperometric biosensing. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed polymerization of thiophene-3-boronic acid (TBA) monomer was conducted in aqueous solution containing HRP (or plus glucose oxidase (GOx)) by either directly added or GOx-glucose generated oxidant H2O2. The mono-/bi-enzyme amperometric biosensors were prepared simply by casting the dialysis-isolated PBCs on Au-plated Au electrode (Auplate/Au), followed by coating with an outer-layer chitosan (CS) film. The boronic acid residues are capable of covalent bonding with enzyme at the glycosyl sites (boronic acid-diols interaction), which should less affect the enzymatic activity as compared with the common cases of covalent bonding at the peptide chains, and UV-vis spectrophotometric tests confirmed that the encapsulated HRP almost possesses its pristine enzymatic specific activity. The enzyme electrodes were studied by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry in the presence of Fe(CN)6(4-) mediator. The CS/HRP-PTBA/Auplate/Au electrode responded linearly to H2O2 concentration from 1 to 300 μM with a sensitivity of 390 μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 μM. The bienzyme CS/GOx-HRP-PTBA(H2O2)/Auplate/Au electrode responded linearly to glucose concentration from 5 μM to 0.83 mM with a sensitivity of 75.1 μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and a LOD of 1 μM, and it is found here that the use of Fe(CN)6(4-) that can only efficiently mediate HRP favorably avoids the "unusual amperometric responses" observed when other mediators that can efficiently turn over both HRP and GOx are used. PMID:23391705

  9. Use of immobilized metal ions as a negative adsorbent for purification of enzymes: application to phosphoglycerate mutase from chicken muscle extract and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Andersson, L; Ersson, B; Berg, M

    1992-01-01

    Two enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase and peroxidase, were purified by using an immobilized metal ion adsorbent for the removal of unwanted proteins. The mutase was obtained pure from a single column, whereas the purification of peroxidase required the use of a thiophilic adsorbent in a tandem. The capacity was 2.5 mg pure peroxidase per mL gel. PMID:1386542

  10. Structural studies by proton-NMR spectroscopy of plant horseradish peroxidase C, the wild-type recombinant protein from Escherichia coli and two protein variants, Phe41----Val and Arg38----Lys.

    PubMed

    Veitch, N C; Williams, R J; Bray, R C; Burke, J F; Sanders, S A; Thorneley, R N; Smith, A T

    1992-07-15

    Wild-type recombinant horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C and two protein variants, Phe41----Val and Arg38----Lys, have been characterised using both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Proton NMR spectra recorded in both resting and cyanide-ligated states of the proteins were compared with those of the corresponding plant peroxidase. The latter contains 18% carbohydrate in eight N-linked oligosaccharide side chains whereas the recombinant proteins are expressed in nonglycosylated form. The spectra of the plant enzyme and refolded recombinant protein are essentially identical with the exception of carbohydrate-linked resonances in the former, indicating that their solution structures are highly similar. This comparison also identifies classes of carbohydrate resonances in the plant enzyme which provides new information on the local environment and mobility of the oligosaccharide side chains. Comparison of the spectra of the cyanide-ligated states of the two variants and those of plant horseradish peroxidase C indicated that there were significant differences with respect to haem and haem-linked resonances. These could not be rationalised simply on the basis of the local perturbation expected from a single-site substitution. The two substitutions made to residues on the distal side of the haem apparently influenced the degree of imidazolate character of the proximal His170 imidazole ring thus perturbing the magnetic environment of the haem group. Inspection of the spectra of the Phe41----Val variant also showed that the resonances of a phenylalanine residue in the haem pocket had been incorrectly assigned to Phe41 in a previous study. A new assignment, based on additional information from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy, was made to Phe152. The assignments made for the Phe41----Val variant were also used as a basis to investigate the structure of the complex formed with the aromatic donor molecule, benzhydroxamic acid. PMID:1633807

  11. Exploring the process-structure-function relationship of horseradish peroxidase through investigation of pH- and heat induced conformational changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana; Ioniță, Elena; Bahrim, Gabriela; Râpeanu, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Given the importance of peroxidase as an indicator for the preservation of vegetables by heat treatment, the present study is focused on enzyme behavior under different pH and temperature conditions, in terms of process-structure-function relationships. Thus, the process-structure-function relationship of peroxidase was investigated by combining fluorescence spectroscopy, in silico prediction methods and inactivation kinetic studies. The fluorescence spectra indicated that at optimum pH value, the Trp117 residue is not located in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Significant blue- and red-shifts were obtained at different pH values, whereas the heat-treatment did not cause significant changes in Trp and Tyr environment. The ANS and quenching experiments demonstrated a more flexible conformation at lower pH and respectively at higher temperature. On the other hand molecular dynamics simulations at different temperatures highlighted that the secondary structure appeared better preserved against temperature, whereas the tertiary structure around the heme was more affected. Temperature dependent changes in the hydrogen bonding and ion paring involving amino acids from the heme-binding region (His170 and Asp247) might trigger miss-coordination of the heme iron atom by His170 residue and further enzyme activity loss.

  12. Employment of 4-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)phenol as a signal enhancer of the chemiluminescent luminol-H2O2-horseradish peroxidase reaction for detection of hepatitis C virus in real samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lili; Fu, Chuanyun; Wang, Yunshan; Sun, Shanhui

    2015-12-01

    Highly sensitive detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in serum is a key method for diagnosing and classifying the extent of HCV infection. In this study, a p-phenol derivative, 4-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)phenol (4-TRP), was employed as an efficient enhancer of the luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) chemiluminescence (CL) system for detection of HCV. Compared with a traditional enhancer, 4-TRP strongly enhanced CL intensity with the effect of prolonging and stabilizing light emission. The developed CL system was applied to detecting HCV core antigen (HCV-cAg) using a sandwich structure inside microwells. Our experimental results showed that there was good linear relationship between CL intensity and HCV-cAg concentration in the 0.6-3.6 pg/mL range (R = 0.99). The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 4.5-5.8% and 5.0-7.3%, respectively. In addition, sensitive determination of HCV-cAg in serum samples using the luminol-H2O2-HRP-4-TRP CL system was also feasible in clinical settings. PMID:25820800

  13. Development of a novel method for determination of mercury based on its inhibitory effect on horseradish peroxidase activity followed by monitoring the surface plasmon resonance peak of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaveisi, Javad; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Moghadam, Masoud Rohani; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive and simple indirect spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of trace amounts of inorganic mercury (Hg2 +) in aqueous media. The method is based on the inhibitory effect of Hg2 + on the activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the oxidation of ascorbic acid by hydrogen peroxide followed by the reduction of Au3 + to Au-NPs by unreacted ascorbic acid and the measurement of the absorbance of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak of gold nanoparticles (at 530 nm) which is directly proportional to the concentration of Hg2 +. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 1-220 ng mL- 1. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.2 and 0.7 ng mL- 1, respectively and the relative standard deviation at 100 ng mL- 1 level of Hg2 + was 2.6%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in different water samples.

  14. Covalent immobilization of lipase, glycerol kinase, glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase & horseradish peroxidase onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) strip & its application in serum triglyceride determination

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nidhi; Narang, Jagriti; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Reusable biostrip consisting enzymes immobilized onto alkylamine glass beads affixed on plasticized PVC strip for determination of triglyceride (TG) suffers from high cost of beads and their detachments during washings for reuse, leading to loss of activity. The purpose of this study was to develop a cheaper and stable biostrip for investigation of TG levels in serum. Methods: A reusable enzyme-strip was prepared for TG determination by co-immobilizing lipase, glycerol kinase (GK), glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO) and peroxidase (HRP) directly onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) strip through glutaraldehyde coupling. The method was evaluated by studying its recovery, precision and reusability. Results: The enzyme-strip showed optimum activity at pH 7.0, 35°C and a linear relationship between its activity and triolein concentration in the range 0.1 to 15 mM. The strip was used for determination of serum TG. The detection limit of the method was 0.1 mM. Analytical recovery of added triolein was 96 per cent. Within and between batch coefficients of variation (CV) were 2.2 and 3.7 per cent, respectively. A good correlation (r=0.99) was found between TG values by standard enzymic colrimetric method employing free enzymes and the present method. The strip lost 50 per cent of its initial activity after its 200 uses during the span of 100 days, when stored at 4°C. Interpretation & conclusions: The nitrating acidic treatment of plasticized PVC strip led to glutaraldehyde coupling of four enzymes used for enzymic colourimetric determination of serum TG. The strip provided 200 reuses of enzymes with only 50 per cent loss of its initial activity. The method could be used for preparation of other enzyme strips also. PMID:24927348

  15. Structure of poly(ethylene glycol)-modified horseradish peroxidase in organic solvents: infrared amide I spectral changes upon protein dehydration are largely caused by protein structural changes and not by water removal per se.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzam, Wasfi; Pastrana, Emil A; Ferrer, Yancy; Huang, Qing; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Griebenow, Kai

    2002-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to guide the development of stable lyophilized protein formulations by providing information on the structure of proteins in amorphous solids. The underlying assumption is that IR spectral changes in the amide I and III region upon protein dehydration are caused by protein structural changes. However, it has been claimed that amide I IR spectral changes could be the result of water removal per se. Here, we investigated whether such claims hold true. The structure of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and poly(ethylene glycol)-modified HRP (HRP-PEG) has been investigated under various conditions (in aqueous solution, the amorphous dehydrated state, and dissolved/suspended in toluene and benzene) by UV-visible (UV-Vis), FTIR, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The resonance Raman and UV-Vis spectra of dehydrated HRP-PEG dissolved in neat toluene or benzene were very similar to that of HRP in aqueous buffer, and thus the heme environment (heme iron spin, coordination, and redox state) was essentially the same under both conditions. Therefore, the three-dimensional structure of HRP-PEG dissolved in benzene and toluene was similar to that in aqueous solution. The amide I IR spectra of HRP-PEG in aqueous buffer and of dehydrated HRP-PEG dissolved in neat benzene and toluene were also very similar, and the secondary structure compositions (percentages of alpha-helices and beta-sheets) were within the standard error the same. These results are irreconcilable with recent claims that water removal per se could cause substantial amide I IR spectral changes (M. van de Weert, P.I. Haris, W.E. Hennink, and D.J. Crommelin. 2001. Anal. Biochem. 297:160-169). On the contrary, amide I IR spectral changes upon protein dehydration are caused by perturbations in the secondary structure. PMID:12496131

  16. Ultrastructural characterization of gerbil olivocochlear neurons based on differential uptake of /sup 3/H-D-aspartic acid and a wheatgerm agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate from the cochlea

    SciTech Connect

    Helfert, R.H.; Schwartz, I.R.; Ryan, A.F.

    1988-09-01

    Two populations of olivocochlear (OC) neurons have been identified in the gerbil brain stem on the basis of differential labeling patterns of 3H-D-aspartic acid (D-ASP) and wheatgerm agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate (WGA/HRP) from the cochlear perilymph. While both populations are capable of uptake and retrograde uptake of WGA/HRP, one population accumulates and retrogradely transports D-ASP (D-ASP OC neurons) and the other does not (non-D-ASP OC neurons). D-ASP OC neurons are found in or near the lateral superior olive, are small in size, and receive very few synaptic contacts. The vast majority of these synapses contain small, mildly pleomorphic vesicles with scattered dense core vesicles. Synapses with distinctly larger pleomorphic vesicles have also been observed. These neurons possess all of the features common to neurons of the lateral olivocochlear system. Non-D-ASP OC neurons are found primarily in the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, as well as in the area between the medial superior olive and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body. These neurons are larger and receive greater numbers and types of synaptic contacts than those found on D-ASP OC neurons. The 2 most common synapses found on non-D-ASP OC neurons are axosomatic ones containing small, mildly pleomorphic vesicles and scattered dense core vesicles similar to those seen on the D-ASP OC neurons, and axodendritic synapses containing large, round vesicles. Much less frequently observed are synapses containing small, round vesicles or ones containing predominantly flat vesicles. The ultrastructural features of the non-D-ASP OC neurons correspond to those described for neurons of the medial olivocochlear system.

  17. Development of multianalyte flow-through and lateral-flow assays using gold particles and horseradish peroxidase as tracers for the rapid determination of carbaryl and endosulfan in agricultural products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shuo

    2006-04-01

    Membrane-based competitive immunoassays using gold particles and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as tracers in flow-through and lateral-flow formats for multianalysis of carbaryl and endosulfan were developed. For gold-based immunoassay, membrane strips were coated with goat anti-rabbit IgG (control line) and carbaryl hapten-ovalbumin (OVA) and endosulfan hapten-OVA (test lines). The visual detection limits for carbaryl and endosulfan were 100 and 10 microg/L in gold-based assays, respectively. For immunoassay using HRP as tracer, anti-carbaryl and anti-endosulfan antibodies were separately coated on the membrane as test lines, and the visual detection limits were 10 microg/L for carbaryl and 1 microg/L for endosulfan. The developed assays used gold particles and HRP as labels, respectively; 10 times enhancement in the visual detection limit using HRP label was obtained in the study. Matrix interference was eliminated by appropriate dilution of sample extracts with buffer. For the validation of the multianalyte assay, the samples were screened by multianalyte gold-based assay and confirmed by HPLC for carbaryl determination and by GC for endosulfan determination. The results of multianalyte gold-based flow-through assay for the determination of carbaryl and endosulfan were in good agreement with the results of instrumental analysis (HPLC with ultraviolet detection and GC with electron capture detection). The developed multianalyte immunoassays for which the results were interpreted visually can be used as convenient qualitative tools for on-site rapid screening of carbaryl and endosulfan simultaneously in agricultural products. PMID:16569035

  18. pH-dependent one- and two-electron oxidation of 3,5-dicarbethoxy-2,6-dimethyl-4-ethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, K; Correia, M A; Thummel, K E; Nagata, K; Darbyshire, J F; Osawa, Y; Gillette, J R

    1994-01-01

    The porphyrinogenic agent 3,5-dicarbethoxy-2,6-dimethyl-4-ethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine (DDEP) is known to inactivate hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes 2C11, 2C6, and 3A1 [Correia et al. (1987) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 258, 436-451] by different mechanisms. The inactivation of P450 2C11 and 2C6 appears to be due to the ethylation of the heme in the active sites of the enzymes [Augusto et al. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 11288-11295], whereas the inactivation of P450 3A1 appears to involve the covalent binding of the heme to the apoprotein [Correia et al. (1987)]. Moreover, we have found that DDEP inactivates horseradish peroxidase (HRP) pretreated with hydrogen peroxide. In this system, DDEP was oxidized predominately to 3,5-dicarbethoxy-2,6-dimethyl-4-ethylpyridine (EDP) under weakly acidic conditions and predominately to 3,5-dicarbethoxy-2,6-dimethylpyridine (DP) under basic conditions. The loss of heme and the formation of altered heme products were also pH-dependent and were correlated with the formation of DP and the inactivation of HRP. Thus the inactivation of HRP appears to depend on the formation of an ethyl radical, which presumably reacts with the heme in the active site of the enzyme. Similar product ratios were obtained for the oxidation of DDEP by K3Fe(CN)6, indicating that product ratios of DP over EDP are mainly determined by the pH of buffer. These results, in addition to semiemperical calculations (AM1) for the oxidation of DDEP in the gas phase, are consistent with the idea that the inhibitor undergoes a single-electron oxidation to form the DDEP radical cation, the fate of which depends on the environment of the active site of the enzyme. The proposed formation of a radical cation by the abstraction of an electron from nitrogen is consistent with the finding of low intramolecular isotope effects of the metabolism of 3,5-dicarbethoxy-2,6-dimethyl-[4-2H,4-1H]-1,4-dihydropyridine by P450 2C11 and 3A4. Under basic or aprotic conditions, the radical

  19. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  20. Screening Actinomycetes for Extracellular Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, D. K.; Iqbal, M.; Miller, P.; McCarthy, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A diverse collection of actinomycete strains were screened for production of extracellular peroxidase activity by adapting a chemiluminescence analysis system developed for horseradish peroxidase-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Extracellular peroxidase activity was found to be common but quantitatively variable, and this rapid and sensitive screening system permitted identification of a small group of high-producing strains. A range of spectrophotometric assays were compared for the measurement of peroxidase activity in concentrated culture supernatants of two selected thermophilic streptomycetes. Of these, the peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol was identified as the most robust and reproducible assay for quantitative studies. PMID:16535344

  1. Lignin-degrading peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Tien, M

    1993-07-01

    Lignin and manganese peroxidases are secreted by the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium during secondary metabolism. These enzymes play major roles in lignin degradation. The active site amino acid sequence of these lignin-degrading peroxidases is similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP). The mechanism by which they oxidize substrates also appears to be the similar. pH has a similar effect on lignin peroxidase compound I formation as on HRP or CcP; however, the pKa controlling compound I formation for lignin peroxidase appears to be much lower. Lignin-degrading peroxidases are able to catalyze the oxidation of substrates with high redox potential. This unique ability is consistent with a heme active site of low electron density, which is indicated by high redox potential. PMID:7763834

  2. Graft copolymers with immobilized peroxidase for organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vargas, Reinaldo Romero; Higa, Olga Zazuco; Barrak, Élcio Rogério; Bechara, Etelvino J. H.; Wlasdislaw, Blanka; Marzorati, Liliana

    1999-07-01

    The graft copolymer poly(propylene)-graft-poly(acrylic acid) (PP-G-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto polypropylene spheres and characterized by thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Maximum percentage of grafting (70%) was obtained at a total dose of 12 kGy using 30% (w/w) of acrylic acid. The Michaelis constant, KM, and the maximum reaction velocity, VMax, were determined for the free horseradish peroxidase and for the immobilized horseradish peroxidase. The enzyme affinity for the substrate ( KM/ Vmax) remains quite good after immobilization. The sulfoxidation reaction of a ketosulfide was investigated with the immobilized peroxidase.

  3. Cooxidation of styrene by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 4-methylphenol

    SciTech Connect

    Grab, L.A.; Ortiz, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    Styrene is cooxidized to styrene oxide in a system containing HRP/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and 4-methylphenol. Styrene oxide is not formed in the absence of any of these components, or if the reaction is run under anaerobic conditions. Styrene oxide formation is inhibited by ascorbic acid and catalase but not mannitol or superoxide dismutase. Incubation with /sup 18/O/sub 2/ resulted in more than 90% incorporation of label into styrene oxide. The epoxidation of trans-(1-/sup 2/H)styrene occurred with partial loss of stereochemistry. The products expected from addition of the phenoxy radical to styrene were synthesized and shown not to be formed. Finally, EPR evidence was obtained for formation of 4-methyl catechol in the presence, but not absence, of styrene. The results imply that a peroxy radical is formed by addition of oxygen to the HRP-generated 4-methylphenoxy radical, and that this peroxy radical then cooxidizes styrene.

  4. Soybean peroxidase as an industrial catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pokora, A.R.

    1995-12-01

    Peroxidases are a large class of enzymes which are very efficient at catalysing oxidation reactions. Horseradish peroxidase, the most abundant and commercially available peroxidase, has been utilized for many years in medical diagnostic test kits but has never been used successfully in an industrial application. One of the major drawbacks associated with the peroxidases cost and has been their lack of the thermal stability required in an industrial process. Recently, we isolated has been their lack of the peroxidase from soybean seed coats. Soybean seed coats are a commodity product available year round in very large volumes. The useful operational temperature for the soy peroxidase is 40{degrees}C higher than for horseradish peroxidase resulting in shorter reaction times and greater reactor efficiency. This process can be used to produce formaldehyde-free polyphenols as well as numerous phenolic dimers used in the manufacture of anti-oxidants, U-V absorbers, epoxies as well as other materials. The process to manufacture resins and dimers will be discussed.

  5. Novel Applications of Peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Abdul; Ball, Andrew S.; Tuncer, Munir; Wilson, Michael T.

    1997-02-01

    The article entitled "Novel Biocatalysts Will Work Even Better for Industry" published recently in this Journal (1) was informative and interesting. However it touched only briefly on the application of peroxidase as catalyst. Here, we would like to mention in more detail the novel applications of peroxidase in agricultural, paper pulp, water treatment, pharmaceutical, and medical situations. Firstly, the peroxidase isolated from Phanerochaete chyrosporium has been shown to detoxify herbicides such as atrazine to less toxic compounds and would certainly find potential application in agriculture (2). Secondly, the peroxidase produced by Streptomyces thermoviolaceus may find application in the paper pulp industry as a delignifying agent (3). Thirdly, it has been shown that extracellular peroxidase produced by Streptomyces avermitilis can remove the intense color from paper-mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw (4), and thus this enzyme might find application as a catalyst in water treatment plants. Fourthly, the heme-containing horseradish peroxidase enzyme has been exploited in several diagnostic applications in pharmaceutics and medicine, such as the detection of human immunodeficiency virus and cystic fibrosis (5-10). Finally, recent work from our laboratory has suggested that thermophilic nonheme peroxidase produced by Thermomonospora fusca BD25 may find medical use in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (11, 12). Literature Cited 1. Wiseman, A. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 55-58. 2. Mougin, C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 705-708. 3. McCarthy A. J.; Peace, W.; Broda, P. Appl. Microbiol. Technol. 1985, 23, 238-244. 4. Hernandez, M; Rodriguez J; Soliveri, J; Copa, J. L; Perez, M. I; Arias, M. E. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 3909-3913. 5. Hopfer, S. M.; Aslanzadeh, J. Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 1995, 25, 475-480. 6. Suzuki, K; Iman, M. J. Virol. Methods 1995, 55, 347-356. 7. Nielsen, K. J. Immunoassay 1995, 16, 183-197. 8

  6. Hydroxyl-radical production in physiological reactions. A novel function of peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, S X; Schopfer, P

    1999-03-01

    Peroxidases catalyze the dehydrogenation by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) of various phenolic and endiolic substrates in a peroxidatic reaction cycle. In addition, these enzymes exhibit an oxidase activity mediating the reduction of O2 to superoxide (O2.-) and H2O2 by substrates such as NADH or dihydroxyfumarate. Here we show that horseradish peroxidase can also catalyze a third type of reaction that results in the production of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) from H2O2 in the presence of O2.-. We provide evidence that to mediate this reaction, the ferric form of horseradish peroxidase must be converted by O2.- into the perferryl form (Compound III), in which the haem iron can assume the ferrous state. It is concluded that the ferric/perferryl peroxidase couple constitutes an effective biochemical catalyst for the production of .OH from O2.- and H2O2 (iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction). This reaction can be measured either by the hydroxylation of benzoate or the degradation of deoxyribose. O2.- and H2O2 can be produced by the oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase in the presence of NADH. The .OH-producing activity of horseradish peroxidase can be inhibited by inactivators of haem iron or by various O2.- and .OH scavengers. On an equimolar Fe basis, horseradish peroxidase is 1-2 orders of magnitude more active than Fe-EDTA, an inorganic catalyst of the Haber-Weiss reaction. Particularly high .OH-producing activity was found in the alkaline horseradish peroxidase isoforms and in a ligninase-type fungal peroxidase, whereas lactoperoxidase and soybean peroxidase were less active, and myeloperoxidase was inactive. Operating in the .OH-producing mode, peroxidases may be responsible for numerous destructive and toxic effects of activated oxygen reported previously. PMID:10103001

  7. Proton NMR investigation into the basis for the relatively high redox potential of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Turano, P. ); Ming Tien ); Kirk, T.K. )

    1991-08-15

    Lignin peroxidase shares several structural features with the well-studied horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase but carries a higher redox potential. Here the heme domain of lignin peroxidase and the lignin peroxidase cyanide adduct was examined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, including nuclear Overhauser effect and two-dimensional measurements, and the findings were compared with those for horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase. Structural information was obtained on the orientation of the heme vinyl and propionate groups and the proximal and distal histidines. The shifts of the {var epsilon}1 proton of the proximal histidine were found to be empirically related to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox potentials.

  8. Two cationic peroxidases from cell walls of Araucaria araucana seeds.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, A; Cardemil, L

    1995-05-01

    We have previously reported the purification and partial characterization of two cationic peroxidases from the cell walls of seeds and seedlings of the South American conifer, Araucaria araucana. In this work, we have studied the amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequences of both enzymes. We also compare the data obtained from these analyses with those reported for other plant peroxidases. The two peroxidases are similar in their amino acid compositions. Both are particularly rich in glycine, which comprises more than 30% of the amino acid residues. The content of serine is also high, ca 17%. The two enzymes are different in their content of arginine, alanine, valine, phenylalanine and threonine. Both peroxidases have identical NH2-terminal sequences, indicating that the two proteins are genetically related and probably are isoforms of the same kind of peroxidase. The amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequence analyses showed marked differences from the cationic peroxidases from turnip and horseradish. PMID:7786490

  9. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Sequence analysis and homology modeling of peroxidase from Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Vinita; Gundala, Prasada babu; Chinthala, Paramageetham

    2012-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are one of the most extensively studied group of enzymes which find applications in the environment, health, pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnological processes. Class III secretary peroxidase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has been characterized using bioinformatics approach Physiochemical properties and topology of alfalfa peroxidase were compared with that of soybean and horseradish peroxidase, two most popular commercially available peroxidase preparations. Lower value of instability index as predicted by ProtParam and presence of extra disulphide linkages as predicted by Cys_REC suggested alfalfa peroxidase to be more stable than either of the commercial preparations. Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) with other functionally similar proteins revealed the presence of highly conserved catalytic residues. Three dimensional model of alfalfa peroxidase was constructed based on the crystal structure of soybean peroxidase (PDB Id: 1FHF A) by homology modelling approach. The model was checked for stereo chemical quality by PROCHECH, VERIFY 3D, WHAT IF, ERRAT, 3D MATCH AND ProSA servers. The best model was selected, energy minimized and used to analyze structure function relationship with substrate hydrogen peroxide by Autodock 4.0. The enzyme substrate complex was viewed with Swiss PDB viewer and one residue ASP43 was found to stabilize the interaction by hydrogen bonds. The results of the study may be a guiding point for further investigations on alfalfa peroxidase. PMID:23275690

  11. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. PMID:26111515

  12. Peroxidase mediated conjugation of corn fibeer gum and bovine serum albumin to improve emulsifying properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum (CFG), a naturally-occurring polysaccharide protein complex, were improved by kinetically controlled formation of hetero-covalent linkages with bovine serum albumin (BSA), using horseradish peroxidase. The formation of hetero-crosslinked CFG-BSA conjugate...

  13. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M. )

    1989-04-18

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum.

  14. Applications and Prospective of Peroxidase Biocatalysis in the Environmental Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    Environmental protection is, doubtless, one of the most important challenges for the human kind. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, endocrine disruptive chemicals, pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. A large variety of these xenobiotics are substrates for peroxidases and thus susceptible to enzymatic transformation. The literature reports mainly the use of horseradish peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and chloroperoxidase on the transformation of these pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, giving oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to a biological activity loss, a reduction in the bioavailability or due to the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. In addition, when the pollutants are present in soil, peroxidases catalyze a covalent binding to soil organic matter. In most of cases, oxidized products are less toxic and easily biodegradable than the parent compounds. In spite of their versatility and potential use in environmental processes, peroxidases are not applied at large scale yet. Diverse challenges, such as stability, redox potential, and the production of large amounts, should be solved in order to apply peroxidases in the pollutant transformation. In this chapter, we critically review the transformation of different xenobiotics by peroxidases, with special attention on the identified transformation products, the probable reaction mechanisms, and the toxicity reports. Finally, the design and development of an environmental biocatalyst is discussed. The design challenges are

  15. Structural diversity and transcription of class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Karen G; Justesen, Annemarie F; Kjaersgård, Inger V H; Jensen, Rikke B; Rasmussen, Søren K; Jespersen, Hans M; Duroux, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Understanding peroxidase function in plants is complicated by the lack of substrate specificity, the high number of genes, their diversity in structure and our limited knowledge of peroxidase gene transcription and translation. In the present study we sequenced expressed sequence tags (ESTs) encoding novel heme-containing class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana and annotated 73 full-length genes identified in the genome. In total, transcripts of 58 of these genes have now been observed. The expression of individual peroxidase genes was assessed in organ-specific EST libraries and compared to the expression of 33 peroxidase genes which we analyzed in whole plants 3, 6, 15, 35 and 59 days after sowing. Expression was assessed in root, rosette leaf, stem, cauline leaf, flower bud and cell culture tissues using the gene-specific and highly sensitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We predicted that 71 genes could yield stable proteins folded similarly to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The putative mature peroxidases derived from these genes showed 28-94% amino acid sequence identity and were all targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum by N-terminal signal peptides. In 20 peroxidases these signal peptides were followed by various N-terminal extensions of unknown function which are not present in HRP. Ten peroxidases showed a C-terminal extension indicating vacuolar targeting. We found that the majority of peroxidase genes were expressed in root. In total, class III peroxidases accounted for an impressive 2.2% of root ESTs. Rather few peroxidases showed organ specificity. Most importantly, genes expressed constitutively in all organs and genes with a preference for root represented structurally diverse peroxidases (< 70% sequence identity). Furthermore, genes appearing in tandem showed distinct expression profiles. The alignment of 73 Arabidopsis peroxidase sequences provides an easy access to the identification of orthologous peroxidases

  16. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Weert, Sandra; Lokman, B. Christien

    The industrial importance of peroxidases has led to much research in the past two decades on the development of a cost effective and efficient production process for peroxidases. Unfortunately, even today, no clear answers can be given to questions such as (1) should the peroxidase be expressed in bacteria, yeast, or fungi? (2) which is the optimal production strain (e.g., protease deficient, heme overproducing)? (3) which expression vector should be chosen? and (4) what purification method should be used? Strategies that have proven successful for one peroxidase can fail for another one; for each individual peroxidase, a new strategy has to be developed. This chapter gives an overview of the heterologous production of heme containing peroxidases in various systems. It focuses on the heterologous production of fungal peroxidases as they have been subject of considerable research for their industrial and environmental applications. An earlier study has also been performed by Conesa et al. [1] and is extended with recent proceedings.

  17. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized (veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)), we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  18. Redox Potential of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Marcela

    Redox potential of peroxidases greatly influences the range of oxidizable substrates: in principle, peroxidases may only catalyze the oxidation of substrates with lower redox potential. There is substantial information on the factors that modulate the redox potential of heme proteins. Both theoretical and experimental evidence highlight the most significant contributions arising from the interaction of heme iron with the axial ligands, as well as the electrostatic interactions surrounding the heme group. However, for different proteins, the factors contribute to different extents. Understanding the electrochemistry of heme peroxidases is fundamental in order to design enhanced biocatalysts. In this chapter, current knowledge of the forces influencing redox potential of heme peroxidases is reviewed.

  19. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  20. Nanostructures for peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  1. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  2. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  3. Immobilized Horseradish Peroxidase on Discs of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Glutaraldehyde Coated with Polyaniline

    PubMed Central

    Caramori, Samantha Salomão; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia; de Carvalho Junior, Luiz Bezerra

    2012-01-01

    Discs of network polyvinyl alcohol-glutaraldehyde (PVAG) were synthesized and coated with polyaniline (PANI) using glutaraldehyde as a chemical arm (PVAG-PANIG-HRP disc). The best conditions for the immobilization were established as about 1.0 mg mL−1 of protein, for 60 min and pH 5.5. The soluble enzyme lost all of its activity after incubation at 70°C for 15 min, whereas the PVAG-PANIG-HRP disc retained about half of the initial activity for pyrogallol. The same PVAG-PANIG-HRP disc was used consecutively three times without any activity lossbut presented 25% of the initial activity after the 7th use. PVAG-PANIG-HRP disc retained approximately 80% and 60% of its initial activity after 60 and 80 days of storage, respectively. Resorcinol, m-cresol, catechol, pyrogallol, α-naphthol, βnaphthol, and 4, 4′-diaminodiphenyl benzidine were efficiently oxidized by the PVAG-PANIG-HRP disc (from about 70% to 90%), and it was less efficient towards aniline, phenol, and 2-nitrosonaphthol. PMID:22619582

  4. Human myeloperoxidase (MPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed oxidation of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.; Eastmond, D.A.; Ruzo, L.O.; Smith, M.T.

    1986-03-01

    MPO-catalyzed conversion of phenolic metabolites of benzene may be involved in benzene-induced myelotoxicity. The authors have studied the metabolism and protein binding of phenol - the major metabolite of benzene - during peroxidatic oxidation. The major metabolite observed during MPO- and HRP- catalyzed oxidation was characterized as 4,4 biphenol using HPLC and combined GC-MS. When glutathione (GSH) was added to the incubation mixtures, two additional compounds were observed during HPLC analysis which were characterized as GSH-conjugates of 4,4-diphenoquinone by fast atom bombardment MS and by NMR. ESR spectroscopy showed that both MPO-and HRP-catalyzed oxidation of phenol proceeded via the generation of free radical intermediates. Using /sup 14/C-phenol, both MPO- and HRP-catalyzed oxidations resulted in the production of species which bound covalently to boiled liver microsomal protein. The increase in binding correlated well with removal of substrate. Thus, peroxidatic oxidation of phenolic metabolites of benzene in the bone marrow may be involved in benzene-induced myelotoxicity.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide-independent generation of superoxide catalyzed by soybean peroxidase in response to ferrous ion

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that extracellular alkalization occurs in plants under the challenges by pathogenic microbes. This may eventually induce the pH-dependent extracellular peroxidase-mediated oxidative burst at the site of microbial challenges. By employing the purified proteins of horseradish peroxidase as a model, we have recently proposed a likely role for free Fe2+ in reduction of ferric enzyme of plant peroxidases into ferrous intermediate and oxygen-bound form of enzyme known as Compound III which may eventually releases superoxide anion radical (O2•−), especially under alkaline condition, possibly contributing to the plant defense mechanism. In the present study, we employed the purified protein of soybean peroxidase (SBP) as an additional model, and examined the changes in the redox status of enzyme accompanying the generation of O2•− in response to Fe2+ under alkaline condition. PMID:26417938

  6. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification. PMID:24632343

  7. Removal of phenolic compounds from wastewaters using soybean peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.; Nicell, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Toxic and odiferous phenolic compounds are present in wastewaters generated by a variety of industries including petroleum refining, plastics, resins, textiles, and iron and steel manufacturing among others. Due to its commercial availability in purified form, its useful presence in raw plant material, and its proven ability to remove a variety of phenolic contaminants from wastewaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) appears to be the peroxidase enzyme of choice in enzymatic wastewater treatment studies. Problems with HRP catalyzed phenol removal, however, include the formation of toxic soluble reaction by-products, the cost of the enzyme, and costs associated with disposal of the phenolic precipitate generated. Enzyme costs are incurred because the enzyme is inactivated during the phenol removal process by various side reactions. While recent work has shown that enzyme inactivation can be reduced using chemical additives, the problem of enzyme cost could be circumvented by using a less expensive source of enzyme. In 1991, the seed coat of the soybean was identified as a very rich source of peroxidase enzyme. Since the seed coat of the soybean is a waste product of the soybean food industry, soybean peroxidase (SBP) has the potential of being a cost effective alternative to HRP in wastewater treatment. In this study, SBP is characterized in terms of its catalytic activity, its stability, and its ability to promote removal of phenolic compounds from synthetic wastewaters. Results obtained are discussed and compared to similar investigations using HRP.

  8. 18O studies of the peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of N-methylcarbazole. Mechanisms of carbinolamine and carboxaldehyde formation.

    PubMed

    Kedderis, G L; Rickert, D E; Pandey, R N; Hollenberg, P F

    1986-12-01

    Chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, hemoglobin, myoglobin, lactoperoxidase, and microperoxidase catalyzed the ethyl hydroperoxide-dependent oxidation of N-methylcarbazole to N-(hydroxymethyl)carbazole and N-formylcarbazole as major products. Mass spectral analysis of the N-(hydroxymethyl)carbazole formed during the peroxidase-catalyzed N-demethylation of N-methylcarbazole in 18O-enriched medium indicated partial incorporation (7.5-25.9%) of solvent water oxygen into the carbinolamine intermediate in all systems investigated, suggesting that the peroxidase active site is partially accessible to solvent water during N-demethylation. In contrast, solvent water oxygen was not incorporated into the N-formylcarbazole formed during the peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of N-methylcarbazole. N-(Hydroxymethyl)carbazole was not further metabolized by the peroxidases in the presence of ethyl hydroperoxide, indicating that it is not an intermediate in N-formylcarbazole formation. The horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed formation of N-formylcarbazole was decreased by 77% when the hydroperoxide-supported reactions were carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere, while the formation of N-(hydroxymethyl)carbazole was decreased by 46%. When the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed reactions were carried out in a 18O2 atmosphere, 18O incorporation into N-(hydroxymethyl)carbazole was 64.4% of the total oxygen, while 81.8% of the oxygen incorporated into N-formylcarbazole came from 18O2. These results suggest that there are two different mechanisms for the formation of N-(hydroxymethyl)carbazole, both involving the initial oxidation of N-methylcarbazole to a neutral carbon-centered radical. The radical can be further oxidized in the enzyme active site to an iminium cation, which reacts with water derived from either the oxidant or the medium to form the carbinolamine. Alternatively, the substrate radical can react with molecular oxygen to form a hydroperoxy radical, which decomposes to form the

  9. Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) exhibit NADH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Wiseman, Ben; Deemagarn, Taweewat; Donald, Lynda J; Duckworth, Harry W; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2004-10-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyze the oxidation of NADH to form NAD+ and either H2O2 or superoxide radical depending on pH. The NADH oxidase reaction requires molecular oxygen, does not require hydrogen peroxide, is not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase, and has a pH optimum of 8.75, clearly differentiating it from the peroxidase and catalase reactions with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.5, respectively, and from the NADH peroxidase-oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase. B. pseudomallei KatG has a relatively high affinity for NADH (Km=12 microm), but the oxidase reaction is slow (kcat=0.54 min(-1)) compared with the peroxidase and catalase reactions. The catalase-peroxidases also catalyze the hydrazinolysis of isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) in an oxygen- and H2O2-independent reaction, and KatG-dependent radical generation from a mixture of NADH and INH is two to three times faster than the combined rates of separate reactions with NADH and INH alone. The major products from the coupled reaction, identified by high pressure liquid chromatography fractionation and mass spectrometry, are NAD+ and isonicotinoyl-NAD, the activated form of isoniazid that inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Isonicotinoyl-NAD synthesis from a mixture of NAD+ and INH is KatG-dependent and is activated by manganese ion. M. tuberculosis KatG catalyzes isonicotinoyl-NAD formation from NAD+ and INH more efficiently than B. pseudomallei KatG. PMID:15280362

  10. Effect of Low and Very Low Doses of Simple Phenolics on Plant Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malarczyk, Elżbieta; Kochmańska-Rdest, Janina; Paździoch-Czochra, Marzanna

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the activity of horseradish peroxidase resulting from an addition of ethanol water dilutions of 19 phenolic compounds were observed. For each compound, the enzyme activity was plotted against the degree of dilution expressed as n = –log100 (mol/L) in the range 0 ≤ n ≥ 20. All the curves showed sinusoidal activity, more or less regular, with two to four peaks on average. Each analyzed compound had a characteristic sinusoidal shape, which was constant for samples of peroxidase from various commercial firms. This was clearly visible after function fitting to experimental results based on the Marquadt–Levenberg algorithm using the least-squares method. Among the 19 phenolics, the highest amplitudes were observed for phenol and iso- and vanillate acids and aldehydes. The specific character of each of the analyzed curves offers a possibility of choosing proper dilutions of phenolic compound for activating or inhibiting of peroxidase activity. PMID:19330128

  11. [Thermostabilities of plant phenol oxidase and peroxidase, determining the technology of their use in food industry].

