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Sample records for agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase wga-hrp

  1. Labelling of neurons in the rat superior cervical ganglion after injection of wheat-germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase into the contralateral ganglion: evidence of transneuronal labelling.

    PubMed Central

    Atasever, A; Palaoğlu, S; Erbengi, A; Celik, H H

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that injection of the tracer wheat-germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) into the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of one side results in labelling of neurons in the contralateral SCG and the stellate ganglion. This study was designed to verify whether or not bilateral projections from the superior cervical ganglion to the midline structures, particularly to the pineal gland, play a role in the transport of WGA-HRP to the contralateral SCG. One group of rats received WGA-HRP injection into the right SCG (group I). Four groups of rats underwent the following operations prior to the injection of WGA-HRP into the right superior cervical ganglion: transection of the external carotid nerve (group II), transection of the internal carotid nerve (group III), transection of the external carotid nerve combined with pinealectomy (group IV), transection of both the internal and the external carotid nerves (group V). The mean number of labelled neurons in the left SCG of each group were found as follows: group I, 1516 +/- 221 (mean +/- S.D.); group II, 861 +/- 122; group III, 543 +/- 99; group IV, 562 +/- 144; group V, 220 +/- 52. The results of this study suggest that the contralateral labelling depends on the transneuronal transport of WGA-HRP through the terminal fields of innervation of the midline structures that receive bilateral projections from both SCGs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7512544

  2. Ultrastructural characterization of gerbil olivocochlear neurons based on differential uptake of /sup 3/H-D-aspartic acid and a wheatgerm agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate from the cochlea

    SciTech Connect

    Helfert, R.H.; Schwartz, I.R.; Ryan, A.F.

    1988-09-01

    Two populations of olivocochlear (OC) neurons have been identified in the gerbil brain stem on the basis of differential labeling patterns of 3H-D-aspartic acid (D-ASP) and wheatgerm agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate (WGA/HRP) from the cochlear perilymph. While both populations are capable of uptake and retrograde uptake of WGA/HRP, one population accumulates and retrogradely transports D-ASP (D-ASP OC neurons) and the other does not (non-D-ASP OC neurons). D-ASP OC neurons are found in or near the lateral superior olive, are small in size, and receive very few synaptic contacts. The vast majority of these synapses contain small, mildly pleomorphic vesicles with scattered dense core vesicles. Synapses with distinctly larger pleomorphic vesicles have also been observed. These neurons possess all of the features common to neurons of the lateral olivocochlear system. Non-D-ASP OC neurons are found primarily in the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, as well as in the area between the medial superior olive and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body. These neurons are larger and receive greater numbers and types of synaptic contacts than those found on D-ASP OC neurons. The 2 most common synapses found on non-D-ASP OC neurons are axosomatic ones containing small, mildly pleomorphic vesicles and scattered dense core vesicles similar to those seen on the D-ASP OC neurons, and axodendritic synapses containing large, round vesicles. Much less frequently observed are synapses containing small, round vesicles or ones containing predominantly flat vesicles. The ultrastructural features of the non-D-ASP OC neurons correspond to those described for neurons of the medial olivocochlear system.

  3. Common fur and mystacial vibrissae parallel sensory pathways: /sup 14/C 2-deoxyglucose and WGA-HRP studies in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, F.R.; Gonzalez, M.F.; Morgan, C.W.; Morton, M.T.; Sharp, J.W.

    1988-04-15

    Stimulation of mystacial vibrissae in rows A,B, and C increased (14C) 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) uptake in spinal trigeminal nucleus pars caudalis (Sp5c) mostly in ventral portions of laminae III-IV with less activation of II and V. Stimulation of common fur above the whiskers mainly activated lamina II, with less activation in deeper layers. The patterns of activation were compatible with an inverted head, onion skin Sp5c somatotopy. Wheatgerm Agglutinin-Horseradish Peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections into common fur between mystacial vibrissae rows A-B and B-C led to anterograde transganglionic labeling only of Sp5c, mainly of lamina II with less label in layer V, and very sparse label in III and IV. WGA-HRP skin injections appear to primarily label small fibers, which along with larger fibers, were metabolically activated during common fur stimulation. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation increased 2DG uptake in ventral ipsilateral spinal trigeminal nuclei pars interpolaris (Sp5i) and oralis (Sp5o) and principal trigeminal sensory nucleus (Pr5). Common fur stimulation above the whiskers slightly increased 2DG uptake in ventral Sp5i, Sp5o, and possibly Pr5. The most dorsal aspect of the ventroposteromedial (VPM) nucleus of thalamus was activated contralateral to whisker stimulation. Stimulation of the common fur dorsal to the whiskers activated a region of dorsal VPM caudal to the VPM region activated during whisker stimulation. This is consistent with previous data showing that ventral whiskers and portions of the face are represented rostrally in VPM, and more dorsal whiskers and dorsal portions of the face are represented progressively more caudally in VPM. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation activated the contralateral primary sensory SI barrelfield cortex and a separate region in the second somatosensory SII cortex.

  4. Spinal cord projections of the rat main forelimb nerves, studied by transganglionic transport of WGA-HRP and by the disappearance of acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Castro-Lopes, J M; Coimbra, A

    1991-03-01

    The spinal cord projections of the 3 main forelimb nerves-median, radial and ulnar, were studied in the rat dorsal horn with transganglionic transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP), or using the disappearance of fluoride resistant acid phosphatase (FRAP) after nerve section. The projection patterns in lamina II were similar following the two procedures. The median and the radial nerve fibers projected to the medial and the intermediate thirds, respectively, of the dorsal horn lamina II in spinal cord segments C4-C8. The ulnar nerve projected to segments C6-C8 between the areas occupied by the other two nerves. The FRAP method also showed that the lateral part of lamina II, which was not filled by radial nerve fibers, received the projections from the dorsal cutaneous branches of cervical spinal nerves. In addition, FRAP disappeared from the medial end of segment T1 after skin incisions extending from the medial brachium to the axilla, which seemed due to severance of the cutaneous branchlets of the lateral anterior thoracic nerve. The FRAP procedure is thus sensitive enough to detect fibers in lamina II arising from small peripheral nerves, and may be used as an alternative to the anterograde tracing methods whenever there are no overlapping projections.

  5. A dopaminergic projection to the rat mammillary nuclei demonstrated by retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalo-Ruiz, A.; Alonso, A.; Sanz, J. M.; Llinas, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence and distribution of dopaminergic neurons and terminals in the hypothalamus of the rat were studied by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry. Strongly labelled TH-immunoreactive neurons were seen in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, periventricular region, zona incerta, arcuate nucleus, and supramammillary nucleus. A few TH-positive neurons were also identified in the dorsal and ventral premammillary nucleus, as well as the lateral hypothalamic area. TH-immunoreactive fibres and terminals were unevenly distributed in the mammillary nuclei; small, weakly labelled terminals were scattered in the medial mammillary nucleus, while large, strongly labelled, varicose terminals were densely concentrated in the internal part of the lateral mammillary nucleus. A few dorsoventrally oriented TH-positive axon bundles were also identified in the lateral mammillary nucleus. A dopaminergic projection to the mammillary nuclei from the supramammillary nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area was identified by double labelling with retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and TH-immunohistochemistry. The lateral mammillary nucleus receives a weak dopaminergic projection from the medial, and stronger projections from the lateral, caudal supramammillary nucleus. The double-labelled neurons in the lateral supramammillary nucleus appear to encapsulate the caudal end of the mammillary nuclei. The medial mammillary nucleus receives a very light dopaminergic projection from the caudal lateral hypothalamic area. These results suggest that the supramammillary nucleus is the principal source of the dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei, establishing a local TH-pathway in the mammillary complex. The supramammillary cell groups are able to modulate the limbic system through its dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei as well as through its extensive dopaminergic projection to the lateral septal nucleus.

  6. Afferent and efferent connections of the nucleus rotundus demonstrated by WGA-HRP in the chick.

    PubMed

    Hu, M; Naito, J; Chen, Y; Ohmori, Y; Fukuta, K

    2003-12-01

    Organization of the fibre connections in the chick nucleus rotundus (Rt) was investigated by an axonal tracing method using wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP). After an injection of WGA-HRP into the Rt, labelled neurones were observed in the striatum griseum centrale (SGC) in both sides of the tectum (TO) and in the ipsilateral nucleus subpretectalis/nucleus interstito-pretecto-subpretectalis (SP/IPS). Labelled fibres and terminals were also found in the ipsilateral ectostriatum (Ect). These fibre connections were topographically organized rostrocaudally. In the TO-Rt projection, the rostral and the dorsocaudal parts of the Rt received afferents from the superficial part of the SGC, the middle part of the Rt received afferents from the intermediate part of the SGC, and the ventrocaudal part of the Rt received mainly fibres from the deep part of the SGC. These topographic projections were accompanied by a considerable number of diffuse projections to the thalamic regions surrounding the Rt. In addition, the rostral and middle caudal parts of the Rt received afferents from the lateral and medial parts of the SP/IPS, respectively, and respective parts of the Rt sent efferents to the lateral and medial parts of the Ect.

  7. A morphometric study of the endocytosis of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase conjugates by retinal ganglion cells in the rat.

    PubMed

    Trojanowski, J Q; Gonatas, N K

    1983-08-08

    In order to elucidate the sequence for the intraneuronal translocation of ligands after internalization in vivo, the adsorptive endocytosis of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugates of the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGHRP) by retinal ganglion cells of the rat was studied by ultrastructural morphometry after intravitreal injections of this probe. Retinas were harvested at post-injection survival times of 15 min to 7 days and processed for the electron microscopic visualization of WGHRP in subcellular organelles. The labeled organelles included vesicles, tubules, lysosomes and the cisterns and coated as well as uncoated vesicles of GERL (Golgi Apparatus-Endoplasmic-Reticulum-Lysosomes). For quantitation, labeled organelles were classed as vesicles, lysosomes and GERL. From 15 min to 3 h the number of labeled GERL and vesicles progressively increased to a maximum at 3 h and then declined to zero by 7 days. In contrast, the number of labeled lysosomes continued to increase beyond 3 h to reach a maximum at 24 h before declining to near zero by 7 days. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the adsorptive endocytosis of WGHRP entails the passage of the ligand through GERL prior to being deposited in lysosomes. They do not exclude the possibility that other endocytic pathways for WGHRP and possible WGHRP-membrane complexes may exist in retinal ganglion cells including a plasma membrane to lysosome route.

  8. Descending projections to the mammillary nuclei in the rat, as studied by retrograde and anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Shibata, H

    1989-07-22

    The cells of origin and projection fields of the descending afferents to the mammillary nuclei were studied in the rat with retrograde and anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The subiculum projects bilaterally to the entire medial mammillary nucleus (MM) in a topographic fashion along the two axes: 1) the proximal part of the subiculum along the presubiculo-CA1 axis projects to the caudal and lateral regions of the MM whereas the more distal part of the subiculum projects to the medial region; 2) the septal part of the subiculum projects to the caudodorsal region of the MM whereas the more temporal part projects progressively to the more rostroventral regions. The ventral subiculum also projects ipsilaterally to the ventral and lateral margin of the lateral mammillary nucleus (LM). The presubiculum projects bilaterally to the dorsolateral region of the pars posterior of the MM and ipsilaterally to the LM. The infra-limbic cortex projects bilaterally to the rostrodorsal region of the MM, whereas the retrosplenial cortex (areas 29a and 29b) projects bilaterally to the medial region at the midrostrocaudal and middorsoventral levels of the MM. The nucleus of the diagonal band projects bilaterally to the caudomedial region of the MM, whereas the lateral septal nucleus projects bilaterally to the pars mediana and the mammillary fiber capsule. A part of the anterior hypothalamic area ventromedial to the fornix projects predominantly ipsilaterally to the rostroventral part of the MM, whereas other basal forebrain regions such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the medial preoptic and anterior hypothalamic areas, and the area of the tuber cinereum send fibers predominantly ipsilaterally to the mammillary fiber capsule. The results reveal a complex organization of the descending projections to the mammillary nuclei, which may reflect the complex functions of these nuclei within the limbic circuitry.

  9. Direct synaptic connections between superior colliculus afferents and thalamo-insular projection neurons in the feline suprageniculate nucleus: a double-labeling study with WGA-HRP and kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Kaeko; Horie, Masao; Nagy, Attila; Berényi, Antal; Benedek, György; Norita, Masao

    2010-01-01

    The suprageniculate nucleus (Sg) of the feline thalamus, which subserves largely unimodal sensory and orientation behavior, receives input from the deep layers of the superior colliculus (SC), and projects to the suprasylvian cortical areas, such as the anterior ectosylvian visual area and the insular visual area (IVA), which contain visually responsive neurons. Through a double tract-tracing procedure involving the injection of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) into the IVA and the injection of kainic acid into the SC, this study sought to determine the nature of the synaptic relationship between the SC afferents and the thalamo-cortical projection neurons. WGA-HRP injections labeled numerous neurons in the Sg, while kainic acid injections destroyed many tectothalamic terminals in the Sg. The distributions of the WGA-HRP-labeled neurons and the degenerated axon terminals overlapped in the dorsal part of the Sg. Electron microscopic observations demonstrated that the degenerated axon terminals made synaptic contacts with the dendrites of the WGA-HRP-labeled neurons in this overlapping region of the Sg. These results provide the first anatomical evidence that the Sg may play a role in the key relay of visual information from the SC to the IVA, within an identified extrageniculo-cortical pathway.

  10. Differences between the endocytosis of horseradish peroxidase and its conjugate with wheat germ agglutinin by cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Stieber, A; Gonatas, J O; Gonatas, N K

    1984-04-01

    A covalent conjugate of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used for a morphologic study of its adsorptive endocytosis by cultured human fibroblasts. Initial binding at 4 degrees C of the conjugate was observed over the entire plasma membrane, including "coated" and smooth pits. Endocytosis of HRP and the WGA-HRP conjugate was observed in lysosomes, but only the conjugate was seen in a cisterna of the Golgi apparatus (GERL), and in adjacent coated vesicles.

  11. Microwave and thermal interactions with oxidative hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, 3,333 pulses per second, duty factor of 0.02, and average specific absorption rate of 0.4 W/kg) on spontaneous hemolysis of human erythrocytes was examined. Cells were exposed to microwave radiation for 20 minutes at 37 degrees, 42 degrees, or 48 degrees C. Some of these cells were sensitized to oxidative damage by treatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and/or by coating with wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) conjugate. Microwave radiation significantly decreased spontaneous hemolysis of untreated cells at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 degrees or 48 degrees C. Microwave exposure significantly enhanced a CDNB membrane stabilizing effect at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 or 48 degrees C. At 42 degrees C, microwave exposure increased hemolysis of WGA-HRP coated cells. Cells treated with both WGA-HRP and CDNB showed no change in fragility at 42 degrees C and increased fragility at 48 degrees C without a microwave effect. The microwave effects observed appear to involve perturbation of the thermal threshold for oxidative hyperthermic hemolysis.

  12. Anatomical evidence for red nucleus projections to motoneuronal cell groups in the spinal cord of the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert; Blok, Bertil F.; Ralston, Diane Daly

    1988-01-01

    In four rhesus monkeys wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections were made in the mesencephalic tegmentum. In three cases with injections involving the red nucleus (RN), rubrospinal fibers descended mainly contralaterally to terminate in laminae V, VI and dorsal VII of the spinal cord and in the lateral motoneuronal cell groups at the level of the cervical and lumbosacral enlargements. In all four cases the area of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) was injected, which resulted in labeled interstitiospinal fibers in the medial part of the ipsilateral ventral funiculus of the spinal cord. The results indicate that there is no major qualitative difference between the mesencephalic (RN and INC) and motor cortical projections to the spinal cord.

  13. Macaque accessory optic system: II. Connections with the pretectum

    SciTech Connect

    Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M.; Cooper, H.M. )

    1990-12-08

    Connections of the accessory optic system (AOS) with the pretectum are described in the macaque monkey. Injections of tritiated amino acids in the pretectum demonstrate a major contralateral projection to the dorsal (DTN), lateral (LTN), and medial (MTN) terminal nuclei of the AOS and a sparser projection to the ipsilateral LTN. Injections of retrograde tracers, Fast Blue (FB), or wheat germ agglutinin horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) plus nonconjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the LTN show that the pretectal-LTN projection originates from two nuclei. The main source of pretectal efferents to the LTN is from the pretectal olivary nucleus (OPN) and is entirely contralateral. This projection, which appears unique to primates, originates from the large multipolar cells of the OPN. In addition to this projection, the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) projects to the ipsilateral LTN, as in nonprimates. Injection of WGA-HRP in the pretectum shows a reciprocal predominantely ipsilateral projection from the LTN to the pretectum. Retinas were observed after injection of FB in the LTN. The retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are mainly distributed near the fovea and in the nasal region of the contralateral eye, suggesting a nasotemporal pattern of decussation. The demonstration of a direct connection between LTN and OPN forces to a reconsideration of the functional role of the AOS. Previous descriptions of luminance responsive cells in the LTN support a possible participation of this nucleus in the control of the pupillary light reflex.

  14. Retrograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit, wheatgerm agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I in primary afferent neurons innervating the rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Wang, H F; Shortland, P; Park, M J; Grant, G

    1998-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated and compared the ability of the cholera toxin B subunit, wheat germ agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, to retrogradely and transganglionically label visceral primary afferents after unilateral injections into the rat urinary bladder wall. Horseradish peroxidase histochemical or lectin-immunofluorescence histochemical labelling of bladder afferents was seen in the L6-S1 spinal cord segments and in the T13-L2 and L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia. In the lumbosacral spinal cord, the most intense and extensive labelling of bladder afferents was seen when cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase was injected. Cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres were found in Lissauer's tract, its lateral and medial collateral projections, and laminae I and IV-VI of the spinal gray matter. Labelled fibres were numerous in the lateral collateral projection and extended into the spinal parasympathetic nucleus. Labelling from both the lateral and medial projections extended into the dorsal grey commissural region. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase labelling produced a similar pattern but was not as dense and extensive as that of cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase. The isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres, on the other hand, were fewer and only observed in the lateral collateral projection and occasionally in lamina I. Cell profile counts showed that a larger number of dorsal root ganglion cells were labelled with cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase than with wheat germ agglutinin- or isolectin B4-horseradish peroxidase. In the L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia, the majority (81%) of the cholera toxin B subunit-, and almost all of the wheat germ agglutinin- and isolectin B4-immunoreactive cells were RT97-negative (an anti-neurofilament antibody that labels dorsal root ganglion neurons with

  15. Reconstruction of atonic bladder innervation after spinal cord injury: A bladder reflex arc with afferent and efferent pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Li, Guitao; Luo, Dixin; Sun, Hongtao; Qi, Yong; Li, Yiyi; Jin, Xunjie

    2015-11-01

    Background Establishing bladder reflex arcs only with the efferent pathway to induce micturition after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been successful. However, the absence of sensory function and micturition desires can lead to serious complications. Objectives To reconstruct a bladder reflex arc with both afferent and efferent pathways to achieve atonic bladder innervation after SCI. Methods A reflex arc was established by microanastomosis of the S2 dorsal root to the peripheral process of the L5 dorsal ganglion and the L5 ventral root to the S2 ventral root. The functions of the reflex arc were evaluated using electrophysiology, wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) tracing, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunocytochemistry analysis. Hind-paw motion was evaluated by CatWalk gait. Results Compound action potentials and compound muscle action potentials were recorded at the right L5 dorsal root following electrical stimulation of right S2 dorsal root. Similar to the control side, these were not significantly different before or after the spinal cord destruction between L6 and S4. WGA-HRP tracing and CGRP immunocytochemistry showed that construction of the afferent and efferent pathways of the bladder reflex arc encouraged axonal regeneration of motor and sensory nerves, which then made contact with the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, ultimately reestablishing axoplasmic transportation. Gait analysis showed that at 3 months following the operation, only the regularity index was significantly different as compared with 1 day before the operation, other parameters showing no difference. Conclusion Bladder reflex arc with the afferent and efferent pathways reconstructs the micturition function without great influence on the motion of leg.

  16. Nasotemporal asymmetries in V1: ocular dominance columns of infant, adult, and strabismic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tychsen, L; Burkhalter, A

    1997-11-10

    To quantify asymmetries of input from the two eyes into each cerebral hemisphere, we measured ocular dominance column (ODC) widths and areas in the striate visual cortex (area V1) of macaque monkeys. Ocular dominance stripes in layer 4C were labeled by using transneuronal transport of intraocularly injected wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) or cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry, after deafferentation of one eye or even by leaving afferent input intact. In infant monkey aged 4 and 8 weeks, ocular dominance stripes labeled by WGA-HRP appeared adultlike with smooth, sharply defined borders. In normal infant and normal adult macaque, ocular dominance stripes driven by the nasal retina (i.e., contralateral eye) were consistently wider than stripes driven by the temporal retina (i.e., ipsilateral eye). Asymmetries in the percentage of area V1 driven by nasal vs. temporal ODCs showed a similar "nasal bias": in infant macaque, approximately 58% of ODCs in V1 were driven by nasal retina, and in adult macaque approximately 57%. The asymmetries tended to be slightly smaller in opercular V1 and greater in calcarine V1. "Spontaneous" ocular dominance stripes were revealed by CO staining of V1 in a naturally strabismic monkey and in a monkey made strabismic by early postnatal alternating monocular occlusion. In these animals, ocular dominance stripes and CO blobs corresponding to the nasal retina stained more intensely for CO in both the right and left V1. ODC spacing and the nasotemporal asymmetry in ODC width and area were similar in strabismic and normal monkeys. Our results in normal monkeys extend the observations of previous investigators and verify that nasotemporal inputs to opercular and calcarine V1 are unequal, with a consistent bias favoring inputs from the nasal retina. The CO results in strabismic macaque suggest that the nasal ODC bias promotes interocular suppression when activity in neighboring ODCs is decorrelated by abnormal binocular

  17. Ipsilateral cortical connections of dorsal and ventral premotor areas in New World owl monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stepniewska, Iwona; Preuss, Todd M; Kaas, Jon H

    2006-04-20

    In order to compare connections of premotor cortical areas of New World monkeys with those of Old World macaque monkeys and prosimian galagos, we placed injections of fluorescent tracers and wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in dorsal (PMD) and ventral (PMV) premotor areas of owl monkeys. Motor areas and injection sites were defined by patterns of movements electrically evoked from the cortex with microelectrodes. Labeled neurons and axon terminals were located in brain sections cut either in the coronal plane or parallel to the surface of flattened cortex, and they related to architectonically and electrophysiologically defined cortical areas. Both the PMV and PMD had connections with the primary motor cortex (M1), the supplementary motor area (SMA), cingulate motor areas, somatosensory areas S2 and PV, and the posterior parietal cortex. Only the PMV had connections with somatosensory areas 3a, 1, 2, PR, and PV. The PMD received inputs from more caudal portions of the cortex of the lateral sulcus and more medial portions of the posterior parietal cortex than the PMV. The PMD and PMV were only weakly interconnected. New World owl monkeys, Old World macaque monkeys, and galagos share a number of PMV and PMD connections, suggesting preservation of a common sensorimotor network from early primates. Comparisons of PMD and PMV connectivity with the cortex of the lateral sulcus and posterior parietal cortex of owl monkeys, galagos, and macaques help identify areas that could be homologous.

  18. Palm tree peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Sakharov, I Yu

    2004-08-01

    Over the years novel plant peroxidases have been isolated from palm trees leaves. Some molecular and catalytic properties of palm peroxidases have been studied. The substrate specificity of palm peroxidases is distinct from the specificity of other plant peroxidases. Palm peroxidases show extremely high stability under acidic and alkaline conditions and high thermal stability. Moreover, these enzymes are more stable with respect to hydrogen peroxide treatment than other peroxidases. Due to their extremely high stability, palm peroxidases have been used successfully in the development of new bioanalytical tests, the construction of improved biosensors, and in polymer synthesis.

  19. Columnar organization of estrogen receptor-alpha immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray projecting to the nucleus para-retroambiguus in the caudal brainstem of the female golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, P O; Krukerink, M; Veening, J G

    2009-06-30

    In the hamster brainstem estrogen receptor-alpha-immunoreactive neurons (ER-alpha-IR) are present in the nucleus para-retroambiguus (NPRA), located in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) ventrolaterally to the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA). NPRA neurons project mainly to the thoracic and upper lumbar cord and are probably involved in the autonomic adaptations during the estrous cycle. The periaqueductal gray (PAG), projecting to the CVLM, also contains ER-alpha-IR neurons. This raises the questions: how are these projections organized and are ER-alpha-IR neurons in PAG and NPRA linked directly? Combined retro- and anterograde tracing techniques, using wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP), were carried out to demonstrate neuronal relationships between PAG and NPRA and/or NRA. Finally, a double-label immunostaining was performed in ovariectomized hamsters combining anti-ER-alpha antibody immunocytochemistry with cholera toxin B injections into the CVLM, to differentiate between ER-alpha-IR projections from the PAG to either NRA or NPRA. The experiments showed that retrograde labeling from the NRA mainly occurred in the rostral and intermediate ipsilateral PAG, while injections involving both NRA and NPRA resulted in numerous labeled neurons in the ipsilateral rostral, intermediate and especially the caudal PAG. The anterograde tracing studies confirmed these projections: from the rostral PAG almost exclusively to the NRA and from the caudal PAG to the NPRA, while the intermediate lateral PAG projects to both NPRA and NRA. Our double-immunostudies revealed that ER-alpha-IR projections descend only towards the NPRA and mainly originate from the ipsilateral caudal PAG. Retrogradely labeled ER-alpha-IR neurons in the PAG were observed in two separate columns, laterally and ventrolaterally in the caudal half of the PAG. The results provide evidence for the existence of differentiated PAG-CVLM projections to NRA and NPRA, respectively, originating from

  20. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  1. Peroxidase(s) in environment protection.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment.

  2. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  3. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  4. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  5. Nerve growth factor induced changes in the Golgi apparatus of PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cells as studied by ligand endocytosis, cytochemical and morphometric methods.

    PubMed

    Hickey, W F; Stieber, A; Hogue-Angeletti, R; Gonatas, J; GOnatas, N K

    1983-10-01

    Cells of the PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line respond to nerve growth factor (NGF) by sprouting neurites and biochemically differentiating into sympathetic ganglion-like cells. NGF-stimulated ('differentiated') and unstimulated ('undifferentiated') cells were studied by cytochemical techniques for the localization of the enzymes acid phosphatase (ACPase) and thiamine pyrophosphatase (TPPase), and by a morphometric analysis of the distribution of endocytosed wheat-germ agglutinin labelled with horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP). Both cytochemical stains showed the enzymes to be distributed in lysosomes and certain cisternae of the Golgi apparatus in both NGF stimulated and unstimulated cells. ACPase was not confined to GERL (Golgi-endoplasmic reticulum-lysosome) as in certain other cells. The morphometric studies demonstrated that the reaction product of the internalized WGA-HRP occupied 4.7% of the cytoplasmic area in unstimulated cells and 4.5% in NGF-stimulated ones. Despite this similarity, the distribution of the WGA-HRP among the studied intracellular compartments in these two cell groups varied. In the NGF-stimulated cells 3.3% of the WGA-HRP reaction product was found in the innermost Golgi cisterna(e) while in unstimulated cells only 0.3% was seen in this compartment. Similarly, 4.3% of the WGA-HRP stain was found in small vesicles at the 'trans' aspect of the Golgi apparatus in stimulated cells, when only 0.3% of the stain occupied this compartment in 'undifferentiated' cells. The morphometric analysis also revealed that when the PC-12 cells were stimulated with NGF, the Golgi apparatus increased in area by approximately 70%. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that NGF induced differentiation of PC-12 cells is coupled with enhanced endocytosis of WGA and probably of its 'receptor' to the innermost Golgi cisterna(e) and the closely associated vesicles.

  6. Novel Applications of Peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Abdul; Ball, Andrew S.; Tuncer, Munir; Wilson, Michael T.

    1997-02-01

    The article entitled "Novel Biocatalysts Will Work Even Better for Industry" published recently in this Journal (1) was informative and interesting. However it touched only briefly on the application of peroxidase as catalyst. Here, we would like to mention in more detail the novel applications of peroxidase in agricultural, paper pulp, water treatment, pharmaceutical, and medical situations. Firstly, the peroxidase isolated from Phanerochaete chyrosporium has been shown to detoxify herbicides such as atrazine to less toxic compounds and would certainly find potential application in agriculture (2). Secondly, the peroxidase produced by Streptomyces thermoviolaceus may find application in the paper pulp industry as a delignifying agent (3). Thirdly, it has been shown that extracellular peroxidase produced by Streptomyces avermitilis can remove the intense color from paper-mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw (4), and thus this enzyme might find application as a catalyst in water treatment plants. Fourthly, the heme-containing horseradish peroxidase enzyme has been exploited in several diagnostic applications in pharmaceutics and medicine, such as the detection of human immunodeficiency virus and cystic fibrosis (5-10). Finally, recent work from our laboratory has suggested that thermophilic nonheme peroxidase produced by Thermomonospora fusca BD25 may find medical use in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (11, 12). Literature Cited 1. Wiseman, A. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 55-58. 2. Mougin, C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 705-708. 3. McCarthy A. J.; Peace, W.; Broda, P. Appl. Microbiol. Technol. 1985, 23, 238-244. 4. Hernandez, M; Rodriguez J; Soliveri, J; Copa, J. L; Perez, M. I; Arias, M. E. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 3909-3913. 5. Hopfer, S. M.; Aslanzadeh, J. Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 1995, 25, 475-480. 6. Suzuki, K; Iman, M. J. Virol. Methods 1995, 55, 347-356. 7. Nielsen, K. J. Immunoassay 1995, 16, 183-197. 8

  7. Molecular Phylogeny of Heme Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Obinger, Christian

    All currently available gene sequences of heme peroxidases can be phylogenetically divided in two superfamilies and three families. In this chapter, the phylogenetics and genomic distribution of each group are presented. Within the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, the main evolutionary direction developed peroxidatic heme proteins involved in the innate immune defense system and in biosynthesis of (iodinated) hormones. The peroxidase-catalase superfamily is widely spread mainly among bacteria, fungi, and plants, and particularly in Class I led to the evolution of bifunctional catalase-peroxidases. Its numerous fungal representatives of Class II are involved in carbon recycling via lignin degradation, whereas Class III secretory peroxidases from algae and plants are included in various forms of secondary metabolism. The family of di-heme peroxidases are predominantly bacteria-inducible enzymes; however, a few corresponding genes were also detected in archaeal genomes. Four subfamilies of dyp-type peroxidases capable of degradation of various xenobiotics are abundant mainly among bacteria and fungi. Heme-haloperoxidase genes are widely spread among sac and club fungi, but corresponding genes were recently found also among oomycetes. All described families herein represent heme peroxidases of broad diversity in structure and function. Our accumulating knowledge about the evolution of various enzymatic functions and physiological roles can be exploited in future directed evolution approaches for engineering peroxidase genes de novo for various demands.

  8. Substrate oxidation sites in versatile peroxidase and other basidiomycete peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Morales, María; García, Eva; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2009-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is defined by its capabilities to oxidize the typical substrates of other basidiomycete peroxidases: (i) Mn(2+), the manganese peroxidase (MnP) substrate (Mn(3+) being able to oxidize phenols and initiate lipid peroxidation reactions); (ii) veratryl alcohol (VA), the typical lignin peroxidase (LiP) substrate; and (iii) simple phenols, which are the substrates of Coprinopsis cinerea peroxidase (CIP). Crystallographic, spectroscopic, directed mutagenesis, and kinetic studies showed that these 'hybrid' properties are due to the coexistence in a single protein of different catalytic sites reminiscent of those present in the other basidiomycete peroxidase families. Crystal structures of wild and recombinant VP, and kinetics of mutated variants, revealed certain differences in its Mn-oxidation site compared with MnP. These result in efficient Mn(2+) oxidation in the presence of only two of the three acidic residues forming its binding site. On the other hand, a solvent-exposed tryptophan is the catalytically-active residue in VA oxidation, initiating an electron transfer pathway to haem (two other putative pathways were discarded by mutagenesis). Formation of a tryptophanyl radical after VP activation by peroxide was detected using electron paramagnetic resonance. This was the first time that a protein radical was directly demonstrated in a ligninolytic peroxidase. In contrast with LiP, the VP catalytic tryptophan is not beta-hydroxylated under hydrogen peroxide excess. It was also shown that the tryptophan environment affected catalysis, its modification introducing some LiP properties in VP. Moreover, some phenols and dyes are oxidized by VP at the edge of the main haem access channel, as found in CIP. Finally, the biotechnological interest of VP is discussed.

  9. Central pupillary light reflex circuits in the cat: I. The olivary pretectal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wensi; May, Paul J

    2014-12-15

    The central pathways subserving the feline pupillary light reflex were examined by defining retinal input to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPt), the midbrain projections of this nucleus, and the premotor neurons within it. Unilateral intravitreal wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections revealed differences in the pattern of retinal OPt termination on the two sides. Injections of WGA-HRP into OPt labeled terminals bilaterally in the anteromedian nucleus, and to a lesser extent in the supraoculomotor area, centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus, and nucleus of the posterior commissure. Labeled terminals, as well as retrogradely labeled multipolar cells, were present in the contralateral OPt, indicating a commissural pathway. Injections of WGA-HRP into the anteromedian nucleus labeled fusiform premotor neurons within the OPt, as well as multipolar cells in the nucleus of the posterior commissure. Connections between retinal terminals and the pretectal premotor neurons were characterized by combining vitreous chamber and anteromedian nucleus injections of WGA-HRP in the same animal. Fusiform-shaped, retrogradely labeled cells fell within the anterogradely labeled retinal terminal field in the OPt. Ultrastructural analysis revealed labeled retinal terminals containing clear spherical vesicles. They contacted labeled pretectal premotor neurons via asymmetric synaptic densities. These results provide an anatomical substrate for the pupillary light reflex in the cat. Pretectal premotor neurons receive direct retinal input via synapses suggestive of an excitatory drive, and project directly to nuclei containing preganglionic motoneurons. These projections are concentrated in the anteromedian nucleus, indicating its involvement in the pupillary light reflex.

  10. Plant peroxidases. Their primary, secondary and tertiary structures, and relation to cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Welinder, K G

    1985-09-16

    The amino acid sequences of the 51% different horseradish peroxidase HRP C and turnip peroxidase TP 7 have previously been completed by us, but the three-dimensional structures are unknown. Recently the amino acid sequence and the crystal structure of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase have appeared. The three known apoperoxidases consist of 300 +/- 8 amino acid residues. The sequences have now been aligned and show 18% and 16% identity only, between the yeast peroxidase and plant peroxidase HRP C and TP 7, respectively. We show that different structural tests all support similar protein folds in plant peroxidases and yeast peroxidase and, therefore, a common evolutionary origin. The following tests support this thesis: (a) predicted helices in the plant peroxidases follow the complex pattern observed in the crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase; (b) their hydropathic profiles are similar and agree with observed buried and exposed peptide chain in cytochrome c peroxidase; (c) half-cystines which are distant in the amino acid sequence of plant peroxidases become spatial neighbours when fitted into the cytochrome c peroxidase model; (d) the two-domain structure proposed from limited proteolysis of apoperoxidase HRP C is observed in the crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase. The similarities and differences of the plant and yeast peroxidases and the reactive side chains of a plant peroxidase active site are described. The characteristics of Ca2+-binding sequences, derived from several superfamilies, are applied to predict the Ca2+-binding sequences in plant peroxidases.

  11. Evolutionary Divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana Classical Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Mamoshina, P O; Ezhova, T A

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms of 62 peroxidase genes derived from Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated to evaluate evolutionary dynamics and divergence of peroxidase proteins. By comparing divergence of duplicated genes AtPrx53-AtPrx54 and AtPrx36-AtPrx72 and their products, nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were identified that were apparently targets of positive selection. These substitutions were detected among paralogs of 461 ecotypes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these substitutions are conservative and matched paralogous peroxidases in other Brassicaceae species. These results suggest that after duplication, peroxidase genes evolved under the pressure of positive selection, and amino acid substitutions identified during our study provided divergence of properties and physiological functions in peroxidases. Our predictions regarding functional significance for amino acid residues identified in variable sites of peroxidases may allow further experimental assessment of evolution of peroxidases after gene duplication.

  12. Engineering Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity Into Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Meharenna, Y.T.; Oertel, P.; Bhaskar, B.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) have very similar structures, and yet neither CCP nor APX exhibits each others activities with respect to reducing substrates. APX has a unique substrate binding site near the heme propionates where ascorbate H-bonds with a surface Arg and one heme propionate (Sharp et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 303--307). The corresponding region in CCP has a much longer surface loop, and the critical Arg residue that is required for ascorbate binding in APX is Asn in CCP. In order to convert CCP into an APX, the ascorbate-binding loop and critical arginine were engineered into CCP to give the CCP2APX mutant. The mutant crystal structure shows that the engineered site is nearly identical to that found in APX. While wild-type CCP shows no APX activity, CCP2APX catalyzes the peroxidation of ascorbate at a rate of {approx}12 min{sup -1}, indicating that the engineered ascorbate-binding loop can bind ascorbate.

  13. Evidence for peroxidase activity in Caralluma umbellata.

    PubMed

    Achar, Raghu Ram; Venkatesh, B K; Sharanappa, P; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2014-08-01

    Vast applications of peroxidases create an increasing demand to characterize peroxidases from new sources with more applicability potential. The aim of the present study was to check the presence of peroxidase activity from Caralluma umbellata. This is the first report on the C. umbellata peroxidase (CUP). The presence of peroxidase was revealed by the histochemical analysis of the stem sections, zymographic studies, and in vitro peroxidase activity assay using various reducing substrates viz., 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and ferulic acid. The band pattern in zymogram confirms that CUP has a molecular weight less than that of horseradish peroxidase (44 kDa). Comparative evaluation of peroxidase activity of CUP with respect to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) indicates that CUP catalyzes ABTS and ferulic acid in a similar pattern as HRP but with guaiacol, the extent of catalysis shown by CUP over HRP is high. The standard inhibitors sodium azide and sodium meta bisulphite inhibited CUP activity in a dose dependent manner.

  14. DyP-type peroxidases comprise a novel heme peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Y

    2009-04-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) is produced by a basidiomycete (Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1) and is a member of a novel heme peroxidase family (DyP-type peroxidase family) that appears to be distinct from general peroxidases. Thus far, 80 putative members of this family have been registered in the PeroxiBase database (http://peroxibase.isbsib.ch/) and more than 400 homologous proteins have been detected via PSI-BLAST search. Although few studies have characterized the function and structure of these proteins, they appear to be bifunctional enzymes with hydrolase or oxygenase, as well as typical peroxidase activities. DyP-type peroxidase family suggests an ancient root compared with other general peroxidases because of their widespread distribution in the living world. In this review, firstly, an outline of the characteristics of DyP from T. cucumeris is presented and then interesting characteristics of the DyP-type peroxidase family are discussed.

  15. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  16. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Actinobacterial peroxidases: an unexplored resource for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Khan, Nuraan; Burton, Stephanie Gail

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are redox enzymes that can be found in all forms of life where they play diverse roles. It is therefore not surprising that they can also be applied in a wide range of industrial applications. Peroxidases have been extensively studied with particular emphasis on those isolated from fungi and plants. In general, peroxidases can be grouped into haem-containing and non-haem-containing peroxidases, each containing protein families that share sequence similarity. The order Actinomycetales comprises a large group of bacteria that are often exploited for their diverse metabolic capabilities, and with recent increases in the number of sequenced genomes, it has become clear that this metabolically diverse group of organisms also represents a large resource for redox enzymes. It is therefore surprising that, to date, no review article has been written on the wide range of peroxidases found within the actinobacteria. In this review article, we focus on the different types of peroxidases found in actinobacteria, their natural role in these organisms and how they compare with the more well-described peroxidases. Finally, we also focus on work remaining to be done in this research field in order for peroxidases from actinobacteria to be applied in industrial processes.

  18. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  19. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  20. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  1. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast.

  2. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast. PMID:26810073

  3. Recents patents in the use of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Berenize; Torres, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidases are hemoenzymes with a wide range of applications, from fine chemical synthesis to environmental biocatalysis. These outstanding biocatalysts are able to catalyze reactions such as heteroatom oxidation (N- and S-oxidation), epoxidation, hydroxylation, and the oxidation of alcohols and indole, often giving high yields and enantiomeric excess values. This makes these biocatalysts very useful for application to several biotechnological processes. In this paper, recent advances and patents surrounding the use of peroxidases are reviewed, covering different aspects related to the applications of peroxidases and the modifications carried out to improve their functionality as biocatalysts.

  4. Substrates and products of eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    van Dalen, C J; Kettle, A J

    2001-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase has been implicated in promoting oxidative tissue damage in a variety of inflammatory conditions, including asthma. It uses H(2)O(2) to oxidize chloride, bromide and thiocyanate to their respective hypohalous acids. The aim of this study was to establish which oxidants eosinophil peroxidase produces under physiological conditions. By measuring rates of H(2)O(2) utilization by the enzyme at neutral pH, we determined the catalytic rate constants for bromide and thiocyanate as 248 and 223 s(-1) and the Michaelis constants as 0.5 and 0.15 mM respectively. On the basis of these values thiocyanate is preferred 2.8-fold over bromide as a substrate for eosinophil peroxidase. Eosinophil peroxidase catalysed substantive oxidation of chloride only below pH 6.5. We found that when eosinophil peroxidase or myeloperoxidase oxidized thiocyanate, another product besides hypothiocyanite was formed; it also converted methionine into methionine sulphoxide. During the oxidation of thiocyanate, the peroxidases were present as their compound II forms. Compound II did not form when GSH was included to scavenge hypothiocyanite. We propose that the unidentified oxidant was derived from a radical species produced by the one-electron oxidation of hypothiocyanite. We conclude that at plasma concentrations of bromide (20-120 microM) and thiocyanate (20-100 microM), hypobromous acid and oxidation products of thiocyanate are produced by eosinophil peroxidase. Hypochlorous acid is likely to be produced only when substrates preferred over chloride are depleted. Thiocyanate should be considered to augment peroxidase-mediated toxicity because these enzymes can convert relatively benign hypothiocyanite into a stronger oxidant. PMID:11485572

  5. Engineering the active site of ascorbate peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Raven, E; Celik, A; Cullis, P M; Sangar, R; Sutcliffe, M J

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the catalytic versatility of haem enzymes, and in particular the relationships that exist between different classes of haem-containing proteins and the mechanisms by which the apo-protein structure controls chemical reactivity, presents a major experimental and theoretical challenge. These issues are discussed in the general context of peroxidase and cytochrome P450 chemistry, and specific issues relating to the catalytic chemistry of ascorbate peroxidase are highlighted.

  6. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  7. Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Activity of Ficin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yufang; Shen, Dongjun; Long, Yijuan; Xie, Zhixiong; Zheng, Huzhi

    2017-01-01

    Ficin is classified as a sulfhydryl protease isolated from the latex of fig trees. In most cases, a particular enzyme fits a few types of substrate and catalyzes one type of reaction. In this investigation, we found sufficient proofs for the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ficin and designed experiments to examine its effectiveness in a variety of scenarios. Ficin can transform peroxidase substrates to colored products in the existence of H2O2. Our results also indicate that the active sites of peroxidase-like activity of ficin are different from that of protease, which reveals that one enzyme may catalyze more than one kind of substrate to perform different types of reactions. On the basis of these findings, H2O2 releasing from MCF-7 cells was detected successfully. Our findings support a wider application of ficin in biochemistry and open up the possibility of utilizing ficin as enzymatic mimics in biotechnology and environmental monitoring. PMID:28224979

  8. Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Activity of Ficin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yufang; Shen, Dongjun; Long, Yijuan; Xie, Zhixiong; Zheng, Huzhi

    2017-02-01

    Ficin is classified as a sulfhydryl protease isolated from the latex of fig trees. In most cases, a particular enzyme fits a few types of substrate and catalyzes one type of reaction. In this investigation, we found sufficient proofs for the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ficin and designed experiments to examine its effectiveness in a variety of scenarios. Ficin can transform peroxidase substrates to colored products in the existence of H2O2. Our results also indicate that the active sites of peroxidase-like activity of ficin are different from that of protease, which reveals that one enzyme may catalyze more than one kind of substrate to perform different types of reactions. On the basis of these findings, H2O2 releasing from MCF-7 cells was detected successfully. Our findings support a wider application of ficin in biochemistry and open up the possibility of utilizing ficin as enzymatic mimics in biotechnology and environmental monitoring.

  9. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation.

  10. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    PubMed Central

    Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Tolleson, William H.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP), lactoperoxidase (LPO), and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2). Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (Ki  9.5 ± 0.7 mM), and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (Ki  14.5 ± 4.7 mM). The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases. PMID:22852071

  11. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  12. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  13. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    PubMed

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  14. Feruloylated arabinoxylans are oxidatively cross-linked by extracellular maize peroxidase but not by horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Burr, Sally J; Fry, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extracellular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H2O2/peroxidase, O2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extracellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H2O2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H2O2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H2O2 was also added, indicating a peroxidase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present. Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [3H]arabinoxylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  15. Conversion of aminonitrotoluenes by fungal manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Scheibner, K; Hofrichter, M

    1998-01-01

    Preparations of extracellular manganese peroxidase from the white-rot fungus Nematoloma frowardii and the litter decaying fungus Stropharia rugosoannulata converted rapidly the main intermediates of the explosive 2,4,-trinitrotoluene--the aminonitrotoluenes. In a cell-free system, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene were degraded without formation of identifiable metabolites. Radioactive experiments using a complex mixture of uniform ring-labeled 14C-TNT reduction products demonstrated the partial direct mineralization of these compounds by manganese peroxidase. The extent of aminonitrotoluene conversion as well as the release of 14CO2 from TNT reduction products were considerably enhanced in the presence of thiols like reduced glutathione or the amino acid L-cystein, which probably act as secondary mediators.

  16. Revisiting the Non-Animal Peroxidase Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto, Fernanda; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia

    2015-12-01

    Peroxidases reduce peroxide through substrate oxidation in order to alleviate oxidative stress in aerobic organisms. Since the initial description of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily, great effort has been made to characterize this large and heterogeneous group of proteins. Next generation sequencing data have permitted an in-depth study of the molecular evolution of this superfamily and allowed us to perform a phylogenetic reconstruction. Through this analysis, we identified two additional class I members and, here, we discuss the similarities and differences among members of this class. Our results provide new insights into the organization of these antioxidant enzymes, allowing us to propose a new model for the emergence and evolution of this superfamily.

  17. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  18. Biochemical and pathological studies on peroxidases -an updated review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad A; Rahmani, Arshad H; Aldebasi, Yousef H; Aly, Salah M

    2014-05-13

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress.

  19. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  20. The Reaction of Coumarins with Horseradish Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Richard W.; Sirois, J.-Claude; Morita, Hirokazu

    1975-01-01

    The peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of indole-3-acetate is inhibited by naturally occurring coumarins such as scopoletin. This inhibition is due to the preferential reactivity of the coumarins with the peroxidase compounds I, II, and III. In view of the possible growth regulatory role of coumarins in plants, the mechanism of oxidation of scopoletin by horse-radish peroxidase has been investigated. Peroxidase catalyzed coumarin oxidation requires either an electron donor and molecular oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. If peroxide is present, the reaction is mediated by peroxidase compound II which reacts rapidly and stoichiometrically with scopoletin. Different oxidation products are formed, depending on whether IAA or hydrogen peroxide promotes the reaction. A scopoletin-free radical intermediate has been isolated from the peroxide reaction mixture but was not detected in the peroxide-free system. When indole-3-acetate is the electron donor, reduced peroxidase combines with molecular oxygen to give peroxidase compound III. Added scopoletin is cooxidized with indole-3-acetate. Compared to the scopoletin peroxidation, this reaction is slower and yields fewer coumarin oxidation products. The differences observed between the two scopoletin oxidation pathways reflect: (a) the competition between indole-3-acetate and scopoletin for peroxidase compounds; (b) the lower reactivity of scopoletin with peroxidase compound III compared with peroxidase compound II. The peroxide-promoted reaction is eliminated by catalase, while the indole-3-acetate initiated oxidation is not affected by excess quantities of either catalase or superoxidase dismutase. PMID:16659024

  1. A PI 4. 6 peroxidase that specifically crosslinks extensin precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Upham, B.L; Alizadeh, H.; Ryan, K.J.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The primary cell wall is a microcomposite of cellulose, pectin, hemicellulose and protein. The warp-weft model of the primary cell wall hypothesize that extensin monomers are intermolecularly crosslinked orthogonal to the cellulose microfibril thus mechanically coupling the major load-bearing polymer: cellulose. Media of tomato cell cultures contains heat labile, peroxide dependent crosslinking activity, as determined by the rate of decrease in monomer concentration analyzed via Superose-6. Isoelectric focusing of tomato cell culture media indicated crosslinking was predominantly in the acidic peroxidase fraction (pI4.6). This peroxidase was partially purified by ultracentrifugation, DEAE-Trisacryl and HPLC-DEAE chromatography techniques resulting in a 90 fold purification and 45% yield. A second acidic peroxidase eluted from the HPLC-DEAE column had 25% of the crosslinking activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. Purified basic peroxidase had only 0.7% of the activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. The specific activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase was 5,473 mg extensin crosslinked/min/mg peroxidase. The pI 4.6 peroxidase crosslinked the following extensins: tomato I and II, carrot, Ginkgo II and did not crosslink Ginkgo I, Douglas Fir, Maize, Asparagus I and II, and sugarbeet extensins as well as bovine serum albumin. Comparison of motifs common to extensins that are crosslinked by the pI 4.6 peroxidase may help identify the crosslink domain(s) of extension.

  2. DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing peroxidase, represents a novel heme peroxidase family: ASP171 replaces the distal histidine of classical peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yasushi; Muramatsu, Riichi; Ichiyanagi, Atsushi; Sato, Takao; Shoda, Makoto

    2007-12-14

    DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing enzyme from the fungus Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1, has been classified as a peroxidase but lacks homology to almost all other known plant peroxidases. The primary structure of DyP shows moderate sequence homology to only two known proteins: the peroxide-dependent phenol oxidase, TAP, and the hypothetical peroxidase, cpop21. Here, we show the first crystal structure of DyP and reveal that this protein has a unique tertiary structure with a distal heme region that differs from that of most other peroxidases. DyP lacks an important histidine residue known to assist in the formation of a Fe4+ oxoferryl center and a porphyrin-based cation radical intermediate (compound I) during the action of ubiquitous peroxidases. Instead, our tertiary structural and spectrophotometric analyses of DyP suggest that an aspartic acid and an arginine are involved in the formation of compound I. Sequence analysis reveals that the important aspartic acid and arginine mentioned above and histidine of the heme ligand are conserved among DyP, TAP, and cpop21, and structural and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that these three enzymes do not belong to any other families of peroxidase. These findings, which strongly suggest that DyP is a representative heme peroxidase from a novel family, should facilitate the identification of additional new family members and accelerate the classification of this novel peroxidase family.

  3. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI. PMID:27180729

  4. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-05-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI.

  5. Bioconjugation of Antibodies to Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP).

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross-linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and convenient means to maintain antibody affinity while imparting a functional reporter used for antigen detection. In this chapter, we describe a process by which Sulfo-SMCC is used to generate a stable maleimide-activated HRP that is reactive with sulfhydryl groups generated in antibodies by SATA-mediated thiolation.

  6. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Eduardo Fernandes; Molina, Fernando Javier; Lopes, Flavio Marques; García-Ruíz, Pedro Antonio; Caramori, Samantha Salomão; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG) activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25%) obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein). The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity. PMID:22489198

  7. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity.

  8. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. PMID:22966760

  9. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  10. Roles of apoplastic peroxidases in plant response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Minibayeva, Farida; Beckett, Richard Peter; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Apoplastic class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) play key roles in the response of plants to pathogen infection and abiotic stresses, including wounding. Wounding is a common stress for plants that can be caused by insect or animal grazing or trampling, or result from agricultural practices. Typically, mechanical damage to a plant immediately induces a rapid release and activation of apoplastic peroxidases, and an oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS), followed by the upregulation of peroxidase genes. We discuss how plants control the expression of peroxidases genes upon wounding, and also the sparse information on peroxidase-mediated signal transduction pathways. Evidence reviewed here suggests that in many plants production of the ROS that comprise the initial oxidative burst results from a complex interplay of peroxidases with other apoplastic enzymes. Later responses following wounding include various forms of tissue healing, for example through peroxidase-dependent suberinization, or cell death. Limited data suggest that ROS-mediated death signalling during the wound response may involve the peroxidase network, together with other redox molecules. In conclusion, the ability of peroxidases to both generate and scavenge ROS plays a key role in the involvement of these enigmatic enzymes in plant stress tolerance.

  11. Horseradish-Peroxidase-Catalyzed Tyrosine Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-02

    The efficiency of protein chemical modification on tyrosine residues with N-methylluminol derivatives was drastically improved by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the previous method, based on the use of hemin and H2 O2 , oxidative side reactions such as cysteine oxidation were problematic for functionalization of proteins selectively on tyrosine residues. Oxidative activation of N-methylluminol derivatives with a minimum amount of H2 O2 prevented the occurrence of oxidative side reactions under HRP-catalyzed conditions. As probes for HRP-catalyzed protein modification, N-methylluminol derivatives showed much higher efficiency than tyramide without inducing oligomerization of probe molecules. Tyrosine modification also proceeded in the presence of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, H2 O2 -free conditions).

  12. Differential peroxidase activities in three different crops upon insect feeding

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpal; Dixit, Sameer; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are the ubiquitous enzyme and reported to be present in all living genera. They catalyses reduction of peroxide and generate reactive oxygen species. In the present study we demonstrated that insect infestation induces peroxidase activity in sap and total soluble protein (TSP) of plant leaves. Three important crop plants viz. tomato, cowpea and cotton were used for this study. After infestation of chewing insect, Peroxidase activity in the sap and TSP of all the studied plants were enhanced in the range of 1.6 to 3.14 fold. Similar observations were also obtained with feeding of sap sucking insects, in which increment in peroxidase activity of sap and TSP was in the range of 1.8 to 2.53 fold. Enhanced peroxidase activity was reconfirmed by in-gel peroxidase assay. Enzyme kinetic study showed turn over efficiency of peroxidase from cotton (~101.3 min-1) was almost similar to tomato (~100.8 min-1) but higher than cowpea (~98.21min-1). MS/MS analysis of observed band showed significant similarity with the reported peroxidases in database. PMID:23857346

  13. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of two chloroplastic peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cys peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Sakihito

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, are generated by the photosystems because photoexcited electrons are often generated in excess of requirements for CO2 fixation and used for reducing molecular oxygen, even under normal environmental conditions. Moreover, ROS generation is increased in chloroplasts if plants are subjected to stresses, such as drought, high salinity and chilling. Chloroplast-localized isoforms of ascorbate peroxidase and possibly peroxiredoxins assume the principal role of scavenging hydrogen peroxide. However, in vitro studies revealed that both types of peroxidases are easily damaged by hydrogen peroxide and lose their catalytic activities. This is one contributing factor for cellular damage that occurs under severe oxidative stress. In this review, I describe mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of these two enzymes and discuss a reason why they became susceptible to damage by hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Effects of microwaves (900 MHz) on peroxidase systems: A comparison between lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barteri, Mario; De Carolis, Roberta; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Tomassetti, Goliardo; Montemiglio, Linda Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field at 900 MHz on the catalytic activity of the enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Experimental evidence that irradiation causes conformational changes of the active sites and influences the formation and stability of the intermediate free radicals is documented by measurements of enzyme kinetics, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and cyclic voltammetry.