    PubMed

    Mchedlishvili, N I; Omiadze, N T; Gulua, L K; Sadunishvili, T A; Zamtaradze, R K; Abutidze, M O; Bendeliani, E G; Kvesitadze, G I

    2005-01-01

    Stabilities of phenol oxidase and peroxidase from tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) clone Kolkhida leaves, apple (Malus domestica L.) cultivar Kekhura fruits, walnut (Juglans regia L.) green pericarp, and horseradish (Armoracia lapathifolia Gilib) roots were studied using different storage temperature modes and storage duration. It was demonstrated that both enzymes retained residual activities (approximately 10%) upon 20-min incubation at 80 degrees C. Phenol oxidases from tea, walnut, and, especially, apple, as well as tea peroxidase were stable during storage. A technology for treatment of plant oxidases was proposed, based on the use of a natural inhibitor phenol oxidase and peroxidase, isolated from tea leaves, which solving the problem of residual activities of these enzymes, arising during pasteurization and storage of beverages and juices. It was demonstrated that browning of apple juice during pasteurization and beer turbidity during storage could be efficiently prevented using the natural inhibitor of these enzymes. PMID:15859458

  12. Broccoli processing wastes as a source of peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Vázquez, Miguel A; García-Padilla, Sandra; García-Almendárez, Blanca E; Whitaker, John R; Regalado, Carlos

    2007-12-12

    A peroxidase isozyme (BP) was purified to homogeneity from broccoli stems ( Brassica oleraceae var. maraton) discarded from industrial processing wastes. BP specific activity was 1216 ABTS [2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] units/mg, representing 466-fold that of crude extract. BP is a monomeric glycoprotein containing 16% carbohydrates, with a molecular mass of 49 kDa and an isoelectric point close to 4.2. From kinetic data it showed a two-substrate ping-pong mechanism, and the catalytic efficiency measured as the rate-limiting step of free BP regeneration was 3.4 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The ABTS K m value was 0.2 mM, which was about 20 times lower than that reported for acidic commercial horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Assessment of BP secondary structure showed 30% helical character, similar to HRP and cytochrome c peroxidase. BP lost only 25% activity after 10 min of heating at 55 degrees C and pH 6; it was stable in the pH range from 4 to 9 and showed an optimum pH of 4.6 using ABTS as substrate. BP was active on substrates normally involved in lignin biosynthesis, such as caffeic and ferulic acids, and also displayed good catechol oxidation activity in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Reverse micellar extraction was successfully used as potential large-scale prepurification of broccoli peroxidase, achieving a purification factor of 7, with 60% activity yield. Stems from the broccoli processing industry have a high potential as an alternative for peroxidase purification. PMID:17997521

  13. Degradation of textile dyes mediated by plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Nair, R Aswathi; Abraham, T Emilia

    2002-01-01

    The peroxidase enzyme from the plants Ipomea palmata (1.003 IU/g of leaf) and Saccharum spontaneum (3.6 IU/g of leaf) can be used as an alternative to the commercial source of horseradish and soybean peroxidase enzyme for the decolorization of textile dyes, mainly azo dyes. Eight textiles dyes currently used by the industry and seven other dyes were selected for decolorization studies at 25-200 mg/L levels using these plant enzymes. The enzymes were purified prior to use by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and ion exchange and gel permeation chromatographic techniques. Peroxidase of S. spontaneum leaf (specific activity of 0.23 IU/mg) could completely degrade Supranol Green and Procion Green HE-4BD (100%) dyes within 1 h, whereas Direct Blue, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G and Chrysoidine were degraded >70% in 1 h. Peroxidase of Ipomea (I. palmata leaf; specific activity of 0.827 U/mg) degraded 50 mg/L of the dyes Methyl Orange (26%), Crystal Violet (36%), and Supranol Green (68%) in 2-4 h and Brilliant Green (54%), Direct Blue (15%), and Chrysoidine (44%) at the 25 mg/L level in 1 to 2 h of treatment. The Saccharum peroxidase was immobilized on a hydrophobic matrix. Four textile dyes, Procion Navy Blue HER, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G, Procion Green HE-4BD, and Supranol Green, at an initial concentration of 50 mg/L were completely degraded within 8 h by the enzyme immobilized on the modified polyethylene matrix. The immobilized enzyme was used in a batch reactor for the degradation of Procion Green HE-4BD and the reusability was studied for 15 cycles, and the half-life was found to be 60 h. PMID:12396133

  14. Catalase-peroxidase (Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG) catalysis and isoniazid activation.

    PubMed

    Chouchane, S; Lippai, I; Magliozzo, R S

    2000-08-15

    Resonance Raman spectra of native, overexpressed M. tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG), the enzyme responsible for activation of the antituberculosis antibiotic isoniazid (isonicotinic acid hydrazide), have confirmed that the heme iron in the resting (ferric) enzyme is high-spin five-coordinate. Difference Raman spectra did not reveal a change in coordination number upon binding of isoniazid to KatG. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of KatG with stoichiometric equivalents or small excesses of hydrogen peroxide revealed only the optical spectrum of the ferric enzyme with no hypervalent iron intermediates detected. Large excesses of hydrogen peroxide generated oxyferrous KatG, which was unstable and rapidly decayed to the ferric enzyme. Formation of a pseudo-stable intermediate sharing optical characteristics with the porphyrin pi-cation radical-ferryl iron species (Compound I) of horseradish peroxidase was observed upon reaction of KatG with excess 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid, peroxyacetic acid, or tert-butylhydroperoxide (apparent second-order rate constants of 3.1 x 10(4), 1.2 x 10(4), and 25 M(-1) s(-1), respectively). Identification of the intermediate as KatG Compound I was confirmed using low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Isoniazid, as well as ascorbate and potassium ferrocyanide, reduced KatG Compound I to the ferric enzyme without detectable formation of Compound II in stopped-flow measurements. This result differed from the reaction of horseradish peroxidase Compound I with isoniazid, during which Compound II was stably generated. These results demonstrate important mechanistic differences between a bacterial catalase-peroxidase and the homologous plant peroxidases and yeast cytochrome c peroxidase, in its reactions with peroxides as well as substrates. PMID:10933818

  15. Computer-controlled system for the study of oxidase reactions: application to the peroxidase-oxidase oscillator.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew G; Tipton, Keith F

    2010-12-16

    An apparatus for the study of bisubstrate oxidase reactions at maintained steady-state substrate concentrations is described, and its specific application to the peroxidase-oxidase biochemical oscillator is reported. Instrument control and data acquisition are provided by custom software written in LabVIEW. The software allows measurement, recording, and control of dissolved oxygen through a Clark-type oxygen electrode, reaction monitoring by a UV/vis spectrophotometer, and controlled substrate delivery by a syringe infusion pump. For peroxidase from horseradish, the optimal pH for oscillatory behavior was found to be in the range 4.5-5.5. PMID:21049952

  16. Biotechnological advances towards an enhanced peroxidase production in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Florian W; Gerstmann, Michaela A; Darnhofer, Barbara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Glieder, Anton

    2016-09-10

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is a high-demand enzyme for applications in diagnostics, bioremediation, biocatalysis and medicine. Current HRP preparations are isolated from horseradish roots as mixtures of biochemically diverse isoenzymes. Thus, there is a strong need for a recombinant production process enabling a steady supply with enzyme preparations of consistent high quality. However, most current recombinant production systems are limited at titers in the low mg/L range. In this study, we used the well-known yeast Pichia pastoris as host for recombinant HRP production. To enhance recombinant enzyme titers we systematically evaluated engineering approaches on the secretion process, coproduction of helper proteins, and compared expression from the strong methanol-inducible PAOX1 promoter, the strong constitutive PGAP promoter, and a novel bidirectional promoter PHTX1. Ultimately, coproduction of HRP and active Hac1 under PHTX1 control yielded a recombinant HRP titer of 132mg/L after 56h of cultivation in a methanol-independent and easy-to-do bioreactor cultivation process. With regard to the many versatile applications for HRP, the establishment of a microbial host system suitable for efficient recombinant HRP production was highly overdue. The novel HRP production platform in P. pastoris presented in this study sets a new benchmark for this medically relevant enzyme. PMID:27432633

  17. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized [veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)], we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  18. A new generation of flowerlike horseradish peroxides as a nanobiocatalyst for superior enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Dogru, Esra; Usta, Seyda

    2015-01-01

    Although various supports including nanomaterials have been widely utilized as platforms for enzymes immobilization in order to enhance their catalytic activities, most of immobilized enzymes exhibited reduced activities compared to free enzymes. In this study, for the first time, we used iron ions (Fe(2+)) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme together to synthesize flowerlike hybrid nanostructures with greatly enhanced activity and stability and reported an explanation of the enhancements in both catalytic activity and stability. We demonstrated that Fe(2+)-HRP hybrid nanoflower (HNF) showed catalytic activity of ∼ 512% and ∼ 710%, respectively when stored at +4 °C and room temperature (RT = 20 °C) compared to free HRP. In addition, the HNF stored at +4 °C lost only 2.9% of its original activity within 30 days while the HNF stored at RT lost approximately 10% of its original activity. However, under the same conditions, free HRP enzymes stored at +4 °C and RT lost 68% and 91% of their activities, respectively. We claim that the drastic increases in activities of HNF are associated with to high local HRP concentration in nanoscale dimension, appropriate HRP conformation, less mass transfer limitations, and role of Fe(2+) ion as an activator for HRP. Further biosensors studies based on enhanced activity and stability of HNF are currently underway. PMID:26047912

  19. Antimicrobial activities of phenethyl isothiocyanate isolated from horseradish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxia; Wang, Chengzhang; Ye, Jianzhong; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Xijuan

    2012-01-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) was obtained from horseradish. The preparation procedure was as follows: the horseradish powder was hydrolysed in the water first, and then, after filtration, the residue was extracted by petroleum ether; finally, PEITC was isolated by silica gel column. The structure of PEITC was identified by IR, MS, ¹H-NMR and ¹³C-NMR chromatography methods. The inhibitory activities of PEITC against Gibberella zeae, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv . citri, Cytospora sp . and Phytophthora capsisi showed that PEITC had good inhibition effects. The EC₅₀ values of G. zeae, X. axonopodis pv . citri, Cytospora sp . and P. capsisi were 13.92, 1.20, 0.73 and 3.69 µg mL⁻¹, respectively. PMID:21815843

  20. Molecular Phylogeny of Heme Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Obinger, Christian

    All currently available gene sequences of heme peroxidases can be phylogenetically divided in two superfamilies and three families. In this chapter, the phylogenetics and genomic distribution of each group are presented. Within the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, the main evolutionary direction developed peroxidatic heme proteins involved in the innate immune defense system and in biosynthesis of (iodinated) hormones. The peroxidase-catalase superfamily is widely spread mainly among bacteria, fungi, and plants, and particularly in Class I led to the evolution of bifunctional catalase-peroxidases. Its numerous fungal representatives of Class II are involved in carbon recycling via lignin degradation, whereas Class III secretory peroxidases from algae and plants are included in various forms of secondary metabolism. The family of di-heme peroxidases are predominantly bacteria-inducible enzymes; however, a few corresponding genes were also detected in archaeal genomes. Four subfamilies of dyp-type peroxidases capable of degradation of various xenobiotics are abundant mainly among bacteria and fungi. Heme-haloperoxidase genes are widely spread among sac and club fungi, but corresponding genes were recently found also among oomycetes. All described families herein represent heme peroxidases of broad diversity in structure and function. Our accumulating knowledge about the evolution of various enzymatic functions and physiological roles can be exploited in future directed evolution approaches for engineering peroxidase genes de novo for various demands.

  1. Antioxidant Capacity of Poly(Ethylene Glycol) (PEG) as Protection Mechanism Against Hydrogen Peroxide Inactivation of Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Moreno, Karla; Ayala, Marcela; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The ability of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to protect enzymatic peroxidase activity was determined for horseradish peroxidase (HRP), versatile peroxidase (VP), commercial Coprinus peroxidase (BP), and chloroperoxidase (CPO). The operational stability measured as the total turnover number was determined for the four peroxidases. The presence of PEG significantly increased the operational stability of VP and HRP up to 123 and 195%, respectively, and dramatically increased the total turnover number of BP up to 597%. Chloroperoxidase was not protected by PEG, which may be due to the different oxidation mechanism, in which the oxidation is mediated by hypochlorous ion instead of free radicals as in the other peroxidases. The presence of PEG does not protect the enzyme when incubated only in the presence of H2O2 without reducing substrate. The catalytic constants (k cat) are insensitive to the presence of PEG, suggesting that the protection mechanism is not due to a competition between the PEG and the substrate as electron donors. On the other hand, PEG showed to have a significant antioxidant capacity. Thus, we conclude that the protection mechanism for peroxidases of PEG is based in its antioxidant capacity with which it is able scavenge or drain radicals that are harmful to the protein. PMID:26306530

  2. Impurity-induced peroxidase mimicry of nanoclay and its potential for the spectrophotometric determination of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Aneesh, K; Vusa, Chiranjeevi Srinivasa Rao; Berchmans, Sheela

    2016-09-01

    A green version of the "Fe" impurity-induced peroxidase mimicry exhibited by simple and cheap substrate "nanoclay (NC)" along with the highly sensitive amperometric and spectrophotometric determination of cholesterol is demonstrated. The "Fe" impurity can act as the catalyst center for hydrogen peroxide reduction similar to the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed reaction. The Michaelis-Menten constant for the NC-catalyzed reaction is found to be lower than that of the HRP-catalyzed reaction indicating high affinity for the substrate. The NC-modulated peroxidase-like catalytic activity originates from the electron transfer between the reducing substrate in the catalyst center and H2O2 with the intermediate generation of hydroxyl radicals. The peroxidase mimicry is successfully applied for the low-potential electrochemical detection of H2O2 (linear detection range 1.96-10.71 mM, R (2) = 0.97). The H2O2 sensing platform is further modified with cholesterol oxidase (CHOx) for the spectrophotometric (linear detection range 50-244 μM, R (2) = 0.99) and amperometric detection of cholesterol (linear detection range 0.099-1.73 mM, R (2) = 0.998). Graphical abstract Peroxidase mimicry of nanoclay for the determination of cholesterol. PMID:27392749

  3. Bienzyme biosensors for glucose, ethanol and putrescine built on oxidase and sweet potato peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jaime; Gáspár, Szilveszter; Sakharov, Ivan; Csöregi, Elisabeth

    2003-05-01

    Amperometric biosensors for glucose, ethanol, and biogenic amines (putrescine) were constructed using oxidase/peroxidase bienzyme systems. The H(2)O(2) produced by the oxidase in reaction with its substrate is converted into a measurable signal via a novel peroxidase purified from sweet potato peels. All developed biosensors are based on redox hydrogels formed of oxidases (glucose oxidase, alcohol oxidase, or amine oxidase) and the newly purified sweet potato peroxidase (SPP) cross-linked to a redox polymer. The developed electrodes were characterized (sensitivity, stability, and performances in organic medium) and compared with similarly built ones using the 'classical' horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The SPP-based electrodes displayed higher sensitivity and better detection limit for putrescine than those using HRP and were also shown to retain their activity in organic phase much better than the HPR based ones. The importance of attractive or repulsive electrostatic interactions between the peroxidases and oxidases (determined by their isoelectric points) were found to play an important role in the sensitivity of the obtained sensors. PMID:12706582

  4. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-05-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe3O4 NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring.Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3

  5. Carboxylic-group-functionalized single-walled carbon nanohorns as peroxidase mimetics and their application to glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuyun; Zhao, Xian-En; You, Jinmao; Xu, Guobao; Wang, Hua

    2015-09-21

    Carboxylic-group-functionalized single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs-COOH) have been found to possess peroxidase-like activity for the first time. Similar to natural peroxidase, SWCNHs-COOH can catalyze the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2 to produce a blue color solution. Compared with horseradish peroxidase, SWCNHs-COOH exhibit higher activity and stability under harsh reaction conditions. The catalytic activity of SWCNHs-COOH depends on the concentration of H2O2. A colorimetric method for glucose detection was developed by combining the SWCNH-COOH catalytic reaction and the generation of H2O2 by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose with glucose oxidase. Taking into account the advantages of good stability, high biocompatibility in aqueous solutions, being metal-catalyst free, and high purity, SWCNHs-COOH are expected to have potential applications in biotechnology and clinical diagnostics as enzymatic mimics. PMID:26247806

  6. Chemoselective Oxidative Polymerization of m-Ethynylphenol by Peroxidase Catalyst to a New Reactive Polyphenol.

    PubMed

    Tonami, Hiroyuki; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Fujita, Takayuki; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Osada, Katsuhisa

    2000-06-13

    Enzymatic oxidative polymerization of m-ethynylphenol possessing two reactive groups, phenol and acetylene moieties, was carried out in aqueous methanol under air. Horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide were used as catalyst and oxidizing agent, respectively. (1)H NMR and IR analysis showed that only the phenolic moiety was polymerized to produce the polymer having the ethynyl group in the side chain. The reaction of the monomer using a copper/amine catalyst, a conventional catalyst for oxidative coupling, exclusively produced a diacetylene derivative. From these data, it was found that the peroxidase catalysis induced the chemoselective polymerization of the monomer. The resulting polymer was converted to carbonized polymer in a much higher yield than enzymatically synthesized poly(m-cresol) and is expected to have potential applications as a reactive starting polymer. PMID:11749146

  7. Chemoselective oxidative polymerization of m-ethynylphenol by peroxidase catalyst to a new reactive polyphenol.

    PubMed

    Tonami, H; Uyama, H; Kobayashi, S; Fujita, T; Taguchi, Y; Osada, K

    2000-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidative polymerization of m-ethynylphenol possessing two reactive groups, phenol and acetylene moieties, was carried out in aqueous methanol under air. Horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide were used as catalyst and oxidizing agent, respectively. 1H NMR and IR analysis showed that only the phenolic moiety was polymerized to produce the polymer having the ethynyl group in the side chain. The reaction of the monomer using a copper/amine catalyst, a conventional catalyst for oxidative coupling, exclusively produced a diacetylene derivative. From these data, it was found that the peroxidase catalysis induced the chemoselective polymerization of the monomer. The resulting polymer was converted to carbonized polymer in a much higher yield than enzymatically synthesized poly(m-cresol) and is expected to have potential applications as a reactive starting polymer. PMID:11710092

  8. Phenylbutazone Oxidation via Cu,Zn-SOD Peroxidase Activity: An EPR Study.

    PubMed

    Aljuhani, Naif; Whittal, Randy M; Khan, Saifur R; Siraki, Arno G

    2015-07-20

    We investigated the effect of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD)-peroxidase activity on the oxidation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug phenylbutazone (PBZ). We utilized electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to detect free radical intermediates of PBZ, UV-vis spectrophotometry to monitor PBZ oxidation, oxygen analysis to determine the involvement of C-centered radicals, and LC/MS to determine the resulting metabolites. Using EPR spectroscopy and spin-trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), we found that the spin adduct of CO3(•-) (DMPO/(•)OH) was attenuated with increasing PBZ concentrations. The resulting PBZ radical, which was assigned as a carbon-centered radical based on computer simulation of hyperfine splitting constants, was trapped by both DMPO and MNP spin traps. Similar to Cu,Zn-SOD-peroxidase activity, an identical PBZ carbon-centered radical was also detected with the presence of both myeloperoxidase (MPO/H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP/H2O2). Oxygen analysis revealed depletion in oxygen levels when PBZ was oxidized by SOD peroxidase-activity, further supporting carbon radical formation. In addition, UV-vis spectra showed that the λmax for PBZ (λ = 260 nm) declined in intensity and shifted to a new peak that was similar to the spectrum for 4-hydroxy-PBZ when oxidized by Cu,Zn-SOD-peroxidase activity. LC/MS evidence supported the formation of 4-hydroxy-PBZ when compared to that of a standard, and 4-hydroperoxy-PBZ was also detected in significant yield. These findings together indicate that the carbonate radical, a product of SOD peroxidase activity, appears to play a role in PBZ metabolism. Interestingly, these results are similar to findings from heme peroxidase enzymes, and the context of this metabolic pathway is discussed in terms of a mechanism for PBZ-induced toxicity. PMID:26090772

  9. Crystal structure and statistical coupling analysis of highly glycosylated peroxidase from royal palm tree (Roystonea regia).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandra; de Moura, Patricia Ribeiro; Bleicher, Lucas; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Zamorano, Laura S; Calvete, Juan J; Sanz, Libia; Pérez, Alicia; Bursakov, Sergey; Roig, Manuel G; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Royal palm tree peroxidase (RPTP) is a very stable enzyme in regards to acidity, temperature, H(2)O(2), and organic solvents. Thus, RPTP is a promising candidate for developing H(2)O(2)-sensitive biosensors for diverse applications in industry and analytical chemistry. RPTP belongs to the family of class III secretory plant peroxidases, which include horseradish peroxidase isozyme C, soybean and peanut peroxidases. Here we report the X-ray structure of native RPTP isolated from royal palm tree (Roystonea regia) refined to a resolution of 1.85A. RPTP has the same overall folding pattern of the plant peroxidase superfamily, and it contains one heme group and two calcium-binding sites in similar locations. The three-dimensional structure of RPTP was solved for a hydroperoxide complex state, and it revealed a bound 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid molecule (MES) positioned at a putative substrate-binding secondary site. Nine N-glycosylation sites are clearly defined in the RPTP electron-density maps, revealing for the first time conformations of the glycan chains of this highly glycosylated enzyme. Furthermore, statistical coupling analysis (SCA) of the plant peroxidase superfamily was performed. This sequence-based method identified a set of evolutionarily conserved sites that mapped to regions surrounding the heme prosthetic group. The SCA matrix also predicted a set of energetically coupled residues that are involved in the maintenance of the structural folding of plant peroxidases. The combination of crystallographic data and SCA analysis provides information about the key structural elements that could contribute to explaining the unique stability of RPTP. PMID:19854274

  10. Development of an amperometric biosensor based on peroxidases to quantify citrinin in rice samples.

    PubMed

    Zachetti, Vanesa Gimena Lourdes; Granero, Adrian Marcelo; Robledo, Sebastián Noel; Zon, María Alicia; Fernández, Héctor

    2013-06-01

    An amperometric biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7,H2O2-oxide-reductases) to determine the content of citrinin mycotoxin in rice samples is proposed by the first time. The method uses carbon paste electrodes filled up with multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a mineral oil, horseradish peroxidase, and ferrocene as a redox mediator. The biosensor is covered externally with a dialysis membrane, which is fixed to the body side of the electrode with a Teflon laboratory film, and an O-ring. The reproducibility and the repeatability were of 7.0% and 3.0%, respectively, showing a very good biosensor performance. The calibration curve was linear in a concentration range from 1 to 11.6nM. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.25nM and 0.75nM, respectively. For comparison, the citrinin content in rice samples was also determined by fluorimetric measurements. A very good correlation was obtained between the electrochemical and spectrophotometric methods. PMID:23416359

  11. Enzymatic decolourisation of Methyl Orange and Bismarck Brown using crude peroxidase from Armoracia rusticana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambatkar, Mugdha; Mukundan, Usha

    2015-12-01

    The decolourisation of Methyl Orange (MO) and Bismarck Brown (BB) by crude peroxidase from Armoracia rusticana (Horseradish) was studied by varying different reaction parameters. The pH of the reaction mixture, initial dye concentration, amount of enzyme and hydrogen peroxide concentration were optimised for ambient temperatures (30 ± 2 °C). The optimum pH for decolourisation was 4.0 (72.95 %) and 3.0 (79.24 %) for MO and BB, respectively. Also it was found that the Chemical Oxygen Demand of the enzyme-treated sample was significantly lower than that of the untreated controls for both dyes. The addition of a complex iron salt like Ferric EDTA was found to enhance the decolourisation of both dyes at pH 6.0, showing an increase of 8.69 % and 14.17 % in the decolourisation of MO and of BB, respectively. The present study explores the potential of crude peroxidase from horseradish to decolourise representative monoazo and diazo dyes, MO and BB, respectively. An attempt has been made to utilise a crude enzyme with appreciable activity obtained after minimal processing for the decolourisation of the aforesaid dyes. The findings of this study would find application in the enzymatic treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  12. Oligosynaptic pathways possibly relaying visceral and/or gustatory information to the olfactory bulb in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Radtke-Schuller, S

    2001-04-27

    Using anterograde and retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin we showed that the parabrachial nucleus, known to receive second order visceral and gustatory afferents, might project directly to the anterior olfactory nucleus which is connected with the olfactory bulb (OfB). Only a small bulbar region is targeted directly by parabrachial fibers. This region is located immediately adjacent to the accessory OfB and may be closely related to, if not identical with the modified glomerular complex. To further substantiate the presence of true parabrachio-bulbar projections thyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry was employed. The absence of immunoreactive neurons in the parabrachial nucleus and the different distribution patterns of immunoreactive fibers and axons labeled with wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase in the target areas make it unlikely that catecholaminergic fibers were involved in the projections shown. PMID:11297822

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of neuronal connections in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Pauls, Jon M; Augath, Mark; Trinath, Torsten; Prause, Burkhard A; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2002-05-30

    Recently, an MRI-detectable, neuronal tract-tracing method in living animals was introduced that exploits the anterograde transport of manganese (Mn2+). We present the results of experiments simultaneously tracing manganese chloride and wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) to evaluate the specificity of the former by tracing the neuronal connections of the basal ganglia of the monkey. Mn2+ and WGA-HRP yielded remarkably similar and highly specific projection patterns. By showing the sequential transport of Mn2+ from striatum to pallidum-substantia nigra and then to thalamus, we demonstrated MRI visualization of transport across at least one synapse in the CNS of the primate. Transsynaptic tract tracing in living primates will allow chronic studies of development and plasticity and provide valuable anatomical information for fMRI and electrophysiological experiments in primates. PMID:12062017

  14. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe(3)O(4) NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring. PMID:22552534

  15. Oxidase-peroxidase enzymes of Datura innoxia. Oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, V S; Mahadevan, S; Kumar, S A

    1975-01-01

    An enzyme system from Datura innoxia roots oxidizing formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was purified 38-fold by conventional methods such as (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, negative adsorption on alumina Cy gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The purified enzyme was shown to catalyse the stoicheiometric oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester to benzoylformic acid ethyl ester and formic acid, utilizing molecular O2. Substrate analogues such as phenylacetaldehyde and phenylpyruvate were oxidized at a very low rate, and formylphenylacetonitrile was an inhilating agents, cyanide, thiol compounds and ascorbic acid. This enzyme was identical with an oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme. Another oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme which separated on DEAE-chromatography also showed formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester oxidase activity, albeit to a lesser extent. The properties of the two isoenzymes of the oxidase were compared and shown to differ in their oxidation and peroxidation properties. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was also catalysed by horseradish peroxidase. The Datura isoenzymes exhibited typical haemoprotein spectra. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was different from other peroxidase-catalysed reactions in not being activated by either Mn2+ or monophenols. The oxidation was inhibited by several mono- and poly-phenols and by catalase. A reaction mechanism for the oxidation is proposed. PMID:997

  16. Degradation of textile dyes using immobilized lignin peroxidase-like metalloporphines under mild experimental conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Synthetic dyes represent a broad and heterogeneous class of durable pollutants, that are released in large amounts by the textile industry. The ability of two immobilized metalloporphines (structurally emulating the ligninolytic peroxidases) to bleach six chosen dyes (alizarin red S, phenosafranine, xylenol orange, methylene blue, methyl green, and methyl orange) was compared to enzymatic catalysts. To achieve a green and sustainable process, very mild conditions were chosen. Results IPS/MnTSPP was the most promising biomimetic catalyst as it was able to effectively and quickly bleach all tested dyes. Biomimetic catalysis was fully characterized: maximum activity was centered at neutral pH, in the absence of any organic solvent, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The immobilized metalloporphine kept a large part of its activity during multi-cycle use; however, well-known redox mediators were not able to increase its catalytic activity. IPS/MnTSPP was also more promising for use in industrial applications than its enzymatic counterparts (lignin peroxidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase). Conclusions On the whole, the conditions were very mild (standard pressure, room temperature and neutral pH, using no organic solvents, and the most environmental-friendly oxidant) and a significant bleaching and partial mineralization of the dyes was achieved in approximately 1 h. Therefore, the process was consistent with large-scale applications. The biomimetic catalyst also had more promising features than the enzymatic catalysts. PMID:23256784

  17. Distribution of primary cochlear afferents in the bulbar nuclei of the rat: a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) study in parasagittal sections.

    PubMed Central

    Merchan, M A; Collia, F P; Merchan, J A; Ludeña, M D

    1986-01-01

    HRP was injected into the cochleae of 25 young albino rats in order to trace the primary afferents to the bulbar cochlear nuclei. Besides the classic V-shaped pattern and unconnected with it, HRP labelling revealed two plexuses stemming directly from the axons of the cochlear root. The plexuses cover the posterior area of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (posterior plexus) and the anterolaterodorsal area of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (anterior plexus). The fibres giving rise to these two plexuses were previously grouped in two bundles which have been called the posterior and anterior bundles, respectively. The origin of the anterior bundle is typically seen with the fibres stemming out at right angles; the origin and course of the posterior bundle, which characteristically cross over, is also a typical feature. Images Fig. 1 Figs. 2-3 (cont.) Figs. 2-3 Fig. 4 PMID:3319993

  18. Apoferritin Protein Nanoparticles Dually labeled with Aptamer and Horseradish Peroxidase as a Sensing Probe for Thrombin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jie; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Haitao; Lin, Yuehe; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-01-08

    A sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor has been developed for the detection of thrombin, based on dual signal-amplification using HRP and apoferritin. Aptamer1 (Apt1) loaded on core/shell Fe3O4/Au magnetic nanoparticle (AuMNP) was used as recognition elements, and apoferritin dually labeled with Aptamer2 (Apt2) and HRP was used as a detection probe. Sandwich-type complex, Apt1/thrombin/Apt2–apoferritin NPs–HRP was formed by the affinity reactions between AuMNPs–Apt1, thrombin, and Apt2–apoferritin–HRP. The complex was anchored on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor the electrode response. The proposed aptasensor yielded a linear current response to thrombin concentrations over a broad range of 0.5 pM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.07 pM (S/N = 3). The detection signal was amplified by using apoferritin and HRP. This nanoparticle-based aptasensor offers a new method for rapid, sensitive, selective, and inexpensive quantification of thrombin, and offers a promising potential in biomarker detection and disease diagnosis. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  19. Phytochelatin homologs induced in hairy roots of horseradish.

    PubMed

    Kubota, H; Sato, K; Yamada, T; Maitani, T

    2000-01-01

    When exposed to excess heavy metals, plants induce phytochelatins and related peptides (all designated as PCAs). Thus, when hairy roots of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) were exposed for 3 days to cadmium (1 mM) along with reduced glutathione (2 mM), PCA induction occurred. Moreover, a new family of thiol peptides was detected as well as the previously known PCAs, as revealed by postcolumn-derivatization HPLC. Two were isolated and their structures were identified as (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gln (n = 3 and 4) by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometer spectra, this being confirmed by chemical synthesis of the peptides. These new analogs constitute the sixth PCA family identified to date. PMID:10680177

  20. Soybean agglutinin-conjugated silver nanoparticles nanocarriers in the treatment of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas Pimentel, Rocio Guadalupe; Robles Botero, Viviana; San Martín Martínez, Eduardo; Gómez García, Consuelo; Hinestroza, Juan Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) induce diverse cell-death mechanisms, similar to those promoted by anticancer chemotherapeutics; however, they have not been tested in vivo because their action is not limited to cancer cells. Therefore, in vivo evaluations of their effectiveness should be developed with targeting systems. Breast cancer shows changes in the sugar expression patterns on cell surfaces, related to cancer progression and metastases; those changes have been identified previously by the specific binding of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Here is proposed the use of SBA to target the AgNP activity in breast cancer. For that, the present work reports the synthesis of AgNPs (3.89 ± 0.90 nm) through the polyol method, the generation of AgNP nanocarriers, and the bioconjugation protocol of the nanocarrier with SBA. The free AgNPs, the AgNP nanocarriers, and the SBA-bioconjugated AgNP nanocarriers were tested for cytotoxicity in breast cancerous (MDA-MB-231and MCF7) and non cancerous (MCF 10A) cells, using the MTT assay. AgNPs demonstrated cytotoxic activity in vitro, the non cancerous cells (MCF 10A) being more sensible than the cancerous cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) showing LD(50) values of 128, 205, and 319 μM Ag, respectively; the nanoencapsulation decreased the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs in non cancerous cells, maintaining or increasing the effect on the cancer-derived cells, whereas the SBA-bioconjugation allowed AgNP cytotoxic activity with a similar behavior to the nanocarriers. Future experiments need to be developed to evaluate the targeting effect of the SBA-bioconjugated AgNP nanocarriers to study their functionality in vivo. PMID:26540350

  1. Model study of the enzymatic modification of natural extracts: peroxidase-based removal of eugenol from rose essential oil.

    PubMed

    Bouhlel, Charfeddine; Dolhem, Gwenn'Ann; Fernandez, Xavier; Antoniotti, Sylvain

    2012-02-01

    A protocol based on the use of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is proposed for the removal of allergenic eugenol from rose essential oil without loss of the organoleptic quality and with a good conservation of the chemical composition. For the first time, an enzyme-based strategy is proposed for essential oils treatment and opens new opportunities in the detoxification of natural extracts used in perfumery and cosmetics. Our results on eugenol in rose essential oil constitute a first step toward the development of efficient and mild processes for the removal of more toxic compounds of natural extracts. PMID:22224510

  2. High-yield production of manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Guzmán-Ortiz, Doralinda A; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    The white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium secretes extracellular oxidative enzymes during secondary metabolism, but lacks versatile peroxidase, an enzyme important in ligninolysis and diverse biotechnology processes. In this study, we report the genetic modification of a P. chrysosporium strain capable of co-expressing two endogenous genes constitutively, manganese peroxidase (mnp1) and lignin peroxidase (lipH8), and the codon-optimized vpl2 gene from Pleurotus eryngii. For this purpose, we employed a highly efficient transformation method based on the use of shock waves developed by our group. The expression of recombinant genes was verified by PCR, Southern blot, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and assays of enzymatic activity. The production yield of ligninolytic enzymes was up to four times higher in comparison to previously published reports. These results may represent significant progress toward the stable production of ligninolytic enzymes and the development of an effective fungal strain with promising biotechnological applications. PMID:25269601

  3. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Peroxidase from the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ogola, Henry Joseph Oduor; Kamiike, Takaaki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Ashida, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    The open reading frame alr1585 of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 encodes a heme-dependent peroxidase (Anabaena peroxidase [AnaPX]) belonging to the novel DyP-type peroxidase family (EC 1.11.1.X). We cloned and heterologously expressed the active form of the enzyme in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was a 53-kDa tetrameric protein with a pI of 3.68, a low pH optima (pH 4.0), and an optimum reaction temperature of 35°C. Biochemical characterization revealed an iron protoporphyrin-containing heme peroxidase with a broad specificity for aromatic substrates such as guaiacol, 4-aminoantipyrine and pyrogallol. The enzyme efficiently catalyzed the decolorization of anthraquinone dyes like Reactive Blue 5, Reactive Blue 4, Reactive Blue 114, Reactive Blue 119, and Acid Blue 45 with decolorization rates of 262, 167, 491, 401, and 256 μM·min−1, respectively. The apparent Km and kcat/Km values for Reactive Blue 5 were 3.6 μM and 1.2 × 107 M−1 s−1, respectively, while the apparent Km and kcat/Km values for H2O2 were 5.8 μM and 6.6 × 106 M−1 s−1, respectively. In contrast, the decolorization activity of AnaPX toward azo dyes was relatively low but was significantly enhanced 2- to ∼50-fold in the presence of the natural redox mediator syringaldehyde. The specificity and catalytic efficiency for hydrogen donors and synthetic dyes show the potential application of AnaPX as a useful alternative of horseradish peroxidase or fungal DyPs. To our knowledge, this study represents the only extensive report in which a bacterial DyP has been tested in the biotransformation of synthetic dyes. PMID:19801472

  4. Copper nanoclusters as peroxidase mimetics and their applications to H2O2 and glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Yuan, Yali; Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Jianming; Majeed, Saadat; Xu, Guobao

    2013-01-31

    Copper nanoclusters (Cu NCs) are found to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity for the first time. Similar to nature peroxidase, they can catalyze the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine by H(2)O(2) to produce a nice blue color reaction. Compared with horseradish peroxidase, Cu NCs exhibits higher activity near neutral pH, which is beneficial for biological applications. The increase in absorbance caused by the Cu NCs catalytic reaction allows the detection of H(2)O(2) in the range of 10 μM to 1 mM with a detection limit of 10 μM. A colorimetric method for glucose detection was also developed by combining the Cu NCs catalytic reaction and the enzymatic oxidation of glucose with glucose oxidase. Taking into account the advantages of ultra-small size, good stability, and high biocompatibility in aqueous solutions, Cu NCs are expected to have potential applications in biotechnology and clinical diagnosis as enzymatic mimics. PMID:23327949

  5. Anionic polythiophene derivative as peroxidase mimetics and their application for detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Li, Baoxin; Cui, Xiang

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we discovered that the anionic polythiophenes derivative, poly[2-(3-thienyl)ethyloxy-4-butylsulfonate] (PTEBS), possesses intrinsic peroxidase-like activity that can catalyze the reaction of peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2 to produce a blue color reaction, which provides colorimetric detection of H2O2. PTEBS exhibits several advantages such as high catalytic efficiency, good stability, and rapid response over horseradish peroxidase (HRP). By coupling the oxidation of glucose catalyzed by glucose oxidase, a simple, inexpensive, highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for glucose detection has been developed. The absorbance was proportional to the concentration of glucose in the range from 0.01 to 0.5mM with a detection limit of 0.004 mM. This work is not only of importance for a better understanding of the unique properties of polythiophenes derivative but also of great potential for medical diagnostics and biotechnology. PMID:24054671

  6. Purification and characterization of novel cationic peroxidases from Asparagus acutifolius L. with biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Guida, Vincenzo; Cantarella, Maria; Chambery, Angela; Mezzacapo, Maria C; Parente, Augusto; Landi, Nicola; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo

    2014-08-01

    Four novel basic peroxidases, named AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4, were purified from Asparagus acutifolius L. seeds by cation-exchange and gel filtration chromatographies. The four proteins showed a similar electrophoretic mobility of 46 kDa while, by MALDI-TOF MS, different Mr values of 42758.3, 41586.9, 42796.3, and 41595.5 were determined for AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4, respectively. N-terminal sequences of AaPs 1-4 up to residue 20 showed a high percentage of identity with the peroxidase from Glycine max. In addition, AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4 were found to be glycoproteins, containing 21.75, 22.27, 25.62, and 18.31 % of carbohydrates, respectively. Peptide mapping and MALDI-TOF MS analysis of AaPs 1-4 showed that the structural differences between AaP-1 and AaP-2 and AaP-3 and AaPs-4 were mainly due to their glycan content. We also demonstrate that AaPs were able to remove phenolic compounds from olive oil mill wastewaters with a higher catalytic efficiency with respect to horseradish peroxidase, thus representing candidate enzymes for potential biotechnological applications in the environmental field. PMID:24740695

  7. Regeneration of horseradish hairy roots incited by Agrobacterium rhizogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Noda, T; Tanaka, N; Mano, Y; Nabeshima, S; Ohkawa, H; Matsui, C

    1987-07-01

    Surface-sterilized leaf disks of horse-radish (Armoracia lapathifolia) were immersed in a suspension of Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring the root-inducing plasmid (pRi) and cultured on a solid medium. Within about 10 days after inoculation, adventitious roots (hairy roots) emerged from the leaf disks. No roots emerged from the uninoculated leaf disks. The excised hairy roots grew vigorously in the dark and exhibited extensive lateral branches in the absence of phytohormones. When the hairy roots were moved into the light, numerous adventitious buds thrust out of the roots within about 10 days, and they developed into complete plants (R0 generation). R0 plants revealed leaf wrinkle. Root masses of cultured R0 plants were of two types. One had fibrous roots only and the other had both fibrous and tuberous roots Leaf disks of the R0 plants proliferated adventitious roots (R1 generation) on a solid medium after 1-2 weeks of culture. Phenotypical characters of the R1 roots were the same as those observed with the initial hairy roots. The T-DNA sequences of pRi were detected within DNA isolated from the hairy roots and their regenerants. PMID:24248760

  8. Peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities of isolated human myeloperoxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, B E; Domeij, K; Lindvall, S; Rydell, G

    1987-01-01

    Isolated neutrophils from healthy donors were used for the isolation of four highly purified forms of myeloperoxidase as determined by spectral (A430/A280 ratio 0.80-0.87) and enzyme-activity measurements. Although the myeloperoxidases exhibited different elution profiles on cation-exchange chromatography, gel filtration indicated similar relative molecular masses. When these forms were assayed for peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities with several substrates, they all exhibited virtually the same specific activities. These results suggest that possible functional differences between the enzymes may be related to differences in their sites of action rather than to differences in enzyme activity. Myeloperoxidase from a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia also revealed a similar heterogeneity on cation-exchange chromatography. However, this myeloperoxidase contained in addition one form with a lower and one form with a higher relative molecular mass, as indicated by gel-filtration chromatography. PMID:3036098

  9. Peroxidase-encapsulated cyclodextrin nanosponge immunoconjugates as a signal enhancement tool in optical and electrochemical assays.