  16. The quantum mixed-spin heme state of barley peroxidase: A paradigm for class III peroxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Howes, B D; Schiodt, C B; Welinder, K G; Marzocchi, M P; Ma, J G; Zhang, J; Shelnutt, J A; Smulevich, G

    1999-01-01

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values, at both room temperature and 20 K, are reported, together with electron paramagnetic resonance spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species coexists with 6- and 5-cHS hemes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the currently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling may be necessary for the QS state. PMID:10388773

  17. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  18. Applications and Prospective of Peroxidase Biocatalysis in the Environmental Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    Environmental protection is, doubtless, one of the most important challenges for the human kind. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, endocrine disruptive chemicals, pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. A large variety of these xenobiotics are substrates for peroxidases and thus susceptible to enzymatic transformation. The literature reports mainly the use of horseradish peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and chloroperoxidase on the transformation of these pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, giving oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to a biological activity loss, a reduction in the bioavailability or due to the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. In addition, when the pollutants are present in soil, peroxidases catalyze a covalent binding to soil organic matter. In most of cases, oxidized products are less toxic and easily biodegradable than the parent compounds. In spite of their versatility and potential use in environmental processes, peroxidases are not applied at large scale yet. Diverse challenges, such as stability, redox potential, and the production of large amounts, should be solved in order to apply peroxidases in the pollutant transformation. In this chapter, we critically review the transformation of different xenobiotics by peroxidases, with special attention on the identified transformation products, the probable reaction mechanisms, and the toxicity reports. Finally, the design and development of an environmental biocatalyst is discussed. The design challenges are

  19. Reactions of the class II peroxidases, lignin peroxidase and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase, with hydrogen peroxide. Catalase-like activity, compound III formation, and enzyme inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Brisset, Nigel C; Smith, Andrew T; Arnao, Marino B; Acosta, Manuel

    2002-07-26

    The reactions of the fungal enzymes Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) and Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase (LiP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) have been studied. Both enzymes exhibited catalase activity with hyperbolic H(2)O(2) concentration dependence (K(m) approximately 8-10 mm, k(cat) approximately 1-3 s(-1)). The catalase and peroxidase activities of LiP were inhibited within 10 min and those of ARP in 1 h. The inactivation constants were calculated using two independent methods; LiP, k(i) approximately 19 x 10(-3) s(-1); ARP, k(i) approximately 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1). Compound III (oxyperoxidase) was detected as the majority species after the addition of H(2)O(2) to LiP or ARP, and its formation was accompanied by loss of enzyme activity. A reaction scheme is presented which rationalizes the turnover and inactivation of LiP and ARP with H(2)O(2). A similar model is applicable to horseradish peroxidase. The scheme links catalase and compound III forming catalytic pathways and inactivation at the level of the [compound I.H(2)O(2)] complex. Inactivation does not occur from compound III. All peroxidases studied to date are sensitive to inactivation by H(2)O(2), and it is suggested that the model will be generally applicable to peroxidases of the plant, fungal, and prokaryotic superfamily.

  20. fPoxDB: fungal peroxidase database for comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peroxidases are a group of oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxide to various electron acceptors. They possess a broad spectrum of impact on industry and fungal biology. There are numerous industrial applications using peroxidases, such as to catalyse highly reactive pollutants and to breakdown lignin for recycling of carbon sources. Moreover, genes encoding peroxidases play important roles in fungal pathogenicity in both humans and plants. For better understanding of fungal peroxidases at the genome-level, a novel genomics platform is required. To this end, Fungal Peroxidase Database (fPoxDB; http://peroxidase.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) has been developed to provide such a genomics platform for this important gene family. Description In order to identify and classify fungal peroxidases, 24 sequence profiles were built and applied on 331 genomes including 216 from fungi and Oomycetes. In addition, NoxR, which is known to regulate NADPH oxidases (NoxA and NoxB) in fungi, was also added to the pipeline. Collectively, 6,113 genes were predicted to encode 25 gene families, presenting well-separated distribution along the taxonomy. For instance, the genes encoding lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase were concentrated in the rot-causing basidiomycetes, reflecting their ligninolytic capability. As a genomics platform, fPoxDB provides diverse analysis resources, such as gene family predictions based on fungal sequence profiles, pre-computed results of eight bioinformatics programs, similarity search tools, a multiple sequence alignment tool, domain analysis functions, and taxonomic distribution summary, some of which are not available in the previously developed peroxidase resource. In addition, fPoxDB is interconnected with other family web systems, providing extended analysis opportunities. Conclusions fPoxDB is a fungi-oriented genomics platform for peroxidases. The sequence

  1. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to [Beta]-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  2. Limits of Versatility of Versatile Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Makovitzki, Arik; Agami, Avi; Lerer, Elad; Mimran, Avishai; Yarden, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Mn2+ is the most abundant substrate of versatile peroxidases (VPs), repression of Pleurotus ostreatus vp1 expression occurred in Mn2+-sufficient medium. This seems to be a biological contradiction. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of direct oxidation by VP1 under Mn2+-deficient conditions, as it was found to be the predominant enzyme during fungal growth in the presence of synthetic and natural substrates. The native VP1 was purified and characterized using three substrates, Mn2+, Orange II (OII), and Reactive Black 5 (RB5), each oxidized by a different active site in the enzyme. While the pH optimum for Mn2+ oxidation is 5, the optimum pH for direct oxidation of both dyes was found to be 3. Indeed, effective in vivo decolorization occurred in media without addition of Mn2+ only under acidic conditions. We have determined that Mn2+ inhibits in vitro the direct oxidation of both OII and RB5 while RB5 stabilizes both Mn2+ and OII oxidation. Furthermore, OII was found to inhibit the oxidation of both Mn2+ and RB5. In addition, we could demonstrate that VP1 can cleave OII in two different modes. Under Mn2+-mediated oxidation conditions, VP1 was able to cleave the azo bond only in asymmetric mode, while under the optimum conditions for direct oxidation (absence of Mn2+ at pH 3) both symmetric and asymmetric cleavages occurred. We concluded that the oxidation mechanism of aromatic compounds by VP1 is controlled by Mn2+ and pH levels both in the growth medium and in the reaction mixture. IMPORTANCE VP1 is a member of the ligninolytic heme peroxidase gene family of the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and plays a fundamental role in biodegradation. This enzyme exhibits a versatile nature, as it can oxidize different substrates under altered environmental conditions. VPs are highly interesting enzymes due to the fact that they contain unique active sites that are responsible for direct oxidation of various aromatic compounds

  3. Purification and characterization of windmill palm tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Caramyshev, Alexei V; Firsova, Yuliya N; Slastya, Evgen A; Tagaev, Andrei A; Potapenko, Nataly V; Lobakova, Elena S; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2006-12-27

    High peroxidase activity was demonstrated to be present in the leaf of several species of cold-resistant palms. Histochemical studies of the leaf of windmill palm tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) showed the peroxidase activity to be localized in hypoderma, epidermis, cell walls, and conducting bundles. However, chlorophyll-containing mesophyll cells had no peroxidase at all. The leaf windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP) was purified to homogeneity and had a specific activity of 6230 units/mg, RZ = 3.0, a molecular mass of 50 kDa, and an isoelectric point of pI 3.5. The electronic spectrum of WPTP with a Soret band at 403 nm was typical of plant peroxidases. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of WPTP was determined. The substrate specificity of WPTP was distinct from that of other palm peroxidases, and the best substrate for WPTP was 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). The palm peroxidase showed an unusually high stability at elevated temperatures and high concentrations of guanidine.

  4. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  5. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized (veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)), we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  6. Thyroid peroxidase activity in human nodular goiters.

    PubMed

    Moura, E G; Rosenthal, D; Carvalho-Guimarães, D P

    1989-01-01

    1. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO, iodide-oxidation) activity was evaluated in nodular and paranodular tissue samples from 27 patients with nodular goiter (19 "cold" and 8 "hot" nodules), and compared to 11 diffuse toxic goiter and 9 normal thyroid tissue samples. 2. In terms of U/g digitonin solubilized protein, TPO activity was increased in hot nodules (P less than 0.05), although not as much as in diffuse toxic goiters (P less than 0.01). 3. The mean TPO activity of tissues paranodular to a cold nodule was not different from that of normal thyroids. 4. Both the highest and the lowest TPO activities were found in cold nodules, but their mean value did not differ from those of their paranodular tissues or normal thyroids. 5. Inter-tissue variability was significantly increased (P less than 0.01) in cold nodules and in tissues paranodular to a hot nodule. 6. These data show that heterogeneity both within and among tissues contributes to the wide range of TPO activity detected in nodular goiters.

  7. Cellular glutathione peroxidase deficiency and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Forgione, Marc A; Weiss, Norbert; Heydrick, Stanley; Cap, André; Klings, Elizabeth S; Bierl, Charlene; Eberhardt, Robert T; Farber, Harrison W; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-04-01

    Cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) is the most abundant intracellular isoform of the GPx antioxidant enzyme family. In this study, we hypothesized that GPx-1 deficiency directly induces an increase in vascular oxidant stress, with resulting endothelial dysfunction. We studied vascular function in a murine model of homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 (GPx-1(-/-)). Mesenteric arterioles of GPx-1(-/-) mice demonstrated paradoxical vasoconstriction to beta-methacholine and bradykinin, whereas wild-type (WT) mice showed dose-dependent vasodilation in response to both agonists. One week of treatment of GPx-1(-/-) mice with L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), which increases intracellular thiol pools, resulted in restoration of normal vascular reactivity in the mesenteric bed of GPx-1(-/-) mice. We observed an increase of the isoprostane iPF(2alpha)-III, a marker of oxidant stress, in the plasma and aortas of GPx-1(-/-) mice compared with WT mice, which returned toward normal after OTC treatment. Aortic sections from GPx-1(-/-) mice showed increased binding of an anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody in the absence of frank vascular lesions. These findings demonstrate that homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 leads to impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilator function presumably due to a decrease in bioavailable nitric oxide and to increased vascular oxidant stress. These vascular abnormalities can be attenuated by increasing bioavailable intracellular thiol pools.

  8. Redundancy among Manganese Peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Salame, Tomer M.; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn2+ amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn2+-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn2+-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn2+-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn2+-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  9. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

  10. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Jovanović, Jelena R; Stefanović, Andrea B; Djokić, Veljko R; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2016-03-01

    Kaolin showed as a very perspective carrier for the enzyme immobilization and it was used for the adsorption of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The effects of the enzyme concentration and pH on the immobilization efficiency were studied in the reaction with pyrogallol and anthraquinone dye C.I. Acid Violet 109 (AV 109). In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analysis by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller were performed for kaolin, thermally activated kaolin and the immobilized enzyme. It has been shown that 0.1 IU of HRP-kaolin decolorized 87 % of dye solution, under the optimal conditions (pH 5.0, temperature 24 °C, dye concentration 40 mg/L and 0.2 mM of H2O2) within 40 min. The immobilized HRP decolorization follows the Ping Pong Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by the dye. The biocatalyst retained 35 ± 0.9 % of the initial activity after seven cycles of reuse in the decolorization reaction of AV 109 under optimal conditions in a batch reactor. The obtained kinetic parameters and reusability study confirmed improvement in performances of k-HRP compared to free, indicating that k-HRP has a great potential for environmental purposes.

  11. Molecular characterization of lignin peroxidase from the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes cervina: a novel fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuta; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-01

    The lignin peroxidase (LiP) from Trametes cervina was cloned, characterized, and identified as a novel fungal peroxidase. The sequence of T. cervina LiP encodes the essential amino acids for shaping the heme cavity and calcium-binding sites, which are conserved in plant and fungal peroxidases. However, a sequence homology analysis showed that T. cervina LiP has two unique features: it lacks the conserved tryptophan residue corresponding to the substrate-oxidation site (Trp171) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium LiP and it has a tyrosine residue (Tyr181) that has never been reported in other lignin peroxidases. A tertiary model of T. cervina LiP showed that Tyr181 sterically adjacent to the 6-propionate group of heme is surrounded by acidic amino acids and is exposed to the exterior. These attributes indicate that Tyr181 could be a T. cervina LiP substrate-oxidation site. A phylogenetic analysis showed that T. cervina LiP does not cluster with any other fungal peroxidases, suggesting that it is a unique molecule that is evolutionarily distant from other peroxidases. Thus, we concluded that T. cervina LiP could be a novel secreted peroxidase, among those produced by fungi, with a new oxidation mechanism probably involving Tyr181.

  12. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  13. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  14. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  15. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    PubMed

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  16. CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF ENDOGENOUS PEROXIDASE IN THYROID FOLLICULAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Judy M.; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    1970-01-01

    Endogenous peroxidase activity in rat thyroid follicular cells is demonstrated cytochemically. Following perfusion fixation of the thyroid gland, small blocks of tissue are incubated in a medium containing substrate for peroxidase, before being postfixed in osmium tetroxide, and processed for electron microscopy. Peroxidase activity is found in thyroid follicular cells in the following sites: (a) the perinuclear cisternae, (b) the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum, (c) the inner few lamellae of the Golgi complex, (d) within vesicles, particularly those found apically, and (e) associated with the external surfaces of the microvilli that project apically from the cell into the colloid. In keeping with the radioautographic evidence of others and the postulated role of thyroid peroxidase in iodination, it is suggested that the microvillous apical cell border is the major site where iodination occurs. However, that apical vesicles also play a role in iodination cannot be excluded. The in vitro effect of cyanide, aminotriazole, and thiourea is also discussed. PMID:4190069

  17. Conversion of adamsite (phenarsarzin chloride) by fungal manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Tsivunchyk, O; Steinbach, K; von Löw, E; Scheibner, K; Hofrichter, M

    2004-02-01

    Fungal manganese peroxidase was found to convert the persistent chemical warfare agent adamsite (phenarsarzin chloride) in a cell-free reaction mixture containing sodium malonate, Mn(2+) ions, and reduced glutathione. The organo-arsenical compound disappeared completely within 48 h accompanied by the formation of a more polar metabolite with a clearly modified UV spectrum. Thus, As(III) in the adamsite molecule was oxidized by manganese peroxidase to As(V) which added dioxygen and released chloride.

  18. Hypocotyl Growth and Peroxidases of Bidens pilosus1

    PubMed Central

    Desbiez, Marie-Odile; Boyer, Nicole; Gaspar, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    Pricking one cotyledon of young Bidens pilosus plants induces rapid inhibition of hypocotyl growth, essentially in its middle portion. Analysis of soluble peroxidases indicates rapid changes (increase of activity) in basic isoenzymes followed by more progressive enhancement of the acidic ones. Pretreatment of the plants with lithium prevents the inhibition of elongation due to pricking as well as the peroxidase changes. The phenomenon is similar to the previously described thigmomorphogenetic process in Bryonia dioica. PMID:16661885

  19. Comparison of lignin peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase for catalyzing the removal of nonylphenol from water.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shipeng; Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Zhou, Lei; Feng, Yiping; Gao, Shixiang

    2014-02-01

    Concentrations of aqueous-phase nonylphenol (NP), a well-known endocrine-disrupting chemical, are shown to be reduced effectively via reaction with lignin peroxidase (LiP) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide. We systematically assessed their reaction efficiencies at varying conditions, and the results have confirmed that the catalytic performance of LiP toward NP was more efficient than that of HRP under experimental conditions. Mass spectrum analysis demonstrated that polymerization through radical-radical coupling mechanism was the pathway leading to NP transformation. Our molecular modeling with the assistance of ab initio suggested the coupling of NP likely proceeded via covalent bonding between two NP radicals at their unsubstituted carbons in phenolic rings. Data from acute immobilization tests with Daphnia confirm that NP toxicity is effectively eliminated by LiP/HRP-catalyzed NP removal. The findings in this study provide useful information for understanding LiP/HRP-mediated NP reactions, and comparison of enzymatic performance can present their advantages for up-scale applications in water/wastewater treatment.

  20. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways.

  1. Roles of horseradish peroxidase in response to terbium stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing

    2014-10-01

    The pollution of the environment by rare earth elements (REEs) causes deleterious effects on plants. Peroxidase plays important roles in plant response to various environmental stresses. Here, to further understand the overall roles of peroxidase in response to REE stress, the effects of the REE terbium ion (Tb(3+)) on the peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents in the leaves and roots of horseradish during different growth stages were simultaneously investigated. The results showed that after 24 and 48 h of Tb(3+) treatment, the peroxidase activity in horseradish leaves decreased, while the H2O2 and lignin contents increased. After a long-term (8 and 16 days) treatment with Tb(3+), these effects were also observed in the roots. The analysis of the changes in peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents revealed that peroxidase plays important roles in not only reactive oxygen species scavenging but also cell wall lignification in horseradish under Tb(3+) stress. These roles were closely related to the dose of Tb(3+), duration of stress, and growth stages of horseradish.

  2. Role of peroxidases in the compensation of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase knockdown in rice plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Aurenivia; Martins, Marcio O; Ribeiro, Carolina W; Fontenele, Adilton V; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2011-10-01

    Current studies, particularly in Arabidopsis, have demonstrated that mutants deficient in cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases (APXs) are susceptible to the oxidative damage induced by abiotic stress. In contrast, we demonstrate here that rice mutants double silenced for cytosolic APXs (APx1/2s) up-regulated other peroxidases, making the mutants able to cope with abiotic stress, such as salt, heat, high light and methyl viologen, similar to non-transformed (NT) plants. The APx1/2s mutants exhibited an altered redox homeostasis, as indicated by increased levels of H₂O₂ and ascorbate and glutathione redox states. Both mutant and NT plants exhibited similar photosynthesis (CO₂) assimilation and photochemical efficiency) under both normal and stress conditions. Overall, the antioxidative compensatory mechanism displayed by the mutants was associated with increased expression of OsGpx genes, which resulted in higher glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the cytosolic and chloroplastic fractions. The transcript levels of OsCatA and OsCatB and the activities of catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOD; type III peroxidases) were also up-regulated. None of the six studied isoforms of OsApx were up-regulated under normal growth conditions. Therefore, the deficiency in cytosolic APXs was effectively compensated for by up-regulation of other peroxidases. We propose that signalling mechanisms triggered in rice mutants could be distinct from those proposed for Arabidopsis.

  3. Looking for Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Joaquín; Esteban-Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Monolignol polymerization into lignin is catalyzed by peroxidases or laccases. Recently, a Zinnia elegans peroxidase (ZePrx) that is considered responsible for monolignol polymerization in this plant has been molecularly and functionally characterized. Nevertheless, Arabidopsis thaliana has become an alternative model plant for studies of lignification, filling the gaps that may occur with Z. elegans. The arabidopsis genome offers the possibility of performing bioinformatic analyses and data mining that are not yet feasible with other plant species, in order to obtain preliminary evidence on the role of genes and proteins. In our search for arabidopsis homologs to the ZePrx, we performed an exhaustive in silico characterization of everything from the protein to the transcript of Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases (AtPrxs) homologous to ZePrx, with the aim of identifying one or more peroxidases that may be involved in monolignol polymerization. Nine peroxidases (AtPrx 4, 5, 52, 68, 67, 36, 14, 49 and 72) with an E-value greater than 1e-80 with ZePrx were selected for this study. The results demonstrate that a high level of 1D, 2D and 3D homology between these AtPrxs and ZePrx are not always accompanied by the presence of the same electrostatic and mRNA properties that indicate a peroxidase is involved in lignin biosynthesis. In summary, we can confirm that the peroxidases involved in lignification are among AtPrx 4, 52, 49 and 72. Their structural and mRNA features indicate that exert their action in the cell wall similar to ZePrx.

  4. Caralluma umbellata Peroxidase: Biochemical Characterization and Its Detoxification Potentials in Comparison with Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Achar, Raghu Ram; Venkatesh, B K; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2017-02-01

    Caralluma umbellata peroxidase (CUP) is an acidic heme-containing protein having a molecular weight of ~42 kDa and is specific to guaiacol. It is not a glycoprotein. It was purified to 12.5-fold purity with 6.16 % yield. Its activity is dependent on hydrogen peroxide and has an optimum pH and temperature of 6.2 and 45 °C respectively. It can decolorize dyes, viz., Aniline Blue, Reactive Black 5, and Reactive Blue 19 but not Congo Red, while HRP can decolorize Congo Red also. It has lignin-degrading potentiality as it can decompose veratryl alcohol. Detoxification of phenol was more by CUP compared to HRP while with p-nitrophenol HRP has a greater detoxification rate. Based on our results, CUP was identified to be capable of oxidizing a variety of hazardous substances and also a lignin-degrading plant biocatalyst.

  5. Cantaloupe melon peroxidase: characterization and effects of additives on activity.

    PubMed

    Lamikanra, O; Watson, M A

    2000-06-01

    Peroxidase in cantaloupe melon (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud.), a fruit commonly fresh cut processed, was characterized to determine reaction pathway, optimal conditions for activity and effect of some additives on enzymatic action. Mn2+, CaCl2, NaNO2 and kinetin had partial inhibitory effects on enzyme activity. Activity was effectively inhibited by compounds capable of chelating peroxidase heme iron such as diethyldithiocarbamate and tiron, but unaffected by EDTA. Free radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase, also had no effect on reaction velocity. Enzymatic action was consistent with that of ascorbate peroxidase based on the relatively higher affinity for ascorbate over guaiacol. Optimum activity temperature was 50-55 degrees C. The enzyme was stable at temperatures below 40 degrees C and at 50 degrees C for up to 10 min. Over 90% of total activity was lost at 80 degrees C within 5 min. Broad pH optima, 5.5-7.5 at 50 degrees C and 6-7 at 30 degrees C, were obtained. Peroxidase activity in cantaloupe was higher than those in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), suggesting a relatively high oxidative stress in fresh cut cantaloupe. The potential use of ascorbate as an additive in fresh cut cantaloupe melon was demonstrated by its ability to preserve color in minimally processed fruits for 25 days at 4 degrees C, possibly as a result of an enhanced antioxidative action of the ascorbate-peroxidase complex and trace metal ion cofactors.

  6. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus

    SciTech Connect

    Mliki, A.; Zimmermann, W. )

    1992-03-01

    Peroxidases play an important role in the oxidation of a large number of aromatic compounds, including recalcitrant substances. An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a K{sub m} of 17.8 {mu}M and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a K{sub m} of 2.07 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C{alpha}-C{beta} bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydroxy-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl) propane, a nonphenolic dimeric lignin model compound. The spectrum of te peroxidase showed a soret band at 405 nm, which disappeared after reduction with sodium dithionite, indicating that the enzyme is a hemoprotein. Testing the effects of various inhibitors on the enzyme activity showed that it is a bifunctional enzyme having catalase and peroxidase activities.

  7. Peroxidase extraction from jicama skin peels for phenol removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiong, T.; Lau, S. Y.; Khor, E. H.; Danquah, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives exist in various types of industrial effluents, and are known to be harmful to aquatic lives even at low concentrations. Conventional treatment technologies for phenol removal are challenged with long retention time, high energy consumption and process cost. Enzymatic treatment has emerged as an alternative technology for phenol removal from wastewater. These enzymes interact with aromatic compounds including phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, forming free radicals which polymerize spontaneously to produce insoluble phenolic polymers. This work aims to extract peroxidase from agricultural wastes materials and establish its application for phenol removal. Peroxidase was extracted from jicama skin peels under varying extraction conditions of pH, sample-to-buffer ratio (w/v %) and temperature. Experimental results showed that extraction process conducted at pH 10, 40% w/v and 25oC demonstrated a peroxidase activity of 0.79 U/mL. Elevated temperatures slightly enhanced the peroxidase activities. Jicama peroxidase extracted at optimum extraction conditions demonstrated a phenol removal efficiency of 87.5% at pH 7. Phenol removal efficiency was ∼ 97% in the range of 30 - 40oC, and H2O2 dosage has to be kept below 100 mM for maximum removal under phenol concentration tested.

  8. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    PubMed Central

    Ahariz, Mohamed; Courtois, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil) was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30) and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm2 of titanium foil (n = 12). The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate), Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated) and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates) to limit C. albicans biofilm formation. PMID:22915919

  9. Feasible Relation between Glutathione Peroxidase and Febrile Seizure

    PubMed Central

    MAHYAR, Abolfazl; AYAZI, Parviz; DALIRANI, Reza; MOHAMMAD HOSEINI, Behzad; SAROOKHANI, Mohammad Reza; JAVADI, Amir; ESMAEILY, Shiva

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase and febrile seizure. Materials & Methods In this case-control study, 43 children with simple febrile seizure (case group) were compared with 43 febrile children without seizure (control group) in terms of serum glutathione peroxidase level, measured by ELISA method. This study was conducted in Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences in Qazvin, Iran in 2012-2013. The results were analyzed and compared in two groups. Results From 43 children 24 (53%) were male and 19 (47%) were female in children with simple febrile seizure, and 26 (60%) were male and 17 (40%) were female in febrile children without seizure (control group) (P=0.827). Serum glutathione peroxidase level was 166 U/ml (SD=107) in the case group and 141 U/ml (SD=90.5) in the control group of no significant difference. Conclusion There was no significant relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase and simple febrile seizure. Thus, it seems that glutathione peroxidase, an essential component of antioxidant system, does not play any role in the pathogenesis of simple febrile seizure. PMID:28277558

  10. Digoxigenylated wheat germ agglutinin visualized with alkaline phosphatase-labeled anti-digoxigenin antibodies--a new, sensitive technique with the potential for single and double tracing of neuronal connections.

    PubMed

    Veh, R W

    1991-01-02

    For double tracing experiments, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) molecules labeled with two different haptens are desirable. In the present report the suitability of digoxigenylated WGA (DIG-WGA) for retrograde tracing was investigated. For this purpose the new tracer was pressure injected into rat brains and the transported DIG-WGA visualized via its digoxigenyl group with an alkaline phosphatase linked anti DIG antibody in permanently stained sections of high quality. With fixatives containing 2.5% glutaraldehyde only few positive cells were found. However, at milder fixation conditions (4% paraformaldehyde, 0.05% glutaraldehyde 0.2% picric acid, 30 min) retrogradely labeled cells were detected with a sensitivity comparable to tetramethylbenzidine protocols for conventional WGA-HRP (horseradish peroxidase) tracing. Preliminary experiments suggest excellent suitability for double labeling.

  11. Assay of methylglyoxal and glyoxal and control of peroxidase interference.

    PubMed

    Thornalley, Paul J; Rabbani, Naila

    2014-04-01

    Methylglyoxal and glyoxal are endogenous α-oxoaldehyde metabolites and substrates of the glyoxalase system. These and related α-oxoaldehydes are often determined in cell, tissue and body fluid samples by derivatization with 1,2-diaminobenzene and similar compounds. Peroxidase activity in physiological tissues is a potential interference in estimation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal as it catalyses the conversion of 1,2-diaminobenzene into trace amounts of these dicarbonyl metabolites. Residual peroxidase activity in deproteinized extracts is found to cause significant interference in methylglyoxal and glyoxal estimations. This interference is blocked by the addition of sodium azide in the derivatizing buffer. Estimates of methylglyoxal concentration thereby obtained are in keeping with those predicted by systems modelling of methylglyoxal glycation kinetics in situ. Blocking sample peroxidase activity is important to avoid overestimation in the measurement of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. A dicarbonyl assay protocol resistant to interferences is described in the present article.

  12. Two distinct groups of fungal catalase/peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2009-08-01

    Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional haem b-containing (Class I) peroxidases with overwhelming catalase activity and substantial peroxidase activity with various one-electron donors. These unique oxidoreductases evolved in ancestral bacteria revealing a complex gene-duplicated structure. Besides being found in numerous bacteria of all phyla, katG genes were also detected in genomes of lower eukaryotes, most prominently of sac and club fungi. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates the occurrence of two distinct groups of fungal KatGs that differ in localization, structural and functional properties. Analysis of lateral gene transfer of bacterial katGs into fungal genomes reveals that the most probable progenitor was a katG from a bacteroidetes predecessor. The putative physiological role(s) of both fungal KatG groups is discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships in bacterial KatGs and is related with the acquisition of (phyto)pathogenicity in fungi.

  13. Glutathione peroxidase in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, P; Velander, G; Mai, J; Thorling, E B; Dupont, E

    1991-01-01

    A defective antioxidant scavenging system plays a major role in one of the theories of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a general difference in antioxidant activity between early and advanced cases of Parkinson's disease. Twenty five recently diagnosed patients, without any clinical fluctuations (group A), and 25 patients in a late phase of the disease with severe fluctuations in response to levodopa therapy (group B) were included in the study. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase was determined as a measure of antioxidant activity and significantly lower values were found in group B than in group A. Regression analyses in groups A and B showed significant correlation between glutathione peroxidase and duration of disease, but not between glutathione peroxidase and age of patients. Images PMID:1940936

  14. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases.

  15. Secretion-related uptake of horseradish peroxidase in neurohypophysial axons

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    During secretion of the neurohypophysial hormones, oxytocin and vasopressin, secretory granule membrane is added to the plasma membrane of the axon terminals. It is generally assumed that subsequent internalization of this additional membrane occurs by endocytosis. In order to study this process, we have traced the uptake of intravenously injected horseradish peroxidase by neurohypophysial axons in rats and golden hamsters. Peroxidase reaction product within the secretory axons was found mainly in vacuolar and C-shaped structures of a size comparable with or larger than the neurosecretory granules. Our observations suggest that these large horseradish peroxidase (HRP)- impregnated vacuoles arise directly by a form of macropinocytosis. Morphometric analysis indicated that this form of membrane retrieval increased significantly after the two types of stimuli used, reversible hemorrhage and electrical stimulation of the pituitary stalk. Microvesicular uptake of HRP was found to be comparatively less. PMID:181385

  16. Inorganic chemistry of defensive peroxidases in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ashby, M T

    2008-10-01

    The innate host response system is comprised of various mechanisms for orchestrating host response to microbial infection of the oral cavity. The heterogeneity of the oral cavity and the associated microenvironments that are produced give rise to different chemistries that affect the innate defense system. One focus of this review is on how these spatial differences influence the two major defensive peroxidases of the oral cavity, salivary peroxidase (SPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). With hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidant, the defensive peroxidases use inorganic ions to produce antimicrobials that are generally more effective than H(2)O(2) itself. The concentrations of the inorganic substrates are different in saliva vs. gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Thus, in the supragingival regime, SPO and MPO work in unison for the exclusive production of hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-), a reactive inorganic species), which constantly bathes nascent plaques. In contrast, MPO is introduced to the GCF during inflammatory response, and in that environment it is capable of producing hypochlorite (OCl(-)), a chemically more powerful oxidant that is implicated in host tissue damage. A second focus of this review is on inter-person variation that may contribute to different peroxidase function. Many of these differences are attributed to dietary or smoking practices that alter the concentrations of relevant inorganic species in the oral cavity (e.g.: fluoride, F(-); cyanide, CN(-); cyanate, OCN(-); thiocyanate, SCN(-); and nitrate, NO(3)(-)). Because of the complexity of the host and microflora biology and the associated chemistry, it is difficult to establish the significance of the human peroxidase systems during the pathogenesis of oral diseases. The problem is particularly complex with respect to the gingival sulcus and periodontal pockets (where the very different defensive stratagems of GCF and saliva co-mingle). Despite this complexity, intriguing in vitro and in vivo

  17. Phylogeny, topology, structure and functions of membrane-bound class III peroxidases in vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Lüthje, Sabine; Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Hopff, David; Möller, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are key player in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. Membrane-bound isoenzymes have been described for peroxidase superfamilies in plants and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a location of peroxidases of the secretory pathway (class III peroxidases) at the tonoplast and the plasma membrane. Proteomic approaches using highly enriched plasma membrane preparations suggest organisation of these peroxidases in microdomains, a developmentally regulation and an induction of isoenzymes by oxidative stress. Phylogenetic relations, topology, putative structures, and physiological function of membrane-bound class III peroxidases will be discussed.

  18. Removal of phenolic compounds from wastewaters using soybean peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.; Nicell, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Toxic and odiferous phenolic compounds are present in wastewaters generated by a variety of industries including petroleum refining, plastics, resins, textiles, and iron and steel manufacturing among others. Due to its commercial availability in purified form, its useful presence in raw plant material, and its proven ability to remove a variety of phenolic contaminants from wastewaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) appears to be the peroxidase enzyme of choice in enzymatic wastewater treatment studies. Problems with HRP catalyzed phenol removal, however, include the formation of toxic soluble reaction by-products, the cost of the enzyme, and costs associated with disposal of the phenolic precipitate generated. Enzyme costs are incurred because the enzyme is inactivated during the phenol removal process by various side reactions. While recent work has shown that enzyme inactivation can be reduced using chemical additives, the problem of enzyme cost could be circumvented by using a less expensive source of enzyme. In 1991, the seed coat of the soybean was identified as a very rich source of peroxidase enzyme. Since the seed coat of the soybean is a waste product of the soybean food industry, soybean peroxidase (SBP) has the potential of being a cost effective alternative to HRP in wastewater treatment. In this study, SBP is characterized in terms of its catalytic activity, its stability, and its ability to promote removal of phenolic compounds from synthetic wastewaters. Results obtained are discussed and compared to similar investigations using HRP.

  19. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  2. Mammalian heme peroxidases: from molecular mechanisms to health implications.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L; Pattison, David I; Rees, Martin D

    2008-07-01

    A marked increase in interest has occurred over the last few years in the role that mammalian heme peroxidase enzymes, primarily myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase, and lactoperoxidase, may play in both disease prevention and human pathologies. This increased interest has been sparked by developments in our understanding of polymorphisms that control the levels of these enzymes, a greater understanding of the basic chemistry and biochemistry of the oxidants formed by these species, the development of specific biomarkers that can be used in vivo to detect damage induced by these oxidants, the detection of active forms of these peroxidases at most, if not all, sites of inflammation, and a correlation between the levels of these enzymes and a number of major human pathologies. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the enzymology, chemistry, biochemistry and biologic roles of mammalian peroxidases and the oxidants that they generate, the potential role of these oxidants in human disease, and the use of the levels of these enzymes in disease prognosis.

  3. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  4. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification.

  5. Immobilization of peroxidase on SPEU film via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Ha; Guanghui, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    The acrylic acid or acrylamide were grafted via radiation onto segmented polyetherurethane (SPEU) film which is a kind of biocompatible material. Then the Horse radish peroxidase was immobilized on the grafted SPEU film through chemical binding. Some quantitative relationships between the percent graft and the activity, amount of immobilized enzyme were given. The properties and application of obtained biomaterial was studied as well.

  6. Calorimetric studies of the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Kresheck, G.C.; Erman, J.E.

    1988-04-05

    Two endotherms are observed by differential scanning calorimetry during the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase at pH 7.0. The transition midpoint temperatures (t/sub m/) were 43.9 +- 1.4 and 63.3 +- 1.6 /sup 0/C, independent of concentration. The two endotherms were observed at all pH values between 4 and 8, with the transition temperatures varying with pH. Precipitation was observed between pH 4 and 6, and only qualitative data are presented for this region. The thermal unfolding of cytochrome c peroxidase was sensitive to the presence and ligation state of the heme. Only a single endotherm was observed for the unfolding of the apoprotein, and this transition was similar to the high-temperature transition in the holoenzyme. Addition of KCN to the holoenzyme increases the midpoint of the high-temperature transition whereas the low-temperature transition was increased upon addition of KF. Binding of the natural substrate ferricytochrome c to the enzyme increases the low-temperature transition by 4.8 +- 1.3 /sup 0/C but has no effect on the high-temperature transition at pH 7. The presence of cytochrome c peroxidase decreases the stability of cytochrome c, and both proteins appear to unfold simultaneously. The results are discussed in terms of the two domains evident in the X-ray crystallographic structure of cytochrome c peroxidase

  7. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification. PMID:24632343

  8. Ethylene production and peroxidase activity in aphid-infested barley.

    PubMed

    Argandoña, V H; Chaman, M; Cardemil, L; Muñoz, O; Zúñiga, G E; Corcuera, L J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether ethylene is involved in the oxidative and defensive responses of barley to the aphids Schizaphis graminum (biotype C) and Rhopalophum padi. The effect of aphid infestation on ethylene production was measured in two barley cultivars (Frontera and Aramir) that differ in their susceptibility to aphids. Ethylene evolution was higher in plants infested for 16 hr than in plants infested for 4 hr in both cultivars. Under aphid infestation, the production of ethylene was higher in cv. Frontera than in Aramir, the more aphid susceptible cultivar. Ethylene production also increases with the degree of infestation. Maximum ethylene evolution was detected after 16 hr when plants were infested with 10 or more aphids. Comparing the two species of aphids, Schizaphis graminum induced more ethylene evolution than Rhopalosiphum padi. Infestation with S. graminum increased hydrogen peroxide content and total soluble peroxidase activity in cv. Frontera, with a maximum level of H2O2 observed after 20 min of infestation and the maximum in soluble peroxidase activity after 30 min of infestation. When noninfested barley seedlings from cv. Frontera were exposed to ethylene, an increase in hydrogen peroxide and in total peroxidase activity was detected at levels similar to those of infested plants from cv. Frontera. When noninfested plants were treated with 40 ppm of ethylene, the maximum levels of H2O2 and soluble peroxidase activity were at 10 and 40 min, respectively. Ethylene also increased the activity of both cell-wall-bound peroxidases types (ionically and covalently bound), comparable with infestation. These results suggest that ethylene is involved in the oxidative responses of barley plants induced by infestation.

  9. Degradation of textile dyes mediated by plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Nair, R Aswathi; Abraham, T Emilia

    2002-01-01

    The peroxidase enzyme from the plants Ipomea palmata (1.003 IU/g of leaf) and Saccharum spontaneum (3.6 IU/g of leaf) can be used as an alternative to the commercial source of horseradish and soybean peroxidase enzyme for the decolorization of textile dyes, mainly azo dyes. Eight textiles dyes currently used by the industry and seven other dyes were selected for decolorization studies at 25-200 mg/L levels using these plant enzymes. The enzymes were purified prior to use by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and ion exchange and gel permeation chromatographic techniques. Peroxidase of S. spontaneum leaf (specific activity of 0.23 IU/mg) could completely degrade Supranol Green and Procion Green HE-4BD (100%) dyes within 1 h, whereas Direct Blue, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G and Chrysoidine were degraded >70% in 1 h. Peroxidase of Ipomea (I. palmata leaf; specific activity of 0.827 U/mg) degraded 50 mg/L of the dyes Methyl Orange (26%), Crystal Violet (36%), and Supranol Green (68%) in 2-4 h and Brilliant Green (54%), Direct Blue (15%), and Chrysoidine (44%) at the 25 mg/L level in 1 to 2 h of treatment. The Saccharum peroxidase was immobilized on a hydrophobic matrix. Four textile dyes, Procion Navy Blue HER, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G, Procion Green HE-4BD, and Supranol Green, at an initial concentration of 50 mg/L were completely degraded within 8 h by the enzyme immobilized on the modified polyethylene matrix. The immobilized enzyme was used in a batch reactor for the degradation of Procion Green HE-4BD and the reusability was studied for 15 cycles, and the half-life was found to be 60 h.

  10. Phenol removal by peroxidases extracted from Chinese cabbage root

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, H.I.; Jeong, Y.H.

    1995-12-31

    More than four million tons of Chinese cabbages are produced in Korea. Most of them are used as raw materials for Kimchi, but root parts of them are discarded as agricultural wastes. A trial for the application of agricultural waste to industrial waste water treatment was made as an effort to the efficient use of natural resources and to reduce water pollution problem simultaneously. Peroxidases of both solid and liquid phases were obtained from Chinese cabbage roots by using commercial juicer. The differences in peroxidase activity among the various cultivars of Chinese cabbages in Korea were little and electrophoretic patterns of various peroxidases will be discussed. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity will be discussed also. Since peroxidases are distributed into 66% in liquid (juice) and 34% in solid phase (pulp), enzymes from both phases were applied to investigate the enzymatic removal of phenol from waste water. After phenol solution at 150 ppm being reacted with liquid phase enzyme (1,800 unit/1) for 3 hours in a batch stirred reactor, 96% of phenol could be removed through polymerization and precipitation. Also, phenol could be removed from initial 120 ppm to final 5 ppm by applying solid phase enzyme in an air lift reactor (600 unit/1). Almost equivalent efficiencies of phenol removal were observed between two systems, even though only one third of the enzymes in batch stirred reactor was applied in air lift reactor. The possible reason for this phenomenon is because peroxidases exist as immobilized forms in solid phase.

  11. Pleurotus ostreatus heme peroxidases: an in silico analysis from the genome sequence to the enzyme molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Fernández, Elena; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2011-11-01

    An exhaustive screening of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was performed to search for nucleotide sequences of heme peroxidases in this white-rot fungus, which could be useful for different biotechnological applications. After sequence identification and manual curation of the corresponding genes and cDNAs, the deduced amino acid sequences were converted into structural homology models. A comparative study of these sequences and their structural models with those of known fungal peroxidases revealed the complete inventory of heme peroxidases of this fungus. This consists of cytochrome c peroxidase and ligninolytic peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase and versatile peroxidase but not lignin peroxidase, as representative of the "classical" superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases; and members of two relatively "new" peroxidase superfamilies, namely heme-thiolate peroxidases, here described for the first time in a fungus from the genus Pleurotus, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases, already known in P. ostreatus but still to be thoroughly explored and characterized.

  12. Chlorpromazine as permeabilizer and reagent for detection of microbial peroxidase and peroxidaselike activities.

    PubMed Central

    Galeazzi, L; Turchetti, G; Grilli, G; Groppa, G; Giunta, S

    1986-01-01

    Chlorpromazine was used to perform a test for the detection of microbial peroxidase activities. The compound acts as both a cell permeabilizer and a reagent in the procedure developed which allows the detection of peroxidase and peroxidase like reactions both semiquantitatively in whole cell determinations and quantitatively in cell-free supernatants. PMID:3539020

  13. Lignin-degrading peroxidases from genome of selective ligninolytic fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E; Martínez, Angel T

    2012-05-11

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora.

  14. Peroxidase Activity in Relation to Suberization and Respiration in White Spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) Seedling Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Flanagan, Anne M.; Owens, John N.

    1985-01-01

    Peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) activity is associated with suberization during endodermal development and metacutization in roots of white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) seedlings. Histochemical analysis indicates a relationship between suberization and peroxidase activity, but peroxidase is ubiquitous. Increased peroxidase activity results from the induction of four anodic peroxidase isozymes in addition to quantitative increases in two anodic peroxidase isozymes. Four of these polymerized eugenol. Cold temperatures induce formation of two anodic isozymes and result in suberization. The increased peroxidase activity associated with suberization is correlated to residual respiration. In an attempt to elucidate this relationship, the effect of respiratory inhibitors on respiration and peroxidase activity are compared. PMID:16664352

  15. Oxidative activation of benzidine and its derivatives by peroxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Josephy, P D

    1985-01-01

    Benzidine (4,4'-diaminobiphenyl) is a known human carcinogen; exposure to this substance resulted in an epidemic of bladder cancer among workers in the dye industry in Europe and North America. The chemical or enzymatic oxidation of benzidine proceeds via a racial cation detectable by electron spin resonance. Peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of benzidine generates reactive electrophiles which readily form adducts with phenol and thiol compounds. The structures of these novel metabolites are described. Peroxidases, including prostaglandin synthase, catalyze benzidine binding to protein and nucleic acid; the nature of the resulting adducts is unknown. The relevance of these processes to benzidine carcinogenesis in vivo is the subject of research and debate. A central question remains: is benzidine activated in extra-hepatic target tissues such as bladder epithelium, or transported to these tissues following hepatic oxidative metabolism? PMID:3007087

  16. Steady state equivalence among autocatalytic peroxidase-oxidase reactions.

    PubMed

    Méndez-González, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-12-14

    Peroxidase-oxidase is an enzymatic reaction that can exhibit dynamical scenarios such as bistability, sustained oscillations, and Shilnikov chaos. In this work, we apply the chemical reaction network theory approach to find kinetic constants such that the associated mass action kinetics ordinary differential equations induced by three four dimensional structurally different enzymatic reaction systems can support the same steady states for several chemical species despite differences in their chemical nature.

  17. Steady state equivalence among autocatalytic peroxidase-oxidase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-González, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    Peroxidase-oxidase is an enzymatic reaction that can exhibit dynamical scenarios such as bistability, sustained oscillations, and Shilnikov chaos. In this work, we apply the chemical reaction network theory approach to find kinetic constants such that the associated mass action kinetics ordinary differential equations induced by three four dimensional structurally different enzymatic reaction systems can support the same steady states for several chemical species despite differences in their chemical nature.

  18. Peripheral Muscle Targets and Central Projections of the Mesencephalic Trigeminal Nucleus in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niping; May, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (MesV) contains the somata of primary afferent neurons that innervate muscle spindles in masticatory muscles and mechanoreceptors in the periodontal ligaments. There are conflicting reports about additional peripheral targets of MesV, such as the extraocular muscles, as well as about its central targets. In addition, only limited primate data are available. Consequently, we examined MesV projections in macaque monkeys. The retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into masticatory or extraocular muscles to define the peripheral targets of the primate MesV. Numerous labeled neurons were found in ipsilateral MesV following masticatory muscle injections. The scattered distribution of labeled cells, and their presence amongst clusters of unlabeled cells, suggests the muscle representations overlap. Just a few MesV neurons were labeled after extraocular muscle injections. This correlates with the small number of muscle spindles present in macaque extraocular muscles, suggesting MesV cells supplying extraocular muscle spindles may contribute a minor component to oculomotor proprioception. To examine the central connections of MesV, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vs). The presence of retrogradely labeled MesV cells indicated a projection to Vs from MesV. These injections also anterogradely labeled terminals that lay in close association with MesV cells, suggesting an ascending projection from Vs to MesV. Finally, a small number of MesV neurons were labeled following WGA-HRP injections into the upper cervical spinal cord. This pattern of central connections indicates MesV and Vs information is combined to guide mastication. PMID:18461596

  19. Direct synaptic contacts on the myenteric ganglia of the rat stomach from the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tetsu; Kuwahara, Sachi; Maeda, Seishi; Tanaka, Koichi; Seki, Makoto

    2006-09-20

    The myenteric ganglia regulate not only gastric motility but also secretion, because a submucous plexus is sparsely developed in the rodent stomach. We have examined whether the neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) have direct synaptic contacts on the myenteric ganglia and the ultrastructure of the vagal efferent terminals by using wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP). The myenteric ganglia of the rat were composed of four types of neurons, i.e., small, medium-sized, large, and elongated neurons. The average numbers of axosomatic terminals per profile were 2.0 on the small neurons, 3.1 on the medium-sized neurons, 1.2 on the large neurons, and 4.2 on the elongated neuron. More than half of the axosomatic terminals contained round vesicles and formed asymmetric synaptic contacts on the small, medium-sized, and large neurons. About 80% of the axosomatic terminals on the elongated neurons contained pleomorphic vesicles and formed asymmetric synaptic contacts. When WGA-HRP was injected into the DMV, many anterogradely labeled terminals were found around the myenteric neurons. The labeled terminals were large (3.16 +/- 0.10 microm) and contacted exclusively the somata. Most of them (about 90%) contained round vesicles and formed asymmetric synaptic contacts. Serial ultrathin sections revealed that almost all neurons in a ganglion received projections from the DMV. The vagal axon terminals generally contacted the medium-sized or the elongated neurons, whereas a few labeled terminals contacted the small and the large neurons. The present results indicate that the DMV projects to all types of neurons and that their axon terminals contain mostly round synaptic vesicles and form asymmetric synaptic contacts.

  20. Luminol-hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence produced by sweet potato peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Alpeeva, Inna S; Yu Sakharov, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Anionic sweet potato peroxidase (SPP; Ipomoea batatas) was shown to efficiently catalyse luminol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide, forming a long-term chemiluminescence (CL) signal. Like other anionic plant peroxidases, SPP is able to catalyse this enzymatic reaction efficiently in the absence of any enhancer. Maximum intensity produced in SPP-catalysed oxidation of luminol was detected at pH 7.8-7.9 to be lower than that characteristic of other peroxidases (8.4-8.6). Varying the concentrations of luminol, hydrogen peroxide and Tris buffer in the reaction medium, we determined favourable conditions for SPP catalysis (100 mmol/L Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.8, containing 5 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide and 8 mmol/L luminol). The SPP detection limit in luminol oxidation was 1.0 x 10(-14) mol/L. High sensitivity in combination with the long-term CL signal and high stability is indicative of good promise for the application of SPP in CL enzyme immunoassay.

  1. Detoxification of pesticides aqueous solution using horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    El-Said, Saad Mohamed

    2013-03-15

    There are pesticide residues in agriculture wastewater and that compounds must be removed before discharge of wastewater in native waters. Thus the aim of this study was to remove toxic pesticide in waste water by the addition of horseradish peroxidase enzyme. The process of pesticide (methyl-parathion (O,O-Diethyl- O-4-nitro-phenylthiophosphate), atrazine (1-chloro-3-ethylamino-5-isopropylamino-2,4,6-triazine) and triazophos (O,O-diethyl O-1-phenyl-1H-1,2,4- triazol-3-yl phosphorothioate) removal from synthetic wastewater using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide has been analyzed. The technical feasibility of the process was studied using 0.001-3.0 mM synthetic pesticides solutions. Experiments were carried out at different time, HRP and H2O2 dose and pH to determine the optimum removing conditions. The removal of the three pesticides increases with an increase in HRP and hydrogen peroxide dose. The optimum HRP dose is 2.0 U L(-1) and 10 mM for H2O2. The contact needed to reach equilibrium was found to be 360 min. Maximum removal was achieved up to 74% at pH 8. Also, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of the effluent reduced at the end of 6 h from 2111-221 mg L(-1) (at pH 8). Tests based upon horseradish peroxidase, at optimized parameters, show the reduction of toxicity to non-toxic levels.

  2. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.

  3. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    DOE PAGES

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group andmore » a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.« less

  4. Biochemical and Pathological Studies on Peroxidases –An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amjad A.; Rahmani, Arshad H.; Aldebasi, Yousef H.; Aly, Salah M.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress. PMID:25168993

  5. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to wall-localized peroxidases from corn seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Terry, M. E.; Hoops, P.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A library of 22 hybridomas, which make antibodies to soluble wall antigens from the coleoptiles and primary leaves of etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings, was raised and cloned three times by limit dilution to assure monoclonal growth and stability. Two of these hybridomas made immunoglobulin G antibodies, designated mWP3 and mWP19, which both effectively immunoprecipitated peroxidase activity from crude and partially purified preparations of wall peroxidases. Direct peroxidase-binding assays revealed that both antibodies bound enzymes with peroxidase activity. As judged by immunoblot analyses, mWP3 recognized a Mr 98,000 wall peroxidase with an isoelectric point near 4.2, and mWP19 recognized a Mr 58,000 wall peroxidase. Immunogold localization studies showed both peroxidases are predominately in cell walls.

  6. The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the role of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), polysaccharides, and protein contents associated with the early events of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava roots. Increases in APX and GPX activity, as well as total protein contents occurred from 3 to 5 days of storage and were correlated with the delay of PPD. Cassava samples stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) highlighted the presence of starch and cellulose. Degradation of starch granules during PPD was also detected. Slight metachromatic reaction with toluidine blue is indicative of increasing of acidic polysaccharides and may play an important role in PPD delay. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified samples according to their levels of enzymatic activity based on the decision tree model which showed GPX and total protein amounts to be correlated with PPD. The Oriental (ORI) cultivar was more susceptible to PPD.

  7. Cu-hemin metal-organic frameworks with peroxidase-like activity as peroxidase mimics for colorimetric sensing of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fenfen; He, Juan; Zeng, Mulang; Hao, Juan; Guo, Qiaohui; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a facile strategy to synthesize Cu-hemin metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with peroxidase-like activity was reported. The prepared Cu-hemin MOFs were characterized by various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance spectra, and so on. The results showed that the prepared Cu-hemin MOFs looked like a ball-flower with an average diameter of 10 μm and provided a large specific surface area. The Cu-hemin MOFs possessing peroxidase-like activity could be used to catalyze the peroxidase substrate of 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine in the presence of H2O2, which was employed to detect H2O2 quantitatively with the linear range from 1.0 μM to 1.0 mM and the detection limit was 0.42 μM. Furthermore, with the additional help of glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective method to detect glucose was developed by using the Cu-hemin MOFs as catalyst and the linear range was from 10.0 μM to 3.0 mM and the detection limit was 6.9 μM. This work informs researchers of the advantages of MOFs for preparing biomimetic catalysts and extends the functionality of MOFs for biosensor application.

  8. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products.

  9. The pretectal complex of the cat: cells of origin of projections to the pulvinar nucleus.

    PubMed

    Weber, J T; Chen, I L; Hutchins, B

    1986-11-12

    The pretectal projection to the pulvinar nucleus in the cat was examined using the retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase. These data show that both visual and non-visual areas of the pretectal complex contribute to the projection. Specifically, large numbers of labeled neurons are located within the pretectal olivary nucleus with a substantial number of labeled neurons observed within the nucleus of the optic tract. Labeled neurons are also located within the medial, anterior and posterior nuclei, but not to the degree observed in the other pretectal nuclei. Morphometric analysis of labeled and Nissl-stained neurons indicate that the pretectopulvinar pathway is not correlated to any single cell size.

  10. Accessory Olfactory Bulb Function is Modulated by Input from the Main Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Slotnick, Burton; Restrepo, Diego; Schellinck, Heather; Archbold, Georgina; Price, Stephen; Lin, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    While it is now established that sensory neurons in both the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ may be activated by both general and pheromonal odorants, it remains unclear what initiates sampling by the VNO. Anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase was used to determine that adequate intranasal syringing with zinc sulfate interrupted all inputs to the main olfactory bulb but left intact those to the accessory olfactory bulb. Adult male treated mice were frankly anosmic when tested with pheromonal and non-pheromonal odors and failed to engage in aggressive behavior. Treated juvenile females failed to show puberty acceleration subsequent to exposure to bedding from adult males. Activation of the immediate early gene c-Fos and electro-vomeronasogram recording confirmed the integrity of the vomeronasal system in zinc sulfate treated mice. These results support the hypothesis that odor detection by the main olfactory epithelium is required to initiate sampling by the vomeronasal system. PMID:20377623

  11. Accessory olfactory bulb function is modulated by input from the main olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Burton; Restrepo, Diego; Schellinck, Heather; Archbold, Georgina; Price, Stephen; Lin, Weihong

    2010-03-01

    Although it is now established that sensory neurons in both the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ may be activated by both general and pheromonal odorants, it remains unclear what initiates sampling by the vomeronasal organ. Anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase was used to determine that adequate intranasal syringing with zinc sulfate interrupted all inputs to the main olfactory bulb but left intact those to the accessory olfactory bulb. Adult male treated mice were frankly anosmic when tested with pheromonal and non-pheromonal odors and failed to engage in aggressive behavior. Treated juvenile females failed to show puberty acceleration subsequent to exposure to bedding from adult males. Activation of the immediate early gene c-Fos and electrovomeronasogram recording confirmed the integrity of the vomeronasal system in zinc sulfate-treated mice. These results support the hypothesis that odor detection by the main olfactory epithelium is required to initiate sampling by the vomeronasal system.

  12. Alterations in Soluble Class III Peroxidases of Maize Shoots by Flooding Stress

    PubMed Central

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Buck, Friedrich; Lüthje, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Due to changing climate, flooding (waterlogged soils and submergence) becomes a major problem in agriculture and crop production. In the present study, the effect of waterlogging was investigated on peroxidases of maize (Zea mays L.) leaves. The plants showed typical adaptations to flooding stress, i.e., alterations in chlorophyll a/b ratios and increased basal shoot diameter. Seven peroxidase bands could be detected by first dimension modified SDS-PAGE and 10 bands by first dimension high resolution Clear Native Electrophoresis that altered in dependence on plant development and time of waterlogging. Native isoelectric focusing revealed three acidic to neutral and four alkaline guaiacol peroxidases that could be further separated by high resolution Clear Native Electrophorese in the second dimension. One neutral peroxidase (pI 7.0) appeared to be down-regulated within four hours after flooding, whereas alkaline peroxidases (pI 9.2, 8.0 and 7.8) were up-regulated after 28 or 52 h. Second dimensions revealed molecular masses of 133 kDa and 85 kDa for peroxidases at pI 8.0 and 7.8, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography revealed native molecular masses of 30–58 kDa for peroxidases identified as class III peroxidases and ascorbate peroxidases by mass spectrometry. Possible functions of these peroxidases in flooding stress will be discussed. PMID:28250383

  13. The role of stigma peroxidases in flowering plants: insights from further characterization of a stigma-specific peroxidase (SSP) from Senecio squalidus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    McInnis, Stephanie M; Emery, David C; Porter, Robert; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John T; Hiscock, Simon J

    2006-01-01

    Angiosperm stigmas have long been known to exhibit high levels of peroxidase activity when they are mature and most receptive to pollen but the biological function of stigma peroxidases is not known. A novel stigma-specific class III peroxidase gene, SSP (stigma-specific peroxidase) expressed exclusively in the stigmas of Senecio squalidus L. (Asteraceae) has recently been identified. Expression of SSP is confined to the specialized secretory cells (papillae) that compose the stigma epidermis. The literature on stigma peroxidases and hypotheses on their function(s) is reviewed here before further characterization of SSP and an attempt to determine its function are described. It is shown that SSP is localized to cytoplasmic regions of stigmatic papillae and also to the surface of these cells, possibly as a component of the pellicle, a thin layer of condensed protein typical of "dry" stigmas. Enzyme assays on recombinant SSP showed it to be a peroxidase with a preference for diphenolic substrates (ABTS and TMB) and a pH optimum of approximately 4.5. In such assays the peroxidase activity of SSP was low when compared with horseradish peroxidase. To explore the function of SSP and other stigmatic peroxidases, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stigmas of S. squalidus were investigated. Relatively large amounts of ROS, principally H(2)O(2), were detected in S. squalidus stigmas where most ROS/H(2)O(2) was localized to the stigmatic papillae, the location of SSP. These observations are discussed in the context of possible functions for SSP, other peroxidases, and ROS in the stigmas of angiosperms.

  14. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  15. Peroxidase and fluorescein isothiocyanate as antibody markers. A quantitative comparison of two peroxidase conjugates prepared with glutaraldehyde or periodate anda fluorescein conjugate.

    PubMed

    Broorsma, D M; Steefkerk, J G; Kors, N

    1976-09-01

    Batches of rabbit anti-human immunoglobulin G antibodies were labeled either with horseradish peroxidase, using the two-step glutaraldehyde method or the periodate method, or with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The peroxidase conjugates were isolated by chromatography using two different gel types. The five types of conjugates thus obtained were standardized to the same amount of rabbit immunoglobulin G. The antibody activity, as estimated by means of single radial immunodiffusion and passive hemagglutination, and the enzyme activity, determined with orthodianisidine, were compared. The ultimate dilutions and absolute amounts of the five conjugates giving positive reactions were determined in direct and indirect immunohistochemical tests, using both cryostat sections of skin and the agarose bead model system. It appeared that during the peroxidase conjugation procedures there was a considerable loss of abtibody and enzyme activity, whereas in the FITC conjugation procedure the antibody activity remained intact. Neverthe less, peroxidase conjugates prepared with glutaraldehyde still gave positive staining reactions in equal or somewhat higher dilutions than the fluorescin conjugate did. The peroxidase conjugates prepared with periodate could not be diluted to the same extent. For the detection of antibodies by indirect immunohistochemical methods, the peroxidase conjugate, prepared with glutaraldehyde, was comparable to the FITC conjugate. The peroxidase conjugate, prepared with periodate, was less effective.

  16. Indomethacin inactivates gastric peroxidase to induce reactive-oxygen-mediated gastric mucosal injury and curcumin protects it by preventing peroxidase inactivation and scavenging reactive oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Ishita; Bandyopadhyay, Uday; Biswas, Kaushik; Maity, Pallab; Banerjee, Ranajit K

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the mechanism of indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the gastroprotective effect of curcumin thereon. Curcumin dose-dependently blocks indomethacin-induced gastric lesions, showing 82% protection at 25 mg/kg. Indomethacin-induced oxidative damage by ROS as shown by increased lipid peroxidation and thiol depletion is almost completely blocked by curcumin. Indomethacin causes nearly fivefold increase in hydroxyl radical (()OH) and significant inactivation of gastric mucosal peroxidase to elevate endogenous H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2)-derived ()OH, which is prevented by curcumin. In vitro studies indicate that indomethacin inactivates peroxidase irreversibly only in presence of H(2)O(2) by acting as a suicidal substrate. 5,5-Dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) protects the peroxidase, indicating involvement of indomethacin radical in the inactivation. Indomethacin radical was also detected in the peroxidase-indomethacin-H(2)O(2) system as DMPO adduct (a(N) = 15 G, a(beta)(H) = 16 G) by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Curcumin protects the peroxidase in a concentration-dependent manner and consumes H(2)O(2) for its oxidation as a suitable substrate of the peroxidase, thereby blocking indomethacin oxidation. Curcumin can also scavenge ()OH in vitro. We suggest that curcumin protects gastric damage by efficient removal of H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2) -derived ()OH by preventing peroxidase inactivation by indomethacin.

  17. Three differentially expressed basic peroxidases from wound-lignifying Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Kirsten B; Andreasen, Per H; Eckloff, Reinhard M G; Kristensen, Brian K; Rasmussen, Søren K

    2003-10-01

    The activity of ionically bound peroxidases from an asparagus spear increased from 5-24 h post-harvest. Isoelectric focusing showed that the post-harvest increase of the total peroxidase activity was due to the increase of several distinct isoperoxidases. Concomitantly, a decrease in the activity of two anionic peroxidases was observed. Peroxidases with pI 5.9, 6.4 and 9.2 were detected only at 24 h post-harvest, whereas four peroxidases, with pI 8.7, 8.1, 7.4, and 6.7, detected throughout the time-course, increased in their activity. Histochemical staining demonstrated that lignin and peroxidase activity were located in the vascular bundles throughout the period of measurement. Lignin was detected in the cell walls of the protoxylem in the vascular bundles of the asparagus stem. A cDNA library of mRNA isolated from asparagus spears 24 h post-harvest was screened for peroxidases using homologous and heterologous probes. Three clones were isolated and the corresponding mature asparagus peroxidases displayed 70%, 76% and 81% amino acid sequence identity to each other. These new asparagus peroxidases are typical class III plant peroxidases in terms of conserved regions with a calculated pI >9.2, which is consistent with most basic peroxidases. One of the genes was shown to be a constitutively expressed single-copy gene, whereas the others showed an increased expression at post-harvest. The highest similarity in the amino acid sequence (71-77%) was found in peroxidases from roots of winter grown turnip TP7, to Arabidopsis AtP49, to an EST sequence from cotton fibres and to TMV-infected tobacco.

  18. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuta; Pogni, Rebecca; Acebes, Sandra; Lucas, Fátima; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Fernández, María I; de los Ríos, Vivian; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Basosi, Riccardo; Hammel, Kenneth E; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-06-15

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2 and VA) lacked this lag, and H2O2-LiP (H2O2-treated LiP) was inactive. MS analyses revealed that VA-LiP includes one VA molecule covalently bound to the side chain of Tyr181, whereas H2O2-LiP contains a hydroxylated Tyr181. No adduct is formed in the Y171N variant. Molecular docking showed that VA binding is favoured by sandwich π stacking with Tyr181 and Phe89. EPR spectroscopy after peroxide activation of the pre-treated LiPs showed protein radicals other than the tyrosine radical found in pristine LiP, which were assigned to a tyrosine-VA adduct radical in VA-LiP and a dihydroxyphenyalanine radical in H2O2-LiP. Both radicals are able to oxidize large low-redox-potential substrates, but H2O2-LiP is unable to oxidize high-redox-potential substrates. Transient-state kinetics showed that the tyrosine-VA adduct strongly promotes (>100-fold) substrate oxidation by compound II, the rate-limiting step in catalysis. The novel activation mechanism is involved in ligninolysis, as demonstrated using lignin model substrates. The present paper is the first report on autocatalytic modification, resulting in functional alteration, among class II peroxidases.

  19. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  20. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved.

  1. Enzymatic degradation of Congo Red by turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ahmedi, Afaf; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Couvert, Annabelle; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolourize textile effluents. This study aims at evaluating the potential of a turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase (TP) preparation in the discolouration of textile azo dyes and effluents. An azo dye, Congo Red (CR), was used as a model pollutant for treatment by the enzyme. The effects of various operating conditions like pH value, temperature, initial dye and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, contact time, and enzyme concentration were evaluated. The optimal conditions for maximal colour removal were at pH 2.0, 40 degrees C, 50 mM hydrogen peroxide, 50 mg/l CR dye, and TP activity of 0.45 U/ml within 10 min of incubation time. Analysis of the by-products from the enzymatic treatment by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy showed no residual compounds in the aqueous phase and a precipitate of polymeric nature.

  2. Design of more powerful iron-TAML peroxidase enzyme mimics.

    PubMed

    Ellis, W Chadwick; Tran, Camly T; Denardo, Matthew A; Fischer, Andreas; Ryabov, Alexander D; Collins, Terrence J

    2009-12-23

    Environmentally useful, small molecule mimics of the peroxidase enzymes must exhibit very high reactivity in water near neutral pH. Here we describe the design and structural and kinetic characterization of a second generation of iron(III)-TAML activators with unprecedented peroxidase-mimicking abilities. Iterative design has been used to remove the fluorine that led to the best performers in first-generation iron-TAMLs. The result is a superior catalyst that meets a green chemistry objective by being comprised exclusively of biochemically common elements. The rate constants for bleaching at pH 7, 9, and 11 of the model substrate, Orange II, shows that the new Fe(III)-TAML has the fastest reactivity at pH's closer to neutral of any TAML activator to date. Under appropriate conditions, the new catalyst can decolorize Orange II without loss of activity for at least 10 half-lives, attesting to its exceptional properties as an oxidizing enzyme mimic.

  3. Kinetics of phenolic polymerization catalyzed by peroxidase in organic media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.P.; Huang, G.L; Yu, Y.T.

    1995-07-05

    Phenolic polymerization was carried out by enzymatic catalysis in organic media, and its kinetics was studied by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Phenols and aromatic amines with electron-withdrawing groups could hardly be polymerized by HRP catalysis, but phenols and aromatic amines with electron-donating groups could easily by polymerized. The reaction rate of either the para-substituted substrate or meta-substituted substrate was higher than that of ortho-substituted substrate. When ortho-position of hydroxy group of phenols was occupied by an electron-donating group and if another electron-donating group occupied para-position of hydroxy group, the reaction rate increased. Horseradish peroxidase and lactoperoxidase could easily catalyze the polymerization, but chloroperoxidase and laccase failed to yield polymers. Metallic ions such as Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 3+}, and Cu{sup 2+} could poison horseradish peroxidase to various extents, but ions such as Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and K{sup +} were not found to inhibit the reaction.

  4. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaonan; Corgié, Stéphane C; Aneshansley, Daniel J; Wang, Peng; Walker, Larry P; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2014-04-04

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2 O2 , producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes.

  5. High Conformational Stability of Secreted Eukaryotic Catalase-peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; García-Fernández, Queralt; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio; Obinger, Christian; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional heme enzymes widely spread in archaea, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. Here we present the first crystal structure (1.55 Å resolution) of an eukaryotic KatG, the extracellular or secreted enzyme from the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea. The heme cavity of the homodimeric enzyme is similar to prokaryotic KatGs including the unique distal +Met-Tyr-Trp adduct (where the Trp is further modified by peroxidation) and its associated mobile arginine. The structure also revealed several conspicuous peculiarities that are fully conserved in all secreted eukaryotic KatGs. Peculiarities include the wrapping at the dimer interface of the N-terminal elongations from the two subunits and cysteine residues that cross-link the two subunits. Differential scanning calorimetry and temperature- and urea-mediated unfolding followed by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that secreted eukaryotic KatGs have a significantly higher conformational stability as well as a different unfolding pattern when compared with intracellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic catalase-peroxidases. We discuss these properties with respect to the structure as well as the postulated roles of this metalloenzyme in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22822072

  6. Peroxidase-catalysed interfacial adhesion of aquatic caddisworm silk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Pan, Huaizhong; Weerasekare, G. Mahika; Stewart, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Casemaker caddisfly (Hesperophylax occidentalis) larvae use adhesive silk fibres to construct protective shelters under water. The silk comprises a distinct peripheral coating on a viscoelastic fibre core. Caddisworm silk peroxinectin (csPxt), a haem-peroxidase, was shown to be glycosylated by lectin affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Using high-resolution H2O2 and peroxidase-dependent silver ion reduction and nanoparticle deposition, imaged by electron microscopy, csPxt activity was shown to be localized in the peripheral layer of drawn silk fibres. CsPxt catalyses dityrosine cross-linking within the adhesive peripheral layer post-draw, initiated perhaps by H2O2 generated by a silk gland-specific superoxide dismutase 3 (csSOD3) from environmental reactive oxygen species present in natural water. CsSOD3 was also shown to be a glycoprotein and is likely localized in the peripheral layer. Using a synthetic fluorescent phenolic copolymer and confocal microscopy, it was shown that csPxt catalyses oxidative cross-linking to external polyphenolic compounds capable of diffusive interpenetration into the fuzzy peripheral coating, including humic acid, a natural surface-active polyphenol. The results provide evidence of enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of a natural bioadhesive to polyphenol conditioned interfaces as a mechanism of permanent adhesion underwater. PMID:26490632

  7. An analysis of horseradish peroxidase enzyme for effluent treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nunavath, Hanumalal; Banoth, Chandrasekhar; Talluri, Venkateswar Rao; Bhukya, Bhima

    2016-01-01

    The present study explains computational methods to design thermostable horseradish peroxidase enzyme using the crystal structure available from Protein Data Bank (PDB ID: 6ATJ). Multiple mutations were introduced to the original enzyme and developed a model by using Modeler9.14. After designing the model functional effect was confirmed in terms of protein ligand binding by molecular docking using Autodock 4.2. The implementation of modeling steps is demonstrated in the context of performing mutations for particular amino acid residue on the ligand pocket of the horseradish peroxidase, to derive the desired ligand binding properties. The docking investigation of modelled HRP with Quercetindihydroxide using Autodock 4.2 software that six amino acid residues, P139, H42, A31, L174, A38, and G169 are involved in hydrogen bonding. More importantly, it provides insight into understanding and properly interpreting the data produced by these methods. The 3D model was docked with Quercetindihydroxide (a known horseradish modulator) to understand molecular interactions at the active site region. PMID:28293074

  8. Glutathione peroxidase 4 and vitamin E cooperatively prevent hepatocellular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bradley A; Tobe, Ryuta; Yefremova, Elena; Tsuji, Petra A; Hoffmann, Victoria J; Schweizer, Ulrich; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L; Conrad, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is an essential mammalian glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells against detrimental lipid peroxidation and governs a novel form of regulated necrotic cell death, called ferroptosis. To study the relevance of Gpx4 and of another vitally important selenoprotein, cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1), for liver function, mice with conditional deletion of Gpx4 in hepatocytes were studied, along with those lacking Txnrd1 and selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA (Trsp) in hepatocytes. Unlike Txnrd1- and Trsp-deficient mice, Gpx4(-/-) mice died shortly after birth and presented extensive hepatocyte degeneration. Similar to Txnrd1-deficient livers, Gpx4(-/-) livers manifested upregulation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) response genes. Remarkably, Gpx4(-/-) pups born from mothers fed a vitamin E-enriched diet survived, yet this protection was reversible as subsequent vitamin E deprivation caused death of Gpx4-deficient mice ~4 weeks thereafter. Abrogation of selenoprotein expression in Gpx4(-/-) mice did not result in viable mice, indicating that the combined deficiency aggravated the loss of Gpx4 in liver. By contrast, combined Trsp/Txnrd1-deficient mice were born, but had significantly shorter lifespans than either single knockout, suggesting that Txnrd1 plays an important role in supporting liver function of mice lacking Trsp. In sum our study demonstrates that the ferroptosis regulator Gpx4 is critical for hepatocyte survival and proper liver function, and that vitamin E can compensate for its loss by protecting cells against deleterious lipid peroxidation.

  9. Polyclonal antibodies mediated immobilization of a peroxidase from ammonium sulphate fractionated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) proteins.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aiman; Husain, Qayyum

    2007-06-01

    Polyclonal antibody bound Sepharose 4B support has been exploited for the immobilization of bitter gourd peroxidase directly from ammonium sulphate precipitated proteins. Immunoaffinity immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase exhibited high yield of immobilization. IgG-Sepharose 4B bound bitter gourd peroxidase showed a higher stability against heat, chaotropic agents (urea and guanidinium chloride), detergents (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and Surf Excel), proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) and water-miscible organic solvents (propanol, THF and dioxane). The activity of immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase was significantly enhanced in the presence of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and after treatment with trypsin as compared to soluble enzyme.

  10. Systematic characterization of the peroxidase gene family provides new insights into fungal pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Park, Sook-Young; Abu Sadat, Md; Kim, Seongbeom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-07-02

    Fungal pathogens have evolved antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced as a part of host innate immunity. Recent studies proposed peroxidases as components of antioxidant defense system. However, the role of fungal peroxidases during interaction with host plants has not been explored at the genomic level. Here, we systematically identified peroxidase genes and analyzed their impact on fungal pathogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Phylogeny reconstruction placed 27 putative peroxidase genes into 15 clades. Expression profiles showed that majority of them are responsive to in planta condition and in vitro H2O2. Our analysis of individual deletion mutants for seven selected genes including MoPRX1 revealed that these genes contribute to fungal development and/or pathogenesis. We identified significant and positive correlations among sensitivity to H2O2, peroxidase activity and fungal pathogenicity. In-depth analysis of MoPRX1 demonstrated that it is a functional ortholog of thioredoxin peroxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for detoxification of the oxidative burst within host cells. Transcriptional profiling of other peroxidases in ΔMoprx1 suggested interwoven nature of the peroxidase-mediated antioxidant defense system. The results from this study provide insight into the infection strategy built on evolutionarily conserved peroxidases in the rice blast fungus.

  11. A structural and functional perspective of DyP-type peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toru; Sugano, Yasushi

    2015-05-15

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta Dec 1 (DyP) is a heme peroxidase. This name reflects its ability to degrade several anthraquinone dyes. The substrate specificity, the amino acid sequence, and the tertiary structure of DyP are different from those of the other heme peroxidase (super)families. Therefore, many proteins showing the similar amino acid sequences to that of DyP are called DyP-type peroxidase which is a new family of heme peroxidase identified in 2007. In fact, all structures of this family show a similar structure fold. However, this family includes many proteins whose amino acid sequence identity to DyP is lower than 15% and/or whose catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) is a few orders of magnitude less than that of DyP. A protein showing an activity different from peroxidase activity (dechelatase activity) has been also reported. In addition, the precise physiological roles of DyP-type peroxidases are unknown. These facts raise a question of whether calling this family DyP-type peroxidase is suitable. Here, we review the differences and similarities of structure and function among this family and propose the reasonable new classification of DyP-type peroxidase family, that is, class P, I and V. In this contribution, we discuss the adequacy of this family name.

  12. Wound-induced deposition of polyphenols in transgenic plants overexpressing peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with a chimeric tobacco anionic peroxidase gene have previously been shown to synthesize high levels of peroxidase in all tissues throughout the plant. One of several distinguishable phenotypes of transformed plants is the rapid browning of pith tissue upon wounding. Pith tissue from plants expressing high levels of peroxidase browned within 24 hours of wounding, while tissue from control plants did not brown as late as 7 days after wounding. A correlation between peroxidase activity and wound-induced browning was observed, whereas no relationship between polyphenol oxidase activity and browning was found. The purified tobacco anionic peroxidase was subjected to kinetic analysis with substrates which resemble the precursors of lignin or polyphenolic acid. The purified enzyme was found to readily polymerize phenolic acids in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via a modified ping-pong mechanism. The percentage of lignin and lignin-related polymers in cell walls was nearly twofold greater in pith tissue isolated from peroxidase-overproducer plants compared to control plants. Lignin deposition in wounded pith tissue from control plants closely followed the induction of peroxidase activity. However, wound-induced lignification occurred 24 to 48 hours sooner in plants overexpressing the anionic peroxidase. This suggests that the availability of peroxidase rather than substrate may delay polyphenol deposition in wounded tissue.

  13. Platelet peroxidase deficiency in a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, M; Jarry, M T; Tulliez, M; Breton-Gorius, J

    1983-01-01

    Morphological and functional abnormalities of the megakaryocytic series have been well described in myelodysplastic syndromes. Platelet peroxidase has always been demonstrated in abnormal megakaryocytes and early megakaryoblasts in such syndromes. We have studied a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with marked morphological abnormalities of megakaryocytes in which ultrastructural studies showed the coexistence of platelet peroxidase positive and platelet peroxidase negative megakaryocytes. This enzymatic deficiency was confirmed by the ultrastructural study of circulating platelets. This case appears to be the first report of a partial platelet peroxidase deficiency. It adds to the enzymatic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome already described for the red cells and the granulocytic cells. Images PMID:6630573

  14. Changes in ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-08-01

    To analyse nodular antioxidant enzyme expression in response to salt stress, Phaseolus vulgaris genotype BAT477 was inoculated with reference strain CIAT899, and treated with 50 mM NaCl. Plant growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixing activity were analysed. Results showed that: (1) all parameters, particularly in nodules, were affected by salt treatments, and (2) confirmed preferential growth allocation to roots. The ARA was significantly decreased by salt treatments. Protein dosage confirmed that nodules were more affected by salt treatment than were roots. We analysed superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase in nodules, roots and a free rhizobial strain. Our results indicated that SOD and CAT nodular isozymes had bacterial and root origins. The SOD expressed the same CuZn, Fe and Mn SOD isoforms in nodules and roots, whereas in free rhizobia we found only one Fe and Mn SOD. APX and POX nodule and root profiles had only root origins, as no rhizobial band was detected. Under salt stress, plant growth, nitrogen fixation and activities of antioxidant defense enzymes in nodules were affected. Thus, these enzymes appear to preserve symbiosis from stress turned out that NaCl salinity lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD and POX isoenzyme. So their levels in nodules appeared to be consistent with a symbiotic nitrogen fixing efficiency hypothesis, and they seem to function as the molecular mechanisms underlying the nodule response to salinity.

  15. Advantages of soybean peroxidase over horseradish peroxidase as the enzyme label in chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of sulfamethoxypyridazine.

    PubMed

    Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Berlina, Anna N; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2010-03-24

    An indirect competitive chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CL-ELISA) of sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMP) was developed. The conjugates of streptavidin with cationic horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and anionic soybean peroxidase (SbP) were used in CL-ELISA for the detection of biotinylated anti-SMP antibodies. For streptavidin-HRP conjugate-catalyzed chemiluminescence measured 20 s after the initiation of the enhanced chemiluminescence reaction (ECR), the limit of detection (IC(10)), the IC(50) value, and the working range in CL-ELISA of SMP are 0.3, 12.4, and 1.2-85.0 ng/mL, respectively. An increase in the time interval between the ECR initiation and the luminescence measurement results in the loss in the quality of analytical measurements because of the time-dependent quenching of chemiluminescence typical of the HRP-catalyzed ECR. In the case of SbP-based CL-ELISA of SMP, the limit of detection, the IC(50) value, and the working range (0.025, 0.17, and 0.045-0.63 ng/mL, respectively) are better than those for HRP-based CL-ELISA. Furthermore, the analytical parameters of SbP-based CL-ELISA remain unchanged during a long period of time (for at least 30 min). The recovery values from four spiked milk samples with different concentrations of SMP in SbP-based CL-ELISA vary from 70 to 130%.

  16. Role of manganese peroxidases and lignin peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the decolorization of kraft bleach plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Michel, F C; Dass, S B; Grulke, E A; Reddy, C A

    1991-08-01

    The role of lignin peroxidases (LIPs) and manganese peroxidases (MNPs) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in decolorizing kraft bleach plant effluent (BPE) was investigated. Negligible BPE decolorization was exhibited by a per mutant, which lacks the ability to produce both the LIPs and the MNPs. Also, little decolorization was seen when the wild type was grown in high-nitrogen medium, in which the production of LIPs and MNPs is blocked. A lip mutant of P. chrysosporium, which produces MNPs but not LIPs, showed about 80% of the activity exhibited by the wild type, indicating that the MNPs play an important role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with 100 ppm of Mn(II), high levels of MNPs but no LIPs were produced, and this culture also exhibited high rates of BPE decolorization, lending further support to the idea that MNPs play a key role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with no Mn(II), high levels of LIPs but negligible levels of MNPs were produced and the rate and extent of BPE decolorization by such cultures were quite low, indicating that LIPs play a relatively minor role in BPE decolorization. Furthermore, high rates of BPE decolorization were seen on days 3 and 4 of incubation, when the cultures exhibit high levels of MNP activity but little or no LIP activity. These results indicate that MNPs play a relatively more important role than LIPs in BPE decolorization by P. chrysosporium.

  17. Apoplastic Peroxidases and Lignification in Needles of Norway Spruce (Picea abies L.).

    PubMed Central

    Polle, A.; Otter, T.; Seifert, F.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the correlation of soluble apoplastic peroxidase activity with lignification in needles of field-grown Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) trees. Apoplastic peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) were obtained by vacuum infiltration of needles. The lignin content of isolated cell walls was determined by the acetyl bromide method. Accumulation of lignin and seasonal variations of apoplastic peroxidase activities were studied in the first year of needle development. The major phase of lignification started after bud break and was terminated about 4 weeks later. This phase correlated with a transient increase in apoplastic guaiacol and coniferyl alcohol peroxidase activity. NADH oxidase activity, which is thought to sustain peroxidase activity by production of H2O2, peaked sharply after bud break and decreased during the lignification period. Histochemical localization of peroxidase with guaiacol indicated that high activities were present in lignifying cell walls. In mature needles, lignin was localized in walls of most needle tissues including mesophyll cells, and corresponded to 80 to 130 [mu]mol lignin monomers/g needle dry weight. Isoelectric focusing of apoplastic washing fluids and activity staining with guaiacol showed the presence of strongly alkaline peroxidases (isoelectric point [greater than or equal to] 9) in all developmental stages investigated. New isozymes with isoelectric points of 7.1 and 8.1 appeared during the major phase of lignification. These isozymes disappeared after lignification was terminated. A strong increase in peroxidase activity in autumn was associated with the appearance of acidic peroxidases (isoelectric point [less than or equal to] 3). These results suggest that soluble alkaline apoplastic peroxidases participate in lignin formation. Soluble acidic apoplastic peroxidases were apparently unrelated to developmentally regulated lignification in spruce needles. PMID:12232302

  18. Class III peroxidases are activated in proanthocyanidin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liguo; Xu, Weifeng; Li, Wenrao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Bin Rahman, A. N. M. Rubaiyath; Fan, Mingshou; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It has previously been shown that proanthocyanidins (PAs) in the seed coat of Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to scavenge superoxide radicals (O2−). However, the physiological processess in PA-deficit seeds are not clear. It is hypothesized that there exist alternative ways in PA-deficient seeds to cope with oxidative stress. Methods The content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and its relevance to the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases was investigated in both wild-type and PA-deficit mutant seeds. A biochemical staining approach was used to detect tissue localizations of peroxidase activities in PA-deficit mutant seeds. Key Results PA-deficient mutants possess significantly lower levels of H2O2 than the wild-type, despite their higher accumulation of superoxide radicals. Screening of the key antioxidant enzymes revealed that peroxidase activity was significantly over-activated in mutant seeds. This high peroxidase activity was mainly confined to the seed coat zone. Interestingly, neither ascorbate peroxidase nor glutathione peroxidase, just the guaiacol peroxidases (class III peroxidases), was specifically activated in the seed coat. However, no significant difference in peroxidase activity was observed in embryos of either mutants or the wild-type, although gene expressions of several candidate peroxidases were down-regulated in the embryos of PA-deficient seeds. Conclusions The results suggest that enhanced class III peroxidase activity in the seed coat of PA-deficient mutants is an adaptive strategy for seed development and survival. PMID:23448691

  19. Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation: Heme Destruction and Influence of Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation. PMID:24185130

  20. Inhibition of thyroid peroxidase by Myrcia uniflora flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andrea C F; Neto, Jair C; da Silva, Alba C M; Kuster, Ricardo M; Carvalho, Denise P

    2006-03-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the key enzyme in thyroid hormone biosynthesis, is inhibited by dietary flavonoids; thus, a high consumption of plants containing inhibitory flavonoids may affect thyroid function and lead to hypothyroidism. In this work, TPO inhibition by the aqueous partition of Myrcia uniflora and its isolated compounds has been evaluated. The aqueous partition of the methanolic extract of M. uniflora is able to inhibit TPO activity in vitro. Two known flavonoids were isolated and characterized by mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR from plant extracts: mearnsitrin and myricitrin. The degree of TPO inhibition produced by the aqueous solution of the flavonoids was very high, with a 50% inhibition of the original TPO activity (IC(50)) obtained at 1.97 microM mearnsitrin and at 2.88 microM myricitrin. These results suggest that the indiscriminated consumption of M. uniflora pharmaceutical products allied to the nutritional deficiency of iodine might contribute to the development of hypothyroidism and goiter.

  1. Asparagus byproducts as a new source of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-03

    Soluble peroxidase (POD) from asparagus byproducts was purified by ion exchange chromatographies, and its kinetic and catalytic properties were studied. The isoelectric point of the purified isoperoxidases was 9.1, and the optimum pH and temperature values were 4.0 and 25 °C, respectively. The cationic asparagus POD (CAP) midpoint inactivation temperature was 57 °C, which favors its use in industrial processes. The Km values of cationic asparagus POD for H₂O₂ and ABTS were 0.318 and 0.634 mM, respectively. The purified CAP is economically obtained from raw materials using a simple protocol and possesses features that make it advantageous for the potential use of this enzyme in a large number of processes with demonstrated requirements of thermostable POD. The results indicate that CAP can be used as a potential candidate for removing phenolic contaminants.

  2. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  3. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction.

  4. Electroenzymatic degradation of azo dye using an immobilized peroxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gha-Young; Lee, Ki-Beom; Cho, Seung-Hee; Shim, Joonmok; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2005-11-11

    Azo dyes are largely resistant to biodegradation and persist in conventional wastewater treatment processes. Combining enzymatic catalysis and the electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an electroenzymatic process was developed, which is a potential alternative to traditional processes. In this study, an electroenzymatic method that uses an immobilized horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP), was investigated to degrade orange II (azo dye) within a two-compartment packed-bed flow reactor. To evaluate the electroenzymatic degradation of orange II, electrolytic experiments were carried out with 0.42 U/mL HRP at -0.5 V. It was found that removal of orange II was partly due to its adsorption to the graphite felt. The overall application of the electroenzymatic led to a greater degradation rate than the use of electrolysis alone. Also the by-products formed were found to consist primarily of an aromatic amine, sulfanilic acid, and unknown compounds.

  5. Production and purification of the multifunctional enzyme horseradish peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The oxidoreductase horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used in numerous industrial and medical applications. In this review, we briefly describe this well-studied enzyme and focus on its promising use in targeted cancer treatment. In combination with a plant hormone, HRP can be used in specific enzyme–prodrug therapies. Despite this outstanding application, HRP has not found its way as a biopharmaceutical into targeted cancer therapy yet. The reasons therefore lie in the present low-yield production and cumbersome purification of this enzyme from its natural source. However, surface glycosylation renders the recombinant production of HRP difficult. Here, we compare different production hosts for HRP and summarize currently used production and purification strategies for this enzyme. We further present our own strategy of glycoengineering this powerful enzyme to allow recombinant high-yield production in Pichia pastoris and subsequent simple downstream processing. PMID:24683473

  6. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lizeng; Zhuang, Jie; Nie, Leng; Zhang, Jinbin; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Wang, Taihong; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Perrett, Sarah; Yan, Xiyun

    2007-09-01

    Nanoparticles containing magnetic materials, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), are particularly useful for imaging and separation techniques. As these nanoparticles are generally considered to be biologically and chemically inert, they are typically coated with metal catalysts, antibodies or enzymes to increase their functionality as separation agents. Here, we report that magnetite nanoparticles in fact possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in natural peroxidases, which are widely used to oxidize organic substrates in the treatment of wastewater or as detection tools. Based on this finding, we have developed a novel immunoassay in which antibody-modified magnetite nanoparticles provide three functions: capture, separation and detection. The stability, ease of production and versatility of these nanoparticles makes them a powerful tool for a wide range of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  7. Involvement of peroxidase activity in developing somatic embryos of Medicago arborea L. Identification of an isozyme peroxidase as biochemical marker of somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Piedad; Martin, Luisa; Blazquez, Antonio; Guerra, Hilario; Villalobos, Nieves

    2014-01-15

    The legume Medicago arborea L. is very interesting as regards the regeneration of marginal arid soils. The problem is that it does not have a good germinative yield. It was therefore decided to regenerate via somatic embryogenesis and find a marker of embryogenic potential. In this study, peroxidase activity was evaluated in non-embryogenic and embryogenic calli from M. arborea L. A decrease in soluble peroxidase activity is observed in its embryonic calli at the time at which the somatic embryos begin to appear. This activity is always lower in embryonic calli than in non-embryonic ones (unlike what happens in the case of wall-bound peroxidases). These results suggest that peroxidases can be considered to be enzymes involved in somatic embryogenesis in M. arborea. In addition, isozyme analyses were carried out on protein extracts using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The band called P5 was detected only in embryogenic cultures at very early stages of development. This band was digested with trypsin and analyzed using linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometer. In P5 isoform a peroxidase-L-ascorbate peroxidase was identified. It can be used as a marker that allows the identification of embryological potential.

  8. Structural and Functional Features of Peroxidases with a Potential as Industrial Biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    This chapter begins with a description of the main structural features of heme peroxidases representative of the two large superfamilies of plant-fungal-bacterial and animal peroxidases, and the four additional (super)families described to date. Then, we focus on several fungal peroxidases of high biotechnological potential as industrial biocatalysts. These include (1) ligninolytic peroxidases from white-rot basidiomycetes being able to oxidize high redox-potential substrates at an exposed protein radical; (2) heme-thiolate peroxidases that are structural hybrids of typical peroxidases and cytochrome P450 enzymes and, after their discovery in sooty molds, are being described in basidiomycetes with even more interesting catalytic properties, such as selective aromatic oxygenation; and (3) the so-called dye-decolorizing peroxidases that are still to be thoroughly investigated but have been identified in different basidiomycete genomes. The structural-functional description of these peroxidases includes an analysis of the heme environment and a description of their substrate oxidation sites, with the purpose of understanding their interesting catalytic properties and biotechnological potential.

  9. The kinetic properties producing the perfunctory pH profiles of catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert L; Powell, Luke J; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2008-06-01

    Many structure-function relationship studies performed on the catalase-peroxidase enzymes are based on limited kinetic data. To provide a more substantive understanding of catalase-peroxidase function, we undertook a more exhaustive evaluation of catalase-peroxidase catalysis as a function of pH. Kinetic parameters across a broad pH range for the catalase and peroxidase activities of E. coli catalase peroxidase (KatG) were obtained, including the separate analysis of the oxidizing and reducing substrates of the peroxidase catalytic cycle. This investigation identified ABTS-dependent inhibition of peroxidase activity, particularly at low pH, unveiling that previously reported pH optima are clearly skewed. We show that turnover and efficiency of peroxidase activity increases with decreasing pH until the protein unfolds. The data also suggest that the catalase pH optimum is more complex than it is often assumed to be. The apparent optimum is in fact the intersection of the optimum for binding (7.00) and the optimum for activity (5.75). We also report the apparent pK(a)s for binding and catalysis of catalase activity as well as approximate values for certain peroxidatic and catalatic steps.

  10. Induction of soluble and cell wall peroxidases by aphid infestation in barley.

    PubMed

    Chaman, M E; Corcuera, L J; Zúñiga, G E; Cardemil, L; Argandoña, V H

    2001-05-01

    Peroxidase enzymes have been found in soluble, ionically bound, and covalently bound forms and have been implicated in several physiological processes in plants. This paper investigates the effect of aphid infestation on soluble and bound-cell wall peroxidase activity and bound-cell wall isoform changes of barley plants. Peroxidase activity was measured in control plants and plants infested with the aphid Schizaphis graminum (Rondani). The activity of soluble peroxidases increased with time of infestation, older plants being more affected than younger ones. The increase in bound-cell wall peroxidase activity as a function of age was higher in infested than in control plants, being higher in ionically bound than in covalently bound peroxidases. When the aphids were removed from plants, the activities of both types of peroxidases decreased to control levels. Isoelectrofocusing analyses of the ionically bound peroxidases showed changes in the isoform pattern. A new isoform was induced by infestation. The activities of all covalently bound isoforms increased after infestation. The physiological implications of these changes are discussed.

  11. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  12. Enzymatic activity and proteomic profile of class III peroxidases during sugarcane stem development.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Sampaio Mayer, Juliana Lischka; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    Class III peroxidases are present as large multigene families in all land plants. This large number of genes together with the diversity of processes catalyzed by peroxidases suggests possible functional specialization of each isoform. However, assigning a precise role for each individual peroxidase gene has continued to be a major bottleneck. Here we investigated the enzyme activity and translational profile of class III peroxidases during stem development of sugarcane as a first step in the estimation of physiological functions of individual isoenzymes. Internodes at three different developmental stages (young, developing and mature) were divided into pith (inner tissue) and rind (outer tissue) fractions. The rind of mature internodes presented the highest enzymatic activity and thus could be considered the ideal tissue for the discovery of peroxidase gene function. In addition, activity staining of 2DE gels revealed different isoperoxidase profiles and protein expression regulation among different tissue fractions. In-gel tryptic digestion of excised spots followed by peptide sequencing by LC-MS/MS positively matched uncharacterized peroxidases in the sugarcane database SUCEST. Multiple spots matching the same peroxidase gene were found, which reflects the generation of more than one isoform from a particular gene by post-translational modifications. The identified sugarcane peroxidases appear to be monocot-specific sequences with no clear ortholog in dicot model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  13. Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Resistant and Susceptible Warm- Season Turfgrasses Challenged by Blissus Occiduus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxidases play an important role in plant stress related interactions. This research assessed the role of peroxidases in the defense response of resistant and susceptible buffalograsses [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm] and zoysiagrasses (Zoysia japonica Steudel) to the western chinch bug, Bli...

  14. Participation of chitin-binding peroxidase isoforms in the wilt pathogenesis of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific chitin-binding isozymes of peroxidase (POX) play an important role in pathogenesis of plant diseases caused with fungi. We studied the dynamics of peroxidase activity in two varieties of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.); one was a susceptible and the other resistant to the plant pathogen Vert...

  15. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  16. Computational Modeling of the Catalytic Cycle of Glutathione Peroxidase Nanomimic.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Ramesh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-12-29

    To elucidate the role of a derivative of ebselen as a mimic of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase, density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE) were applied to model the reaction mechanism in a catalytic cycle. This mimic plays the role of glutathione peroxidase through a four-step catalytic cycle. The first step is described as the oxidation of 1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, while selenoxide is reduced by methanthiol at the second step. In the third step of the reaction, the reduction of selenenylsulfide occurs by methanthiol, and the selenenic acid is dehydrated at the final step. Based on the kinetic parameters, step 4 is the rate-determining step (RDS) of the reaction. The bond strength of the atoms involved in the RDS is discussed with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Low value of electron density, ρ(r), and positive Laplacian values are the evidence for the covalent nature of the hydrogen bonds rupture (O30-H31, O33-H34). A change in the sign of the Laplacian, L(r), from the positive value in the reactant to a negative character at the transition state indicates the depletion of the charge density, confirming the N5-H10 and O11-Se1 bond breaking. The analysis of electron location function (ELF) and localized orbital locator (LOL) of the Se1-N5 and Se1-O11 bonds have been done by multi-WFN program. High values of ELF and LOL at the transition state regions between the Se, N, and O atoms display the bond formation. Finally, the main donor-acceptor interaction energies were analyzed using the natural bond orbital analysis for investigation of their stabilization effects on the critical bonds at the RDS.

  17. Characterization of Anionic Peroxidases in Tomato Isolines Infected by Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Zacheo, G.; Orlando, C.; Bleve-Zacheo, T.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in peroxidase activity during nematode infection were studied using root extracts of tomato near-isogenic lines differing in resistance to Meloidogyne incognita. Total peroxidase activity increased slightly in crude extracts of four susceptible isolines but doubled in two resistant lines, Monita and Motaci. Nematode infection enhanced levels of both p-phenylenediamine-pyrocatechol oxidase and syringaldazine oxidase 7 days after inoculation, especially in resistant lines. This elevated peroxidase activity in resistant isolines was caused by an increase in anionic peroxidase activity. These enzymes, which likely are involved in lignification, were isolated and purified from tomato isolines by ammonium sulfate precipitation, high performance ion-exchange chromatography, and gel electrophoresis. The purified anionic peroxidase extracts contained an electrophoretic band with Rf 0.51 that was present in extracts of infected but not uninfected roots. PMID:19279765

  18. Suppression of Arabidopsis peroxidase 72 alters cell wall and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María A; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Class III peroxidases are glycoproteins with a major role in cell wall maturation such as lignin formation. Peroxidases are usually present in a high number of isoenzymes, which complicates to assign specific functions to individual peroxidase isoenzymes. Arabidopsis genome encodes for 73 peroxidases, among which AtPrx72 has been shown to participate in lignification. Here, we report by using knock out peroxidase mutants how the disruption of AtPrx72 causes thinner secondary walls in interfascicular fibres but not in the xylem of the stem. This effect is also age-dependent, and AtPrx72 function seems to be particularly important when lignification prevails over elongation processes. Finally, the suppression AtPrx72 leads to the down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis pathway, as well as genes and transcription factors involved in secondary wall thickening.

  19. Chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay based on Pt nanoparticle with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Min; Jung, Ha-Wook; Chang, Young Wook; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    A lateral flow immunoassay (LF-immunoassay) with an enhanced sensitivity and thermostability was developed by using Pt nanoparticles with a peroxidase activity. The Pt nanoparticles were synthesized by citrate reduction method, and the peroxidase activity of Pt nanoparticles was optimized by adjusting reaction conditions. The peroxidase activity was estimated by using Michaelis-Menten kinetics model with TMB as a chromogenic substrate. The kinetics parameters of KM and Vmax were calculated and compared with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The thermal stability of the Pt nanoparticles was compared with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) according to the storage temperature and long-term storage period. The feasibility of lateral flow immunoassay with a chemiluminescent signal band was demonstrated by the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) as a model analyte, and the sensitivity was determined to be improved by as much as 1000-fold compared to the conventional rapid test based on colored gold-colloids.

  20. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Lundell, Taina; Floudas, Dimitrios; Nagy, Laszlo G; Barrasa, José M; Hibbett, David S; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades. The study confirms the absence of ligninolytic peroxidase genes from the manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) families, in the brown-rot fungal genomes (all of them from the antrodia clade), which include only a limited number of predicted low redox-potential generic peroxidase (GP) genes. When members of the heme-thiolate peroxidase (HTP) and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) superfamilies (up to a total of 64 genes) also are considered, the newly sequenced B. adusta appears as the Polyporales species with the highest number of peroxidase genes due to the high expansion of both the ligninolytic peroxidase and DyP (super)families. The evolutionary relationships of the 111 genes for class-II peroxidases (from the GP, MnP, VP, LiP families) in the 10 Polyporales genomes is discussed including the existence of different MnP subfamilies and of a large and homogeneous LiP cluster, while different VPs mainly cluster with short MnPs. Finally, ancestral state reconstructions showed that a putative MnP gene, derived from a primitive GP that incorporated the Mn(II)-oxidation site, is the precursor of all the class-II ligninolytic peroxidases. Incorporation of an exposed tryptophan residue involved in oxidative degradation of lignin in a short MnP apparently resulted in evolution of the first VP. One of these ancient VPs might have lost the Mn(II)-oxidation site being at the origin of all the LiP enzymes, which are found only in

  1. Substrate oxidation by dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from wood- and litter-degrading agaricomycetes compared to other fungal and plant heme-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Liers, Christiane; Pecyna, Marek J; Kellner, Harald; Worrich, Anja; Zorn, Holger; Steffen, Kari T; Hofrichter, Martin; Ullrich, René

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic and physicochemical properties of representative fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) of wood- (WRF) and litter-decomposing white-rot fungi (LDF) are summarized and compared, including one recombinant Mycetinis scorodonius DyP (rMscDyP; LDF), the wild-type Auricularia auricula-judae DyP (AauDyP; WRF), and two new DyPs secreted by the jelly fungi Exidia glandulosa (EglDyP; WRF) and Mycena epipterygia (MepDyP; LDF). Homogeneous preparations of these DyPs were obtained after different steps of fast protein liquid chromatography, and they increase the total number of characterized fungal DyP proteins to eight. The peptide sequences of AauDyP, MepDyP, and EglDyP showed highest homologies (52-56%) to the DyPs of M. scorodonius. Five out of the eight characterized fungal DyPs were used to evaluate their catalytic properties compared to classic fungal and plant heme peroxidases, namely lignin peroxidase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium (PchLiP; WRF), versatile peroxidase of Bjerkandera adusta (BadVP; WRF), and generic peroxidases of Coprinopsis cinerea (CiP) and Glycine max (soybean peroxidase=SBP). All DyPs tested possess unique properties regarding the stability at low pH values: 50-90% enzymatic activity remained after 4-h exposition at pH 2.5, and the oxidation of nonphenolic aromatic substrates (lignin model compounds) was optimal below pH 3. Furthermore, all DyPs efficiently oxidized recalcitrant dyes (e.g., Azure B) as well as the phenolic substrate 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. Thus, DyPs combine features of different peroxidases on the functional level and may be part of the biocatalytic system secreted by fungi for the oxidation of lignin and/or toxic aromatic compounds.

  2. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-03-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to {Beta}-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  3. Characterization of Antisense Transformed Plants Deficient in the Tobacco Anionic Peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L. M.; Gingas, V.; Finger, F.; Rothstein, S.; Liu, TTY.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of the biological compounds that they metabolize, plant peroxidases have long been implicated in plant growth, cell wall biogenesis, lignification, and host defenses. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that underexpress anionic peroxidase were generated using antisense RNA. The antisense RNA was found to be specific for the anionic isoenzyme and highly effective, reducing endogenous transcript levels and total peroxidase activity by as much as 1600-fold. Antisense-transformed plants appeared normal at initial observation; however, growth studies showed that plants with reduced peroxidase activity grow taller and flower sooner than control plants. In contrast, previously transformed plants overproducing anionic peroxidase were shorter and flowered later than controls. Axillary buds were more developed in antisense-transformed plants and less developed in plants overproducing this enzyme. It was found that the lignin content in leaf, stem, and root was unchanged in antisense-transformed plants, which does not support a role for anionic peroxidase in the lignification of secondary xylem vessels. However, studies of wounded tissue show some reduction in wound-induced deposition of lignin-like polymers. The data support a possible role for tobacco anionic peroxidase in host defenses but not without a reduction in growth potential. PMID:12223765

  4. Production and Preliminary Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Cationic Peanut Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunfang; Carbonera, Daniela; van Huystee, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) have been produced against the cationic peroxidase from peanut suspension cell culture. Eight of these antibodies were found to be of the immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 subclass and two were of IgA subclass. A combination of competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting analysis, and direct antigen-binding assay revealed that the antibodies are directed against four different epitopes on the cationic peroxidase and the McAbs can be subdivided into four groups. Only group A inhibits peroxidase activity. Group B and D bind equally well to the native and the denatured form of cationic peroxidase, whereas the remaining McAbs react with more or less reduced affinity to the denatured antigen. Group C probably recognizes a conformation-dependent epitope. All the McAbs cross react weakly with the anionic peanut peroxidase, suggesting a structural nonidentity as well as some similarity between these two peroxidase isozymes. Cross reactivities of these McAbs with peroxidases of various plant species were also demonstrated. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665674

  5. Crystal structure analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Amanda; Textor, Larissa C; Santos, Jademilson C; Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Roig, Manuel G; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Muniz, João R C; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Palm tree peroxidases are known to be very stable enzymes and the peroxidase from the Chamaerops excelsa (CEP), which has a high pH and thermal stability, is no exception. To date, the structural and molecular events underscoring such biochemical behavior have not been explored in depth. In order to identify the structural characteristics accounting for the high stability of palm tree peroxidases, we solved and refined the X-ray structure of native CEP at a resolution of 2.6 Å. The CEP structure has an overall fold typical of plant peroxidases and confirmed the conservation of characteristic structural elements such as the heme group and calcium ions. At the same time the structure revealed important modifications in the amino acid residues in the vicinity of the exposed heme edge region, involved in substrate binding, that could account for the morphological variations among palm tree peroxidases through the disruption of molecular interactions at the second binding site. These modifications could alleviate the inhibition of enzymatic activity caused by molecular interactions at the latter binding site. Comparing the CEP crystallographic model described here with other publicly available peroxidase structures allowed the identification of a noncovalent homodimer assembly held together by a number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions. We demonstrate, that this dimeric arrangement results in a more stable protein quaternary structure through stabilization of the regions that are highly dynamic in other peroxidases. In addition, we resolved five N-glycosylation sites, which might also contribute to enzyme stability and resistance against proteolytic cleavage.

  6. Probing the two-domain structure of homodimeric prokaryotic and eukaryotic catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Srijib; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are ancestral bifunctional heme peroxidases found in archaeons, bacteria and lower eukaryotes. In contrast to homologous cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APx) homodimeric KatGs have a two-domain monomeric structure with a catalytic N-terminal heme domain and a C-terminal domain of high sequence and structural similarity but without obvious function. Nevertheless, without its C-terminal counterpart the N-terminal domain exhibits neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Except some hybrid-type proteins all other members of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily lack this C-terminal domain. In order to probe the role of the two-domain monomeric structure for conformational and thermal stability urea and temperature-dependent unfolding experiments were performed by using UV-Vis-, electronic circular dichroism- and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Recombinant prokaryotic (cyanobacterial KatG from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803) and eukaryotic (fungal KatG from Magnaporthe grisea) were investigated. The obtained data demonstrate that the conformational and thermal stability of bifunctional KatGs is significantly lower compared to homologous monofunctional peroxidases. The N- and C-terminal domains do not unfold independently. Differences between the cyanobacterial and the fungal enzyme are relatively small. Data will be discussed with respect to known structure and function of KatG, CcP and APx.

  7. Uncovering a new role for peroxidase enzymes as drivers of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Zinonos, Irene; Leach, Damien A; Hay, Shelley J; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Ingman, Wendy V; DeNichilo, Mark O; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes released by activated immune cells at sites of inflammation. To-date their functional role in human health has mainly been limited to providing a mechanism for oxidative defence against invading bacteria and other pathogenic microorganisms. Our laboratory has recently identified a new functional role for peroxidase enzymes in stimulating fibroblast migration and collagen biosynthesis, offering a new insight into the causative association between inflammation and the pro-fibrogenic events that mediate tissue repair and regeneration. Peroxidases are found at elevated levels within and near blood vessels however, their direct involvement in angiogenesis has never been reported. Here we report for the first time that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are readily internalised by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) where they promote cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and stimulate angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These pro-angiogenic effects were attenuated using the specific peroxidase inhibitor 4-ABAH, indicating the enzyme's catalytic activity is essential in mediating this response. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that MPO and EPO regulate endothelial FAK, Akt, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and stabilisation of HIF-2α, culminating in transcriptional regulation of key angiogenesis pathways. These findings uncover for the first time an important and previously unsuspected role for peroxidases as drivers of angiogenesis, and suggest that peroxidase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of angiogenesis related diseases driven by inflammation.

  8. Localization of gastric peroxidase and its inhibition by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, U; Bhattacharyya, D K; Chatterjee, R; Banerjee, R K

    1992-01-01

    Mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI) is a potent inducer of gastric acid secretion which is associated with significant inhibition of peroxidase activity of rat gastric mucosa in vivo. A time-dependent increase in acid secretion correlates well with time-dependent decrease in the peroxidase activity. In a chamber experiment in vitro using isolated gastric mucosa, MMI stimulates acid secretion, showing an almost linear response up to 600 microM. The time-dependent increase in acid secretion is also correlated with time-dependent inhibition of the peroxidase activity. This effect is not mediated through oxidation of MMI by flavin-containing mono-oxygenase, which is absent from gastric mucosa. The peroxidase has been localized mainly in parietal cells isolated and purified from gastric mucosa by controlled digestion with collagenase followed by Percoll-density-gradient centrifugation. Peroxidase activity was further localized in the outer membrane of the purified mitochondria of the parietal cell by some membrane-impermeant reagents, indicating outward orientation of the enzyme. MMI can inhibit the peroxidase activity of both the parietal cell and its mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. The possible involvement of the parietal-cell peroxidase-H2O2 system in MMI-induced acid secretion may be suggested. PMID:1318028

  9. [Oxidative destruction of estradiol after treatment with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase and methemoglobin].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Iu M; Matiushin, A I; Titov, V Iu

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that estradiol in the presence of horse radish peroxidase interacts with hydrogen peroxide, which is evidenced by an increase in its optical density at 280 nm. The photometering of samples containing estradiol and horse radish peroxidase upon their titration with hydrogen peroxide indicated that the increase in optical density stops after introducing hydrogen peroxide equimolar in concentration to estradiol. The stoichiometric ratio of estradiol consumed during oxidative destruction to hydrogen peroxide was 1:1. In the presence of ascorbate, the oxidative destruction of estradiol by the action of hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by horse radish peroxidase, was observed only after a latent period and showed the same regularities as in the absence of ascorbate. It was found by calorimetry that, during the latent period, estradiol catalyzes the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate without undergoing oxidative destruction. The substrates of the peroxidase reaction benzidine, 1-naphthol, and phenol interact with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ascorbate and horse radish peroxidase in a similar way. Presumably, upon interaction with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of horse radish peroxidase, estradiol, like other substrates of this reaction, undergoes oxidative destruction by the mechanism of peroxidase reaction. It is shown that oxidative destruction of estradiol by the action of hydrogen peroxide can also be catalyzed by methemoglobin by the same mechanism. These data are important for understanding the role of estradiol in the organism and the pathways of its metabolic conversions.

  10. Suspension cell culture as a tool for the characterization of class III peroxidases in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Creste, Silvana; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Secreted class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) are implicated in a broad range of physiological processes throughout the plant life cycle. However, the unambiguous determination of the precise biological role of an individual class III peroxidase isoenzyme is still a difficult task due to genetic redundancy and broad substrate specificity in vitro. In addition, many difficulties are encountered during extraction and analysis of cell wall proteins. Since class III peroxidases are also secreted into the apoplast, the use of suspension cell cultures can facilitate isolation and functional characterization of individual isoforms. Here, we report on the characterization of class III peroxidases secreted in the spent medium of sugarcane suspension cell cultures. After treatment with specific inducers of cell wall lignification, peroxidases were isolated and activities assayed with guaiacol, syringaldazine and coniferyl alcohol. Enzymatic activity was not significantly different after treatments, regardless of the substrate, with the exception of methyl-jasmonate treatment, which led to a decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Remarkably, peroxidases isolated from the medium were capable of oxidizing syringaldazine, an analog to sinapyl alcohol, suggesting that sugarcane cultures can produce peroxidases putatively correlated to lignification. A proteomic approach using activity staining of 2-DE gels revealed a complex isoperoxidase profile, composed predominantly of cationic isoforms. Individual spots were excised and analyzed by LC-ESI-Q-TOF and homology-based search against the Sugarcane EST Database resulted in the identification of several proteins. Spatio-temporal expression pattern of selected genes was determined for validation of identified class III peroxidases that were preferentially expressed during sugarcane stem development.

  11. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR.

  12. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and abscisic acid induction of a suberization-associated highly anionic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Kolattukudy, P E

    1989-06-01

    A highly anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing cells was suggested to be the key enzyme involved in polymerization of phenolic monomers to generate the aromatic matrix of suberin. The enzyme encoded by a potato cDNA was found to be highly homologous to the anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing tomato fruit. A tomato genomic library was screened using the potato anionic peroxidase cDNA and one genomic clone was isolated that contained two tandemly oriented anionic peroxidase genes. These genes were sequenced and were 96% and 87% identical to the mRNA for potato anionic peroxidase. Both genes consist of three exons with the relative positions of their two introns being conserved between the two genes. Primer extension analysis showed that only one of the genes is expressed in the periderm of 3 day wound-healed tomato fruits. Southern blot analyses suggested that there are two copies each of the two highly homologous genes per haploid genome in both potato and tomato. Abscisic acid (ABA) induced the accumulation of the anionic peroxidase transcripts in potato and tomato callus tissues. Northern blots showed that peroxidase mRNA was detectable at 2 days and was maximal at 8 days after transfer of potato callus to solid agar media containing 10(-4) M ABA. The transcripts induced by ABA in both potato and tomato callus were identical in size to those induced in wound-healing potato tuber and tomato fruit. The anionic peroxidase peptide was detected in extracts of potato callus grown on the ABA-containing media by western blot analysis. The results support the suggestion that stimulation of suberization by ABA involves the induction of the highly anionic peroxidase.