    PubMed

    Wajs, Ewelina; Caldera, Fabrizio; Trotta, Francesco; Fragoso, Alex

    2014-01-21

    Cyclodextrin nanosponges bearing carboxylate groups have been prepared by crosslinking β-cyclodextrin with pyromellitic dianhydride to form a carboxylic acid terminated nanoporous material. The surface of the particles was covalently modified with an anti-IgG antibody and then loaded with horseradish peroxidase. The structures of unmodified and protein modified nanosponge particles were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and imaging methods. Confocal microscopy indicates that the antibody is located in the outside of the particle while HRP is encapsulated in the inner part. The possibility to use these modified nanosponges as a signal enhancement tool in enzyme-linked colorimetric and electrochemical assays was evaluated using a sandwich format comprising immobilised gliadin as an antigen, a target anti-gliadin antibody and an anti-IgG antibody conjugated to the enzyme-loaded nanosponge immunoconjugates. PMID:24276364

  10. Bio-based Wrinkled Surfaces Harnessed from Biological Design Principles of Wood and Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Hironori; Okuda, Noriko; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Rojas, Orlando J

    2015-11-01

    A new and simple approach for surface wrinkling inspired by polymer assemblies in wood fibers is introduced. A hard skin is synthesized on a linear polysaccharide support that resembles the structural units of the cell wall. This skin, a wood mimetic layer, is produced through immersion in a solution containing phenolic precursor and subsequent surface reaction by horseradish peroxidase. A patterned surface with micron-scale wrinkles is formed upon drying and as a result of inhomogeneous shrinkage. We demonstrate that the design of the wrinkled surfaces can be controlled by the molecular structure of the phenolic precursor, temperature, and drying stress. It is noteworthy that this is a totally bio-based system involving green materials and processes. PMID:26489384

  11. Peroxidase induced oligo-tyrosine cross-links during polymerization of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Surender Kumar; Sforza, Stefano; Wierenga, Peter A; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-12-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) induced cross-linking of proteins has been reported to proceed through formation of di-tyrosine cross-links. In the case of low molar mass phenolic substrates, the enzymatic oxidation is reported to lead to polymerization of the phenols. The aim of this work was to investigate if during oxidative cross-linking of proteins oligo-tyrosine cross-links are formed in addition to dityrosine. To this end, α-lactalbumin (α-LA) was cross-linked using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). The reaction products were acid hydrolysed, after which the cross-linked amino acids were investigated by LC-MS and MALDI-MS. To test the effect of the size of the substrate, the cross-linking reaction was also performed with L-tyrosine, N-acetyl L-tyrosinamide and angiotensin. These products were analyzed by LC-MS directly, as well as after acid hydrolysis. In the acid hydrolysates of all samples oligo-tyrosine (Yn, n=3-8) was found in addition to di-tyrosine (Y2). Two stages of cross-linking of α-LA were identified: a) 1-2 cross-links were formed per monomer until the monomers were converted into oligomers, and b) subsequent cross-linking of oligomers formed in the first stage to form nanoparticles containing 3-4 cross-links per monomer. The transition from first stage to the second stage coincided with the point where di-tyrosine started to decrease and more oligo-tyrosines were formed. In conclusion, extensive polymerization of α-LA using HRP via oligo-tyrosine cross-links is possible, as is the case for low molar mass tyrosine containing substrates. PMID:26282909

  12. Structure-based discovery of the first non-covalent inhibitors of Leishmania major tryparedoxin peroxidase by high throughput docking

    PubMed Central

    Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Relitti, Nicola; Vallone, Alessandra; Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Novellino, Ettore; Colotti, Gianni; Angiulli, Gabriella; Di Chiaro, Francesco; Fiorillo, Annarita; Ilari, Andrea; Campiani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected vector-born disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania and affecting more than 1.300.000 people worldwide. The couple tryparedoxin/tryparedoxin peroxidase is essential for parasite survival in the host since it neutralizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by macrophages during the infection. Herein we report a study aimed at discovering the first class of compounds able to non-covalently inhibit tryparedoxin peroxidase. We have solved the high-resolution structure of Tryparedoxin peroxidase I from Leishmania major (LmTXNPx) in the reduced state and in fully folded conformation. A first series of compounds able to inhibit LmTXNPx was identified by means of the high throughput docking technique. The inhibitory activity of these compounds was validated by a Horseradish peroxidase-based enzymatic assay and their affinity for LmTXNPx calculated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. On the basis of these results, the analysis of the enzyme-inhibitor docked models allowed us to rationally design and synthesize a series of N,N-disubstituted 3-aminomethyl quinolones. These compounds showed an inhibitory potency against LmTXNPx in the micromolar range. Among them, compound 12 represents the first non-covalent LmTXNPx inhibitor reported to date and could pave the way to the discovery of a new class of drugs against leishmaniasis. PMID:25951439

  13. Cationization of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. Effect of improved intraarticular retention on experimental arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schalkwijk, J; van den Berg, W B; van de Putte, L B; Joosten, L A; van den Bersselaar, L

    1985-01-01

    Several enzymes and other proteins were made cationic either by coupling to polylysine or by shielding of anionic sites. These cationic proteins, all having an isoelectric point greater than 8.5 exhibited excellent retention in articular structures when injected in mouse knee joints. Autoradiography and histochemistry showed that cationic forms of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and horseradish peroxidase were firmly retained by synovial and cartilaginous tissues. The half-life of these enzymes in the joint is thus significantly extended compared with native enzymes. The native enzymes and their cationic derivatives were tested for antiinflammatory properties in mice, using antigen-induced arthritis and zymosan-induced arthritis. It was found that injection of cationic catalase or peroxidase induced a marked suppression of some parameters of the inflammatory response in both types of arthritis, as measured by 99m technetium pertechnetate uptake and leakage of 125I-labeled albumin. Native catalase and peroxidase were less, or not at all effective. Cationic superoxide dismutase or cationic nonenzyme proteins did not suppress inflammation. The observed suppression of two different types of inflammation (an immune and a nonimmune arthritis) by catalase and peroxidase suggests that elimination of peroxides contributes to the suppression of an inflammatory response. We would hypothesize that cationic enzymes offer the possibility for investigating the mechanisms of inflammation and, in addition, might be interesting from a therapeutical point of view. Images PMID:4019779

  14. Obtention of plant peroxidase and its potential for the decolorization of the reactive dye Remazol Turquoise G 133%.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Cristina; Torres, Juliana Arriel; Corrêa, Angelita Duarte; Junqueira, Allana Maria Bernardes; Amorim, Maria Teresa Pessoa; dos Santos, Custódio Donizete

    2012-01-01

    Peroxidases can be used in the decolorization process. There is a growing interest for new sources of this enzyme and for obtaining economically viable processes. In this work, a low-cost vegetable peroxidase extraction process is proposed; the resulting enzyme is characterized to determine its optimum pH, temperature, and stability conditions, and it is then applied in the decolorization of reactive dye Remazol Turquoise G 133%. The turnip peroxidase (TP) was utilized as an enzymatic source. This enzyme exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.0, and it was active in the temperature range of 30 to 50 °C, which favors its use in industrial processes. Acetone was the most efficient solvent to induce precipitation. The removal of Remazol Turquoise G 133% was 56.0% complete after 50 min, while 41.0% of the same dye was removed with the commercial horseradish peroxidase enzyme in 50 min. TP presents potential as a viable alternative in the decolorization of textile wastewaters. PMID:22277225

  15. Cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes as efficient redox mediators in peroxidase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Alpeeva, Inna S; Soukharev, Valentin S; Alexandrova, Larissa; Shilova, Nadezhda V; Bovin, Nicolai V; Csöregi, Elisabeth; Ryabov, Alexander D; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2003-07-01

    Cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(II)(C~N)(N~N)(2)]PF(6) [HC~N=2-phenylpyridine (Hphpy) or 2-(4'-tolyl)pyridine; N~N=2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, or 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine], are rapidly oxidized by H(2)O(2) catalyzed by plant peroxidases to the corresponding Ru(III) species. The commercial isoenzyme C of horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C) and two recently purified peroxidases from sweet potato (SPP) and royal palm tree (RPTP) have been used. The most favorable conditions for the oxidation have been evaluated by varying the pH, buffer, and H(2)O(2) concentrations and the apparent second-order rate constants ( k(app)) have been measured. All the complexes studied are oxidized by HRP-C at similar rates and the rate constants k(app) are identical to those known for the best substrates of HRP-C (10(6)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Both cationic (HRP-C) and anionic (SPP and RPTP) peroxidases show similar catalytic efficiency in the oxidation of the Ru(II) complexes. The mediating capacity of the complexes has been evaluated using the SPP-catalyzed co-oxidation of [Ru(II)(phpy)(bpy)(2)]PF(6) and catechol as a poor peroxidase substrate as an example. The rate of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of catechol increases more than 10000-fold in the presence of the ruthenium complex. A simple routine for calculating the rate constant k(c) for the oxidation of catechol by the Ru(III) complex generated enzymatically from [Ru(II)(phpy)(bpy)(2)](+) is proposed. It is based on the accepted mechanism of peroxidase catalysis and involves spectrophotometric measurements of the limiting Ru(II) concentration at different concentrations of catechol. The calculated k(c) value of 0.75 M(-1) s(-1) shows that the cyclometalated Ru(II) complexes are efficient mediators in peroxidase catalysis. PMID:12774217

  16. Biosynthesis of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) in a melanoma cell line and its metabolization by peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Melissa M; Coimbra, Janine B; Clara, Renan O; Dörr, Felipe A; Moreno, Ana Carolina R; Chagas, Jair R; Tufik, Sérgio; Pinto, Ernani; Catalani, Luiz H; Campa, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) is essential for many physiological processes, and its metabolism changes in some diseases such as infection and cancer. The most studied aspects of TRP metabolism are the kynurenine and serotonin pathways. A minor metabolic route, tryptamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) biosynthesis, has received far less attention, probably because of the very low amounts of these compounds detected only in some tissues, which has led them to be collectively considered as trace amines. In a previous study, we showed a metabolic interrelationship for TRP in melanoma cell lines. Here, we identified DMT and N,N-dimethyl-N-formyl-kynuramine (DMFK) in the supernatant of cultured SK-Mel-147 cells. Furthermore, when we added DMT to the cell culture, we found hydroxy-DMT (OH-DMT) and indole acetic acid (IAA) in the cell supernatant at 24 h. We found that SK-Mel-147 cells expressed mRNA for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and also had peroxidase activity. We further found that DMT oxidation was catalyzed by peroxidases. DMT oxidation by horseradish peroxidase, H2O2 and MPO from PMA-activated neutrophils produced DMFK, N,N-dimethyl-kynuramine (DMK) and OH-DMT. Oxidation of DMT by peroxidases apparently uses the common peroxidase cycle involving the native enzyme, compound I and compound II. In conclusion, this study describes a possible alternative metabolic pathway for DMT involving peroxidases that has not previously been described in humans and identifies DMT and metabolites in a melanoma cell line. The extension of these findings to other cell types and the biological effects of DMT and its metabolites on cell proliferation and function are key questions for future studies. PMID:24508833

  17. Mechanism and regulation of peroxidase-catalyzed nitric oxide consumption in physiological fluids: critical protective actions of ascorbate and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Rees, Martin D; Maiocchi, Sophie L; Kettle, Anthony J; Thomas, Shane R

    2014-07-01

    Catalytic consumption of nitric oxide (NO) by myeloperoxidase and related peroxidases is implicated as playing a key role in impairing NO bioavailability during inflammatory conditions. However, there are major gaps in our understanding of how peroxidases consume NO in physiological fluids, in which multiple reactive enzyme substrates and antioxidants are present. Notably, ascorbate has been proposed to enhance myeloperoxidase-catalyzed NO consumption by forming NO-consuming substrate radicals. However, we show that in complex biological fluids ascorbate instead plays a critical role in inhibiting NO consumption by myeloperoxidase and related peroxidases (lactoperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase) by acting as a competitive substrate for protein-bound redox intermediates and by efficiently scavenging peroxidase-derived radicals (e.g., urate radicals), yielding ascorbyl radicals that fail to consume NO. These data identify a novel mechanistic basis for how ascorbate preserves NO bioavailability during inflammation. We show that NO consumption by myeloperoxidase Compound I is significant in substrate-rich fluids and is resistant to competitive inhibition by ascorbate. However, thiocyanate effectively inhibits this process and yields hypothiocyanite at the expense of NO consumption. Hypothiocyanite can in turn form NO-consuming radicals, but thiols (albumin, glutathione) readily prevent this. Conversely, where ascorbate is absent, glutathione enhances NO consumption by urate radicals via pathways that yield S-nitrosoglutathione. Theoretical kinetic analyses provide detailed insights into the mechanisms by which ascorbate and thiocyanate exert their protective actions. We conclude that the local depletion of ascorbate and thiocyanate in inflammatory microenvironments (e.g., due to increased metabolism or dysregulated transport) will impair NO bioavailability by exacerbating peroxidase-catalyzed NO consumption. PMID:24704973

  18. Engineering Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity Into Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Meharenna, Y.T.; Oertel, P.; Bhaskar, B.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) have very similar structures, and yet neither CCP nor APX exhibits each others activities with respect to reducing substrates. APX has a unique substrate binding site near the heme propionates where ascorbate H-bonds with a surface Arg and one heme propionate (Sharp et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 303--307). The corresponding region in CCP has a much longer surface loop, and the critical Arg residue that is required for ascorbate binding in APX is Asn in CCP. In order to convert CCP into an APX, the ascorbate-binding loop and critical arginine were engineered into CCP to give the CCP2APX mutant. The mutant crystal structure shows that the engineered site is nearly identical to that found in APX. While wild-type CCP shows no APX activity, CCP2APX catalyzes the peroxidation of ascorbate at a rate of {approx}12 min{sup -1}, indicating that the engineered ascorbate-binding loop can bind ascorbate.

  19. The parabrachio-subfornical organ projection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gu, G B; Ju, G

    1995-01-01

    Previous physiological studies have shown that both the parabrachial nucleus and the subfornical organ are involved in drinking behavior and cardiovascular controls. The purpose of the present work was to study the direct connections between these two structures by using anterograde and retrograde transport methods. A mixture of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and free horseradish peroxidase or Fluorogold was injected into either the parabrachial nucleius (PBN) or the subfornical organ (SFO). The results indicated that the parabrachial nucleus sends a substantial projection to the entirety of the subfornical organ, and this input appears to be distributed to both the central and peripheral regions of this structure. Neurons that give origin to this projection are mainly located in the outer layer of the lateral division of the parabrachial nucleus, including the superior, internal, dorsal, and external lateral subnuclei. These findings suggest that, besides the already known connections, there is an additional parabrachio-subfornical pathway that may be involved in the central integration of cardiovascular function and drinking behavior. PMID:7552374

  20. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase mimics

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Overproduction of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are increasingly implicated in human disease and aging. ROS are also being explored as important modulating agents in a number of cell signaling pathways. Earlier work has focused on development of small catalytic scavengers of O2−, commonly referred to as superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. Many of these compounds also have substantial abilities to catalytically scavenge H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Peroxides have been increasingly shown to disrupt cell signaling cascades associated with excessive inflammation associated with a wide variety of human diseases. Early studies with enzymatic scavengers like SOD frequently reported little or no beneficial effect in biologic models unless SOD was combined with catalase or a peroxidase. Increasing attention has been devoted to developing catalase or peroxidase mimetics as a way to treat overt inflammation associated with the pathophysiology of many human disorders. This review will focus on recent development of catalytic scavengers of peroxides and their potential use as therapeutic agents for pulmonary, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. PMID:18948086

  1. Carbodiimide or periodate method to prepare peroxidase hydrazide for its use in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G

    2004-01-01

    Peroxidase hydrazides were prepared by conjugating horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) by carbodiimide or periodate oxidation method. The resulting HRP hydrazides (ADH-HRP) were conjugated to cortisol-21-hemisuccinate (cortisol-21-HS) by forming diimide bonds using the N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) carbodiimide mediated reaction. The prepared cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP enzyme conjugates were utilized for the development of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for direct estimation of cortisol. To the cortisol antibody coated microtiter wells, standard or serum sample (50 microL), along with 100 microL of cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP enzyme conjugate (ADH-HRP used is prepared by either carbodiimide or periodate oxidation method), was incubated for 1 hr at 37 degrees C. Bound enzyme activity was measured by using tetramethyl benzidine/hydrogen peroxide (TMB/H202) as substrate. The sensitivity, specificity, and recovery of the assays were found to be identical when ELISAs were employed with cortisol enzyme conjugates prepared by conjugating cortisol-21-HS to HRP hydrazide, made either by the carbodiimide method or periodate oxidation method. PMID:15461389

  2. Peroxidase-mediated conjugation of corn fiber gum and bovine serum albumin to improve emulsifying properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Qiu, Shuang; Li, Jinlong; Chen, Hao; Tatsumi, Eizo; Yadav, Madhav; Yin, Lijun

    2015-03-15

    The emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum (CFG), a naturally occurring polysaccharide-protein complex, was improved by kinetically controlled formation of hetero-covalent linkages with bovine serum albumin (BSA), using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The formation of hetero-crosslinked CFG-BSA conjugates was confirmed using ultraviolet-visible and Fourier-transform infrared analyses. The optimum CFG-BSA conjugates were prepared at a CFG:BSA weight ratio of 10:1, and peroxidase:BSA weight ratio of 1:4000. Selected CFG-BSA conjugates were used to prepare oil-in-water emulsions; the emulsifying properties were better than those of emulsions stabilized with only CFG or BSA. Measurements of mean droplet sizes and zeta potentials showed that CFG-BSA-conjugate-stabilized emulsions were less susceptible to environmental stresses, such as pH changes, high K ionic strengths, and freeze-thaw treatments than CFG- or BSA-stabilized emulsions. These conjugates have potential applications as novel emulsifiers in food industry. PMID:25542109

  3. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions. PMID:25575902

  4. (Characterization of lignin peroxidases from Phanerochaete)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-14

    Work has continued on characterizing the kinetics of lignin peroxidases and has now expanded to include the chemistry of Mn peroxidases. Progress in these two area in addition to the authors work on the molecular biology of lignin biodegradation is briefly described below. Copies of two reprints and one preprint which have resulted from the work are attached.

  5. Biogenic magnetic nanoparticles from Burkholderia sp. YN01 exhibiting intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and their applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Li, Na; Mu, Jianshuai; Zhou, Runhong; Xu, Yan; Cui, Daizong; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain containing biogenic magnetic nanoparticles (BMNPs) was isolated from the sediments of Songhua River in Harbin, China, and was identified as Burkholderia sp. YN01. Extracted BMNPs from YN01 were characterized as pure face-centered cubic Fe3O4 with an average size of 80 nm through transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hysteresis parameters of the BMNP samples such as Bc and Bcr and ratios Mrs/Ms were deduced as 35.6 mT, 43.2 mT, and 0.47, respectively, indicating that the BMNPs exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior. This is the first report concerning on biogenic Fe3O4 NPs produced in Burkholderia genus. Significantly, the BMNPs were proved to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the oxidation of peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2. Kinetic analysis indicates that the catalytic behavior is in accord with typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and follows ping-pong mechanism. The catalytic constants (K cat) were 6.5 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.78 × 10(4) s(-1) with H2O2 and TMB as substrate, respectively, which was higher than that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy experiments showed that the BMNPs could catalyze H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radicals. The origin of peroxidase-like activity is also associated with their ability to transfer electron between electrode and H2O2 according to an electrochemical study. As a novel peroxidase mimetic, the BMNPs were employed to offer a simple, sensitive, and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose determination, and the BMNPs could efficiently catalyze the degradation of phenol and Congo red dye. PMID:25030455

  6. Peroxidase-dependent metabolism of benzene's phenolic metabolites and its potential role in benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M T; Yager, J W; Steinmetz, K L; Eastmond, D A

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of two of benzene's phenolic metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, by peroxidase enzymes has been studied in detail. Studies employing horseradish peroxidase and human myeloperoxidase have shown that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide phenol is converted to 4,4'-diphenoquinone and other covalent binding metabolites, whereas hydroquinone is converted solely to 1,4-benzoquinone. Surprisingly, phenol stimulates the latter conversion rather than inhibiting it, an effect that may play a role in the in vivo myelotoxicity of benzene. Indeed, repeated coadministration of phenol and hydroquinone to B6C3F1 mice results in a dramatic and significant decrease in bone marrow cellularity similar to that observed following benzene exposure. A mechanism of benzene-induced myelotoxicity is therefore proposed in which the accumulation and interaction of phenol and hydroquinone in the bone marrow and the peroxidase-dependent formation of 1,4-benzoquinone are important components. This mechanism may also be responsible, at least in part, for benzene's genotoxic effects, as 1,4-benzoquinone has been shown to damage DNA and is shown here to induce multiple micronuclei in human lymphocytes. Secondary activation of benzene's phenol metabolites in the bone marrow may therefore play an important role in benzene's myelotoxic and carcinogenic effects. PMID:2551665

  7. Synthesis of hierarchical iron hydrogen phosphate crystal as a robust peroxidase mimic for stable H₂O₂ detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tongbao; Lu, Yangcheng; Luo, Guangsheng

    2014-08-27

    To develop a green, cost-efficient and robust peroxidase mimic, micro/nano hierarchical morphology (for ease of separation and reuse), relative chemically stable composition (for ease of storage) and stable crystal structure (for long-term stability) are highly desired. Herein, using phosphoric acid as a chelating ligand to control the release of iron ions, hierarchical iron(III) hydrogen phosphate hydrate crystals are successfully prepared by nanosheets formation and following self-assembling in a facile low-temperature hydrothermal process. They are first found to have peroxidase-like activity and showed higher affinity for H2O2 and lower affinity for 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine compared with horseradish peroxidase. The affinity feature is used for quantitative detection of H2O2 and shows a wide linear detection range from 57.4 to 525.8 μM (R(2) = 0.994) with a low detection limit of 1 μM. Benefited from chemical stability of hierarchical iron(III) salt crystals, they own good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.95% for 10 independent measurements), long-term stability (no activity loss after 10 cycles), and ease of recovery (by simple centrifugation). Because the method is easily accessible, iron hydrogen phosphate hierarchical crystals have great potential for practical use of H2O2 sensing and detection under harsh conditions. PMID:25029358

  8. Combined experimental and theoretical study on the removal of pollutant compounds by peroxidases: affinity and reactivity toward a bioremediation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Cristina; Torres, Juliana Arriel; Castro, Alexandre A; da Cunha, Elaine F F; Alves de Oliveira, Luiz Carlos; Corrêa, Angelita Duarte; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2016-09-01

    Water pollution is a significant and growing problem throughout the world, especially in developing countries. In order to minimize environmental problems, catalysts have increasingly been designed to remove pollutants from the water. In an attempt to innovate by the creation of new low-cost alternatives to efficiently remove pollutants, the enzymatic treatment has been intensely studied for this purpose. Reactions catalyzed by enzymes are able to perform specific treatments, commonly with high rates of the final products. With this, the enzyme, peroxidase, is a promising candidate as a bioremediation catalyst. The efficiency of oxidoreductive enzymes, such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and soybean peroxidase (SP) have been studied, given that their performance depends on the substrate. In this investigation, experimental techniques and theoretical calculations have been employed in order to investigate the oxidative process for the ferulic acid and bromophenol blue dyes, performed by HRP and SP. Both enzymes showed a comparable behavior with respect to ferulic acid substrate. On the other hand, by utilizing bromophenol blue dye as a substrate, the behavior of the employed catalysts was significantly different. Experimental data have shown that HRP was more active toward bromophenol blue when compared to ferulic acid, being more rapidly degraded by the HRP enzyme. This tendency was confirmed by our theoretical docking, PM6 semi-empirical method, and DFT calculation results, in which the interaction, binding energies, and transition states were determined. PMID:26130457

  9. Use of crude extract of lentil plant (Lens culinaris Medikus) in peroxidase-based analyses: fast kinetic determination of hydrogen peroxide and sarcosine in urine.

    PubMed

    Pérez Galende, Patricia; Manzano Muñoz, Teresa; Roig, Manuel G; García de María, Cándido

    2012-11-01

    Peroxidase-catalysed reactions are used in a wide variety of analytical applications, most of them based on the final quantification of hydrogen peroxide. Clinical tests for glucose, cholesterol, creatine, creatinine or uric acid in blood or urine and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for pesticides, hepatitis or acquired immune deficiency syndrome are good examples of such applications. The most widely used and commercially available peroxidase for biotechnological processes and analytical applications is horseradish peroxidase followed, although in much lower proportion, by soybean peroxidase. The high commercial interest in peroxidases has led to the search for new sources of these enzymes. This work describes the analytical use of lentil plant peroxidase (LPP), which is a new peroxidase extracted from lentil plants (Lens culinaris Medikus); an abundant post-harvest agricultural waste in the area of Castilla y León (Spain). A procedure for the quantification of hydrogen peroxide in urine is first proposed using crude extract of lentil plant instead of the purified enzyme. This procedure is then applied to the determination of sarcosine; a natural amino acid that has attracted considerable interest in clinical diagnostics since urinary sarcosine was proposed and later questioned as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Under the action of sarcosine oxidase, sarcosine is oxidized by molecular oxygen to give glycine, formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide that is quantified according to the previously proposed procedure. The limit of detection for both hydrogen peroxide and sarcosine is around 5 × 10(-7) M. In the determination of sarcosine, the high selectivity of the overall enzymatic reaction, the simple sample treatment and instrumentation, the high-sample throughput and the use of LPP in the plant extract instead of the purified enzyme provide a rapid and inexpensive procedure with characteristics very suitable for routine analysis in a clinical laboratory. PMID

  10. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  11. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  12. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H2O2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H2O2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H2O2 concentration were 7.0 and 8μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1UmL(-1) SBP in 30min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3UmL(-1) was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (KCAT) and catalytic efficiency (KCAT/KM) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via CC and CO coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment. PMID:26921508

  13. Recents patents in the use of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Berenize; Torres, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidases are hemoenzymes with a wide range of applications, from fine chemical synthesis to environmental biocatalysis. These outstanding biocatalysts are able to catalyze reactions such as heteroatom oxidation (N- and S-oxidation), epoxidation, hydroxylation, and the oxidation of alcohols and indole, often giving high yields and enantiomeric excess values. This makes these biocatalysts very useful for application to several biotechnological processes. In this paper, recent advances and patents surrounding the use of peroxidases are reviewed, covering different aspects related to the applications of peroxidases and the modifications carried out to improve their functionality as biocatalysts. PMID:19519565

  14. Colorimetric detection of urea, urease, and urease inhibitor based on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao-Hua; Hong, Guo-Lin; Lin, Feng-Lin; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we reported for the first time that gold nanoparticles-catalyzed 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine-H2O2 system can serve as an ultrasensitive colorimetric pH indicator. Gold nanoparticles acted as a catalyst and imitated the function of horseradish peroxidase. The absorbance at 450 nm of the yellow-color product in the catalytic reaction exhibited a linear fashion over the pH range of 6.40-6.60. On the basis of this property, we constructed a novel sensing platform for the determination of urea, urease, and urease inhibitor. The limit of detection for urea and urease was 5 μM and 1.8 U/L, respectively. The half-maximal inhibition value IC50 of acetohydroxamic acid was found to be 0.05 mM. Urea in human urine and urease in soil were detected with satisfied results. PMID:26995642

  15. Bienzymatic glucose biosensor based on co-immobilization of peroxidase and glucose oxidase on a carbon nanotubes electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liande; Yang, Ruilan; Zhai, Jiangli; Tian, Chunyuan

    2007-11-30

    A bienzymatic glucose biosensor was proposed for selective and sensitive detection of glucose. This mediatorless biosensor was made by simultaneous immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in an electropolymerized pyrrole (PPy) film on a single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) coated electrode. The amperometric detection of glucose was assayed by potentiostating the bienzymatic electrode at -0.1 versus Ag/AgCl to reduce the enzymatically produced H(2)O(2) with minimal interference from the coexisting electroactive compounds. The single-wall carbon nanotubes, sandwiched between the enzyme loading polypyrrole (PPy) layer and the conducting substrate (gold electrode), could efficiently promote the direct electron transfer of HRP. Operational characteristics of the bienzymatic sensor, in terms of linear range, detection limit, sensitivity, selectivity and stability, were presented in detail. PMID:17764922

  16. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases. PMID:7851395

  17. Self-enhanced N-(aminobutyl)-N-(ethylisoluminol) derivative-based electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for sensitive laminin detection using PdIr cubes as a mimic peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xinya; Wang, Huijun; Wang, Haijun; Zhuo, Ying; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2016-04-01

    Herein, a self-enhanced N-(aminobutyl)-N-(ethylisoluminol) (ABEI) derivative-based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was constructed for the determination of laminin (LN) using PdIr cubes as a mimic peroxidase for signal amplification. Initially, PdIr cubes with efficient peroxidase mimicking properties, large specific surface areas, and good stability and uniformity were synthesized. Then, l-cysteine (l-Cys) and ABEI were immobilized on the PdIr cubes to form the self-enhanced ECL nanocomplex (PdIr-l-Cys-ABEI). In this nanocomplex, PdIr cubes, whose catalytic constant is higher than that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), could effectively catalyze H2O2 decomposition and thus enhance the ECL intensity of ABEI. Moreover, PdIr cubes can be easily modified with functional groups, which make them adaptable to desired supported platforms. On the other hand, l-Cys as a coreactant of ABEI could effectively enhance the luminous efficiency due to the intramolecular ECL reaction which could reduce the energy loss between l-Cys and ABEI by giving a shorter electron transfer distance. The developed strategy combined an ABEI derivative as a self-enhanced ECL luminophore and PdIr cubes as a mimic peroxidase, resulting in a significantly enhanced ECL signal output. Also, the strategy showed high sensitivity and selectivity for LN, which suggested that our new approach could be potentially applied in monitoring different proteins.

  18. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  3. A heme peroxidase with a functional role as an L-tyrosine hydroxylase in the biosynthesis of anthramycin.

    PubMed

    Connor, Katherine L; Colabroy, Keri L; Gerratana, Barbara

    2011-10-18

    We report the first characterization and classification of Orf13 (S. refuineus) as a heme-dependent peroxidase catalyzing the ortho-hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA. The putative tyrosine hydroxylase coded by orf13 of the anthramycin biosynthesis gene cluster has been expressed and purified. Heme b has been identified as the required cofactor for catalysis, and maximal L-tyrosine conversion to L-DOPA is observed in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Preincubation of L-tyrosine with Orf13 prior to the addition of hydrogen peroxide is required for L-DOPA production. However, the enzyme becomes inactivated by hydrogen peroxide during catalysis. Steady-state kinetic analysis of L-tyrosine hydroxylation revealed similar catalytic efficiency for both L-tyrosine and hydrogen peroxide. Spectroscopic data from a reduced-CO(g) UV-vis spectrum of Orf13 and electron paramagnetic resonance of ferric heme Orf13 are consistent with heme peroxidases that have a histidyl-ligated heme iron. Contrary to the classical heme peroxidase oxidation reaction with hydrogen peroxide that produces coupled aromatic products such as o,o'-dityrosine, Orf13 is novel in its ability to catalyze aromatic amino acid hydroxylation with hydrogen peroxide, in the substrate addition order and for its substrate specificity for L-tyrosine. Peroxygenase activity of Orf13 for the ortho-hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA by a molecular oxygen dependent pathway in the presence of dihydroxyfumaric acid is also observed. This reaction behavior is consistent with peroxygenase activity reported with horseradish peroxidase for the hydroxylation of phenol. Overall, the putative function of Orf13 as a tyrosine hydroxylase has been confirmed and establishes the first bacterial class of tyrosine hydroxylases. PMID:21919439

  4. Identification of core alpha 1,3-fucosylated glycans and cloning of the requisite fucosyltransferase cDNA from Drosophila melanogaster. Potential basis of the neural anti-horseadish peroxidase epitope.

    PubMed

    Fabini, G; Freilinger, A; Altmann, F; Wilson, I B

    2001-07-27

    For many years, polyclonal antibodies raised against the plant glycoprotein horseradish peroxidase have been used to specifically stain the neural and male reproductive tissue of Drosophila melanogaster. This epitope is considered to be of carbohydrate origin, but no glycan structure from Drosophila has yet been isolated that could account for this cross-reactivity. Here we report that N-glycan core alpha1,3-linked fucose is, as judged by preabsorption experiments, indispensable for recognition of Drosophila embryonic nervous system by anti-horseradish peroxidase antibody. Further, we describe the identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography of two Drosophila N-glycans that, as already detected in other insects, carry both alpha1,3- and alpha1,6-linked fucose residues on the proximal core GlcNAc. Moreover, we have isolated three cDNAs encoding alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase homologues from Drosophila. One of the cDNAs, when transformed into Pichia pastoris, was found to direct expression of core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase activity. This recombinant enzyme preferred as substrate a biantennary core alpha1,6-fucosylated N-glycan carrying two non-reducing N-acetylglucosamine residues (GnGnF6; Km 11 microm) over the same structure lacking a core fucose residue (GnGn; Km 46 microm). The Drosophila core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase enzyme was also shown to be able to fucosylate N-glycan structures of human transferrin in vitro, this modification correlating with the acquisition of binding to anti-horseradish peroxidase antibody. PMID:11382750

  5. (Molecular characteristics of the lignin forming peroxidase)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Since this manuscript was submitted we have conducted a more thorough physiological analysis of water relations in wild-type and peroxidase overproducing plants. These experiments include pressure bomb, plasmolysis, and membrane integrity analysis. We are also in the process of analyzing other phenotypes in peroxidase overproducer plants such as excessive browning of tissue, the rapid death of tissue in culture, and poor germination of seed. Transformed plants of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris were obtained which have peroxidase activity 3--7 fold lower than wild-type plants. This was done by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the CaMV 35S promoter and the 5' half of the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA in the antisense RNA configuration. A manuscript which describes this work is being written, and will be submitted for publication in January 1990. The anionic peroxidase gene has been cloned by hybridization to the cloned cDNA. The entire gene is contained on an 8.7kb fragment within a lambda phage clone. Several smaller DNA fragments have been subcloned, and some have been sequenced. One exon within the coding sequence has been sequenced, along with the partial sequence of two introns. Further sequencing is being carried-out to identify the promoter, which will be later joined to a reporter gene. 6 figs.