  13. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized [veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)], we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  14. Identification of a copper-sensitive ascorbate peroxidase in the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum.

    PubMed

    Sauser, K R; Liu, J K; Wong, T Y

    1997-07-01

    Extracts from the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum exhibit high superoxide dismutase activity, but only traces of catalase activity. The excess hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the superoxide dismutase in S. capricornutum may be degraded by a unique peroxidase. This peroxidase has a high specificity for ascorbate as its electron donor. The enzyme has an optimum pH at 8, is insensitive to cyanide and is inhibited by oxine. Addition of low concentrations of copper to algal cultures stimulates the peroxidase activity threefold. This enzymatic system could be used as a sensitive bioindicator for copper in fresh water.

  15. Oxidation of Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Amino Acid Conjugates by Horseradish Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ro Dong; Park, Chang Kyu

    1987-01-01

    The stability of 21 amino acid conjugates of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) toward horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. The IAA conjugates of Arg, Ile, Leu, Tyr, and Val were oxidized readily by peroxidase. Those of Ala, β-Ala, Asp, Cys, Gln, Glu, Gly, and Lys were not degraded and their recovery was above 92% after 1 hour incubation with HRP. A correlation between the stability of IAA conjugates toward peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation and the hydrophobicity of the amino acid moiety conjugated to IAA was demonstrated. Polar amino acid conjugates of IAA are more resistant to HRP-catalyzed oxidation. PMID:16665529

  16. Thyroid peroxidase inhibition by Kalanchoe brasiliensis aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A C; Rosenthal, D; Carvalho, D P

    2000-05-01

    Flavonoids are known inhibitors of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and some are components of Kalanchoe brasiliensis, a plant used in popular medicine to treat tissue injuries, enlarged ganglia and peptic ulcer. As K. brasiliensis extract is currently used, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of K. brasiliensis aqueous extract on TPO activity. We show here that TPO iodide-oxidation activity was significantly inhibited by K. brasiliensis aqueous extract and that TPO inhibition seems to be competitive, since the enzyme V(max) was unchanged and K(m) for iodide was significantly increased in the presence of the plant extract. Furthermore, TPO inhibitory activity produced by K. brasiliensis extract was unchanged after boiling or by incubation with hepatic enzymes (activated S9 fraction), suggesting that at least the antithyroid component of this plant infusion could probably reach systemic circulation. We also report that K. brasiliensis aqueous extract is able to scavenge H(2)O(2), in vitro. As H(2)O(2) is an essential TPO cofactor, it is possible that the H(2)O(2) trapping effect of K. brasiliensis may be responsible, at least in part, for the inhibition of the iodide-oxidation reaction catalysed by this enzyme. Thus, K. brasiliensis aqueous extract has antithyroid effects in vitro, suggesting that its chronic consumption could contribute to the development of goitre and hypothyroidism, mainly in areas of low iodine intake.

  17. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  18. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  19. Degradation of horseradish peroxidase after microinjection into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, S.E.; Hopgood, M.F.; Ballard, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been microinjected into mammalian cells in tissue culture by the erythrocyte ghost-mediated technique. This protein was selected because it can be localized and quantified after injection by cytochemical and spectrophotometric methods. HRP labeled by reductive methylation retained full catalytic activity, was efficiently loaded into erythrocyte ghosts, and did not associate to a significant degree with ghost membranes. A combination of cytochemical staining and autoradiography established that HRP injected into rat L6 myoblasts, HE(39)L human diploid fibroblasts, or HeLa cells was intracellular and uniformly distributed throughout the cell, while cell lysis techniques showed that the catalytically active HRP was not membrane bound. Inactivation of labeled HRP after injection paralleled the disappearance of the 40-kDa polypeptide, and was always more rapid than its overall degradation. This difference was associated with a pool of water-insoluble radioactivity in the injected cells. This material was of smaller molecular size than the native protein: many labeled peptides were detected in the range of 10 to 38 kDa. By the use of inhibitors of autophagic proteolysis or lysosomal function it was established that HRP degradation was not subjected quantitatively to the same regulatory processes as the average endogenous protein labeled in the same cultures.

  20. Modification of photosynthetic regulation in tomato overexpressing glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Herbette, Stephane; Menn, Aline Le; Rousselle, Patrick; Ameglio, Thierry; Faltin, Zehava; Branlard, Gérard; Eshdat, Yuval; Julien, Jean-Louis; Drevet, Joël R; Roeckel-Drevet, Patricia

    2005-06-20

    To investigate the function of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in plants, we produced transgenic tomato plants overexpressing an eukaryotic selenium-independent GPX (GPX5). We show here that total GPX activity was increased by 50% in transgenic plants, when compared to control plants transformed with the binary vector without the insert (PZP111). A preliminary two-dimensional electrophoretic protein analysis of the GPX overexpressing plants showed notably a decrease in the accumulation of proteins identified as rubisco small subunit 1 and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, two proteins involved in photosynthesis. These observations, together with the fact that in standard culture conditions, GPX-overexpressing plants were not phenotypically distinct from control plants prompted us to challenge the plants with a chilling treatment that is known to affect photosynthesis activity. We found that upon chilling treatment with low light level, photosynthesis was not affected in GPX-overexpressing plants while it was in control plants, as revealed by chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and fructose-1,6-biphosphatase activity. These results suggest that overexpression of a selenium-independent GPX in tomato plants modifies specifically gene expression and leads to modifications of photosynthetic regulation processes.

  1. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Omar, Haneen; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-03-04

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) with a detection limit of 1.86 μM. In the absence of UO2(2+), the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2(2+), this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2(2+) was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2(2+) and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2(2+) from seawater.

  2. Role of eosinophil peroxidase in host defense and disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Slungaard, Arne

    2006-01-15

    Three unusual substrates-bromide (Br(-)), nitrite (NO(2)(-)), and thiocyanate (SCN(-))-compete for oxidation by eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in physiologic fluids in the presence of H(2)O(2) to yield, respectively, hypobromous acid (HOBr), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)()), or hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN). These oxidant products have strikingly different reactivities: HOBr and NO(2)() are potent, widely reactive, membrane-lytic oxidants whereas HOSCN is a weak, SH-specific oxidant that penetrates into cells and imposes an intracellular oxidant stress that can activate kinase pathways and transcription factors that profoundly influence gene expression in host cells. All three oxidants are lethal for pathogens. SCN(-) is the strongly preferred substrate for the EPO/H(2)O(2). Specific biomarkers document that EPO-dependent oxidants are generated at sites of inflammation, but direct evidence that these oxidants cause disease is confined to the observation that an EPO knockout mouse line has dramatically less pathologic damage than do wild type animals in a murine model of ulcerative colitis.

  3. Mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 disruption causes male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuela; Förster, Heidi; Boersma, Auke; Seiler, Alexander; Wehnes, Helga; Sinowatz, Fred; Neumüller, Christine; Deutsch, Manuel J; Walch, Axel; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ursini, Fulvio; Roveri, Antonella; Maleszewski, Marek; Maiorino, Matilde; Conrad, Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Selenium is linked to male fertility. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4), first described as an antioxidant enzyme, is the predominant selenoenzyme in testis and has been suspected of being vital for spermatogenesis. Cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear isoforms are all encoded by the same gene. While disruption of entire GPx4 causes early embryonic lethality in mice, inactivation of nuclear GPx4 does not impair embryonic development or fertility. Here, we show that deletion of mitochondrial GPx4 (mGPx4) allows both normal embryogenesis and postnatal development, but causes male infertility. Infertility was associated with impaired sperm quality and severe structural abnormalities in the midpiece of spermatozoa. Knockout sperm display higher protein thiol content and recapitulate features typical of severe selenodeficiency. Interestingly, male infertility induced by mGPx4 depletion could be bypassed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. We also show for the first time that mGPx4 is the prevailing GPx4 product in male germ cells and that mGPx4 disruption has no effect on proliferation or apoptosis of germinal or somatic tissue. Our study finally establishes that mitochondrial GPx4 confers the vital role of selenium in mammalian male fertility and identifies cytosolic GPx4 as the only GPx4 isoform being essential for embryonic development and apoptosis regulation.

  4. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca(2+) ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca(2+) concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca(2+) binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance.

  5. Ultrastructural Localization of Peroxidase Activity in Human Platelets and Megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Breton-Gorius, Janine; Guichard, Josette

    1972-01-01

    Normal human platelets and megakaryocytes were examined for peroxidase activity by the diaminobenzidine (DAB) cytochemical technic. When the fixation and the incubation were adequate, a strong reaction was present in the dense tubular system of platelets suspended in plasma or spread on carbon. The black reaction product was ascribed to enzyme activity, since the reaction was completely eliminated when H2O2 or DAB were omitted, or when H2O2 was in excess. In addition, the reaction was inhibited by aminotriazole, cyanide and azide. In the human megakaryocytes, the reaction was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum including the perinuclear envelope. The Golgi complex and the clear vacuolar system were negative for the reaction. After platelet release, the reaction was always seen in the perinuclear space. The nature and function of the enzyme, as well as its possible relationships with catalase, are discussed. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16 PMID:5009974

  6. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL−1, specific activity 78 U mg−1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4–5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+, Cu2+, Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2. H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL−1 enzyme activities. PMID:24948923

  7. Comparative permeability of different glioma models to horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, D R; Fischer, J M; Vick, N A; Bigner, D D

    1981-01-01

    Seven different experimental glioma models were studied to determine their capillary permeability to horseradish peroxidase. The models were the autochthonous ASV-viral model, intracerebral (ic) and (sc) injections of rat 9L and RG-2 tumor cell lines, the sc rat S-69C15 tumor cell line, and human glioblastoma cell lines in nude mice. The ASV-viral model showed an average HRP permeability of 63% of tumor volume, the ic RG-2 tumors were 100% permeable, and the ic 9L tumors were 41% permeable. The permeability of the marginal zone (brain-tumor interface) showed similar variation from group to group. In contrast, all of the sc tumors were 100% permeable regardless of the cell line used to create the tumors. Our results show the variability between these glioma models, and suggest that RG-2 ic gliomas and all sc gliomas should be optimal to assess the tumoricidal effect of drugs, because access to the tumor compartment from the vascular compartment is complete.

  8. Thiol Chemistry in Peroxidase Catalysis and Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fukuto, Jon M.; Forman, Henry Jay

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The oxidation chemistry of thiols and disulfides of biologic relevance is described. The review focuses on the interaction and kinetics of hydrogen peroxide with low-molecular-weight thiols and protein thiols and, in particular, on sulfenic acid groups, which are recognized as key intermediates in several thiol oxidation processes. In particular, sulfenic and selenenic acids are formed during the catalytic cycle of peroxiredoxins and glutathione peroxidases, respectively. In turn, these enzymes are in close redox communication with the thioredoxin and glutathione systems, which are the major controllers of the thiol redox state. Oxidants formed in the cell originate from several different sources, but the major producers are NADPH oxidases and mitochondria. However, a different role of the oxygen species produced by these sources is apparent as oxidants derived from NADPH oxidase are involved mainly in signaling processes, whereas those produced by mitochondria induce cell death in pathways including also the thioredoxin system, presently considered an important target for cancer chemotherapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 10, 1549–1564. PMID:18479206

  9. Phenol removal from refinery wastewater by mutant recombinant horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Asad, Sedigheh; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Khajeh, Khosro

    2014-01-01

    Application of mutated recombinant horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for phenol removal from refinery effluents is reported. Recombinant HRP produced in Escherichia coli suffers from the disadvantage of lacking glycosylation, which affects its catalytic efficiency and stability toward inactivating parameters such as increased temperature and enhanced amounts of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, the previously reported variant (in which Asn268 was substituted with Asp, N268D) with improved stability characteristics and catalytic efficiency was used to remove phenol from a petroleum refinery effluent. The presence and removal of phenol was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography; the precipitated oxidized phenol was also observed and removed from the sample by centrifugation. Results showed that the N268D variant can remove 61%, 67%, and 81% of phenol from effluent in 1, 2, and 16 H, respectively. By exploiting the N268D mutant, removal of 50% phenol could be achieved in 42 Min, which was more than 22 times less than the treatment time required by native recombinant enzyme.

  10. Glutathione Peroxidase 4 Is Required for Maturation of Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ueta, Takashi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Takahisa; Tamaki, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Yasuhito; Imai, Hirotaka; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathologies of photoreceptor cells, and the protective role of antioxidant enzymes for photoreceptor cells have been well understood. However, their essentiality has remained unknown. In this study we generated photoreceptor-specific conditional knock-out (CKO) mice of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) and showed the critical role of GPx4 for photoreceptor cells. In the wild-type retina the dominant GPx4 expression was in the mitochondria, indicating the mitochondrial variant was the major GPx4 in the retina. In the GPx4-CKO mice, although photoreceptor cells developed and differentiated into rod and cone cells by P12, they rapidly underwent drastic degeneration and completely disappeared by P21. The photoreceptor cell death in the GPx4-CKO mice was associated with the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and TUNEL-positive cells. Photoreceptor cells before undergoing apoptosis (P11) exhibited decreased mitochondrial biomass, decreased number of connecting cilia, as well as disorganized structure of outer segments. These findings indicate that GPx4 is a critical antioxidant enzyme for the maturation and survival of photoreceptor cells. PMID:22207760

  11. Decolorization of direct dyes by immobilized turnip peroxidase in batch and continuous processes.

    PubMed

    Matto, Mahreen; Husain, Qayyum

    2009-03-01

    An inexpensive immobilized turnip peroxidase has been employed for the decolorization of some direct dyes in batch and continuous reactors. Wood shaving was investigated as an inexpensive material for the preparation of bioaffinity support. Concanavalin A-wood shaving bound turnip peroxidase exhibited 67% of the original enzyme activity. Both soluble and immobilized turnip peroxidase could effectively remove more than 50% color from dyes in the presence of metals/salt and 0.6mM 1-hydroxybenzotriazole, after 1h of incubation. The columns containing immobilized peroxidase could decolorize 64% direct red 23% and 50% mixture of direct dyes at 4 and 3 months of operation, respectively. Total organic carbon analysis of treated dye or mixture of dyes revealed that these results were quite comparable to the loss of color from solutions. Thus, this study showed that the immobilized enzyme could be efficiently used for the removal of synthetic dyes from industrial effluents.

  12. Bromination of deoxycytidine by eosinophil peroxidase: A mechanism for mutagenesis by oxidative damage of nucleotide precursors

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Byun, Jaeman; Williams, Michelle V.; McCormick, Michael L.; Parks, William C.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidants generated by eosinophils during chronic inflammation may lead to mutagenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Eosinophil peroxidase, a heme enzyme released by eosinophils, generates hypobromous acid that damages tissue in inflammatory conditions. We show that human eosinophils use eosinophil peroxidase to produce 5-bromodeoxycytidine. Flow cytometric, immunohistochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses all demonstrated that 5-bromodeoxycytidine generated by eosinophil peroxidase was taken up by cultured cells and incorporated into genomic DNA as 5-bromodeoxyuridine. Although previous studies have focused on oxidation of chromosomal DNA, our observations suggest another mechanism for oxidative damage of DNA. In this scenario, peroxidase-catalyzed halogenation of nucleotide precursors yields products that subsequently can be incorporated into DNA. Because the thymine analog 5-BrUra mispairs with guanine in DNA, generation of brominated pyrimidines by eosinophils might constitute a mechanism for cytotoxicity and mutagenesis at sites of inflammation. PMID:11172002

  13. Interaction of metals with peroxidase--mediated luminol-enhanced, chemiluminescence (PLmCL).

    PubMed

    Coteur, G; Dubois, P

    2004-01-01

    The peroxidase-mediated luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (PLmCL) method has been used to study the in vitro effect of contaminants such as heavy metals on the reactive oxygen species production by immunocytes. We were interested to know whether metals could directly affect peroxidase-mediated luminescence, taking horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model enzyme, since this could contribute to the inhibition of immunocyte LmCL. Copper inhibited PLmCL in a dose-dependent manner, while cadmium, iron, silver and lead only partly decreased the signal in the concentration range tested. In contrast, zinc enhanced the signal at high concentrations. Eventually, chromium, mercury and aluminium did not affect PLmCL. It is suggested that these effects reflect the ability of the metals to interact with the active site of the peroxidase. These results demonstrate that such interactions have to be considered when interpreting the effects of metals on immunocytes using the LmCL method.

  14. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  15. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Marcela . E-mail: maa@ibt.unam.mx; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-06-08

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple.

  16. Degradation of disperse dye from textile effluent by free and immobilized Cucurbita pepo peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucherit, N.; Abouseoud, M.; Adour, L.

    2012-06-01

    Disperse dyes constitute the largest group of dyes used in local textile industry. This work evaluates the potential of the Cucurbita peroxidase(C-peroxidase) extracted from courgette in the decolourization of disperse dye in free and immobilized form. The optimal conditions for immobilization of C-peroxidase in Ca-alginate were identified. The immobilization was optimized at 2%(w/v) of sodium alginate and 0.2 M of calcium chloride. After optimization of treatment parameters, the results indicate that at pH 2, dye concentration: 80 mg/L(for FCP) and 180 mg/L(for ICP), H2O2 dose: 0,02M (for FCP) and 0,12M(for ICP), the decolourization by free and immobilized C-peroxidase were 72.02% and 69.71 % respectively. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed after the degradation were also predicted using UV-vis spectroscopy analysis.

  17. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1978-01-01

    Dwarf Marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition, and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required corrections for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  18. The SKPO-1 peroxidase functions in the hypodermis to protect Caenorhabditis elegans from bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Tiller, George R; Garsin, Danielle A

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the synergistic relationship between NADPH oxidase (NOX)/dual oxidase (DUOX) enzymes and peroxidases has received increased attention. Peroxidases utilize NOX/DUOX-generated H2O2 for a myriad of functions including, but not limited to, thyroid hormone biosynthesis, cross-linking extracellular matrices (ECM), and immune defense. We postulated that one or more peroxidases produced by Caenorhabditis elegans would act in host defense, possibly in conjunction with BLI-3, the only NOX/DUOX enzyme encoded by the genome that is expressed. Animals exposed to RNA interference (RNAi) of the putative peroxidase genes were screened for susceptibility to the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. One of three genes identified, skpo-1 (ShkT-containing peroxidase), was studied in depth. Animals mutant for this gene were significantly more susceptible to E. faecalis, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A slight decrease in longevity was also observed. The skpo-1 mutant animals had a dumpy phenotype of incomplete penetrance; half the animals displayed a dumpy phenotype ranging from slight to severe, and half were morphologically wild type. The SKPO-1 protein contains the critical catalytic residues necessary for peroxidase activity, and in a whole animal assay, more H2O2 was detected from the mutant compared to the wild type, consistent with the loss of an H2O2 sink. By using tissue-specific skpo-1 RNAi and immunohistochemical localization with an anti-SKPO-1 antibody, it was determined that the peroxidase is functionally and physically present in the hypodermis. In conclusion, these results characterize a peroxidase that functions protectively in the hypodermis during exposure to E. faecalis.

  19. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dwarf marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required correction for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  20. Evaluation of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 role in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinguo; Lin, Yan; Li, Jinling; Liu, Mengchun; Wang, Jingli; Li, Xueying; Liu, Jingjing; Jia, Xuewen; Jing, Zhongcui; Huang, Zuzhou; Chu, Kaiqiu; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome that may be lifethreatening to pregnancies and fetus. Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (GPx4) is a powerful antioxidant enzyme that can provide protection from oxidative stress damage which plays a pivotal role in the pathology of PE. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between Gpx4 polymorphisms and the susceptibility to PE in Chinese Han women. TaqMan allelic discrimination real-time PCR was used to perform the genotyping of rs713041 and rs4807542 in 1008 PE patients and 1386 normotensive pregnancies. Obviously statistical difference of genotypic and allelic frequencies were found of rs713041 in GPx4 between PE patients and controls and the C allele has the higher risk for pathogenesis of PE (χ2 = 12.292, P = 0.002 by genotype; χ2 = 11.035, P = 0.001, OR = 1.216, 95% CI 1.084–1.365 by allele). Additionally, when subdividing these samples into CC + CT and TT groups, we found a significant difference between the two groups (χ2 = 11.241, P = 0.001, OR = 1.417, 95% CI 1.155–1.738). Furthermore, the genotype of rs713041 was found to be associated with the mild, severe and early-onset PE. Our results suggest that rs713041 in GPx4 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27641822

  1. Thiocyanate, a plausible physiological electron donor of gastric peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Das, D; De, P K; Banerjee, R K

    1995-01-01

    Gastric peroxidase (GPO) was purified to apparent homogeneity to characterize its major physiological electron donor. The enzyme (RZ = 0.7), with a subunit molecular mass of 50 kDa, is a glycoprotein, with a relative abundance of aspartic and glutamic acid over arginine and lysine. It has a Soret maximum at 412 nm, which is shifted to 426 nm by H2O2 due to formation of compound II. Although the physiological electron donors I-, Br- and SCN-, but not Cl-, are oxidized by GPO optimally at acid pH, only I- and SCN- are oxidized appreciably at physiological pH. Considering that the I- concentration in stomach is less than 1 microM, whereas the SCN- concentration is about 250 microM, SCN- may act as a major electron donor for GPO. Moreover, SCN- oxidation remains unaltered in the presence of physiological concentrations of other halides. The second-order rate constant for the reaction of GPO with H2O2 (k1) and compound I with SCN- (k2) at pH 7 was found to be 8 x 10(7) M-1.s-1 and 2 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 respectively. GPO has significant pseudocatalase activity also in the presence of I- or Br-, but it is blocked by SCN-. The SCN- oxidation product OSCN- may be reduced back to SCN- by cellular GSH, and GSSG may be reduced back to GSH by glutathione reductase and NADPH. In a system reconstituted with pure glutathione reductase, NADPH, GSH, SCN- and H2O2. GPO-catalysed SCN- oxidation could be coupled to NADPH oxidation. This system where GPO utilizes SCN- as the major physiological electron donor may operate efficiently to scavenge intracellular H2O2. Images Figure 1 PMID:7826354

  2. Determinants of human plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3) expression.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Charlene; Voetsch, Barbara; Jin, Richard C; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2004-06-25

    Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3) is a selenocysteine-containing protein with antioxidant properties. GPx-3 deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke. The regulation of GPx-3 expression remains largely uncharacterized, however, and we studied its transcriptional and translational determinants in a cultured cell system. In transient transfections of a renal cell line (Caki-2), the published sequence cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene produced minimal activity (relative luminescence (RL) = 0.6 +/- 0.4). Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to identify a novel transcription start site that is located 233 bp downstream (3') of the published site and that produced a >25-fold increase in transcriptional activity (RL = 16.8 +/- 1.9; p < 0.0001). Analysis of the novel GPx-3 promoter identified Sp-1- and hypoxia-inducible factor-1-binding sites, as well as the redox-sensitive metal response element and antioxidant response element. Hypoxia was identified as a strong transcriptional regulator of GPx-3 expression, in part through the presence of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1-binding site, leading to an almost 3-fold increase in expression levels after 24 h compared with normoxic conditions (normalized RL = 3.5 +/- 0.3 versus 1.2 +/- 0.1; p < 0.001). We also investigated the role of the translational cofactors tRNA(Sec), SECIS-binding protein-2, and SelD (selenophosphate synthetase D) in GPx-3 protein expression. tRNA(Sec) and SelD significantly enhanced GPx-3 expression, whereas SECIS-binding protein-2 showed a trend toward increased expression. These results demonstrate the presence of a novel functional transcription start site for the human GPx-3 gene with a promoter regulated by hypoxia, and identify unique translational determinants of GPx-3 expression.

  3. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M.; Barja, Maria V.; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K.; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  4. Horseradish peroxidase mediated free radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Kalra, B; Gross, R A

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports the free radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). A novel method was developed whereby MMA polymerization can be carried out at ambient temperatures in the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and 2,4-pentanedione in a mixture of water and a water-miscible solvent. Polymers of MMA formed were highly stereoregular with predominantly syndiotactic sequences (syn-dyad fractions from 0.82 to 0.87). Analyses of the chloroform-soluble fraction of syndio-PMMA products by GPC showed that they have number-average molecular weights, Mn, that range from 7500 to 75,000. By using 25% v/v of the cosolvents dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, acetone, and dimethylformamide, 85, 45, 7 and 2% product yields, respectively, resulted after 24 h. Increasing the proportion of dioxane to water from 1:3 to 1:1 and 3:1 resulted in a decrease in polymer yield from 45 to 38 and 7%, respectively. Increase in the enzyme concentration from 70 to 80 and 90 mg/mL resulted in increased reaction kinetics. By adjustment of the molar ratio of 2,4-pentanedione to hydrogen peroxide between 1.30:1.0 and 1.45:1.0, the product yields and Mn values were increased. On the basis of the catalytic properties of HRP and studies herein, we believe that the keto-enoxy radicals from 2,4-pentanedione are the first radical species generated. Then, initiation may take place through this radical or by the radical transfer to another molecule.

  5. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Manuel A; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M; Barja, Maria V; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function.

  6. Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases: peroxidase hydroperoxide specificity and cyclooxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiayan; Seibold, Steve A; Rieke, Caroline J; Song, Inseok; Cukier, Robert I; Smith, William L

    2007-06-22

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) activity of prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases (PGHSs) converts arachidonic acid and O2 to prostaglandin G2 (PGG2). PGHS peroxidase (POX) activity reduces PGG2 to PGH2. The first step in POX catalysis is formation of an oxyferryl heme radical cation (Compound I), which undergoes intramolecular electron transfer forming Intermediate II having an oxyferryl heme and a Tyr-385 radical required for COX catalysis. PGHS POX catalyzes heterolytic cleavage of primary and secondary hydroperoxides much more readily than H2O2, but the basis for this specificity has been unresolved. Several large amino acids form a hydrophobic "dome" over part of the heme, but when these residues were mutated to alanines there was little effect on Compound I formation from H2O2 or 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a surrogate substrate for PGG2. Ab initio calculations of heterolytic bond dissociation energies of the peroxyl groups of small peroxides indicated that they are almost the same. Molecular Dynamics simulations suggest that PGG2 binds the POX site through a peroxyl-iron bond, a hydrogen bond with His-207 and van der Waals interactions involving methylene groups adjoining the carbon bearing the peroxyl group and the protoporphyrin IX. We speculate that these latter interactions, which are not possible with H2O2, are major contributors to PGHS POX specificity. The distal Gln-203 four residues removed from His-207 have been thought to be essential for Compound I formation. However, Q203V PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 mutants catalyzed heterolytic cleavage of peroxides and exhibited native COX activity. PGHSs are homodimers with each monomer having a POX site and COX site. Cross-talk occurs between the COX sites of adjoining monomers. However, no cross-talk between the POX and COX sites of monomers was detected in a PGHS-2 heterodimer comprised of a Q203R monomer having an inactive POX site and a G533A monomer with an inactive COX site.

  7. Association of antithyroid peroxidase antibody with fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Blumen, Helena; Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate how autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) affects the clinical presentation of established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with particular reference to fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain (CWP). A cohort of 204 patients with RA for whom the presence or absence of autoimmune thyroid antibodies was documented was examined for the relationships between thyroid autoantibodies and fibromyalgia or CWP. We identified 29 % who tested positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). The anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) was found in 24 %. Among the thyroid autoantibody-positive patients, 40 % had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia or CWP versus 17 % for antibody negative patients. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex, diabetes and BMI) indicated that TPOAb-positive patients were more likely to have fibromyalgia or CWP, with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.641, 95 % confidence interval (CI) (2.110-10.207) P < .001. Adjusting for spinal degenerative disc disease did not change the association with fibromyalgia, OR 4.458, 95 % CI (1.950-10.191), P < .001. The OR between TgAb and fibromyalgia was not significant (P > .05). Additional logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex and BMI) indicated a significant relationship between TPOAb and fibromyalgia or CWP in patients without diabetes and those without hypothyroidism (OR of 4.873, 95 % CI (1.877-12.653), P = .001 and OR of 4.615 95 % CI (1.810-11.770), P = .001, respectively). There may be a positive association between the ATD antibody TPOAb, and fibromyalgia syndrome and CWP in patients with established RA.

  8. Rhythms of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in brain of chick and their inhibition by light.

    PubMed

    Pablos, M I; Reiter, R J; Ortiz, G G; Guerrero, J M; Agapito, M T; Chuang, J I; Sewerynek, E

    1998-01-01

    Melatonin was recently shown to be a component of the antioxidative defense system of organisms due to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. Pharmacologically, melatonin stimulates the activity of the peroxide detoxifying enzyme glutathione peroxidase in rat brain and in several tissues of chicks. In this report, we studied the endogenous rhythm of two antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, in five regions (hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum, cortex and cerebellum) of chick brain and correlated them with physiological blood melatonin concentrations. Glutathione peroxidase exhibited a marked 24 h rhythm with peak activity in each brain region which had acrophases about 8 h after lights off and about 4 h after the serum melatonin peak was detected. Glutathione reductase activity exhibited similar robust rhythms with the peaks occurring roughly 2 h after those of glutathione peroxidase. We suggest that neural glutathione peroxidase increases due to the rise of nocturnal melatonin levels while glutathione reductase activity rises slightly later possibly due to an increase of its substrate, oxidized glutathione. The exposure of chicks to constant light for 6 days eliminated the melatonin rhythm as well as the peaks in both glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. These findings suggest that the melatonin rhythm may be related to the nighttime increases in the enzyme activities, although other explanations cannot be excluded.

  9. Mode of binding of the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil to mammalian haem peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R. P.; Singh, A.; Kushwaha, G. S; Singh, A. K.; Kaur, P.; Sharma, S.; Singh, T. P.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian haem peroxidase superfamily consists of myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoperoxidase (LPO), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These enzymes catalyze a number of oxidative reactions of inorganic substrates such as Cl−, Br−, I− and SCN− as well as of various organic aromatic compounds. To date, only structures of MPO and LPO are known. The substrate-binding sites in these enzymes are located on the distal haem side. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a potent antithyroid drug that acts by inhibiting the function of TPO. It has also been shown to inhibit the action of LPO. However, its mode of binding to mammalian haem peroxidases is not yet known. In order to determine the mode of its binding to peroxidases, the structure of the complex of LPO with PTU has been determined. It showed that PTU binds to LPO in the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side. The IC50 values for the inhibition of LPO and TPO by PTU are 47 and 30 µM, respectively. A comparision of the residues surrounding the substrate-binding site on the distal haem side in LPO with those in TPO showed that all of the residues were identical except for Ala114 (LPO numbering scheme), which is replaced by Thr205 (TPO numbering scheme) in TPO. A threonine residue in place of alanine in the substrate-binding site may affect the affinity of PTU for peroxidases. PMID:25760705

  10. Hemoglobins Likely Function as Peroxidase in Blood Clam Tegillarca granosa Hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Yu, Xiaopei; Lin, Zhihua; Zhang, Shunqin; Xue, Liangyi; Xue, Qinggang; Bao, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobins are a group of respiratory proteins principally functioning in transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in red blood cells of all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The blood clam T. granosa is one of the few invertebrates that have hemoglobin-containing red hemocytes. In the present research, the peroxidase activity of T. granosa hemoglobins (Tg-Hbs) was characterized and the associated mechanism of action was deciphered via structural comparison with other known peroxidases. We detected that purified Tg-Hbs catalyzed the oxidation of phenolic compounds in the presence of exogenous H2O2. Tg-Hbs peroxidase activity reached the maximum at pH 5 and 35°C and was inhibited by Fe(2+), Cu(2+), SDS, urea, and sodium azide. Tg-Hbs shared few similarities in amino acid sequence and overall structural characteristics with known peroxidases. However, the predicted structure at their heme pocket was highly similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This research represented the first systemic characterization of hemoglobin as a peroxidase.

  11. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  12. Rapid and reliable determination of the halogenating peroxidase activity in blood samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2014-12-15

    By combining easy and fast leukocyte enrichment with aminophenyl-fluorescein (APF) staining we developed a method to quickly and specifically address the halogenating activity of the immunological relevant blood heme peroxidases myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, respectively. For leukocyte enrichment a two-fold hypotonic lysis procedure of the blood with Millipore water was chosen which represents a cheap, fast and reliable method to diminish the amount of erythrocytes in the samples. This procedure is shown to be suitable both to human and murine blood micro-samples, making it also applicable to small animal experiments with recurring blood sampling. As all types of leukocytes are kept in the sample during the preparation, they can be analysed separately after discrimination during the flow cytometry analysis. This also holds for all heme peroxidase-containing cells, namely neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes. Moreover additional parameters (e.g. antibody staining) can be combined with the heme peroxidase activity determination to gain additional information about the different immune cell types. Based on previous results we applied APF for specifically addressing the halogenating activity of leukocyte peroxidases in blood samples. This dye is selectively oxidized by the MPO and EPO halogenation products hypochlorous and hypobromous acid. This approach may provide a suitable tool to gain more insights into the immune-physiological role of the halogenating activity of heme peroxidases.

  13. Hemoglobins Likely Function as Peroxidase in Blood Clam Tegillarca granosa Hemocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaopei; Lin, Zhihua; Xue, Liangyi

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobins are a group of respiratory proteins principally functioning in transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in red blood cells of all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The blood clam T. granosa is one of the few invertebrates that have hemoglobin-containing red hemocytes. In the present research, the peroxidase activity of T. granosa hemoglobins (Tg-Hbs) was characterized and the associated mechanism of action was deciphered via structural comparison with other known peroxidases. We detected that purified Tg-Hbs catalyzed the oxidation of phenolic compounds in the presence of exogenous H2O2. Tg-Hbs peroxidase activity reached the maximum at pH 5 and 35°C and was inhibited by Fe2+, Cu2+, SDS, urea, and sodium azide. Tg-Hbs shared few similarities in amino acid sequence and overall structural characteristics with known peroxidases. However, the predicted structure at their heme pocket was highly similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This research represented the first systemic characterization of hemoglobin as a peroxidase. PMID:28182094

  14. Some enzymatic characteristics of eosinophil peroxidase from patients with eosinophilia and from healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Bos, A J; Wever, R; Hamers, M N; Roos, D

    1981-05-01

    Some enzymatic characteristics of human eosinophil peroxidase were compared with those of human myeloperoxidase. Both enzymes catalyzed the oxidation of iodide by hydrogen peroxide. This assay proved to be very sensitive; the activity of 100 eosinophils/ml could be measured. The position of the pH optimum of this reaction was linearly dependent on the logarithm of the iodide/H2O2 ratio. At the same substrate ratio, this optimum was about 1 pH unit higher for eosinophil peroxidase than for myeloperoxidase. This difference may be related to the action of myeloperoxidase inside an acidified phagolysosome as opposed to the extracellular action of eosinophil peroxidase on the surface of certain parasites. Under defined conditions (KI, 1.4 mM; H2O2, 0.18 mM; cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, 0.008% [wt/vol]; pH 6), the activity of eosinophil peroxidase could be measured in a mixed granulocyte suspension independently of myeloperoxidase. Eosinophils from patients with eosinophilia were found to contain as much peroxidase activity as did eosinophils from healthy donors. No enzymatic differences in eosinophil peroxidase were found between the two types of donors.

  15. [Participation of the active oxygen forms in the induction of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase under heat hardening of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Kolupaev, Iu E; Oboznyĭ, A I

    2012-01-01

    The influence of one-minute hardening heating at 42 degrees C on the dynamics of hydrogen peroxide generation and activity of antioxidant enzymes in roots of winter wheat seedlings has been investigated. It was shown that the content of hydrogen peroxide increased within the first 30 minutes after heat influence, whereupon it approached the level of control variant. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased significantly within 10 min after heating and was maintained at a high level during 24 hours of observation. The activity of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase increased after 3-6 hours after the hardening and reached its maximum after 24 hours, when there was the most significant increase in heat resistance of seedlings. The short-term increase in hydrogen peroxide content caused by hardening heating was suppressed by treatment of seedlings with H2O2 scavenger dimethylthiourea, inhibitors of NADPH-oxidase (imidazole) and SOD (sodium diethyldithiocarbamate). All these effectors levelled the increase of activity of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase and significantly inhibited the development of heat resistance of seedlings. The conclusion was made about the role of hydrogen peroxide produced with the participation of NADPH-oxidase and SOD in the induction of antioxidant system by heat hardening of wheat seedlings.

  16. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-05

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater.

  17. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in white-rot fungus Trametes hirsuta 072. Absolute expression quantification of full multigene family

    PubMed Central

    Vasina, Daria V.; Moiseenko, Konstantin V.; Fedorova, Tatiana V.; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V.

    2017-01-01

    Ligninolytic heme peroxidases comprise an extensive family of enzymes, which production is characteristic for white-rot Basidiomycota. The majority of fungal heme peroxidases are encoded by multigene families that differentially express closely related proteins. Currently, there were very few attempts to characterize the complete multigene family of heme peroxidases in a single fungus. Here we are focusing on identification and characterization of peroxidase genes, which are transcribed and secreted by basidiomycete Trametes hirsuta 072, an efficient lignin degrader. The T. hirsuta genome contains 18 ligninolytic peroxidase genes encoding 9 putative lignin peroxidases (LiP), 7 putative short manganese peroxidases (MnP) and 2 putative versatile peroxidases (VP). Using ddPCR method we have quantified the absolute expression of the 18 peroxidase genes under different culture conditions and on different growth stages of basidiomycete. It was shown that only two genes (one MnP and one VP) were prevalently expressed as well as secreted into cultural broth under all conditions investigated. However their transcriptome and protein profiles differed in time depending on the effector used. The expression of other peroxidase genes revealed a significant variability, so one can propose the specific roles of these enzymes in fungal development and lifestyle. PMID:28301519

  18. Peroxidases from root exudates of Medicago sativa and Sorghum bicolor: Catalytic properties and involvement in PAH degradation.

    PubMed

    Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Golubev, Sergey; Muratova, Anna; Grinev, Vyacheslav; Bondarenkova, Anastasiya; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2017-02-01

    Peroxidases from root exudates of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were purified and characterized, and their ability to oxidize native PAHs and PAH-derivatives was evaluated. The obtained data confirm that peroxidases are involved in the rhizosphere degradation of PAHs. Nondenaturing PAGE showed that the peroxidases of both plants were represented by a range of isoforms/isoenzymes (five to eight). Minor forms were lost during further purification, and as a result, the major anionic form from alfalfa root exudates and the major cationic form from those of sorghum were obtained. Both electrophoretically homogeneous peroxidases were monomeric proteins with a molecular weight of about 46-48 kDa. The pH optima and the main catalytic constants for the test substrates were determined. On the basis of their molecular and catalytic properties, the obtained enzymes were found to be typical plant peroxidases. Derivatives of PAHs and potential products of their microbial degradation (9-phenanthrol and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone), unlike the parent PAH (phenanthrene), inhibited the catalytic activity of the peroxidases, possibly indicating greater availability of the enzymes' active centers to these substances. Peroxidase-catalyzed decreases in the concentrations of a number of PAHs and their derivatives were observed. Sorghum peroxidase oxidized anthracene and phenanthrene, while alfalfa peroxidase oxidized only phenanthrene. 1-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid was best oxidized by peroxidase of alfalfa. However, quinone derivatives of PAHs were unavailable to sorghum peroxidase, but were oxidized by alfalfa peroxidase. These results indicate that the major peroxidases from root exudates of alfalfa and sorghum can have a role in the rhizosphere degradation of PAHs.

  19. Partially purified bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) peroxidase catalyzed decolorization of textile and other industrially important dyes.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Suhail; Ali Khan, Amjad; Husain, Qayyum

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic action of partially purified bitter gourd peroxidase for the degradation/decolorization of complex aromatic structures. Twenty-one dyes, with a wide spectrum of chemical groups, currently being used by the textile and other important industries have been selected for the study. Here, for the first time we have shown peroxidases from Momordica charantia (300 EU/gm of vegetable) to be highly effective in decolorizing industrially important dyes. Dye solutions, containing 50-200 mg dye/l, were used for the treatment with bitter gourd peroxidase (specific activity of 99.0 EU/mg protein). M. charantia peroxidases were able to decolorize most of the textile dyes by forming insoluble precipitate. When the textile dyes were treated with increasing concentration of enzyme, it was observed that greater fraction of the color was removed but four out of eight reactive dyes were recalcitrant to decolorization by bitter gourd peroxidase. Step-wise addition of enzyme to the decolorizing reaction mixture at the interval of 1h further enhanced the dye decolorization. The rate of decolorization was enhanced when the dyes were incubated with fixed quantity of enzyme for increasing times. Decolorization of non-textile dyes resulted in the degradation and removal of dyes from the solution without any precipitate formation. Decolorization rate was drastically increased when the textile and other industrially important non-textile dyes were treated with bitter gourd peroxidase in presence of 1.0 mM 1-hydroxybenzotriazole. Complex mixtures of dyes were prepared by taking three to four reactive textile and non-textile dyes in equal proportions. Each mixture was decolorized by more than 80% when treated with the enzyme in presence of 1.0 mM 1-hydroxybenzotriazole. Our data suggest that the peroxidase/mediator system is an effective biocatalyst for the treatment of effluents containing recalcitrant dyes from textile, dye manufacturing

  20. Catalytic Profile of Arabidopsis Peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, Contributing to Stem Lignification

    PubMed Central

    Shigeto, Jun; Nagano, Mariko; Fujita, Koki; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols), oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C) and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs) were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine), which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors. PMID:25137070

  1. Catalytic profile of Arabidopsis peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, contributing to stem lignification.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Nagano, Mariko; Fujita, Koki; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols), oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C) and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs) were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine), which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors.

  2. The ligninolytic peroxidases in the genus Pleurotus: divergence in activities, expression, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Knop, Doriv; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2015-02-01

    Mushrooms of the genus Pleurotus are comprised of cultivated edible ligninolytic fungi with medicinal properties and a wide array of biotechnological and environmental applications. Like other white-rot fungi (WRF), they are able to grow on a variety of lignocellulosic biomass substrates and degrade both natural and anthropogenic aromatic compounds. This is due to the presence of the non-specific oxidative enzymatic systems, which are mainly consisted of lacasses, versatile peroxidases (VPs), and short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs). Additional, less studied, peroxidase are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) and heme-thiolate peroxidases (HTPs). During the past two decades, substantial information has accumulated concerning the biochemistry, structure and function of the Pleurotus ligninolytic peroxidases, which are considered to play a key role in many biodegradation processes. The production of these enzymes is dependent on growth media composition, pH, and temperature as well as the growth phase of the fungus. Mn(2+) concentration differentially affects the expression of the different genes. It also severs as a preferred substrate for these preoxidases. Recently, sequencing of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was completed, and a comprehensive picture of the ligninolytic peroxidase gene family, consisting of three VPs and six short-MnPs, has been established. Similar enzymes were also discovered and studied in other Pleurotus species. In addition, progress has been made in the development of molecular tools for targeted gene replacement, RNAi-based gene silencing and overexpression of genes of interest. These advances increase the fundamental understanding of the ligninolytic system and provide the opportunity for harnessing the unique attributes of these WRF for applied purposes.

  3. Copper-induced oxidative stress in maize shoots (Zea mays L.): H2O2 accumulation and peroxidases modulation.

    PubMed

    Bouazizi, Houda; Jouili, H; El Ferjani, E

    2007-06-01

    The effect of copper excess on growth, H2O2 level and peroxidase activities were studied in maize shoots. Ten-day-old seedlings were cultured in nutrient solution that contained Cu2+ ions at various concentrations (50 and 100 microM) for seven days. High concentrations of Cu2+ ions caused significant decrease both in matter production and elongation of maize shoots. In addition, treatment with CuSO4 increased levels of H2O2 and induced changes in several peroxidase activities. Moreover, the disturbance of the physiological parameters was accompanied by the modulation of the peroxidase activities: GPX (Guaiacol peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.7), CAPX (Coniferyl alcohol peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.4) and APX (Ascorbate peroxidase, EC. 1.11.1.11). Furthermore, this modulation becomes highly significant, especially, in the presence of 100 microM of CuSO4.

  4. Comparative study of the physiological roles of three peroxidases (NADH peroxidase, Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and Thiol peroxidase) in oxidative stress response, survival inside macrophages and virulence of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    La Carbona, Stephanie; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Benachour, Abdellah; Posteraro, Brunella; Auffray, Yanick; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Hartke, Axel

    2007-12-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis is well equipped with peroxidatic activities. It harbours three loci encoding a NADH peroxidase, an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and a protein (EF2932) belonging to the AhpC/TSA family. We present results demonstrating that ef2932 does encode a thiol peroxidase (Tpx) and show that it is part of the regulon of the hydrogen peroxide regulator HypR. Characterization of unmarked deletion mutants showed that all three peroxidases are important for the defence against externally provided H(2)O(2). Exposure to internal generated H(2)O(2) by aerobic growth on glycerol, lactose, galactose or ribose showed that Npr was absolutely required for aerobic growth on glycerol and optimal growth on the other substrates. Growth on glycerol was also dependent on Ahp. Addition of catalase restored growth of the mutants, and therefore, extracellular H(2)O(2) concentrations have been determined. This showed that the time point of growth arrest of the Deltanpr mutant correlated with the highest H(2)O(2) concentration measured. Analysis of the survival of the different strains inside peritoneal macrophages revealed that Tpx was the most important antioxidant activity for protecting the cells against the hostile phagocyte environment. Finally, the Deltatpx and the triple mutant showed attenuated virulence in a mouse peritonitis model.

  5. [Accelerated determination of microbial sensitivity to antibiotics and chemotherapeutic preparations by serial dilutions using the peroxidase test].

    PubMed

    Fel'dman, Iu M; Leĭbman, E T

    1980-02-01

    A rapid method for determination of microbial sensitivity to antibiotics and chemotherapeutic drugs with the use of the peroxidase test is described. The procedure takes 6 hours. Peroxidase is determined by a change in the color of the methyl-para-amino phenol sulfate solution added to the broth culture in 6 hours (simultaneously with hydrogen peroxide). The peroxidase test provides detection of the microbe multiplication even when no turbidity is observed.

  6. Enhanced peroxidase activity and tumour tissue visualization by cobalt-doped magnetoferritin nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Cao, Changqian; Tang, Xu; Cai, Yao; Yang, Caiyun; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-01-01

    Magnetoferritin (M-HFn) is a biomimetic magnetic nanoparticle with a human heavy-chain ferritin (HFn) shell, trapping a magnetite (Fe3O4) core that has inherited peroxidase-like activity. In this study, cobalt-doped M-HFn nanoparticles (M-HFn-Co x Fe3-x O4) with different amounts of cobalt were successfully synthesized. Experimental results indicate that the controlled doping of a certain amount of cobalt into the magnetite cores of M-HFn nanoparticles enhances its peroxidase-like catalytic activity and efficacy for visualizing tumour tissues. For example, compared with sample Co0 (without cobalt doping), the peroxidase-like activity of the cobalt-doped nanoparticle sample Co60 (with a cobalt doping molar percentage of ˜34.2%) increases 1.7 times, and has the maximal reaction velocity (V max) values. Moreover, after a one-step incubation with Co60 nanoparticles, and using the peroxidase substrate 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) for colour development, the tumour tissues of breast, colorectal, stomach and pancreas tumours showed a deeper brown colour with clear boundaries between the healthy and tumourous cells. Therefore, this suggests that the cobalt-doped magnetoferritin nanoparticles enhance peroxidase activity and tumour tissue visualization.

  7. Lignin Peroxidase Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds in Systems Containing Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Westlake, Donald W. S.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These included anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracenes, acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene. Of the compounds studied, lignin peroxidase was able to oxidize those with ionization potentials of <8 eV (measured by electron impact). The reaction products contain hydroxyl and keto groups. In one case, carbon-carbon bond cleavage, yielding anthraquinone from 9-methylanthracene, was detected. Kinetic constants and stability characteristics of lignin peroxidase were determined by using pyrene as the substrate in systems containing different amounts of organic solvent. Benzyl alkylation of lignin peroxidase improved its activity in a system containing water-miscible organic solvent but did not increase its resistance to inactivation at high solvent concentrations. PMID:16349176

  8. An updated view on horseradish peroxidases: recombinant production and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Florian W; Glieder, Anton

    2015-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase has been the subject of scientific research for centuries. It has been used exhaustively as reporter enzyme in diagnostics and histochemistry and still plays a major role in these applications. Numerous studies have been conducted on the role of horseradish peroxidase in the plant and its catalytic mechanism. However, little progress has been made in its recombinant production. Until now, commercial preparations of horseradish peroxidase are still isolated from plant roots. These preparations are commonly mixtures of various isoenzymes of which only a small fraction has been described so far. The composition of isoenzymes in these mixed isolates is subjected to uncontrollable environmental conditions. Nowadays, horseradish peroxidase regains interest due to its broad applicability in the fields of medicine, life sciences, and biotechnology in cancer therapy, biosensor systems, bioremediation, and biocatalysis. These medically and commercially relevant applications, the recent discovery of new natural isoenzymes with different biochemical properties, as well as the challenges in recombinant production render this enzyme particularly interesting for future biotechnological solutions. Therefore, we reviewed previous studies as well as current developments with biotechnological emphasis on new applications and the major remaining biotechnological challenge-the efficient recombinant production of horseradish peroxidase enzymes.

  9. From Zinnia to Arabidopsis: approaching the involvement of peroxidases in lignification.

    PubMed

    Novo-Uzal, Esther; Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Herrero, Joaquín; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Gómez-Ros, Laura V; Bernal, María Ángeles; Díaz, José; Cuello, Juan; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María Ángeles

    2013-09-01

    Zinnia elegans constitutes one of the most useful model systems for studying xylem differentiation, which simultaneously involves secondary cell wall synthesis, cell wall lignification, and programmed cell death. Likewise, the in vitro culture system of Z. elegans has been the best characterized as the differentiation of mesophyll cells into tracheary elements allows study of the biochemistry and physiology of xylogenesis free from the complexity that heterogeneous plant tissues impose. Moreover, Z. elegans has emerged as an excellent plant model to study the involvement of peroxidases in cell wall lignification. This is due to the simplicity and duality of the lignification pattern shown by the stems and hypocotyls, and to the basic nature of the peroxidase isoenzyme. This protein is expressed not only in hypocotyls and stems but also in mesophyll cells transdifferentiating into tracheary elements. Therefore, not only does this peroxidase fulfil all the catalytic requirements to be involved in lignification overcoming all restrictions imposed by the polymerization step, but also its expression is inherent in lignification. In fact, its basic nature is not exceptional since basic peroxidases are differentially expressed during lignification in other model systems, showing unusual and unique biochemical properties such as oxidation of syringyl moieties. This review focuses on the experiments which led to a better understanding of the lignification process in Zinnia, starting with the basic knowledge about the lignin pattern in this plant, how lignification takes place, and how a sole basic peroxidase with unusual catalytic properties is involved and regulated by hormones, H2O2, and nitric oxide.

  10. Peroxidase 4 is involved in syringyl lignin formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Vivar, Tamara; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María A; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Syringyl lignins result from the oxidative polymerization of sinapyl alcohol in a reaction mediated by syringyl (basic) peroxidases. Several peroxidases have been identified in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana as close homologues to ZePrx, the best characterized basic peroxidase so far, but none of these has been directly involved in lignification. We have used a knock-out mutant of AtPrx4, the closest homologue to ZePrx, to study the involvement of this basic peroxidase in the physiology of the plant under both long- and short-day light conditions. Our results suggest that AtPrx4 is involved in cell wall lignification, especially in syringyl monomer formation. The disruption of AtPrx4 causes a decrease in syringyl units proportion, but only when light conditions are optimal. Moreover, the effect of AtPrx4 disruption is age-dependent, and it is only significant when the elongation process of the stem has ceased and lignification becomes active. In conclusion, AtPrx4 emerges as a basic peroxidase regulated by day length with an important role in lignification.

  11. Proximity-based protein thiol oxidation by H2O2-scavenging peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Gutscher, Marcus; Sobotta, Mirko C; Wabnitz, Guido H; Ballikaya, Seda; Meyer, Andreas J; Samstag, Yvonne; Dick, Tobias P

    2009-11-13

    H(2)O(2) acts as a signaling molecule by oxidizing critical thiol groups on redox-regulated target proteins. To explain the efficiency and selectivity of H(2)O(2)-based signaling, it has been proposed that oxidation of target proteins may be facilitated by H(2)O(2)-scavenging peroxidases. Recently, a peroxidase-based protein oxidation relay has been identified in yeast, namely the oxidation of the transcription factor Yap1 by the peroxidase Orp1. It has remained unclear whether the protein oxidase function of Orp1 is a singular adaptation or whether it may represent a more general principle. Here we show that Orp1 is in fact not restricted to oxidizing Yap1 but can also form a highly efficient redox relay with the oxidant target protein roGFP (redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein) in mammalian cells. Orp1 mediates near quantitative oxidation of roGFP2 by H(2)O(2), and the Orp1-roGFP2 redox relay effectively converts physiological H(2)O(2) signals into measurable fluorescent signals in living cells. Furthermore, the oxidant relay phenomenon is not restricted to Orp1 as the mammalian peroxidase Gpx4 also mediates oxidation of proximal roGFP2 in living cells. Together, these findings support the concept that certain peroxidases harbor an intrinsic and powerful capacity to act as H(2)O(2)-dependent protein thiol oxidases when they are recruited into proximity of oxidizable target proteins.

  12. Proximity-based Protein Thiol Oxidation by H2O2-scavenging Peroxidases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Gutscher, Marcus; Sobotta, Mirko C.; Wabnitz, Guido H.; Ballikaya, Seda; Meyer, Andreas J.; Samstag, Yvonne; Dick, Tobias P.

    2009-01-01

    H2O2 acts as a signaling molecule by oxidizing critical thiol groups on redox-regulated target proteins. To explain the efficiency and selectivity of H2O2-based signaling, it has been proposed that oxidation of target proteins may be facilitated by H2O2-scavenging peroxidases. Recently, a peroxidase-based protein oxidation relay has been identified in yeast, namely the oxidation of the transcription factor Yap1 by the peroxidase Orp1. It has remained unclear whether the protein oxidase function of Orp1 is a singular adaptation or whether it may represent a more general principle. Here we show that Orp1 is in fact not restricted to oxidizing Yap1 but can also form a highly efficient redox relay with the oxidant target protein roGFP (redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein) in mammalian cells. Orp1 mediates near quantitative oxidation of roGFP2 by H2O2, and the Orp1-roGFP2 redox relay effectively converts physiological H2O2 signals into measurable fluorescent signals in living cells. Furthermore, the oxidant relay phenomenon is not restricted to Orp1 as the mammalian peroxidase Gpx4 also mediates oxidation of proximal roGFP2 in living cells. Together, these findings support the concept that certain peroxidases harbor an intrinsic and powerful capacity to act as H2O2-dependent protein thiol oxidases when they are recruited into proximity of oxidizable target proteins. PMID:19755417

  13. Ubiquity of lignin-degrading peroxidases among various wood-degrading fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Orth, A B; Royse, D J; Tien, M

    1993-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium is rapidly becoming a model system for the study of lignin biodegradation. Numerous studies on the physiology, biochemistry, chemistry, and genetics of this system have been performed. However, P. chrysosporium is not the only fungus to have a lignin-degrading enzyme system. Many other ligninolytic species of fungi, as well as other distantly related organisms which are known to produce lignin peroxidases, are described in this paper. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of the peroxidative enzymes in nine species not previously investigated. The fungi studied produced significant manganese peroxidase activity when they were grown on an oak sawdust substrate supplemented with wheat bran, millet, and sucrose. Many of the fungi also exhibited laccase and/or glyoxal oxidase activity. Inhibitors present in the medium prevented measurement of lignin peroxidase activity. However, Western blots (immunoblots) revealed that several of the fungi produced lignin peroxidase proteins. We concluded from this work that lignin-degrading peroxidases are present in nearly all ligninolytic fungi, but may be expressed differentially in different species. Substantial variability exists in the levels and types of ligninolytic enzymes produced by different white not fungi. Images PMID:8285705

  14. Impurity-induced peroxidase mimicry of nanoclay and its potential for the spectrophotometric determination of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Aneesh, K; Vusa, Chiranjeevi Srinivasa Rao; Berchmans, Sheela

    2016-09-01

    A green version of the "Fe" impurity-induced peroxidase mimicry exhibited by simple and cheap substrate "nanoclay (NC)" along with the highly sensitive amperometric and spectrophotometric determination of cholesterol is demonstrated. The "Fe" impurity can act as the catalyst center for hydrogen peroxide reduction similar to the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed reaction. The Michaelis-Menten constant for the NC-catalyzed reaction is found to be lower than that of the HRP-catalyzed reaction indicating high affinity for the substrate. The NC-modulated peroxidase-like catalytic activity originates from the electron transfer between the reducing substrate in the catalyst center and H2O2 with the intermediate generation of hydroxyl radicals. The peroxidase mimicry is successfully applied for the low-potential electrochemical detection of H2O2 (linear detection range 1.96-10.71 mM, R (2) = 0.97). The H2O2 sensing platform is further modified with cholesterol oxidase (CHOx) for the spectrophotometric (linear detection range 50-244 μM, R (2) = 0.99) and amperometric detection of cholesterol (linear detection range 0.099-1.73 mM, R (2) = 0.998). Graphical abstract Peroxidase mimicry of nanoclay for the determination of cholesterol.