  6. Wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for enhanced intracellular delivery of paclitaxel to colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxia; Ho, Paul C; Lim, Lee Yong

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potentiation of the anticancer activity and enhanced cellular retention of paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles after surface conjugation with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) against colon cancer cells. Glycosylation patterns of representative colon cancer cells confirmed the higher expression levels of WGA-binding glycoproteins in the Caco-2 and HT-29 cells, than in the CCD-18Co cells. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of WNP (final formulation) against colon cell lines was evaluated alongside control formulations. Confocal microscopy and quantitative analysis of intracellular paclitaxel were used to monitor the endocytosis and retention of nanoparticles inside the cells. WNP showed enhanced anti-proliferative activity against Caco-2 and HT-29 cells compared to corresponding nanoparticles without WGA conjugation (PNP). The greater efficacy of WNP was associated with higher cellular uptake and sustained intracellular retention of paclitaxel, which in turn was attributed to the over-expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-containing glycoprotein on the colon cell membrane. WNP also demonstrated increased intracellular retention in the Caco-2 (30% of uptake) and HT-29 (40% of uptake) cells, following post-uptake incubation with fresh medium, compared to the unconjugated PNP nanoparticles (18% in Caco-2) and (27% in HT-29), respectively. Cellular trafficking study of WNP showed endocytosed WNP could successful escape from the endo-lysosome compartment and release into the cytosol with increasing incubation time. It may be concluded that WNP has the potential to be applied as a targeted delivery platform for paclitaxel in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:20804835

  7. Modelling a Peroxidase-based Optical Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Romas; Gaidamauskaite, Evelina; Kulys, Juozas

    2007-01-01

    The response of a peroxidase-based optical biosensor was modelled digitally. A mathematical model of the optical biosensor is based on a system of non-linear reaction-diffusion equations. The modelling biosensor comprises two compartments, an enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer. The digital simulation was carried out using finite difference technique. The influence of the substrate concentration as well as of the thickness of both the enzyme and diffusion layers on the biosensor response was investigated. Calculations showed complex kinetics of the biosensor response, especially at low concentrations of the peroxidase and of the hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Kinetic study of the inactivation of ascorbate peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Hiner, A N; Rodríguez-López, J N; Arnao, M B; Lloyd Raven, E; García-Cánovas, F; Acosta, M

    2000-01-01

    The activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) has been studied with H(2)O(2) and various reducing substrates. The activity decreased in the order pyrogallol>ascorbate>guaiacol>2, 2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). The inactivation of APX with H(2)O(2) as the sole substrate was studied. The number of H(2)O(2) molecules required for maximal inactivation of the enzyme was determined as approx. 2.5. Enzymic activity of approx. 20% of the original remained at the end of the inactivation process (i.e. approx. 20% resistance) when ascorbate or ABTS was used as the substrate in activity assays. With pyrogallol or guaiacol no resistance was seen. Inactivation by H(2)O(2) followed over time with ascorbate or pyrogallol assays exhibited single-exponential decreases in enzymic activity. Hyperbolic saturation kinetics were observed in both assay systems; a similar dissociation constant (0.8 microM) for H(2)O(2) was obtained in each case. However, the maximum rate constant (lambda(max)) obtained from the plots differed depending on the assay substrate. The presence of reducing substrate in addition to H(2)O(2) partly or completely protected the enzyme from inactivation, depending on how many molar equivalents of reducing substrate were added. An oxygen electrode system has been used to confirm that APX does not exhibit a catalase-like oxygen-releasing reaction. A kinetic model was developed to interpret the experimental results; both the results and the model are compared and contrasted with previously obtained results for horseradish peroxidase C. The kinetic model has led us to the conclusion that the inactivation of APX by H(2)O(2) represents an unusual situation in which no enzyme turnover occurs but there is a partition of the enzyme between two forms, one inactive and the other with activity towards reducing substrates such as ascorbate and ABTS only. The partition ratio is less than 1. PMID:10816425

  9. Modeling suberization with peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of hydroxycinnamic acids: cross-coupling and dimerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Stark, Ruth E

    2006-04-01

    An anionic potato peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7, APP) thought to be involved in suberization after wounding was isolated from slices of Solanum tuberosum in order to elucidate the first steps of dehydrogenative polymerization between pairs of different hydroxycinnamic acids (FA, CafA, CA and SA) present in wound-healing plant tissues. Use of a commercial horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-H2O2 catalytic system gave the identical major products in these coupling reactions, providing sufficient quantities for purification and structural elucidation. Using an equimolar mixture of pairs of hydroxycinnamic acid suberin precursors, only caffeic acid is coupled to ferulic acid and sinapic acid in separate cross-coupling reactions. For the other systems, HRP and APP reacted as follows: (1) preferentially with ferulic acid in a reaction mixture that contained p-coumaric and ferulic acids; (2) with sinapic acid in a mixture of p-coumaric and sinapic acids; (3) with sinapic acid in a mixture of ferulic and sinapic acids; (4) with caffeic acid in a reaction mixture of p-coumaric and caffeic acids. The resulting products, isolated and identified by NMR and MS analysis, had predominantly beta-beta-gamma-lactone and beta-5 benzofuran molecular frameworks. Five cross-coupling products are described for the first time, whereas the beta-O-4 dehydrodimers identified from the caffeic acid and sinapic acid cross-coupling reaction are known materials that are highly abundant in plants. These reactivity trends lead to testable hypotheses regarding the molecular architecture of intractable suberin protective plant materials, complementing prior analysis of monomeric constituents by GC-MS and polymer functional group identification from solid-state NMR, respectively. PMID:16524605

  10. Enzymatic Degradation of Oxidized and Reduced Graphene Nanoribbons by Lignin Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    The expanding use of graphene for various industrial and biomedical applications requires efficient remediation strategies during their disposal into waste streams. Additionally, the interactions of graphene with the biota need thorough evaluation. In this study, we investigated the interactions of oxidized and reduced graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs and rGONRs) with lignin peroxidase (LiP), a ligninolytic enzyme released from white rot fungus. GONRs and rGONRs were treated with LiP in the presence and absence of veratryl alcohol (VA; an electron transfer mediator and secondary metabolite of white rot fungi). Transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of large defects (holes) in the graphene sheet, which increased in diameter with increased degradation time. Raman spectroscopic analysis indicated that, within 96 hours, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and VA, the GONRs and rGONRs were completely and partially degraded by LiP, respectively. Comparisons between groups with or without VA showed that degradation of GONRs was accelerated in the presence of VA. These results indicated that LiP could efficiently degrade GONRs and rGONRs in the presence of VA, suggesting that VA may be an essential factor needed to degrade rGONRs via LiP treatment. Thus, the wide presence of white rot fungi, and thereby LiP, in nature, could lead to efficient degradation of graphene present in the environment. Additionally, LiP, which has a higher theoretical redox potential compared to horseradish peroxidases and myeloperoxidases, could be a better candidate for the environmental remediation of graphene. PMID:25215188

  11. INTERACTIONS OF HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE WITH MONTMORILLONITE HOMOIONIC TO NA+ AND CA2+: EFFECTS ON ENZYME ACTIVITY AND MICROBIAL DEGRADATION. (R826107)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. A Biosensor Based on Immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase in Chitosan Matrix Cross-linked with Glyoxal for Amperometric Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Sheng; Pan, Qian-Xiu; Wang, Gui-Xiang

    2005-01-01

    An amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was developed via an easy and effective enzyme immobilization method with the “sandwich” configuration: ferrocene-chitosan: HRP: chitosan-glyoxal using a glassy carbon electrode as the basic electrode. In order to prevent the loss of immobilized HRP under optimized conditions, the biosensor surface was cross-linked with glyoxal. Ferrocene was selected and immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode surface as a mediator. The fabrication procedure was systematically optimized to improve the biosensor performance. The biosensor had a fast response of less than 10 s to H2O2, with a linear range of 3.5×10-5 to 1.1×10-3 M, and a detection limit of 8.0×10-6 M based on S/N = 3.

  13. Controllable Biotinylated Poly(Ethylene-co-Glycidyl Methacrylate) (PE-co-GMA) Nanofibers to Bind Streptavidin-Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) for Potential Biosensor Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (PE-co-GMA) nanofibers with abundant active epoxy groups on surfaces were fabricated through a novel manufacturing process. The prepared PE-co-GMA nanofibers with different average diameters ranging from 100 to 400 nm were aminated by reacting the epoxy groups...

  14. Metal-organic framework-derived copper nanoparticle@carbon nanocomposites as peroxidase mimics for colorimetric sensing of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongliang; Ma, Chanjiao; Gao, Li; Li, Qian; Song, Yonghai; Xu, Fugang; Wang, Tao; Wang, Li

    2014-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as very fascinating functional materials due to their diversity nature. A nanocomposite consisting of copper nanoparticles dispersed within a carbon matrix (Cu NPs@C) is prepared through a one-pot thermolysis of copper-based metal-organic framework precursors. Cu NPs@C can catalyze the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) to form a colored product in the presence of H2 O2 . As a peroxidase mimic, Cu NPs@C not only has the advantages of low cost, high stability, and easy preparation, but also follows Michaelis-Menten behaviors and shows strong affinity to H2 O2 . As the Cu NPs' surfaces are free from stabilizing agent, Cu NPs@C exhibited a higher affinity to H2 O2 than horseradish peroxidase. On the basis of the inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid (AA) on oxidation of TMB, this system serves as a colorimetric method for the detection of AA, suggesting that the present work would expand the potential applications of MOF-derived nanocomposites in biomedical fields. PMID:25332148

  15. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation. PMID:24763280

  16. Widespread Occurrence of Expressed Fungal Secretory Peroxidases in Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J.; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R.; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation. PMID:24763280

  17. Amperometric DNA-Peroxidase Sensor for the Detection of Pharmaceutical Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Evtugyn, G.A.; Goldfarb, O.E.; Budnikov, H.C.; Ivanov, A.N.; Vinter, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    Novel DNA-sensor with enzymatic amplification of the signal has been developed on the base of glassy carbon electrode modified with ds-DNA and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Phenothiazine dyes Methylene Blue and Methylene Green were used as electrochemical markers for the detection of sulfonamide and anthracycline preparations able to interact with DNA. The biosensor signal related to HRP oxidation of the markers depends on the relation between their bonded and readily oxidized forms which depends on the nature and concentration of pharmaceuticals. Sulfonamides diminish surface concentration of MB accessible for HRP reaction whereas anthracyclines release intercalated marker and increase the signal. The DNA-HRP sensor developed makes it possible to detect down to 0.002 nmol L-1 of sulfamethoxazole, 0.1 nmol L-1 of sulfadiazine, 0.01 nmol L-1 of sulfamethazine, 0.1 nmol L-1 of sulfaguanine, 0.05 μmol L-1 of rubomycin and 0.08 μmol L-1 of doxorubicin.

  18. Sonoenzymatic decolourization of an azo dye employing immobilized horse radish peroxidase (HRP): a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Malani, Ritesh S; Khanna, Swati; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2013-07-15

    For degradation of biorefractory pollutants, enzymatic treatments and sonochemical treatments have shown high potential. A combined technique of sono-enzymatic treatment is of special interest as it has shown enhancement effect than the individual techniques. This work has attempted to give a mechanistic insight into the interaction of sonochemical and enzymatic treatments using immobilized horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme on the decolourization of acid red dye (an azo dye). In order to segregate the effect of ultrasound and cavitation, experiments were conducted at elevated static pressure. The kinetic parameters of HRP, viz. Vmax and Km were marginally affected by immobilization. There was a minor change in pH optima and temperature optima for immobilized HRP (6.5, 25°C) from free HRP (7.0, 20-25°C). Though the specific activity of free enzyme (0.272U/mg) was found to be higher than the immobilized enzyme (0.104U/mg), immobilized enzyme exhibited higher stability (up to 3 cycles) and degradation potential than free enzyme in all experiments. The results revealed that the coupling of sonication and enzymatic treatment at high pressure in presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) yielded the highest decolourization of acid red (61.2%). However, the total decolourization achieved with combined technique was lesser than the sum of individual techniques, indicating negative synergy between the sonochemical and enzymatic techniques. PMID:23708258

  19. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  20. Microfluidic peroxidase biochip for polyphenol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Aravind; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2003-03-01

    An enzyme-containing microfluidic biochip has been developed for the oxidative polymerization of phenols. The biochip consists of a simple T-junction with two feed reservoirs 20 mm apart and a microreaction channel 30 mm long. The channel is 15 microm deep and 200 microm wide at the center, giving a reaction volume of 90 nL. The biochip was fabricated using conventional photolithographic methods on a glass substrate etched using a HF-based solution. Fluid transport was enabled using electroosmotic flow. Soybean peroxidase was used as the phenol oxidizing catalyst, and in the presence of p-cresol and H(2)O(2), essentially complete conversion of the H(2)O(2) (the limiting substrate) occurred in the microchannel at a flow rate of ca. 290 nL/min. Thus, peroxidase was found to be intrinsically active even upon dramatic scale-down as achieved in microfluidic reactors. These results were extended to a series of phenols, thereby demonstrating that the microfluidic peroxidase reactor may have application in high-throughput screening of phenolic polymerization reactions for use in phenolic resin synthesis. Finally, rapid growth of poly(p-cresol) on the walls of the microreaction channel could be performed in the presence of higher H(2)O(2) concentrations. This finding suggests that solution-phase peroxidase catalysis can be used in the controlled deposition of polymers on the walls of microreactors. PMID:12514805

  1. Creation of a Thermally Tolerant Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Nakajima, H

    2016-01-01

    An artificial peroxidase with thermal tolerance and high catalytic activity has been successfully prepared by mutagenesis of an electron transfer protein, cytochrome c552 from Thermus thermophilus. The mutant enzymes were rationally designed based on the general peroxidase mechanism and spectroscopic analyses of an active intermediate formed in the catalytic reaction. Stopped flow UV-vis spectroscopy and EPR spectroscopy with a rapid freezing sample technique revealed that the initial double mutant, V49D/M69A, which was designed to reproduce the peroxidase mechanism, formed an active oxo-ferryl heme intermediate with a protein radical predominantly localized on Tyr45 during the catalytic reaction. The magnetic power saturation measurement obtained from EPR studies showed little interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the tyrosyl radical. Kinetics studies indicated that the isolated oxo-ferryl heme component in the active intermediate was a possible cause of heme degradation during the reaction with H2O2. Strong interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the radical was achieved by replacing Tyr45 with tryptophan (resulting in the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant), which was similar to a tryptophanyl radical found in active intermediates of some catalase-peroxidases. Compared to the protein radical intermediates of V49D/M69A mutant, those of the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant showed higher reactivity to an organic substrate than to H2O2. The Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant exhibited improved peroxidase activity and thermal tolerance. PMID:27586345

  2. Long-term chemiluminescence signal is produced in the course of luminol oxidation catalyzed by enhancer-independent peroxidase purified from Jatropha curcas leaves.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peipei; Cai, Feng; Luo, Yongting; Chen, Yangxi; Zou, Shujuan

    2015-09-01

    Isoenzyme c of horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C) is widely used in enzyme immunoassay combined with chemiluminescence (CL) detection. For this application, HRP-C activity measurement is usually based on luminol oxidation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, this catalysis reaction was enhancer dependent. In this study, we demonstrated that Jatropha curcas peroxidase (JcGP1) showed high efficiency in catalyzing luminol oxidation in the presence of H2O2. Compared with HRP-C, the JcGP1-induced reaction was enhancer independent, which made the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) simpler. In addition, the JcGP1 catalyzed reaction showed a long-term stable CL signal. We optimized the conditions for JcGP1 catalysis and determined the favorable conditions as follows: 50 mM Tris buffer (pH 8.2) containing 10 mM H2 O2, 14 mM luminol and 0.75 M NaCl. The optimum catalysis temperature was 30°C. The detection limit of JcGP1 under optimum condition was 0.2 pM. Long-term stable CL signal combined with enhancer-independent property indicated that JcGP1 might be a valuable candidate peroxidase for clinical diagnosis and enzyme immunoassay with CL detection. PMID:25511847

  3. Axial histidyl imidazole non-exchangeable proton resonances as indicators of imidazole hydrogen bonding in ferric cyanide complexes of heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    La Mar, G N; De Ropp, J S; Chacko, V P; Satterlee, J D; Erman, J E

    1982-11-19

    Proton NMR spectra of a model of low-spin cyanide complexes of ferric hemoproteins indicate that two broad single-protein resonances from the axial imidazole can be resolved outside the diamagnetic spectral region. Upon deprotonation of the imidazole in the model, the upfield resonance shifts dramatically to higher field, suggesting that its position may reflect the degree of hydrogen bonding or proton donation of the imidazole. Met-cyano myoglobin reveals a pair of such broad peaks in the regions expected for an essentially neutral axial imidazole. In the cyano complexes of horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, a pair of single-proton resonances are located which are assigned to the same imidazole protons on the basis of their linewidth and shift changes upon altering the heme substituents. The upfiled proton, however, is found at much higher field than in metMbCN. The upfield bias of this resonance is taken as evidence for appreciable imidazolate character for the axial ligand in these heme peroxidases. PMID:6293582

  4. The interaction of diamines and polyamines with the peroxidase-catalyzed metabolism of aromatic amines: a potential mechanism for the modulation of aniline toxicity.

    PubMed

    Michail, Karim; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic and biological amines such as ethylenediamine (EDA), spermine, and spermidine have not been previously investigated in free-radical biochemical systems involving aniline-based drugs or xenobiotics. We aimed to study the influence of polyamines in the modulation of aromatic amine radical metabolites in peroxidase-mediated free radical reactions. The aniline compounds tested caused a relatively low oxidation rate of glutathione in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and H2O2; however, they demonstrated marked oxygen consumption when a polyamine molecule was present. Next, we characterized the free-radical products generated by these reactions using spin-trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Primary and secondary but not tertiary polyamines dose-dependently enhanced the N-centered radicals of different aniline compounds catalyzed by either HRP or myeloperoxidase, which we believe occurred via charge transfer intermediates and subsequent stabilization of aniline-derived radical species as suggested by isotopically labeled aniline. Aniline/peroxidase reaction product(s) were monitored at 435 nm by kinetic spectrophotometry in the presence and absence of a polyamine additive. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, the dimerziation product of aniline, azobenzene, was significantly amplified when EDA was present. In conclusion, di- and poly-amines are capable of enhancing the formation of aromatic-amine-derived free radicals, a fact that is expected to have toxicological consequences. PMID:23537436

  5. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  6. PEROXIDASE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN BUFFALOGRASS AND OTHER GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant peroxidases are a family of related proteins possessing highly conserved domains. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on these conserved domains can be used to amplify DNA sequences coding for peroxidases from plants with unsequenced genomes. Polymorphisms in peroxidase genes among buffa...

  7. Nematicidal activity of allylisothiocyanate from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Nadhem; Tedeschi, Paola; Maietti, Annalisa; Brandolini, Vincenzo; Garau, Vincenzo Luigi; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2013-05-22

    In recent years, there has been a great development in the search for new natural pesticides for crop protection aiming a partial or total replacement of currently used chemical nematicides. Glucosinolate breakdown products are volatile and are therefore good candidates for nematodes fumigants. In this article, the methanol-aqueous extract (1:1, w/v) of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) fresh roots (MAH) was in vitro tested for nematicidal activity against second stage (J2) Meloidogyne incognita. The EC50 of MAH after 3 days of J2 immersion in test solutions was 251 ± 46 mg/L. The chemical composition analysis of the extract carried out by the GC-MS technique showed that allylisothicyanate was the most abundant compound. This pure compound induced J2 paralysis with an EC50 of 52.6 ± 45.6 and 6.6 ± 3.4 mg/L after 1 h and 3 days of incubation. The use of LC-MS/MS showed for the first time that horseradish root is rich in polyphenols. The study of isothiocyanate degradation in soil showed that allylisothiocyanate was the most quickly degradable compound (half-life <10 min), whereas no significant differences in half-life time were noted between degradation in regular and autoclaved soil. PMID:23627288

  8. Peroxidase Activity and Involvement in the Oxidative Stress Response of Roseobacter denitrificans Truncated Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaya; Barbeau, Xavier; Bilimoria, Astha; Lagüe, Patrick; Couture, Manon; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Roseobacter denitrificans is a member of the widespread marine Roseobacter genus. We report the first characterization of a truncated hemoglobin from R. denitrificans (Rd. trHb) that was purified in the heme-bound form from heterologous expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Rd. trHb exhibits predominantly alpha-helical secondary structure and absorbs light at 412, 538 and 572 nm. The phylogenetic classification suggests that Rd. trHb falls into group II trHbs, whereas sequence alignments indicate that it shares certain important heme pocket residues with group I trHbs in addition to those of group II trHbs. The resonance Raman spectra indicate that the isolated Rd. trHb contains a ferric heme that is mostly 6-coordinate low-spin and that the heme of the ferrous form displays a mixture of 5- and 6-coordinate states. Two Fe-His stretching modes were detected, notably one at 248 cm-1, which has been reported in peroxidases and some flavohemoglobins that contain an Fe-His-Asp (or Glu) catalytic triad, but was never reported before in a trHb. We show that Rd. trHb exhibits a significant peroxidase activity with a (kcat/Km) value three orders of magnitude higher than that of bovine Hb and only one order lower than that of horseradish peroxidase. This enzymatic activity is pH-dependent with a pKa value ~6.8. Homology modeling suggests that residues known to be important for interactions with heme-bound ligands in group II trHbs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus subtilis are pointing toward to heme in Rd. trHb. Genomic organization and gene expression profiles imply possible functions for detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in vivo. Altogether, Rd. trHb exhibits some distinctive features and appears equipped to help the bacterium to cope with reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and/or to operate redox biochemistry. PMID:25658318

  9. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  10. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  11. Redox thermodynamics of lactoperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bellei, Marzia; Vlasits, Jutta; Banerjee, Srijib; Furtmüller, Paul G; Sola, Marco; Obinger, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are important constituents of the innate immune system of mammals. These heme enzymes belong to the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and catalyze the oxidation of thiocyanate, bromide and nitrite to hypothiocyanate, hypobromous acid and nitrogen dioxide that are toxic for invading pathogens. In order to gain a better understanding of the observed differences in substrate specificity and oxidation capacity in relation to heme and protein structure, a comprehensive spectro-electrochemical investigation was performed. The reduction potential (E degrees ') of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of EPO and LPO was determined to be -126mV and -176mV, respectively (25 degrees C, pH 7.0). Variable temperature experiments show that EPO and LPO feature different reduction thermodynamics. In particular, reduction of ferric EPO is enthalpically and entropically disfavored, whereas in LPO the entropic term, which selectively stabilizes the oxidized form, prevails on the enthalpic term that favors reduction of Fe(III). The data are discussed with respect to the architecture of the heme cavity and the substrate channel. Comparison with published data for myeloperoxidase demonstrates the effect of heme to protein linkages and heme distortion on the redox chemistry of mammalian peroxidases and in consequence on the enzymatic properties of these physiologically important oxidoreductases. PMID:19944669

  12. Further characterization of human eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, R L; Syse, K; Little, C; Christensen, T B

    1985-01-01

    The large and the small subunits (Mr 50 000 and 10 500 respectively) of human eosinophil peroxidase were isolated by gel filtration under reducing conditions. The subunits were very strongly associated but not apparently cross-linked by disulphide bridges. During storage, the large subunit tended to form aggregates, which required reduction to dissociate them. Amino acid analysis of the performic acid-treated large subunit showed the presence of 19 cysteic acid residues. The small subunit of eosinophil peroxidase had the same Mr value as the small subunit of myeloperoxidase. However, although these subunits have very similar amino acid compositions, they showed different patterns of peptide fragmentation after CNBr treatment. The carbohydrate of eosinophil peroxidase seemed associated exclusively with the large subunit and comprised mannose (4.5%, w/w) and N-acetylglucosamine (0.8%, w/w). The far-u.v.c.d. spectrum of the enzyme indicated the presence of relatively little ordered secondary structure. Images Fig. 3. PMID:4052025

  13. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  14. Peroxidase-induced degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes: hypochlorite is a major oxidant capable of in vivo degradation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, I. I.; Vakhrusheva, T. V.; Sokolov, A. V.; Kostevich, V. A.; Ragimov, A. A.

    2011-04-01

    Due to their extraordinary properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have a tremendous potential for medical applications such as clinical diagnostics, targeted drug (or gene) delivery and cancer therapy. Hence, effects of SWNTs on living systems as well as mechanisms for biodegradation of SWTNs are of great importance and must be studied before starting to explore SWNTs for medical use. This study was undertaken to compare the potential of different peroxidases in degrading carboxylated SWNT (c-SWNT) and to elucidate the role of peroxidase-generated reactive products in this process. A detailed study showed that neither reactive intermediate products nor free radicals generated via peroxidase cycle can considerably oxidize c-SWNT. Biodegradation of c-SWNT in model system can be induced by free radicals generated as a result of heme degradation. The latter explains why hemoglobin, which is a pseudo-peroxidase possessing low peroxidase activity, is able to oxidize carbon nanotubes with a higher efficiency than horseradish peroxidase. However, c-SWNT in the presence of blood plasma (15 vol %) demonstrated no degradation even at high concentrations of hemoglobin and H2O2. The comparison of the ability of various peroxidases to degrade SWNTs in vitro revealed that MPO, due to its ability to produce hypochlorite, and lactoperoxidase, due to its ability to produce hypobromite, are extremely efficient in degrading carbon nanotubes. Since neutrophils are a main source of human MPO, we tested the effect of SWNTs on these cells. SWNTs were unable to stimulate neutrophils. On the other hand, they dose-dependently enhanced opsonized zymosan-induced cell stimulation as detected by measuring the amount of hypochlorite produced. This finding may be relevant to the in vivo situation, for example, at inflammatory sites. In order to imitate conditions characteristic of phagosomes and inflammatory sites, we titrated the suspension of c-SWNT in the presence of diluted blood

  15. A PI 4. 6 peroxidase that specifically crosslinks extensin precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Upham, B.L; Alizadeh, H.; Ryan, K.J.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The primary cell wall is a microcomposite of cellulose, pectin, hemicellulose and protein. The warp-weft model of the primary cell wall hypothesize that extensin monomers are intermolecularly crosslinked orthogonal to the cellulose microfibril thus mechanically coupling the major load-bearing polymer: cellulose. Media of tomato cell cultures contains heat labile, peroxide dependent crosslinking activity, as determined by the rate of decrease in monomer concentration analyzed via Superose-6. Isoelectric focusing of tomato cell culture media indicated crosslinking was predominantly in the acidic peroxidase fraction (pI4.6). This peroxidase was partially purified by ultracentrifugation, DEAE-Trisacryl and HPLC-DEAE chromatography techniques resulting in a 90 fold purification and 45% yield. A second acidic peroxidase eluted from the HPLC-DEAE column had 25% of the crosslinking activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. Purified basic peroxidase had only 0.7% of the activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. The specific activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase was 5,473 mg extensin crosslinked/min/mg peroxidase. The pI 4.6 peroxidase crosslinked the following extensins: tomato I and II, carrot, Ginkgo II and did not crosslink Ginkgo I, Douglas Fir, Maize, Asparagus I and II, and sugarbeet extensins as well as bovine serum albumin. Comparison of motifs common to extensins that are crosslinked by the pI 4.6 peroxidase may help identify the crosslink domain(s) of extension.

  16. Growth-associated protein 43 immunoreactivity in the superficial dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord is localized in atrophic C-fiber, and not in sprouted A-fiber, central terminals after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Doubell, T P; Woolf, C J

    1997-09-15

    Peripheral nerve injury induces the up-regulation in dorsal root ganglion cells of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and its transport to the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, where it is located primarily in unmyelinated axons and growth-cone like structures. Peripheral nerve injury also induces the central terminals of axotomized myelinated axons to sprout and form novel synaptic contacts in lamina II of the dorsal horn. To investigate whether the sprouting of A-fiber central terminals into lamina II is the consequence of GAP-43 incorporation into their terminal membranes, we have used an ultrastructural analysis with double labelling to identify the localization of GAP-43 immunoreactivity. Transganglionic transport of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was used to identify C-fiber terminals. Transganglionic transport of the B fragment of cholera toxin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP) was used to label A-fiber sciatic nerve central terminals in combination with GAP-43 immunocytochemistry. GAP-43 was found to colocalize only with WGA-HRP- and not with B-HRP-labelled synapses or axons. In addition, many single-labelled GAP-43 synapses were observed. Many of the WGA-HRP-labelled terminals that were characterized by degenerative changes were GAP-43 immunoreactive. Our results indicate that peripheral nerve injury induces novel synapse formation of A fibers in lamina II but that up-regulated levels of GAP-43 are present mainly in other axon projections to the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:9303528

  17. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  18. Distribution of cortical neurons projecting to dorsal column nuclear complex and spinal cord in the hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Rehkämper, G

    1992-01-01

    Using retrograde axonal flow and wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, we studied the distribution of cortical neurons giving rise to spinal and dorsal column nuclear projections, and correlated the regions involved in the projections with the cytoarchitectonic areas recently identified in the lesser hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi (Insectivora). Labeled cortical neurons were most numerous following injections of tracer into higher cervical segments, whereas almost none were found following thoracic injections. The cortical labeling appeared more prominent ipsilaterally than contralaterally after spinal injections, although it was more prominent on the contralateral side after injection into the dorsal column nuclear complex. The majority of labeled neurons found in lamina V occupied the neocortex adjacent to the interhemispheric fissure along the rostrocaudal extent of the small corpus callosum. This location corresponded to an intermediate rostrocaudal portion of the hemisphere, and particularly to area 2 of Rehkämper. In some cases, adjacent portions of areas 1 and 3 were also involved, as well as neocortical regions of the lateral hemisphere. The present data did not suggest a somatotopic organization of the projections; likewise, evidence for the presence of more than one somatosensorimotor representation was sparse. PMID:1414117

  19. Neuronal network disturbance after focal ischemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, K.; Hayakawa, T.; Yamada, K.; Mushiroi, T.; Kuroda, R.; Mogami, H. )

    1989-09-01

    We studied functional disturbances following left middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. Neuronal function was evaluated by (14C)2-deoxyglucose autoradiography 1 day after occlusion. We analyzed the mechanisms of change in glucose utilization outside the infarct using Fink-Heimer silver impregnation, axonal transport of wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated-horseradish peroxidase, and succinate dehydrogenase histochemistry. One day after occlusion, glucose utilization was remarkably reduced in the areas surrounding the infarct. There were many silver grains indicating degeneration of the synaptic terminals in the cortical areas surrounding the infarct and the ipsilateral cingulate cortex. Moreover, in the left thalamus where the left middle cerebral artery supplied no blood, glucose utilization significantly decreased compared with sham-operated rats. In the left thalamus, massive silver staining of degenerated synaptic terminals and decreases in succinate dehydrogenase activity were observed 4 and 5 days after occlusion. The absence of succinate dehydrogenase staining may reflect early changes in retrograde degeneration of thalamic neurons after ischemic injury of the thalamocortical pathway. Terminal degeneration even affected areas remote from the infarct: there were silver grains in the contralateral hemisphere transcallosally connected to the infarct and in the ipsilateral substantia nigra. Axonal transport study showed disruption of the corticospinal tract by subcortical ischemia; the transcallosal pathways in the cortex surrounding the infarct were preserved. The relation between neural function and the neuronal network in the area surrounding the focal cerebral infarct is discussed with regard to ischemic penumbra and diaschisis.

  20. Innervation of propatagial musculature in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans (Rodentia, Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Chickering, J G; Sokoloff, A J

    1996-01-01

    The propatagium of gliding and flying mammals is of both functional and phylogenetic interest. The innervation of the propatagial muscle, platysma II, was studied with the axonal tracer wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans. Injections of WGA-HRP into the proximal third of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the lateral part of the medial subdivision of the ipsilateral facial nucleus and in the ipsilateral ventral horn of the brachial enlargement. Injections into distal regions of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the ipsilateral ventral horn of spinal segments C5-C8 but not in the facial nucleus. Injections along the whole length of the muscle labeled afferent axons in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of spinal segments C4-T1. These results demonstrate a mixed facial and spinal motor innervation of propatagial musculature in the flying squirrel and indicate that this pattern of mixed innervation is more widespread among flying and gliding mammals than previously reported. Mixed facial and cervical propatagial innervation, independently derived in different flying and gliding mammals, may represent a common solution in the design of the propatagium. These findings complicate the use of propatagial muscle innervation patterns for the establishment of phylogenetic relationships among flying and gliding mammals. PMID:8834780

  1. Central Pupillary Light Reflex Circuits in the Cat: I. The Olivary Pretectal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wensi; May, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The central pathways subserving the feline pupillary light reflex were examined by defining retinal input to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPt), the midbrain projections of this nucleus, and the premotor neurons within it. Unilateral intravitreal wheat germ agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections revealed differences in the pattern of retinal OPt termination on the two sides. Injections of WGA-HRP into OPt labeled terminals bilaterally in the anteromedian nucleus, and to a lesser extent in the supraoculomotor area, centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus and nucleus of the posterior commissure. Labeled terminals, as well as retrogradely labeled multipolar cells, were present in the contralateral OPt, indicating a commissural pathway. Injections of WGA-HRP into the anteromedian nucleus labeled fusiform premotor neurons within the OPt, as well as multipolar cells in the nucleus of the posterior commissure. Connections between retinal terminals and the pretectal premotor neurons were characterized by combining vitreous chamber and anteromedian nucleus injections of WGA-HRP in the same animal. Fusiform shaped, retrogradely labeled cells fell within the anterogradely labeled retinal terminal field in OPt. Ultrastructural analysis revealed labeled retinal terminals containing clear spherical vesicles. They contacted labeled pretectal premotor neurons via asymmetric synaptic densities. These results provide an anatomical substrate for the pupillary light reflex in the cat. Pretectal premotor neurons receive direct retinal input via synapses suggestive of an excitatory drive, and project directly to nuclei containing preganglionic motoneurons. These projections are concentrated in the anteromedian nucleus, indicating its involvement in the pupillary light reflex. PMID:24706328

  2. Cytochrome c peroxidase from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Zahn, J A; Arciero, D M; Hooper, A B; Coats, J R; DiSpirito, A A

    1997-11-01

    A bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase was purified from the obligate methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath in either the fully oxidized or the half reduced form depending on the purification procedure. The cytochrome was a homo-dimer with a subunit mol mass of 35.8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.5. At physiological temperatures, the enzyme contained one high-spin, low-potential (Em7 = -254 mV) and one low-spin, high-potential (Em7 = +432 mM ) heme. The low-potential heme center exhibited a spin-state transition from the penta-coordinated, high-spin configuration to a low-spin configuration upon cooling the enzyme to cryogenic temperatures. Using M. capsulatus Bath ferrocytochrome c555 as the electron donor, the KM and Vmax for peroxide reduction were 510 +/- 100 nM and 425 +/- 22 mol ferrocytochrome c555 oxidized min-1 (mole cytochrome c peroxidase)-1, respectively. PMID:9325424

  3. Potent antioxidative and antigenotoxic activity in aqueous extract of Japanese rice bran--association with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Higashi-Okai, Kiyoka; Kanbara, Keiko; Amano, Kanako; Hagiwara, Akiko; Sugita, Chie; Matsumoto, Norie; Okai, Yasuji

    2004-08-01

    To estimate the preventive potential of Japanese rice bran (Oryza sativa japonica) against the oxygen radical-related chronic diseases such as cardio-vascular diseases and cancer, antioxidative and antigenotoxic activities of the rice bran extracts were analyzed by using assay systems for lipid peroxidation and genotoxin-induced umu gene expression. When effects of the rice bran extracts under different extraction conditions on hydroperoxide generation from auto-oxidized linoleic acid were examined using aluminum chloride method, the water extract showed strong antioxidant activity, but the methanol and acetone extracts did not exhibit significant activity. The water extract of rice bran was divided into the ethanol-precipitable (EP) and supernatant fractions, and EP fraction showed the dominant antioxidant activity, but the supernatant fraction did not exhibit significant antioxidant activity. When the effect of EP fraction on umu C gene expression in SOS response associated with DNA damage in Salmonella typhimurium (TA 1535/pSK 1002) induced by 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) was analyzed, it showed a dose-dependent suppressive activity against Trp-P-1-induced umu C gene expression. The bio-chemical analysis of EP fraction indicates that the major antioxidative and antigenotoxic activity of EP fraction is associated with a proteinous component with the molecular weight of more than 30 KDa. As a possible active principle for the antioxidative and antigenotoxic activity in EP fraction, the strong activity of an oxygen radical-scavenging enzyme, peroxidase was detected, and the purified horseradish peroxidase also caused the similar antioxidative and antigenotoxic activities. The significance of this finding is discussed from the viewpoint of the preventive role of rice bran against oxygen radical-related chronic diseases. PMID:15476307

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:25957835

  5. Impact of aging on the formation of bound residues after peroxidase-mediated treatment of 2,4-DCP contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Mónica; Bhandari, Alok

    2006-05-15

    This study evaluated the impact of solute-soil contact time on the formation of "bound" residue in two surface soils exposed to solutions containing 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) or DCP polymerization products (DPP). DPP was generated by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediated oxidative polymerization of 14C-labeled DCP in the soil slurry. Soils were preloaded with DCP or DPP for durations ranging from 2 h to 84 days. Bound residue was described as solute that was resistant to methanol extraction. Alkali extractions were conducted to estimate the 14C-activity associated with the humic acid, fulvic acid, and humin/mineral components of the soil. Changes in the distribution of the preloaded 14C-DCP and 14C-DPP were observed as a function of the solute-soil contact time. Results suggest that an assumption of sorption equilibrium based solely on the achievement of constant aqueous- or solid-phase solute concentrations can lead to erroneous conclusions about the establishment of true thermodynamic sorption equilibrium. This work also illustrated that (i) significant "irreversible" binding of phenolic contaminants to soils can be achieved during peroxidase-mediated treatment; and (ii) the "aging" process can lead to greater bound-residue formation over time. PMID:16749713

  6. Peroxidase Isozymes from Meloidogyne spp. and Their Origin

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Two peroxidase isozymes (Ef 0.43 and 0.53) were detected by electrophoretic analysis in homogenates of Meloidogyne arenaria, M. hapla, M. javanica, and M. incognita females reared on tomato. No peroxidase isozymes were detected electrophoretically in homogenates of adult males, preparasitic larvae, or eggs. Peroxidase isozymes from females reared on bean, eggplant, or tobacco differed from those from females reared on tomato. Bean and eggplant populations had a single peroxidase isozyme each, respectively Ef 0.21 and 0.28. No peroxidase isozymes were detected in tobacco populations under the conditions used, although total activity assays did reveal low levels of peroxidase activity in homogenates of tobacco populations. The peroxidase isozymes detected in females reared on tomato or bean appear similar to the peroxidase isozymes present in root-knot galls, adjacent ungalled roots, and roots from uninoculated plants of the corresponding hosts. The probability is discussed that most of the peroxittase activity associated with Meloidogyne spp. females is of host origin. PMID:19305520

  7. Heterogeneity and regulation of manganese peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, E A; Tien, M

    1992-01-01

    Lignin and Mn peroxidases are two families of isozymes produced by the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium under nutrient nitrogen or carbon limitation. We purified to homogeneity the three major Mn peroxidase isozymes, H3 (pI = 4.9), H4 (pI = 4.5), and H5 (pI = 4.2). Amino-terminal sequencing of these isozymes demonstrates that they are encoded by different genes. We also analyzed the regulation of these isozymes in carbon- and nitrogen-limited cultures and found not only that the lignin and Mn peroxidases are differentially regulated but also that differential regulation occurs within the Mn peroxidase isozyme family. The isozyme profile and the time at which each isozyme appears in secondary metabolism differ in both nitrogen- and carbon-limited cultures. Each isozyme also responded differently to the addition of a putative inducer, divalent Mn. The stability of the Mn peroxidases in carbon- and nitrogen-limited cultures was also characterized after cycloheximide addition. The Mn peroxidases are more stable in carbon-limited cultures than in nitrogen-limited cultures. They are also more stable than the lignin peroxidases. These data collectively suggest that the Mn peroxidase isozymes serve different functions in lignin biodegradation. Images PMID:1592808

  8. Accelerating peroxidase mimicking nanozymes using DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-08-01

    DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04176g

  9. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, R. S. S.; Yadav, K. S.; Yadav, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with Ki value of 3.35 mM. PMID:21804936

  10. Peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative coupling of phenols in the presence of geosorbents: rates of non-extractable product formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingguo; Selig, Hildegarde; Weber, Walter J

    2002-02-15

    Oxidative coupling processes in subsurface systems comprise a form of natural contaminant attenuation in which hydroxylated aromatic compounds (HACs) are incorporated into soil/sediment organic matter matrices. Here we describe the oxidative coupling of phenol catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in systems containing two geosorbents having organic matter of different composition; specifically Chelsea soil, a near-surface geologically young soil having a predominantly humic-type soil/sediment organic matter (SOM) matrix, and Lachine shale, a diagenetically older natural material having a predominantly kerogen-type SOM matrix. It was found that each of these two different types of natural geosorbents increased the formation of non-extractable coupling products (NEPs) over that which occurred in solids-free systems. The extent of coupling was higher in the systems containing humic-type Chelsea SOM than in those containing kerogen-type Lachine SOM. It was observed that HRP inactivation by free radical attack was significantly reduced in the presence of each geosorbent. A rate model was developed to facilitate quantitative evaluation and mechanistic interpretation of such coupling processes. Experimental rate measurements revealed thatthe greater extent of reaction observed in the presence of Chelsea soil than in the presence of Lachine shale can be attributed to two factors: (i) more effective protection of HRP from inactivation by the Chelsea SOM and (ii) the greater reactivity of Chelsea SOM with respect to cross-coupling. Interrelationships among enzyme protection, cross-coupling reactivity, and SOM chemistry are discussed. PMID:11878372

  11. Development of porous alginate-based scaffolds covalently cross-linked through a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Kawakami, Koei

    2011-01-01

    Porous scaffolds are important in tissue engineering. We developed porous scaffolds from the hydrogels of an alginate derivative bearing phenolic hydroxyl groups. The hydrogels were prepared using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to catalyze the cross-linking between the phenolic hydroxyl groups. A porous structure with a pore size of approx. 200 μm was developed through simultaneous water-extraction and ionic cross-linking by calcium ions by soaking frozen hydrogels in the mixture of ethanol and CaCl2 solution at -20°C. Due to the existence of the covalent cross-links developed through the enzymatic reaction, the porous form had a higher stability from a loss of cross-linked calcium ions than that obtained from non-modified sodium alginate (Na-Alg). The porous specimen developed from the hydrogel obtained with 10 U/ml HRP and 10 mM H2O2 showed about 1.5-times greater repulsion forces than those detected for the porous specimen obtained from Na-Alg toward compressions. No harmful effects of the enzymatically cross-linked specimens were detected on the growth and morphology of the entrapped cells: cells in the enzymatically cross-linked specimens showed almost the same growth profile and morphology with those in the porous specimen obtained from Na-Alg. PMID:21144141

  12. Changes in permeability of rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture as revealed by the peroxidase method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ohta, N; Kawaji, W; Takata, K; Hirano, H

    1984-11-01

    Changes in permeability of adult rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy, employing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an indicator. The knee joint was plaster-immobilized for 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 weeks in the flexion position. One ml of 4% HRP was administered in the articular cavity of the knee joint and allowed to diffuse and permeate into the articular cartilage. Distribution of the permeated HRP was visualized in the cartilage taken from the lateral condyle of the femur, utilizing the DAB-H2O2 reaction. In the normal and the non-immobilized joints, the permeated HRP reached to the matrix and chondrocytes situated in the deep layer of the articular cartilage. HRP was heavily deposited in the intercellular matrices, particularly around the chondrocytes, and was actively endocytosed by these cells. In the plaster-immobilized joints, especially after 4 weeks or longer of immobilization, the administered HRP had not permeated well and was restricted to the surface (lamina splendens) and the superficial layer of the cartilage. These results show that administered HRP diffuses into the deep layer of the articular cartilage and is actively endocytosed by chondrocytes and that the permeability of articular cartilage is remarkably reduced by joint contracture. PMID:6532371

  13. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  14. fPoxDB: fungal peroxidase database for comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peroxidases are a group of oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxide to various electron acceptors. They possess a broad spectrum of impact on industry and fungal biology. There are numerous industrial applications using peroxidases, such as to catalyse highly reactive pollutants and to breakdown lignin for recycling of carbon sources. Moreover, genes encoding peroxidases play important roles in fungal pathogenicity in both humans and plants. For better understanding of fungal peroxidases at the genome-level, a novel genomics platform is required. To this end, Fungal Peroxidase Database (fPoxDB; http://peroxidase.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) has been developed to provide such a genomics platform for this important gene family. Description In order to identify and classify fungal peroxidases, 24 sequence profiles were built and applied on 331 genomes including 216 from fungi and Oomycetes. In addition, NoxR, which is known to regulate NADPH oxidases (NoxA and NoxB) in fungi, was also added to the pipeline. Collectively, 6,113 genes were predicted to encode 25 gene families, presenting well-separated distribution along the taxonomy. For instance, the genes encoding lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase were concentrated in the rot-causing basidiomycetes, reflecting their ligninolytic capability. As a genomics platform, fPoxDB provides diverse analysis resources, such as gene family predictions based on fungal sequence profiles, pre-computed results of eight bioinformatics programs, similarity search tools, a multiple sequence alignment tool, domain analysis functions, and taxonomic distribution summary, some of which are not available in the previously developed peroxidase resource. In addition, fPoxDB is interconnected with other family web systems, providing extended analysis opportunities. Conclusions fPoxDB is a fungi-oriented genomics platform for peroxidases. The sequence

  15. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to [Beta]-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  16. Stabilization of lignin peroxidases in white rot fungi by tryptophan.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, P J; Field, J A; Teunissen, P; Dobson, A D

    1997-01-01

    Supplementation of various cultures of white rot fungi with tryptophan was found to have a large stimulatory effect on lignin peroxidase activity levels. This enhancement was greater than that observed in the presence of the lignin peroxidase recycling agent veratryl alcohol. Using reverse transcription-PCR, we found that tryptophan does not act to induce lignin peroxidase expression at the level of gene transcription. Instead, the activity enhancement observed is likely to result from the protective effect of tryptophan against H2O2 inactivation. In experiments using a partially purified lignin peroxidase preparation, tryptophan and its derivative indole were determined to function in the same way as veratryl alcohol in converting compound II, an oxidized form of lignin peroxidase, to ferric enzyme, thereby completing the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, tryptophan was found to be a better substrate for lignin peroxidase than veratryl alcohol. Inclusion of either tryptophan or indole enhanced the oxidation of the azo dyes methyl orange and Eriochrome blue black. Stimulation of azo dye oxidations by veratryl alcohol has previously been shown to be due to its enzyme recycling function. Our data allow us to propose that tryptophan stabilizes lignin peroxidase by acting as a reductant for the enzyme. PMID:9212404

  17. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  18. Application of peroxidase labelled antibody assays for detection of porcine IgG antibodies to hog cholera and bovine viral diarrhea viruses.

    PubMed

    Afshar, A; Dulac, G C; Bouffard, A

    1989-03-01

    Rapid, sensitive peroxidase labelled antibody (PLA) assays using microtiter systems, were developed for detection of hog cholera virus (HCV) and cross-reacting bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antibodies in pig sera. HCV-infected pig kidney cell line (PK 15) prepared in microtiter plates were fixed and used in PLA assays. After inoculation with test serum, bound antibodies (HCV/BVDV) were reacted with either horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugated anti-porcine immunoglobulin (H & L) or biotinylated protein A (BPA) and subsequent HRP labelled avidin (A). Positive reactions were easily visualized under an inverted light microscope as foci of brown colored cells after enzyme degradation of hydrogen peroxidase in the presence of amino-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The PLA assays were superior to the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test in detecting anti-HCV antibodies in porcine sera collected early after inoculation of pigs with a lapinized HCV vaccine. The performances of the PLA, IFA and FA neutralization (FAN) tests in measuring the immune response in the vaccinated pigs were comparable. Cross-reacting anti-BVDV antibody, as measured by a microtiter serum neutralization (MTSN) test, was not demonstrable in vaccinated pigs until they were challenged with a virulent HCV, 13 weeks later. The PLA assays relative to the IFA test detected more reactive samples among porcine field sera collected from HC-free pigs in Canada. Of 795 samples, 24 (3.01%) were reactive in the PLA employing HRP anti-porcine IgG, and 21 (2.6%) in the PLA, using BPA-HRP-A. When 324 of these sera were screened by the IFA test (using HC antigen), only one sample (0.30%) was found reactive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2541152

  19. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  20. Redundancy among Manganese Peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Salame, Tomer M.; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn2+ amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn2+-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn2+-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn2+-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn2+-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  1. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

  2. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  3. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  4. Stimuli-responsive peroxidase mimicking at a smart graphene interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Zhao, Huimin; Chen, Shuo; Yu, Hongtao; Quan, Xie

    2012-07-18

    A synergistic graphene-based catalyst was engineered by the in situ growth of "naked" Au-nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene sheets. The catalyst exhibits excellent switchable peroxidase-like activity in response to specific DNA. PMID:22673613

  5. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters. PMID:25195693

  6. Grafting of Functional Molecules: Insights into Peroxidase-Derived Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyanhongo, Gibson S.; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Kudanga, Tukayi; Guebitz, Georg

    An insight into the progress made in applying heme peroxidases in grafting processes, starting from the production of simple resins to more complex polymers, is presented. The refinement of the different reaction conditions (solvents, concentrations of the reactants) and careful study of the reaction mechanisms have been instrumental in advancing enzymatic grafting processes. A number of processes described here show how peroxidase mediated catalysis could provide a new strategy as an alternative to conventional energy intensive procedures mediated by chemical catalysts.

  7. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways. PMID:26291534

  8. Serine incorporation into the selenocysteine moiety of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, R.A.; Evenson, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The selenium in mammalian glutathione peroxidase is present as a selenocysteine ((Se)Cys) moiety incorporated into the peptide backbone 41-47 residues from the N-terminal end. To study the origin of the skeleton of the (Se)Cys moiety, we perfused isolated rat liver with /sup 14/C- or /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids for 4 h, purified the GSH peroxidase, derivatized the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase to carboxymethylselenocysteine ((Se)Cys(Cm)), and determined the amino acid specific activity. Perfusion with (/sup 14/C)cystine resulted in (/sup 14/C)cystine incorporation into GSH peroxidase without labeling (Se)Cys(Cm), indicating that cysteine is not a direct precursor for (Se)Cys. (/sup 14/C)Serine perfusion labeled serine, glycine (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase product), and (Se)Cys(Cm) in purified GSH peroxidase, whereas (3-3H)serine perfusion only labeled serine and (Se)Cys(Cm), thus demonstrating that the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase is derived from serine. The similar specific activities of serine and (Se)Cys(Cm) strongly suggest that the precursor pool of serine used for (Se) Cys synthesis is the same or similar to the serine pool used for acylation of seryl-tRNAs.

  9. Study of a reagent- and mediator-less biosensor for D-amino acids based on co-immobilized D-amino acid oxidase and peroxidase in carbon paste electrodes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, E; Marko-Varga, G; Gorton, L

    1993-10-01

    A biosensor for the analysis of D-amino acids is described. Carbon paste (graphite/paraffin oil) was chemically modified with immobilized D-amino acid oxidase and either horse-radish peroxidase or fungal peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus. The two enzymes dissolved in buffer, together with an amine containing oligomer or polymer, were adsorbed on dry graphite. Prior to immobilization, the graphite was heat treated at 700 degrees C for 15 s to promote an efficient electron transfer between graphite and the peroxidase. The mixture was dried before addition of the pasting liquid. The sensor is based on the fact that the hydrogen peroxide produced by the action of D-amino acid oxidase is electrocatalytically reduced through the action of the peroxidase. The amine containing compound acted as a stabilizer and activator of the enzymes in the paste. The enzyme electrode was investigated as a sensor for D-phenylalanine and hydrogen peroxide in a flow through electrochemical cell connected to a single line flow injection system. The influences on the response by different additives to the paste and pH are reported. Linear calibration curves were obtained between 0.1 and 1.4 mM for D-phenylalanine and 5 and 1000 microM for hydrogen peroxide at an applied potential of -50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. The sensor was also active for the following D-amino acids: D-alanine, D-valine, D-leucine, D-isoleucine, D-serine, D-aspartic acid, D-glutamic acid, D-lysine, D-histidine, D-arginine, D-tryptophan, D-methionine, and D-proline. PMID:7902430

  10. Engineering the proximal heme cavity of catalase-peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Regelsberger, Günther; Furtmüller, Paul Georg; Rüker, Florian; Peschek, Günter A; Obinger, Christian

    2002-07-25

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are prokaryotic heme peroxidases with homology to yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and plant ascorbate peroxidases (APXs). KatGs, CCP and APXs contain identical amino acid triads in the heme pocket (distal Arg/Trp/His and proximal His/Trp/Asp), but differ dramatically in their reactivities towards hydrogen peroxide and various one-electron donors. Only KatGs have high catalase activity in addition to a peroxidase activity of broad specificity. Here, we investigated the effect of mutating the conserved proximal triad on KatG catalysis. With the exception of W341F, all variants (H290Q, W341A, D402N, D402E) exhibited a catalase activity <1% of wild-type KatG and spectral properties indicating alterations in heme coordination and spin states. Generally, the peroxidase activity was much less effected by these mutations. Compared with wild-type KatG the W341F variant had a catalase and halogenation activity of about 40% and an even increased overall peroxidase activity. This variant, for the first time, allowed to monitor the hydrogen peroxide mediated transitions of ferric KatG to compound I and back to the resting enzyme. Compound I reduction by aromatic one-electron donors (o-dianisidine, pyrogallol, aniline) was not influenced by exchanging Trp by Phe. The findings are discussed in comparison with the data known from CCP and APX and a reaction mechanism for the multifunctional activity of the W341F variant is suggested. PMID:12121764

  11. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus

    SciTech Connect

    Mliki, A.; Zimmermann, W. )

    1992-03-01

    Peroxidases play an important role in the oxidation of a large number of aromatic compounds, including recalcitrant substances. An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a K{sub m} of 17.8 {mu}M and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a K{sub m} of 2.07 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C{alpha}-C{beta} bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydroxy-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl) propane, a nonphenolic dimeric lignin model compound. The spectrum of te peroxidase showed a soret band at 405 nm, which disappeared after reduction with sodium dithionite, indicating that the enzyme is a hemoprotein. Testing the effects of various inhibitors on the enzyme activity showed that it is a bifunctional enzyme having catalase and peroxidase activities.

  12. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein. PMID:26928591

  13. Peroxidase extraction from jicama skin peels for phenol removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiong, T.; Lau, S. Y.; Khor, E. H.; Danquah, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives exist in various types of industrial effluents, and are known to be harmful to aquatic lives even at low concentrations. Conventional treatment technologies for phenol removal are challenged with long retention time, high energy consumption and process cost. Enzymatic treatment has emerged as an alternative technology for phenol removal from wastewater. These enzymes interact with aromatic compounds including phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, forming free radicals which polymerize spontaneously to produce insoluble phenolic polymers. This work aims to extract peroxidase from agricultural wastes materials and establish its application for phenol removal. Peroxidase was extracted from jicama skin peels under varying extraction conditions of pH, sample-to-buffer ratio (w/v %) and temperature. Experimental results showed that extraction process conducted at pH 10, 40% w/v and 25oC demonstrated a peroxidase activity of 0.79 U/mL. Elevated temperatures slightly enhanced the peroxidase activities. Jicama peroxidase extracted at optimum extraction conditions demonstrated a phenol removal efficiency of 87.5% at pH 7. Phenol removal efficiency was ∼ 97% in the range of 30 - 40oC, and H2O2 dosage has to be kept below 100 mM for maximum removal under phenol concentration tested.

  14. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases. PMID:26542837

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of banyan peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Palm, Gottfried J.; Kumari, Moni; Panjikar, Santosh; Jagannadham, M. V.; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications owing to their high environmental and thermal stability. A new peroxidase, named banyan peroxidase, was purified from the latex of Ficus benghalensis and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native crystals and from bromide and xenon derivatives to resolutions of up to 1.66 Å in the trigonal space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.1, c = 164.6 Å. The anomalous signal of the intrinsic iron and calcium ions was sufficient for structure solution by SAD, although the sequence is not yet known. PMID:22869125

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Suicide inactivation of peroxidase from Chamaerops excelsa palm tree leaves.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Zhadan, Galina G; Roig, Manuel G; Shnyrov, Valery L

    2011-12-01

    The concentration and time-dependences and the mechanism of the inactivation of Chamaerops excelsa peroxidase (CEP) by hydrogen peroxide were studied kinetically with four co-substrates (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine and o-phenylenediamine). The turnover number (r) of H(2)O(2) required to complete the inactivation of the enzyme varied for the different substrates, the enzyme most resistant to inactivation (r=4844) with ABTS being the most useful substrate for biotechnological applications, opening a new avenue of enquiry with this peroxidase. PMID:21925205

  18. In vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for intranasal delivery to the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qingfeng; Shao Xiayan; Chen Jie; Shen Yehong; Feng Chengcheng; Gao Xiaoling; Zhao Yue; Li Jingwei; Zhang Qizhi Jiang, Xinguo

    2011-02-15

    Biodegradable polymer-based nanoparticles have been widely studied to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain after intranasal administration. However, knowledge as to the side effects of nanoparticle delivery system to the brain is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles (WGA-NP) after intranasal instillation. Sprague-Dawley rats were intranasally given WGA-NP for 7 continuous days. Amino acid neurotransmitters, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH), acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase activity, tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in rat olfactory bulb (OB) and brain were measured to estimate the in vivo toxicity of WGA-NP. Balb/C mice were intranasally immunized by WGA-NP and then WGA-specific antibodies in serum and nasal wash were detected by indirect ELISA. WGA-NP showed slight toxicity to brain tissue, as evidenced by increased glutamate level in rat brain and enhanced LDH activity in rat OB. No significant changes in acetylcholine level, acetylcholinesterase activity, GSH level, TNF-{alpha} level and IL-8 level were observed in rat OB and brain for the WGA-NP group. WGA-specific antibodies in mice serum and nasal wash were not increased after two intranasal immunizations of WGA-NP. These results demonstrate that WGA-NP is a safe carrier system for intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain.

  19. Rescuing apoptotic neurons in Alzheimer’s disease using wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated and cardiolipin-conjugated liposomes with encapsulated nerve growth factor and curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Lin, Ching-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes with cardiolipin (CL) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) were developed to permeate the blood–brain barrier and treat Alzheimer’s disease. WGA-conjugated and CL-incorporated liposomes (WGA-CL-liposomes) were used to transport nerve growth factor (NGF) and curcumin (CUR) across a monolayer of human brain-microvascular endothelial cells regulated by human astrocytes and to protect SK-N-MC cells against apoptosis induced by β-amyloid1–42 (Aβ1–42) fibrils. An increase in the CL mole percentage in lipids increased the liposomal diameter, absolute zeta potential value, entrapment efficiency of NGF and CUR, release of NGF, biocompatibility, and viability of SK-N-MC cells with Aβ1–42, but decreased the atomic ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus and release of CUR. In addition, an increase in the WGA concentration for grafting enhanced the liposomal diameter, atomic ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus, and permeability of NGF and CUR across the blood–brain barrier, but reduced the absolute zeta potential value and biocompatibility. WGA-CL-liposomes carrying NGF and CUR could be promising colloidal delivery carriers for future clinical application in targeting the blood–brain barrier and inhibiting neurotoxicity. PMID:25878499

  20. Genome Sequence of Pectobacterium carotovorum Phage PPWS1, Isolated from Japanese Horseradish [Eutrema japonicum (Miq.) Koidz] Showing Soft-Rot Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kashihara, Misako; Horiike, Tokumasa; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Dohra, Hideo; Netsu, Osamu; Tsuyumu, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and its lytic bacteriophage PPWS1 were isolated from a Japanese horseradish rhizome with soft rot. Sequencing of the phage genomic DNA suggested that PPWS1 is a new species of the family Podoviridae and has high similarity to the bacteriophage Peat1 infectious to P. atrosepticum. PMID:27103734

  1. Fumigant activity of plant essential oils and components from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), anise (Pimpinella anisum) and garlic (Allium sativum) oils against Lycoriella ingenua (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Park, Ii-Kwon; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Do-Hyung; Choi, In-Ho; Kim, Lee-Sun; Bak, Won-Chull; Choi, Joon-Weon; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2006-08-01

    Plant essential oils from 40 plant species were tested for their insecticidal activities against larvae of Lycoriella ingénue (Dufour) using a fumigation bioassay. Good insecticidal activity against larvae of L. ingenua was achieved with essential oils of Chenopodium ambrosioides L., Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus smithii RT Baker, horseradish, anise and garlic at 10 and 5 microL L(-1) air. Horseradish, anise and garlic oils showed the most potent insecticidal activities among the plant essential oils. At 1.25 microL L(-1), horseradish, anise and garlic oils caused 100, 93.3 and 13.3% mortality, but at 0.625 microL L(-1) air this decreased to 3.3, 0 and 0% respectively. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry led to the identification of one major compound from horseradish, and three each from anise and garlic oils. These seven compounds and m-anisaldehyde and o-anisaldehyde, two positional isomers of p-anisaldehyde, were tested individually for their insecticidal activities against larvae of L. ingenua. Allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic, followed by trans-anethole, diallyl disulfide and p-anisaldehyde with LC(50) values of 0.15, 0.20, 0.87 and 1.47 microL L(-1) respectively. PMID:16786497

  2. Comparison of peroxidase-labeled DNA probes with radioactive RNA probes for detection of human papillomaviruses by in situ hybridization in paraffin sections

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Kurman, R.J.; Kessis, T.D.; Shah, K.V. )

    1991-01-01

    A study comparing in situ hybridization using nonradioactive DNA probes directly conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and {sup 35}S-labeled antisense RNA probes for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11, 16, and 18 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 34 lesions of the cervix and vulva. These lesions included exophytic condylomas and intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms. HPV 6/11 was detected in two of four condylomata acuminata by both in situ techniques. HPV 16 was detected in 13 of 30 cases of intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms by both methods. Discordance between the two methods occurred in two instances. The radiolabeled probe but not the HRP probe detected HPV 16 in one case of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3), whereas the converse occurred in one case of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3). HPV 18 was not detected in any of the specimens by either method. This study demonstrates that nonradioactive HRP-labeled probes for the detection of specific HPV types are as sensitive as the more laborious and potentially hazardous radioactive probes.

  3. Investigating the effect of gallium curcumin and gallium diacetylcurcumin complexes on the structure, function and oxidative stability of the peroxidase enzyme and their anticancer and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Jahangoshaei, Parisa; Hassani, Leila; Mohammadi, Fakhrossadat; Hamidi, Akram; Mohammadi, Khosro

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. Complexation of curcumin with metals has gained attention in recent years for improvement of its stability. In this study, the effect of gallium curcumin and gallium diacetylcurcumin on the structure, function and oxidative stability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme were evaluated by spectroscopic techniques. In addition to the enzymatic investigation, the cytotoxic effect of the complexes was assessed on bladder, MCF-7 breast cancer and LNCaP prostate carcinoma cell lines by MTT assay. Furthermore, antibacterial activity of the complexes against S. aureus and E. coli was explored by dilution test method. The results showed that the complexes improve activity of HRP and also increase its tolerance against the oxidative condition. After addition of the complexes, affinity of HRP for hydrogen peroxide substrate decreases, while the affinity increases for phenol substrate. Circular dichroism, intrinsic and synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that the enzyme structure around the catalytic heme group becomes less compact and also the distance between the heme group and tryptophan residues increases due to binding of the complexes to HRP. On the whole, it can be concluded that the change in the enzyme structure upon binding to the gallium curcumin and gallium diacetylcurcumin complexes results in an increase in the antioxidant efficiency and activity of the peroxidise enzyme. The result of anticancer and antibacterial activities suggested that the complexes exhibit the potential for cancer treatment, but they have no significant antibacterial activity. PMID:26369539

  4. Detection of Semliki Forest virus in cell culture by use of an enzyme immunoassay with peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibodies specific for glycoproteins E1 and E2.

    PubMed Central

    van Tiel, F H; Boere, W A; Vinjé, J; Harmsen, T; Benaissa-Trouw, B J; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1984-01-01

    Four noncompeting monoclonal antibodies (MA) directed against either the E1 (UM 8.64 and 8.139) or E2 (UM 8.55 and 8.73) glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus were purified and labeled with horseradish peroxidase. Each enzyme-labeled MA was tested alone and in combination with others for its sensitivity to detect virus-infected cells. Semliki Forest virus-infected L cells seeded as monolayers in 96-well plates were screened for the virus after incubation with enzyme-labeled MA and a substrate. In this system single enzyme-labeled MA even at high dilution (10(3.0) to 10(4.5] were able to detect virus-infected cells. The sensitivity of the test could be enhanced by combining two noncompeting MA (10(4.5) to 10(5.0]. Combinations of three and four MA were less effective, due to high absorbance values for noninfected cells. The threshold of virus defection was between 10(5) and 10(6) PFU/ml. This test is sensitive and specific and therefore may be useful for diagnostic purposes. PMID:6386855

  5. Direct Electron Transfer Kinetics of Peroxidase at Edge Plane Sites of Cup-Stacked Carbon Nanofibers and Their Comparison with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kikuo; Tatsuma, Tetsu; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2016-09-13

    Electron transfer kinetics at the graphene edge site is of great interest from the viewpoints of application to sensing and energy conversion and storage. Here we analyzed kinetics of direct electron transfer of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) adsorbed through surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate at cup-stacked carbon nanofibers (CSCNFs), which provide highly ordered graphene edges, and compared it with that at single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which consist of a rolled-up basal plane graphene. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of the Fe(2+/3+) couple of the HRP reaction center at CSCNFs (ca. 34.8 s(-1)) was an order of magnitude larger than that at SWCNTs (ca. 4.7 s(-1)). In addition, the overall rate constant of the electron transfer reaction from CSCNFs to HRP oxidized by H2O2 was higher than that from SWCNTs by a factor of 3. CSCNFs also allowed enhancement of the complex-formation reaction rate of HRP with H2O2, in comparison with that at SWCNTs. CSCNFs would therefore be applied to not only biosensors but also biofuel cells with enhanced performance. PMID:27529505

  6. Development of a fed-batch process for a recombinant Pichia pastoris Δoch1 strain expressing a plant peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, Christoph; Saadati, Amirhossein; Maresch, Daniel; Krasteva, Stanimira; Frank, Manuela; Altmann, Friedrich; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is a prominent host for recombinant protein production, amongst other things due to its capability of glycosylation. However, N-linked glycans on recombinant proteins get hypermannosylated, causing problems in subsequent unit operations and medical applications. Hypermannosylation is triggered by an α-1,6-mannosyltransferase called OCH1. In a recent study, we knocked out OCH1 in a recombinant P. pastoris CBS7435 Mut(S) strain (Δoch1) expressing the biopharmaceutically relevant enzyme horseradish peroxidase. We characterized the strain in the controlled environment of a bioreactor in dynamic batch cultivations and identified the strain to be physiologically impaired. We faced cell cluster formation, cell lysis and uncontrollable foam formation.In the present study, we investigated the effects of the 3 process parameters temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen concentration on 1) cell physiology, 2) cell morphology, 3) cell lysis, 4) productivity and 5) product purity of the recombinant Δoch1 strain in a multivariate manner. Cultivation at 30°C resulted in low specific methanol uptake during adaptation and the risk of methanol accumulation during cultivation. Cell cluster formation was a function of the C-source rather than process parameters and went along with cell lysis. In terms of productivity and product purity a temperature of 20°C was highly beneficial. In summary, we determined cultivation conditions for a recombinant P. pastoris Δoch1 strain allowing high productivity and product purity. PMID:25567661

  7. Immobilization of peroxidase on SPEU film via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Ha; Guanghui, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    The acrylic acid or acrylamide were grafted via radiation onto segmented polyetherurethane (SPEU) film which is a kind of biocompatible material. Then the Horse radish peroxidase was immobilized on the grafted SPEU film through chemical binding. Some quantitative relationships between the percent graft and the activity, amount of immobilized enzyme were given. The properties and application of obtained biomaterial was studied as well.

  8. Peroxidase activity in cotton cell culture infected with Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our studies with cotton, we have shown that the plant’s induced anionic peroxidases bind to chitin, which is a component of the cell wall of the plant pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae. In binding to the cell wall surface, they disrupt the integrity of the pathogen’s cell wall. Thus, these...

  9. TiO(2) nanotube arrays: intrinsic peroxidase mimetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Han, Lei; Hu, Peng; Wang, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-11-18

    TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTA), prepared by potentiostatic anodization, were discovered to possess an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. The colorimetric and electrochemical assays both demonstrated their excellent catalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. On this basis, a simple and inexpensive electrochemical biosensor for glucose detection was developed. PMID:24084751

  10. Structural and spectroscopic characterisation of a heme peroxidase from sorghum.

    PubMed

    Nnamchi, Chukwudi I; Parkin, Gary; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Kwon, Hanna; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Agirre, Jon; Okolo, Bartholomew N; Moneke, Anene; Nwanguma, Bennett C; Moody, Peter C E; Raven, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    A cationic class III peroxidase from Sorghum bicolor was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme contains a high-spin heme, as evidenced by UV-visible spectroscopy and EPR. Steady state oxidation of guaiacol was demonstrated and the enzyme was shown to have higher activity in the presence of calcium ions. A Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential of -266 mV vs NHE was determined. Stopped-flow experiments with H2O2 showed formation of a typical peroxidase Compound I species, which converts to Compound II in the presence of calcium. A crystal structure of the enzyme is reported, the first for a sorghum peroxidase. The structure reveals an active site that is analogous to those for other class I heme peroxidase, and a substrate binding site (assigned as arising from binding of indole-3-acetic acid) at the γ-heme edge. Metal binding sites are observed in the structure on the distal (assigned as a Na(+) ion) and proximal (assigned as a Ca(2+)) sides of the heme, which is consistent with the Ca(2+)-dependence of the steady state and pre-steady state kinetics. It is probably the case that the structural integrity (and, thus, the catalytic activity) of the sorghum enzyme is dependent on metal ion incorporation at these positions. PMID:26666777

  11. Towards uncovering the roles of switchgrass peroxidases in plant processes

    PubMed Central

    Saathoff, Aaron J.; Donze, Teresa; Palmer, Nathan A.; Bradshaw, Jeff; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Twigg, Paul; Tobias, Christian M.; Lagrimini, Mark; Sarath, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Herbaceous perennial plants selected as potential biofuel feedstocks had been understudied at the genomic and functional genomic levels. Recent investments, primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy, have led to the development of a number of molecular resources for bioenergy grasses, such as the partially annotated genome for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), and some related diploid species. In its current version, the switchgrass genome contains 65,878 gene models arising from the A and B genomes of this tetraploid grass. The availability of these gene sequences provides a framework to exploit transcriptomic data obtained from next-generation sequencing platforms to address questions of biological importance. One such question pertains to discovery of genes and proteins important for biotic and abiotic stress responses, and how these components might affect biomass quality and stress response in plants engineered for a specific end purpose. It can be expected that production of switchgrass on marginal lands will expose plants to diverse stresses, including herbivory by insects. Class III plant peroxidases have been implicated in many developmental responses such as lignification and in the adaptive responses of plants to insect feeding. Here, we have analyzed the class III peroxidases encoded by the switchgrass genome, and have mined available transcriptomic datasets to develop a first understanding of the expression profiles of the class III peroxidases in different plant tissues. Lastly, we have identified switchgrass peroxidases that appear to be orthologs of enzymes shown to play key roles in lignification and plant defense responses to hemipterans. PMID:23802005

  12. Phenol removal by peroxidases extracted from Chinese cabbage root

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, H.I.; Jeong, Y.H.

    1995-12-31

    More than four million tons of Chinese cabbages are produced in Korea. Most of them are used as raw materials for Kimchi, but root parts of them are discarded as agricultural wastes. A trial for the application of agricultural waste to industrial waste water treatment was made as an effort to the efficient use of natural resources and to reduce water pollution problem simultaneously. Peroxidases of both solid and liquid phases were obtained from Chinese cabbage roots by using commercial juicer. The differences in peroxidase activity among the various cultivars of Chinese cabbages in Korea were little and electrophoretic patterns of various peroxidases will be discussed. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity will be discussed also. Since peroxidases are distributed into 66% in liquid (juice) and 34% in solid phase (pulp), enzymes from both phases were applied to investigate the enzymatic removal of phenol from waste water. After phenol solution at 150 ppm being reacted with liquid phase enzyme (1,800 unit/1) for 3 hours in a batch stirred reactor, 96% of phenol could be removed through polymerization and precipitation. Also, phenol could be removed from initial 120 ppm to final 5 ppm by applying solid phase enzyme in an air lift reactor (600 unit/1). Almost equivalent efficiencies of phenol removal were observed between two systems, even though only one third of the enzymes in batch stirred reactor was applied in air lift reactor. The possible reason for this phenomenon is because peroxidases exist as immobilized forms in solid phase.

  13. Pt74Ag26 nanoparticle-decorated ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets as novel peroxidase mimics for highly selective colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuangfei; Han, Qiusen; Qi, Cui; Lian, Zheng; Jia, Xinghang; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2016-02-01

    To extend the functionalities of two-dimensional graphene-like layered compounds as versatile materials, the modification of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets such as MoS2 with metal nanoparticles is of great and widespread interest. However, few studies are available on the preparation of bimetallic nanoparticles supported on MoS2. Herein, a facile and efficient method to synthesize MoS2-PtAg nanohybrids by decorating ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with octahedral Pt74Ag26 alloy nanoparticles has been reported. The as-prepared MoS2-Pt74Ag26 nanohybrids were investigated as novel peroxidase mimics to catalyze the oxidation of classical peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2, producing a blue colored reaction and exhibiting typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. MoS2-Pt74Ag26 has a higher affinity for H2O2 than horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and a higher vmax value with TMB as the substrate than MoS2. The improved catalytic activity of hybrids for colorimetric reactions could be attributed to the synergistic effects of octahedral Pt74Ag26 nanoparticles and ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets as supports. Meanwhile, the generation of active oxygen species (&z.rad;OH) by H2O2 decomposition with MoS2-Pt74Ag26 was responsible for the oxidation of TMB. On the basis of these findings, a colorimetric method based on MoS2-Pt74Ag26 nanohybrids that is highly sensitive and selective was developed for glucose detection. Lower values of the limit of detection (LOD) were obtained, which is more sensitive than MoS2 nanosheets.To extend the functionalities of two-dimensional graphene-like layered compounds as versatile materials, the modification of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets such as MoS2 with metal nanoparticles is of great and widespread interest. However, few studies are available on the preparation of bimetallic nanoparticles supported on MoS2. Herein, a facile and efficient method to synthesize MoS2-PtAg nanohybrids by decorating

  14. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ON ORGANIC CARBON MINERALIZATION IN SOIL, USING RECOMBINANT STREPTOMYCES STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified lignin peroxidase was added to sterile and nonsterile silt loam soil to study the effects of bacterial lignin peroxidase ALip-P3 of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A on the rate of organic carbon turnover in soil. ignin peroxidase ALip-P3 appears to affect the short-term tur...

  15. Variation in Yield of Near-isogenic Soybean Lines for High and Low Seed Coat Peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxidase is an enzyme present in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed coats and is characterized as either high (dominant allele) or low (recessive allele) activity. Cultivar Cutler 71 is a mixture of high and low seed coat peroxidase genotypes. Mechanical mixtures of 1 high: 1 low peroxidase...

  16. Identification of IAA-oxidase in peroxidase isozymes from cotton plant leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the functions of plant peroxidase is to regulate the indole acetic acid (IAA) hormonal level by oxidizing it to inactive 3-methyleneoxyindole. IAA-binding proteins and plant peroxidase revealed five structurally similar fragments. We have isolated peroxidase isozymes with IAA-oxidase activit...

  17. Lignin-degrading Peroxidases from Genome of Selective Ligninolytic Fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Martínez, Angel T.

    2012-01-01

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora. PMID:22437835

  18. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  19. Data on the catalytic mechanism of thiol peroxidase mimics.

    PubMed

    Zadehvakili, B; Giles, N M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-09-01

    We have recently reported SAR data describing the pharmacological activity of a series of phenyl alkyl selenides and tellurides which catalyse the oxidation of thiols by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), "The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action" B. Zadehvakili, S.M. McNeill, J.P. Fawcett, G.I. Giles (2016) [1]. This thiol peroxidase (TPx) activity is potentially useful for a number of therapeutic applications, as it can alter the outcome of oxidative stress related pathologies and modify redox signalling. This article presents data describing the molecular changes that occur to a TPx mimic upon exposure to H2O2, and then the thiol mercaptoethanol, as characterised by UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC retention time. PMID:27331089

  20. Thermal denaturation and regeneration of japanese-radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Morita, Y

    1975-09-01

    Thermal denaturation of Japanese-radish peroxidase [EC 1.11.1.7] was investigated with respect to its spectrophotometric properties and effect on the enzymatic activity. Inactivation of the peroxidase occurred at temperatures higher than 60degrees and involved three processes, i.e., dissociation of protohemin from the holoperoxidase, a conformation change in the apperoxidase, and the modification or degradation of protohemin. The splitting process of protohemin from holoperoxidase as followed by the change in the absorption spectrum at high temperatures coincided with the degrease in the activity, and it was found to be at least biphasic. The regeneration of peroxidase on cooling to room temperature was essentially reversible at neutral pH, while at pH 5 and pH 9 these processes were irreversible. The irreversibility at acidic pH was mainly due to an irreversible change in the conformation of the apoenzyme. The difference spectrum of heat-treated apoperoxidase exhibited a denaturation blueshift with negative maxima at 287 and 294 nm, and the total protein fluorescence quantum yield. qprotein, increased by 20% compared to that of the untreated apoenzyme. On the other hand, the irreversibility at alkaline pH was largely attributable to the modification of protohemin. Apoperoxidase was more resistnat to heat denaturation but the modification or degradation of protohemin in heated enzyme was greater at alkaline pH than at acidic pH. The pyridine-ferrohemochrome spectrum of peroxidase exhibited slight shifts of the maxima of the alpha-band to shorter wavelength on heat treatment, and the paper chromatogram showed the presence of a new derivative other than protohemin. The modified product is probably (2(4)-vinyl-4(2)-hydroxyethyldeuterohemin. PMID:5412

  1. Prokaryotic origins of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily and organelle-mediated transmission to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Passardi, Filippo; Bakalovic, Nenad; Teixeira, Felipe Karam; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Penel, Claude; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-05-01

    Members of the superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases are known to be present in a wide variety of living organisms. Extensive searching within sequencing projects identified organisms containing sequences of this superfamily. Class I peroxidases, cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), ascorbate peroxidase (APx), and catalase peroxidase (CP), are known to be present in bacteria, fungi, and plants, but have now been found in various protists. CcP sequences were detected in most mitochondria-possessing organisms except for green plants, which possess only ascorbate peroxidases. APx sequences had previously been observed only in green plants but were also found in chloroplastic protists, which acquired chloroplasts by secondary endosymbiosis. CP sequences that are known to be present in prokaryotes and in Ascomycetes were also detected in some Basidiomycetes and occasionally in some protists. Class II peroxidases are involved in lignin biodegradation and are found only in the Homobasidiomycetes. In fact class II peroxidases were identified in only three orders, although degenerate forms were found in different Pezizomycota orders. Class III peroxidases are specific for higher plants, and their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. We have found, however, that class III peroxidases are present in some green algae, which predate land colonization. The presence of peroxidases in all major phyla (except vertebrates) makes them powerful marker genes for understanding the early evolutionary events that led to the appearance of the ancestors of each eukaryotic group. PMID:17355904

  2. Mechanistic study of a diazo dye degradation by Soybean Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enzyme based remediation of wastewater is emerging as a novel, efficient and environmentally-friendlier approach. However, studies showing detailed mechanisms of enzyme mediated degradation of organic pollutants are not widely published. Results The present report describes a detailed study on the use of Soybean Peroxidase to efficiently degrade Trypan Blue, a diazo dye. In addition to examining various parameters that can affect the dye degradation ability of the enzyme, such as enzyme and H2O2 concentration, reaction pH and temperature, we carried out a detailed mechanistic study of Trypan Blue degradation. HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS studies were carried out to confirm dye degradation and analyze the intermediate metabolites and develop a detailed mechanistic dye degradation pathway. Conclusion We report that Soybean peroxidase causes Trypan Blue degradation via symmetrical azo bond cleavage and subsequent radical-initiated ring opening of the metabolites. Interestingly, our results also show that no high molecular weight polymers were produced during the peroxidase-H2O2 mediated degradation of the phenolic Trypan Blue. PMID:23711110

  3. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between (/sup 14/C)NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols.

  4. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to wall-localized peroxidases from corn seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Terry, M. E.; Hoops, P.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A library of 22 hybridomas, which make antibodies to soluble wall antigens from the coleoptiles and primary leaves of etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings, was raised and cloned three times by limit dilution to assure monoclonal growth and stability. Two of these hybridomas made immunoglobulin G antibodies, designated mWP3 and mWP19, which both effectively immunoprecipitated peroxidase activity from crude and partially purified preparations of wall peroxidases. Direct peroxidase-binding assays revealed that both antibodies bound enzymes with peroxidase activity. As judged by immunoblot analyses, mWP3 recognized a Mr 98,000 wall peroxidase with an isoelectric point near 4.2, and mWP19 recognized a Mr 58,000 wall peroxidase. Immunogold localization studies showed both peroxidases are predominately in cell walls.