  15. Regulation of cytochrome C peroxidase activity by nitric oxide and laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, A N; Stepanov, G O; Vladimirov, Yu A; Kozlov, A V; Kagan, V E

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis can be induced by activation of so-called "death receptors" (extrinsic pathway) or multiple apoptotic factors (intrinsic pathway), which leads to release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. This event is considered to be a point of no return in apoptosis. One of the most important events in the development of apoptosis is the enhancement of cytochrome c peroxidase activity upon its interaction with cardiolipin, which modifies the active center of cytochrome c. In the present work, we have investigated the effects of nitric oxide on the cytochrome c peroxidase activity when cytochrome c is bound to cardiolipin or sodium dodecyl sulfate. We have observed that cytochrome c peroxidase activity, distinctly increased due to the presence of anionic lipids, is completely suppressed by nitric oxide. At the same time, nitrosyl complexes of cytochrome c, produced in the interaction with nitric oxide, demonstrated sensitivity to laser irradiation (441 nm) and were photolyzed during irradiation. This decomposition led to partial restoration of cytochrome c peroxidase activity. Finally, we conclude that nitric oxide and laser irradiation may serve as effective instruments for regulating the peroxidase activity of cytochrome c, and, probably, apoptosis.

  16. Characteristics of estrogen-induced peroxidase in mouse uterine luminal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinck, P.H.; Newbold, R.R.; McLachlan, J.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Peroxidase activity in the uterine luminal fluid of mice treated with diethylstilbestrol was measured by the guaiacol assay and also by the formation of 3H2O from (2-3H)estradiol. In the radiometric assay, the generation of 3H2O and 3H-labeled water-soluble products was dependent on H2O2 (25 to 100 microM), with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Tyrosine or 2,4-dichlorophenol strongly enhanced the reaction catalyzed either by the luminal fluid peroxidase or the enzyme in the CaCl2 extract of the uterus, but decreased the formation of 3H2O from (2-3H)estradiol by lactoperoxidase in the presence of H2O2 (80 microM). NADPH, ascorbate, and cytochrome c inhibited both luminal fluid and uterine tissue peroxidase activity to the same extent, while superoxide dismutase showed a marginal activating effect. Lactoferrin, a major protein component of uterine luminal fluid, was shown not to contribute to its peroxidative activity, and such an effect by prostaglandin synthase was also ruled out. However, it was not possible to exclude eosinophil peroxidase, brought to the uterus after estrogen stimulation, as being the source of peroxidase activity in uterine luminal fluid.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis, molecular modeling, substrate-inhibitor specificity, and active site comparison of bacterial, fungal, and plant heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Pandey, Veda P; Naaz, Huma; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 40 heme peroxidases, belonging to both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, revealed their clustering into three major classes. Class I represented sequences from plants, bacteria, fungi, and algae, whereas classes II and III exclusively represented plant and fungal peroxidases, respectively. Modeling of three representative classes of peroxidases, belonging to each of bacterial, plant, and fungal categories, revealed a similar kind of folding; however, superimposition analysis revealed relatively more closeness between plant and fungal peroxidases than that of the bacterial peroxidase. The docking analysis of three representative modeled peroxidases with three common substrates, namely, H₂O₂, guaiacol, and ascorbate, and three arginine-specific inhibitors, namely, phenylglyoxal, 1,2-cyclohexanedione, and 2,3-butanedione, revealed that all three inhibitors competed for guaiacol- and ascorbate-binding sites of peroxidases, except for phenylglyoxal binding in the case of plant peroxidase. Phenylglyoxal, 1,2-cyclohexanedione, and 2,3-butanedione were found to be most potent inhibitors of bacterial, fungal, and plant peroxidases, respectively.

  18. Effect of Low and Very Low Doses of Simple Phenolics on Plant Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malarczyk, Elżbieta; Kochmańska-Rdest, Janina; Paździoch-Czochra, Marzanna

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the activity of horseradish peroxidase resulting from an addition of ethanol water dilutions of 19 phenolic compounds were observed. For each compound, the enzyme activity was plotted against the degree of dilution expressed as n = –log100 (mol/L) in the range 0 ≤ n ≥ 20. All the curves showed sinusoidal activity, more or less regular, with two to four peaks on average. Each analyzed compound had a characteristic sinusoidal shape, which was constant for samples of peroxidase from various commercial firms. This was clearly visible after function fitting to experimental results based on the Marquadt–Levenberg algorithm using the least-squares method. Among the 19 phenolics, the highest amplitudes were observed for phenol and iso- and vanillate acids and aldehydes. The specific character of each of the analyzed curves offers a possibility of choosing proper dilutions of phenolic compound for activating or inhibiting of peroxidase activity. PMID:19330128

  19. Fluorescent derivatization of aromatic carboxylic acids with horseradish peroxidase in the presence of excess hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Odo, Junichi; Inoguchi, Masahiko; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Sogawa, Yuto; Nishimura, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The fluorescent derivatization of aromatic carboxylic acids by the catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the presence of excess H2O2 was investigated. Four monocarboxylic acids, nine dicarboxylic acids, and two tricarboxylic acids, all of which are non- or weakly fluorescent, were effectively converted into fluorescent compounds using this new method. This technique was further developed for the fluorometric determination of trace amounts of terephthalic acid (3c) and lutidinic acid (2b), and linear calibration curves for concentrations between 2.5 and 20.0 nmol of terephthalic acid (3c) and 1.0 and 10.0 nmol of lutidinic acid (2b) were demonstrated. Compound III, an intermediate of HRP, played an essential role in this process. Additionally, lactoperoxidase and manganese peroxidase, peroxidases similar to HRP, showed successful fluorescent derivatization of nicotinic acid (1b), lutidinic acid (2b), and hemimellitic acid (4a) in the presence of excess H2O2.

  20. The abscisic acid induction of a novel peroxidase is antagonized by cytokinin in Spirodela polyrrhiza L.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloupková, K; Smart, C C

    1994-01-01

    The growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) can be used to induce dormant bud structures (turions) in the duckweed Spirodela polyrrhiza L. In this paper we show that during this process, ABA rapidly induces elevated levels of mRNA transcripts encoding a novel basic peroxidase. In addition, we show that in the presence of the cytokinin kinetin the maintained increase is attenuated. Kinetin not only totally inhibits the induction of turions by ABA but also alleviates ABA-induced growth inhibition. This antagonism of an ABA-induced gene by a cytokinin correlates with an easily observable antagonistic effect of these two hormones on plant morphogenesis. These data contribute to a growing body of evidence linking growth regulators with changes in peroxidase gene expression and to the concept of pairs of hormones playing antagonistic roles during plant development. Finally, we discuss the possible functions that peroxidases could have during ABA-induced turion formation and growth inhibition. PMID:8066130

  1. Musa paradisiaca stem juice as a source of peroxidase and ligninperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Vernwal, S K; Yadav, R S; Yadav, K D

    2000-10-01

    Musa paradisiaca stem juice has been shown to contain peroxidase activity of the order of 0.1 enzyme unit/ml. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide are 2.4 and 0.28 mM respectively. The pH and temperature optima are 4.5 and 62.5 degrees C respectively. Like other peroxidases, it follows double displacement type mechanism. At low pH, Musa paradisiaca stem juice exhibits ligninperoxidase type activity. The pH optimum for ligninperoxidase type activity is 2.0 and the temperature optimum is 24 degrees C. The Km values for veratryl alcohol and n-propanol are 66 and 78 microM respectively.

  2. Gamma irradiation effect on the enzymatic activities of horseradish and apple peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinovici, M.; Oancea, D.; Zaharescu, T.

    2009-01-01

    The behavior at low-dose exposure (0.033-0.4 kGy) of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and of two different purified fractions of apple (Jonathan cultivar) peroxidases (named APR 1S and APR 2S) was studied. The HRP solutions were added with either 0.32 M fructose or glucose in order to study their effect on enzymes activity response under γ ( 137Cs, dose rate 0.4 kGy/h) irradiation. The obtained results showed similar behavior between HRP-sugar-added solution and apple fraction with higher oligosaccharides content (APR 2S) undergoing low-dose treatment. The same pattern was observed between unglycosylated HRP and APR 1S with lower oligosaccharides content. These similarities gave us the possibility to conclude that the presence of oligosaccharides, in more or less quantities, influences in the same way the peroxidases activity, from different plant species, exposed to γ irradiation.

  3. Sequential rooting media and rooting capacity of Sequoiadendron giganteum in vitro. Peroxidase activity as a marker.

    PubMed

    Berthon, J Y; Boyer, N; Gaspar, T

    1987-10-01

    The rooting capacities of tips of seedling, juvenile and mature shoots of Sequoiadendron giganteum were compared on different rooting media (inductive and expressive media) after passage on an elongating medium. None of the cuttings rooted when continuously kept on medium containing the auxin NAA and vitamin D2. Peroxidase activity of all those cuttings on NAA+D2 first increased during the 7-9 first days and decreased in the days after. Rooting was obtained by transfer of the cuttings after periods longer than 7-9 days from the NAA+D2 inductive medium to a basal medium supplemented or not with rutin (expressive medium). The rooting capacity was emphasized by rutin treatment and was in correlation with the peroxidase peak reached on the NAA+D2 medium. Seedlings, characterised by the highest peroxidase activity, were most performing in rooting.

  4. Screening of postharvest agricultural wastes as alternative sources of peroxidases: characterization and kinetics of a novel peroxidase from lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) stubble.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Cuadrado, Nazaret; Pérez-Galende, Patricia; Manzano, Teresa; De Maria, Cándido Garcia; Shnyrov, Valery L; Roig, Manuel G

    2012-05-16

    Aqueous crude extracts of a series of plant wastes (agricultural, wild plants, residues from sports activities (grass), ornamental residues (gardens)) from 17 different plant species representative of the typical biodiversity of the Iberian peninsula were investigated as new sources of peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7). Of these, lentil (Lens culinaris L.) stubble crude extract was seen to provide one of the highest specific peroxidase activities, catalyzing the oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to tetraguaiacol, and was used for further studies. For the optimum extraction conditions found, the peroxidase activity in this crude extract (110 U mL(-1)) did not vary for at least 15 months when stored at 4 °C (k(inact) = 0.146 year(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 4.75 year), whereas, for comparative purposes, the peroxidase activity (60 U mL(-1)) of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana L.) root crude extract, obtained and stored under the same conditions, showed much faster inactivation kinetics (k(inact) = 2.2 × 10(-3) day(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 315 days). Using guaiacol as an H donor and a universal buffer (see above), all crude extract samples exhibited the highest peroxidase activity in the pH range between 4 and 7. Once semipurified by passing the crude extract through hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, the novel peroxidase (LSP) was characterized as having a purity number (RZ) of 2.5 and three SDS-PAGE electrophoretic bands corresponding to molecular masses of 52, 35, and 18 kDa. The steady-state kinetic study carried out on the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of guaiacol by the catalytic action of this partially purified peroxidase pointed to apparent Michaelian kinetic behavior (K(m)(appH(2)O(2)) = 1.87 mM; V(max)(appH(2)O(2)) = 6.4 mM min(-1); K(m)(app guaicol) = 32 mM; V(max)(app guaicol) = 9.1 mM min(-1)), compatible with the two-substrate ping-pong mechanism generally accepted for peroxidases. Finally, after the effectiveness of the crude

  5. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II)

    DOE PAGES

    Fernandez-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; ...

    2015-05-13

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymesmore » also oxidize Mn2+ to Mn3+, albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn2+ turnover (56 s–1) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s–1 average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s–1 average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn2+ has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s–1) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn2+ oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. In conclusion, it is suggested that generation of Mn3+ oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.« less

  6. Purification and characterization of a new cationic peroxidase from fresh flowers of Cynara scolymus L.

    PubMed

    López-Molina, Dorotea; Heering, Hendrik A; Smulevich, Giulietta; Tudela, José; Thorneley, Roger N F; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2003-03-01

    A basic heme peroxidase isoenzyme (AKPC) has been purified to homogeneity from artichoke flowers (Cynara scolymus L.). The enzyme was shown to be a monomeric glycoprotein, M(r)=42300+/-1000, (mean+/-S.D.) with an isoelectric point >9. The native enzyme exhibits a typical peroxidase ultraviolet-visible spectrum with a Soret peak at 404 nm (epsilon=137,000+/-3000 M(-1) cm(-1)) and a Reinheitzahl (Rz) value (A(404nm)/A(280nm)) of 3.8+/-0.2. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra of compounds I, II and III were typical of class III plant peroxidases but unlike horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C, compound I was unstable. Resonance Raman and UV-Vis spectra of the ferric form show that between pH 5.0 and 7.0 the protein is mainly 6 coordinate high spin with a water molecule as the sixth ligand. The substrate-specificity of AKPC is characteristic of class III (guaiacol-type) peroxidases with chlorogenic and caffeic acids, that are abundant in artichoke flowers, as particularly good substrates at pH 4.5. Ferric AKPC reacts with hydrogen peroxide to yield compound I with a second-order rate constant (k(+1)) of 7.4 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) which is significantly slower than that reported for most other class III peroxidases. The reaction of ferric and ferrous AKPC with nitric oxide showed a potential use of this enzyme for quantitative spectrophotometric determination of NO and as a component of novel NO sensitive electrodes.

  7. Role of peroxidase in the development of water-impermeable seed coats in Sida spinosa L.

    PubMed

    Egley, G H; Paul, R N; Vaughn, K C; Duke, S O

    1983-04-01

    The seed coats of S. spinosa (prickly sida, Malvaceae) become impermeable to water during seed development on the mother plant. After the seeds have dehydrated during the final maturation stages, piercing of seed coats is necessary to induce imbibition of water and germination. Onset of impermeability occurs during seed coat browning, well in advance of seed dehydration. I. Marbach and A.M. Mayer (1975, Plant Physiol. 56, 93-96) implicated polyphenol oxidase (PO; EC 1.10.3.1) as catechol oxidase in the formation of insoluble polymers during development of coat impermeability in a wild strain of pea (Pisum elatius) seeds. We found, however, that peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), not PO, is instrumental in the development of water-impermeable seed coats in prickly sida. We isolated coats and embryos from seeds harvested at several stages of development. Highest peroxidase activity of coat extracts correlated well with the developmental stages of maximum conversion of soluble phenolics to insoluble lignin polymers. Although seed extracts oxidized dihydroxyphenylalanine, this activity was eliminated by catalase, indicating that the oxidation of phenolics in the coat is catalyzed by peroxidase rather than PO. Histochemical localization of peroxidase was strongest in the palisade layer; both the level and time of appearance of activity was proportional to the spectrophotometric assays of seed-coat extracts. The presence of peroxidase and the absence of PO in the seed coat were also confirmed with immunocytochemistry. Our results support the view that peroxidase is involved in the polymerization of soluble phenolics to insoluble lignin polymers during development of prickly sida seed coats, causing the formation of a water-impermeable barrier prior to seed dehydration. As dehydration proceeds, the chalazal area finally becomes impermeable resulting in the hard mature seeds of prickly sida.

  8. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; López-Lucendo, María F; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-11-01

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn(2+) turnover (56 s(-1)) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s(-1) average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s(-1) average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn(2+) has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s(-1)) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn(2+) oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. It is suggested that generation of Mn(3+) oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis: in silico promoter analysis and hormonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Joaquín; Esteban Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José Miguel

    2014-07-01

    Phytohormones such as auxins, cytokinins, and brassinosteroids, act by means of a signaling cascade of transcription factors of the families NAC, MYB, AP2 (APETALA2), MADS and class III HD (homeodomain) Zip, regulating secondary growth. When the hormonal regulation of Zinnia elegans peroxidase (ZePrx), an enzyme involved in lignin biosynthesis, was studied, it was found that this peroxidase is sensitive to a plethora of hormones which control xylem lignification. In a previous study we sought Arabidopsis thaliana homologues to ZePrx. Peroxidases 4, 52, 49 and 72 are the four peroxidases that fulfill the restrictive conditions that a peroxidase involved in lignification must have. In the present study, we focus our attention on hormonal regulation in order to establish the minimal structural and regulatory elements contained in the promoter region which an AtPrx involved in lignification must have. The results indicate that of the four peroxidases selected in our previous study, the one most likely to be homologous to ZePrx is AtPrx52. The results suggest that hormones such as auxins, cytokinins and BRs directly regulate AtPrx52, and that the AtPrx52 promoter may be the target of the set of transcription factors (NAC, MYB, AP2 and class I and III HD Zip) which are up-regulated by these hormones during secondary growth. In addition, the AtPrx52 promoter contains multiple copies of all the putative cis-elements (the ACGT box, the OCS box, the OPAQ box, the L1BX, the MYCL box and the W box) known to confer regulation by NO and H2O2.

  10. The crystal plane effect on the peroxidase-like catalytic properties of Co₃O₄ nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jianshuai; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Guangyu; Wang, Yan

    2014-08-07

    Nanomaterials as enzyme mimics have received considerable attention as they can overcome some serious disadvantages associated with the natural enzymes. In recently developed Co3O4 nanoparticles as peroxidase mimics, the influence of the crystal plane on the catalytic performance has not been demonstrated. In order to better understand their crystal plane-dependent catalysis, the present study was initiated using three different Co3O4 nanomaterials, nanoplates, nanorods and nanocubes, as model systems. According to HRTEM, the predominantly exposed planes of nanoplates, nanorods and nanocubes are {112}, {110} and {100} planes, respectively. The catalytic activities were explored by using H2O2 and different organic substrates as the substrates of peroxidase mimics, and were investigated in-depth by steady-state kinetics and electrochemistry methods in depth. The results show that the peroxidase-like activity increases from nanocubes to nanoplates, via nanorods. The effect of external conditions such as pH and temperature on the three nanomaterials is the same, which indicates that the difference in their catalytic activities originates from their different shapes. The peroxidase-like catalytic activities of Co3O4 nanomaterials are crystal plane-dependent and follow the order: {112} ≫ {110} > {100}. The three crystal planes have different arrangements of surface atoms, thus exhibiting different abilities of electron transfer, which induce their different peroxidase-like catalytic activities. This investigation clarifies that the peroxidase-like activity of Co3O4 nanomaterials can be enhanced by shape control. These findings show that Co3O4 nanomaterials can serve as catalyst models for designing other catalysts.

  11. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-05-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe3O4 NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring.Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa

    PubMed Central

    Textor, Larissa C.; Santos, Jademilson C.; Hidalgo Cuadrado, Nazaret; Roig, Manuel G.; Zhadan, Galina G.; Shnyrov, Valery L.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are presently used extensively in a wide range of bio­technological applications owing to their high environmental and thermal stability. As part of efforts towards the discovery of appealing new biotechnological enzymes, the peroxidase from leaves of the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa (CEP) was extracted, purified and crystallized in its native form. An X-­ray diffraction data set was collected at a synchrotron source and data analysis showed that the CEP crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.2, b = 100.7, c = 132.3 Å. PMID:22139187

  13. Crystal and solution structural studies of mouse phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase 4

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Robert; Scanu, Sandra; Niessing, Dierk; Madl, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian glutathione peroxidase (GPx) family is a key component of the cellular antioxidative defence system. Within this family, GPx4 has unique features as it accepts a large class of hydroperoxy lipid substrates and has a plethora of biological functions, including sperm maturation, regulation of apoptosis and cerebral embryogenesis. In this paper, the structure of the cytoplasmic isoform of mouse phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (O70325-2 GPx4) with selenocysteine 46 mutated to cysteine is reported solved at 1.8 Å resolution using X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, solution data of an isotope-labelled GPx protein are presented. PMID:27710939

  14. [Isolation and purification of Mn-peroxidase from Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    PubMed

    Kupriashina, M A; Selivanov, N Iu; Nikitina, V E

    2012-01-01

    Homogenous Mn-peroxidase of a 26-fold purity grade was isolated from a culture of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 cultivated on a medium containing 0.1 mM pyrocatechol. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 43 kD as revealed by electrophoresis in SDS-PAAG. It was shown that the use of pyrocatechol and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzotiazoline-6-sulfonate) at concentrations of 0.1 and I mM as inductors increased the Mn-peroxidase activity by a factor of 3.

  15. DNA-directed immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto porous SiO2 optical transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtenberg, Giorgi; Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Engin, Sinem; Sharon, Michal; Fruk, Ljiljana; Segal, Ester

    2012-08-01

    Multifunctional porous Si nanostructure is designed to optically monitor enzymatic activity of horseradish peroxidase. First, an oxidized PSi optical nanostructure, a Fabry-Pérot thin film, is synthesized and is used as the optical transducer element. Immobilization of the enzyme onto the nanostructure is performed through DNA-directed immobilization. Preliminary studies demonstrate high enzymatic activity levels of the immobilized horseradish peroxidase, while maintaining its specificity. The catalytic activity of the enzymes immobilized within the porous nanostructure is monitored in real time by reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy. We show that we can easily regenerate the surface for consecutive biosensing analysis by mild dehybridization conditions.

  16. Screening of laccase, manganese peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase activities of the genus Pleurotus in media with some raw plant materials as carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Stajic, Mirjana; Persky, Limor; Cohen, Emanuel; Hadar, Yitzhak; Brceski, Ilija; Wasser, Solomon P; Nevo, Eviatar

    2004-06-01

    Species of the genus Pleurotus are among the most efficient natural species in lignin degradation belonging to the subclass of ligninolytic organisms that produce laccase (Lac), Mn-dependent peroxidase (MnP), versatile peroxidase (VP), and the H2O2-generating enzyme aryl-alcohol oxidase, but not lignin peroxidases. Production of Lac and oxidation of 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) in the presence and absence of Mn2+ were detected both in submerged fermentation (SF) of dry ground mandarine peels and in solid-state fermentation (SSF) of grapevine sawdust in all investigated Pleurotus species and strains. Evidence of cultivation methods having a distinct influence on the level of enzyme activities has been demonstrated. Most of the species and strains had higher Lac activity under SSF conditions than under SF conditions. DMP oxidation in the presence and absence of Mn2+ was detected in all investigated species and strains, but was lower under SF conditions than under SSF conditions for most of them. However, relative activities of DMP oxidation in the absence of Mn2+, as percentages of activity against DMP in the presence of Mn2+, were higher under conditions of SF than in SSF cultures in most of the investigated species and strains. The obtained results showed that strains of different origins have different efficiently ligninolytic systems and that conditions of SSF are more favorable for ligninolytic activity than those in SF owing to their similarity to natural conditions on wood substrates.

  17. Mechanism of NADPH oxidation catalyzed by horse-radish peroxidase and 2,4-diacetyl-[2H]heme-substituted horse-radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    De Sandro, V; Dupuy, C; Kaniewski, J; Ohayon, R; Dème, D; Virion, A; Pommier, J

    1991-10-15

    The mechanism of NADPH oxidation catalyzed by horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) and 2,4-diacetyl-[2H]heme-substituted horse-radish peroxidase (DHRP) was studied. The roles of the different H2O2/peroxidase compounds were examined by spectral studies. The oxidized NADPH species were identified using the superoxide dismutase effect and by measuring the stoichiometry between NADPH oxidized and H2O2 used. In the presence of a mediating molecule, like scopoletin, both enzymes acted via a similar mechanism, producing only NADP degrees, which in turn reacted with O2 producing O2-. Consequently H2O2 was completely regenerated in the presence of superoxide dismutase and partially regenerated in its absence. In the absence of a mediating molecule, the H2O2 complex of both enzymes (compound I) catalysed NADPH oxidation by single-electron transfer, producing NADP degrees; compound II of these enzymes catalyzed NADPH oxidation more slowly by a direct two-electron transfer, producing NADPH+. There were difference between HRP and DHRP. HRP compound II was produced by the oxidation of 1 mol NADPH/mole compound I, while DHRP compound II was formed by the spontaneous conversion of compound I to compound II. The NADPH oxidation catalyzed by DHRP compound I did not lead to the formation of compound II. When H2O2 was produced slowly by the glucose/glucose-oxidase system, compound II was never formed and a pure O2- adduct of DHRP (compound III) accumulated.

  18. Peroxidase release induced by ozone in Sedum album leaves: involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/. [Sedum album

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.J.; Penel, C.; Greppin, H.

    1984-04-01

    The effect of ozone was studied on the peroxidase activity from various compartments of Sedum album leaves (epidermis, intercellular fluid, residual cell material, and total cell material). The greatest increase following a 2-hour ozone exposure (0.4 microliters O/sub 3/ per liter) was observed in extracellular peroxidases. Most of the main bands of peroxidase activity separated by isoelectric focusing exhibited an increase upon exposure to ozone. Incubation experiments with isolated peeled or unpeeled leaves showed that leaves from ozone-treated plants release much more peroxidases in the medium than untreated leaves. The withdrawal of Ca/sup 2 +/ ions reduced the level of extracellular peroxidase activity either in whole plants or in incubation experiments. This reduction and the activation obtained after addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ resulted from a direct requirment of Ca/sup 2 +/ by the enzyme and from an effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on peroxidase secretion. The ionophore A23187 promoted an increase of extracellular peroxidase activity only in untreated plants. The release of peroxidases by untreated and ozone-treated leaves is considerably lowered by metabolic inhibitors (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and sodium azide) and by puromycin.

  19. Identification of an orthologous clade of peroxidases that respond to feeding by greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum) in c4 grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of specific peroxidases that respond to aphid herbivory is limited in C4 grasses, but could provide targets for improving defence against these pests. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) peroxidase (SbPrx-1; Sobic.002G416700) has been previously linked to biotic stress responses, and w...

  20. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase.

  1. A role of glycosyl moieties in the stabilization of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aiman; Husain, Qayyum

    2007-06-01

    The possible role of carbohydrate moieties in the stabilization of proteins has been investigated by using bitter gourd peroxidase as a model system. A comparative study of glycosylated and non-glycosylated isoenzymes of bitter gourd peroxidase was performed at various temperatures, pH, water-miscible organic solvents, detergents and chaotropic agent like urea. The pH-optima and temperature-optima of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated isoforms of bitter gourd peroxidase remained unchanged. The probes employed were changes in the enzyme activity and fluorescence. The glycosylated form of peroxidase retained greater fraction of enzyme activity against the exposure caused by various physical and chemical denaturants. The unfolding of both forms of enzyme in the presence of high urea concentrations, studied by fluorescence, indicated greater perturbations in the conformation of non-glycosylated preparation. The different properties examined thus indicated that glycosylation plays an important role in the stabilization of native conformation of proteins against the inactivation caused by various types of denaturants.

  2. Direct evidence for catalase and peroxidase activities of ferritin-platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jia; Yin, Jun-Jie; Ning, Bo; Wu, Xiaochun; Hu, Ye; Ferrari, Mauro; Anderson, Gregory J; Wei, Jingyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2011-02-01

    Using apoferritin (apoFt) as a nucleation substrate, we have successfully synthesized 1-2 nm platinum nanoparticles (Pt-Ft) which are highly stable. By directly measuring the products of Pt-Ft-catalyzed reactions, we showed, with no doubt, Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities. With hydrogen peroxide as substrate, we observed oxygen gas bubbles were generated from hydrogen peroxide decomposed by Pt-Ft; the generation of oxygen gas strongly supports Pt-Ft reacts as catalase, other than peroxidase. While with organic dyes and hydrogen peroxide as substrates, distinctive color products were formed catalyzed by Pt-Ft, which indicates a peroxidase-like activity. Interestingly, these biomimetic properties showed differential response to pH and temperature for different reaction substrates. Pt-Ft showed a significant increase in catalase activity with increasing pH and temperature. The HRP-like activity of Pt-Ft was optimal at physiological temperature and slightly acidic conditions. Our current study demonstrates that Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities for different substrates under different conditions.

  3. Effect of iron concentration on the expression and activity of catalase-peroxidases in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Veena C; Sundaram, C A S Sivagami; Sritharan, Manjula

    2005-02-01

    Mycobacterial catalases are known to exist in different isoforms. We studied the influence of iron concentration on the expression and activity of the different isoforms in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum, M. kansasii and M. vaccae by growing them under iron-sufficient (4 microg Fe/mL) and iron-deficient (0.02 microg Fe/ml) conditions. Upon iron deprivation, significant differences were observed in the catalase/peroxidase activities in both quantitative spectrophotometric assays and in the activity staining in native gels. Notable feature was that the peroxidase activity showed a significant decrease upon iron deprivation in all the mycobacteria, except M. vaccae. Peroxidase activity in all the mycobacteria, irrespective of the iron status was susceptible to heat inactivation. However, the isoforms of catalase showed differences in their heat stability, indicating possible structural differences in these proteins. For example, M. bovis BCG expressed a heat labile catalase under iron-sufficient conditions, while a heat stable catalase band of similar mobility was expressed under iron-deprivation conditions. The study clearly indicates that iron plays an important role in the regulation of expression of the different isoforms of the catalase-peroxidases.

  4. Abolishing activity against ascorbate in a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Frank A; Sarath, Gautam; Woodworth, Kyle; Twigg, Paul; Tobias, Christian M

    2013-10-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is being developed as a bioenergy species. Recently an early version of its genome has been released permitting a route to the cloning and analysis of key proteins. Ascorbate peroxidases (APx) are an important part of the antioxidant defense system of plant cells and present a well studied model to understand structure-function relationships. Analysis of the genome indicates that switchgrass encodes several cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases with apparent varying levels of tissue expression. A major cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase was thus selected for further studies. This gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells to obtain purified active protein. Full heme incorporation of the enzyme was achieved utilizing slow growth and supplementing the media with 5-aminolevulinic acid. The enzyme was observed to be monomeric in solution via size exclusion chromatography. Activity toward ascorbate was observed that was non-Michaelis-Menten in nature. A site-directed mutant, R172S, was made in an attempt to differentiate activity against ascorbate versus other substrates. The R172S protein exhibited negligible ascorbate peroxidase activity, but showed near wild type activity toward other aromatic substrates.

  5. Tissue Printing to Visualize Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase in Vegetables, Fruits, and Mushrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melberg, Amanda R.; Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    A simple tissue-printing procedure to determine the tissue location of the endogenous enzymes polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and mushrooms is described. In tissue printing, cell contents from the surface of a cut section of the tissue are transferred to an adsorptive surface, commonly a nitrocellulose…

  6. Biochemical Characterization of the Suberization-Associated Anionic Peroxidase of Potato1

    PubMed Central

    Bernards, Mark A.; Fleming, Warren D.; Llewellyn, David B.; Priefer, Ronny; Yang, Xiaolong; Sabatino, Anita; Plourde, Guy L.

    1999-01-01

    The anionic peroxidase associated with the suberization response in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during wound healing has been purified and partially characterized at the biochemical level. It is a 45-kD, class III (plant secretory) peroxidase that is localized to suberizing tissues and shows a preference for feruloyl (o-methoxyphenol)-substituted substrates (order of substrate preference: feruloyl > caffeoyl > p-coumaryl ≈ syringyl) such as those that accumulate in tubers during wound healing. There was little influence on oxidation by side chain derivatization, although hydroxycinnamates were preferred over the corresponding hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. The substrate specificity pattern is consistent with the natural substrate incorporation into potato wound suberin. In contrast, the cationic peroxidase(s) induced in response to wound healing in potato tubers is present in both suberizing and nonsuberizing tissues and does not discriminate between hydroxycinnamates and hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. A synthetic polymer prepared using E-[8-13C]ferulic acid, H2O2, and the purified anionic enzyme contained a significant amount of cross-linking through C-8, albeit with retention of unsaturation. PMID:10482668

  7. Improved manganese-oxidizing activity of DypB, a peroxidase from a lignolytic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rahul; Grigg, Jason C.; Qin, Wei; Kadla, John F.; Murphy, Michael E.P.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2013-01-01

    DypB, a dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the lignolytic soil bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, catalyzes the peroxide-dependent oxidation of divalent manganese (Mn2+), albeit less efficiently than fungal manganese peroxidases. Substitution of Asn246, a distal heme residue, with alanine, increased the enzyme’s apparent kcat and kcat/Km values for Mn2+ by 80- and 15-fold, respectively. A 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the N246A variant revealed the Mn2+ to be bound within a pocket of acidic residues at the heme edge, reminiscent of the binding site in fungal manganese peroxidase and very different to that of another bacterial Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase. The first coordination sphere was entirely comprised of solvent, consistent with the variant’s high Km for Mn2+ (17 ± 2 mM). N246A catalyzed the manganese-dependent transformation of hard wood kraft lignin and its solvent-extracted fractions. Two of the major degradation products were identified as 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde, respectively. These results highlight the potential of bacterial enzymes as biocatalysts to transform lignin. PMID:23305326

  8. Mapping the Long-Range Electron Transfer Route in Ligninolytic Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Acebes, Sandra; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Toubes, Mario; Saez-Jimenez, Veronica; Perez-Boada, Marta; Lucas, Maria Fatima; Martínez, Angel T; Guallar, Victor

    2017-04-04

    Combining a computational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis, we have studied the long-range electron transfer pathway in versatile and lignin peroxidases, two enzymes of biotechnological interest that play a key role for fungal degradation of lignin in plant biomass. The in silico study established two possible electron transfer routes starting at the surface tryptophan residue previously identified as responsible for oxidation of the bulky lignin polymer. Moreover, in both enzymes, a second buried tryptophan residue appears as a top electron transfer carrier, indicating the prevalence of one pathway. Site-directed mutagenesis of versatile peroxidase (from Pleurotus eryngii) allowed us to corroborate the computational analysis and the role played by the buried tryptophan (Trp244) and a neighbor phenylalanine residue (Phe198), together with the surface tryptophan, in the electron transfer. These three aromatic residues are highly conserved in all the sequences analyzed (up to a total of 169). The importance of the surface (Trp171) and buried (Trp251) tryptophan residues in lignin peroxidase has been also confirmed by directed mutagenesis of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium enzyme. Overall, the combined procedure identifies analogous electron transfer pathways in the long-range oxidation mechanism for both ligninolytic peroxidases, constituting a good example of how computational analysis avoids making extensive trial-error mutagenic experiments.

  9. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  10. Improved manganese-oxidizing activity of DypB, a peroxidase from a lignolytic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Grigg, Jason C; Qin, Wei; Kadla, John F; Murphy, Michael E P; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2013-04-19

    DypB, a dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the lignolytic soil bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, catalyzes the peroxide-dependent oxidation of divalent manganese (Mn(2+)), albeit less efficiently than fungal manganese peroxidases. Substitution of Asn246, a distal heme residue, with alanine increased the enzyme's apparent k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values for Mn(2+) by 80- and 15-fold, respectively. A 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the N246A variant revealed the Mn(2+) to be bound within a pocket of acidic residues at the heme edge, reminiscent of the binding site in fungal manganese peroxidase and very different from that of another bacterial Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase. The first coordination sphere was entirely composed of solvent, consistent with the variant's high K(m) for Mn(2+) (17 ± 2 mM). N246A catalyzed the manganese-dependent transformation of hard wood kraft lignin and its solvent-extracted fractions. Two of the major degradation products were identified as 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde, respectively. These results highlight the potential of bacterial enzymes as biocatalysts to transform lignin.

  11. Degradation of textile dyes using immobilized lignin peroxidase-like metalloporphines under mild experimental conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Synthetic dyes represent a broad and heterogeneous class of durable pollutants, that are released in large amounts by the textile industry. The ability of two immobilized metalloporphines (structurally emulating the ligninolytic peroxidases) to bleach six chosen dyes (alizarin red S, phenosafranine, xylenol orange, methylene blue, methyl green, and methyl orange) was compared to enzymatic catalysts. To achieve a green and sustainable process, very mild conditions were chosen. Results IPS/MnTSPP was the most promising biomimetic catalyst as it was able to effectively and quickly bleach all tested dyes. Biomimetic catalysis was fully characterized: maximum activity was centered at neutral pH, in the absence of any organic solvent, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The immobilized metalloporphine kept a large part of its activity during multi-cycle use; however, well-known redox mediators were not able to increase its catalytic activity. IPS/MnTSPP was also more promising for use in industrial applications than its enzymatic counterparts (lignin peroxidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase). Conclusions On the whole, the conditions were very mild (standard pressure, room temperature and neutral pH, using no organic solvents, and the most environmental-friendly oxidant) and a significant bleaching and partial mineralization of the dyes was achieved in approximately 1 h. Therefore, the process was consistent with large-scale applications. The biomimetic catalyst also had more promising features than the enzymatic catalysts. PMID:23256784

  12. Hormone-induced repression of a peroxidase isozyme in plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Ockerse, R; Siegel, B Z; Galston, A W

    1966-01-28

    Young stem sections of dwarf peas (Progress No. 9) grown in light contain at least seven peroxidase isozymes separable by electrophoresis on starch gel. An eighth isozyme appears as the tissue elongates and ages, on or off the plant. The appearance of this isozyme in excised sections is repressed by application of the plant growth hormone, indole-3-acetic acid.

  13. Peroxidase mediated conjugation of corn fibeer gum and bovine serum albumin to improve emulsifying properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum (CFG), a naturally-occurring polysaccharide protein complex, were improved by kinetically controlled formation of hetero-covalent linkages with bovine serum albumin (BSA), using horseradish peroxidase. The formation of hetero-crosslinked CFG-BSA conjugate...

  14. Reducing odorous VOC emissions from swine manure using soybean peroxidase and peroxides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air emissions from swine production facilities can cause odor nuisance issues. Peroxidase enzymes have been used to treat phenolic compounds in industrial wastewaters, but little is known about their efficacy for treating swine manure. The objective of the research was to determine the optimum app...

  15. Graphene-Based Nanomaterials as Efficient Peroxidase Mimetic Catalysts for Biosensing Applications: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Bisht, Tanuja; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-08-04

    "Artificial enzymes", a term coined by Breslow for enzyme mimics is an exciting and promising branch of biomimetic chemistry aiming to imitate the general and essential principles of natural enzymes using a variety of alternative materials including heterogeneous catalysts. Peroxidase enzymes represent a large family of oxidoreductases that typically catalyze biological reactions with high substrate affinity and specificity under relatively mild conditions and thus offer a wide range of practical applications in many areas of science. The increasing understanding of general principles as well as intrinsic drawbacks such as low operational stability, high cost, difficulty in purification and storage, and sensitivity of catalytic activity towards atmospheric conditions of peroxidases has triggered a dynamic field in nanotechnology, biochemical, and material science that aims at joining the better of three worlds by combining the concept adapted from nature with the processability of catalytically active graphene-based nanomaterials (G-NMs) as excellent peroxidase mimetic catalysts. This comprehensive review discusses an up-to-date synthesis, kinetics, mechanisms, and biosensing applications of a variety of G-NMs that have been explored as promising catalysts to mimic natural peroxidases.

  16. Fungal unspecific peroxygenases: heme-thiolate proteins that combine peroxidase and cytochrome p450 properties.

    PubMed

    Hofrichter, Martin; Kellner, Harald; Pecyna, Marek J; Ullrich, René

    2015-01-01

    Eleven years ago, a secreted heme-thiolate peroxidase with promiscuity for oxygen transfer reactions was discovered in the basidiomycetous fungus, Agrocybe aegerita. The enzyme turned out to be a functional mono-peroxygenase that transferred an oxygen atom from hydrogen peroxide to diverse organic substrates (aromatics, heterocycles, linear and cyclic alkanes/alkenes, fatty acids, etc.). Later similar enzymes were found in other mushroom genera such as Coprinellus and Marasmius. Approximately one thousand putative peroxygenase sequences that form two large clusters can be found in genetic databases and fungal genomes, indicating the widespread occurrence of such enzymes in the whole fungal kingdom including all phyla of true fungi (Eumycota) and certain fungus-like heterokonts (Oomycota). This new enzyme type was classified as unspecific peroxygenase (UPO, EC 1.11.2.1) and placed in a separate peroxidase subclass. Furthermore, UPOs and related heme-thiolate peroxidases such as well-studied chloroperoxidase (CPO) represent a separate superfamily of heme proteins on the phylogenetic level. The reactions catalyzed by UPOs include hydroxylation, epoxidation, O- and N-dealkylation, aromatization, sulfoxidation, N-oxygenation, dechlorination and halide oxidation. In many cases, the product patterns of UPOs resemble those of human cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenases and, in fact, combine the catalytic cycle of heme peroxidases with the "peroxide shunt" of P450s. Here, an overview on UPOs is provided with focus on their molecular and catalytic properties.

  17. Peroxidase activity as an indicator of exposure of wetland seedlings to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, H.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The enzyme peroxidase has been found to increase quantitatively in several aquatic plant species in response to increasing exposure to various contaminants. In this study, a number of wetland species are tested for their usefulness as bioindicators of metal exposure using the peroxidase assay. Woody species tested include Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), and Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), while herbaceous species include Saururus cernuus (lizard`s tail) and Sparganium americanum (bur-reed). The assay has been optimized for all of these species. In all cases the pH optimum has been found to be either 5.5 or 6.0 and the substrate optimum is 2.8 or 1.4mM hydrogen peroxide. There is considerable variation in baseline peroxidase activity among the species when tested under their optimal assay conditions. These species are being dosed with copper, nickel, and cadmium in order to determine whether a response elicited. Seedlings will be dosed using both petri dish culture conditions and test tubes filled with vermiculite and sand combinations. The peroxidase response will be compared to germination and root elongation endpoints. Lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus sativus) are being tested alongside the wetland species as reference organisms for which background data is available. The wetland species tested in the present study have rarely if ever been used in toxicological studies.

  18. Abolishing activity against ascorbate in a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is being developed as a bioenergy species. Recently an early version of its genome has been released permitting a route to the cloning and analysis of key proteins. Ascorbate peroxidases (APx) are an important part of the antioxidant defense system of plant cells a...

  19. Direct interaction between terbium ion and peroxidase in horseradish at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) entering plant cells can directly interact with peroxidase in plants, which is the structural basis for the decrease in the activity of peroxidase. Different cellular compartments have different pH values. However, little information is available regarding the direct interaction between REEs and peroxidase in plants at different pH values. Here, we investigated the charge distribution on the surface of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecule as well as the interaction of terbium ion (Tb(3+), one type of REEs) and HRP at different pH values. Using the molecular dynamics simulation, we found that when the pH value was from 4.0 to 8.0, a large amount of negative charges were intensively distributed on the surface of HRP molecule, and thus, we speculated that Tb(3+) with positive charges might directly interact with HRP at pH 4.0-8.0. Subsequently, using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, we demonstrated that Tb(3+) could directly interact with HRP in the simulated physiological solution at pH 7.0 and did not interact with HRP in other solutions at pH 5.0, pH 6.0 and pH 8.0. In conclusion, we showed that the direct interaction between Tb(3+) and HRP molecule depended on the pH value of cellular compartments.

  20. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) and ferroptosis: what's so special about it?

    PubMed

    Conrad, Marcus; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The system XC (-)/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) axis pivotally controls ferroptosis, a recently described form of regulated non-apoptotic cell death. Compelling evidence has established that this route of cell death is not only of high relevance for triggering cancer cell death, but also proves to be amenable for therapeutic intervention to halt ischemia/reperfusion-related diseases.

  1. Role of anionic isoforms of peroxidase during phytopathogenic infection of plants from the family Malvaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase of the activity and the appearance of new isoforms (high- and low-molecular-weight) in the isospectrum of peroxidase were noted after the action of the phytopathogen Verticillium dahliae on plants from the family Malvaceae. The temperature was shown to have an effect on the resistance to...

  2. Prussian blue nanoparticles as peroxidase mimetics for sensitive colorimetric detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weimin; Ma, Diao; Du, Jianxiu

    2014-03-01

    Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB NPs) exhibits an intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity towards the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidation of classical peroxidase substrate 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt to produce a colored product. The catalysis follows Michaelis-Menen kinetics and shows strong affinity for H2O2. Using PB NPs as a peroxidase mimetics, a colorimetric method was developed for the detection of 0.05-50.0 μM H2O2, with a detection limit of 0.031 μM. When the catalytic reaction of PB NPs was coupled with the reaction of glucose oxidation catalyzed by glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective colorimetric method for the detection of glucose was realized. The limit of detection for glucose was determined to be as low as 0.03 μM and the linear range was from 0.1 μM to 50.0 μM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human serum. Compared with other nanomaterials-based peroxidase mimetics, PB NPs provides 10-100 times higher sensitivity toward the detection of H2O2 and glucose. The detection platform developed showed great potential applications in varieties of physiological importance substances when merged with appropriate H2O2-producing oxidases.

  3. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt's method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts.

  4. Partial purification and characterization of a copper-induced anionic peroxidase of sunflower roots.

    PubMed

    Jouili, Hager; Bouazizi, Houda; Rossignol, Michel; Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of 14-day-old sunflower seedlings with a toxic amount of copper (50 microM of CuSO(4)) during 5days caused significant increase in peroxidase activity in roots. Qualitative analysis of soluble proteins using native anionic PAGE followed by detection of peroxidase activity with guaïacol as electron donor in the presence of H(2)O(2) revealed five stimulated peroxidases, named A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5. These peroxidases had differential behavior during the period of treatment. A1, A2, A3 and A4 were stimulated in the first period of stress, but rapidly suppressed at 72h. A5 showed a progressive stimulation which was even increased at 120h. A1 was partially purified, identified using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and characterized. Effects of pH and temperature on its activity were determined with guaïacol as electron donor. Optima were obtained at pH 8 and at 40 degrees C. Analysis of substrate specificity showed that A1 was active on coniferyl alcohol but not on IAA. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by a high concentration of H(2)O(2).

  5. Induction of peroxidases and superoxide dismutases in transformed embryogenic calli of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were analyzed in non-regenerative transformed embryogenic lines of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) carrying wound-inducible oryzacystatin I (OC-I), wound-inducible oryzacystatin I antisense (OC-Ias) or hygromycin phosphotransferase (...

  6. Structural Basis for a Distinct Catalytic Mechanism in Trypanosoma brucei Tryparedoxin Peroxidase*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Melchers, Johannes; Diechtierow, Michael; Fehér, Krisztina; Sinning, Irmgard; Tews, Ivo; Krauth-Siegel, R. Luise; Muhle-Goll, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, encodes three cysteine homologues (Px I-III) of classical selenocysteine-containing glutathione peroxidases. The enzymes obtain their reducing equivalents from the unique trypanothione (bis(glutathionyl)spermidine)/tryparedoxin system. During catalysis, these tryparedoxin peroxidases cycle between an oxidized form with an intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys47 and Cys95 and the reduced peroxidase with both residues in the thiol state. Here we report on the three-dimensional structures of oxidized T. brucei Px III at 1.4Å resolution obtained by x-ray crystallography and of both the oxidized and the reduced protein determined by NMR spectroscopy. Px III is a monomeric protein unlike the homologous poplar thioredoxin peroxidase (TxP). The structures of oxidized and reduced Px III are essentially identical in contrast to what was recently found for TxP. In Px III, Cys47, Gln82, and Trp137 do not form the catalytic triad observed in the selenoenzymes, and related proteins and the latter two residues are unaffected by the redox state of the protein. The mutational analysis of three conserved lysine residues in the vicinity of the catalytic cysteines revealed that exchange of Lys107 against glutamate abrogates the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, whereas Lys97 and Lys99 play a crucial role in the interaction with tryparedoxin. PMID:18684708

  7. Peroxidase-Generated Apoplastic ROS Impair Cuticle Integrity and Contribute to DAMP-Elicited Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Survila, Mantas; Davidsson, Pär R.; Pennanen, Ville; Kariola, Tarja; Broberg, Martin; Sipari, Nina; Heino, Pekka; Palva, Erkki T.

    2016-01-01

    Cuticular defects trigger a battery of reactions including enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. However, the source of ROS generated by such impaired cuticles has remained elusive. Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana ohy1 mutant, a Peroxidase 57 (PER57) – overexpressing line that demonstrates enhanced defense responses that result both from increased accumulation of ROS and permeability of the leaf cuticle. The ohy1 mutant was identified in a screen of A. thaliana seedlings for oligogalacturonides (OGs) insensitive/hypersensitive mutants that exhibit altered growth retardation in response to exogenous OGs. Mutants impaired in OG sensitivity were analyzed for disease resistance/susceptibility to the necrotrophic phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In the ohy1 line, the hypersensitivity to OGs was associated with resistance to the tested pathogens. This PER57 overexpressing line exhibited a significantly more permeable leaf cuticle than wild-type plants and this phenotype could be recapitulated by overexpressing other class III peroxidases. Such peroxidase overexpression was accompanied by the suppressed expression of cutin biosynthesis genes and the enhanced expression of genes associated with OG-signaling. Application of ABA completely removed ROS, restored the expression of genes associated with cuticle biosynthesis and led to decreased permeability of the leaf cuticle, and finally, abolished immunity to B. cinerea. Our work demonstrates that increased peroxidase activity increases permeability of the leaf cuticle. The loss of cuticle integrity primes plant defenses to necrotrophic pathogens via the activation of DAMP-responses. PMID:28066496

  8. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2•−). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2•− in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA. PMID:26633563

  9. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  10. Peroxidase-Generated Apoplastic ROS Impair Cuticle Integrity and Contribute to DAMP-Elicited Defenses.

    PubMed

    Survila, Mantas; Davidsson, Pär R; Pennanen, Ville; Kariola, Tarja; Broberg, Martin; Sipari, Nina; Heino, Pekka; Palva, Erkki T

    2016-01-01

    Cuticular defects trigger a battery of reactions including enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. However, the source of ROS generated by such impaired cuticles has remained elusive. Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana ohy1 mutant, a Peroxidase 57 (PER57) - overexpressing line that demonstrates enhanced defense responses that result both from increased accumulation of ROS and permeability of the leaf cuticle. The ohy1 mutant was identified in a screen of A. thaliana seedlings for oligogalacturonides (OGs) insensitive/hypersensitive mutants that exhibit altered growth retardation in response to exogenous OGs. Mutants impaired in OG sensitivity were analyzed for disease resistance/susceptibility to the necrotrophic phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In the ohy1 line, the hypersensitivity to OGs was associated with resistance to the tested pathogens. This PER57 overexpressing line exhibited a significantly more permeable leaf cuticle than wild-type plants and this phenotype could be recapitulated by overexpressing other class III peroxidases. Such peroxidase overexpression was accompanied by the suppressed expression of cutin biosynthesis genes and the enhanced expression of genes associated with OG-signaling. Application of ABA completely removed ROS, restored the expression of genes associated with cuticle biosynthesis and led to decreased permeability of the leaf cuticle, and finally, abolished immunity to B. cinerea. Our work demonstrates that increased peroxidase activity increases permeability of the leaf cuticle. The loss of cuticle integrity primes plant defenses to necrotrophic pathogens via the activation of DAMP-responses.

  11. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt’s method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts. PMID:27610153

  12. Purification and kinetic characterization of two peroxidases of Selaginella martensii Spring. involved in lignification.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cortés, Teresa; Pomar, Federico; Espiñeira, José Manuel; Merino, Fuencisla; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2012-03-01

    Two cationic peroxidases from Selaginella martensii Spring. (SmaPrx2 and SmaPrx3) were purified using a three-step protocol which includes ammonium sulfate precipitation, adsorption chromatography on phenyl sepharose and cationic exchange chromatography on SP sepharose. The molecular mass for SmaPrx2 and SmaPrx3 was calculated to be 36.3 kDa and 45.6 kDa, respectively, according to MALDI-TOF/TOF. The isoelectric points were estimated in 9.2 and 9.5 for SmaPrx2 and SmaPrx3, respectively, according to isoelectrofocusing. Both enzymes show a typical peroxidase UV-visible spectrum with a Soret peak at 403 nm for SmaPrx2 and 404 nm for SmaPrx3. The specific activities showed against several substrates and the kinetic parameters suggest SmaPrx2 and SmaPrx3 have specific roles in cell wall formation and especially in lignin biosynthesis. Several peptides from tryptic digestion of both peroxidases were identified through MALDI-TOF MS/MS. The presence in these peptides of structural determinants typical of syringyl peroxidases indicates these proteins show no structural restrictions to oxidize syringyl moieties. These data, along with the in vitro capacity of using sinapyl alcohol as substrate and the low K(m) in the μM range suggest these two peroxidases may be responsible for the oxidation of syringyl monolignols that leads to syringyl lignins biosynthesis.

  13. Characterization of sheep lacrimal-gland peroxidase and its major physiological electron donor.

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, A; Chatterjee, R; Adak, S; Ghosh, A; Mondal, C; Banerjee, R K

    1996-01-01

    A soluble sheep lacrimal-gland peroxidase was purified to apparent homogeneity. It had a native molecular mass of 75 kDa with a subunit molecular mass of 82 kDa and an isoelectric point of 6.5. Western blotting showed that it shares some of the enzyme antigenic determinants in common with other soluble peroxidases. The enzyme exhibits a Soret peak at 410 nm which is shifted to 431 nm by 5 equiv. of H2O2 due to the formation of compound II. The latter is, however, unstable and gradually returns to the native state. The enzyme forms complexes with CN- and N3- and is reduced by dithionite showing a characteristic reduced peroxidase spectrum. Although the enzyme oxidizes I-, SCN- and Br- optimally at pH 5.5., 5.25 and 5.0 respectively, at physiological pH, it oxidizes I- and SCN- only. Since extracellular SCN- concentration is much higher than I-, SCN- may act as the major electron donor to the enzyme. The second-order rate constants for the reaction of the enzyme with H2O2 (k+1) and of compound I with SCN- (k+2) were 4 X 10(7) M-1 X s-1 and 8.1 X 10(5) M-1 X s-1 respectively. A plot of log Vmax against pH yields a sigmoidal curve consistent with a single ionizable group on the enzyme with a pK(a) value of 5.75, controlling thiocyanate oxidation. In a coupled system with the peroxidase, H2O2, SCN-, GSH, NADPH and glutathione reductase, peroxidase-catalysed SCN- oxidation by H2O2 could be coupled to NADPH consumption. The system is proposed to operate in vivo for the efficient elimination of endogenous H2O2. PMID:8670050

  14. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  15. Characterization of a putative thioredoxin peroxidase prx1 of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Kavitha; Kim, Na-Rae; Kim, Jiwon; Kim, Minsun; Bae, Ju Yun; Jeong, Woojin; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we characterized a putative peroxidase Prx1 of Candida albicans by: 1) demonstrating the thioredoxin-linked peroxidase activity with purified proteins, 2) examining the sensitivity to several oxidants and the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species with a null mutant (prx1Δ), a mutant (C69S) with a point mutation at Cys69, and a revertant, and 3) subcelluar localization. Enzymatic assays showed that Prx1 is a thioredoxin-linked peroxidase which reduces both hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH). Compared with two other strong H(2)O(2) scavenger mutants for TSA1 and CAT1, prx1Δ and C69S were less sensitive to H(2)O(2), menadione and diamide at all concentrations tested, but were more sensitive to low concentration of t-BOOH. Intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulated in prx1Δ and C69S cells treated with t-BOOH but not H(2)O(2). These results suggest that peroxidase activity of Prx1 is specified to t-BOOH in cells. In both biochemical and physiological cases, the evolutionarily conserved Cys69 was found to be essential for the function. Immunocytochemical staining revealed Prx1 is localized in the cytosol of yeast cells, but is translocated to the nucleus during the hyphal transition, though the significances of this observation are unclear. Our data suggest that PRX1 has a thioredoxin peroxidase activity reducing both t-BOOH and H(2)O(2), but its cellular function is specified to t-BOOH.

  16. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1994-05-01

    Our group continues to focus on the characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase and its genes. Throughout this past year we have generated transgenic plants expressing {beta}-glucuronidase under control of the anionic peroxidase promoter, characterized effectors of peroxidase gene expression in transformed protoplasts, generated numerous transgenic plants which over- and under-express the anionic peroxidase in a tissue specific manner, characterized the role of the anionic peroxidase in the metabolism of auxin, introduced a marker (flag) into the anionic peroxidase primary protein sequence which will permit the identification of the recombinant protein in plant tissue, and described the enhancement of insect resistance as a result of over-expression of the anionic peroxidase. Although our research program has continued along the lines of the original proposal, we have redirected a significant effort to the role which this enzyme plays in the metabolism of auxin, and conversely, the role which auxin plays in regulating the expression of the anionic peroxidase gene.

  17. Use of immobilized metal ions as a negative adsorbent for purification of enzymes: application to phosphoglycerate mutase from chicken muscle extract and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Andersson, L; Ersson, B; Berg, M

    1992-01-01

    Two enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase and peroxidase, were purified by using an immobilized metal ion adsorbent for the removal of unwanted proteins. The mutase was obtained pure from a single column, whereas the purification of peroxidase required the use of a thiophilic adsorbent in a tandem. The capacity was 2.5 mg pure peroxidase per mL gel.

  18. Salicylic acid changes the properties of extracellular peroxidase activity secreted from wounded wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Minibayeva, F; Mika, A; Lüthje, S

    2003-05-01

    Wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) roots released proteins showing peroxidase activity in the apoplastic solution in response to wound stress. Preincubation of excised roots with 1 mM salicylic acid at pH 7.0 enhanced the guaiacol peroxidase activity of the extracellular solution (so-called extracellular peroxidase). The soluble enzymes were partially purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate followed by size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. Despite an increase in the total activity of secreted peroxidase induced by pretreatment of excised roots with salicylic acid, the specific activity of the partially purified protein was significantly lower compared to that of the control. Purification of the corresponding proteins by ion exchange chromatography indicates that several isoforms of peroxidase occurred in both control and salicylic acid-treated samples. The activities of the extracellular peroxidases secreted by the salicylic acid-treated roots responded differently to calcium and lectins compared with those from untreated roots. Taken together, our data suggest that salicylic acid changes the isoforms of peroxidase secreted by wounded wheat roots.

  19. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1995-06-01

    My research program focuses entirely on the study of the lignin-forming peroxidase of tobacco. Ever since our cloning and sequencing of the first plant peroxidase cDNA, we have pioneered in the introduction of the tools of molecular biology to the study of plant peroxidases. A significant part of our effort has been focused on the construction and analysis of transgenic plants which either over- or under-express the tobacco anionic peroxidase. This research has not only supported the role for this enzyme in lignification, but has opened the door to our understanding of additional metabolic functions including auxin metabolism and insect defense. As you will learn, this enzyme`s role in auxin catabolism has lead to numerous phenotypes in transgenic plants. More recently, our attention has been directed towards the analysis of peroxidase gene expression. From this work we have learned that the anionic peroxidase gene is expressed at high levels in the xylem-forming cells, epidermis, and trichomes. This expression pattern supports its role lignification and hose defenses. We have also learned that this gene is down-regulated by auxin which indicates a strong relationship between auxin and the anionic peroxidase. 12 figs.

  20. Antioxidant Capacity of Poly(Ethylene Glycol) (PEG) as Protection Mechanism Against Hydrogen Peroxide Inactivation of Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Moreno, Karla; Ayala, Marcela; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The ability of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to protect enzymatic peroxidase activity was determined for horseradish peroxidase (HRP), versatile peroxidase (VP), commercial Coprinus peroxidase (BP), and chloroperoxidase (CPO). The operational stability measured as the total turnover number was determined for the four peroxidases. The presence of PEG significantly increased the operational stability of VP and HRP up to 123 and 195%, respectively, and dramatically increased the total turnover number of BP up to 597%. Chloroperoxidase was not protected by PEG, which may be due to the different oxidation mechanism, in which the oxidation is mediated by hypochlorous ion instead of free radicals as in the other peroxidases. The presence of PEG does not protect the enzyme when incubated only in the presence of H2O2 without reducing substrate. The catalytic constants (k cat) are insensitive to the presence of PEG, suggesting that the protection mechanism is not due to a competition between the PEG and the substrate as electron donors. On the other hand, PEG showed to have a significant antioxidant capacity. Thus, we conclude that the protection mechanism for peroxidases of PEG is based in its antioxidant capacity with which it is able scavenge or drain radicals that are harmful to the protein.

  1. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase. Progress summary report, April 1, 1989--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-04-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  2. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; Lopez-Lucendo, María F.; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Martinez, Angel T.

    2015-05-13

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn2+ to Mn3+, albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn2+ turnover (56 s–1) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s–1 average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s–1 average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn2+ has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s–1) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn2+ oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. In conclusion, it is suggested that generation of Mn3+ oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  3. Role of. pi. -cation radicals in the enzymatic cycles of peroxidases, catalases, and nitrite and sulfite reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L K; Chang, C K; Davis, M S; Fajer, J

    1980-01-01

    Charge iterative extended Hueckel calculations, and magnetic and optical results on porphyrins, chlorins, and isobacteriochlorins (1) suggest that the catalytic cycles of the enzymes horseradish peroxidase, catalase, Neurospora crassa catalase, and nitrite and sulfite reductases proceed via ..pi..-cation radicals of their prosthetic groups; (2) offer distinguishing features for the optical and magnetic spectra of these radicals, pertinent to their detection as enzymatic intermediates; (3) reconcile the seemingly contradictory optical and NMR data on Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase; and (4) predict that the axial ligation of the heme differs for horseradish peroxidase and catalase.

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of procollagens. I. Light microscopic distribution of procollagen I, III and IV antigenicity in the rat incisor tooth by the indirect peroxidase-anti-peroxidase method.

    PubMed

    Cournil, I; Leblond, C P; Pomponio, J; Hand, A R; Sederlof, L; Martin, G R

    1979-07-01

    Frozen sections of the growing end of the rat incisor tooth were exposed to antisera or affinity prepared antibodies against partially purified type I, II, or IV procollagen in the hope of detecting the location of the corresponding antigens by the peroxidase-anti-peroxidase technique. The distribution of immunostaining was similar with antisera as with purified antibodies of a given type, but differed for each type; that is, predentin, odontoblasts, pulp and periodontal tissue were the sites of type I; blood vessel walls, pulp and periodontal tissue, of type III; and basement membranes, of type IV antigenicity. It was demonstrated, at least in cases of type I and III, that immunostaining detected the corresponding procollagens and related substances, but not the corresponding collagens. The interpretation of these observations is that: 1) odontoblasts elaborate procollagen I for release to predentin and subsequent transformation to dentinal collagen I; 2) pulp and periodontal cells produce procollagens I and III which presumably become collagens I and III respectively, while the adventitial cells of blood vessels give rise to collagen III; and 3) procollagen IV is associated with basement membranes and, occasionally, adjacent cells.

  5. Identification and Comparative Analysis of H2O2-Scavenging Enzymes (Ascorbate Peroxidase and Glutathione Peroxidase) in Selected Plants Employing Bioinformatics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Ibrahim I.; Filiz, Ertugrul; Vatansever, Recep; Kurtoglu, Kuaybe Y.; Koc, Ibrahim; Öztürk, Münir X.; Anjum, Naser A.

    2016-01-01

    Among major reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exhibits dual roles in plant metabolism. Low levels of H2O2 modulate many biological/physiological processes in plants; whereas, its high level can cause damage to cell structures, having severe consequences. Thus, steady-state level of cellular H2O2 must be tightly regulated. Glutathione peroxidases (GPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) are two major ROS-scavenging enzymes which catalyze the reduction of H2O2 in order to prevent potential H2O2-derived cellular damage. Employing bioinformatics approaches, this study presents a comparative evaluation of both GPX and APX in 18 different plant species, and provides valuable insights into the nature and complex regulation of these enzymes. Herein, (a) potential GPX and APX genes/proteins from 18 different plant species were identified, (b) their exon/intron organization were analyzed, (c) detailed information about their physicochemical properties were provided, (d) conserved motif signatures of GPX and APX were identified, (e) their phylogenetic trees and 3D models were constructed, (f) protein-protein interaction networks were generated, and finally (g) GPX and APX gene expression profiles were analyzed. Study outcomes enlightened GPX and APX as major H2O2-scavenging enzymes at their structural and functional levels, which could be used in future studies in the current direction. PMID:27047498

  6. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon.

  7. Distinct structural and redox properties of the heme active site in bacterial dye decolorizing peroxidase-type peroxidases from two subfamilies: resonance Raman and electrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Murat; Santos, Ana; Kielb, Patrycja; Pinto, Tiago; Martins, Ligia O; Todorovic, Smilja

    2013-05-07

    Spectroscopic data of dye decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from Bacillus subtilis (BsDyP), an A subfamily member, and Pseudomonas putida (PpDyP), a B subfamily enzyme, reveal distinct heme coordination patterns of the respective active sites. In solution, both enzymes show a heterogeneous spin population, with the six-coordinated low-spin state being the most populated in the former and the five-coordinated quantum mechanically mixed-spin state in the latter. We ascribe the poor catalytic activity of BsDyP to the presence of a catalytically incompetent six-coordinated low-spin population. The spin populations of the two DyPs are sensitively dependent on the pH, temperature, and physical, i.e., solution versus crystal versus immobilized, state of the enzymes. We observe a redox potential for the Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) couple in BsDyP (-40 mV) at pH 7.6 substantially more positive than those reported for the majority of other peroxidases, including PpDyP (-260 mV). Furthermore, we evaluate the potential of the studied enzymes for biotechnological applications on the basis of electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical data.

  8. Clitoral Sexual Arousal: Neuronal Tracing Study From the Clitoris Through the Spinal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Alguacil, Nieves; Schober, Justine M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.; Pfaff, Donald W.; Shelley, Deborah N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Although genital tactile stimulation is regarded as a precursor to sexual arousal and a recognized initiator of central nervous system arousal, specific afferent neural pathways transmit sensory stimuli of arousal, beginning at the epithelial level on the clitoris and following the course of arousal stimuli through the central nervous system. Limited knowledge exists of the pathway from the cutaneous receptors of nerves originating in the epithelial tissue of the clitoris and continuing to spinal cord afferents. Such information may contribute to an understanding of sexual arousal, particularly in female vertebrates. We further defined the neural pathways and mechanisms responsible for arousal originating in the epithelium of the clitoris as well as related neural pathways to the spinal cord in a murine model. Materials and Methods We performed a comprehensive review of the published relevant clinical and histological material from human and nonhuman vertebrate studies. In 29 adult female C57B1/6 mice the distribution of pelvic nerves and vessels was mapped. Gross dissection of 4 female mice was facilitated by resin injection of the vascular system in 2. Neuronal tracing was performed in 25 mice that received clitoral injection of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase into the clitoris and were sacrificed after 72 to 96 hours. The spinal cord and periclitoral tissue were removed and fixed. Immunohistochemistry was performed. Results Gross anatomy of the mouse clitoris showed that pudendal and hypogastric nerves have a major role in the innervation of the external genitalia. Neuronal tracing revealed that the greatest nerve density was noted in the L5/6 spinal cord. The distribution extended from S1 to L2 with no labeling seen in the L3 spinal cord. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase labeling was seen caudal in levels S1 through L4 and rostral in L2. Conclusions Understanding the neuroanatomy of the clitoris using a murine model may provide

  9. Additive Effect on Soybean Peroxidase-Catalyzed Removal of Anilines from Water

    PubMed Central

    Mazloum, Samar; Al-Ansari, Mohammed Mousa; Taylor, Keith; Bewtra, Jatinder K.; Biswas, Niharendu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Soybean peroxidase has been shown to be effective in removal of aromatic compounds from wastewater, while the use of additives effectively reduces enzyme concentration requirement, hence overall treatment cost. Enzymatic treatment, an oxidative polymerization, was successful in removal of over 95% of both aniline and o-anisidine. The originality of this study lies in the findings that the additives, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS), Triton X-100, and sodium dodecanoate (SDOD), reduced enzyme concentration requirement, while polyethylene glycol (PEG, average molar mass of 3350 g/mol) had no effect on the required enzyme concentration. In addition, the presence of SDS also enhanced treatment by improving precipitation and color removal. These results are enabling advancement of soybean peroxidase-catalyzed treatment of anilines found in wastewaters as a new sustainable method. PMID:26989345

  10. Peroxidase-Catalyzed Oxidative Coupling of Phenols in the Presence of Geosorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qingguo; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2003-03-26

    This study focuses on elucidation of the reaction behaviors of peroxidase-mediated phenol coupling in the presence of soil/sediment materials. Our goal is a mechanistic understanding of the influences of geosorbent materials on enzymatic coupling reactions in general and the development of methods for predicting such influences. Extensive experimental investigations of coupling reactions were performed under strategically selected conditions in systems containing model geosorbents having different properties and chemical characteristics. The geosorbents tested were found to influence peroxidase-mediated phenol coupling through one or both of two principal mechanisms; i.e., (1) mitigation of enzyme inactivation and/or (2) participation in cross-coupling reactions. Such influences were found to correlate with the chemical characteristics of the sorbent materials and to be simulated well by a modeling approach designed in this paper. The results of the study have important implications for potential engineering implementation and enhancement of enzymatic coupling reactions in soil/subsurface remediation practice.

  11. Size-dependent tuning of horseradish peroxidase bioreactivity by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haohao; Liu, Yi; Li, Meng; Chong, Yu; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the α-helicity of the enzyme to extents inversely related to their size. Au-5 nm inhibited both HRP peroxidase activity toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and HRP compound I/II reactivity toward 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Au-5 nm enhanced the HRP peroxidase activity toward ascorbic acid and the HRP compound I/II reactivity toward redox-active residues in the HRP protein moiety. Further, Au-5 nm also decreased the catalase- and oxidase-like activities of HRP. Au-10 nm showed similar, but weaker effects, while Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm had no effect. Results suggest that AuNPs can size-dependently enhance or inhibit HRP bioreactivity toward substrates with different redox potentials via a mechanism involving extension of the HRP substrate access channel and decline in the redox potentials of HRP catalytic intermediates.Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the

  12. Chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose based magnetic nanocomposites for application of peroxidase purification.

    PubMed

    Zengin Kurt, Belma; Uckaya, Fatih; Durmus, Zehra

    2017-03-01

    Recently, protein purification methods have a very wide area of research. Many of these methods are both expensive and multi-stage methods, that are needed in specific equipment. In this study, biopolymer coated magnetic nanoparticles, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and chitosan (CH) coated Fe3O4 (magnetite) nanocomposites, are used in a new purification process. The structure of the synthesized magnetic nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis and zeta potential for surface charge of magnetic nanocomposites. Molecular weight and purification degree of peroxidase were estimated with SDS-PAGE. Peroxidase enzyme was purified a yield of 82.55% with carboxymethyl cellulose and 76.72% with chitosan using this method.

  13. In vitro depolymerization of lignin by manganese peroxidase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Wariishi, H.; Valli, K.; Gold, M.H. )

    1991-04-15

    Homogeneous manganese peroxidase catalyzed the in vitro partial depolymerization of four different {sup 14}C-labeled synthetic lignin preparations. Gel permeation profiles demonstrated significant depolymerization of {sup 14}C-sidechain-labeled syringyl lignin, a {sup 14}C-sidechain-labeled syringyl-guaiacyl copolymer (angiosperm lignin), and depolymerization of {sup 14}C-sidechain- and {sup 14}C-ring-labeled guaiacyl lignins (gymnosperm lignin). 3,5-Dimethoxy-1,4-benzo-quinone, 3,5-dimethoxy-1,4-hydroquinone, and syringylaldehyde were identified as degradation products of the syringyl and syringyl-guaiacyl lignins. These results suggest that manganese peroxidase plays a significant role in the depolymerization of lignin by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

  14. Detection of the halogenating activity of heme peroxidases in leukocytes by aminophenyl fluorescein.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, J; Remmler, J; Zschaler, J; Arnhold, J

    2015-06-01

    The formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acids by heme peroxidases is a key property of certain immune cells. These products are not only involved in defense against pathogenic microorganisms and in regulation of inflammatory processes, but contribute also to tissue damage in certain pathologies. After a short introduction about experimental approaches for the assessment of the halogenating activity in vitro and in cell suspensions, we are focusing on novel applications of fluorescent dye systems to detect the formation of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in leukocytes. Special attention is directed to properties and applications of the non-fluorescent dye aminophenyl fluorescein that is converted by HOCl, HOBr, and other strong oxidants to fluorescein. This dye allows the detection of the halogenating activity in samples containing free myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase as well as in intact granulocytes using fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry, respectively.

  15. The importance of thyroglobulin structure in thyroid peroxidase-catalyzed conversion of diiodotyrosine to thyroxine.

    PubMed

    Lamas, L; Taurog, A

    1977-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated that thyroid peroxidase (TPO) not only catalyzes the iodination of thyroglobulin and other proteins, but that it also catalyzes the intramolecular conversion of DIT residues to T4 (coupling reaction). The present study was designed to determine whether the native structure of thyroglobulin contributes to the efficiency of TPO-catalyzed coupling. Two lines of evidence are presented in support of the view that the conformation of thyroglobulin is important for TPO-catalyzed coupling. The first was based on comparison of T4 yields in thyroglobulin and other proteins. The second involved the effect of guanidine pretreatment on T4 yields in thyroglobulin. Both types of experiment provided evidence that the native structure of thyroglobulin contributes to the efficiency of the coupling reaction. Specificity of thyroid peroxidase activity, on the other hand, does not appear to be of importance in the coupling reaction.

  16. Emerging pollutants and plants--Metabolic activation of diclofenac by peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Huber, Christian; Preis, Martina; Harvey, Patricia J; Grosse, Sylvia; Letzel, Thomas; Schröder, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Human pharmaceuticals and their residues are constantly detected in our waterbodies, due to poor elimination rates, even in the most advanced waste water treatment plants. Their impact on the environment and human health still remains unclear. When phytoremediation is applied to aid water treatment, plants may transform and degrade xenobiotic contaminants through phase I and phase II metabolism to more water soluble and less toxic intermediates. In this context, peroxidases play a major role in activating compounds during phase I via oxidation. In the present work, the ability of a plant peroxidase to oxidize the human painkiller diclofenac was confirmed using stopped flow spectroscopy in combination with LC-MS analysis. Analysis of an orange colored product revealed the structure of the highly reactive Diclofenac-2,5-Iminoquinone, which may be the precursor of several biological conjugates and breakdown products in planta.

  17. Catalase-like and peroxidase-like catalytic activities of silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwei; Jiang, Wenwen; Wang, Yanwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Yao, Jianlin; Yuan, Lin; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Li, Dan; Song, Bo; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-08

    Silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs) were found to have catalytic activities similar to those of biological enzymes catalase and peroxidase. Thus not only can these materials catalyze the decomposition reaction of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, but they can also catalyze the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPD), a common substrate for peroxidases, by H(2)O(2). The presence of Si-H bonds and the morphology of the SiNWAs are found to be crucial to the occurrence of such catalytic activity. When the SiNWAs are reacted with H(2)O(2), the data from Raman spectroscopy suggests the formation of (Si-H)(2)···(O species) ((Si-H)(2)···Os), which is presumably responsible for the catalytic activity. These findings suggest the potential use of SiNWAs as enzyme mimics in medicine, biotechnology, and environmental chemistry.

  18. Compounds I of catalase and horse radish peroxidase: pi-cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, D; Forman, A; Borg, D C; Fajer, J; Felton, R H

    1971-03-01

    Two-electron oxidation of cobaltous octaethylporphyrin [Co(II)(Et)(8)P] yields a stable pi-cation radical [Co(III)(Et)(8)P](2+.), the optical spectrum of which exhibits spectral changes dependent upon the nature of the counterion. Comparison of these spectra with those of Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase and catalase leads us to propose that these Compounds I contain a pi-cation radical of the heme prosthetic group. This proposal explains the oxidation level, optical spectra, and stability of the primary compounds without recourse to properties such as stoichiometric mixtures of special porphyrins, stable Fe(V) porphyrins, or unique conformers of heme porphyrins. Explanations are advanced to account for the missing electron spin resonance signal of Compound I of horseradish peroxidase.

  19. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztekin, Aykut; Almaz, Züleyha; Özdemir, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC50 values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  20. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of royal palm tree (Roystonea regia) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandra; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Zamorano, Laura S; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-09-01

    Royal palm tree peroxidase (RPTP), which was isolated from Roystonea regia leaves, has an unusually high stability that makes it a promising candidate for diverse applications in industry and analytical chemistry [Caramyshev et al. (2005), Biomacromolecules, 6, 1360-1366]. Here, the purification and crystallization of this plant peroxidase and its X-ray diffraction data collection are described. RPTP crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.8 A. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3(1)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.83, c = 92.24 A, and contain one protein molecule per asymmetric unit. The V(M) value and solvent content are 4.07 A3 Da(-1) and 69.8%, respectively.

  2. Catalyzed degradation of disperse dyes by calcium alginate-pectin entrapped bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Satar, Rukhsana; Husain, Qayyum

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-alginate pectin entrapped bitter gourd peroxidase (BGP) has been employed for the treatment of disperse dyes: Disperse Brown 1 (DB 1) and Disperse Red 17 (DR 17). Peroxidase alone was unable to decolorize DR 17 and DB 1. However, the investigated dyes were decolorized maximally by BGP in the presence of 0.2 mmol/L redox mediator, violuric acid (VA). A slow decrease in percent decolorization was observed when VA concentration was higher than 0.2 mmol/L which could likely be due to the high reactivity of its aminoxyl radical (> N-O*) intermediate, that might undergo chemical reactions with aromatic amino acid side chains of the enzyme thereby inactivating it. Maximum decolorization of the dyes was observed at pH 3.0 and 40 degrees C within 2 hr of incubation. Immobilized peroxidase decolorized 98% DR 17 and 71% DB 1 using 35 U of BGP in batch process in 90 min. Immobilized enzyme decolorized 85% DR 17 and 51% DB 1 whereas soluble enzyme decolorized DR 17 to 48% and DB 1 to 30% at 60 degrees C. UV-visible spectral analysis was used to evaluate the degradation of these dyes and their toxicity was tested by Allium cepa test. The generally observed higher stability of the bioaffinity bound enzymes against various forms of inactivation may be related to the specific and strong binding of enzyme with bioaffinity support which prevents the unfolding/denaturation of enzyme. Thus entrapped peroxidase was found to be effective in the decolorization of the investigated dyes.

  3. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-02

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation.

  4. Trametes villosa lignin peroxidase (TvLiP): genetic and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rita Terezinha de Oliveira; Lopes, Maíza Alves; Silva, Marília Lordelo Cardoso; Santos, Verônica da Silva; Souza, Volnei Brito de; Sousa, Aurizangela Oliveira de; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho; Koblitz, Maria Gabriela Bello; Benevides, Raquel Guimarães; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles

    2016-10-06

    White-rot basidiomycetes are the organisms that decompose lignin most efficiently and Trametes villosa is a promising species for the ligninolytic enzymes production. There are several publications on Trametes villosa applications for lignin degradation regarding the expression and secretion of laccase (Lac) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) but no reports on the identification and characterization of lignin peroxidase (LiP), a relevant enzyme for the efficient breaking down of lignin. The object of this study was to identify and partially characterize, for the first time, gDNA, mRNA and the corresponding lignin peroxidase (TvLiP) protein from a strain of Trametes villosa CCMB561 from the Brazilian semi-arid region. The presence of ligninolytic enzymes produced by this strain grown in inducer media was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by spectrophotometry, qPCR, and dye fading using RBBR. The spectrophotometric analysis showed that LiP activity was higher than that of MnP. The greatest LiP expression as measured by qPCR occurred on the 7(th) day, and the ABSA medium (agar, sugarcane bagasse and ammonium sulfate) was the medium that best favored LiP expression. The amplification of the TvLiP gene median region covering approximately 50% of the T. versicolor LPGIV gene (87% identity); the presence of Trp199, Leu115, Asp193, Trp199 and Ala203 in the translated amplicon of the T. villosa mRNA; and the close phylogenetic relationship between TvLiP and T. versicolor LiP all indicate that the target enzyme is a lignin peroxidase. Therefore, T. villosa CCMB561 has great potential for use as a LiP, MnP and Lac producer for industrial applications.

  5. Molecular cloning and sequences of lignin peroxidase genes of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Schalch, H; Gaskell, J; Smith, T L; Cullen, D

    1989-01-01

    The genomic clones encoding lignin peroxidase isozyme H8 and two closely related genes were isolated from Phanerochaete chrysosporium BKM-1767, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. The positions and approximate lengths of introns were found to be highly conserved in all three clones. Analysis of homokaryotic derivatives indicated that the three clones are not alleles of the same gene(s). Images PMID:2761543

  6. Nonidet P40 and the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase in undamaged visceral nerves.

    PubMed

    Rogers, R C; Liholtz, L A; Ebly, E M

    1982-06-01

    The cell bodies of origin of peripheral nerves, in particular visceral nerves, are often difficult to identify using standard horseradish peroxidase (HRP) methods. The non-ionic surfactant Nonidet-P40, when applied to intact peripheral nerve along with HRP, allows the investigator to examine the neurons of origin of the nerve without cutting the fibers or injecting label into its peripheral terminal field.

  7. Mechanism of nitrite oxidation by eosinophil peroxidase: implications for oxidant production and nitration by eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    van Dalen, Christine J.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Kettle, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase is a haem enzyme of eosinophils that is implicated in oxidative tissue injury in asthma. It uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize thiocyanate and bromide to their respective hypohalous acids. Nitrite is also a substrate for eosinophil peroxidase. We have investigated the mechanisms by which the enzyme oxidizes nitrite. Nitrite was very effective at inhibiting hypothiocyanous acid (‘cyanosulphenic acid’) and hypobromous acid production. Spectral studies showed that nitrite reduced the enzyme to its compound II form, which is a redox intermediate containing FeIV in the haem active site. Compound II does not oxidize thiocyanate or bromide. These results demonstrate that nitrite is readily oxidized by compound I, which contains FeV at the active site. However, it reacts more slowly with compound II. The observed rate constant for reduction of compound II by nitrite was determined to be 5.6×103 M−1·s−1. Eosinophils were at least 4-fold more effective at promoting nitration of a heptapeptide than neutrophils. This result is explained by our finding that nitrite reacts 10-fold faster with compound II of eosinophil peroxidase than with the analogous redox intermediate of myeloperoxidase. Nitration by eosinophils was increased 3-fold by superoxide dismutase, which indicates that superoxide interferes with nitration. We propose that at sites of eosinophilic inflammation, low concentrations of nitrite will retard oxidant production by eosinophil peroxidase, whereas at higher concentrations nitrogen dioxide will be a major oxidant formed by these cells. The efficiency of protein nitration will be decreased by the diffusion-controlled reaction of superoxide with nitrogen dioxide. PMID:16336215

  8. Bioinformatic and functional characterization of the basic peroxidase 72 from Arabidopsis thaliana involved in lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Joaquín; Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Yebra, Tatiana; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, Ma Ángeles; Cuello, Juan; Guéra, Alfredo; Esteban-Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Lignins result from the oxidative polymerization of three hydroxycinnamyl (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl) alcohols in a reaction mediated by peroxidases. The most important of these is the cationic peroxidase from Zinnia elegans (ZePrx), an enzyme considered to be responsible for the last step of lignification in this plant. Bibliographical evidence indicates that the arabidopsis peroxidase 72 (AtPrx72), which is homolog to ZePrx, could have an important role in lignification. For this reason, we performed a bioinformatic, histochemical, photosynthetic, and phenotypical and lignin composition analysis of an arabidopsis knock-out mutant of AtPrx72 with the aim of characterizing the effects that occurred due to the absence of expression of this peroxidase from the aspects of plant physiology such as vascular development, lignification, and photosynthesis. In silico analyses indicated a high homology between AtPrx72 and ZePrx, cell wall localization and probably optimal levels of translation of AtPrx72. The histochemical study revealed a low content in syringyl units and a decrease in the amount of lignin in the atprx72 mutant plants compared to WT. The atprx72 mutant plants grew more slowly than WT plants, with both smaller rosette and principal stem, and with fewer branches and siliques than the WT plants. Lastly, chlorophyll a fluorescence revealed a significant decrease in ΦPSII and q L in atprx72 mutant plants that could be related to changes in carbon partitioning and/or utilization of redox equivalents in arabidopsis metabolism. The results suggest an important role of AtPrx72 in lignin biosynthesis. In addition, knock-out plants were able to respond and adapt to an insufficiency of lignification.

  9. The conformational bases for the two functionalities of 2-cysteine peroxiredoxins as peroxidase and chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2013-01-01

    2-Cysteine peroxiredoxins (2-CysPrxs) are ubiquitous and highly abundant proteins that serve multiple functions as peroxidases, chaperones, and thiol oxidases and in redox-dependent cell signalling. The chloroplast protein plays a role in seedling development and protection of the photosynthetic apparatus. This study aimed to unequivocally link conformation and function. To this end, a set of non-tagged site-directed mutagenized At2-CysPrx variants was engineered, which mimicked the conformational states and their specific functions: hyperoxidized form (C54D), reduced form (C54S, C176S), oxidized form (C54DC176K), phosphorylated form (T92D), reduced ability for oligomerization by interfering with the dimer–dimer interface (F84R) and a C-terminally truncated form [ΔC (–20 aa)]. These variants were fully or partly fixed in their quaternary structure and function, respectively, and were analysed for their conformational state and peroxidase and chaperone activity, as well as for their sensitivity to hyperoxidation. The presence of a His6-tag strongly influenced the properties of the protein. The ΔC variant became insensitive to hyperoxidation, while T92D and F84R became more sensitive. The C54D variant revealed the highest chaperone activity. The highest peroxidase activity was observed for the F84R and ΔC variants. Efficient interaction with NADP-dependent thioredoxin reductase C depended on the presence of Cys residues and the C-terminal tail. The results suggest that the structural flexibility is important for the switch between peroxidase and chaperone function and that evolution has conserved the functional switch instead of maximizing a single function. These variants are ideal tools for future conformation-specific studies in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23828546

  10. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  11. Evaluation of seven cosubstrates in the quantification of horseradish peroxidase enzyme by square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2012-01-15

    The electrochemical detection for horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems was optimized. o-Phenilendiamine, phenol, hydroquinone, pyrocatechol, p-chlorophenol, p-aminophenol and 3,3'-5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine were evaluated as cosubstrates of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Therefore, the reaction time, the addition sequence of the substrates, the cosubstrate:H(2)O(2) ratio and the electrochemical techniques were elected by one-factor optimization assays while the buffer pH, the enzymatic activity and cosubstrate and H(2)O(2) concentrations for each system were selected simultaneously by response surface methodology. Then, the calibration curves for seven horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems were built and the analytic parameters were analyzed. o-Phenilendiamine was selected as the best cosubstrate for the HRP enzyme. For this system the reaction time of 60s, the phosphate buffer pH 6.0, and the concentrations of 2.5×10(-4)molL(-1) o-phenilendiamine and of 1.25×10(-4)molL(-1) H(2)O(2) were chosen as the optimal conditions. In these conditions, the calibration curve of horseradish peroxidase by square wave voltammetry showed a linearity range from 9.5×10(-11) to 1.9×10(-8)molL(-1) and the limit of detection of 3.8×10(-11)molL(-1) with RSD% of 0.03% (n=3).

  12. Gut Microbiota Conversion of Dietary Ellagic Acid into Bioactive Phytoceutical Urolithin A Inhibits Heme Peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Piu; Yeoh, Beng San; Singh, Rajbir; Chandrasekar, Bhargavi; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Vijay-Kumar, Matam; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies signify that diets rich in phytochemicals offer many beneficial functions specifically during pathologic conditions, yet their effects are often not uniform due to inter-individual variation. The host indigenous gut microbiota and their modifications of dietary phytochemicals have emerged as factors that greatly influence the efficacy of phytoceutical-based intervention. Here, we investigated the biological activities of one such active microbial metabolite, Urolithin A (UA or 3,8-dihydroxybenzo[c]chromen-6-one), which is derived from the ellagic acid (EA). Our study demonstrates that UA potently inhibits heme peroxidases i.e. myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) when compared to the parent compound EA. In addition, chrome azurol S (CAS) assay suggests that EA, but not UA, is capable of binding to Fe3+, due to its catechol-like structure, although its modest heme peroxidase inhibitory activity is abrogated upon Fe3+-binding. Interestingly, UA-mediated MPO and LPO inhibition can be prevented by innate immune protein human NGAL or its murine ortholog lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), implying the complex nature of host innate immunity-microbiota interactions. Spectral analysis indicates that UA inhibits heme peroxidase-catalyzed reaction by reverting the peroxidase back to its inactive native state. In support of these in vitro results, UA significantly reduced phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced superoxide generation in neutrophils, however, EA failed to block the superoxide generation. Treatment with UA significantly reduced PMA-induced mouse ear edema and MPO activity compared to EA treated mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that microbiota-mediated conversion of EA to UA is advantageous to both host and microbiota i.e. UA-mediated inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes reduce tissue inflammation, mitigate non-specific killing of gut bacteria, and abrogate iron-binding property of EA, thus providing a competitive edge to the microbiota in

  13. Revisiting catechol derivatives as robust chromogenic hydrogen donors working in alkaline media for peroxidase mimetics.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Pytlos, Jakub; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-12-15

    Colloidal noble metal-based nanoparticles are able to catalyze oxidation of chromogenic substrates by H2O2, similarly to peroxidases, even in basic media. However, lack of robust chromogens, which work in high pH impedes their real applications. Herein we demonstrate the applicability of selected catechol derivatives: bromopyrogallol red (BPR) and pyrogallol (PG) as chromogenic substrates for peroxidase-like activity assays, which are capable of working over wide range of pH, covering also basic values. Hyperbranched polyglycidol-stabilized gold nanoparticles (HBPG@AuNPs) were used as model enzyme mimetics. Efficiency of several methods of improving stability of substrates in alkaline media by means of selective suppression of their autoxidation by molecular oxygen was evaluated. In a framework of presented studies the impact of borate anion, applied as complexing agent for PG and BPR, on their stability and reactivity towards oxidation mediated by catalytic AuNPs was investigated. The key role of high concentration of hydrogen peroxide in elimination of non-catalytic oxidation of PG and improvement of optical properties of BPR in alkaline media containing borate was underlined. Described methods of peroxidase-like activity characterization with the use of BPR and PG can become universal tools for characterization of nanozymes, which gain various applications, among others, they are used as catalytic labels in bioassays and biosensors.

  14. Identification and characterization of a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in Setaria cervi

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anchal; Rathaur, Sushma . E-mail: sushmarathaur@yahoo.com

    2005-06-17

    Setaria cervi a bovine filarial parasite secretes selenium glutathione peroxidase during in vitro cultivation. A significant amount of enzyme activity was detected in the somatic extract of different developmental stages of the parasite. Among different stages, microfilariae showed a higher level of selenium glutathione peroxidase activity followed by males then females. However, when the activity was compared in excretory secretory products of these stages males showed higher activity than microfilariae and female worms. The enzyme was purified from female somatic extract using a combination of glutathione agarose and gel filtration chromatography, which migrated as a single band of molecular mass {approx}20 kDa. Selenium content of purified enzyme was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and found to be 3.5 ng selenium/{mu}g of protein. Further, inhibition of enzyme activity by potassium cyanide suggested the presence of selenium at the active site of enzyme. This is the first report of identification of selenium glutathione peroxidase from any filarial parasite.

  15. Purification and characterization of a novel peroxidase from bitter gourd (Momordica charantia).

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aiman; Husain, Qayyum

    2008-01-01

    Peroxidase from bitter gourd was purified by three step purification scheme; ammonium sulphate fractionation, gel filtration and affinity chromatography. The enzyme was purified 42 fold with the retention of 67% of the initial activity. The enzyme exhibited its maximum activity at pH 5.6 and 40 degrees C. The enzyme retained half of its activity even after 1 h incubation at 60 degrees C. Molecular weight of the purified glycosylated bitter gourd peroxidase determined by Sephacryl S-100 and SDS-PAGE was 43 kDa. The stokes radius, diffusion coefficient and sedimentation coefficient of the purified peroxidase were 27.3 A, 8.17 x 10(-7) cm(2)/sec and 3.74 S, respectively. K(m) for o-dianisidine and ABTS were 1.3 and 4.9 mM, respectively. The activity of the enzyme was inhibited by sulfide, azide and L-cysteine. The carbohydrate content and sulfydryl groups of the enzyme were 25% (w/w) mass of the protein and 16 mmoles/mole of the protein, respectively.

  16. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities.

  17. Purification and characterization of novel cationic peroxidases from Asparagus acutifolius L. with biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Guida, Vincenzo; Cantarella, Maria; Chambery, Angela; Mezzacapo, Maria C; Parente, Augusto; Landi, Nicola; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo

    2014-08-01

    Four novel basic peroxidases, named AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4, were purified from Asparagus acutifolius L. seeds by cation-exchange and gel filtration chromatographies. The four proteins showed a similar electrophoretic mobility of 46 kDa while, by MALDI-TOF MS, different Mr values of 42758.3, 41586.9, 42796.3, and 41595.5 were determined for AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4, respectively. N-terminal sequences of AaPs 1-4 up to residue 20 showed a high percentage of identity with the peroxidase from Glycine max. In addition, AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4 were found to be glycoproteins, containing 21.75, 22.27, 25.62, and 18.31 % of carbohydrates, respectively. Peptide mapping and MALDI-TOF MS analysis of AaPs 1-4 showed that the structural differences between AaP-1 and AaP-2 and AaP-3 and AaPs-4 were mainly due to their glycan content. We also demonstrate that AaPs were able to remove phenolic compounds from olive oil mill wastewaters with a higher catalytic efficiency with respect to horseradish peroxidase, thus representing candidate enzymes for potential biotechnological applications in the environmental field.

  18. Toxicity of textile dyes and their degradation by the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP).

    PubMed

    Ulson de Souza, Selene Maria Arruda Guelli; Forgiarini, Eliane; Ulson de Souza, Antônio Augusto

    2007-08-25

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolorize textile effluents. This study evaluates the potential of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the decolorization of textile dyes and effluents. Some factors such as pH and the amount of H(2)O(2) and the enzyme were evaluated in order to determine the optimum conditions for the enzyme performance. For the dyes tested, the results indicated that the decolorization of the dye Remazol Turquoise Blue G 133% was approximately 59%, and 94% for the Lanaset Blue 2R; for the textile effluent, the decolorization was 52%. The tests for toxicity towards Daphnia magna showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. However, the toxicity of the textile effluent showed no change towards Artemia salina after the enzyme treatment. This study verifies the viability of the use of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase in the biodegradation of textile dyes.

  19. Biobleaching of industrial important dyes with peroxidase partially purified from garlic.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Akudo Chigozirim; Eze, Sabinus Oscar O; Osayi, Emmanuel Emeka; Chilaka, Ferdinand Chiemeka

    2014-01-01

    An acidic peroxidase was extracted from garlic (Allium sativum) and was partially purified threefold by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, and gel filtration chromatography using sephadex G-200. The specific activity of the enzyme increased from 4.89 U/mg after ammonium sulphate precipitation to 25.26 U/mg after gel filtration chromatography. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme were 50°C and 5.0, respectively. The Km and V max for H2O2 and o-dianisidine were 0.026 mM and 0.8 U/min, and 25 mM and 0.75 U/min, respectively. Peroxidase from garlic was effective in decolourizing Vat Yellow 2, Vat Orange 11, and Vat Black 27 better than Vat Green 9 dye. For all the parameters monitored, the decolourization was more effective at a pH range, temperature, H2O2 concentration, and enzyme concentration of 4.5-5.0, 50°C, 0.6 mM, and 0.20 U/mL, respectively. The observed properties of the enzyme together with its low cost of extraction (from local sources) show the potential of this enzyme for practical application in industrial wastewater treatment especially with hydrogen peroxide. These Vat dyes also exhibited potentials of acting as peroxidase inhibitors at alkaline pH range.

  20. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine. PMID:25221454

  1. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  2. Chinese hamster ovary cell lysosomes retain pinocytized horseradish peroxidase and in situ-radioiodinated proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Storrie, B.; Sachdeva, M.; Viers, V.S.

    1984-02-01

    We used Chinese hamster ovary cells, a cell line of fibroblastic origin, to investigate whether lysosomes are an exocytic compartment. To label lysosomal contents, Chinese hamster ovary cells were incubated with the solute marker horseradish peroxidase. After an 18-h uptake period, horseradish peroxidase was found in lysosomes by cell fractionation in Percoll gradients and by electron microscope cytochemistry. Over a 24-h period, lysosomal horseradish peroxidase was quantitatively retained by Chinese hamster ovary cells and inactivated with a t 1/2 of 6 to 8 h. Lysosomes were radioiodinated in situ by soluble lactoperoxidase internalized over an 18-h uptake period. About 70% of the radioiodine incorporation was pelleted at 100,000 X g under conditions in which greater than 80% of the lysosomal marker enzyme beta-hexosaminidase was released into the supernatant. By one-dimensional electrophoresis, about 18 protein species were present in the lysosomal membrane fraction, with radioiodine incorporation being most pronounced into species of 70,000 to 75,000 daltons. After a 30-min or 2-h chase at 37 degrees C, radioiodine that was incorporated into lysosomal membranes and contents was retained in lysosomes. These observations indicate that lysosomes labeled by fluid-phase pinocytosis are a terminal component of endocytic pathways in fibroblasts.

  3. The effect of bilirubin photoisomers on unbound-bilirubin concentrations estimated by the peroxidase method.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, S; Yamakawa, T; Onishi, S; Isobe, K; Manabe, M; Sasaki, K

    1986-01-01

    Unbound bilirubin is oxidized to nearly colourless substances in the presence of H2O2 or ethyl hydroperoxide and horseradish peroxidase. To predict the risk of kernicterus (degenerated yellow pigmentation of nerve cells), this principle has been widely utilized for estimating the concentration of unbound bilirubin in hyperbilirubinaemic serum. However, the serum contains polar geometric photoisomers of bilirubin. Therefore, to clarify the effect of bilirubin photoisomer concentrations on unbound-bilirubin concentration, the concentration of bilirubin and its photoisomer and of unbound bilirubin in samples obtained from experiments in vivo and in vitro were simultaneously and individually estimated by h.p.l.c. and the peroxidase method. During photoirradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, the serum polar (ZE)-bilirubin IX alpha concentration increased remarkably, but unbound-bilirubin values were not affected at all. However, during experiments in vitro, unbound bilirubin concentrations increased only when concentrations of the rather polar (EZ)- and (EE)-cyclobilirubin IX alpha increased considerably in a human serum albumin-bilirubin solution irradiated with blue light. Thus it is concluded that unbound-bilirubin concentrations, and consequently the initial rate of the peroxidase reaction, is not accelerated by the increase in either (ZE)-bilirubin or (EZ)-cyclobilirubin concentration within the clinically observed range. PMID:3545181

  4. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) buds.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Ekrem; Gülçin, Ilhami

    2008-01-01

    Peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; donor: hydrogen peroxide oxidoreductase) are part of a large group of enzymes. In this study, peroxidase, a primer antioxidant enzyme, was purified with 19.3 fold and 0.2% efficiency from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, CM-Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-25 purification steps. The substrate specificity of peroxidase was investigated using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol), 1,2,3-trihyidroxybenzene (pyrogallol) and 4-methylcatechol. Also, optimum pH, optimum temperature, optimum ionic strength, stable pH, stable temperature, thermal inactivation conditions were determined for guaiacol/H(2)O(2), pyrogallol/H(2)O(2), ABTS/H(2)O(2), catechol/H(2)O(2) and 4-methyl catechol/H(2)O(2) substrate patterns. The molecular weight (M(w)) of this enzyme was found to be 44 kDa by gel filtration chromatography method. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was performed for isoenzyme determination and a single band was observed. K(m) and V(max) values were calculated from Lineweaver-Burk graph for each substrate patterns.

  5. Sperm nuclei glutathione peroxidases and their occurrence in animal species with cysteine-containing protamines.

    PubMed

    Bertelsmann, Holger; Kuehbacher, Markus; Weseloh, Gundolf; Kyriakopoulos, Antonios; Behne, Dietrich

    2007-10-01

    The selenoenzyme sperm nuclei glutathione peroxidase (snGPx), also called the nuclear form of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (n-PHGPx), was found to be involved in the stabilization of condensed sperm chromatin, most likely by thiol to disulfide oxidation of the cysteine residues of the mammalian protamines, small nuclear basic proteins in the nuclei of sperm cells. By applying Acidic Urea-PAGE in combination with SDS-PAGE, snGPx with an apparent molecular mass of 34 kDa and a 24-kDa protein were purified from rat sperm nuclei. The 24-kDa protein was identified by means of mass spectrometry as a truncated form of snGPx produced by cleavage at the N-terminal end. After defined processing of spermatozoa and detergent treatment of the sperm nuclei fraction, snGPx and its truncated form were shown to be the only selenoproteins present in mature mammalian sperm nuclei. Both forms were found in mature rat and horse sperm nuclei but in man only snGPx was detected. In trout and chicken, species with sperm cells which likewise undergo chromatin condensation but do not contain cysteine in their protamines, the snGPx proteins were missing. This can be taken as an indirect proof of the function of snGPx to act as protamine cysteine thiol peroxidase in the mammalian species with cysteine-containing protamines.

  6. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of graphene oxide from the peroxidase-like activity perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Ying; Lou, Zhichao; Song, Lina; Wu, Yang; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2017-03-01

    In this study, PEGylated graphene oxide (PEG-GO)-hemin composite structure was constructed. Hemin in the form of nanoscaled aggregates were immobilized on PEG-GO sheets by the π-π stacking super-molecular interaction. Via catalyzing the oxidation of chromogenic substrates, we elicited the obtained PEG-GO-Hemin composite sheets have much higher peroxidase-like activity compared to hemin or PEG-GO alone, which is due to the introduction of enzyme active center of hemin with high dispersity, the excellent affinity to organic substrate through π-π stacking and/or electrostatic adsorption and the rapid electron transfer capability of PEG-GO. Similarly, PEG-GO-Hemin was found to be able to catalyze the oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by H2O2, resulting in toxicity to porcine iliac endothelial cells (PIECs) in vitro. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that PEG-GO sheets showed enhanced peroxidase activity when met hemin containing proteins including hemoglobin and cytochrome c. High glucose level (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) can induce cytochrome c to release from the respiratory chain, thus applying PEG-GO under HG condition could cause a much higher peroxidase-like activity, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radical (OH) and cytochrome c radical (cytochrome c), which eventually enhance the apoptosis. These results suggest GO has potential hazard for biomedical applications in some pathophysiological conditions.

  7. [Pineal gland glutathione peroxidase activity in rats and its age-associated change].

    PubMed

    Razygraev, A V

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity has been studied in the pineal gland (epiphysis) of young and aging female Wistar rats (2-4 and 17-19 month old). For comparison the same activity was studied in the pyramids of medulla oblongata and in the olfactory tubercle. These two brain structures represent white and gray matter respectively. The determination of the activity was performed with H2O2 as a substrate and with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) for estimation of the decrease of restored form of glutathione concentration. The glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in the pineal gland than in the brain structures used. Pineal glutathione peroxidase activities (micromole of GSH per minute per milligram of protein, M +/- m) in young and old rats were 1,52 +/- 0,07 and 1,27 +/- 0,06 respectively (p<0,05). The potential reason for the declined enzymatic activity found in the aged rats is the age-associated decrease of the selenium content in the pineal gland. The decline found may be one of the reflections of the pineal gland functional involution.

  8. Stimulation of Mn peroxidase activity: A possible role for oxalate in lignin biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuan, Iching; Tien, Ming )

    1993-02-15

    Oxalate is produced by numerous wood-degrading fungi. Our studies here show that the white-rot fungus Phaerochaete chrysosporium produces extracellular exalate under conditions that induce synthesis of the ligninolytic system. Little or no oxalate was detected in cultures grown under high nutrient nitrogen or carbon. This extracellular exalate was identified and quantitated by HPLC. Its identity was further substaintiated by its decomposition by the enzyme oxalate oxidase. The oxalate content of the extracellular fluid (peaking at 60 [mu]M) paralleled the extracellular activity of the lignin-degrading enzyme, Mn peroxidase. Significantly, we demonstrated that oxalate, at physiological concentrations, substantially stimulated Mn perosidase-catalyzed phenol red oxidation, presumably by its ability to chelate Mn. Stopped flow studies also indicate that oxalate accelerates the turnover of Mn peroxidase. Furthermore, we discovered that oxalate can support Mn peroxidase-catalyzed oxidations in the absence of exogenous H[sub 2]O[sub 2] and in the presence of dioxygen. These results allow us to propose an important role for oxalate, a ubiquitous compound produced by wood-destroying fungi, in lignin biodegradation. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Characterization of a purified decolorizing detergent-stable peroxidase from Streptomyces griseosporeus SN9.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Hatem; Nadia, Zaraî Jaouadi; Bejar, Wacim; Kourdali, Sidali; Belhoul, Mouna; Hmidi, Maher; Benkiar, Amina; Badis, Abdelmalek; Sallem, Naim; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-02-01

    A novel extracellular lignin peroxidase (called LiP-SN) was produced and purified from a newly isolated Streptomyces griseosporeus strain SN9. The findings revealed that the pure enzyme was a monomeric protein with an estimated molecular mass of 43 kDa and a Reinheitzahl value of 1.63. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of LiP-SN showed high homology with those of Streptomyces peroxidases. Its optimum pH and temperature were pH 8.5 and 65 °C, respectively. The enzyme was inhibited by sodium azide and potassium cyanide, suggesting the presence of heme components in its tertiary structure. Its catalytic efficiency was higher than that of the peroxidase from Streptomyces albidoflavus strain TN644. Interestingly, LiP-SN showed marked dye-decolorization efficiency and stability toward denaturing, oxidizing, and bleaching agents, and compatibility with EcoVax and Dipex as laundry detergents for 48 h at 40 °C. These properties make LiP-SN a potential candidate for future applications in distaining synthetic dyes and detergent formulations.

  10. Quantitative proteomics reveals that peroxidases play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mudassar Nawaz; Sakata, Katsumi; Hiraga, Susumu; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-12-05

    Soybean is an important legume crop that exhibits markedly reduced growth and yields under flooding conditions. To unravel the mechanisms involved in recovery after flooding in soybean root, gel-free proteomic analysis was performed. Morphological analysis revealed that growth suppression was more severe with increased flooding duration. Out of a total of 1645 and 1707 identified proteins, 73 and 21 proteins were changed significantly during the recovery stage following 2 and 4 days flooding, respectively. Based on the proteomic, clustering, and in silico protein-protein interaction analyses, six key enzymes were analyzed at the mRNA level. Lipoxygenase 1, which was increased at the protein level during the recovery period, was steadily down-regulated at the mRNA level. The peroxidase superfamily protein continuously increased in abundance during the course of recovery and was up-regulated at the mRNA level. HAD acid phosphatase was decreased at the protein level and down-regulated at the transcript level, while isoflavone reductase and an unknown protein were increased at both the protein and mRNA levels. Consistent with these findings, the enzymatic activity of peroxidase was decreased under flooding stress but increased significantly during the recovery sage. These results suggest that peroxidases might play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots through the scavenging of toxic radicals.

  11. Turnover capacity of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase for phenol and monosubstituted phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, M.D.; Heck, P.E.

    1998-05-01

    Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and other peroxidases are susceptible to mechanism-based inactivation during the oxidation of phenolic substrates. The turnover capacity of CIP was quantified for phenol and 11 monosubstituted phenols under conditions in which enzyme inactivation by mechanisms involving hydrogen peroxide alone were minimized. Turnover capacities varied by nearly 2 orders of magnitude, depending on the substituent. On a mass basis, the enzyme consumption corresponding to the lowest turnover capacities is considerable and may influence the economic feasibility of proposed industrial applications of peroxidases. Within a range of substituent electronegativity values, molar turnover capacities correlated well (r{sup 2} = 0.89) with substituent effects quantified by radical {sigma} values and semiquantitatively with homolytic O-H bond dissociation energies of the phenolic substrates, suggesting that phenoxyl radical intermediates are probably involved in the suicide inactivation of CIP. The correlation range in each case did not include phenols with highly electron-withdrawing (nitro and cyano) substituents because they are not oxidized by CIP, nor phenols with highly electron-donating (hydroxy and amino) substituents because they led to virtually complete inactivation of the enzyme with minimal substrate removal.

  12. Vascular peroxidase 1: a novel enzyme in promoting oxidative stress in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Gang; Peng, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1) is a recently identified novel family member of peroxidases in cardiovascular system. As an enzyme that is downstream of NADPH oxidases (NOX), VPO1 functions to utilize NOX - derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a strong oxidant which is believed to greatly promote oxidative stress. Under multiple conditions, NOX is activated concomitantly with an increase in superoxide anion (O2(.-)) and H2O2 production. The latter is converted to HOCl by VPO1. In this process (O2(.-) → H2O2 → HOCl), the oxidant reactivities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are significantly increased and therefore the oxidative stress is dramatically amplified. Several lines of evidence suggest that the NOX/VPO1 pathway - mediated oxidative stress plays an important role in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, endothelial cell apoptosis and/or smooth muscle cell proliferation. In addition, VPO1 can be secreted into the extracellular space to participate in extracellular matrix formation, suggesting that VPO1 may also play a role in cardiovascular remodeling (such as fibrosis). This function is independent of the peroxidase activity of VPO1.

  13. Biobleaching of Industrial Important Dyes with Peroxidase Partially Purified from Garlic

    PubMed Central

    Osuji, Akudo Chigozirim; Eze, Sabinus Oscar O.; Osayi, Emmanuel Emeka; Chilaka, Ferdinand Chiemeka

    2014-01-01

    An acidic peroxidase was extracted from garlic (Allium sativum) and was partially purified threefold by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, and gel filtration chromatography using sephadex G-200. The specific activity of the enzyme increased from 4.89 U/mg after ammonium sulphate precipitation to 25.26 U/mg after gel filtration chromatography. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme were 50°C and 5.0, respectively. The Km and Vmax for H2O2 and o-dianisidine were 0.026 mM and 0.8 U/min, and 25 mM and 0.75 U/min, respectively. Peroxidase from garlic was effective in decolourizing Vat Yellow 2, Vat Orange 11, and Vat Black 27 better than Vat Green 9 dye. For all the parameters monitored, the decolourization was more effective at a pH range, temperature, H2O2 concentration, and enzyme concentration of 4.5–5.0, 50°C, 0.6 mM, and 0.20 U/mL, respectively. The observed properties of the enzyme together with its low cost of extraction (from local sources) show the potential of this enzyme for practical application in industrial wastewater treatment especially with hydrogen peroxide. These Vat dyes also exhibited potentials of acting as peroxidase inhibitors at alkaline pH range. PMID:25401128

  14. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahare, Padmavati; Ayala, Marcela; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Agrawal, Vivechana

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine.

  15. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  16. Photosynthetic pigments and peroxidase activity of Lepidium sativum L. during assisted Hg phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, Beata; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2017-04-06

    The study was conducted to evaluate metabolic answer of Lepidium sativum L. on Hg, compost, and citric acid during assisted phytoextraction. The chlorophyll a and b contents, total carotenoids, and activity of peroxidase were determined in plants exposed to Hg and soil amendments. Hg accumulation in plant shoots was also investigated. The pot experiments were provided in soil artificially contaminated by Hg and/or supplemented with compost and citric acid. Hg concentration in plant shoots and soil substrates was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) method after acid mineralization. The plant photosynthetic pigments and peroxidase activity were measured by standard spectrophotometric methods. The study shows that L. sativum L. accumulated Hg in its aerial tissues. An increase in Hg accumulation was noticed when soil was supplemented with compost and citric acid. Increasing Hg concentration in plant shoots was correlated with enhanced activation of peroxidase activity and changes in total carotenoid concentration. Combined use of compost and citric acid also decreased the chlorophyll a and b contents in plant leaves. Presented study reveals that L. sativum L. is capable of tolerating Hg and its use during phytoextraction assisted by combined use of compost and citric acid lead to decreasing soil contamination by Hg.