  5. The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the role of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), polysaccharides, and protein contents associated with the early events of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava roots. Increases in APX and GPX activity, as well as total protein contents occurred from 3 to 5 days of storage and were correlated with the delay of PPD. Cassava samples stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) highlighted the presence of starch and cellulose. Degradation of starch granules during PPD was also detected. Slight metachromatic reaction with toluidine blue is indicative of increasing of acidic polysaccharides and may play an important role in PPD delay. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified samples according to their levels of enzymatic activity based on the decision tree model which showed GPX and total protein amounts to be correlated with PPD. The Oriental (ORI) cultivar was more susceptible to PPD. PMID:26617011

  6. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products. PMID:27138198

  7. Heterologous Expression of Pleurotus eryngii Peroxidase Confirms Its Ability To Oxidize Mn2+ and Different Aromatic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T.

    1999-01-01

    A versatile ligninolytic peroxidase has been cloned from Pleurotus eryngii and its allelic variant MnPL2 expressed in Aspergillus nidulans, with properties similar to those of the mature enzyme from P. eryngii. These include the ability to oxidize Mn2+ and aromatic substrates, confirming that this is a new peroxidase type sharing catalytic properties of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase. PMID:10508113

  8. Identification of an orthologous clade of peroxidases that respond to feeding by greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum) in c4 grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scully et al. FY15 – C4 grass peroxidases and greenbug herbivory TECHNICAL ABSTRACT The role of peroxidases in response to green bug-feeding has been well characterized in several plant species, but information linking specific peroxidases to resistance and the identification of peroxidases that re...

  9. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots. PMID:26720810

  10. Broad spectrum antibacterial activity of a mixture of isothiocyanates from nasturtium (Tropaeoli majoris herba) and horseradish (Armoraciae rusticanae radix).

    PubMed

    Conrad, A; Biehler, D; Nobis, T; Richter, H; Engels, I; Biehler, K; Frank, U

    2013-02-01

    Isothiocyanates have been reported to exert antimicrobial activity. These compounds are found in a licensed native preparation of nasturtium (Tropaeoli majoris herba) and horseradish (Armoraciae rusticanae radix) which is used for treatment of upper respiratory and urinary tract infections. The aim of our investigation was to assess the antimicrobial activity of a mixture of the contained benzyl-, allyl-, and phenylethyl- isothiocyanates against clinically important bacterial and fungal pathogens including antimicrobial resistant isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed by agar-dilution technique. Isothiocyanates were mixed in proportions identical to the licensed drug. Minimum inhibitory- and minimum bactericidal concentrations were assessed. The Minimum inhibitory concentration90 was defined as the concentration which inhibited 90% of the microbial species tested. H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, S. marcescens, P. vulgaris, and Candida spp. were found to be highly susceptible, with minimum inhibitory concentration90 -values ranging between ≤0.0005% and 0.004% (v/v) of total ITC. Intermediate susceptibilities were observed for S. aureus, S. pyogenes, S. pneumoniae, K. pneumoniae, E. coli and P. aeruginosa, with Minimum inhibitory concentration90 -values ranging between 0.004% and 0.125% (v/v), but with elevated Minimum bactericidal concentrations90-values (2-7 dilution steps above Minimum inhibitory concentration90). Low susceptibilities were determined for viridans streptococci and enterococci. Interestingly, both resistant and non-resistant bacteria were similarly susceptible to the test preparation. PMID:23447075

  11. Food as a Source for Quorum Sensing Inhibitors: Iberin from Horseradish Revealed as a Quorum Sensing Inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bragason, Steinn Kristinn; Phipps, Richard Kerry; Christensen, Louise Dahl; van Gennip, Maria; Alhede, Morten; Skindersoe, Mette; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Foods with health-promoting effects beyond nutritional values have been gaining increasing research focus in recent years, although not much has been published on this subject in relation to bacterial infections. With respect to treatment, a novel antimicrobial strategy, which is expected to transcend problems with selective pressures for antibiotic resistance, is to interrupt bacterial communication, also known as quorum sensing (QS), by means of signal antagonists, the so-called QS inhibitors (QSIs). Furthermore, QSI agents offer a potential solution to the deficiencies associated with use of traditional antibiotics to treat infections caused by bacterial biofilms and multidrug-resistant bacteria. Several QSIs of natural origin have been identified, and in this study, several common food products and plants were extracted and screened for QSI activity in an attempt to isolate and characterize previously unknown QSI compounds active against the common opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Several extracts displayed activity, but horseradish exhibited the highest activity. Chromatographic separation led to the isolation of a potent QSI compound that was identified by liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as iberin—an isothiocyanate produced by many members of the Brassicaceae family. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and DNA microarray studies showed that iberin specifically blocks expression of QS-regulated genes in P. aeruginosa. PMID:22286987

  12. The central localization of the vagus nerve in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and the mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Ranson, R N; Butler, P J; Taylor, E W

    1993-05-01

    The location of vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN) has been determined in nine ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) and seven mink (M. vison) using neuronal tract-tracing techniques employing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and wheat-germ agglutinin conjugated HRP (WGA-HRP) mixtures injected into the nodose ganglion of the vagus nerve. Labelled VPN were located ipsilaterally in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DmnX), nucleus ambiguus (nA), and reticular formation (rf) of the medulla oblongata. In four of the ferrets, labelled VPN were also identified in the nucleus dorsomedialis (ndm) and the nucleus of the spinal accessory nerve (nspa). In a single mink a few labelled cells were observed in the ndm but no labelled VPN were found in the nspa. Labelling of afferent components of the vagus nerve was seen in two ferrets and two mink with the best labelling obtained following an injection of an HRP/WGA-HRP mixture into the nodose ganglion. Labelled afferents were observed to cross the ipsilateral spinal trigeminal tract (SpV) before entering the tractus solitarius (TS) in regions separate from the motor axons which exit the medulla in separate fasicles. Sensory terminal fields were identified bilaterally in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (nTS) in both species and bilaterally in the area postrema (ap) of the ferret; however, the contralateral labelling was sparse in comparison to the densely labelled ipsilateral nTS/ap. Maximal terminal labelling was seen in regions just rostral and caudal to obex in both species. PMID:7686926

  13. An evaluation of retrograde tracing methods for the identification of chemically distinct cochlear efferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Vetter, D E; Mugnaini, E

    1990-07-01

    We have compared retrograde labelling of rat olivocochlear neurons after unilateral cochlear injections of wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) and free HRP. After cochlear injection of WGA-HRP, labelling of nerve cell bodies in the brainstem can be explained not only as conventional retrograde labelling resulting from uptake by efferent nerve terminals synapsing on or near hair cells, but also as spurious labelling originating from tracer leakage, through the periotic duct and over the eighth nerve sheaths, into the cerebral-spinal fluid. Depending on the length of survival time, spurious labelling can involve small portions of the nucleus of the trapezoid body or the entire auditory brainstem and other non-auditory centers. On the contrary, moderate amounts of free HRP delivered to the cochlea do not lead to spurious labelling. With free HRP as the tracer of choice, we found that cochlear efferent cells were located not only in the ipsilateral LSO body and bilaterally within MVPO and RPO as already described by White and Warr, but also surrounding the ipsilateral LSO and in the ipsilateral LVPO. The allocation of these newly described olivocochlear neurons to the medial large cell or lateral small cell system is uncertain because they are located laterally in the brainstem and project ipsilaterally but are large spherical to fusiform or multipolar cells. A zinc salicylate-formol fixative and a metal intensified DAB reaction were found to be effective in visualizing retrogradely transported HRP in neurons and allowed immunocytochemical staining of the same sections with antisera to glutamic acid decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase. This double label protocol can be used to produce a neurochemical map of the OC systems. PMID:1702612

  14. Rescuing transient corticospinal terminations and promoting growth with corticospinal stimulation in kittens.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Iran; Martin, John H

    2004-05-26

    Development of corticospinal (CS) terminations is activity dependent. In the cat, activity-dependent refinement of termination topography occurs between weeks 3 and 6. Initially, sparse terminals are present in the gray matter bilaterally, including the motor nuclei. By week 6, virtually all motor nuclear terminations are eliminated, as are most ipsilateral terminations. In this study, we determined whether electrical stimulation of CS axons could be used to rescue transient terminations and promote their growth. We implanted microwires in the pyramid or spinal white matter to stimulate CS axons (2 hr/d, 330 Hz, 45 msec burst, 2 sec intervals) for 2-3 weeks during the refinement period. CS terminations were traced using wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. Animals were killed after week 6. Stimulation produced dense terminations bilaterally, including within the motor nuclei. Termination density was least in lamina 1 and ventral lamina 9. Reticular formation stimulation produced a control (i.e., nonstimulated) termination pattern. To determine whether CS stimulation affected development of the nonstimulated CS system, we traced terminations from the contralateral cortex using biotinylated dextran amine. Compared with controls or after reticular formation stimulation, there was a shift in the distribution of terminations of the nonstimulated side to more dorsal laminas, which is where the stimulated CS system had fewer terminals. This distribution shift is consistent with competition for termination space between the CS systems on both sides. Our findings indicate that activity can be harnessed to bias CS axon terminal development. This has important implications for using activity to modify motor system organization after perinatal CNS trauma. PMID:15163687

  15. The Mesencephalic Reticular Formation as a Conduit for Primate Collicular Gaze Control: Tectal Inputs to Neurons Targeting the Spinal Cord and Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Eddie; Warren, Susan; May, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC), which directs orienting movements of both the eyes and head, is reciprocally connected to the mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF), suggesting the latter is involved in gaze control. The MRF has been provisionally subdivided to include a rostral portion, which subserves vertical gaze, and a caudal portion, which subserves horizontal gaze. Both regions contain cells projecting downstream that may provide a conduit for tectal signals targeting the gaze control centers which direct head movements. We determined the distribution of cells targeting the cervical spinal cord and rostral medullary reticular formation (MdRF), and investigated whether these MRF neurons receive input from the SC by the use of dual tracer techniques in Macaca fascicularis monkeys. Either biotinylated dextran amine or Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin was injected into the SC. Wheat germ agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase was placed into the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord or medial MdRF to retrogradely label MRF neurons. A small number of medially located cells in the rostral and caudal MRF were labeled following spinal cord injections, and greater numbers were labeled in the same region following MdRF injections. In both cases, anterogradely labeled tectoreticular terminals were observed in close association with retrogradely labeled neurons. These close associations between tectoreticular terminals and neurons with descending projections suggest the presence of a trans-MRF pathway that provides a conduit for tectal control over head orienting movements. The medial location of these reticulospinal and reticuloreticular neurons suggests this MRF region may be specialized for head movement control. PMID:19645020

  16. Tracing neural circuits in vivo with Mn-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yusuke; Weber, Bruno; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Augath, Mark; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2006-05-01

    The application of MRI-visible paramagnetic tracers to reveal in vivo connectivity can provide important subject-specific information for multisite, multielectrode intracortical recordings in combined behavioral and physiology experiments. To establish the use of such tracers in the nonhuman primate, we recently compared the specificity of the anterograde tracer Mn2+ with that of wheat-germ-agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in experiments tracing the neuronal connections of the basal ganglia of the monkey. It was shown that Mn2+ and WGA-HRP yield the same projection patterns and that the former tracer crosses at least two synapses, for it could be found in thalamus following injections into the striatum. Here we provide evidence that Mn2+ reaches the cortex following striatum injections and, thus, is transferred even further than previously shown. In other words, used as a paramagnetic MRI tracer, Mn2+ can permit the visualization of neural networks covering at least four processing stages. Moreover, unilateral intravitreal injections show that Mn2+ is sufficiently synapse specific to permit visualization of the lamina of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Interestingly, the transfer rate of the substance reflected the well-known axonal size differences between the parvocellular and magnocellular layers of dLGN. After intravitreal injections, we were able to demonstrate transfer of Mn2+ into several subcortical and cortical areas, including the inferotemporal cortex. The specificity of the transsynaptic transfer of manganese that we report here indicates the value of this tracer for chronic studies of development and plasticity, as well as for studies of brain pathology. PMID:16677940

  17. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    SciTech Connect

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-04-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been madeexclamation In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection.

  18. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  19. Fluoride inhibits the antimicrobial peroxidase systems in human whole saliva.

    PubMed

    Hannuksela, S; Tenovuo, J; Roger, V; Lenander-Lumikari, M; Ekstrand, J

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride (F-) ions at concentrations present in vivo at the plaque/enamel interface (0.05-10 mM) inhibited the activities of lactoperoxidase (LP), myeloperoxidase (MP) and total salivary peroxidase (TSP) in a pH- and dose-dependent way. The inhibition was observed only at pH < or = 6.5 and with F- concentrations > or = 0.1 mM. At pH 5.5 LP activity was inhibited by 85% and MP by 34% with 10 mM F-. TSP activity was also inhibited only at low pH (5.5) by approximately 25%. Furthermore, the generation of the actual antimicrobial agent in vivo, hypothiocyanite (HOSCN/OSCN-), of the oral peroxidase systems was inhibited by F-, again at low pH (5.0-5.5) both in buffer (by 45%) and in saliva (by 15%). This inhibition was observed only with the highest F- concentrations studied (5-10 mM). Fluoridated toothpaste (with 0.10 or 0.14% F) mixed with saliva did not inhibit TSP or HOSCN/OSCN- generation. This may have been due to the 'buffering' effect of toothpaste which did not allow salivary pH to drop below 5.9. We conclude that the F- ions in acidic fluoride products, e.g. in gels or varnishes (but not in toothpastes), may have the potential to locally inhibit the generation of a nonimmune host defense factor, HOSCN/OSCN/SCN-, produced by oral peroxidase systems. The possible clinical significance of this finding remains to be shown. PMID:7850846

  20. Antifungal Properties of Haem Peroxidase from Acorus calamus

    PubMed Central

    GHOSH, MODHUMITA

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plants have evolved a number of inducible defence mechanisms against pathogen attack, including synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins. The aim of the study was to purify and characterize antifungal protein from leaves of Acorus calamus. • Methods Leaf proteins from A. calamus were fractionated by cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration and the fraction inhibiting the hyphal extension of phytopathogens was characterized. The temperature stability and pH optima of the protein were determined and its presence was localized in the leaf tissues. • Key Results The purified protein was identified as a class III haem peroxidase with a molecular weight of approx. 32 kDa and pI of 7·93. The temperature stability of the enzyme was observed from 5 °C to 60 °C with a temperature optimum of 36 °C. Maximum enzyme activity was registered at pH 5·5. The pH and temperature optima were corroborated with the antifungal activity of the enzyme. The enzyme was localized in the leaf epidermal cells and lumen tissues of xylem, characteristic of class III peroxidases. The toxic nature of the enzyme which inhibited hyphal growth was demonstrated against phytopathogens such as Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium moniliforme and Trichosporium vesiculosum. Microscopic observations revealed distortion in the hyphal structure with stunted growth, increased volume and extensive hyphal branching. • Conclusions This study indicates that peroxidases may have a role to play in host defence by inhibiting the hyphal extension of invading pathogens. PMID:17056613

  1. Synthesis and properties of lignin peroxidase from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A

    SciTech Connect

    Lodha, S.J.; Korus, R.A.; Crawford, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The production of lignin peroxidase by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A was studied in shake flasks and under aerobic conditions in a 7.5-L batch fermentor. Lignin peroxidase synthesis was found to be strongly affected by catabolite repression. Lignin peroxidase was a non-growth-associated, secondary metabolite. The maximum lignin peroxidase activity was 0.064 U/mL at 36 h. In order to maximize lignin peroxidase activity, optimal conditions were determined. The optimal incubation temperature, pH, and substrate (2,4-dichlorophenol) concentration for the enzyme assays were 45{degrees}C, 6, and 3 m-M, respectively. Stability of lignin peroxidase was determined at 37, 45, and 60{degrees}C, and over the pH range 4-9.

  2. The early development of major projections from caudal levels of the spinal cord to the brainstem and cerebellum in the gray short-tailed Brazilian opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Qin, Y Q; Wang, X M; Martin, G F

    1993-09-17

    The Brazilian short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, is born 14-15 days after copulation and is available for experimentation at stages of development corresponding to those which occur in utero in placental mammals. In the present study, we took advantage of the opossum's embryology to study the development of projections from caudal levels of the spinal cord to the brainstem and cerebellum using axonal tracing methods. In all cases, a 2-3 day survival time was used for axonal transport. When injections of Fast blue (FB) were made into caudal levels of the thoracic cord at postnatal day (PD) 1 or 2, axonal labeling could not be identified at supraspinal levels. When injections were made at PD3, however, labeled axons were found in the fasciculus gracilis at caudal medullary levels, within the ventrolateral medulla and pons, within an incipient inferior cerebellar peduncle, and within the cerebellar anlage. The dorsal root origin of at least some of the axons within the fasciculus gracilis was evidenced by the transganglionic transport of cholera toxin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase from the hindlimbs. After FB injections at PD7, a few labeled axons could be traced from the fasciculus gracilis into the nucleus gracilis and from the ventrolateral pathway to the inferior olive. Generally comparable results were obtained using wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP). In cases injected with FB at PD9, the pattern of brainstem labeling was adult-like. Although labeled axons were present within the cerebellum of animals injected with FB on PD3, they were limited to the marginal zone. Axonal labeling was present within an identifiable internal granular layer in cases injected with either FB or WGA-HRP at PD16, and it appeared to be limited to specific bands which foreshadowed those seen at later stages of development and in the adult animal. In some cases, labeled axons were present within the molecular layer where they were not

  3. Purification and characterization of a cationic peroxidase Cs in Raphanus sativus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Soo; Lee, Dong Ju

    2005-06-01

    A short distance migrating cationic peroxidase from Korean radish seeds (Raphanus sativus) was detected. Cationic peroxidase Cs was purified to apparent homogeneity and characterized. The molecular mass of the purified cationic peroxidase Cs was estimated to be about 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE. After reconstitution of apoperoxidase Cs with protohemin, the absorption spectra revealed a new peak in the Soret region around 400 nm, which is typical in a classical type III peroxidase family. The optimum pH of peroxidase activity for o-dianisidine oxidation was observed at pH 7.0. Kinetic studies revealed that the reconstituted cationic peroxidase Cs has Km values of 1.18 mM and of 1.27 mM for o-dianisidine and H2O2, respectively. The cationic peroxidase Cs showed the peroxidase activities for native substrates, such as coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and scopoletin. This result suggested that cationic peroxidase Cs plays an important role in plant cell wall formation during seed germination. PMID:16008083

  4. A structural and functional perspective of DyP-type peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toru; Sugano, Yasushi

    2015-05-15

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta Dec 1 (DyP) is a heme peroxidase. This name reflects its ability to degrade several anthraquinone dyes. The substrate specificity, the amino acid sequence, and the tertiary structure of DyP are different from those of the other heme peroxidase (super)families. Therefore, many proteins showing the similar amino acid sequences to that of DyP are called DyP-type peroxidase which is a new family of heme peroxidase identified in 2007. In fact, all structures of this family show a similar structure fold. However, this family includes many proteins whose amino acid sequence identity to DyP is lower than 15% and/or whose catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) is a few orders of magnitude less than that of DyP. A protein showing an activity different from peroxidase activity (dechelatase activity) has been also reported. In addition, the precise physiological roles of DyP-type peroxidases are unknown. These facts raise a question of whether calling this family DyP-type peroxidase is suitable. Here, we review the differences and similarities of structure and function among this family and propose the reasonable new classification of DyP-type peroxidase family, that is, class P, I and V. In this contribution, we discuss the adequacy of this family name. PMID:25655348

  5. Wound-induced deposition of polyphenols in transgenic plants overexpressing peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with a chimeric tobacco anionic peroxidase gene have previously been shown to synthesize high levels of peroxidase in all tissues throughout the plant. One of several distinguishable phenotypes of transformed plants is the rapid browning of pith tissue upon wounding. Pith tissue from plants expressing high levels of peroxidase browned within 24 hours of wounding, while tissue from control plants did not brown as late as 7 days after wounding. A correlation between peroxidase activity and wound-induced browning was observed, whereas no relationship between polyphenol oxidase activity and browning was found. The purified tobacco anionic peroxidase was subjected to kinetic analysis with substrates which resemble the precursors of lignin or polyphenolic acid. The purified enzyme was found to readily polymerize phenolic acids in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via a modified ping-pong mechanism. The percentage of lignin and lignin-related polymers in cell walls was nearly twofold greater in pith tissue isolated from peroxidase-overproducer plants compared to control plants. Lignin deposition in wounded pith tissue from control plants closely followed the induction of peroxidase activity. However, wound-induced lignification occurred 24 to 48 hours sooner in plants overexpressing the anionic peroxidase. This suggests that the availability of peroxidase rather than substrate may delay polyphenol deposition in wounded tissue.

  6. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  7. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  8. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  9. Homologous expression of recombinant lignin peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Sollewijn Gelpke, M.D.; Mayfield-Gambill, M.; Lin Cereghino, G.P.; Gold, M.H.

    1999-04-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) promoter was used to drive expression of lip2, the gene encoding lignin peroxidase (LiP) isozyme H8, in primary metabolic cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression vector, pUGL, also contained the Schizophyllum commune ura1 gene as a selectable marker. pUGL was used to transform a P. chrysosporium Ura11 auxotroph to prototrophy. Ura{sup +} transformants were screened for peroxidase activity in liquid cultures containing high-carbon and high-nitrogen medium. Recombinant LiP (rLiP) was secreted in active form by the transformants after 4 days of growth, whereas endogenous lip genes were not expressed under these conditions. Approximately 2 mg of homogeneous rLiP/liter was obtained after purification. The molecular mass, pI, and optical absorption spectrum of rLiPH8 were essentially identical to those of the wild-type LiPH8 (wt LiPH8), indicating that heme insertion, folding, and secretion functioned normally in the transformant. Steady-state and transient-state kinetic properties for the oxidation of veratryl alcohol between wtLiPH8 and rLiPH8 were also identical.

  10. High Conformational Stability of Secreted Eukaryotic Catalase-peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; García-Fernández, Queralt; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio; Obinger, Christian; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional heme enzymes widely spread in archaea, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. Here we present the first crystal structure (1.55 Å resolution) of an eukaryotic KatG, the extracellular or secreted enzyme from the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea. The heme cavity of the homodimeric enzyme is similar to prokaryotic KatGs including the unique distal +Met-Tyr-Trp adduct (where the Trp is further modified by peroxidation) and its associated mobile arginine. The structure also revealed several conspicuous peculiarities that are fully conserved in all secreted eukaryotic KatGs. Peculiarities include the wrapping at the dimer interface of the N-terminal elongations from the two subunits and cysteine residues that cross-link the two subunits. Differential scanning calorimetry and temperature- and urea-mediated unfolding followed by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that secreted eukaryotic KatGs have a significantly higher conformational stability as well as a different unfolding pattern when compared with intracellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic catalase-peroxidases. We discuss these properties with respect to the structure as well as the postulated roles of this metalloenzyme in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22822072

  11. Peroxidase-catalysed interfacial adhesion of aquatic caddisworm silk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Pan, Huaizhong; Weerasekare, G Mahika; Stewart, Russell J

    2015-11-01

    Casemaker caddisfly (Hesperophylax occidentalis) larvae use adhesive silk fibres to construct protective shelters under water. The silk comprises a distinct peripheral coating on a viscoelastic fibre core. Caddisworm silk peroxinectin (csPxt), a haem-peroxidase, was shown to be glycosylated by lectin affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Using high-resolution H2O2 and peroxidase-dependent silver ion reduction and nanoparticle deposition, imaged by electron microscopy, csPxt activity was shown to be localized in the peripheral layer of drawn silk fibres. CsPxt catalyses dityrosine cross-linking within the adhesive peripheral layer post-draw, initiated perhaps by H2O2 generated by a silk gland-specific superoxide dismutase 3 (csSOD3) from environmental reactive oxygen species present in natural water. CsSOD3 was also shown to be a glycoprotein and is likely localized in the peripheral layer. Using a synthetic fluorescent phenolic copolymer and confocal microscopy, it was shown that csPxt catalyses oxidative cross-linking to external polyphenolic compounds capable of diffusive interpenetration into the fuzzy peripheral coating, including humic acid, a natural surface-active polyphenol. The results provide evidence of enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of a natural bioadhesive to polyphenol conditioned interfaces as a mechanism of permanent adhesion underwater. PMID:26490632

  12. Enzymatic degradation of Congo Red by turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ahmedi, Afaf; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Couvert, Annabelle; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolourize textile effluents. This study aims at evaluating the potential of a turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase (TP) preparation in the discolouration of textile azo dyes and effluents. An azo dye, Congo Red (CR), was used as a model pollutant for treatment by the enzyme. The effects of various operating conditions like pH value, temperature, initial dye and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, contact time, and enzyme concentration were evaluated. The optimal conditions for maximal colour removal were at pH 2.0, 40 degrees C, 50 mM hydrogen peroxide, 50 mg/l CR dye, and TP activity of 0.45 U/ml within 10 min of incubation time. Analysis of the by-products from the enzymatic treatment by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy showed no residual compounds in the aqueous phase and a precipitate of polymeric nature. PMID:23016283

  13. A novel amperometric alcohol biosensor developed in a 3rd generation bioelectrode platform using peroxidase coupled ferrocene activated alcohol oxidase as biorecognition system.

    PubMed

    Chinnadayyala, Somasekhar R; Kakoti, Ankana; Santhosh, Mallesh; Goswami, Pranab

    2014-05-15

    Alcohol oxidase (AOx) with a two-fold increase in efficiency (Kcat/Km) was achieved by physical entrapment of the activator ferrocene in the protein matrix through a simple microwave based partial unfolding technique and was used to develop a 3rd generation biosensor for improved detection of alcohol in liquid samples. The ferrocene molecules were stably entrapped in the AOx protein matrix in a molar ratio of ~3:1 through electrostatic interaction with the Trp residues involved in the functional activity of the enzyme as demonstrated by advanced analytical techniques. The sensor was fabricated by immobilizing ferrocene entrapped alcohol oxidase (FcAOx) and sol-gel chitosan film coated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon electrode through layer-by-layer technique. The bioelectrode reactions involved the formation of H2O2 by FcAOx biocatalysis of substrate alcohol followed by HRP-catalyzed reduction of the liberated H2O2 through MWCNT supported direct electron transfer mechanism. The amperometric biosensor exhibited a linear response to alcohol in the range of 5.0 × 10(-6) to 30 × 10(-4)mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), and a sensitivity of 150 µA mM(-1) cm(-2). The biosensor response was steady for 28 successive measurements completed in a period of 5h and retained ~90% of the original response even after four weeks when stored at 4 °C. The biosensor was successfully applied for the determination of alcohol in commercial samples and its performance was validated by comparing with the data obtained by GC analyses of the samples. PMID:24368229

  14. Roles of Lignin Peroxidase and Manganese Peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the Decolorization of Olive Mill Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Sayadi, S.; Ellouz, R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative contributions of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) to the decolorization of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated. A relatively low level (25%) of OMW decolorization was found with P. chrysosporium which was grown in a medium with a high Mn(II) concentration and in which a high level of MnP (0.65 (mu)M) was produced. In contrast, a high degree of OMW decolorization (more than 70%) was observed with P. chrysosporium which was grown in a medium with a low Mn(II) concentration but which resulted in a high level of LiP activity (0.3 (mu)M). In this culture medium, increasing the Mn(II) concentration resulted in decreased levels of OMW decolorization and LiP activity. Decolorization by reconstituted cultures of P. chrysosporium was found to be more enhanced by the addition of isolated LiP than by the addition of isolated MnP. The highest OMW decolorization levels were obtained at low initial chemical oxygen demands combined with high levels of extracellular LiP. These data, plus the positive effect of veratryl alcohol on OMW decolorization and LiP activity, indicate that culture conditions which yield high levels of LiP activity lead to high levels of OMW decolorization. PMID:16534959

  15. Role of manganese peroxidases and lignin peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the decolorization of kraft bleach plant effluent.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, F C; Dass, S B; Grulke, E A; Reddy, C A

    1991-01-01

    The role of lignin peroxidases (LIPs) and manganese peroxidases (MNPs) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in decolorizing kraft bleach plant effluent (BPE) was investigated. Negligible BPE decolorization was exhibited by a per mutant, which lacks the ability to produce both the LIPs and the MNPs. Also, little decolorization was seen when the wild type was grown in high-nitrogen medium, in which the production of LIPs and MNPs is blocked. A lip mutant of P. chrysosporium, which produces MNPs but not LIPs, showed about 80% of the activity exhibited by the wild type, indicating that the MNPs play an important role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with 100 ppm of Mn(II), high levels of MNPs but no LIPs were produced, and this culture also exhibited high rates of BPE decolorization, lending further support to the idea that MNPs play a key role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with no Mn(II), high levels of LIPs but negligible levels of MNPs were produced and the rate and extent of BPE decolorization by such cultures were quite low, indicating that LIPs play a relatively minor role in BPE decolorization. Furthermore, high rates of BPE decolorization were seen on days 3 and 4 of incubation, when the cultures exhibit high levels of MNP activity but little or no LIP activity. These results indicate that MNPs play a relatively more important role than LIPs in BPE decolorization by P. chrysosporium. Images PMID:1768105

  16. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  17. Structural and Functional Features of Peroxidases with a Potential as Industrial Biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    This chapter begins with a description of the main structural features of heme peroxidases representative of the two large superfamilies of plant-fungal-bacterial and animal peroxidases, and the four additional (super)families described to date. Then, we focus on several fungal peroxidases of high biotechnological potential as industrial biocatalysts. These include (1) ligninolytic peroxidases from white-rot basidiomycetes being able to oxidize high redox-potential substrates at an exposed protein radical; (2) heme-thiolate peroxidases that are structural hybrids of typical peroxidases and cytochrome P450 enzymes and, after their discovery in sooty molds, are being described in basidiomycetes with even more interesting catalytic properties, such as selective aromatic oxygenation; and (3) the so-called dye-decolorizing peroxidases that are still to be thoroughly investigated but have been identified in different basidiomycete genomes. The structural-functional description of these peroxidases includes an analysis of the heme environment and a description of their substrate oxidation sites, with the purpose of understanding their interesting catalytic properties and biotechnological potential.

  18. Selective oxidation of enzyme extracts for improved quantification of peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu; Penner, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    Natural components endogenous to plant material extracts often interfere with traditional peroxidase assays by reducing the oxidized product generated as a result of the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. This leads to an underestimation of peroxidase activity when the oxidized product provides the signal for enzyme activity quantification. This article describes a relatively simple way to alleviate complications arising due to the presence of such confounding compounds. The method is based on using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as the reducing substrate. The oxidized product of the reaction is ABTS(+), the accumulation of which can be followed spectrophotometrically. It is shown here that one can selectively inactivate the endogenous compounds that confound the peroxidase assay by treating the enzyme preparation with the oxidized product itself, ABTS(+), prior to initiating the quantification assay. This approach is selective for those compounds likely to interfere with peroxidase quantification. The presented method is shown to alleviate the complications associated with lag phases typical of plant extract peroxidase assays and, thus, to more accurately reflect total peroxidase activity. The presented assay is expected to be applicable to the wide range of biological systems for which the determination of peroxidase activity is desired. PMID:25640588

  19. Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Resistant and Susceptible Warm- Season Turfgrasses Challenged by Blissus Occiduus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxidases play an important role in plant stress related interactions. This research assessed the role of peroxidases in the defense response of resistant and susceptible buffalograsses [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm] and zoysiagrasses (Zoysia japonica Steudel) to the western chinch bug, Bli...

  20. Interference by morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and related buffers in phenolic oxidation by peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the 4-morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer being used. In the presence of MES, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H2O2, was uti...

  1. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lizeng; Zhuang, Jie; Nie, Leng; Zhang, Jinbin; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Wang, Taihong; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Perrett, Sarah; Yan, Xiyun

    2007-09-01

    Nanoparticles containing magnetic materials, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), are particularly useful for imaging and separation techniques. As these nanoparticles are generally considered to be biologically and chemically inert, they are typically coated with metal catalysts, antibodies or enzymes to increase their functionality as separation agents. Here, we report that magnetite nanoparticles in fact possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in natural peroxidases, which are widely used to oxidize organic substrates in the treatment of wastewater or as detection tools. Based on this finding, we have developed a novel immunoassay in which antibody-modified magnetite nanoparticles provide three functions: capture, separation and detection. The stability, ease of production and versatility of these nanoparticles makes them a powerful tool for a wide range of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  2. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  3. Cytochrome c peroxidase activity of heme bound amyloid β peptides.

    PubMed

    Seal, Manas; Ghosh, Chandradeep; Basu, Olivia; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2016-09-01

    Heme bound amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), can catalytically oxidize ferrocytochrome c (Cyt c(II)) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The rate of catalytic oxidation of Cyt(II) c has been found to be dependent on several factors, such as concentration of heme(III)-Aβ, Cyt(II) c, H2O2, pH, ionic strength of the solution, and peptide chain length of Aβ. The above features resemble the naturally occurring enzyme cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) which is known to catalytically oxidize Cyt(II) c in the presence of H2O2. In the absence of heme(III)-Aβ, the oxidation of Cyt(II) c is not catalytic. Thus, heme-Aβ complex behaves as CCP. PMID:27270708

  4. A Stable Bacterial Peroxidase with Novel Halogenating Activity and an Autocatalytically Linked Heme Prosthetic Group*

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Markus; Gruber, Clemens; Bellei, Marzia; Pirker, Katharina F.; Zamocky, Marcel; Kroiss, Daniela; Teufer, Stefan A.; Hofbauer, Stefan; Soudi, Monika; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of the main evolutionary lines of the mammalian peroxidases lactoperoxidase and myeloperoxidase revealed the presence of novel bacterial heme peroxidase subfamilies. Here, for the first time, an ancestral bacterial heme peroxidase is shown to possess a very high bromide oxidation activity (besides conventional peroxidase activity). The recombinant protein allowed monitoring of the autocatalytic peroxide-driven formation of covalent heme to protein bonds. Thereby, the high spin ferric rhombic heme spectrum became similar to lactoperoxidase, the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple shifted to more positive values (−145 ± 10 mV at pH 7), and the conformational and thermal stability of the protein increased significantly. We discuss structure-function relationships of this new peroxidase in relation to its mammalian counterparts and ask for its putative physiological role. PMID:23918925

  5. Storage of Heparinised Canine Whole Blood for the Measurement of Glutathione Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity is used as a biomarker of selenium status in dogs. Freshly collected blood samples are usually measured, due to the lack of knowledge on the effect of storing the samples. This study investigated if the analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity in whole blood collected from dogs was affected by storage of between 5 and 164 days. Results indicated that glutathione peroxidase activity was more variable in the freshly analysed samples compared to the stored samples. Although the mean differences between fresh and stored samples were not always equal to zero, this is thought to be caused by the variability of reagent preparation rather than by storage, as no consistent increase or decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity was found. Therefore, it can be concluded that heparinised dog blood samples can be successfully stored up to 164 days before analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity. PMID:26701335

  6. Effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Y.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver was studied in vivo. A daily dose of 10mg methylmercuric chloride/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously to 15 male Wistar rats for 10 days, and the glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver was measured to compare with the control activity. A marked decrease was observed in the glutathione peroxidase activity in the experimental animals, which measured as low as 40% in comparison to that in the control animals. It can be speculated that the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity plays a significant role in the development of mercury toxicity and that the protective effect of selenium and vitamin E on the mercury intoxication might be partly due to preserving the glutathione peroxidase activity in the antioxidative defense mechanisms.

  7. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  8. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Lundell, Taina; Floudas, Dimitrios; Nagy, Laszlo G; Barrasa, José M; Hibbett, David S; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades. The study confirms the absence of ligninolytic peroxidase genes from the manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) families, in the brown-rot fungal genomes (all of them from the antrodia clade), which include only a limited number of predicted low redox-potential generic peroxidase (GP) genes. When members of the heme-thiolate peroxidase (HTP) and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) superfamilies (up to a total of 64 genes) also are considered, the newly sequenced B. adusta appears as the Polyporales species with the highest number of peroxidase genes due to the high expansion of both the ligninolytic peroxidase and DyP (super)families. The evolutionary relationships of the 111 genes for class-II peroxidases (from the GP, MnP, VP, LiP families) in the 10 Polyporales genomes is discussed including the existence of different MnP subfamilies and of a large and homogeneous LiP cluster, while different VPs mainly cluster with short MnPs. Finally, ancestral state reconstructions showed that a putative MnP gene, derived from a primitive GP that incorporated the Mn(II)-oxidation site, is the precursor of all the class-II ligninolytic peroxidases. Incorporation of an exposed tryptophan residue involved in oxidative degradation of lignin in a short MnP apparently resulted in evolution of the first VP. One of these ancient VPs might have lost the Mn(II)-oxidation site being at the origin of all the LiP enzymes, which are found only in

  9. Measurement of tomato plant gene expression on a genomic scale for tomato plants that over express peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the gene expression of transgenic tomato plants that over-express the plant defense peroxidase in comparison to the control tomato plants with normal levels of peroxidase. In general, jasmonate-related plant defenses such as putative protease inhibitors were suppressed in peroxidase-rel...

  10. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-03-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to {Beta}-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  11. Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension peroxidase: purification, characterization and application for dye decolorization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductase enzymes produced by most organisms. In this study, a peroxidase was purified from Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension by using anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose), affinity chromatography (Con A-agarose) and preparative SDS-PAGE. The obtained enzyme appeared as a single band on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass of 70 kDa. Surprisingly, this purified peroxidase also had polyphenol oxidase activity. However, the biochemical characteristics were only studied in term of peroxidase because similar experiments in term of polyphenol oxidase have been reported in our pervious publication. The optimal pH of the purified peroxidase was 5.0 and its activity was retained at pH values between 5.0–10.0. The enzyme was heat stable over a wide range of temperatures (0–60°C), and less than 50% of its activity was lost at 70°C after incubation for 30 min. The enzyme was completely inhibited by β-mercaptoethanol and strongly inhibited by NaN3; in addition, its properties indicated that it was a heme containing glycoprotein. This peroxidase could decolorize many dyes; aniline blue, bromocresol purple, brilliant green, crystal violet, fuchsin, malachite green, methyl green, methyl violet and water blue. The stability against high temperature and extreme pH supported that the enzyme could be a potential peroxidase source for special industrial applications. PMID:23402438

  12. Site-specific Effects of DUOX1-Related Peroxidase on Intercellular Apoptosis Signaling.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Sonja; Bauer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    Intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl signaling is known as an interplay between superoxide anions/H₂O₂ of transformed target cells and dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1)-related peroxidase that is released from neighboring non-transformed or transformed effector cells. Effector cells are dispensable when the release of the peroxidase domain of DUOX1 from target cells is prevented through inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Membrane-associated peroxidase is then co-localized to NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) and establishes HOCl signaling specifically in transformed cells, using the same biochemical pathways as classical intercellular HOCl signaling. Membrane-associated peroxidase protects against exogenous HOCl through reversal of the peroxidase reaction. In addition, membrane-associated peroxidase protects against NO/peroxynitrite signaling as it oxidates NO and decomposes peroxynitrite. The protective function of membrane-associated peroxidase (in the absence of MMP) is analogous to that of catalase, whereas the destructive effect of the enzyme, i.e. the synthesis of HOCl, is independent of its localization and of MMP activity. PMID:26504019

  13. Uncovering a new role for peroxidase enzymes as drivers of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Zinonos, Irene; Leach, Damien A; Hay, Shelley J; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Ingman, Wendy V; DeNichilo, Mark O; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes released by activated immune cells at sites of inflammation. To-date their functional role in human health has mainly been limited to providing a mechanism for oxidative defence against invading bacteria and other pathogenic microorganisms. Our laboratory has recently identified a new functional role for peroxidase enzymes in stimulating fibroblast migration and collagen biosynthesis, offering a new insight into the causative association between inflammation and the pro-fibrogenic events that mediate tissue repair and regeneration. Peroxidases are found at elevated levels within and near blood vessels however, their direct involvement in angiogenesis has never been reported. Here we report for the first time that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are readily internalised by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) where they promote cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and stimulate angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These pro-angiogenic effects were attenuated using the specific peroxidase inhibitor 4-ABAH, indicating the enzyme's catalytic activity is essential in mediating this response. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that MPO and EPO regulate endothelial FAK, Akt, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and stabilisation of HIF-2α, culminating in transcriptional regulation of key angiogenesis pathways. These findings uncover for the first time an important and previously unsuspected role for peroxidases as drivers of angiogenesis, and suggest that peroxidase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of angiogenesis related diseases driven by inflammation. PMID:26386352

  14. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT. PMID:26461310

  15. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR. PMID

  16. Peroxidase activity in Aloe barbadensis commercial gel: probable role in skin protection.

    PubMed

    Esteban, A; Zapata, J M; Casano, L; Martín, M; Sabater, B

    2000-12-01

    A basic peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) (pl around 9.0) has been identified in commercial gel of Aloe barbadensis. In vivo, the activity is localised in the vascular system of inner aqueous leaf parenchyma. Some relevant properties of this basic peroxidase of Aloe have been investigated in leaf extract and in commercial gel where it is notably stable. The acid optimum pH (5.0) for activity and the low KM for H2O2 (0.14 mM) suggest that, when topically applied, Aloe peroxidase may scavenge H2O2 in skin surface. PMID:11199129

  17. Identification of a copper-sensitive ascorbate peroxidase in the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum.