  17. Purification and structural stability of white Spanish broom (Cytisus multiflorus) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Perez Galende, Patricia; Hidalgo Cuadrado, Nazaret; Arellano, Juan B; Gavilanes, Francisco; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Zhadan, Galina G; Villar, Enrique; Roig, Manuel G; Kennedy, John F; Shnyrov, Valery L

    2015-01-01

    New plant peroxidase has been isolated to homogeneity from the white Spanish broom Cytisus multiflorus. The enzyme purification steps included homogenization, NH(4)SO(4) precipitation, extraction of broom colored compounds and consecutive chromatography on Phenyl-Sepharose, HiTrap™ SP HP and Superdex-75 and 200. The novel peroxidase was characterized as having a molecular weight of 50 ± 3 kDa. Steady-state tryptophan fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism (CD) studies, together with enzymatic assays, were carried out to monitor the structural stability of C. multiflorus peroxidase (CMP) at pH 7.0. Thus changes in far-UV CD corresponded to changes in the overall secondary structure of enzyme, while changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission corresponded to changes in the tertiary structure of the enzyme. It is shown that the process of CMP denaturation can be interpreted with sufficient accuracy in terms of the simple kinetic scheme, N ⟶ kD, where k is a first-order kinetic constant that changes with temperature following the Arrhenius equation; N is the native state, and D is the denatured state. On the basis of this model, the parameters of the Arrhenius equation were calculated.

  18. Transformation of dissolved organic matter by oxidative polymerization with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jee, S H; Kim, Y J; Ko, S O

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has significant influence on the transport and fate of contaminants in multiple phases and it has potential hazard by acting as a precursor of disinfection by-products in water supply. The changes in DOM characteristics, especially by oxidative polymerization might result in different behaviour in the interaction with many contaminants. The aim of this work was to verify the catalytic effects of peroxidase on oxidative polymerization of humic and fulvic substances by examination of the structural characteristics. Transformation of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) by oxidative polymerization catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide were investigated. Size exclusion chromatography, excitation-emission matrices spectra (EEMs), synchronous fluorescence spectra, and infrared spectroscopy was used to evaluate the structural transformation of HA and FA. Molecular weight of HA and FA was continuously changed and their weight-average molecular weight (MWw) reached maximum after 8 h. The MWw of HA and FA were proportionally increased with a dosage of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide, indicating that HA and FA was transformed into larger and complex molecules. Spectroscopic results indicated that HA and FA structure contains strong polycyclic aromatic structures with more aromatic rings and a higher degree of conjugation.

  19. Gpx1 is a stationary phase-specific thioredoxin peroxidase in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si-Young; Song, Ji-Yoon; Kwon, Eun-Soo; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2008-02-29

    The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe reveals only one gene for a putative glutathione peroxidase (gpx1{sup +}). The Gpx1 protein has a peroxidase activity but preferred thioredoxin to glutathione as an electron donor when examined in vitro and in vivo, and therefore is a thioredoxin peroxidase. Besides H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, it can reduce alkyl and phospholipid hydroperoxides. Expression of the gpx1 gene was elevated at the stationary phase, and we found that it supported long-term survival of S. pombe. The mutant also exhibited some defect in the activity of aconitase, an oxidation-labile Fe-S enzyme in mitochondria. Activity of sulfite reductase, a labile Fe-S enzyme in the cytosol, was also dramatically lowered in the mutant in the stationary phase. The Gpx1 protein, without any obvious targeting sequence, was localized in mitochondria as well as in the cytosol. Therefore, Gpx1 must serve to ensure optimal mitochondrial function and cytosolic environment, especially in the stationary phase.

  20. Ultrasmall Pt Nanoclusters as Robust Peroxidase Mimics for Colorimetric Detection of Glucose in Human Serum.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lihua; Meng, Zheng; Zhang, Yongqing; Cai, Shijie; Zhang, Zaihua; Li, Cong; Shang, Li; Shen, Yehua

    2017-02-28

    In this work, a new type of ultrasmall Pt nanoclusters (Pt NCs) has been prepared via a facile one-pot approach by using yeast extract as the reductant and stabilizer. Besides their excellent water-solubility, these yeast extract-stabilized Pt NCs also possess attractive peroxidase mimics property. They can efficiently catalyze the oxidation of 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the coexistence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Catalytic mechanism analysis suggested that the peroxidase mimics activity of these Pt NCs might originate from their characteristic of accelerating electron transfer between TMB and H2O2, and their enzymatic kinetics followed typical Michaelis-Menten theory. Based on these findings, we developed a new highly sensitive colorimetric method for glucose detection, and the limit of detection was calculated as low as 0.28 μM (S/N = 3). Further application of the present system for glucose detection in human serum has been successfully demonstrated, suggesting its promising utilization as robust peroxidase mimics in the clinical diagnosis, pharmaceutical and environmental chemistry fields.

  1. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems.

  2. Lipid peroxidation induced by indomethacin with horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide: involvement of indomethacin radicals.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Muraoka, Sanae; Fujimoto, Yukio

    2002-06-01

    Some of the side-effects of using indomethacin (IM) involve damage to the gastric mucosa and liver mitochondria. On the other hand, neutrophils infiltrate inflammatory sites to damage the tissues through the generation of reactive oxygen species by myeloperoxidase. The stomach and intestine have large amounts of peroxidase. These findings suggest that peroxidases are involved in tissue damage induced by IM. To clarify the basis for the tissue damage induced by IM in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H2O2 (HRP-H2O2), lipid peroxidation was investigated. When IM was incubated with liver microsomes in the presence of HRP-H2O2 and ADP-Fe3+, lipid peroxidation was time-dependent. Catalase and desferrioxamine almost completely inhibited lipid peroxidation, indicating that H2O2 and iron are necessary for lipid peroxidation. Of interest, superoxide dismutase strongly inhibited lipid peroxidation, and it also inhibited the formation of bathophenanthroline-Fe2+, indicating that reduction of the ferric ion was due to superoxide (O2-). ESR signals of IM radicals were detected during the interaction of IM with HRP-H2O2. However, the IM radical by itself did not reduce the ferric ion. These results suggest that O2- may be generated during the interaction of IM radicals with H2O2. Ferryl species, which are formed during the reduction of iron by O2-, probably are involved in lipid peroxidation.

  3. Ookinete-induced midgut peroxidases detonate the time bomb in anopheline mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-07-01

    Previous analysis of the temporal-spatial relationship between ookinete migration and the cellular localization of genes mediating midgut immune defense responses suggested that, in order to survive, parasites must complete invasion before toxic chemicals ("a bomb") are generated by the invaded cell. Recent studies indicate that ookinete invasion induces tyrosine nitration as a two-step reaction, in which NOS induction is followed by a localized increase in peroxidase activity. Peroxidases utilize nitrite and hydrogen peroxide as substrates, and detonate the time bomb by generating reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitrogen dioxide, which mediate nitration. There is evidence that peroxidases also mediate antimicrobial responses to bacteria, fungi and parasites in a broad range of biological systems including humans and plants. Defense reactions that generate toxic chemicals are also potentially harmful to the host mounting the response and often results in apoptosis. The two-step nitration pathway is probably an ancient response, as it has also been described in vertebrate leukocytes and probably evolved as a mechanism to circumscribe the toxic products generated during defense responses involving protein nitration.

  4. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Sahare, Padmavati; Ayala, Marcela; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Agrawal, Vivechana

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of royal palm tree (Roystonea regia) peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Leandra; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Zamorano, Laura S.; Shnyrov, Valery L.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-09-01

    The purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction data acquisition and molecular-replacement results of royal palm tree (R. regia) peroxidase are described. Royal palm tree peroxidase (RPTP), which was isolated from Roystonea regia leaves, has an unusually high stability that makes it a promising candidate for diverse applications in industry and analytical chemistry [Caramyshev et al. (2005 ▶), Biomacromolecules, 6, 1360–1366]. Here, the purification and crystallization of this plant peroxidase and its X-ray diffraction data collection are described. RPTP crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.8 Å. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.83, c = 92.24 Å, and contain one protein molecule per asymmetric unit. The V{sub M} value and solvent content are 4.07 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and 69.8%, respectively.

  6. The production of class III plant peroxidases in transgenic callus cultures transformed with the rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes.

    PubMed

    Shkryl, Y N; Veremeichik, G N; Bulgakov, V P; Avramenko, T V; Günter, E A; Ovodov, Y S; Muzarok, T I; Zhuravlev, Y N

    2013-10-10

    The production of plant peroxidases by plant cell cultures is of great interest because of the potential for industrial applications. We used plant cell cultures overexpressing the rolB gene to produce increased amounts of plant class III peroxidases. The rolB gene ensured the stable and permanent activation of peroxidase activity in the transformed callus cultures of different plants. In particular, the total peroxidase activity in transformed Rubia cordifolia cells was increased 23-86-fold, and the abundance of the major peroxidase gene transcripts was increased 17-125-fold (depending on the level of rolB expression) compared with non-transformed control calli. The peroxidase-activating effect of rolB was greater than that of other peroxidase inducers, such as external stresses and methyl jasmonate.

  7. The limitation of the human neutrophil chemiluminescence response by extracellular peroxidase is stimulus dependent: effect of added horse radish peroxidase on the response induced by both soluble and particulate stimuli.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, C; Lock, R

    1988-05-01

    When polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) interact with soluble and particulate stimuli, the cells increase their production of oxidative metabolites. This increased production can be measured as luminol amplified light emission or chemiluminescence (CL). The CL response of human PMNL has been investigated, and it was found that the formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and the phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) induced responses were limited by the amount of available peroxidase, whereas the ionomycin induced response was unaffected by the amount of extracellular peroxidase. A small increase in the response induced by the Salmonella typhimurium MR10 bacteria upon addition of peroxidase was also observed. The results indicate that stimuli inducing an intracellular response in PMNL are insensitive to the amount of extracellularly released peroxidase, whereas the response induced by stimuli also generating an extracellularly located production of oxidative metabolites are highly influenced by the amount of peroxidase available extracellularly. Furthermore, the extracellularly localized peroxidase dependency is reduced at higher luminol concentrations. The use of the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence technique in various types of scientific investigations is discussed.

  8. The involvement of polyphenols and peroxidase activities in heavy-metal accumulation by epidermal glands of the waterlily (Nymphaeaceae).

    PubMed

    Lavid, N; Schwartz, A; Yarden, O; Tel-Or, E

    2001-02-01

    Co-localization of polyphenols and peroxidase activity was demonstrated in epidermal glands of the waterlily (Nymphaea) by histochemistry. Total phenols, tannins and peroxidase activity were determined quantitatively in plant extracts. Polyphenols were partially identified and were found to consist mainly of hydrolyzable tannins, gallic and tannic acid derivatives. Nymphaea polyphenols were shown to chelate Cr, Hg, and Pb in vitro, and Cd-binding by polymerized polyphenols was demonstrated in leaves exposed to Cd in vivo. Both polyphenols and peroxidases were found at very high constitutive levels, which were not induced or altered by external conditions, such as light and heavy-metal stress. It is suggested that the polymerization of polyphenols by peroxidases, enhanced after heavy-metal uptake and detoxification, is responsible for the binding of heavy metals in Nymphaea epidermal glands.

  9. Fluorescence decrease of conjugated polymers by the catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase and its application in phenolic compounds detection.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, M I; Laurenti, M; Rubio-Retama, J; Valero, E; Lopez-Cabarcos, E

    2011-04-11

    We report the fluorescence decrease of the water-soluble π-π-conjugated polymer poly(2-methoxy-5-propyloxy sulfonate phenylene vinylene, MPS-PPV) by the catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase in the presence of H(2)O(2). MPS-PPV acts as a donor substrate in the catalytic cycle of horseradish peroxidase where the electron-deficient enzymatic intermediates compounds I and II can subtract electrons from the polymer leading to its fluorescence decrease. The addition of phenolic drug acetaminophen to the former solution favors the decrease of the polymer fluorescence, which indicates the peroxidase-catalyzed co-oxidation of MPS-PPV and acetaminophen. The encapsulation of horseradish peroxidase within polyacrylamide microgels allows the isolation of intermediates compound I and compound II from the polymer, leading to a fluorescence decrease that is only due to the product of biocatalytic acetaminophen oxidation. This system could be used to develop a new device for phenolic compounds detection.

  10. Detection of zeptomolar concentrations of alkaline phosphatase based on a tyrosinase and horse-radish peroxidase bienzyme biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ruan, C; Li, Y

    2001-07-06

    A bienzyme biosensor based on tyrosinase and horse-radish peroxidase is described in a flow injection analysis and cyclic voltammetry for measurement of phenol. Tyrosinase and horse-radish peroxidase were immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode by bovine serum albumin and glutaric dialdehyde. Phenol was oxidized by tyrosinase and horse-radish peroxidase via catechol to o-quinone in the presence of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The o-quinone was reduced to produce catechol (the substrate recycling) on the electrode surface. The enhanced sensitivity of the bienzyme electrode to phenol was observed in the flow injection system comparing with tyrosinase and horse-radish peroxidase monoenzyme electrodes. The mechanisms for enhanced amperometric response to phenol of bienzyme electrode were discussed. The biosensor was used to detect alkaline phosphatase (ALP). A detection limit of 1.4x10(-15) M ALP (140 zmol/100 mul) was obtained after 1 h incubation with phenyl phosphate.

  11. Studies on polyphenol content, activities and isozymes of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase during air-curing in three tobacco types.

    PubMed

    Sheen, S J; Calvert, J

    1969-02-01

    The change in polyphenol content in the primed leaves of burley, flue-cured, and Turkish tobaccos during air-curing was related to the activities and isozymes of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The quantity of chlorogenic acid was rapidly reduced during the first week of curing. The decrease in rutin content during curing was less significant, especially when the concentration of chlorogenic acid was high in leaf tissues. This result was further confirmed by in vitro assays with partially purified tobacco polyphenol oxidase.The polyphenol oxidase activity did not differ at any stage of curing in the 3 tobaccos. When the activity was measured by the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine it rose rapidly during the first day of curing and then decreased sharply so that in the fully cured leaf only 15% activity remained. The increase in activity was not observed when chlorogenic acid was used as the substrate. A similar level of peroxidase activity was found in the 3 tobaccos before curing. Peroxidase activities increased rapidly during the first 24 hr of curing, declined thereafter, and remained highest in the flue-cured tobacco, less in the Turkish line, and least in the burley at the end of curing process.By polyacrylamide gel block electrophoresis, 10 peroxidase isozyme bands, 2 cationic and 8 anionic, appeared identical in all 3 tobaccos. When catechol replaced benzidine-2 HCl as the electron donor, 1 cationic and 2 anionic peroxidase isozymes did not form. Of interest is that the same 10 peroxidase isozyme bands also exhibited polyphenol oxidase activities when treated with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine or chlorogenic acid. Results suggest that in the crude tobacco leaf extract the peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase may associate as protein complexes, and peroxidase isozymes may differ in electron-donor requirements. Isozyme patterns for both oxidases at various curing intervals differed only quantitatively.

  12. Peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in fig leaves in response to ambient air pollution in a subtropical city.

    PubMed

    Li, M H

    2003-08-01

    Urban air pollution is a serious problem in both developing and developed countries, and antioxidant enzyme activities in plants have been suggested as a useful bioindicator of air pollution. In this study, the seasonal and spatial variability of peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were measured in leaves of Ficus microcarpa at eight sampling sites in the Taipei metropolitan area and one background site in rural area at each month for a year. The spatial pattern of peroxidase activity in figs collected from the Taipei metropolitan area was similar to the spatial pattern of O3 concentration in the Taipei metropolitan area. The peroxidase activities of Ficus microcarpa were significantly higher at sampling sites from the outer zone of the metropolitan area than those from the inner zone of the metropolitan area in spring and summer. On the other hand, the spatial pattern of superoxide dismutase activity in fig leaves did not show significant differences between the inner and outer zones of the Taipei metropolitan area. In addition, peroxidase activities, but not superoxide dismutase activities, of Ficus microcarpa were significantly higher in sites with high traffic density than those in low traffic density sites. Even though peroxidase activities in Ficus microcarpa tended to be higher in high traffic density sites or some sites with high ozone concentration, site-specific changes of peroxidase activity in Ficus microcarpa due to O3 pollution were not clearly observed in this study. Based on these results, neither peroxidase nor superoxide dismutase in Ficus microcarpa is a sensitive bioindicator for O3 pollution, although peroxidase shows some potential to be used as a general bioindicator of air quality.

  13. Differential expression on mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTcTXNPx) in Trypanosoma cruzi after ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides treatments.

    PubMed

    Kohatsu, Andréa A N; Silva, Flávia A J; Francisco, Acácio I; Rimoldi, Aline; Silva, Marco T A; Vargas, Maria D; Rosa, João A da; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    Resistance to benznidazole in certain strains of Trypanosoma cruzi may be caused by the increased production of enzymes that act on the oxidative metabolism, such as mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase which catalyses the reduction of peroxides. This work presents cytotoxicity assays performed with ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides in six different strains of T. cruzi epimastigote forms (Y, Bolivia, SI1, SI8, QMII, and SIGR3). The last four strains have been recently isolated from triatominae and mammalian host (domestic cat). The expression of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase was analyzed by the Western blotting technique using polyclonal antibody anti mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase obtained from a rabbit immunized with the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase recombinant protein. All the tested ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides were more cytotoxic than benznidazole. The expression of the 25.5kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase did not increase in strains that were more resistant to the ferrocenyl compounds (SI8 and SIGR3). In addition, a 58kDa polypeptide was also recognized in all strains. Ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides showed trypanocidal activity and the expression of 25.5kDa mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase is not necessarily increased in some T. cruzi strains. Most likely, other mechanisms, in addition to the over expression of this antioxidative enzyme, should be involved in the escape of parasites from cytotoxic oxidant agents.

  14. Induction of hairy roots and characterization of peroxidase expression as a potential root growth marker in sesame.

    PubMed

    Chun, J-A; Lee, J-W; Yi, Y-B; Park, G-Y; Chung, C-H

    2009-01-01

    Using hypocotyl and cotyledon of sesame seedlings, hairy root cultures were established and cDNA coding for a peroxidase was cloned from the roots. The frequency of sesame hairy root formation was higher in hypocotyl (33.4%) than cotyledon (9.3%). Applicable levels of kanamycin and hygromycin as a selectable marker were 100 microg/mL and 30 microg/mL, respectively. The peroxidase cDNA showed relatively high sequence identity with and similarity to plant class III peroxidase family. The cDNA encoded polypeptide was identified with the presence of three sequence features: 1) the putative 4 disulfide bridges, 2) an ER-targeted signal sequence in the N-terminus, and 3) two triplets, NXS for glycosylation. A real-time RT-PCR exhibited an abrupt increase in the peroxidase transcription activity after 4-week cultures of the sesame hairy roots and its highest level in 6-week cultured hairy roots. In contrast, the growth pattern of sesame hairy roots showed a typical sigmoidal curve. The active hairy root growth began after 2-week culture and their stationary growth phase occurred after 5-week culture. These results suggested that the peroxidase expression patterns at its transcription level could be used a potential indicator signaling a message that there will be no longer active growth in hairy root cultures. The sesame peroxidase gene was differentially expressed in different tissues.

  15. Potential applications of immobilized bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) peroxidase in the removal of phenols from polluted water.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Suhail; Husain, Qayyum

    2006-11-01

    The potential applications of immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase in the treatment of model wastewater contaminated with phenols have been investigated. The synthetic water was treated with soluble and immobilized enzyme preparations under various experimental conditions. Maximum removal of phenols was found in the buffers of pH values 5.0-6.0 and at 40 degrees C in the presence of 0.75 mM H(2)O(2). Fourteen different phenols were independently treated with soluble and immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase in the buffer of pH 5.6 at 37 degrees C. Chlorinated phenols and native phenol were significantly removed while other substituted phenols were marginally removed by the treatment. Phloroglucinol and pyrogallol were recalcitrant to the action of bitter gourd peroxidase. Immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase preparation was capable of removing remarkably high percentage of phenols from the phenolic mixtures. Significantly higher level of total organic carbon was removed from the model wastewater containing individual phenol or complex mixture of phenols by immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase as compared to the soluble enzyme. 2,4-dichlorophenol and a phenolic mixture were also treated in a stirred batch reactor with fixed quantity of enzyme for longer duration. The soluble bitter gourd peroxidase ceased to function after 3h while the immobilized enzyme was active even after 6h of incubation with phenolic solutions.

  16. Decolorization of textile effluent by bitter gourd peroxidase immobilized on concanavalin A layered calcium alginate-starch beads.

    PubMed

    Matto, Mahreen; Husain, Qayyum

    2009-05-30

    Bitter gourd peroxidase immobilized on the surface of concanavalin A layered calcium alginate-starch beads was used for the successful and effective decolorization of textile industrial effluent. Effluent was recalcitrant to the action of bitter gourd peroxidase; however, in the presence of some redox mediators, it was successfully decolorized. Effluent decolorization was maximum (70%) in the presence of 1.0mM 1-hydroxybenzotriazole within 1h of incubation. However, immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase showed maximum decolorization at pH 5.0 and 40 degrees C. Immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase decolorized more than 90% effluent after 3h of incubation in a batch process. The two-reactor system, one reactor containing immobilized peroxidase and the other had activated silica, was quite effective in the decolorization of textile effluent. The system was capable of decolorizing 40% effluent even after 2 months of continuous operation. The absorption spectra of the untreated and treated effluent exhibited a marked difference in absorbance at various wavelengths. Immobilized peroxidase/1-hydroxybenzotriazole system could be employed for the treatment of a large volume of effluent in a continuous reactor.

  17. Protein and peroxidase modulations in sunflower seedlings (Helianthus annuus L.) treated with a toxic amount of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Jouili, Hager; Bouazizi, Houda; El Ferjani, Ezzedine

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of aluminium treatment on peroxidases activities and protein content in both soluble and cell-wall-bound fractions of sunflower leaves, stems and roots. Fourteen-day-old seedlings, grown in a nutrient solution, were exposed to a toxic amount of aluminium (500 μM AlNO(3)) for 72 h. Under stress conditions, biomass production, root length and leaf expansion were significantly reduced. Also, our results showed modulations on soluble and ionically cell-wall-bound peroxidases activities. In soluble fraction, peroxidases activities were enhanced in all investigated organs. This stimulation was also observed in ionically cell-wall-bound fraction in leaves and stems. Roots showed a differential behaviour: peroxidase activity was severely reduced. Lignifying peroxidases activities assayed using coniferyl alcohol and H(2)O(2) as substrates were also modulated. Significant stimulation was shown on soluble fraction in leaves, stems and roots. In ionically cell-wall-bound fraction lignifying peroxidases were enhanced only in stems but severely inhibited in roots. Also, aluminium toxicity caused significant increase on cell wall protein content in sunflower roots.

  18. Hemin-block copolymer micelle as an artificial peroxidase and its applications in chromogenic detection and biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Rui; Shen, Liangliang; Chai, Zhihua; Jing, Chen; Zhang, Yufeng; An, Yingli; Shi, Linqi

    2014-01-01

    Following an inspiration from the fine structure of natural peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP), an artificial peroxidase was constructed through the self-assembly of diblock copolymers and hemin, which formed a functional micelle with peroxidase-like activity. The pyridine moiety in block copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PEG-b-P4VP) can coordinate with hemin, and thus hemin is present in a five-coordinate complex with an open site for binding substrates, which mimics the microenvironment of heme in natural peroxidases. The amphiphilic core-shell structure of the micelle and the coordination interaction of the polymer to the hemin inhibit the formation of hemin μ-oxo dimers, and thereby enhance the stability of hemin in the water phase. Hemin-micelles exhibited excellent catalytic performance in the oxidation of phenolic and azo compounds by H2O2. In comparison with natural peroxidases, hemin-micelles have higher catalytic activity and better stability over wide temperature and pH ranges. Hemin-micelles can be used as a detection system for H2O2 with chromogenic substrates, and they anticipate the possibility of constructing new biocatalysts tailored to specific functions.

  19. Phytochrome induces changes in the immunodetectable level of a wall peroxidase that precede growth changes in maize seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Shinkle, J. R.; Roux, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory pigment phytochrome induces rapid and opposite growth changes in different regions of etiolated maize seedlings: it stimulates the elongation rate of coleoptiles and inhibits that of mesocotyls. As measured by a quantitative immunoassay, phytochrome also promotes rapid and opposite changes in the extractable content of a Mr 98,000 anionic isoperoxidase in the cell walls of these same organs: it induces a decrease of this peroxidase in coleoptiles and an increase in mesocotyls. The peroxidase changes precede the growth changes. As measured by video stereomicroscopy or a position transducer, red light (R), which photoactivates phytochrome, stimulates coleoptile elongation with a lag of about 15-20 min and suppresses mesocotyl growth with a lag of 45-50 min. R also induces a 50% reduction in the extractable level of the anionic peroxidase in coleoptile walls in less than 10 min and a 40% increase in the level of this peroxidase in mesocotyl walls within 30 min. Ascorbic acid, an inhibitor of peroxidase activity, blocks the effects of R on mesocotyl section growth. These results are relevant to hypotheses that postulate that certain wall peroxidases can participate in light-induced changes in growth rate by their effects on wall extensibility.

  20. Magnetosomes extracted from Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 showed enhanced peroxidase-like activity under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Kefeng; Chen, Chuanfang; Chen, Changyou; Wang, Yuzhan; Wei, Zhao; Pan, Weidong; Song, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Magnetosomes are intracellular structures produced by magnetotactic bacteria and are magnetic nanoparticles surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. Magnetosomes reportedly possess intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and can scavenge reactive oxygen species depending on peroxidase activity. Our previous study has demonstrated the phototaxis characteristics of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 cells, but the mechanism is not well understood. Therefore, we studied the relationship between visible-light irradiation and peroxidase-like activity of magnetosomes extracted from M. magneticum strain AMB-1. We then compared this characteristic with that of HRP, iron ions, and naked magnetosomes using 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine as a peroxidase substrate in the presence of H2O2. Results showed that HRP and iron ions had different activities from those of magnetosomes and naked magnetosomes when exposed to visible-light irradiation. Magnetosomes and naked magnetosomes had enhanced peroxidase-like activities under visible-light irradiation, but magnetosomes showed less affinity toward substrates than naked magnetosomes under visible-light irradiation. These results suggested that the peroxidase-like activity of magnetosomes may follow an ordered ternary mechanism rather than a ping-pong mechanism. This finding may provide new insight into the function of magnetosomes in the phototaxis in magnetotactic bacteria.

  1. Enhancement of Peroxidase Release from Non-Malignant and Malignant Cells through Low-Dose Irradiation with Different Radiation Quality.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazzak, Abdelrazek B; Pottgießer, Stefanie J; Hill, Mark A; O'Neill, Peter; Bauer, Georg

    2016-02-01

    The release of peroxidase by nontransformed or transformed fibroblasts or epithelial cells (effector cells) triggers apoptosis induction selectively in transformed fibroblasts or transformed epithelial cells (target cells) through intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. The release of peroxidase can be induced either by treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 or by low doses of alpha particles, gamma rays or ultrasoft X rays. In addiation, data indicates that radiation quality does not determine the overall efficiency of peroxidase release and the effects among a wide range of radiation doses are indistinguishable. These findings suggested that peroxidase release might be being triggered through intercellular bystander signaling. We show here that maximal peroxidase release does indeed occur after coculture of a small number of irradiated cells with an excess of unirradiated cells and demonstrate an enhanced effector function of nontransformed cells after the addition of a small number of irradiated cells. These data strongly indicate that peroxidase release is indeed triggered through bystander signaling mechanisms in mammalian cells.

  2. Production of laccase and manganese peroxidase by Pleurotus pulmonarius in solid-state cultures and application in dye decolorization.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Bazanella, Gisele Cristina; de Souza, Daniela Farani; Castoldi, Rafael; Oliveira, Roselene Ferreira; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2013-11-01

    The production of ligninolytic enzymes (laccase and Mn-dependent peroxidase) by the white-rot fungus Pleurotus pulmonarius (FR.) Quélet was studied in solid-state cultures using agricultural and food wastes as substrate. The highest activities of laccase were found in wheat bran (2,860 ± 250 U/L), pineapple peel (2,450 ± 230 U/L), and orange bagasse (2,100 ± 270 U/L) cultures, all of them at an initial moisture level of 85 %. The highest activities of Mn peroxidase were obtained in pineapple peel cultures (2,200 ± 205 U/L) at an initial moisture level of 75 %. In general, the condition of high initial moisture level (80-90 %) was the best condition for laccase activity, while the best condition for Mn peroxidase activity was cultivation at low initial moisture (50-70 %). Cultures containing high Mn peroxidase activities were more efficient in the decolorization of the industrial dyes remazol brilliant blue R (RBBR), Congo red, methylene blue, and ethyl violet than those containing high laccase activity. Also, crude enzymatic extracts with high Mn peroxidase activity were more efficient in the in vitro decolorization of methylene blue, ethyl violet, and Congo red. The dye RBBR was efficiently decolorized by both crude extracts, rich in Mn peroxidase activity or rich in laccase activity.

  3. Highly sensitive and robust peroxidase-like activity of porous nanorods of ceria and their application for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhimin; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyun; Gao, Wei; Zhou, Xuemei; Qu, Yongquan

    2015-08-01

    Porous nanorods of ceria (PN-Ceria), a novel ceria nanostructure with a large surface area and a high surface Ce(3+) fraction, exhibited strong intrinsic peroxidase activity toward a classical peroxidase substrate in the presence of H2O2. Peroxidase-like activity of ceria originated from surface Ce(3+) species as the catalytic center, thereby explaining the high performance of PN-Ceria as an artificial enzyme mimicking peroxidase. Compared with the natural enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), PN-Ceria showed several advantages such as low cost, easy storage, high sensitivity, and, prominently, chemical and catalytic stability under harsh conditions. Importantly, the enzymatic activity of PN-Ceria remained nearly constant and stable over a wide range of temperature and pH values, ensuring the accuracy and reliability of measurements of its peroxidase-like activity. A PN-Ceria based novel diagnostic system was developed for breast cancer detection with a higher sensitivity than the standard HRP detection system. Our work has laid a solid foundation for the development of PN-Ceria as a novel diagnostic tool for clinical use.

  4. Leishmania major encodes an unusual peroxidase that is a close homologue of plant ascorbate peroxidase: a novel role of the transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Adak, Subrata; Datta, Alok K.

    2005-01-01

    Haem-containing enzymes (peroxidase and catalase) are widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes and play a vital role in H2O2 detoxification. But, to date, no haem-containing enzymatic defence against toxic H2O2 has been discovered in Leishmania species. We cloned, expressed and purified an unusual plant-like APX (ascorbate peroxidase) from Leishmania major (LmAPX) and characterized its catalytic parameters under steady-state conditions. Examination of its protein sequence indicated approx. 30–60% identity with other APXs. The N-terminal extension of LmAPX is characterized by a charged region followed by a stretch of 22 amino acids containing a transmembrane domain. To understand how the transmembrane domain influences the structure–function of LmAPX, we generated, purified and extensively characterized a variant that lacked the transmembrane domain. Eliminating the transmembrane domain had no impact on substrate-binding affinity but slowed down ascorbate oxidation and increased resistance to H2O2-dependent inactivation in the absence of electron donor by 480-fold. Spectral studies show that H2O2 can quickly oxidize the native enzyme to compound (II), which subsequently is reduced back to the native enzyme by an electron donor. In contrast, ascorbate-free transmembrane domain-containing enzyme did not react with H2O2, as revealed by the absence of compound (II) formation. Our findings suggest that the single copy LmAPX gene may play an important role in detoxification of H2O2 that is generated by endogenous processes and as a result of external influences such as the oxidative burst of infected host macrophages or during drug metabolism by Leishmania. PMID:15850459

  5. Different peroxidase activities and expression of abiotic stress-related peroxidases in apical root segments of wheat genotypes with different drought stress tolerance under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Csiszár, Jolán; Gallé, Agnes; Horváth, Edit; Dancsó, Piroska; Gombos, Magdolna; Váry, Zsolt; Erdei, László; Györgyey, János; Tari, Irma

    2012-03-01

    One-week-old seedlings of Triticum aestivum L. cv. Plainsman V, a drought tolerant; and Cappelle Desprez, a drought sensitive wheat cultivar were subjected gradually to osmotic stress using polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) reaching 400 mOsm on the 11th day. Compared to controls cv. Plainsman V maintained the root growth and relative water content of root tissues, while these parameters were decreased in the drought sensitive cv. Cappelle Desprez under PEG-mediated osmotic stress. Simultaneously, H(2)O(2) content in 1-cm-long apical segment of roots comprising the proliferation and elongation zone, showed a transient increase in cv. Plainsman V and a permanent raise in cv. Cappelle Desprez. Measurements of the transcript levels of selected class III peroxidase (TaPrx) coding sequences revealed significant differences between the two cultivars on the 9th day, two days after applying 100 mOsm PEG. The abundance of TaPrx04 transcript was enhanced transitionally in the root apex of cv. Plainsman V but decreased in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress while the expression of TaPrx01, TaPrx03, TaPrx19, TaPrx68, TaPrx107 and TaPrx109-C decreased to different extents in both cultivars. After a transient decrease, activities of soluble peroxidase fractions of crude protein extracts rose in both cultivars on day 11, but the activities of cell wall-bound fractions increased only in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress. Parallel with high H(2)O(2) content of the tissues, certain isoenzymes of covalently bound fraction in cv. Cappelle Desprez showed increased activity suggesting that they may limit the extension of root cell walls in this cultivar.

  6. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III) Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hernández Anzaldo, Samuel; Arroyo Abad, Uriel; León García, Armando; Ramírez Rosales, Daniel; Zamorano Ulloa, Rafael; Reyes Ortega, Yasmi

    2016-06-27

    The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H₂O₂ oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto), (meso), (deuteroporphyrinato) (picdien)]Fe(III) complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively) pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III) quantum mixed spin (qms) ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1-3 + guaiacol + H₂O₂ → oxidation guaiacol products). The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III) and H₂O₂, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0-4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III) family with the ligand picdien [N,N'-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, ¹H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  7. Neuronal transport of acid hydrolases and peroxidase within the lysosomal system or organelles: involvement of agranular reticulum-like cisterns.

    PubMed

    Broadwell, R D; Oliver, C; Brightman, M W

    1980-04-01

    Neurosecretory neurons of the hyperosmotically stressed hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system have been a useful model with which to demonstrate interrelationships among perikaryal lysosomes, agranular reticulum-like cisterns, endocytotic vacuoles, and the axoplasmic transport of acid hydrolases and horseradish peroxidase. Supraoptic neurons from normal mice and mice given 2% salt water to drink for 5--8 days have been studied using enzyme cytochemical techniques for peroxidase and lysosomal acid hydrolases. Peroxidase-labeling of these neurons was accomplished by intravenous injection or cerebral ventriculocisternal perfusion of the protein as previously reported (Broadwell and Brightman, '79). Compared to normal controls, supraoptic cell bodies from hyperosmotically stimulated mice contained elevated concentrations of peroxidase-labeled dense bodies demonstrated to be secondary lysosomes and acid hydrolase-positive and peroxidase-positive cisterns either attached or unattached to secondary lysosomes. These cisterns were smooth-surfaced and 400--1,000 A wide. Their morphology was similar to that of the agranular reticulum. Some of the cisterns contained both peroxidase and acid hydrolase activities. The cisterns probably represent an elongated form of lysosome and, therefore, are not elements of the agranular reticulum per se. By virtue of their direct connections with perikaryal secondary lysosomes, these cisterns may provide the route by which acid hydrolases and exogenous macromolecules can leave perikaryal secondary lysosomes for anterograde flow down the axon. Very few smooth-surfaced cisterns were involved in the retrograde transport of peroxidase within pituitary stalk axons from normal and salt-treated mice injected intravenously with peroxidase. Peroxidase undergoing retrograde transport was predominantly in endocytotic structures such as vacuoles and cup-shaped organelles, which deliver this exogenous macromolecule directly to secondary lysosomes for

  8. A peroxidase biomimetic system based on Fe3O4 nanoparticles in non-enzymatic sensors.

    PubMed

    Guivar, Juan A Ramos; Fernandes, Edson G R; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2015-08-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been applied in many areas of nanomedicine. Sensing platforms based on this type of nanoparticles have received attention due to the relative low cost and biocompatibility. Biosensor is the most widely investigated type of analytical device. This type of sensor combines the physicochemical transduction with the incorporation of biological sensing components. Among the biological components, enzymes are the most commonly used as sensitive elements. However, natural enzymes may exhibit serious disadvantages such as lack of stability and loss of catalytic activity after immobilization. The study of enzymatic biomimetic systems are of great interest. This study reports the development of a new sensor composed of Fe3O4@CTAB and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) films assembled via Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique and used as peroxidase mimetic systems. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNps) were synthesized using thermal decomposition method and further dispersed to aqueous medium by ligand modification reaction using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The amperometric detection limit of H2O2 was found to be ca. 103 µmol L(-1). By chronoamperometry, the peroxidase biomimetic sensor exhibited a linear response for H2O2 in the range from 100 µmol L(-1) to 1.8 mmol L(-1) (R(2) = 0.994) with sensitivity of 16 nA mol(-1) L. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant was 5.3 mmol L(-1), comparable with some biosensors based on peroxidase enzyme. Moreover, the sensor presented a reproducibility of ca. 7.7% (n = 4) and their response (response time: 90 s) is not significantly affected in the presence of some interferents including K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Uric Acid.

  9. In situ simultaneous protein-polysaccharide bioconjugation and hydrogelation using horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Hirose, Keisuke; Kawakami, Koei

    2010-05-10

    We propose the peroxidase-catalyzed simultaneous conjugation and hydrogelation of polysaccharide and protein derivatives, each possessing phenolic hydroxyl (Ph) moieties, as a novel route for obtaining protein-polysaccharide conjugate hydrogels. We used alginate, gelatin, and albumin derivatives bearing Ph moieties (Alg-Ph, Gela-Ph, and Alb-Ph) to demonstrate the feasibility. The gelation time of conjugate gels decreased with decreasing H(2)O(2) concentration and with increasing horseradish peroxidase concentration. Gelation time was controllable from a few seconds to 6 min. The repulsion force detected at 40% compression of a conjugate gel obtained from a mixture of Alg-Ph and Gela-Ph at 1.0% (w/v), respectively, was more than 2.8 times larger than that detected for gels produced from 3.0% (w/v) Gela-Ph or 2.0% (w/v) Alg-Ph alone. Cell adhesiveness of gels was tunable by changing the type of protein derivative. A gel from Gela-Ph and Alg-Ph showed higher cell adhesiveness than Alg-Ph gel, but a gel produced from Alb-Ph and Alg-Ph showed a lower cell adhesiveness than Alg-Ph gel. The conjugate gel was degradable by degrading alginate molecules using the nonproteolytic enzyme alginate lyase. The tunable gelation, mechanical properties, and cell adhesiveness of polysaccharide-protein conjugate hydrogels obtained through peroxidase-catalyzed gelation indicates great potential for a wide range of applications, such as scaffolds for tissue engineering and carriers for drug delivery system.

  10. Kinetics of Horseradish Peroxidase-Catalyzed Nitration of Phenol in a Biphasic System.

    PubMed

    Kong, Mingming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Qida; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2017-02-28

    The use of peroxidase in the nitration of phenols is gaining interest as compared with traditional chemical reactions. We investigated the kinetic characteristics of phenol nitration catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in an aqueous-organic biphasic system using n-butanol as the organic solvent and NO2(-) and H2O2 as substrates. The reaction rate was mainly controlled by the reaction kinetics in the aqueous phase when appropriate agitation was used to enhance mass transfer in the biphasic system. The initial velocity of the reaction increased with increasing HRP concentration. Additionally, an increase in the substrate concentrations of phenol (0-2 mM in organic phase) or H2O2 (0-0.1 mM in aqueous phase) enhanced the nitration efficiency catalyzed by HRP. In contrast, high concentrations of organic solvent decreased the kinetic parameter Vmax/Km. No inhibition of enzyme activity was observed when the concentrations of phenol and H2O2 were at or below 10 mM and 0.1 mM, respectively. On the basis of the peroxidase catalytic mechanism, a double-substrate ping-pong kinetic model was established. The kinetic parameters were Km(H2O2)= 1.09 mM, Km(PhOH) = 9.45 mM, and Vmax = 0.196 mM/min. The proposed model was well fit to the data obtained from additional independent experiments under the suggested optimal synthesis conditions. The kinetic model developed in this paper lays a foundation for further comprehensive study of enzymatic nitration kinetics.

  11. Purification, properties, and distribution of ascorbate peroxidase in legume root nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, D.A.; Hanus, F.J.; Russell, S.A.; Evans, H.J. )

    1987-01-01

    All aerobic biological system, including N{sub 2}-fixing root nodules, are subject to O{sub 2} toxicity that results from the formation of reactive intermediates such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and free radicals of O{sub 2}. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may be removed from root nodules in a series of enzymic reactions involving ascorbate peroxidase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and glutathione reductase. The authors confirm here the presence of these enzymes in root nodules from nine species of legumes and from Alnus rubra. Ascorbate peroxidase from soybean nodules was purified to near homogeneity. This enzyme was found to be a hemeprotein with a molecular weight of 30,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. KCN, NaN{sub 3}, CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were potent inhibitors of activity. Nonphysiological reductants such as guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and pyrogallol functioned as substrates for the enzyme. No activity was detected with NAD(P)H, reduced glutathione, or urate. Ascorbate peroxidation did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The substrate concentration which resulted in a reaction rate of 1/2 V{sub max} was 70 micromolar for ascorbate and 3 micromolar for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The high affinity of ascorbate peroxidase for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} indicates that this enzyme, rather than catalase, is responsible for most H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal outside of peroxisomes in root nodules.

  12. Changes in the activity of ascorbate peroxidase under anaerobiosis in cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Chibueze, Nwose

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the activity of ascorbate peroxidase in the cormels of cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta var. antiquorum) immediately after harvest and in storage under anaerobiosis for one and three weeks, respectively. During stress condition in plants, hydrogen peroxide is released and mechanisms to detoxify it must be maintained. The cocoyam tubers that were neither damaged nor affected by disease were harvested from a local farm in Ugbogui, Ovia North Local Government Area in Edo State, Nigeria. The selected cocoyam tubers were peeled manually, washed with ice cold water and cut into pieces. The root tissues (50 g) were homogenised with 100 mL of ice cold 0.05 M phosphate buffer. The extract obtained was clarified by centrifugation for 15 min at 8000 g at 4 degrees C. Ascorbate-peroxidising activity was assayed using the initial rate of decrease in ascorbate concentration as measured by its absorbance at 290 nm using Milton Roy Spectron 21D. Results showed the weight of the cormels decreased all through during storage. Immediately after harvest the activity of ascorbate peroxidase was 15.49 unit mL(-1) with a significant increase (p < 0.05) after one week to 73.05 U mL(-1). Thereafter there was a significant decrease in activity of the enzyme after three weeks of storage to 33.33 U mL(-1). This increase in activity of ascorbate peroxidase after three weeks of storage may be related to increase in response to various biotic stresses. Therefore, manipulation of the capacity of cocoyam to tolerate anaerobiosis is a function of its ability to modulate the antioxidant enzymes' armory in case of need.

  13. Molecular characterization of fruit-specific class III peroxidase genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chii-Jeng; Chan, Yuan-Li; Shien, Chin Hui; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, expression of four peroxidase genes, LePrx09, LePrx17, LePrx35 and LePrxA, was identified in immature tomato fruits, and the function in the regulation of fruit growth was characterized. Analysis of amino acid sequences revealed that these genes code for class III peroxidases, containing B, D and F conserved domains, which bind heme groups, and a buried salt bridge motif. LePrx35 and LePrxA were identified as novel peroxidase genes in Solanum lycopersicum (L.). The temporal expression patterns at various fruit growth stages revealed that LePrx35 and LePrxA were expressed only in immature green (IMG) fruits, whereas LePrx17 and LePrx09 were expressed in both immature and mature green fruits. Tissue-specific expression profiles indicated that only LePrx09 was expressed in the mesocarp but not the inner tissue of immature fruits. The effects of hormone treatments and stresses on the four genes were examined; only the expression levels of LePrx17 and LePrx09 were altered. Transcription of LePrx17 was up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and pathogen infection and expression of LePrx09 was induced by ethephon, salicylic acid (SA) and JA, in particular, as well as wounding, pathogen infection and H2O2 stress. Tomato plants over-expressing LePrx09 displayed enhanced resistance to H2O2 stress, suggesting that LePrx09 may participate in the H2O2 signaling pathway to regulate fruit growth and disease resistance in tomato fruits.

  14. Veratryl alcohol-mediated oxidation of isoeugenyl acetate by lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    ten Have, R; De Thouars, R G; Swarts, H J; Field, J A

    1999-11-01

    The mechanism of the veratryl alcohol (VA)-mediated oxidation of isoeugenyl acetate (IEA) by lignin peroxidase, and the subsequent spontaneous Calpha-Cbeta cleavage of IEA to vanillyl acetate were studied. IEA oxidation only occurred in the presence of VA. It probably did not bind to lignin peroxidase as evidenced by an unaffected Km for VA in the presence of IEA, and by the fact that a 10-fold molar excess of the unreactive IEA counterpart, eugenyl acetate, did not affect the IEA oxidation rate. IEA was very efficient in recycling VA. Up to 34 mol of IEA were oxidized per mol VA. Formation of the predominant VA oxidation product, veratraldehyde, was postponed until IEA was almost completely oxidized. Together these findings suggest that IEA was oxidized by VA.+ rather than directly by lignin peroxidase. Thus, VA functioned as a redox mediator during IEA oxidation which is remarkable considering the high calculated ionization potential of 8.81 eV. Regardless of the presence of O2, approximately 2 mol of IEA were consumed per mol H2O2, which indicated that IEA was enzymatically oxidized by one electron to the putative radical cation (IEA.+). After formation of IEA.+, a series of O2-dependent chemical reactions were responsible for Calpha-Cbeta cleavage to the major oxidation product vanillyl acetate, as evidenced by the observation that an N2 atmosphere did not inhibit IEA oxidation, but almost completely inhibited vanillyl acetate formation. GC-MS analyses revealed that under an air atmosphere 1-(4'-acetoxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-2-propanone, 1-(4'-acetoxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-1-hydroxy-2-propanone, and 1-(4'-acetoxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-2-hydroxy-1-propanone were also formed. Formation of the latter two was diminished under an N2 atmosphere.

  15. Vascular defense responses in rice: peroxidase accumulation in xylem parenchyma cells and xylem wall thickening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Young, S. A.; Willard, L. H.; McGee, J. D.; Sweat, T.; Chittoor, J. M.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    The rice bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is a vascular pathogen that elicits a defensive response through interaction with metabolically active rice cells. In leaves of 12-day-old rice seedlings, the exposed pit membrane separating the xylem lumen from the associated parenchyma cells allows contact with bacterial cells. During resistant responses, the xylem secondary walls thicken within 48 h and the pit diameter decreases, effectively reducing the area of pit membrane exposed for access by bacteria. In susceptible interactions and mock-inoculated controls, the xylem walls do not thicken within 48 h. Xylem secondary wall thickening is developmental and, in untreated 65-day-old rice plants, the size of the pit also is reduced. Activity and accumulation of a secreted cationic peroxidase, PO-C1, were previously shown to increase in xylem vessel walls and lumen. Peptide-specific antibodies and immunogold-labeling were used to demonstrate that PO-C1 is produced in the xylem parenchyma and secreted to the xylem lumen and walls. The timing of the accumulation is consistent with vessel secondary wall thickening. The PO-C1 gene is distinct but shares a high level of similarity with previously cloned pathogen-induced peroxidases in rice. PO-C1 gene expression was induced as early as 12 h during resistant interactions and peaked between 18 and 24 h after inoculation. Expression during susceptible interactions was lower than that observed in resistant interactions and was undetectable after infiltration with water, after mechanical wounding, or in mature leaves. These data are consistent with a role for vessel secondary wall thickening and peroxidase PO-C1 accumulation in the defense response in rice to X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  16. Inactivation of the potent Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin pyocyanin by airway peroxidases and nitrite.

    PubMed

    Reszka, Krzysztof J; Xiong, Ye; Sallans, Larry; Pasula, Rajamouli; Olakanmi, Oyebode; Hassett, Daniel J; Britigan, Bradley E

    2012-05-15

    Pyocyanin (1-hydroxy-N-methylphenazine, PCN) is a cytotoxic pigment and virulence factor secreted by the human bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we report that exposure of PCN to airway peroxidases, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and NaNO(2) generates unique mononitrated PCN metabolites (N-PCN) as revealed by HPLC/mass spectrometry analyses. N-PCN, in contrast to PCN, was devoid of antibiotic activity and failed to kill Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, in contrast to PCN, intratracheal instillation of N-PCN into murine lungs failed to induce a significant inflammatory response. Surprisingly, at a pH of ∼7, N-PCN was more reactive than PCN with respect to NADH oxidation but resulted in a similar magnitude of superoxide production as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance and spin trapping experiments. When incubated with Escherichia coli or lung A549 cells, PCN and N-PCN both led to superoxide formation, but lesser amounts were detected with N-PCN. Our results demonstrate that PCN that has been nitrated by peroxidase/H(2)O(2)/NO(2)(-) systems possesses less cytotoxic/proinflammatory activity than native PCN. Yield of N-PCN was decreased by the presence of the competing physiological peroxidase substrates (thiocyonate) SCN(-) (myeloperoxidase, MPO, and lactoperoxidase, LPO) and Cl(-) (MPO), which with Cl(-) yielded chlorinated PCNs. These reaction products also showed decreased proinflammatory ability when instilled into the lungs of mice. These observations add important insights into the complexity of the pathogenesis of lung injury associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and provide additional rationale for exploring the efficacy of NO(2)(-) in the therapy of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infection in cystic fibrosis.

  17. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-06-05

    This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H2O2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H2O2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H2O2 concentration were 7.0 and 8μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1UmL(-1) SBP in 30min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3UmL(-1) was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (KCAT) and catalytic efficiency (KCAT/KM) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via CC and CO coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment.

  18. Overexpression of thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase shows enhanced resistance to chilling stress in tomato.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming; Feng, Hai-Long; Wang, Li-Yan; Li, Dong; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2012-06-15

    Photosynthesis provides a strong reducing power and a high risk for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) particularly under chilling stress. Ascorbate peroxidases (APXs) reduce H(2)O(2) to water and play an important role in the antioxidant system of plants. Though thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) has been thought to be key regulator of intracellular levels of H(2)O(2), its physiological significance in the response to chilling stress is still under discussion. To study the contribution of tAPX to the ROS scavenging, a tomato thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase gene (LetAPX) was isolated and transgenic tomatoes were obtained. The LetAPX-GFP fusion protein was targeted to chloroplast in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplast. RNA blotting analysis revealed that the LetAPX transcript expression was up-regulated by chilling, high light, exogenous salicylic acid (SA) and methyl viologen (MV). Over expression of LetAPX in tomatoes conferred tolerance to chilling stress by maintaining higher reduced glutathione (GSH) content, chlorophyll and APX activities compared with wild type (WT) plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants showed lower levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and ion leakage, lower malendialdehyde (MDA) content, higher net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and higher maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm). The oxidizable P700 decreased more obviously in WT than that in transgenic plants under chilling stress in low irradiance. The results suggested that over expression of tAPX played a key role both in alleviating photo inhibition of PSI and PSII and enhancing their tolerance to chilling stress.

  19. High Throughput Screening against the Peroxidase Cascade of African Trypanosomes Identifies Antiparasitic Compounds That Inactivate Tryparedoxin*

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Florian; Jehle, Britta; Putzker, Kerstin; Lewis, Joe D.; Krauth-Siegel, R. Luise

    2012-01-01

    In African trypanosomes, the detoxification of broad spectrum hydroperoxides relies on a unique cascade composed of trypanothione (T(SH)2), trypanothione reductase, tryparedoxin (Tpx), and nonselenium glutathione peroxidase-type enzymes. All three proteins are essential for Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we subjected the complete system to a high throughput screening approach with nearly 80,000 chemicals. Twelve compounds inhibited the peroxidase system. All but one carried chloroalkyl substituents. The detailed kinetic analysis showed that two compounds weakly inhibited trypanothione reductase, but none of them specifically interacted with the peroxidase. They proved to be time-dependent inhibitors of Tpx-modifying Cys-40, the first cysteine of its active site WCPPC motif. Importantly, gel shift assays verified Tpx as a target in the intact parasites. T(SH)2, present in the in vitro assays and in the cells in high molar excess, did not interfere with Tpx inactivation. The compounds inhibited the proliferation of bloodstream T. brucei with EC50 values down to <1 μm and exerted up to 83-fold lower toxicity toward HeLa cells. Irreversible inhibitors are traditionally regarded as unfavorable. However, a large number of antimicrobials and anticancer therapeutics acts covalently with their target protein. The compounds identified here also interacted with recombinant human thioredoxin, a distant relative of Tpx. This finding might even be exploited for thioredoxin-based anticancer drug development approaches reported recently. The fact that the T(SH)2/Tpx couple occupies a central position within the trypanosomal thiol metabolism and delivers electrons also for the synthesis of DNA precursors renders the parasite-specific oxidoreductase an attractive drug target molecule. PMID:22275351

  20. Decolorization of Azo, Triphenyl Methane, Heterocyclic, and Polymeric Dyes by Lignin Peroxidase Isoenzymes from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Ollikka, P; Alhonmäki, K; Leppänen, V M; Glumoff, T; Raijola, T; Suominen, I

    1993-12-01

    The ligninolytic enzyme system of Phanerochaete chrysosporium decolorizes several recalcitrant dyes. Three isolated lignin peroxidase isoenzymes (LiP 4.65, LiP 4.15, and LiP 3.85) were compared as decolorizers with the crude enzyme system from the culture medium. LiP 4.65 (H2), LiP 4.15 (H7), and LiP 3.85 (H8) were purified by chromatofocusing, and their kinetic parameters were found to be similar. Ten different types of dyes, including azo, triphenyl methane, heterocyclic, and polymeric dyes, were treated by the crude enzyme preparation. Most of the dyes lost over 75% of their color; only Congo red, Poly R-478, and Poly T-128 were decolorized less than the others, 54, 46, and 48%, respectively. Five different dyes were tested for decolorization by the three purified isoenzymes. The ability of the isoenzymes to decolorize the dyes in the presence of veratryl alcohol was generally comparable to that of the crude enzyme preparation, suggesting that lignin peroxidase plays a major role in the decolorization and that manganese peroxidase is not required to start the degradation of these dyes. In the absence of veratryl alcohol, the decolorization activity of the isoenzymes was in most cases dramatically reduced. However, LiP 3.85 was still able to decolorize 20% of methylene blue and methyl orange and as much as 60% of toluidine blue O, suggesting that at least some dyes can function as substrates for isoenzyme LiP 3.85 but not to the same extent for LiP 4.15 or LiP 4.65. Thus, the isoenzymes have different specificities towards dyes as substrates.

  1. Decolorization of Azo, Triphenyl Methane, Heterocyclic, and Polymeric Dyes by Lignin Peroxidase Isoenzymes from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Ollikka, Pauli; Alhonmäki, Kirsi; Leppänen, Veli-Matti; Glumoff, Tuomo; Raijola, Timo; Suominen, Ilari

    1993-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzyme system of Phanerochaete chrysosporium decolorizes several recalcitrant dyes. Three isolated lignin peroxidase isoenzymes (LiP 4.65, LiP 4.15, and LiP 3.85) were compared as decolorizers with the crude enzyme system from the culture medium. LiP 4.65 (H2), LiP 4.15 (H7), and LiP 3.85 (H8) were purified by chromatofocusing, and their kinetic parameters were found to be similar. Ten different types of dyes, including azo, triphenyl methane, heterocyclic, and polymeric dyes, were treated by the crude enzyme preparation. Most of the dyes lost over 75% of their color; only Congo red, Poly R-478, and Poly T-128 were decolorized less than the others, 54, 46, and 48%, respectively. Five different dyes were tested for decolorization by the three purified isoenzymes. The ability of the isoenzymes to decolorize the dyes in the presence of veratryl alcohol was generally comparable to that of the crude enzyme preparation, suggesting that lignin peroxidase plays a major role in the decolorization and that manganese peroxidase is not required to start the degradation of these dyes. In the absence of veratryl alcohol, the decolorization activity of the isoenzymes was in most cases dramatically reduced. However, LiP 3.85 was still able to decolorize 20% of methylene blue and methyl orange and as much as 60% of toluidine blue O, suggesting that at least some dyes can function as substrates for isoenzyme LiP 3.85 but not to the same extent for LiP 4.15 or LiP 4.65. Thus, the isoenzymes have different specificities towards dyes as substrates. Images PMID:16349103

  2. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrite (NO2−), both absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry indicated formation of a new metabolite with features expected for the nitrated drug. The new metabolites showed an absorption maximum at 410 nm and pKa of 6.6 of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In addition to nitrosalbutamol (m/z 285.14), a salbutamol-derived nitrophenol, formed by elimination of the formaldehyde group, was detected (m/z 255.13) by mass spectrometry. It is noteworthy that the latter metabolite was detected in exhaled breath condensates of asthma patients receiving salbutamol but not in unexposed control subjects, indicating the potential for β2-agonist nitration to occur in the inflamed airway in vivo. Salbutamol nitration was inhibited in vitro by ascorbate, thiocyanate, and the pharmacological agents methimazole and dapsone. The efficacy of inhibition depended on the nitrating system, with the lactoperoxidase/H2O2/NO2− being the most affected. Functionally, nitrated salbutamol showed decreased affinity for β2-adrenergic receptors and impaired cAMP synthesis in airway smooth muscle cells compared with the native drug. These results suggest that under inflammatory conditions associated with asthma, phenolic β2-agonists may be subject to peroxidase-catalyzed nitration that could potentially diminish their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20974700

  3. Thyroid function in fasting rats: variations in 131I uptake and transient decrease in peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Moura, E G; Ramos, C F; Nascimento, C C; Rosenthal, D; Breitenbach, M M

    1987-01-01

    Serum thyroxine and triiodothyronine, radioiodide thyroid uptake and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity were studied over a 2 to 5 day period in fasting rats treated (F+) or not (F-) with TSH. In F- rats, TPO activity was transiently decreased on the 3rd day, whereas in F+ it was always higher than in controls. On the 5th day, the 2 h thyroid uptake of 131I decreased in F-, while the 24 h uptake increased in both F- and F+. Serum T3 and T4 decreased in both fasting groups. Thus, not all effects of fasting on rat thyroid function are reverted by TSH administration, suggesting intrinsic impairment of glandular function.

  4. Dyshormonogenetic goiter: presence of an inhibitor of normal human thyroid peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, D; Carvalho-Guimarães, D P; Knobel, M; Medeiros-Neto, G A

    1990-12-01

    A dialyzable, thermostable inhibitor of normal thyroid peroxidase (TPO), with UV absorption maximum at 250-260 nm, was found in the digitonized, washed particulate fraction of two dyshormonogenetic goiters. No intrinsic TPO iodide-oxidation activity was detectable in either of these goiters, and their TPO iodination activity was below the method sensitivity threshold, even after dialysis. These findings could be explained by an absent or abnormal TPO associated with the synthesis of a TPO-inhibitor, or by the irreversible inhibition of a normal enzyme by the inhibitor.

  5. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 2: peroxidase reagents.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen; Ciuksza, Tomasz; Nic Daéid, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the optimisation of peroxidase based enhancement techniques for footwear impressions made in blood on various fabric surfaces. Four different haem reagents: leuco crystal violet (LCV), leuco malachite green (LMG), fluorescein and luminol were used to enhance the blood contaminated impressions. The enhancement techniques in this study were used successfully to enhance the impressions in blood on light coloured surfaces, however, only fluorescent and/or chemiluminescent techniques allowed visualisation on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leather. Luminol was the only technique to enhance footwear impressions made in blood on all the fabrics investigated in this study.

  6. Temperature dependence of oxygen evolution through catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović-Bijelić, A.; Bijelić, G.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.; Vukojević, V.

    2007-09-01

    By experimental investigations of the temperature dependence of catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase in the temperature range 278 328 K, different kinetic profiles for oxygen evolution were found below and above 298 K. Extension of the model is proposed to account for these observations. By numeric simulations of the reaction kinetics at different temperatures, it was found that enhanced evaporation of molecular oxygen from the reaction solution is the main root through which oxygen is lost at elevated temperatures in laboratory conditions.

  7. Construction of a Fusion Enzyme Exhibiting Superoxide Dismutase and Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-04-01

    A chimeric gene construct encoding human peroxiredoxin 6 and Mn-superoxide dismutase from Escherichia coli was developed. Conditions for expression of the fusion protein in E. coli cell were optimized. Fusing of the enzymes into a single polypeptide chain with peroxiredoxin 6 at the N-terminus (PSH) did not affect their activities. On the contrary, the chimeric protein with reverse order of enzymes (SPH) was not obtained in a water-soluble active form. The active chimeric protein (PSH) exhibiting both peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities was prepared and its physicochemical properties were characterized.

  8. Oxidation of phenols by horseradish peroxidase and lactoperoxidase compound II--kinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Zahida, M S; Deva, W; Peerzada, G M; Behere, D V

    1998-12-01

    Oxidation of para substituted phenols by horseradish peroxidase compound II (HRP-II) and lactoperoxidase compound II (LPO-II) were studied using stopped flow technique. Apparent second order rate constants (kapp) of the reactions were determined. The kinetics of oxidation of phenols by HRP-II and LPO-II have been compared with the oxidation potentials of the substrates. Reorganization energies of electron-transfer of phenols to the enzymes were estimated from the variation of second order rate constants with the thermodynamic driving force.

  9. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  10. Apoplastic Peroxidases are Required for Salicylic Acid-Mediated Defense Against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Mammarella, Nicole D.; Cheng, Zhenyu; Fu, Zheng Qing; Daudi, Arsalan; Bolwell, G. Paul; Dong, Xinnian; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases play an important role in the plant defense response. Diminished expression of at least two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase encoding genes, PRX33 (At3g49110) and PRX34 (At3g49120), as a consequence of anti-sense expression of a heterologous French bean peroxidase gene (asFBP1.1), were previously shown to result in reduced levels of ROS following pathogen attack, enhanced susceptibility to a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens, and reduced levels of callose production and defense-related gene expression in response to the microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules flg22 and elf26. These data demonstrated that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in the elicitation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Further work reported in this paper, however, shows that asFBP1.1 antisense plants are not impaired in all PTI-associated responses. For example, some but not all flg22-elicited genes are induced to lower levels by flg22 in asFPB1.1, and callose deposition in asFPB1.1 is similar to wild-type following infiltration with a Pseudomonas syringae hrcC mutant or with non-host P. syringae pathovars. Moreover, asFPB1.1 plants did not exhibit any apparent defect in their ability to mount a hypersensitive response (HR). On the other hand, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated activation of PR1 was dramatically impaired in asFPB1.1 plants. In addition, P. syringae-elicited expression of many genes known to be SA-dependent was significantly reduced in asFBP1.1 plants. Consistent with this latter result, in asFBP1.1 plants the key regulator of SA-mediated responses, NPR1, showed both dramatically decreased total protein abundance and a failure to monomerize, which is required for its translocation into the nucleus. PMID:25096754

  11. Stobadine pretreatment enhances glutathione peroxidase activity in the heart of irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Kováciková, Z; Chorvatovicová, D; Ginter, E

    1997-05-01

    The effect of pretreatment with stobadine (a novel drug with cardioprotective properties) on the activity of glutathione peroxidase was studied in the heart of mice after Co60 irradiation. Exposure to 6.5 Gy caused significant decrease in the activity of the enzyme (p < 0.01). Treatment with stobadine (70.07 mg/kg) 1 or 2 h before irradiation resulted in activity enhancement in comparison with the nonpretreated irradiated group (p < 0.01). We conclude that the radical scavenging mechanism may be involved in the protection exerted by stobadine. The results are in agreement with those obtained by the micronucleus test.

  12. Apoplastic peroxidases are required for salicylic acid-mediated defense against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Mammarella, Nicole D; Cheng, Zhenyu; Fu, Zheng Qing; Daudi, Arsalan; Bolwell, G Paul; Dong, Xinnian; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases play an important role in the plant defense response. Diminished expression of at least two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase encoding genes, PRX33 (At3g49110) and PRX34 (At3g49120), as a consequence of anti-sense expression of a heterologous French bean peroxidase gene (asFBP1.1), were previously shown to result in reduced levels of ROS following pathogen attack, enhanced susceptibility to a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens, and reduced levels of callose production and defense-related gene expression in response to the microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules flg22 and elf26. These data demonstrated that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in the elicitation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Further work reported in this paper, however, shows that asFBP1.1 antisense plants are not impaired in all PTI-associated responses. For example, some but not all flg22-elicited genes are induced to lower levels by flg22 in asFPB1.1, and callose deposition in asFPB1.1 is similar to wild-type following infiltration with a Pseudomonas syringae hrcC mutant or with non-host P. syringae pathovars. Moreover, asFPB1.1 plants did not exhibit any apparent defect in their ability to mount a hypersensitive response (HR). On the other hand, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated activation of PR1 was dramatically impaired in asFPB1.1 plants. In addition, P. syringae-elicited expression of many genes known to be SA-dependent was significantly reduced in asFBP1.1 plants. Consistent with this latter result, in asFBP1.1 plants the key regulator of SA-mediated responses, NPR1, showed both dramatically decreased total protein abundance and a failure to monomerize, which is required for its translocation into the nucleus.

  13. The cytochrome c peroxidase and cytochrome c encounter complex: the other side of the story.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Jesika; Löhr, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2014-05-21

    Formation of an encounter complex is important for efficient protein complex formation. The encounter state consists of an ensemble of orientations of two proteins in the complex. Experimental description of such ensembles inherently suffers from insufficient data availability. We have measured paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PRE) on cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) caused by its partner cytochrome c (Cc) carrying a spin label. The data complement earlier PRE data of spin labelled CcP, identifying several new interactions. This work demonstrates the need of obtaining as many independent data sets as possible to achieve the most accurate description of an encounter complex.

  14. The biological selenium status of livestock in Britain as indicated by sheep erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P H; Berrett, S; Patterson, D S

    1979-03-17

    The reliability of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity as an indicator of selenium status in livestock is discussed. Based on this measurement, a survey is described of the biological selenium status of sheep on each of 329 farms in Britain. Results showed that 47 per cent of these farms were probably unable to provide grazing livestock with sufficient selenium to maintain blood levels greater than 0.075 microgram per ml. Increased selenium deficiency from the increasing use of home grown feeds as a major constituent of livestock rations may be causally related to the increase of white muscle disease and other selenium responsive diseases in Britain.

  15. Absorption of horse-radish peroxidase by the conjunctival epithelium of monkeys and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Steuhl, P; Rohen, J W

    1983-01-01

    Horse-radish peroxidase was instilled into the conjunctival sac of rabbits and Cynomolgus monkeys. After an interval of 5, 30 or 60 min the conjunctival epithelium was studied by electron microscopy. The tracer was found to be absorbed predominantly by type-V cells, which are rich in mitochondria; this process was found to occur more rapidly in the rabbit than in the monkey. The particles were primarily incorporated into pinocytotic vesicles and phagosomes and were then either digested by phagolysosomes or transported through the basal portion of the surface epithelial cells into the expanding intercellular spaces distal to the junctional complexes.

  16. In vitro degradation of carbamazepine and diclofenac by crude lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Geissen, Sven-Uwe

    2010-04-15

    Carbamazepine and diclofenac were frequently detected in water bodies. In this study, crude lignin peroxidase, produced from a white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was studied on its in vitro degradation of both drugs. The influencing parameters were studied, including pH, the hydrogen peroxide concentration, veratryl alcohol and the temperature. It was found that LiP completely degraded diclofenac at pH 3.0-4.5 and 3-24 ppm H(2)O(2) while the degradation efficiency of carbamazepine was mostly below 10%. The addition of veratryl alcohol and the increased temperature did not enhance the degradation of carbamazepine.

  17. Peroxidase-like oxidative activity of a manganese-coordinated histidyl bolaamphiphile self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2015-10-01

    A peroxidase-like catalyst was constructed through the self-assembly of histidyl bolaamphiphiles coordinated to Mn2+ ions. The prepared catalyst exhibited oxidation activity for the organic substrate o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The histidyl bolaamphiphiles of bis(N-alpha-amido-histidine)-1,7-heptane dicarboxylates self-assembled to make spherical structures in an aqueous solution. Subsequent association of Mn2+ ions with the histidyl imidazoles in the self-assembly produced catalytic active sites. The optimal Mn2+ ion concentration was determined and coordination of the Mn2+ ion with multiple histidine imidazoles was investigated using spectroscopy analysis. The activation energy of the produced catalysts was 55.0 kJ mol-1, which was comparable to other peroxidase-mimetic catalysts. A detailed kinetics study revealed that the prepared catalyst followed a ping-pong mechanism and that the turnover reaction was promoted by increasing the substrate concentration. Finally, application of the prepared catalyst for glucose detection was demonstrated through cascade enzyme catalysis. This study demonstrated a facile way to prepare an enzyme-mimetic catalyst through the self-assembly of an amphiphilic molecule containing amino acid segments.A peroxidase-like catalyst was constructed through the self-assembly of histidyl bolaamphiphiles coordinated to Mn2+ ions. The prepared catalyst exhibited oxidation activity for the organic substrate o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The histidyl bolaamphiphiles of bis(N-alpha-amido-histidine)-1,7-heptane dicarboxylates self-assembled to make spherical structures in an aqueous solution. Subsequent association of Mn2+ ions with the histidyl imidazoles in the self-assembly produced catalytic active sites. The optimal Mn2+ ion concentration was determined and coordination of the Mn2+ ion with multiple histidine imidazoles was investigated using spectroscopy

  18. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 signals through antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1 to regulate redox homeostasis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lingtao; Li, Dan; Alesi, Gina N; Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Lu, Zhou; Boggon, Titus J; Jin, Peng; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Duong, Duc; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Egnatchik, Robert; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Magliocca, Kelly R; He, Chuan; Arellano, Martha L; Khoury, Hanna J; Shin, Dong M; Khuri, Fadlo R; Kang, Sumin

    2015-02-09

    How mitochondrial glutaminolysis contributes to redox homeostasis in cancer cells remains unclear. Here we report that the mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) is commonly upregulated in human cancers. GDH1 is important for redox homeostasis in cancer cells by controlling the intracellular levels of its product alpha-ketoglutarate and subsequent metabolite fumarate. Mechanistically, fumarate binds to and activates a reactive oxygen species scavenging enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1. Targeting GDH1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor R162 resulted in imbalanced redox homeostasis, leading to attenuated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  19. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 signals through antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1 to regulate redox homeostasis and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lingtao; Li, Dan; Alesi, Gina N.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Lu, Zhou; Boggon, Titus J.; Jin, Peng; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Duong, Duc; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Egnatchik, Robert; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Magliocca, Kelly R.; He, Chuan; Arellano, Martha L.; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Kang, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY How mitochondrial glutaminolysis contributes to redox homeostasis in cancer cells remains unclear. Here we report that the mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) is commonly upregulated in human cancers. GDH1 is important for redox homeostasis in cancer cells by controlling the intracellular levels of its product alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and subsequent metabolite fumarate. Mechanistically, fumarate binds to and activates a ROS scavenging enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1). Targeting GDH1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor R162 resulted in imbalanced redox homeostasis, leading to attenuated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:25670081

  20. Hydrogen peroxide-independent generation of superoxide by plant peroxidase: hypotheses and supportive data employing ferrous ion as a model stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Umemoto, Yosuke; Kawano, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    When plants are threaten by microbial attacks or treated with elicitors, alkalization of extracellular space is often induced and thus pH-dependent extracellular peroxidase-mediated oxidative burst reportedly takes place, especially at the site of microbial challenge. However, direct stimulus involved in activation of peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst has not been identified to date. Here, we would like to propose a likely role for free ferrous ion in reduction of ferric native peroxidase into ferrous enzyme intermediate which readily produces superoxide anion via mechanism involving Compound III, especially under alkaline condition, thus, possibly contributing to the plant defense mechanism. Through spectroscopic and chemiluminescence (CL) analyses of reactions catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the present study proposed that plant peroxidase-catalyzed production of superoxide anion can be stimulated in the absence of conventional peroxidase substrates but in the presence of free ferrous ion. PMID:25071789

  1. Ligninolytic peroxidase gene expression by Pleurotus ostreatus: differential regulation in lignocellulose medium and effect of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Castanera, Raul; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; López-Lucendo, María F; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Martínez, Angel T

    2014-11-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an important edible mushroom and a model lignin degrading organism, whose genome contains nine genes of ligninolytic peroxidases, characteristic of white-rot fungi. These genes encode six manganese peroxidase (MnP) and three versatile peroxidase (VP) isoenzymes. Using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, secretion of four of these peroxidase isoenzymes (VP1, VP2, MnP2 and MnP6) was confirmed when P. ostreatus grows in a lignocellulose medium at 25°C (three more isoenzymes were identified by only one unique peptide). Then, the effect of environmental parameters on the expression of the above nine genes was studied by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR by changing the incubation temperature and medium pH of P. ostreatus cultures pre-grown under the above conditions (using specific primers and two reference genes for result normalization). The cultures maintained at 25°C (without pH adjustment) provided the highest levels of peroxidase transcripts and the highest total activity on Mn(2+) (a substrate of both MnP and VP) and Reactive Black 5 (a VP specific substrate). The global analysis of the expression patterns divides peroxidase genes into three main groups according to the level of expression at optimal conditions (vp1/mnp3>vp2/vp3/mnp1/mnp2/mnp6>mnp4/mnp5). Decreasing or increasing the incubation temperature (to 10°C or 37°C) and adjusting the culture pH to acidic or alkaline conditions (pH 3 and 8) generally led to downregulation of most of the peroxidase genes (and decrease of the enzymatic activity), as shown when the transcription levels were referred to those found in the cultures maintained at the initial conditions. Temperature modification produced less dramatic effects than pH modification, with most genes being downregulated during the whole 10°C treatment, while many of them were alternatively upregulated (often 6h after the thermal shock) and downregulated (12h) at 37°C. Interestingly, mnp4 and

  2. Molecular cloning of two novel peroxidases and their response to salt stress and salicylic acid in the living fossil Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Novo-Uzal, Esther; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Martínez-Cortés, Teresa; Pomar, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Peroxidase isoenzymes play diverse roles in plant physiology, such as lignification and defence against pathogens. The actions and regulation of many peroxidases are not known with much accuracy. A number of studies have reported direct involvement of peroxidase isoenzymes in the oxidation of monolignols, which constitutes the last step in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. However, most of the available data concern only peroxidases and lignins from angiosperms. This study describes the molecular cloning of two novel peroxidases from the ‘living fossil’ Ginkgo biloba and their regulation by salt stress and salicylic acid. Methods Suspension cell cultures were used to purify peroxidases and to obtain the cDNAs. Treatments with salicylic acid and sodium chloride were performed and peroxidase activity and gene expression were monitored. Key Results A novel peroxidase was purified, which preferentially used p-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols as substrates and was able to form dehydrogenation polymers in vitro from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Two peroxidase full-length cDNAs, GbPrx09 and GbPrx10, were cloned. Both peroxidases showed high similarity to other basic peroxidases with a putative role in cell wall lignification. Both GbPrx09 and GbPrx10 were expressed in leaves and stems of the plant. Sodium chloride enhanced the gene expression of GbPrx09 but repressed GbPrx10, whereas salicylic acid strongly repressed both GbPrx09 and GbPrx10. Conclusions Taken together, the data suggest the participation of GbPrx09 and GbPrx10 in the developmental lignification programme of the cell wall. Both peroxidases possess the structural characteristics necessary for sinapyl alcohol oxidation. Moreover, GbPrx09 is also involved in lignification induced by salt stress, while salicylic acid-mediated lignification is not a result of GbPrx09 and GbPrx10 enzymatic activity. PMID:25139427

  3. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  4. A new peroxidase from leaves of guinea grass (Panicum maximum): A potential biocatalyst to build amperometric biosensors.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Diana A; Solano, Xuxan H; Castillo, John J

    2017-03-29

    A new plant peroxidase was isolated from the leaves of guinea grass (Panicum maximum) and partially purified using a biphasic polymer system (poly(ethylene glycol) - ammonium sulfate) followed by size-exclusion chromatography and ultracentrifugation until obtaining a homogeneous extract containing a high peroxidase activity. The novel peroxidase was characterized as having a specific activity of 408U/mg and a molecular weight of 30kDa. The pH for its optimum activity was 8.0 and exhibited a high thermostability at 66°C with a kinact of 8.0×10(-3)min(-1). The best substrates for peroxidase from guinea grass are o-dianisidine and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). POD from guinea grass was directly immobilized on the surface of a graphene screen printed electrode and cyclic voltammograms in the presence of potassium ferrocyanide ([Fe(CN)6](3-/4-)) as a redox species demonstrated an increase in the electron transfer process. The graphene- modified electrode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of H2O2, with a linear response in the 100μM to 3.5mM concentration range and a detection limit of 150μM. The new peroxidase from guinea grass allowed the modification of a graphene electrode providing a potential sensor detection system for determination of H2O2 in real samples with some biomedical or environmental importance.

  5. Dual role of the active-center cysteine in human peroxiredoxin 1: Peroxidase activity and heme binding.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuta; Ishimori, Koichiro; Uchida, Takeshi

    2017-02-12

    HBP23, a 23-kDa heme-binding protein identified in rats, is a member of the peroxiredoxin (Prx) family, the primary peroxidases involved in hydrogen peroxide catabolism. Although HBP23 has a characteristic Cys-Pro heme-binding motif, the significance of heme binding to Prx family proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we examined the effect of heme binding to human peroxiredoxin-1 (PRX1), which has 97% amino acid identity to HBP23. PRX1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Spectroscopic titration demonstrated that PRX1 binds heme with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a dissociation constant of 0.17 μM. UV-vis spectra of heme-PRX1 suggested that Cys52 is the axial ligand of ferric heme. PRX1 peroxidase activity was lost upon heme binding, reflecting the fact that Cys52 is not only the heme-binding site but also the active center of peroxidase activity. Interestingly, heme binding to PRX1 caused a decrease in the toxicity and degradation of heme, significantly suppressing H2O2-dependent heme peroxidase activity and degradation of PRX1-bound heme compared with that of free hemin. By virtue of its cytosolic abundance (∼20 μM), PRX1 thus functions as a scavenger of cytosolic hemin (<1 μM). Collectively, our results indicate that PRX1 has a dual role; Cys-dependent peroxidase activity and cytosolic heme scavenger.

  6. Rapid and direct spectrophotometric method for kinetics studies and routine assay of peroxidase based on aniline diazo substrates.

    PubMed

    Mirazizi, Fatemeh; Bahrami, Azita; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Bakavoli, Mehdi; Legge, Raymond L

    2016-12-01

    Peroxidases are ubiquitous enzymes that play an important role in living organisms. Current spectrophotometrically based peroxidase assay methods are based on the production of chromophoric substances at the end of the enzymatic reaction. The ambiguity regarding the formation and identity of the final chromophoric product and its possible reactions with other molecules have raised concerns about the accuracy of these methods. This can be of serious concern in inhibition studies. A novel spectrophotometric assay for peroxidase, based on direct measurement of a soluble aniline diazo substrate, is introduced. In addition to the routine assays, this method can be used in comprehensive kinetics studies. 4-[(4-Sulfophenyl)azo]aniline (λmax = 390 nm, ɛ = 32 880 M(-1) cm(-1) at pH 4.5 to 9) was introduced for routine assay of peroxidase. This compound is commercially available and is indexed as a food dye. Using this method, a detection limit of 0.05 nmol mL(-1) was achieved for peroxidase.

  7. Characterization and application of a novel class II thermophilic peroxidase from Myceliophthora thermophila in biosynthesis of polycatechol.

    PubMed

    Zerva, Anastasia; Christakopoulos, Paul; Topakas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    A peroxidase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila that belongs to ascomycete Class II based on PeroxiBase classification was functionally expressed in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The putative peroxidase from the genomic DNA was successfully cloned in P. pastoris X-33 under the transcriptional control of the alcohol oxidase (AOX1) promoter. The heterologous production was greatly enhanced by the addition of hemin with a titer of 0.41 U mL(-1) peroxidase activity at the second day of incubation. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity (50 kDa) and characterized using a series of phenolic substrates that indicated similar characteristics with those of generic peroxidases. In addition, the enzyme was found thermostable, retaining its activity for temperatures up to 60 °C after eight hours incubation. Moreover, the enzyme displayed remarkable H2O2 stability, retaining more than 80% of its initial activity after 24h incubation in 5000-fold molar excess of H2O2. The ability of the peroxidase to polymerize catechol at high superoxide concentrations, together with its high thermostability and substrate specificity, indicate a potential commercial significance of the enzyme.

  8. Isolation of a gene encoding for a class III peroxidase in female flower of Corylus avellana L.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Chiara; Torello Marinoni, Daniela; Perrone, Irene; Botta, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Hazelnut is a monoecious species characterized by mid-winter blooming and sporophytic incompatibility. The molecular mechanisms at the basis of the female flower development and of the pollen-stigma interaction are little known, although pollination in this species is a critical factor to ensure good yield. Differential display technique was used to study genes expressed during the female flower development, comparing styles before emergence from the bud and styles at full bloom. The full-length cDNA clone, designated CavPrx (Corylus avellana peroxidase) and isolated in mature styles, was characterized as a sequence encoding for a 330 amino acids protein, containing all the conserved features of class III peroxidases. CavPrx resulted expressed only in styles, with a peak in mature styles pollinated with compatible pollen. Class III peroxidases are expressed in several different plant tissue types and are involved in a broad spectrum of physiological processes. Until now, four peroxidases expressed in the stigma were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and Senecio squalidus: they were assumed to be possibly involved in pollen-pistil interaction, pollen tube penetration/growth and/or in defence against pathogens. CavPrx is the first gene for a floral peroxidase isolated in hazelnut and its expression pattern suggests a possible role in the pollination process.

  9. Kinetic properties of manganese peroxidase from the mushroom Stereum ostrea and its ability to decolorize dyes.

    PubMed

    Praveen, K; Usha, K Y; Viswanath, Buddolla; Reddy, B Rajasekhar

    2012-11-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was isolated from the culture filtrate of the wood log mushroom Stereum ostrea (S. ostrea), grown on Koroljova medium, and then purified by ammonium sulfate [70% (w/v)] fractionation, DEAE-cellulose anion exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography, with an attainment of 88.6-fold purification and the recovery of 22.8% of initial activity. According to SDS-PAGE the molecular mass of the MnP was 40 kDa. The optimal pH and temperature were found to be 4.5 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable even after exposure to a pH range of 4.5 to 6.0, and at temperatures of up to 35 degrees C at a pH of 4.5 for 1h. The K(m) and V(max) values for the substrate phenol red were found to be 8 micronm and 111.14 U/mg of protein, respectively. The MnP also oxidized other substrates such as guaiacol, DMP, and veratryl alcohol. Sodium azide, EDTA, SDS, Cu(2+), and Fe(2+), at 1-5 mM, strongly inhibited enzyme activity, whereas Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) increased enzyme activity. The participation of the purified enzyme in the decolorization of dyes suggests that S. ostrea manganese peroxidase could be effectively employed in textile industries.

  10. Oxidative stress response in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: assessing catalase and cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Alessandra S; Andrade, Rosângela V; de Carvalho, Maria J; Felipe, Maria Sueli S; Campos, Elida G

    2008-06-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that infects humans and establishes infection in the yeast form. We are interested in the mechanisms this fungus uses to evade the human immune system, and in its survival strategies within infected host cells. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in host defence, but are detoxified by pathogen-derived antioxidant enzymes to prevent oxidative damage. The transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of P. brasiliensis catalase and cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP) antioxidant enzymes upon culture treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is described. High H(2)O(2) concentrations (up to 100 mm) still permitted 70-100% survival of exponential and stationary phase yeast cells, though stationary phase cells were consistently more resistant. P. brasiliensis has both cytosolic and peroxisomal catalase isoenzymes and a single cytochrome-c peroxidase. High-dose treatments with H(2)O(2) led to an early increase in total catalase and CCP enzymatic activities, indicative of post-transcriptional regulation. The expression levels of the catalase genes increased three to fourfold when the cells were treated with 50 mm H(2)O(2) for 40 or 50 min. Lipid peroxidation, as assessed by the thiobarbituric acid method, was relatively low upon treatment with H(2)O(2), which was consistent with our results demonstrating that P. brasiliensis has a powerful antioxidant defence system enabling it to survive H(2)O(2)-mediated stress.

  11. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    PubMed

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10(4) s(-1) subunit(-1) at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  12. Lignin Peroxidase from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A: Enzyme Concentration Using Ultrafiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Leda M. F.; Bon, Elba P. S.; Nobrega, Ronaldo

    It is well known that lignin degradation is a key step in the natural process of biomass decay whereby oxidative enzymes such as laccases and high redox potential ligninolytic peroxidases and oxidases play a central role. More recently, the importance of these enzymes has increased because of their prospective industrial use for the degradation of the biomass lignin to increase the accessibility of the cellulose and hemicellulose moieties to be used as renewable material for the production of fuels and chemicals. These biocatalysts also present potential application on environmental biocatalysis for the degradation of xenobiotics and recalcitrant pollutants. However, the cost for these enzymes production, separation, and concentration must be low to permit its industrial use. This work studied the concentration of lignin peroxidase (LiP), produced by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, by ultrafiltration, in a laboratory-stirred cell, loaded with polysulfone (PS) or cellulose acetate (CA) membranes with molecular weight cutoffs (MWCO) of 10, 20, and 50 KDa. Experiments were carried out at 25 °C and pH 7.0 in accordance to the enzyme stability profile. The best process conditions and enzyme yield were obtained using a PS membrane with 10 KDa MWCO, whereby it was observed a tenfold LiP activity increase, reaching 1,000 U/L and 90% enzyme activity upholding.

  13. Peroxidase-coupled method for kinetic colorimetry of total creatine kinase activity in serum.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, M C; Artiss, J D; Zak, B

    1985-10-01

    We describe a peroxidase-coupled method involving a colorimetric indicator reaction for determining the total activity of creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2) in serum. The kinetically favorable reverse reaction is exploited to generate adenosine 5'-triphosphate, which is used in the glycerol kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of glycerol. The glycerol 3-phosphate so generated is oxidized in the presence of alpha-glycerophosphate oxidase to produce hydrogen peroxide, which is reduced in the presence of peroxidase with the simultaneous oxidation and coupling of 4-aminoantipyrene and 2-hydroxy-3,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonate to produce an intensely colored red chromogen. Results of the proposed method (y) correlate well with those of the Boehringer-Mannheim "CK-NAC UV" method as applied to the Hitachi 705 chemistry analyzer (y = 1.025 chi - 18.1, r = 0.9985, n = 100, range = 19-4531 U/L). The sensitivity of the method, based on molar absorptivities, is nearly fourfold that of procedures involving the reduction of NADP+.

  14. Ultra-small particles of iron oxide as peroxidase for immunohistochemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yihang; Song, Mengjie; Xin, Zhuang; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Chunyu; Li, Suyi; Gu, Ning

    2011-06-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) modified ultra-small particles of iron oxide (USPIO) were synthesized through a two-step process. The first step: oleic acid (OA) capped Fe3O4 (OA-USPIO) were synthesized by a novel oxidation coprecipitation method in H2O/DMSO mixing system, where DMSO acts as an oxidant simultaneously. The second step: OA was replaced by DMSA to obtain water-soluble nanoparticles. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, FTIR, TGA, VSM, DLS, EDS and UV-vis. Hydrodynamic sizes and Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of the nanoparticles were investigated. The hydrodynamic sizes of the nanoparticles (around 24.4 nm) were well suited to developing stable nanoprobes for bio-detection. The kinetic studies were performed to quantitatively evaluate the catalytic ability of the peroxidase-like nanoparticles. The calculated kinetic parameters indicated that the DMSA-USPIO possesses high catalytic activity. Based on the high activity, immunohistochemical experiments were established: using low-cost nanoparticles as the enzyme instead of expensive HRP, Nimotuzumab was conjugated onto the surface of the nanoparticles to construct a kind of ultra-small nanoprobe which was employed to detect epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-expressed on the membrane of esophageal cancer cell. The proper sizes of the probes and the result of membranous immunohistochemical staining suggest that the probes can be served as a useful diagnostic reagent for bio-detection.

  15. Peroxidase-mediated conjugation of corn fiber gum and bovine serum albumin to improve emulsifying properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Qiu, Shuang; Li, Jinlong; Chen, Hao; Tatsumi, Eizo; Yadav, Madhav; Yin, Lijun

    2015-03-15

    The emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum (CFG), a naturally occurring polysaccharide-protein complex, was improved by kinetically controlled formation of hetero-covalent linkages with bovine serum albumin (BSA), using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The formation of hetero-crosslinked CFG-BSA conjugates was confirmed using ultraviolet-visible and Fourier-transform infrared analyses. The optimum CFG-BSA conjugates were prepared at a CFG:BSA weight ratio of 10:1, and peroxidase:BSA weight ratio of 1:4000. Selected CFG-BSA conjugates were used to prepare oil-in-water emulsions; the emulsifying properties were better than those of emulsions stabilized with only CFG or BSA. Measurements of mean droplet sizes and zeta potentials showed that CFG-BSA-conjugate-stabilized emulsions were less susceptible to environmental stresses, such as pH changes, high K ionic strengths, and freeze-thaw treatments than CFG- or BSA-stabilized emulsions. These conjugates have potential applications as novel emulsifiers in food industry.

  16. A novel horseradish peroxidase biosensor towards the detection of dopamine: a voltammetric study.

    PubMed

    Raghu, P; Reddy, T Madhusudana; Gopal, P; Reddaiah, K; Sreedhar, N Y

    2014-04-10

    A polymerized film of glycine (Gly) was prepared on the surface of carbon paste electrode (CPE) through the cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. A novel biosensor for the determination of dopamine (DA) has been constructed based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) immobilizing on Poly (Gly)/CPE through silica sol-gel (SiSG) entrapment. CV measurements were employed in order to understand the feasibility of poly (Gly) as an electron carrier between the immobilized peroxidase and the surface of CPE. By using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) the calibration curves of DA was obtained in the range of 15-865 μM. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of DA was found to be 6×10⁻⁷ M and 2×10⁻⁶ M respectively. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km(app)) was found to be 0.5 mM and illustrated that the good biological activity of the fixed enzyme. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results confirmed the rapid electron transfer and also the immobilization of enzyme on the electrode surface. The biosensor showed high sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility. This method has been used to determine DA in the presence of various interferences and in clinical preparations.

  17. Facile method to synthesize dopamine-capped mixed ferrite nanoparticles and their peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumtaz, Shazia; Wang, Li-Sheng; Abdullah, Muhammad; Zajif Hussain, Syed; Iqbal, Zafar; Rotello, Vincent M.; Hussain, Irshad

    2017-03-01

    A facile single-step strategy to prepare stable and water-dispersible dopamine-functionalized ultra-small mixed ferrite nanoparticles MFe2O4-DOPA (where M is a bivalent metal atom i.e. Fe, Co Cu, Mn and Ni) at room temperature is described. The nanoparticles formed have narrow size distribution as indicated by their characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. The surface chemistry of these nanoparticles was probed by FTIR spectroscopy indicating their successful capping with dopamine ligands, which was further confirmed using zetapotential measurements and thermogravimetric analysis. The comparative horseradish peroxidase (HRP)—like activity of these cationic mixed ferrites nanoparticles was studied at pH 4.6 using a negatively-charged 2, 2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as a chromogenic substrate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. A time-dependent relative peroxidase-like activity follows the following order CoFe2O4-DOPA  >  MnFe2O4-DOPA  >  CuFe2O4-DOPA  >  NiFe2O4-DOPA  >  Fe3O4-DOPA. This diversity in HRP-like activity may be attributed to the different redox properties of ferrite nanoparticles when doped with M (Fe, Co Cu, Mn and Ni).

  18. Hydrodynamics of horseradish peroxidase revealed by global analysis of multiple fluorescence probes.

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, J E; Vargas, V; Gratton, E; Jameson, D M

    1994-01-01

    Previous fluorescence studies of horseradish peroxidase conjugated with protoporphyrin IX suggested that the protein behaved hydrodynamically as a prolate ellipsoid of axial ratio 3 to 1. The present study, designed to further investigate the hydrodynamics of this protein, exploits a series of probes, noncovalently bound to the heme binding site of apo-horseradish peroxidase, having different orientations of the excitation and emission transition dipoles with respect to the protein's rotational axes. The probes utilized included protoporphyrin IX and the naphthalene probes 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate, 2-p-toluidinyl-6-naphthalene sulfonate, and 4,4'-bis(1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate). Time-resolved data were obtained using multifrequency phase fluorometry. The global analysis approach to the determination of molecular shape using multiple probes was evaluated by utilizing all data sets while maintaining a constant molecular shape for the protein. The results indicated that, in such analyses, probes exhibiting a single exponential decay and limited local motion have the major weight in the evaluation of the axial ratio. Probes that show complex decay patterns and local motions, such as the naphthalene derivatives, give rise to significant uncertainties in such global treatments. By explicitly accounting for the effect of such local motion, however, the shape of the protein can be reliably recovered. PMID:8161698

  19. Phenol-mediated decolorization and removal of disperse dyes by bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Satar, Rukhsana; Husain, Qayyum

    2009-12-14

    Salt-fractionated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) proteins were employed for the decolorization of disperse dyes in the presence of H2O2. The effect of various experimental conditions such as concentration of enzyme, H2O2, phenol, reaction time, pH and temperature on the decolorization of dyes was investigated. Dyes were recalcitrant to the decolorization catalysed by bitter gourd peroxidase. However, these dyes were decolorized significantly in the presence of a redox mediator, phenol. Bitter gourd peroxidase (0.215 U/mL) could decolorize about 60% of Disperse Red 17 in the presence of 0.2 mM phenol, whereas Disperse Brown 1 was decolorized by only 40% even in the presence of 0.4 mM phenol. Maximum decolorization of dyes was achieved in the presence of 0.75 mM H2O2 in a buffer ofpH 3.0 and 40 degrees C within 30 min. The K(m) values obtained were 0.625 mg/(L x h) and 2.5 mg/(L x h) for Disperse Red 17 and Disperse Brown 1, respectively. In all the experiments, Disperse Brown 1 was found to be more recalcitrant to decolorization catalysed by bitter gourd peroxidise, as compared to Disperse Red 17.

  20. Manganese peroxidase degrades pristine but not surface-oxidized (carboxylated) single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Chen, Wei; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-07-15

    The transformation of engineered nanomaterials in the environment can significantly affect their transport, fate, bioavailability, and toxicity. Little is known about the biotransformation potential of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In this study, we compared the enzymatic transformation of SWNTs and oxidized (carboxylated) SWNTs (O-SWNTs) using three ligninolytic enzymes: lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase (MnP), and laccase. Only MnP was capable of transforming SWNTs, as determined by Raman spectroscopy, near-infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, MnP degraded SWNTs but not O-SWNTs. The recalcitrance of O-SWNTs to enzymatic transformation is likely attributable to the binding of Mn2+ by their surface carboxyl groups at the enzyme binding site, which inhibits critical steps in the MnP catalytic cycle (i.e., Mn2+ oxidation and Mn3+ dissociation from the enzyme). Our results suggest that oxygen-containing surface functionalities do not necessarily facilitate the biodegradation of carbonaceous nanomaterials, as is commonly assumed.

  1. Colorimetric Glucose Assay Based on Magnetic Particles Having Pseudo-peroxidase Activity and Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Martinkova, Pavla; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter; Styriak, Igor; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are currently used as a suitable alternative for peroxidase in the construction of novel biosensors, analytic and diagnostic methods. Their better chemical and thermal stabilities predestine them as appropriate pseudo-enzymatic catalysts. In this point of view, our research was focused on preparation of simply and fast method for immobilization of glucose oxidase onto surface of MPs with peroxidase-like activity. Spectrophotometric method (wavelength 450 nm) optimized for glucose determination using modified MPs has been successfully developed. Concentration curve for optimization of method was assayed, and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) calculated, maximum reaction rate (V max), limit of detection, and correlation coefficient were determined to be 0.13 mmol/l (2.34 mg/dl), 1.79 pkat, 3.74 µmol/l (0.067 mg/dl), and 0.996, respectively. Interferences of other sugars such as sucrose, sorbitol, deoxyribose, maltose, and fructose were determined as well as effect of substances presenting in plasma (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, trolox, and urea). Results in comparison with positive and negative controls showed no interferences of the other sugars and no influence of plasma substances to measuring of glucose. The constructed method showed corresponding results with linear dependence and a correlation coefficient of 0.997. Possibility of repeated use of modified MPs was successfully proved.

  2. Isonicotinic acid hydrazide conversion to Isonicotinyl-NAD by catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Ben; Carpena, Xavi; Feliz, Miguel; Donald, Lynda J; Pons, Miquel; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2010-08-20

    Activation of the pro-drug isoniazid (INH) as an anti-tubercular drug in Mycobacterium tuberculosis involves its conversion to isonicotinyl-NAD, a reaction that requires the catalase-peroxidase KatG. This report shows that the reaction proceeds in the absence of KatG at a slow rate in a mixture of INH, NAD(+), Mn(2+), and O(2), and that the inclusion of KatG increases the rate by >7 times. Superoxide, generated by either Mn(2+)- or KatG-catalyzed reduction of O(2), is an essential intermediate in the reaction. Elimination of the peroxidatic process by mutation slows the rate of reaction by 60% revealing that the peroxidatic process enhances, but is not essential for isonicotinyl-NAD formation. The isonicotinyl-NAD(*+) radical is identified as a reaction intermediate, and its reduction by superoxide is proposed. Binding sites for INH and its co-substrate, NAD(+), are identified for the first time in crystal complexes of Burkholderia pseudomallei catalase-peroxidase with INH and NAD(+) grown by co-crystallization. The best defined INH binding sites were identified, one in each subunit, on the opposite side of the protein from the entrance to the heme cavity in a funnel-shaped channel. The NAD(+) binding site is approximately 20 A from the entrance to the heme cavity and involves interactions primarily with the AMP portion of the molecule in agreement with the NMR saturation transfer difference results.

  3. Kinetic characterization of the oxidation of esculetin by polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Munoz, Joseph Louis; Garcia-Molina, Francis; Varon, Raymond; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joseph Neptune; Garcia-Canovas, Francis; Tudela, Joseph

    2007-02-01

    Esculetin has been described as an inhibitor of tyrosinase and polyphenol oxidase and, therefore, of melanogenesis. In this work, we demonstrate that esculetin is not an inhibitor but a substrate of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and horseradish peroxidase (POD), enzymes which oxidize esculetin, generating its o-quinone. Since o-quinones are very unstable, the usual way of determining the enzymatic activity (slope of recordings) is difficult. For this reason, we developed a chronometric method to characterize the kinetics of this substrate, based on measurements of the lag period in the presence of micromolar concentrations of ascorbic acid. The catalytic constant determined was of the same order for both enzymes. However, polyphenol oxidase showed greater affinity (a lower Michaelis constant) than peroxidase for esculetin. The affinity of PPO and POD towards oxygen and hydrogen peroxide was very high, suggesting the possible catalysis of both enzymes in the presence of low physiological concentrations of these oxidizing substrates. Taking into consideration optimum pHs of 4.5 and 7 for POD and PPO respectively, and the acidic pHs of melanosomes, the studies were carried out at pH 4.5 and 7. The in vivo pH might be responsible for the stronger effect of these enzymes on L-tyrosine and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylanaline (L-DOPA) (towards melanogenesis) and on cumarins such as esculetin towards an alternative oxidative pathway.

  4. Kinetic characterization of the oxidation of carbidopa and benserazide by tyrosinase and peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Munoz, Joseph Louis; Garcia-Molina, Francis; Garcia-Molina, Mary; Tudela, Joseph; García-Cánovas, Francis; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joseph Neptune

    2009-06-01

    Carbidopa and benserazide have been described as inhibitors of dopa decarboxylase and both have been used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Because of their chemical structure as polyphenols, these compounds can behave as substrates of tyrosinase and peroxidase. We demonstrate that these enzymes oxidize both substrates. Since o-quinones are unstable, a chronometric method for enzymatic initial rate determinations was used based on measurements of the lag period in the presence of micromolar concentrations of ascorbic acid to kinetically characterize these substrates. In the case of tyrosinase, the values of the Michaelis constant for both substrates were greater than those described for dopa, although the catalytic constants were lower, probably due to the greater size of the substitute group in carbon 1. As regards peroxidase, the saturation of the enzyme by both substrates is possible, however this effect does not occur with the isomers of dopa. The distance of the charges from the benzene ring may enable the ring to approach the iron of the active site and, therefore, act.

  5. Nitration Transforms a Sensitive Peroxiredoxin 2 into a More Active and Robust Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Lía M.; Manta, Bruno; Hugo, Martín; Gil, Magdalena; Batthyàny, Carlos; Trujillo, Madia; Poole, Leslie B.; Denicola, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are efficient thiol-dependent peroxidases and key players in the mechanism of H2O2-induced redox signaling. Any structural change that could affect their redox state, oligomeric structure, and/or interaction with other proteins could have a significant impact on the cascade of signaling events. Several post-translational modifications have been reported to modulate Prx activity. One of these, overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine to the sulfinic derivative, inactivates the enzyme and has been proposed as a mechanism of H2O2 accumulation in redox signaling (the floodgate hypothesis). Nitration of Prx has been reported in vitro as well as in vivo; in particular, nitrated Prx2 was identified in brains of Alzheimer disease patients. In this work we characterize Prx2 tyrosine nitration, a post-translational modification on a noncatalytic residue that increases its peroxidase activity and its resistance to overoxidation. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that treatment of disulfide-oxidized Prx2 with excess peroxynitrite renders mainly mononitrated and dinitrated species. Tyrosine 193 of the YF motif at the C terminus, associated with the susceptibility toward overoxidation of eukaryotic Prx, was identified as nitrated and is most likely responsible for the protection of the peroxidatic cysteine against oxidative inactivation. Kinetic analyses suggest that tyrosine nitration facilitates the intermolecular disulfide formation, transforming a sensitive Prx into a robust one. Thus, tyrosine nitration appears as another mechanism to modulate these enzymes in the complex network of redox signaling. PMID:24719319

  6. Spatiotemporal Secretion of PEROXIDASE36 Is Required for Seed Coat Mucilage Extrusion in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Kunieda, Tadashi; Shimada, Tomoo; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Nishitani, Kazuhiko; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal cells of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat, which correspond to the second layer of the outer integument (oi2), contain large quantities of a pectic polysaccharide called mucilage within the apoplastic space beneath the outer periclinal cell wall. Immediately after seed imbibition, the mucilage is extruded and completely envelops the seed in a gel-like capsule. We found that a class III peroxidase family protein, PEROXIDASE36 (PER36), functions as a mucilage extrusion factor. Expression of PER36 occurred only in oi2 cells for a few days around the torpedo stage. A PER36–green fluorescent protein fusion was secreted into the outer cell wall in a polarized manner. per36 mutants were defective in mucilage extrusion after seed imbibition due to the failure of outer cell wall rupture, although the mutants exhibited normal monosaccharide composition of the mucilage. This abnormal phenotype of per36 was rescued by pectin solubilization, which promoted cell wall loosening. These results suggest that PER36 regulates the degradation of the outer cell wall. Taken together, this work indicates that polarized secretion of PER36 in a developmental stage-dependent manner plays a role in cell wall modification of oi2 cells. PMID:23572548

  7. Fructans, ascorbate peroxidase, and hydrogen peroxide in ryegrass exposed to ozone under contrasting meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, C B; Sandrin, C Z; Pedroso, A N V; Domingos, M; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, R C L

    2015-03-01

    Ozone (O3) is the most abundant tropospheric oxidant as well as an important component of photochemical pollution. Once inside the plant, ozone can produce reactive oxygen species that change the antioxidative pool and the carbohydrate metabolism. The current study aimed to analyze whether the contents and the composition of the fructan, the ascorbate peroxidase activity, and the H2O2 accumulation were changed in Lolium multiflorum ssp. italicum cv. Lema plants as response to short-term exposure to ozone and/or to different meteorological conditions, in two contrasting seasons (winter and summer). Results showed that higher solar radiation tends to decrease fructose content and, along with temperature, increases the ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Such activity and levels of fructans practically did not vary during the time the experiment was being done, but APX daylight variation was modified by the ozone. Thus, the higher levels of this pollutant decreased the APX activity and increased fructose content, as well as changed the size of the fructan chains. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation was higher in plants that were fumigated with ozone when compared to the control, and it decreased throughout the day. As a conclusion, fructan contents increased when the APX activity decreased. It suggested that fructans could also help the defense system when there is a reduction on the APX activity in the plant.

  8. Enzymatic decolourisation of Methyl Orange and Bismarck Brown using crude peroxidase from Armoracia rusticana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambatkar, Mugdha; Mukundan, Usha

    2015-12-01

    The decolourisation of Methyl Orange (MO) and Bismarck Brown (BB) by crude peroxidase from Armoracia rusticana (Horseradish) was studied by varying different reaction parameters. The pH of the reaction mixture, initial dye concentration, amount of enzyme and hydrogen peroxide concentration were optimised for ambient temperatures (30 ± 2 °C). The optimum pH for decolourisation was 4.0 (72.95 %) and 3.0 (79.24 %) for MO and BB, respectively. Also it was found that the Chemical Oxygen Demand of the enzyme-treated sample was significantly lower than that of the untreated controls for both dyes. The addition of a complex iron salt like Ferric EDTA was found to enhance the decolourisation of both dyes at pH 6.0, showing an increase of 8.69 % and 14.17 % in the decolourisation of MO and of BB, respectively. The present study explores the potential of crude peroxidase from horseradish to decolourise representative monoazo and diazo dyes, MO and BB, respectively. An attempt has been made to utilise a crude enzyme with appreciable activity obtained after minimal processing for the decolourisation of the aforesaid dyes. The findings of this study would find application in the enzymatic treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  9. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Thiol Peroxidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rho,B.; Hung, L.; Holton, J.; Vigil, D.; Kim, S.; Park, M.; Terwilliger, T.; Pedelacq, j.

    2006-01-01

    A thiol peroxidase (Tpx) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was functionally analyzed. The enzyme shows NADPH-linked peroxidase activity using a thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system as electron donor, and anti-oxidant activity in a thiol-dependent metal-catalyzed oxidation system. It reduces H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, t-butyl hydroperoxide, and cumene hydroperoxide, and is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents. Mutational studies revealed that the peroxidatic (Cys60) and resolving (Cys93) cysteine residues are critical amino acids for catalytic activity. The X-ray structure determined to a resolution of 1.75 Angstroms shows a thioredoxin fold similar to that of other peroxiredoxin family members. Superposition with structural homologues in oxidized and reduced forms indicates that the M. tuberculosis Tpx is a member of the atypical two-Cys peroxiredoxin family. In addition, the short distance that separates the Ca atoms of Cys60 and Cys93 and the location of these cysteine residues in unstructured regions may indicate that the M. tuberculosis enzyme is oxidized, though the side-chain of Cys60 is poorly visible. It is solely in the reduced Streptococcus pneumoniae Tpx structure that both residues are part of two distinct helical segments. The M. tuberculosis Tpx is dimeric both in solution and in the crystal structure. Amino acid residues from both monomers delineate the active site pocket.

  10. Graphene oxide vs. reduced graphene oxide as carbon support in porphyrin peroxidase biomimetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Socaci, C; Pogacean, F; Biris, A R; Coros, M; Rosu, M C; Magerusan, L; Katona, G; Pruneanu, S

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of supramolecular assemblies of tetrapyridylporphyrin (TPyP) and its metallic complexes with graphene oxide (GO) and thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO). The two carbon supports are introducing different characteristics in the absorption spectra of the investigated nanocomposites. Raman spectroscopy shows that the absorption of iron-tetrapyridylporphyrin is more efficient on GO than TRGO, suggesting that oxygen functionalities are involved in the non-covalent interaction between the iron-porphyrin and graphene. The biomimetic peroxidase activity is investigated and the two iron-containing composites exhibit a better catalytic activity than each component of the assembly, and their cobalt and manganese homologues, respectively. The main advantages of this work include the demonstration of graphene oxide as a very good support for graphene-based nanomaterials with peroxidase-like activity (K(M)=0.292 mM), the catalytic activity being observed even with very small amounts of porphyrins (the TPyP:graphene ratio=1:50). Its potential application in the detection of lipophilic antioxidants (vitamin E can be measured in the 10(-5)-10(-4) M range) is also shown.

  11. Effect of Diffusion on Discoloration of Congo Red by Alginate Entrapped Turnip (Brassica rapa) Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedi, Afaf; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Abdeltif, Amrane; Annabelle, Couvert

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic discoloration of the diazo dye, Congo red (CR), by immobilized plant peroxidase from turnip “Brassica rapa” is investigated. Partially purified turnip peroxidase (TP) was immobilized by entrapment in spherical particles of calcium alginate and was assayed for the discoloration of aqueous CR solution. Experimental data revealed that pH, reaction time, temperature, colorant, and H2O2 concentration play a significant role in dye degradation. Maximum CR removal was found at pH 2.0, constant temperature of 40°C in the presence of 10 mM H2O2, and 180 mg/L of CR. More than 94% of CR was removed by alginate immobilized TP after 1 h of incubation in a batch process under optimal conditions. About 74% removal efficiency was retained after four recycles. Diffusional limitations in alginate beads such as effectiveness factor η, Thiele modulus Φ, and effective diffusion coefficients (De) of Congo red were predicted assuming a first-order biodegradation kinetic. Results showed that intraparticle diffusion resistance has a significant effect on the CR biodegradation rate. PMID:25734011

  12. Selenium proteins in ovine tissues: III. Distribution of selenium and glutathione peroxidases in tissue cytosols.

    PubMed

    Black, R S; Tripp, M J; Whanger, P D; Weswig, P H

    1978-01-01

    Three 6 week-old lambs were injected with carrier-free selenium-75 as sodium selenite initially and again after 6 days. One lamb received no further injections whereas the other two received injections of either vitamin E or unlabeled Na2SeO3 when the first selenium-75 injection was given. Selected tissues were removed at autopsy 10 days after the first injection. The cytosol from homogenates of these tissues was subjected to gel chromatography, and the elution profiles determined for radioactivity, protein content, and glutathione peroxidase activity using either hydrogen peroxide or cumene hydroperoxide as substrates. The selenium-75 was found to be distributed mainly between 2 different MW peaks. The larger MW seleno-peak (90,000) possessed both glutathione:hydrogen peroxide oxidoreductase, and glutathione:cumene hydroperoxide oxidoreductase activities, but the smaller MW seleno-peak (about 10,000) possessed no glutathione peroxidase activity. A peak of about 60,000 daltons containing only glutathione:cumene hydroperoxide oxidoreductase activity and no selenium-75 was found primarily in the liver and kidney. Vitamin E had no effect on the elution profiles. Selenium status of the animal had only a minor effect on the selenium-75 distribution in the cytosol, but had a marked effect on the absolute amount of the label taken up by tissues.

  13. Reactivity of chemical respiratory allergens in the Peroxidase Peptide Reactivity Assay.

    PubMed

    Lalko, J F; Dearman, R J; Gerberick, G F; Troutman, J A; Api, A M; Kimber, I

    2013-03-01

    Sensitizing chemicals are commonly associated primarily with either skin or respiratory sensitization. In the Direct Peptide Reactivity Assay (DPRA), when compared with skin sensitizers, respiratory allergens have been demonstrated to selectively react with lysine rather than cysteine. The Peroxidase Peptide Reactivity Assay (PPRA) has been developed as a refinement to the DPRA. The PPRA incorporates dose-response analyses, mass spectroscopy for peptide detection and a horseradish peroxidase-hydrogen peroxide enzymatic system, increasing the potential to identify pro-haptens. In the investigations reported here, the PPRA was evaluated to determine whether it provides advantages for the identification of respiratory allergens. Twenty respiratory sensitizers, including five predicted to be pre-/pro-haptens were evaluated. The PPRA performed similarly to the DPRA with respect to identifying inherently reactive respiratory sensitizers. However, three respiratory sensitizers predicted to be pre-/pro-haptens (chlorhexidine, ethylenediamine and piperazine) were non-reactive and the general selectivity of the respiratory allergens for lysine was lost in the PPRA. Overall, the data indicate that the PPRA does not provide an advantage over the DPRA for discriminating allergens as either contact or respiratory sensitizers. Nevertheless, the PPRA pr