    PubMed

    Sauser, K R; Liu, J K; Wong, T Y

    1997-07-01

    Extracts from the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum exhibit high superoxide dismutase activity, but only traces of catalase activity. The excess hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the superoxide dismutase in S. capricornutum may be degraded by a unique peroxidase. This peroxidase has a high specificity for ascorbate as its electron donor. The enzyme has an optimum pH at 8, is insensitive to cyanide and is inhibited by oxine. Addition of low concentrations of copper to algal cultures stimulates the peroxidase activity threefold. This enzymatic system could be used as a sensitive bioindicator for copper in fresh water. PMID:9243795

  18. The multihued palette of dye-decolorizing peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2015-05-15

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs; EC 1.11.1.19) are heme enzymes that comprise a family of the dimeric α+β barrel structural superfamily of proteins. The first DyP, identified relatively recently in the fungus Bjerkandera adusta, was characterized for its ability to catalyze the decolorization of anthraquinone-based industrial dyes. These enzymes are now known to be present in all three domains of life, but do not appear to occur in plants or animals. They are involved in a range of physiological processes, although in many cases their roles remain unknown. This has not prevented the development of their biocatalytic potential, which includes the transformation of lignin. This review highlights the functional diversity of DyPs in the light of phylogenetic, structural and biochemical data. The phylogenetic analysis reveals the existence of at least five classes of DyPs. Their potential physiological roles are discussed based in part on synteny analyses. Finally, the considerable biotechnological potential of DyPs is summarized. PMID:25743546

  19. Identification of S-RNase and peroxidase in petunia nectar.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Melissa S; Kanobe, Charles; Thornburg, Robert W; Macintosh, Gustavo C

    2011-05-01

    Previous SDS PAGE gel analysis of the floral nectars from petunia and tobacco plants revealed significant differences in the protein patterns. Petunia floral nectar was shown to contain a number of RNase activities by in gel RNase activity assay. To identify these proteins in more detail, the bands with RNase activity were excised from gel and subjected to trypsin digestion followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. This analysis revealed that S-RNases accumulate in nectar from Petunia hybrida, where they should carry out a biological function different from self-pollen rejection. In addition, other proteins were identified by the LC-MS/MS analysis. These proteins include a peroxidase, an endochitinase, and a putative fructokinase. Each of these proteins contained a secretory signal sequence that marked them as potential nectar proteins. We developed RT-PCR assays for each of these five proteins and demonstrated that each of these proteins was expressed in the petunia floral nectary. A discussion of the role of these proteins in antimicrobial activity in nectar is presented. PMID:21093100

  20. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Eosinophil Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Andón, Fernando T.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Feng, Weihong; Baygan, Arjang; Chambers, Benedict J.; Hultenby, Kjell; Ye, Fei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Brandner, Birgit D.; Fornara, Andrea; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the major oxidant-producing enzymes during inflammatory states in the human lung. The degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) upon incubation with human EPO and H2O2 is reported. Biodegradation of SWCNTs is higher in the presence of NaBr, but neither EPO alone nor H2O2 alone caused the degradation of nanotubes. Molecular modeling reveals two binding sites for SWCNTs on EPO, one located at the proximal side (same side as the catalytic site) and the other on the distal side of EPO. The oxidized groups on SWCNTs in both cases are stabilized by electrostatic interactions with positively charged residues. Biodegradation of SWCNTs can also be executed in an ex vivo culture system using primary murine eosinophils stimulated to undergo degranulation. Biodegradation is proven by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible-NIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal Raman imaging. Thus, human EPO (in vitro) and ex vivo activated eosinophils mediate biodegradation of SWCNTs: an observation that is relevant to pulmonary responses to these materials. PMID:23447468

  1. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL−1, specific activity 78 U mg−1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4–5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+, Cu2+, Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2. H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL−1 enzyme activities. PMID:24948923

  2. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Omar, Haneen; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-03-01

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) with a detection limit of 1.86 μM. In the absence of UO2(2+), the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2(2+), this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2(2+) was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2(2+) and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2(2+) from seawater. PMID:25658750

  3. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  4. Atherogenic diets exacerbate colitis in mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Esworthy, R. Steven; Kim, Byung-Wook; Synold, Timothy W.; Smith, David D.; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory effect of high-fat diet has been observed beyond the cardiovascular system, but there is little evidence to support its role in triggering inflammatory bowel disease. GPx1/2-double knockout (DKO) mice deficient in two intracellular glutathione peroxidases, GPx1 and GPx2, on a C57BL/6 (B6) background, have mild ileocolitis on a conventional chow. We fed B6 DKO mice two atherogenic diets to test the dietary effect on atherosclerosis and ileocolitis. Both atherogenic diets have high cholesterol, the Chol+/CA diet has cholic acid (CA) and the Chol+ diet has no CA. The Chol+/CA diet induced severe colitis, but not ileitis, in the DKO mice compared with Chol+ and a Chol- control diet. On the Chol+/CA diet, the wild-type (WT) mice had similar levels of aortic lesions and hypercholesterolemia as DKO mice did, but had no intestinal pathology. The diet-associated inflammatory responses in the DKO mice included increase of colonic pro-inflammatory serum amyloid A 3 expression, plasma lipopolysaccharide and TNF-α levels. The Chol+/CA diet has lowered the expression of unfolded protein response genes, ATF6, CHOP, unspliced XbpU and Grp78/Bip, in WT and DKO mice on the Chol- diet. Thus, we conclude that cholesterol diet weakens colon unfolded protein response, which can aggravate spontaneous colitis leading to gut barrier breakdown. GPx has no impact on atherosclerosis without ultra-hypercholesterolemia. PMID:20848490

  5. Eosinophil peroxidase-dependent hydroxyl radical generation by human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M L; Roeder, T L; Railsback, M A; Britigan, B E

    1994-11-11

    Eosinophil production of superoxide (O2-.) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is important in host defense. The present study assessed the potential of eosinophils to generate another potent cytotoxic species, the hydroxyl radical (.OH). .OH formation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated eosinophils was demonstrated using an alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butyl nitrone/ethanol spin trapping system. Additionally, .OH was spin trapped following the addition of purified eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) to a cell-free O2-./H2O2 generating systems. Effects of superoxide dismutase, catalase, azide, aminotriazole, chloride-depleted buffer, and extensive metal chelation were consistent with .OH formation via the reaction of O2-. and EPO-generated hypohalous acid. Under chloride-depleted conditions, physiologic concentrations of Br- increased .OH formation by both PMA-stimulated eosinophils and the cell-free EPO system. Physiologic concentrations of SCN-, however, did not increase .OH formation, and in the presence of both Br- and SCN-, .OH formation was similar to SCN- only. Eosinophils appear to form .OH via an EPO-dependent mechanism, the magnitude of which varies with the availability of various EPO substrates. Given the highly reactive nature of this radical and the ability of EPO to adhere to cell membranes, even small amounts of .OH formed at such sites could contribute to eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:7961724

  6. Activation of lignin peroxidase in organic media by reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Michizoe, Junji; Oakazaki, Shin-Ya; Furusaki, Shintaro; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2004-11-20

    Activation of lignin peroxidase (LIP) in an organic solvent by reversed micelles was investigated. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) was used as a surfactant to form a reversed micelle. Lyophilized LIP from an optimized aqueous solution exhibited no enzymatic activity in any organic solvents examined in this study; however, LIP was catalytically active by being entrapped in the AOT reversed micellar solution. LIP activity in the reversed micelle was enhanced by optimizing either the preparation or the operation conditions, such as water content and pH in water pools of the reversed micelle and the reaction temperature. Stable activity was obtained in isooctane because of the stability of the reversed micelle. The optimal pH was 5 in the reversed micellar system, which shifted from pH 3 in the aqueous solution. The degradation reaction of several environmental pollutants was attempted using LIP hosted in the AOT reversed micelle. Degradation achieved after a 1-h reaction reached 81%, 50%, and 22% for p-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively. This is the first report on the utilization of LIP in organic media. PMID:15459910

  7. Oxidation of pharmaceutically active compounds by a ligninolytic fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Eibes, Gemma; Debernardi, Gianfranco; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, M Teresa; Lema, Juan M

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals are an important group of emerging pollutants with increasing interest due to their rising consumption and the evidence for ecotoxicological effects associated to trace amounts in aquatic environments. In this paper, we assessed the potential degradation of a series of pharmaceuticals: antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole), antidepressives (citalopram hydrobromide and fluoxetine hydrochloride), antiepileptics (carbamazepine), anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and naproxen) and estrogen hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol) by means of a versatile peroxidase (VP) from the ligninolytic fungus Bjerkandera adusta. The effects of the reaction conditions: VP activity, organic acid concentration and H(2)O(2) addition rate, on the kinetics of the VP based oxidation system were evaluated. Diclofenac and estrogens were completely degraded after only 5-25 min even with a very low VP activity (10 U l(-1)). High degradation percentages (80%) were achieved for sulfamethoxazole and naproxen. Low or undetectable removal yields were observed for citalopram (up to 18%), fluoxetine (lower than 10%) and carbamazepine (not degraded). PMID:20972884

  8. Research Advances: Horseradish Peroxide Mixture May End War of the Noses-- Even Low Levels of Benzene Are Hemotoxic--New "Nuclear Battery" Runs 10 Years. 10 Times More Powerful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Experts have mixed horseradish root with hydrogen peroxide or calcium peroxide in laboratory studies to get rid of the problem of odors from farm manure. Researchers evaluated how well the system reduced the concentration of volatile fatty acids, indole and skatole, compounds that are also associated with the stink of animal manure.

  9. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Marcela . E-mail: maa@ibt.unam.mx; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-06-08

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple.

  10. Inhibition of Peroxidase Activity of Cytochrome c: De Novo Compound Discovery and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Ahmet; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Bayir, Hulya; Hu, Feizhou; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) release from mitochondria is accepted to be the point of no return for eliciting a cascade of interactions that lead to apoptosis. A strategy for containing sustained apoptosis is to reduce the mitochondrial permeability pore opening. Pore opening is enhanced by peroxidase activity of cyt c gained upon its complexation with cardiolipin in the presence of reactive oxygen species. Blocking access to the heme group has been proposed as an effective intervention method for reducing, if not eliminating, the peroxidase activity of cyt c. In the present study, using a combination of druggability simulations, pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and in vitro fluorescence measurements to probe peroxidase activity, we identified three repurposable drugs and seven compounds that are validated to effectively inhibit the peroxidase activity of cyt c. PMID:26078313

  11. IMPROVED TOLERANCE TO ENVIRONMENTALLY INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESSES IN TRANSGENIC TOMATO OVEREXPRESSING ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effect on oxidative stress resistance of overexpressing, in transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants, a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (APX) gene derived from pea (Pisum sativum). Transformants were selected using Kanamycin resistance and confirmed by PCR, Southern and Nort...

  12. Degradation of disperse dye from textile effluent by free and immobilized Cucurbita pepo peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucherit, N.; Abouseoud, M.; Adour, L.

    2012-06-01

    Disperse dyes constitute the largest group of dyes used in local textile industry. This work evaluates the potential of the Cucurbita peroxidase(C-peroxidase) extracted from courgette in the decolourization of disperse dye in free and immobilized form. The optimal conditions for immobilization of C-peroxidase in Ca-alginate were identified. The immobilization was optimized at 2%(w/v) of sodium alginate and 0.2 M of calcium chloride. After optimization of treatment parameters, the results indicate that at pH 2, dye concentration: 80 mg/L(for FCP) and 180 mg/L(for ICP), H2O2 dose: 0,02M (for FCP) and 0,12M(for ICP), the decolourization by free and immobilized C-peroxidase were 72.02% and 69.71 % respectively. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed after the degradation were also predicted using UV-vis spectroscopy analysis.

  13. Amino Acid Sequence of Anionic Peroxidase from the Windmill Palm Tree Trachycarpus fortunei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications. PMID:25383699

  14. Influence of organophosphorus pesticides on peroxidase and chlorination activity of human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara; Momić, Tatjana; Radojević, Miloš M; Vasić, Vesna

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of five organophosphorus pesticides (diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl and phorate) and their oxo-analogs on human myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were investigated. While inspecting separately peroxidase and chlorination activity, it was observed that investigated OPs affect peroxidase activity, but not chlorination activity. Among investigated pesticides, malathion and malaoxon have showed the highest power to inhibit MPO peroxidase activity with IC50 values of the order of 3×10(-7) and 5×10(-9) M, respectively. It was proposed that inhibition trend is rendered by molecular structure which invokes steric hindrance for OPs interaction with MPO active center responsible for peroxidase activity. In addition, it was concluded that physiological function of MPO is not affected by any of the investigated OPs. PMID:25149236

  15. Manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase expression and lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens

    SciTech Connect

    Perie, F.; Gold, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Extracellular manganese peroxidase and laccase activities were detected in cultures of Dichomitus squalens (Polyporus anceps) under conditions favoring lignin degradation. In contrast, neither extracellular lignin peroxidase nor aryl alcohol oxidase activity was detected in cultures grown under a wide variety of conditions. The mineralization of {sup 14}C-ring-, -side chain-, and -methoxy-labeled synthetic guaiacyl lignins by D. squalens and the expression of extracellular manganese peroxidase were dependent on the presence of Mn(II), suggesting that manganese peroxidase is an important component of this organism's lignin degradation system. The expression of laccase activity was independent of manganese. In contrast to previous findings with Phanero-chaete chrysosporium, lignin degradation by D. squalens proceeded in the cultures containing excess carbon and nitrogen.

  16. Determination of estrogenic/antiestrogenic potential of antifertility substances using rat uterine peroxidase assay.

    PubMed

    Johri, R K; Pahwa, G S; Sharma, S C; Zutshi, U

    1991-11-01

    The effect of three compounds (clomiphene citrate, centchroman, embelin) and plant-derived methanolic extracts (Abutilon indicum and Butea monosperma) was studied on uterotropic and uterine peroxidase activities in ovariectomized rats. It was observed that these two parameters were highly correlated in response to treatment with these test materials and also to estradiol. It was suggested that the uterine peroxidase assay could be utilized as a biochemical parameter in the screening of new antifertility agents for their estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. PMID:1665776

  17. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dwarf marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required correction for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  18. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1978-01-01

    Dwarf Marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition, and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required corrections for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  19. Uptake of horseradish peroxydase by the testis of locusta migratoria during the last larval instar; relation with variations of ecdysteroid levels in haemolymph.

    PubMed

    Marcaillou, C; Szollosi, A; Porcheron, P; Dray, F

    1978-03-31

    By using horseradish peroxydase (HRP) as a tracer, it is shown that the gonial region of the locust testis is an "open" compartment which is almost always freely penetrated by the tracer. During the last larval instar, however, the penetration of HRP decreases and ceases at the time when high levels of ecdysteroids are detected in the haemolymph by radioimmunoassay. A cause and effect relationship between tracer uptake and hormonal level could not be demonstrated by the experiments carried out up to now. From ultrastructural observations of the testis, it is concluded that the temporary isolation of the gonial compartment is not based upon any morphological structure which could act as a barrier. Penetration of the macromolecule is considered as the expression of an active uptake by the testis and the short period of nonpenetrability as a state of inertia whose significance remains to be discovered. PMID:639097

  20. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-β-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  1. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Manuel A; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M; Barja, Maria V; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  2. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M.; Barja, Maria V.; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K.; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  3. Characterization of manganese peroxidases from the hyperlignolytic fungus IZU-154.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, M; Suzuki, J; Deguchi, T; Miura, M; Kitaoka, Y

    1996-01-01

    Four isozymes of manganese peroxidase (MnP) were identified in the culture fluid of the hyperlignolytic fungus IZU-154 under nitrogen starvation conditions. One of them was purified and characterized kinetically. The specific activity and Kcat/K(m) value of the MnP from IZU-154 were 1.6 times higher than those of the MnP from a typical lignin-degrading fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Two cDNAs encoding MnP isozymes from IZU-154 were isolated. The coding sequence of the two cDNAs, IZ-MnP1 cDNA and IZ-MnP2 cDNA, were 1,152 (384 amino acids) and 1,155 (385 amino acids) bp in length, respectively. They exhibit 96.2% identity at the nucleotide level and 95.1% identity at the amino acid level. Southern blot analysis indicated that two MnP isozyme genes exist in IZU-154 genomic DNA. The primary structures of two MnPs from IZU-154 were similar to those of MnPs from P. chrysosporium. The amino acid sequences including the important residues identified in MnPs from P. chrysosporium, such as the manganese-binding residues, the calcium-binding residues, the disulfide bonds, and the N-glycosylation site, were conserved in the two deduced IZ-MnPs. However, several discrepancies were found in the context around the distal histidine residue between MnP from IZU-154 and MnP from P. chrysosporium, which likely led to the difference in the kinetic parameters for MnP function. PMID:8899997

  4. Direct interaction of lignin and lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Johjima, T; Itoh, N; Kabuto, M; Tokimura, F; Nakagawa, T; Wariishi, H; Tanaka, H

    1999-03-01

    Binding properties of lignin peroxidase (LiP) from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium against a synthetic lignin (dehydrogenated polymerizate, DHP) were studied with a resonant mirror biosensor. Among several ligninolytic enzymes, only LiP specifically binds to DHP. Kinetic analysis revealed that the binding was reversible, and that the dissociation equilibrium constant was 330 microM. The LiP-DHP interaction was controlled by the ionization group with a pKa of 5.3, strongly suggesting that a specific amino acid residue plays a role in lignin binding. A one-electron transfer from DHP to oxidized intermediates LiP compounds I and II (LiPI and LiPII) was characterized by using a stopped-flow technique, showing that binding interactions of DHP with LiPI and LiPII led to saturation kinetics. The dissociation equilibrium constants for LiPI-DHP and LiPII-DHP interactions were calculated to be 350 and 250 microM, and the first-order rate constants for electron transfer from DHP to LiPI and to LiPII were calculated to be 46 and 16 s-1, respectively. These kinetic and spectral studies strongly suggest that LiP is capable of oxidizing lignin directly at the protein surface by a long-range electron transfer process. A close look at the crystal structure suggested that LiP possesses His-239 as a possible lignin-binding site on the surface, which is linked to Asp-238. This Asp residue is hydrogen-bonded to the proximal His-176. This His-Asp...proximal-His motif would be a possible electron transfer route to oxidize polymeric lignin. PMID:10051582

  5. Nitration of veratryl alcohol by lignin peroxidase and tetranitromethane.

    PubMed

    Sheng, D; Joshi, D K; Gold, M H

    1998-04-01

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP), from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, in the presence of H2O2 and tetranitromethane (TNM), oxidizes veratryl (3,4-dimethoxybenzyl) alcohol (VA) (I) to veratraldehyde (IV), 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl alcohol (V), and 3,4-dimethoxy-nitrobenzene (VI). The formation of these products is explained by a mechanism involving the one-electron oxidation of VA by LiP to produce the corresponding cation radical, which loses a proton to generate the benzylic radical. The latter reduces TNM to generate the trinitromethane anion (VIII) and the nitrogen dioxide radical (.NO2). .NO2 couples with the VA cation radical, and the subsequent loss of a proton leads to V. Alternatively, the attack of .NO2 at C-1 of the VA cation radical, followed by aromatization and loss of formaldehyde (VII), yields VI. Isotopic labeling experiments confirm that V is generated by the reaction of .NO2 with the VA cation radical, rather than with the benzylic radical. The nitration of two other LiP substrates, 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (II) and tyrosine (III), also was examined. Product analysis of reactions conducted in the presence of H2O2 with these substrates indicated less nitrated product was formed from 1,4-dimethoxybenzene and no nitrated product was formed from tyrosine. However, significant amounts of nitrated products were formed from 1,4-dimethoxybenzene and tyrosine when glucose and glucose oxidase were used as an H2O2 source. These results suggest that a reductant, either the veratryl alcohol benzylic radical or superoxide, is required in the reaction to reduce TNM to generate .NO2. These results provide further evidence for the formation of the VA cation radical and the first chemical evidence for the formation of the VA benzylic radical in LiP-catalyzed reactions. PMID:9521824

  6. Glutathione peroxidase-1 protects from CD95-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gouaze, Valerie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Cuvillier, Olivier; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Frisach, Marie-Francoise; Mirault, Marc-Edouard; Levade, Thierry

    2002-11-01

    Through the induction of apoptosis, CD95 plays a crucial role in the immune response and the elimination of cancer cells. Ligation of CD95 receptor activates a complex signaling network that appears to implicate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the place of ROS production in CD95-mediated apoptosis and the role of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1). Anti-CD95 antibodies triggered an early generation of ROS in human breast cancer T47D cells that was blocked by overexpression of GPx1 and inhibition of initiator caspase activation. Enforced expression of GPx1 also resulted in inhibition of CD95-induced effector caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic cell death. Resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis was not due to an increased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules and could be reversed by glutathione-depleting agents. In addition, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL prevented CD95-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, it did not inhibit the early ROS production. Moreover, Bcl-xL but not GPx1 overexpression could suppress the staurosporine-induced late generation of ROS and subsequent cell death. Altogether, these findings suggest that GPx1 functions upstream of the mitochondrial events to inhibit the early ROS production and apoptosis induced by CD95 ligation. Finally, transgenic mice overexpressing GPx1 were partially protected from the lethal effect of anti-CD95, underlying the importance of peroxide formation (and GPx1) in CD95-triggered apoptosis. PMID:12221075

  7. Biphenyl-Metabolizing Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Horseradish and Bulk Soil Contaminated by Polychlorinated Biphenyls as Revealed by Stable Isotope Probing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Vlcek, Cestmir; Hroudova, Miluse; Demnerova, Katerina; Paces, Vaclav; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based stable isotope probing in combination with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used in order to identify members of the microbial community that metabolize biphenyl in the rhizosphere of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) cultivated in soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) compared to members of the microbial community in initial, uncultivated bulk soil. On the basis of early and recurrent detection of their 16S rRNA genes in clone libraries constructed from [13C]DNA, Hydrogenophaga spp. appeared to dominate biphenyl catabolism in the horseradish rhizosphere soil, whereas Paenibacillus spp. were the predominant biphenyl-utilizing bacteria in the initial bulk soil. Other bacteria found to derive carbon from biphenyl in this nutrient-amended microcosm-based study belonged mostly to the class Betaproteobacteria and were identified as Achromobacter spp., Variovorax spp., Methylovorus spp., or Methylophilus spp. Some bacteria that were unclassified at the genus level were also detected, and these bacteria may be members of undescribed genera. The deduced amino acid sequences of the biphenyl dioxygenase α subunits (BphA) from bacteria that incorporated [13C]into DNA in 3-day incubations of the soils with [13C]biphenyl are almost identical to that of Pseudomonas alcaligenes B-357. This suggests that the spectrum of the PCB congeners that can be degraded by these enzymes may be similar to that of strain B-357. These results demonstrate that altering the soil environment can result in the participation of different bacteria in the metabolism of biphenyl. PMID:19700551

  8. Detection of Lignin Peroxidase and Xylanase by Immunocytochemical Labeling in Wood Decayed by Basidiomycetes †

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, R. A.; Abad, A. R.; Farrell, R. L.; Leathers, T. D.

    1989-01-01

    The white rot fungi used in this study caused two different forms of degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, strain BKM-F-1767, and Phellinus pini caused a preferential removal of lignin from birch wood, whereas Trametes (Coriolus) versicolor caused a nonselective attack of all cell wall components. Use of polyclonal antisera to H8 lignin peroxidase and monoclonal antisera to H2 lignin peroxidase followed by immunogold labeling with protein A-gold or protein G-gold, respectively, showed lignin peroxidase extra-and intracellularly to fungal hyphae and within the delignified cell walls after 12 weeks of laboratory decay. Lignin peroxidase was localized at sites within the cell wall where electron-dense areas of the lignified cell wall layers remained. In wood decayed by Trametes versicolor, lignin peroxidase was located primarily along the surface of eroded cell walls. No lignin peroxidase was evident in brown-rotted wood, but slight labeling occurred within hyphal cells. Use of polyclonal antisera to xylanase followed by immunogold labeling showed intense labeling on fungal hyphae and surrounding slime layers and within the woody cell wall, where evidence of degradation was apparent. Colloidal-gold-labeled xylanase was prevalent in wood decayed by all fungi used in this study. Areas of the wood with early stages of cell wall decay had the greatest concentration of gold particles, while little labeling occurred in cells in advanced stages of decay by brown or white rot fungi. Images PMID:16347939

  9. Differences in peroxidase localization of rabbit peritoneal macrophages after surface adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Bodel, P. T.; Nichols, B. A.; Bainton, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Unlike resident peritoneal macrophages, which contain peroxidase in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and perinuclear cisternae (PN), macrophages elicited into the rabbit peritoneal cavity by various stimulants lack the enzyme. Since we had previously found that such peroxidase reactivity rapidly appears in the RER and PN of blood monocytes after surface adherence in vitro, we wondered whether the enzyme could be similarly produced in elicited macrophages by adherence. Cells from peritoneal exudates (96 hours after endotoxin injection) were harvested, suspended in culture medium, and allowed to adhere to fibrin-coated or plastic surfaces. Following culture for various intervals, they were fixed, incubated for peroxidase, and examined by electron microscopy. We observed that these elicited cells, which initially contained no cytochemically detectable peroxidase, acquired peroxidatic activity in the RER and PN within 2 hours after adherence in culture. Thus macrophages, like blood monocytes, may rapidly acquire peroxidase reactivity as a consequence of plasma membrane: external surface interaction. In view of this finding, it would seem unwise to use peroxidase localization as the basis for advocating the existence of two separate lines of peritoneal macrophages, as has been proposed by previous investigators. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:645814

  10. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases. PMID:26643175

  11. Partial purification and characterization of a peroxidase from neonatal rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Strohm, B.H.

    1987-01-01

    Peroxidase activity was partially purified from neonatal CFN rat skin. The membrane-bound peroxidase activity was extracted with 0.5 M calcium chloride and was monitored spectrophotometrically at 470 nm with 2-methoxyphenol and hydrogen peroxide as substrates. Subcellular distribution studies indicated the specific activity to be highest and comparable in the 800 {times} g and 8000 {times} g pellets, lowest in the 100,000 {times} g pellet, and absent in the 100,000 {times} g supernatant. The peroxidase activity was partially purified by affinity chromatography on concanavaline-A-sepharose 4-B and by gel filtration using Bio-gel P-150. The apparent molecular weight of the native enzyme as determined by Bio-gel P-200 gel filtration was approximately 42,500 {plus minus} 2,300 daltons. Peroxidase activity increased linearly with increases in protein concentration, time, and guaiacol concentration. Activity was inhibited approximately 75% by 0.1 mM potassium cyanide or 0.05 mM sodium azide. Pyrogallol, hydroquinone, p-cresol, catechol, benzidine, 3,3{prime}-dimethoxybenzidine, tetramethylbenzidine, and p-phenylenediamine were active as substrates for rat skin peroxidase. Rat skin peroxidase was also shown to mediate non-extractable binding of ({sup 3}H)-benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol and ({sup 3}H)-2-aminofluorene to DNA and protein.

  12. Peroxidase-dependent apoplastic oxidative burst in Arabidopsis required for pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Dewdney, Julia; Blee, Kris A; Stone, Julie M; Asai, Tsuneaki; Plotnikov, Julia; Denoux, Carine; Hayes, Tezni; Gerrish, Chris; Davies, Dewi R; Ausubel, Frederick M; Bolwell, G Paul

    2006-09-01

    The oxidative burst is an early response to pathogen attack leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide. Two major mechanisms involving either NADPH oxidases or peroxidases that may exist singly or in combination in different plant species have been proposed for the generation of ROS. We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana azide-sensitive but diphenylene iodonium-insensitive apoplastic oxidative burst that generates H(2)O(2) in response to a Fusarium oxysporum cell-wall preparation. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing an anti-sense cDNA encoding a type III peroxidase, French bean peroxidase type 1 (FBP1) exhibited an impaired oxidative burst and were more susceptible than wild-type plants to both fungal and bacterial pathogens. Transcriptional profiling and RT-PCR analysis showed that the anti-sense (FBP1) transgenic plants had reduced levels of specific peroxidase-encoding mRNAs, including mRNAs corresponding to Arabidopsis genes At3g49120 (AtPCb) and At3g49110 (AtPCa) that encode two class III peroxidases with a high degree of homology to FBP1. These data indicate that peroxidases play a significant role in generating H(2)O(2) during the Arabidopsis defense response and in conferring resistance to a wide range of pathogens. PMID:16889645

  13. Mode of binding of the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil to mammalian haem peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Singh, A; Kushwaha, G S; Singh, A K; Kaur, P; Sharma, S; Singh, T P

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian haem peroxidase superfamily consists of myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoperoxidase (LPO), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These enzymes catalyze a number of oxidative reactions of inorganic substrates such as Cl(-), Br(-), I(-) and SCN(-) as well as of various organic aromatic compounds. To date, only structures of MPO and LPO are known. The substrate-binding sites in these enzymes are located on the distal haem side. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a potent antithyroid drug that acts by inhibiting the function of TPO. It has also been shown to inhibit the action of LPO. However, its mode of binding to mammalian haem peroxidases is not yet known. In order to determine the mode of its binding to peroxidases, the structure of the complex of LPO with PTU has been determined. It showed that PTU binds to LPO in the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side. The IC50 values for the inhibition of LPO and TPO by PTU are 47 and 30 µM, respectively. A comparision of the residues surrounding the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side in LPO with those in TPO showed that all of the residues were identical except for Ala114 (LPO numbering scheme), which is replaced by Thr205 (TPO numbering scheme) in TPO. A threonine residue in place of alanine in the substrate-binding site may affect the affinity of PTU for peroxidases. PMID:25760705

  14. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-01

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater. PMID:27060866

  15. The ligninolytic peroxidases in the genus Pleurotus: divergence in activities, expression, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Knop, Doriv; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2015-02-01

    Mushrooms of the genus Pleurotus are comprised of cultivated edible ligninolytic fungi with medicinal properties and a wide array of biotechnological and environmental applications. Like other white-rot fungi (WRF), they are able to grow on a variety of lignocellulosic biomass substrates and degrade both natural and anthropogenic aromatic compounds. This is due to the presence of the non-specific oxidative enzymatic systems, which are mainly consisted of lacasses, versatile peroxidases (VPs), and short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs). Additional, less studied, peroxidase are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) and heme-thiolate peroxidases (HTPs). During the past two decades, substantial information has accumulated concerning the biochemistry, structure and function of the Pleurotus ligninolytic peroxidases, which are considered to play a key role in many biodegradation processes. The production of these enzymes is dependent on growth media composition, pH, and temperature as well as the growth phase of the fungus. Mn(2+) concentration differentially affects the expression of the different genes. It also severs as a preferred substrate for these preoxidases. Recently, sequencing of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was completed, and a comprehensive picture of the ligninolytic peroxidase gene family, consisting of three VPs and six short-MnPs, has been established. Similar enzymes were also discovered and studied in other Pleurotus species. In addition, progress has been made in the development of molecular tools for targeted gene replacement, RNAi-based gene silencing and overexpression of genes of interest. These advances increase the fundamental understanding of the ligninolytic system and provide the opportunity for harnessing the unique attributes of these WRF for applied purposes. PMID:25503316

  16. Crystal structure analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Amanda; Textor, Larissa C; Santos, Jademilson C; Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Roig, Manuel G; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Muniz, João R C; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Palm tree peroxidases are known to be very stable enzymes and the peroxidase from the Chamaerops excelsa (CEP), which has a high pH and thermal stability, is no exception. To date, the structural and molecular events underscoring such biochemical behavior have not been explored in depth. In order to identify the structural characteristics accounting for the high stability of palm tree peroxidases, we solved and refined the X-ray structure of native CEP at a resolution of 2.6 Å. The CEP structure has an overall fold typical of plant peroxidases and confirmed the conservation of characteristic structural elements such as the heme group and calcium ions. At the same time the structure revealed important modifications in the amino acid residues in the vicinity of the exposed heme edge region, involved in substrate binding, that could account for the morphological variations among palm tree peroxidases through the disruption of molecular interactions at the second binding site. These modifications could alleviate the inhibition of enzymatic activity caused by molecular interactions at the latter binding site. Comparing the CEP crystallographic model described here with other publicly available peroxidase structures allowed the identification of a noncovalent homodimer assembly held together by a number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions. We demonstrate, that this dimeric arrangement results in a more stable protein quaternary structure through stabilization of the regions that are highly dynamic in other peroxidases. In addition, we resolved five N-glycosylation sites, which might also contribute to enzyme stability and resistance against proteolytic cleavage. PMID:25660651

  17. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  18. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol mediated increases in extracellular peroxidase activity in three species of Lemnaceae.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dilip K; Scannell, Gillian; Akhmetov, Nurlan; Fitzpatrick, Dara; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2010-11-01

    Chlorinated phenols, or chlorophenols, are persistent priority pollutants that are widespread in the environment. Class III peroxidases are well-characterised plant enzymes that can catalyse the oxidative dechlorination of chlorophenols. Expression of these enzymes by plants is commonly associated with plant stress, therefore limiting scope for phytoremediation. In this study, we have quantitatively compared peroxidase activity and phytotoxicity as a function of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) concentration in three species of Lemnaceae; Lemna minor, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata. Effects of TCP on the growth rates of the three species differed considerably with L. punctata being the most tolerant species. TCP also affected photosynthetic parameters, causing a decrease in open photosystem II reaction centres (qP) and, in L. punctata only, a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (qN). In parallel, TCP exposure resulted in increased peroxidase activity in all three species. Peroxidase activity in L. minor and L. gibba displayed an inverse relationship with biomass accumulation, i.e. the more growth reduction the more peroxidase activity. In contrast, induction of peroxidase activity in L. punctata was bi-phasic, with a TCP-induced activity peak at concentrations that had no major effect on growth, and further induction under phytotoxic concentrations. The mechanism by which L. punctata recognises and responds to low concentrations of an anthropogenic compound, in the absence of wide-ranging stress, remains enigmatic. However, we conclude that this "window" of peroxidase production in the absence of major growth inhibition offers potential for the development of sustainable, peroxidise-mediated phytoremediation systems. PMID:20810175

  19. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics and the Activation Energy Relate Soil Peroxidase Kinetics to the Lignin Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebwasser-Freese, D.; Tharayil, N.; Preston, C. M.; Gerard, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that lignin exhibit a turnover rate of less than 6 years, suggesting that the enzymatic mechanisms mediating the decay of lignin are less understood. One factor that could be affecting the mean residence time of lignin in the soil is the catalytic efficiency of soil oxidoreductase enzymes. We characterized the spatial and seasonal transitions in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and activation energy of the soil oxidoreductase enzyme, peroxidase, across three ecosystems of differing litter chemistries- pine, deciduous forest, and a cultivated field- and associate it to the soil lignin chemistries. To interpret the combined effect of Vmax and Km, the two parameters were integrated into one term which we defined as the catalytic efficiency. Generally, the peroxidases in pine soils exhibited the highest Vmax and Km, resulting in the lowest catalytic efficiency, followed by that in the deciduous soils. Meanwhile, the agricultural soils which exhibited the lowest Vmax and Km contained the highest catalytic efficiency of peroxidase. Through linear regression analysis of the kinetic parameters to the soil lignin chemistry, we discerned that the catalytic efficiency term best associated to the lignin monomer ratios (C/V, P/V, and SCV/V). The Activation Energy of peroxidase varied by depth, and seasons across the ecosystems. However, the Activation Energy of peroxidase did not relate to the lignin chemistry or quantity. Collectively, our results show that although the peroxidase Vmax and Km in the phenolic-poor soils are low, the degradation efficiency of peroxidases in this soils can be equivalent or exceed that of phenolic-rich soils. This study, through the characterization of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, provides a new insight into the mechanisms that could moderate the decomposition of lignin in soils.

  20. Direct and mediated electrochemistry of peroxidase and its electrocatalysis on a variety of screen-printed carbon electrodes: amperometric hydrogen peroxide and phenols biosensor.

    PubMed

    Chekin, Fereshteh; Gorton, Lo; Tapsobea, Issa

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the behaviour of direct and mediated electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilised on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs), screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carboxyl-functionalised multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-SPCEs) and screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carboxyl-functionalised single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-SPCEs). The techniques of cyclic voltammetry and amperometry in the flow mode were used to characterise the properties of the HRP immobilised on screen-printed electrodes. From measurements of the mediated and mediatorless currents of hydrogen peroxide reduction at the HRP-modified electrodes, it was concluded that the fraction of enzyme molecules in direct electron transfer (DET) contact with the electrode varies substantially for the different electrodes. It was observed that the screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-SPCEs and SWCNT-SPCEs) demonstrated a substantially higher percentage (≈100 %) of HRP molecules in DET contact than the screen-printed carbon electrodes (≈60 %). The HRP-modified electrodes were used for determination of hydrogen peroxide in mediatorless mode. The SWCNT-SPCE gave the lowest detection limit (0.40 ± 0.09 μM) followed by MWCNT-SPCE (0.48 ± 0.07 μM) and SPCE (0.98 ± 0.2 μM). These modified electrodes were additionally developed for amperometric determination of phenolic compounds. It was found that the SWCNT-SPCE gave a detection limit for catechol of 110.2 ± 3.6 nM, dopamine of 640.2 ± 9.2 nM, octopamine of 3341 ± 15 nM, pyrogallol of 50.10 ± 2.9 nM and 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine of 980.7 ± 8.7 nM using 50 μM H2O2 in the flow carrier. PMID:25374125

  1. Lignin Peroxidase Activity Is Not Important in Biological Bleaching and Delignification of Unbleached Kraft Pulp by Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Frederick S.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery in 1983 of fungal lignin peroxidases able to catalyze the oxidation of nonphenolic aromatic lignin model compounds and release some CO2 from lignin has been seen as a major advance in understanding how fungi degrade lignin. Recently, the fungus Trametes versicolor was shown to be capable of substantial decolorization and delignification of unbleached industrial kraft pulps over 2 to 5 days. The role, if any, of lignin peroxidase in this biobleaching was therefore examined. Several different assays indicated that T. versicolor can produce and secrete peroxidase proteins, but only under certain culture conditions. However, work employing a new lignin peroxidase inhibitor (metavanadate ions) and a new lignin peroxidase assay using the dye azure B indicated that secreted lignin peroxidases do not play a role in the T. versicolor pulp-bleaching system. Oxidative activity capable of degrading 2-keto-4-methiolbutyric acid (KMB) appeared unique to ligninolytic fungi and always accompanied pulp biobleaching. PMID:16348775

  2. Activity and isoforms of peroxidases, lignin and anatomy, during adventitious rooting in cuttings of Ebenus cretica L.

    PubMed

    Syros, Thomas; Yupsanis, Traianos; Zafiriadis, Helias; Economou, Athanasios

    2004-01-01

    Adventitious rooting of Ebenus cretica cuttings was studied in order to examine a) the rooting ability of different genotypes in relation to electrophoretic patterns of peroxidases. b) the activity and electrophoretic patterns of soluble and wall ionically bound peroxidases, the lignin content and anatomical changes in the control and IBA treated cuttings of and genotypes in the course of adventitious root formation. In addition, a fraction of soluble cationic peroxidases was separated by gel filtration chromatography from the total soluble peroxidases of a genotype. No rooting occurred in cuttings without IBA-treatment. In both genotypes, electrophoretic patterns of soluble anionic peroxidases revealed two common peroxidase isoforms, while a fast-migrating anionic peroxidase isoform (A3) appeared only in genotypes. Both genotypes showed similar patterns of soluble, as well as wall ionically bound cationic peroxidase isoforms. The number of isoforms was unchanged during the rooting process (induction, initiation and expression phase) but an increase in peroxidase activity (initiation phase) followed by decrease has been found in IBA-treated cuttings. During initiation phase the lignin content was almost similar to that on day 0 in genotype while it was reduced at by about 50% in genotype at the respective time. Microscopic observations revealed anatomical differences between genotypes. According to this study, the and genotypes display differences in anatomy, lignin content, activity of soluble peroxidases and the electrophoretic patterns of soluble anionic peroxidase isoforms. The A3-anionic peroxidase isoform could be used as biochemical marker to distinguish and genotypes of E. cretica and seems to be correlated to lignin synthesis in rooting process. PMID:15002666

  3. Activity and Isoenzyme Profile of Peroxidase as Affected by Microgravity Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnatska, V. V.; Gladun, H. O.; Padalko, S. F.

    2008-06-01

    To investigate microgravity (clinorotation) effect on activity and isoenzyme pattern of peroxidase the culture of primary explants of potato tubers with normal activation of proliferation in vitro, explants inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens(A.t.), where crown-gall tumors were formed and dormant potato tubers were used. Substantial decrease of total peroxidase activity after one day-clinorotation of potato explants, normal and inoculated with A.t., was revealed. Seven day- clinorotation resulted in the decreased peroxidase activity in normal clinorotated explants, while peroxidase activity in clinorotated explants, inoculated with A.t., returned to the level of its stationary control. When peroxidase of potato explants was analyzed by PAGE, the result obtained show the decrease in activity of one electrophoretic fractions with low migrating mobility and two fractions with moderate mobility in clinorotated explants, normal and with crown gall, as compared with the ones in stationary conditions. The decrease in activity of these fractions under microgravity was less pronounced in explants with crown-galls.

  4. Phenol-Oxidizing Peroxidases Contribute to the Protection of Plants from Ultraviolet Radiation Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Marcel A.K.; van den Noort, Ria E.; Tan, M.Y. Adillah; Prinsen, Els; Lagrimini, L. Mark; Thorneley, Roger N.F.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of UV protection in two duckweed species (Lemnaceae) by exploiting the UV sensitivity of photosystem II as an in situ sensor for radiation stress. A UV-tolerant Spirodela punctata G.F.W. Meyer ecotype had significantly higher indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels than a UV-sensitive ecotype. Parallel work on Lemna gibba mutants suggested that UV tolerance is linked to IAA degradation rather than to levels of free or conjugated IAA. This linkage is consistent with a role for class III phenolic peroxidases, which have been implicated both in the degradation of IAA and the cross-linking of various UV-absorbing phenolics. Biochemical analysis revealed increased activity of a specific peroxidase isozyme in both UV-tolerant duckweed lines. The hypothesis that peroxidases play a role in UV protection was tested in a direct manner using genetically modified tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris). It was found that increased activity of the anionic peroxidase correlated with increased tolerance to UV radiation as well as decreased levels of free auxin. We conclude that phenol-oxidizing peroxidases concurrently contribute to UV protection as well as the control of leaf and plant architecture. PMID:11457952

  5. Oxidative 4-dechlorination of polychlorinated phenols is catalyzed by extracellular fungal lignin peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, K.E.; Tardone, P.J.

    1988-08-23

    The extracellular lignin peroxidases (ligninases) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium catalyzed H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-dependent spectral changes in several environmentally significant polychlorinated phenols: 2,4-dichloro-, 2,4,5-trichloro-, 2,4,6-trichloro-, and pentachlorophenol. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of reduced and acetylated reaction products showed that, in each case, lignin peroxidase catalyzed a 4-dechlorination of the starting phenol to yield a p-benzoquinone. The oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol also yielded a dechlorinated coupling dimer, tentatively identified as 2-chloro-6-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-p-benzoquinone. Experiments on the stoichiometry of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol oxidation showed that this substrate was quantitatively dechlorinated to give the quinone and inorganic chloride. H/sub 2//sup 18/O-labeling experiments on 2,4,6-trichlorophenol oxidation demonstrated that water was the source of the new 4-oxo substituent in 2,6-di-chloro-p-benzoquinone. The results indicate a mechanism whereby lignin peroxidase oxidizes a 4-chlorinated phenol to an electrophilic intermediate, perhaps the 4-chlorocyclohexadienone cation. Nucleophilic attack by water and elimination of HCl then ensue at the 4-position, which produces the quinone. Lignin peroxidases have previously been implicated in the degradation by Phanerochaete of several nonphenolic aromatic pollutants. It appears likely from their results that these peroxidases could also catalyze the initial dechlorination of certain polychlorinated phenols in vivo.

  6. Lignin Peroxidase Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds in Systems Containing Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Westlake, Donald W. S.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These included anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracenes, acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene. Of the compounds studied, lignin peroxidase was able to oxidize those with ionization potentials of <8 eV (measured by electron impact). The reaction products contain hydroxyl and keto groups. In one case, carbon-carbon bond cleavage, yielding anthraquinone from 9-methylanthracene, was detected. Kinetic constants and stability characteristics of lignin peroxidase were determined by using pyrene as the substrate in systems containing different amounts of organic solvent. Benzyl alkylation of lignin peroxidase improved its activity in a system containing water-miscible organic solvent but did not increase its resistance to inactivation at high solvent concentrations. PMID:16349176

  7. Lignin peroxidase oxidation of aromatic compounds in systems containing organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Westlake, D W; Fedorak, P M

    1994-02-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These included anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracenes, acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene. Of the compounds studied, lignin peroxidase was able to oxidize those with ionization potentials of <8 eV (measured by electron impact). The reaction products contain hydroxyl and keto groups. In one case, carbon-carbon bond cleavage, yielding anthraquinone from 9-methylanthracene, was detected. Kinetic constants and stability characteristics of lignin peroxidase were determined by using pyrene as the substrate in systems containing different amounts of organic solvent. Benzyl alkylation of lignin peroxidase improved its activity in a system containing water-miscible organic solvent but did not increase its resistance to inactivation at high solvent concentrations. PMID:16349176

  8. Characteristics of estrogen-induced peroxidase in mouse uterine luminal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinck, P.H.; Newbold, R.R.; McLachlan, J.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Peroxidase activity in the uterine luminal fluid of mice treated with diethylstilbestrol was measured by the guaiacol assay and also by the formation of 3H2O from (2-3H)estradiol. In the radiometric assay, the generation of 3H2O and 3H-labeled water-soluble products was dependent on H2O2 (25 to 100 microM), with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Tyrosine or 2,4-dichlorophenol strongly enhanced the reaction catalyzed either by the luminal fluid peroxidase or the enzyme in the CaCl2 extract of the uterus, but decreased the formation of 3H2O from (2-3H)estradiol by lactoperoxidase in the presence of H2O2 (80 microM). NADPH, ascorbate, and cytochrome c inhibited both luminal fluid and uterine tissue peroxidase activity to the same extent, while superoxide dismutase showed a marginal activating effect. Lactoferrin, a major protein component of uterine luminal fluid, was shown not to contribute to its peroxidative activity, and such an effect by prostaglandin synthase was also ruled out. However, it was not possible to exclude eosinophil peroxidase, brought to the uterus after estrogen stimulation, as being the source of peroxidase activity in uterine luminal fluid.

  9. Purification and biochemical characterization of a heme containing peroxidase from the human parasite P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Vishal; Srivastava, Kumkum; Puri, Sunil K; Maulik, Prakas R; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2005-05-01

    A peroxidase (30 kDa) has been purified from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to its homogeneity. The protein is a dimer of 15 kDa subunit as evident from SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass analysis. The antibodies developed against the purified protein cross-react selectively with this protein present in parasite lysate. It is a heme containing peroxidase [R/Z value (A408/A278)=2.33] showing characteristic heme spectra with Soret peak at 408 nm and visible peaks at 536 and 572 nm. Analysis of Soret spectra in presence or absence of cyanide or azide reveals that iron of heme is in Fe-III state. Circular dichroism spectral analysis establishes that this protein contains mainly alpha-helix (60-70%). H2O2 interacts with the heme moiety of the enzyme as evidenced by optical difference spectroscopy and spectral studies indicate the formation of catalytically active peroxidase-H2O2 complex (Soret peak at 413 nm) to exhibit peroxidase activity. During the erythrocytic stages of its life cycle, the parasite is exposed to oxidative stress. As the parasite is susceptible to oxidative stress, this peroxidase may offer antioxidant role by scavenging endogenous H2O2. PMID:15802233

  10. Interprotein Coupling Enhances the Electrocatalytic Efficiency of Tobacco Peroxidase Immobilized at a Graphite Electrode.

    PubMed

    Olloqui-Sariego, José Luis; Zakharova, Galina S; Poloznikov, Andrey A; Calvente, Juan José; Hushpulian, Dmitry M; Gorton, Lo; Andreu, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    Covalent immobilization of enzymes at electrodes via amide bond formation is usually carried out by a two-step protocol, in which surface carboxylic groups are first activated with the corresponding cross-coupling reagents and then reacted with protein amine groups. Herein, it is shown that a modification of the above protocol, involving the simultaneous incubation of tobacco peroxidase and the pyrolytic graphite electrode with the cross-coupling reagents produces higher and more stable electrocatalytic currents than those obtained with either physically adsorbed enzymes or covalently immobilized enzymes according to the usual immobilization protocol. The remarkably improved electrocatalytic properties of the present peroxidase biosensor that operates in the 0.3 V ≤ E ≤ 0.8 V (vs SHE) potential range can be attributed to both an efficient electronic coupling between tobacco peroxidase and graphite and to the formation of intra- and intermolecular amide bonds that stabilize the protein structure and improve the percentage of anchoring groups that provide an adequate orientation for electron exchange with the electrode. The optimized tobacco peroxidase sensor exhibits a working concentration range of 10-900 μM, a sensitivity of 0.08 A M(-1) cm(-2) (RSD 0.05), a detection limit of 2 μM (RSD 0.09), and a good long-term stability, as long as it operates at low temperature. These parameter values are among the best reported so far for a peroxidase biosensor operating under simple direct electron transfer conditions. PMID:26437673

  11. Peroxidase 4 is involved in syringyl lignin formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Vivar, Tamara; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María A; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Syringyl lignins result from the oxidative polymerization of sinapyl alcohol in a reaction mediated by syringyl (basic) peroxidases. Several peroxidases have been identified in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana as close homologues to ZePrx, the best characterized basic peroxidase so far, but none of these has been directly involved in lignification. We have used a knock-out mutant of AtPrx4, the closest homologue to ZePrx, to study the involvement of this basic peroxidase in the physiology of the plant under both long- and short-day light conditions. Our results suggest that AtPrx4 is involved in cell wall lignification, especially in syringyl monomer formation. The disruption of AtPrx4 causes a decrease in syringyl units proportion, but only when light conditions are optimal. Moreover, the effect of AtPrx4 disruption is age-dependent, and it is only significant when the elongation process of the stem has ceased and lignification becomes active. In conclusion, AtPrx4 emerges as a basic peroxidase regulated by day length with an important role in lignification. PMID:25506770

  12. Spatial and temporal accumulation of mRNAs encoding two common lignin peroxidases in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Moukha, S M; Wösten, H A; Mylius, E J; Asther, M; Wessels, J G

    1993-01-01

    Accumulation of peroxidases and their mRNAs was localized in colonies of Phanerochaete chrysosporium sandwiched between perforated polycarbonate membranes. Northern (RNA) blot analyses of colonial rings and in situ hybridizations with specific probes for manganese(II)-dependent peroxidase (MnP-1) and lignin peroxidase (LiP H8) mRNAs indicated that the expression of MnP-1 and Lip H8 genes started simultaneously in the central area of 3-day-old colonies. With time the signals for both transcripts spread to more-peripheral areas while decreasing in intensity. Furthermore, the appearance of MnP protein, as detected with specific immune serum, immediately followed accumulation of the MnP-1 mRNA transcript. However, LiP protein could be detected only some time after accumulation of LiP H8 mRNA. Images PMID:8501073

  13. Dechlorination of chlorophenols using extracellular peroxidases produced by streptomyces albus ATCC 3005.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulos, V T.; Rob, A; Ball, A S.; Wilson, M T.

    2001-07-01

    Streptomyces albus ATCC 3005 was found to produce higher levels of extracellular peroxidase activity (3.420 U mg(-1)) than previously reported for any other actinomycete. Maximum peroxidase activity was obtained after 72 h of incubation at a temperature of 30 degrees C in a liquid medium (pH 7.6) containing (in w/v) 0.8% to 0.9% oat spelts xylan and 0.6% yeast extract, corresponding to a C:N ratio of around 8.4:1. Characterization of the peroxidases revealed that the optimal temperature for peroxidase activity, using the standard 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) assay was 53 degrees C, when the enzyme reaction was performed at pH 7.2. A study of the effect of temperature on the stability of peroxidase over time, showed that the enzyme was stable at 40 degrees C, with a half-life of 224 min, while at higher temperatures the stability and activity was reduced such that at 50 degrees C and 70 degrees C the half-life of the enzyme was 50 min and 9 min respectively. The optimum pH for the activity of the enzyme occurred between pH 8.1 and 10.4. In terms of substrate specificity, the peroxidase was able to catalyze a broad range of substrates including 2,4-DCP, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol and other chlorophenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Ion exchange chromatography was used to confirm that the enzyme was able to release chloride ions from a range of chlorophenols. PMID:11427236

  14. Inducible peroxidases mediate nitration of anopheles midgut cells undergoing apoptosis in response to Plasmodium invasion.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Lalita; Han, Yeon Soo; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2004-12-17

    Plasmodium berghei invasion of Anopheles stephensi midgut cells causes severe damage, induces expression of nitric-oxide synthase, and leads to apoptosis. The present study indicates that invasion results in tyrosine nitration, catalyzed as a two-step reaction in which nitric-oxide synthase induction is followed by increased peroxidase activity. Ookinete invasion induced localized expression of peroxidase enzymes, which catalyzed protein nitration in vitro in the presence of nitrite and H(2)O(2). Histochemical stainings revealed that when a parasite migrates laterally and invades more than one cell, the pattern of induced peroxidase activity is similar to that observed for tyrosine nitration. In Anopheles gambiae, ookinete invasion elicited similar responses; it induced expression of 5 of the 16 peroxidase genes predicted by the genome sequence and decreased mRNA levels of one of them. One of these inducible peroxidases has a C-terminal oxidase domain homologous to the catalytic moiety of phagocyte NADPH oxidase and could provide high local levels of superoxide anion (O(2)), that when dismutated would generate the local increase in H(2)O(2) required for nitration. Chemically induced apoptosis of midgut cells also activated expression of four ookinete-induced peroxidase genes, suggesting their involvement in general apoptotic responses. The two-step nitration reaction provides a mechanism to precisely localize and circumscribe the toxic products generated by defense reactions involving nitration. The present study furthers our understanding of the biochemistry of midgut defense reactions to parasite invasion and how these may influence the efficiency of malaria transmission by anopheline mosquitoes. PMID:15456781

  15. Vascular peroxidase-1 is rapidly secreted, circulates in plasma, and supports dityrosine cross-linking reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guangjie; Li, Hong; Cao, Zehong; Qiu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Sally; Thannickal, Victor J; Nauseef, William M

    2011-10-01

    Members of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily catalyze biochemical reactions essential to a broad spectrum of biological processes, including host defense, thyroid hormone biosynthesis, and modification of extracellular matrix, as well as contributing to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. We recently identified a novel member of this family, vascular peroxidase-1 (VPO1), that is highly expressed in the human cardiovascular system. Its biosynthesis and enzymatic properties are largely unknown. Here, we report that VPO1 was rapidly and efficiently secreted into the extracellular space when the gene was stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Secreted VPO1 is a monomer with complex N-linked oligosaccharides and exhibits peroxidase activity. Biosynthesis of endogenous VPO1 by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) shares features exhibited by heterologous expression of recombinant VPO1 (rVPO1) in HEK cells. The proinflammatory agents lipopolysaccharide and tumor necrosis factor-α induce expression of VPO1 mRNA and protein in HUVECs. Furthermore, murine and bovine sera and human plasma contain enzymatically active VPO1. rVPO1 exhibits spectral and enzymatic properties characteristic of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase family, except with regard to its heat stability. rVPO1 catalyzes tyrosyl radical formation and promotes dityrosine cross-linking. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VPO1 is a glycosylated heme peroxidase that is actively secreted into circulating plasma by vascular endothelial cells and shares several features with other members of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase family, including the catalysis of dityrosine formation. PMID:21798344

  16. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; López-Lucendo, María F; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-11-01

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn(2+) turnover (56 s(-1)) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s(-1) average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s(-1) average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn(2+) has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s(-1)) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn(2+) oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. It is suggested that generation of Mn(3+) oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation. PMID:25967658

  17. Evaluation of Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays and IgG Avidity Assays Using a Protein A-Peroxidase Conjugate for Serological Distinction between Brucella abortus S19-Vaccinated and -Infected Cows ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pajuaba, Ana C. A. M.; Silva, Deise A. O.; Mineo, José R.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of protein A-peroxidase (horseradish peroxidase [HRPO]) in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (iELISAs) and IgG avidity assays for serological distinction between Brucella abortus S19-vaccinated and -infected cows. Four groups were analyzed: GI, 41 nonvaccinated seropositive cows; GII, 79 S19-vaccinated heifers analyzed at 3 months postvaccination; GIII, 105 S19-vaccinated cows analyzed after 24 months of age; and GIV, 278 nonvaccinated seronegative cows. IgG levels and avidity to B. abortus smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) were determined using anti-bovine IgG-HRPO or protein A-HRPO conjugates. Similar levels of IgG anti-S-LPS were found with GI using both conjugates. Lower IgG levels were detected with GII, GIII, and GIV using protein A-HRPO. Both conjugates showed high performance in discriminating GI from GIII, with high sensitivity (Se; 97.6%) and specificity (Sp; 97.1%). Protein A-HRPO was better in distinguishing GI from GIV (Se, 97.6%; Sp, 94.6%) and GI from GII (Se, 80.5%; Sp, 94.9%). Protein A-HRPO excluded a higher number of positive samples with GII and GIV. IgG avidity showed that protein A-HRPO, but not anti-IgG-HRPO, was able to distinguish nonvaccinated from vaccinated cattle, showing a higher avidity index (AI) with GI than with GII, with 78% of serum samples in GII showing an AI of <50%. Therefore, the iELISA using B. abortus S-LPS antigen and protein A-HRPO conjugate for preferential detection of the IgG2 subclass was shown to be suitable for serological distinction between S19-vaccinated and -infected cows. Also, antibodies generated after vaccination showed lower avidity, suggesting a role for the IgG2 subclass as an antibody of higher-affinity maturation after infection, constituting an additional tool for differentiating vaccinated from infected cattle. PMID:20147498

  18. Evaluation of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and IgG avidity assays using a protein A-peroxidase conjugate for serological distinction between Brucella abortus S19-vaccinated and -infected cows.

    PubMed

    Pajuaba, Ana C A M; Silva, Deise A O; Mineo, José R

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of protein A-peroxidase (horseradish peroxidase [HRPO]) in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (iELISAs) and IgG avidity assays for serological distinction between Brucella abortus S19-vaccinated and -infected cows. Four groups were analyzed: GI, 41 nonvaccinated seropositive cows; GII, 79 S19-vaccinated heifers analyzed at 3 months postvaccination; GIII, 105 S19-vaccinated cows analyzed after 24 months of age; and GIV, 278 nonvaccinated seronegative cows. IgG levels and avidity to B. abortus smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) were determined using anti-bovine IgG-HRPO or protein A-HRPO conjugates. Similar levels of IgG anti-S-LPS were found with GI using both conjugates. Lower IgG levels were detected with GII, GIII, and GIV using protein A-HRPO. Both conjugates showed high performance in discriminating GI from GIII, with high sensitivity (Se; 97.6%) and specificity (Sp; 97.1%). Protein A-HRPO was better in distinguishing GI from GIV (Se, 97.6%; Sp, 94.6%) and GI from GII (Se, 80.5%; Sp, 94.9%). Protein A-HRPO excluded a higher number of positive samples with GII and GIV. IgG avidity showed that protein A-HRPO, but not anti-IgG-HRPO, was able to distinguish nonvaccinated from vaccinated cattle, showing a higher avidity index (AI) with GI than with GII, with 78% of serum samples in GII showing an AI of <50%. Therefore, the iELISA using B. abortus S-LPS antigen and protein A-HRPO conjugate for preferential detection of the IgG2 subclass was shown to be suitable for serological distinction between S19-vaccinated and -infected cows. Also, antibodies generated after vaccination showed lower avidity, suggesting a role for the IgG2 subclass as an antibody of higher-affinity maturation after infection, constituting an additional tool for differentiating vaccinated from infected cattle. PMID:20147498

  19. [Isolation and purification of Mn-peroxidase from Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    PubMed

    Kupriashina, M A; Selivanov, N Iu; Nikitina, V E

    2012-01-01

    Homogenous Mn-peroxidase of a 26-fold purity grade was isolated from a culture of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 cultivated on a medium containing 0.1 mM pyrocatechol. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 43 kD as revealed by electrophoresis in SDS-PAAG. It was shown that the use of pyrocatechol and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzotiazoline-6-sulfonate) at concentrations of 0.1 and I mM as inductors increased the Mn-peroxidase activity by a factor of 3. PMID:22567881

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa.

    PubMed

    Textor, Larissa C; Santos, Jademilson C; Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Roig, Manuel G; Zhadan, Galina G; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2011-12-01

    Plant peroxidases are presently used extensively in a wide range of biotechnological applications owing to their high environmental and thermal stability. As part of efforts towards the discovery of appealing new biotechnological enzymes, the peroxidase from leaves of the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa (CEP) was extracted, purified and crystallized in its native form. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected at a synchrotron source and data analysis showed that the CEP crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 70.2, b = 100.7, c = 132.3 Å. PMID:22139187

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa

    PubMed Central

    Textor, Larissa C.; Santos, Jademilson C.; Hidalgo Cuadrado, Nazaret; Roig, Manuel G.; Zhadan, Galina G.; Shnyrov, Valery L.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are presently used extensively in a wide range of bio­technological applications owing to their high environmental and thermal stability. As part of efforts towards the discovery of appealing new biotechnological enzymes, the peroxidase from leaves of the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa (CEP) was extracted, purified and crystallized in its native form. An X-­ray diffraction data set was collected at a synchrotron source and data analysis showed that the CEP crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.2, b = 100.7, c = 132.3 Å. PMID:22139187

  2. A Peroxidase/Dual Oxidase System Modulates Midgut Epithelial Immunity in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Rodrigues, Janneth; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrices in diverse biological systems are crosslinked by dityrosine covalent bonds catalyzed by the peroxidase/oxidase system. We show that the Immunomodulatory Peroxidase (IMPer), an enzyme secreted by the mosquito Anopheles gambiae midgut, and dual oxidase (Duox) form a dityrosine network that decreases gut permeability to immune elicitors and protects the microbiota by preventing activation of epithelial immunity. It also provides a suitable environment for malaria parasites to develop within the midgut lumen without inducing nitric oxide synthase expression. Disruption of this barrier results in strong and effective pathogen-specific immune responses. PMID:20223948

  3. A peroxidase/dual oxidase system modulates midgut epithelial immunity in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Rodrigues, Janneth; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2010-03-26

    Extracellular matrices in diverse biological systems are cross-linked by dityrosine covalent bonds catalyzed by the peroxidase/oxidase system. We show that a peroxidase, secreted by the Anopheles gambiae midgut, and dual oxidase form a dityrosine network that decreases gut permeability to immune elicitors. This network protects the microbiota by preventing activation of epithelial immunity. It also provides a suitable environment for malaria parasites to develop within the midgut lumen without inducing nitric oxide synthase expression. Disruption of this barrier results in strong and effective pathogen-specific immune responses. PMID:20223948

  4. Identification of an orthologous clade of peroxidases that respond to feeding by greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum) in c4 grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of specific peroxidases that respond to aphid herbivory is limited in C4 grasses, but could provide targets for improving defence against these pests. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) peroxidase (SbPrx-1; Sobic.002G416700) has been previously linked to biotic stress responses, and w...

  5. Induction of peroxidases and superoxide dismutases in transformed embryogenic calli of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were analyzed in non-regenerative transformed embryogenic lines of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) carrying wound-inducible oryzacystatin I (OC-I), wound-inducible oryzacystatin I antisense (OC-Ias) or hygromycin phosphotransferase (...

  6. MECHANISMS OF THE STIMULATION OF RAT UTERINE PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY BY METHOXYCHLOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methoxychlor (MXC), a pro-estrogenic pesticide, has adverse effects on fertility and affects the rat uterus directly via its active metabolite HPTE. terine peroxidase, a marker of estrogen action, was used to probe the mechanisms through which MXC exerts its activity on the uteru...

  7. In planta anthocyanin degradation by a vacuolar class III peroxidase in Brunfelsia calycina flowers.

    PubMed

    Zipor, Gadi; Duarte, Patrícia; Carqueijeiro, Inês; Shahar, Liat; Ovadia, Rinat; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Eshel, Dani; Levin, Yishai; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Sottomayor, Mariana; Oren-Shamir, Michal

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to detailed knowledge regarding the biosynthesis of anthocyanins, the largest group of plant pigments, little is known about their in planta degradation. It has been suggested that anthocyanin degradation is enzymatically controlled and induced when beneficial to the plant. Here we investigated the enzymatic process in Brunfelsia calycina flowers, as they changed color from purple to white. We characterized the enzymatic process by which B. calycina protein extracts degrade anthocyanins. A candidate peroxidase was partially purified and characterized and its intracellular localization was determined. The transcript sequence of this peroxidase was fully identified. A basic peroxidase, BcPrx01, is responsible for the in planta degradation of anthocyanins in B. calycina flowers. BcPrx01 has the ability to degrade complex anthocyanins, it co-localizes with these pigments in the vacuoles of petals, and both the mRNA and protein levels of BcPrx01 are greatly induced parallel to the degradation of anthocyanins. Both isoelectric focusing (IEF) gel analysis and 3D structure prediction indicated that BcPrx01 is cationic. Identification of BcPrx01 is a significant breakthrough both in the understanding of anthocyanin catabolism in plants and in the field of peroxidases, where such a consistent relationship between expression levels, in planta subcellular localization and activity has seldom been demonstrated. PMID:25256351

  8. Structure of a mitochondrial cytochrome c conformer competent for peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Levi J.; Mou, Tung-Chung; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E.; Sprang, Stephen R.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of apoptosis, the peroxidation of cardiolipin at the inner mitochondrial membrane by cytochrome c requires an open coordination site on the heme. We report a 1.45-Å resolution structure of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with the Met80 heme ligand swung out of the heme crevice and replaced by a water molecule. This conformational change requires modest adjustments to the main chain of the heme crevice loop and is facilitated by a trimethyllysine 72-to-alanine mutation. This mutation also enhances the peroxidase activity of iso-1-cytochrome c. The structure shows a buried water channel capable of facilitating peroxide access to the active site and of moving protons produced during peroxidase activity to the protein surface. Alternate positions of the side chain of Arg38 appear to mediate opening and closing of the buried water channel. In addition, two buried water molecules can adopt alternate positions that change the network of hydrogen bonds in the buried water channel. Taken together, these observations suggest that low and high proton conductivity states may mediate peroxidase function. Comparison of yeast and mammalian cytochrome c sequences, in the context of the steric factors that permit opening of the heme crevice, suggests that higher organisms have evolved to inhibit peroxidase activity, providing a more stringent barrier to the onset of apoptosis. PMID:24760830

  9. Prussian blue nanoparticles as peroxidase mimetics for sensitive colorimetric detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weimin; Ma, Diao; Du, Jianxiu

    2014-03-01

    Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB NPs) exhibits an intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity towards the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidation of classical peroxidase substrate 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt to produce a colored product. The catalysis follows Michaelis-Menen kinetics and shows strong affinity for H2O2. Using PB NPs as a peroxidase mimetics, a colorimetric method was developed for the detection of 0.05-50.0 μM H2O2, with a detection limit of 0.031 μM. When the catalytic reaction of PB NPs was coupled with the reaction of glucose oxidation catalyzed by glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective colorimetric method for the detection of glucose was realized. The limit of detection for glucose was determined to be as low as 0.03 μM and the linear range was from 0.1 μM to 50.0 μM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human serum. Compared with other nanomaterials-based peroxidase mimetics, PB NPs provides 10-100 times higher sensitivity toward the detection of H2O2 and glucose. The detection platform developed showed great potential applications in varieties of physiological importance substances when merged with appropriate H2O2-producing oxidases. PMID:24468383

  10. Tissue Printing to Visualize Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase in Vegetables, Fruits, and Mushrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melberg, Amanda R.; Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    A simple tissue-printing procedure to determine the tissue location of the endogenous enzymes polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and mushrooms is described. In tissue printing, cell contents from the surface of a cut section of the tissue are transferred to an adsorptive surface, commonly a nitrocellulose…

  11. SELENIUM CONCENTRATIONS AND GLULATHIONE PEROXIDASE ACTIVITIES IN A POPULATION EXPOSED TO SELENIUM VIA DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selenium concentrations in blood, urine, hair, and tap water were determined in samples obtained from individuals exposed to varying amounts of the element via water from home wells. Glutathione peroxidase activities were also determined on the blood samples. Correlations of bloo...

  12. Biochemical characterization of the suberization-associated anionic peroxidase of potato.

    PubMed

    Bernards, M A; Fleming, W D; Llewellyn, D B; Priefer, R; Yang, X; Sabatino, A; Plourde, G L

    1999-09-01

    The anionic peroxidase associated with the suberization response in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during wound healing has been purified and partially characterized at the biochemical level. It is a 45-kD, class III (plant secretory) peroxidase that is localized to suberizing tissues and shows a preference for feruloyl (o-methoxyphenol)-substituted substrates (order of substrate preference: feruloyl > caffeoyl > p-coumaryl approximately syringyl) such as those that accumulate in tubers during wound healing. There was little influence on oxidation by side chain derivatization, although hydroxycinnamates were preferred over the corresponding hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. The substrate specificity pattern is consistent with the natural substrate incorporation into potato wound suberin. In contrast, the cationic peroxidase(s) induced in response to wound healing in potato tubers is present in both suberizing and nonsuberizing tissues and does not discriminate between hydroxycinnamates and hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. A synthetic polymer prepared using E-[8-(13)C]ferulic acid, H(2)O(2), and the purified anionic enzyme contained a significant amount of cross-linking through C-8, albeit with retention of unsaturation. PMID:10482668

  13. Graphene-Based Nanomaterials as Efficient Peroxidase Mimetic Catalysts for Biosensing Applications: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Bisht, Tanuja; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    "Artificial enzymes", a term coined by Breslow for enzyme mimics is an exciting and promising branch of biomimetic chemistry aiming to imitate the general and essential principles of natural enzymes using a variety of alternative materials including heterogeneous catalysts. Peroxidase enzymes represent a large family of oxidoreductases that typically catalyze biological reactions with high substrate affinity and specificity under relatively mild conditions and thus offer a wide range of practical applications in many areas of science. The increasing understanding of general principles as well as intrinsic drawbacks such as low operational stability, high cost, difficulty in purification and storage, and sensitivity of catalytic activity towards atmospheric conditions of peroxidases has triggered a dynamic field in nanotechnology, biochemical, and material science that aims at joining the better of three worlds by combining the concept adapted from nature with the processability of catalytically active graphene-based nanomaterials (G-NMs) as excellent peroxidase mimetic catalysts. This comprehensive review discusses an up-to-date synthesis, kinetics, mechanisms, and biosensing applications of a variety of G-NMs that have been explored as promising catalysts to mimic natural peroxidases. PMID:26248071

  14. Oxidation and nitration of mononitrophenols by a DyP-type peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Enrico; Ullrich, René; Strittmatter, Eric; Piontek, Klaus; Plattner, Dietmar A; Hofrichter, Martin; Liers, Christiane

    2015-05-15

    Substantial conversion of nitrophenols, typical high-redox potential phenolic substrates, by heme peroxidases has only been reported for lignin peroxidase (LiP) so far. But also a dye-decolorizing peroxidase of Auricularia auricula-judae (AauDyP) was found to be capable of acting on (i) ortho-nitrophenol (oNP), (ii) meta-nitrophenol (mNP) and (iii) para-nitrophenol (pNP). The pH dependency for pNP oxidation showed an optimum at pH 4.5, which is typical for phenol conversion by DyPs and other heme peroxidases. In the case of oNP and pNP conversion, dinitrophenols (2,4-DNP and 2,6-DNP) were identified as products and for pNP additionally p-benzoquinone. Moreover, indications were found for the formation of random polymerization products originating from initially formed phenoxy radical intermediates. Nitration was examined using (15)N-labeled pNP and Na(14)NO2 as an additional source of nitro-groups. Products were identified by HPLC-MS, and mass-to-charge ratios were evaluated to clarify the origin of nitro-groups. The additional nitrogen in DNPs formed during enzymatic conversion was found to originate both from (15)N-pNP and (14)NO2Na. Based on these results, a hypothetical reaction scheme and a catalytically responsible confine of the enzyme's active site are postulated. PMID:25796533

  15. CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF A LIGNIN PEROXIDASE GENE FROM STREPTOMYCES VIRIDOSPORUS IN STREPTOMYCES LIVIDANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A lignin peroxidase gene was cloned from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A into Streptomyces lividans TK64 in plasmid pIJ702. g1II-digested genomic DNA(4-10kb) of S. viridosporus was shotgun-cloned into S. lividans after insertion into the melanin (mel+) gene of pIJ702. ransformants ...

  16. Extension of polyphenolics by CWPO-C peroxidase mutant containing radical-robust surface active site.

    PubMed

    Pham, L T Mai; Kim, S Jin; Ahn, U Suk; Choi, J Weon; Song, B Keun; Kim, Y Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Expressed as insoluble forms in Escherichia coli, native cationic cell wall peroxidase (CWPO-C) from the poplar tree and mutant variants were successfully reactivated via refolding experiments and used to elucidate the previously presumed existence of an electron transfer (ET) pathway in the CWPO-C structure. Their catalytic properties were fully characterized through various analyses including steady-state kinetic, direct oxidation of lignin macromolecules and their respective stabilities during the polymerization reactions. The analysis results proved that the 74th residue on the CWPO-C surface plays an important role in catalyzing the macromolecules via supposed ET mechanism. By comparing the residual activities of wild-type CWPO-C and mutant 74W CWPO-C after 3 min, mutation of tyrosine 74 residue to tryptophan increased the radical resistance of peroxidase up to ten times dramatically while maintaining its capability to oxidize lignin macromolecules. Furthermore, extension of poly(catechin) as well as lignin macromolecules with CWPO-C Y74W mutant clearly showed that this radical-resistant peroxidase mutant can increase the molecular weight of various kinds of polyphenolics by using surface-located active site. The anti-oxidation activity of the synthesized poly(catechin) was confirmed by xanthine oxidase assay. The elucidation of a uniquely catalytic mechanism in CWPO-C may improve the applicability of the peroxidase/H2O2 catalyst to green polymer chemistry. PMID:24122664

  17. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) and ferroptosis: what's so special about it?

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Marcus; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The system XC−/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) axis pivotally controls ferroptosis, a recently described form of regulated non-apoptotic cell death. Compelling evidence has established that this route of cell death is not only of high relevance for triggering cancer cell death, but also proves to be amenable for therapeutic intervention to halt ischemia/reperfusion-related diseases. PMID:27308484

  18. Peroxidase as the Major Protein Constituent in Areca Nut and Identification of Its Natural Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ching; Chen, Chao-Jung; Lee, Miau-Rong; Li, Mi; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chung, Jing-Gung; Ho, Heng-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Numerous reports illustrate the diverse effects of chewing the areca nut, most of which are harmful and have been shown to be associated with oral cancer. Nearly all of the studies are focused on the extract and/or low molecular weight ingredients in the areca nut. The purpose of this report is to identify the major protein component in the areca nut. After ammonium sulfate fractionation, the concentrated areca nut extract is subjected to DEAE-cellulose chromatography. A colored protein is eluted at low NaCl concentration and the apparently homogeneous eluent represents the major protein component compared to the areca nut extract. The colored protein shares partial sequence identity with the royal palm tree peroxidase and its peroxidase activity is confirmed using an established assay. In the study, the natural substrates of areca nut peroxidase are identified as catechin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B1. The two former substrates are similarly oxidized to form a 576 Da product with concomitant removal of four hydrogen atoms. Interestingly, oxidation of procyanidin B1 occurs only in the presence of catechin or epicatechin and an additional product with an 864 Da molecular mass. In addition, procyanidin B1 is identified as a peroxidase substrate for the first time. PMID:24250715

  19. Peroxidase activity as an indicator of exposure of wetland seedlings to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, H.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The enzyme peroxidase has been found to increase quantitatively in several aquatic plant species in response to increasing exposure to various contaminants. In this study, a number of wetland species are tested for their usefulness as bioindicators of metal exposure using the peroxidase assay. Woody species tested include Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), and Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), while herbaceous species include Saururus cernuus (lizard`s tail) and Sparganium americanum (bur-reed). The assay has been optimized for all of these species. In all cases the pH optimum has been found to be either 5.5 or 6.0 and the substrate optimum is 2.8 or 1.4mM hydrogen peroxide. There is considerable variation in baseline peroxidase activity among the species when tested under their optimal assay conditions. These species are being dosed with copper, nickel, and cadmium in order to determine whether a response elicited. Seedlings will be dosed using both petri dish culture conditions and test tubes filled with vermiculite and sand combinations. The peroxidase response will be compared to germination and root elongation endpoints. Lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus sativus) are being tested alongside the wetland species as reference organisms for which background data is available. The wetland species tested in the present study have rarely if ever been used in toxicological studies.

  20. Identification and Properties of Insect Resistance-Associated Maize Anionic Peroxidases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies with transgenic plants have indicated a tobacco anionic peroxidase can confer enhanced resistance to a variety of insects when expressed in different plant species. Tissue that expresses high levels of this enzyme often browns rapidly when damaged. When introduced biolistically, m...